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Sample records for surface show stable

  1. Physically and chemically stable ionic liquid-infused textured surfaces showing excellent dynamic omniphobicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Miranda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A fluorinated and hydrophobic ionic liquid (IL, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl imide, effectively served as an advantageous lubricating liquid for the preparation of physically and chemically stable omniphobic surfaces based on slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces. Here, we used particulate microstructures as supports, prepared by the chemical vapor deposition of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane and subsequent surface modification with (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. Confirmed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the resulting IL-infused microtextured surfaces are smooth and not only water but also various low surface tension liquids can easily slide off at low substrate tilt angles of <5°, even after exposure to high temperature, vacuum, and UV irradiation.

  2. Physically and chemically stable ionic liquid-infused textured surfaces showing excellent dynamic omniphobicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Daniel F.; Urata, Chihiro; Masheder, Benjamin; Dunderdale, Gary J.; Hozumi, Atsushi, E-mail: a.hozumi@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98, Anagahora, Shimo-Shidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 463-8560 (Japan); Yagihashi, Makoto [Nagoya Municipal Industrial Research Institute, Rokuban, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-0058 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    A fluorinated and hydrophobic ionic liquid (IL), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, effectively served as an advantageous lubricating liquid for the preparation of physically and chemically stable omniphobic surfaces based on slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces. Here, we used particulate microstructures as supports, prepared by the chemical vapor deposition of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane and subsequent surface modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane. Confirmed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the resulting IL-infused microtextured surfaces are smooth and not only water but also various low surface tension liquids can easily slide off at low substrate tilt angles of <5°, even after exposure to high temperature, vacuum, and UV irradiation.

  3. Stable discrete surface light bullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, Dumitru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Lederer, Falk; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2007-01-22

    We analyze spatiotemporal light localization near the edge of a semi-infinite array of weakly coupled nonlinear optical waveguides and demonstrate the existence of a novel class of continuous-discrete spatiotemporal solitons, the so-called discrete surface light bullets. We show that their properties are strongly affected by the presence of the surface. To this end the crossover between surface and quasi-bulk bullets is studied by analyzing the families of solitons propagating at different distances from the edge of the waveguide array.

  4. Stable surface solitons in truncated complex potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yingji; Mihalache, Dumitru; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Lina; Kartashov, Yaroslav V

    2012-07-01

    We show that surface solitons in the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation with truncated complex periodic potential can be stabilized by linear homogeneous losses, which are necessary to balance gain in the near-surface channel arising from the imaginary part of potential. Such solitons become stable attractors when the strength of homogeneous losses acquires values from a limited interval and they exist in focusing and defocusing media. The domains of stability of the surface solitons shrink with an increase in the amplitude of the imaginary part of complex potential.

  5. Stable surface solitons in truncated complex potentials

    CERN Document Server

    He, Yingji; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Lina; Kartashov, Yaroslav V

    2012-01-01

    We show that surface solitons in the one-dimensional nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation with truncated complex periodic potential can be stabilized by linear homogeneous losses, which are necessary to balance gain in the near-surface channel arising from the imaginary part of potential. Such solitons become stable attractors when the strength of homogeneous losses acquires values from a limited interval and they exist in focusing and defocusing media. The domains of stability of surface solitons shrink with increase of the amplitude of imaginary part of complex potential.

  6. Preparation of stable silica surfaces for surface forces measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huai-Yin; Mizukami, Masashi; Kurihara, Kazue

    2017-09-01

    A surface forces apparatus (SFA) measures the forces between two surfaces as a function of the surface separation distance. It is regarded as an essential tool for studying the interactions between two surfaces. However, sample surfaces used for the conventional SFA measurements have been mostly limited to thin (ca. 2-3 μm) micas, which are coated with silver layers (ca. 50 nm) on their back, due to the requirement of the distance determination by transmission mode optical interferometry called FECO (fringes of equal chromatic order). The FECO method has the advantage of determining the absolute distance, so it should be important to increase the availability of samples other than mica, which is chemically nonreactive and also requires significant efforts for cleaving. Recently, silica sheets have been occasionally used in place of mica, which increases the possibility of surface modification. However, in this case, the silver layer side of the sheet is glued on a cylindrical quartz disc using epoxy resin, which is not stable in organic solvents and can be easily swollen or dissolved. The preparation of substrates more stable under severe conditions, such as in organic solvents, is necessary for extending application of the measurement. In this study, we report an easy method for preparing stable silica layers of ca. 2 μm in thickness deposited on gold layers (41 nm)/silica discs by sputtering, then annealed to enhance the stability. The obtained silica layers were stable and showed no swelling in organic solvents such as ethanol and toluene.

  7. Stable water layers on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ying-Jhan; Tai, Lin-Ai; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chang, Pin; Yang, Chung-Shi; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-02-17

    Liquid layers adhered to solid surfaces and that are in equilibrium with the vapor phase are common in printing, coating, and washing processes as well as in alveoli in lungs and in stomata in leaves. For such a liquid layer in equilibrium with the vapor it faces, it has been generally believed that, aside from liquid lumps, only a very thin layer of the liquid, i.e., with a thickness of only a few nanometers, is held onto the surface of the solid, and that this adhesion is due to van der Waals forces. A similar layer of water can remain on the surface of a wall of a microchannel after evaporation of bulk water creates a void in the channel, but the thickness of such a water layer has not yet been well characterized. Herein we showed such a water layer adhered to a microchannel wall to be 100 to 170 nm thick and stable against surface tension. The water layer thickness was measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and the water layer structure was characterized by using a quantitative nanoparticle counting technique. This thickness was found for channel gap heights ranging from 1 to 5 μm. Once formed, the water layers in the microchannel, when sealed, were stable for at least one week without any special care. Our results indicate that the water layer forms naturally and is closely associated only with the surface to which it adheres. Our study of naturally formed, stable water layers may shed light on topics from gas exchange in alveoli in biology to the post-wet-process control in the semiconductor industry. We anticipate our report to be a starting point for more detailed research and understanding of the microfluidics, mechanisms and applications of gas-liquid-solid systems.

  8. Are Vicinal Metal Surfaces Stable?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frenken, J. W. M.; Stoltze, Per

    1999-01-01

    We use effective medium theory to demonstrate that the energies of many metal surfaces are lowered when these surfaces are replaced by facets with lower-index orientations. This implies that the low-temperature equilibrium shapes of many metal crystals should be heavily faceted. The predicted ins...

  9. Scattering from Alpha-Stable Non-Gaussian Distributed Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yu-Chao; GUO Li-Xin; WU Zhen-Sen

    2007-01-01

    @@ The scattering problem of alpha-stable non-Gaussian distributed rough surfaces is studied. The alpha-stable non-Gaussian distribution is used to describe the surfaces that exhibit sharp and sparse peaks, not usually seen in Gaussian distributed surfaces. Then a magnetic field integral equation is formulated to calculate the scattered field and the scattering coefficient. Numerical simulations show that the magnitude distribution of the scattered field is affected significantly by the probability distribution of the surface when the height of the surface changes in a random way. In addition, simulation results are presented as bistatic scattering coefficient for alpha-stable distributed surfaces.

  10. A simple approach to fabricate stable superhydrophobic glass surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Haiyan; Chen, Gang; Yang, Jin; Hu, Jie; Song, Haojie; Zhao, Yutao

    2013-02-01

    We present a facile method to fabricate superhydrophobic glass surface via one-step hydrothermal method and chemical modification. The etched glass surface shows the hierarchical textured morphology as well as the multiple scales of roughness and large numbers of nanorods and pores. The formation mechanism of the hierarchically structured surface is discussed in detail. After surface modification with vinyltriethoxysilane, the glass surface exhibits stable superhydrophobicity with a high contact angle of 155° and a low sliding angle of 5°. A water droplet of 10 μL can bounce away from the surface when it vertically hit the superhydrophobic glass surface. Moreover, the contact angle of the superhydrophobic glass surface under different pH values and storage time are measured to study the stability of the superhydrophobic property.

  11. Exploring Scintillometry in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to investigate observation methods of heat and momentum exchange and key variables that characterise turbulence in the atmospheric stable surface layer (SSL), a layer defined as the lower part of the stable boundary layer (SBL) where surface fluxes do not change

  12. Exploring Scintillometry in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to investigate observation methods of heat and momentum exchange and key variables that characterise turbulence in the atmospheric stable surface layer (SSL), a layer defined as the lower part of the stable boundary layer (SBL) where surface fluxes do not change

  13. Area inequalities for stable marginally trapped surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Jaramillo, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    We discuss a family of inequalities involving the area, angular momentum and charges of stably outermost marginally trapped surfaces in generic non-vacuum dynamical spacetimes, with non-negative cosmological constant and matter sources satisfying the dominant energy condition. These inequalities provide lower bounds for the area of spatial sections of dynamical trapping horizons, namely hypersurfaces offering quasi-local models of black hole horizons. In particular, these inequalities represent particular examples of the extension to a Lorentzian setting of tools employed in the discussion of minimal surfaces in Riemannian contexts.

  14. Highly stable superhydrophobic surfaces under flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moonchan; Yim, Changyong; Jeon, Sangmin

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized hydrophobic anodic aluminum oxide nanostructures with pore diameters of 35, 50, 65, and 80 nm directly on quartz crystal microresonators, and the stability of the resulting superhydrophobicity was investigated under flow conditions by measuring changes in the resonance frequency and dissipation factor. When the quartz substrates were immersed in water, their hydrophobic surfaces did not wet due to the presence of an air interlayer. The air interlayer was gradually replaced by water over time, which caused decreases in the resonance frequency (i.e., increases in mass) and increases in the dissipation factor (i.e., increases in viscous damping). Although the water contact angles of the nanostructures increased with increasing pore size, the stability of their superhydrophobicity increased with decreasing pore size under both static conditions (without flow) and dynamic conditions (with flow); this increase can be attributed to an increase in the solid surface area that interacts with the air layer above the nanopores as the pore size decreases. Further, the effects of increasing the flow rate on the stability of the superhydrophobicity were quantitatively determined.

  15. Highly Stable Silver Nanoplates for Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Chuanbo [University of California, Riverside; Lu, Zhenda [University of California, Riverside; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Liu, ying [University of California, Riverside; Cheng, Quan [University of California, Riverside; Yin, Yadong [University of California, Riverside

    2012-01-01

    An SPR biosensor was developed by employing highly stable Au-protected Ag nanoplates (NP) as enhancers (see picture). Superior performance was achieved by depositing a thin and uniform coating of Au on the Ag surface while minimizing disruptive galvanic replacement and retaining the strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the silver nanoplates.

  16. The stable moduli space of Riemann surfaces: Mumford's conjecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, I.; Weiss, Michael

    2007-01-01

    D. Mumford conjectured in "Towards an enumerative geometry of the moduli space of curves" that the rational cohomology of the stable moduli space of Riemann surfaces is a polynomial algebra generated by certain classes $\\kappa_i$ of dimension $2i$. For the purpose of calculating rational cohomology......, one may replace the stable moduli space of Riemann surfaces by $B\\Gamma_{\\infty}$, where $\\Gamma_\\infty$ is the group of isotopy classes of automorphisms of a smooth oriented connected surface of ``large'' genus. Tillmann's theorem that the plus construction makes $B\\Gamma_{\\infty}$ into an infinite...

  17. Duality and universality for stable pair invariants of surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kool, M

    2013-01-01

    Let $\\beta$ be a curve class on a surface $S$. The moduli space of stable pairs on $S$ with class $\\beta$ carries a natural reduced virtual cycle \\cite{KT1, KT2}. This cycle is defined when $h^2(L) = 0$ for any \\emph{effective} $L \\in \\mathrm{Pic}^\\beta(S)$ (weak assumption). When $h^2(L) = 0$ for \\emph{any} $L \\in \\mathrm{Pic}^{\\beta}(S)$ (strong assumption), the associated invariants are given by universal functions in $\\beta^2$, $\\beta.c_1(S)$, $c_1(S)^2$, $c_2(S)$, and certain invariants of the ring structure of $H^*(S,\\Z)$. In this paper, we show the following. (1) Universality \\emph{no longer} holds when just the weak assumption is satisfied. (2) For any $S,\\beta$ (no conditions), the BPS spectrum of the non-reduced stable pair invariants of $S,\\beta$ with maximal number of point insertions consists of a single number. This number is the Seiberg-Witten invariant of $S, \\beta$. (3) The GW/PT correspondence for $X = K_S$ implies Taubes' GW/SW correspondence in certain cases, e.g. when $\\beta$ is irreducib...

  18. Long-term stable surface modification of DLC coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotzmann Gaby

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of coatings based on diamond like carbon (DLC for medical applications was established during the last years. Main advantages of these coatings are its high hardness, good wear and friction behavior and its biocompatibility. Using low-energy electron-beam treatment, we addressed the surface modification of DLC coatings. The aim was to generate new biofunctional surface characteristics that are long-term stable.

  19. The stable moduli space of Riemann surfaces: Mumford's conjecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, I.; Weiss, Michael

    2007-01-01

    D. Mumford conjectured in "Towards an enumerative geometry of the moduli space of curves" that the rational cohomology of the stable moduli space of Riemann surfaces is a polynomial algebra generated by certain classes $\\kappa_i$ of dimension $2i$. For the purpose of calculating rational cohomolo...

  20. Investigation of Si(001) stable surfaces in alternating current heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, T.; Koguchi, M.

    2016-11-01

    The topography of a Si(001) vicinal surface is investigated using reflection electron microscopy (REM) during alternating current (AC) heating of the surface in ultra-high vacuum. The normal direction of the surface is slightly tilted from the [001] direction at θx or θy on the x or y axis (they are orthogonal directions in the Si(001) surface), and the average widths of the terraces (a or b in x or y axis) are determined by θx or θy; the direction perpendicular to the incidence electron beam on the surface is selected as the x (horizontal) axis in each REM image. Alternating current heating changes each initial surface from stable to double-domain (DD), in which 2 × 1 and 1 × 2 terraces are arranged regularly with approximately equal width, at its transition temperature Tc; the dimer rows are parallel to the x or y axis in the 1 × 2 or 2 × 1 terraces. There are two types of stable surfaces in the vicinal surface. At temperatures below its Tc, the surface with horizontally (vertically) long terraces, where b a), changes to a 2 × 1 (1 × 2) surface with wide 2 × 1 (1 × 2) and narrow 1 × 2 (2 × 1) terraces. The terrace, the short side of which is parallel to its dimer row direction, grows to create a stable surface by thermal diffusion of Si atoms at temperatures below Tc. During AC heating, thermal diffusion plays a key role in analyzing the kinetics of the atoms on the surface because the thermal effect acts as the driving force for the atoms that have not yet evaporated from the surface. Then, by evaporating atoms from the vicinal surface, AC heating creates a DD surface at temperatures between its Tc and 1100 °C and a rugged surface consisting of small 2 × 1 and 1 × 2 terraces at temperatures above 1100 °C.

  1. In-induced stable ordering of stepped Si(553) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL) , Dr. K.S. KrishnanRoad, New Delhi -110012 (India); Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha [Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL) , Dr. K.S. KrishnanRoad, New Delhi -110012 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Control growth of In on step Si(553) & thermal stability of novel superstructure. • Influence of temperature on growth modes (SK,VB) under different growth conditions. • In-induced superstructure: (8 × 2), (8 × 4), mixed (553)-7 × 1 + (111)√3 × √3R30° phases. - Abstract: The growth mechanism and adsorbate-induced surface morphology of metal atoms on semiconducting surfaces crucially determines the electronic and physicochemical properties of these metal/semiconductor systems. In this study, we investigate the kinetically controlled growth of indium (In) atoms on the high index stepped Si(553)-7 × 7 surface and the thermal stability of various novel In-induced superstructural phases formed during adsorption/desorption process. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that In adsorption at room temperature (RT) and at 350 °C, with a controlled incident flux of 0.0016 ML/s, proceeds in the Stranski–Krastanov growth mode where two dimensional (2D)/three dimensional (3D) islands are formed on top of two complete monolayers. At higher substrate temperature up to 450 °C, the growth of In atoms occurs in the form of islands on the bare Si(553) surface, and In coverage is limited to the sub-monolayer regime. During the thermal desorption of the RT grown In/Si(553) system, the In clusters rearrange themselves and an unusual “cluster to layer” transformation occurs on top of the stable monolayer. In situ low energy electron diffraction analysis during adsorption and desorption shows the development of various coverage and temperature dependent In-induced superstructural phases on Si(553) surface, such as: (8 × 2) after annealing at 520 °C with coverage 0.5 ML, (8 × 4) after annealing at 580 °C (∼1 ML coverage) and (553)-7 × 1 + (111)-√3 × √3-R30° at 0.3 ML (630 °C). These adsorbate-induced superstructural phases could potentially be utilized as templates for pattern assisted growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures for

  2. Macromolecular surface design: photopatterning of functional stable nitrile oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Ozcan; Glassner, Mathias; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Welle, Alexander; Trouillet, Vanessa; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2015-05-04

    The efficient trapping of photogenerated thioaldehydes with functional shelf-stable nitrile oxides in a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition is a novel and versatile photochemical strategy for polymer end-group functionalization and surface modification under mild and equimolar conditions. The modular ligation in solution was followed in detail by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to analyze the functionalized surfaces, whereas time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) confirmed the spatial control of the surface functionalization using a micropatterned shadow mask. Polymer brushes were grown from the surface in a spatially confined regime by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) as confirmed by TOF-SIMS, XPS as well as ellipsometry. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. STABLE VARIANTS OF SPERM ANEUPLOIDY AMONG HEALTHY MEN SHOW ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN GERMINAL AND SOMATIC ANEUPLOIDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract.Our objective was to identify men who consistently produced high frequencies of sperm with numerical chromosomal abnormalities (stable variants) and to determine whether healthy men with normal semen quality vary with respect to the incidence of sperm aneuploidy ...

  4. Stable Variants of Sperm Aneuploidy among Healthy Men Show Associations between Germinal and Somatic Aneuploidy

    OpenAIRE

    Rubes, Jiri; Vozdova, Miluse; Robbins, Wendie A.; Rezacova, Olga; Perreault, Sally D; Andrew J. Wyrobek

    2002-01-01

    Repeated semen specimens from healthy men were analyzed by sperm fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to identify men who consistently produced elevated frequencies of aneuploid sperm and to determine whether men who were identified as stable variants of sperm aneuploidy also exhibited higher frequencies of aneuploidy in their peripheral blood lymphocytes. Seven semen specimens were provided by each of 15 men over a 2-year period and were evaluated by the X-Y-8 multicolor sperm FISH met...

  5. Stable glass transformation to supercooled liquid via surface-initiated growth front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallen, Stephen F; Traynor, Katherine; McMahon, Robert J; Ediger, M D; Mates, Thomas E

    2009-02-13

    Highly stable glasses of tris-naphthylbenzene transform into a liquid when annealed above the glass transition temperature T_{g}. In contrast to the predictions of standard models, the observed transformation is spatially inhomogeneous. Secondary ion mass spectrometry experiments on isotopically labeled multilayer films show that the liquid grows into the stable glass with sharp growth fronts initiated at the free surface and at the interface with the substrate. For the free surface, the growth velocity is constant in time and has the same temperature dependence as self-diffusion in the equilibrium supercooled liquid. These stable glasses are packed so efficiently that surfaces and interfaces are required to initiate the transformation to the liquid even well above T_{g}.

  6. Enterococcus faecalis strains show culture heterogeneity in cell surface charge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Merode, Annet; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Waar, K; Krom, BP

    2006-01-01

    Adhesion of micro-organisms to biotic and abiotic surfaces is an important virulence factor and involves different types of interactions. Enterococcus faecalis, a human commensal and an important opportunistic pathogen, has the ability to adhere to surfaces. Biliary stents frequently become clogged

  7. Mitotic evolution of Plasmodium falciparum shows a stable core genome but recombination in antigen families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina E R Bopp

    Full Text Available Malaria parasites elude eradication attempts both within the human host and across nations. At the individual level, parasites evade the host immune responses through antigenic variation. At the global level, parasites escape drug pressure through single nucleotide variants and gene copy amplification events conferring drug resistance. Despite their importance to global health, the rates at which these genomic alterations emerge have not been determined. We studied the complete genomes of different Plasmodium falciparum clones that had been propagated asexually over one year in the presence and absence of drug pressure. A combination of whole-genome microarray analysis and next-generation deep resequencing (totaling 14 terabases revealed a stable core genome with only 38 novel single nucleotide variants appearing in seventeen evolved clones (avg. 5.4 per clone. In clones exposed to atovaquone, we found cytochrome b mutations as well as an amplification event encompassing the P. falciparum multidrug resistance associated protein (mrp1 on chromosome 1. We observed 18 large-scale (>1 kb on average deletions of telomere-proximal regions encoding multigene families, involved in immune evasion (9.5×10(-6 structural variants per base pair per generation. Six of these deletions were associated with chromosomal crossovers generated during mitosis. We found only minor differences in rates between genetically distinct strains and between parasites cultured in the presence or absence of drug. Using these derived mutation rates for P. falciparum (1.0-9.7×10(-9 mutations per base pair per generation, we can now model the frequency at which drug or immune resistance alleles will emerge under a well-defined set of assumptions. Further, the detection of mitotic recombination events in var gene families illustrates how multigene families can arise and change over time in P. falciparum. These results will help improve our understanding of how P. falciparum

  8. Stable Approximations of a Minimal Surface Problem with Variational Inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zuhair Nashed

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop a new approach for the stable approximation of a minimal surface problem associated with a relaxed Dirichlet problem in the space BV(Ω of functions of bounded variation. The problem can be reformulated as an unconstrained minimization problem of a functional on BV(Ω defined by (u=(u+∫∂Ω|Tu−Φ|, where (u is the “area integral” of u with respect to Ω,T is the “trace operator” from BV(Ω into L i(∂Ω, and ϕ is the prescribed data on the boundary of Ω. We establish convergence and stability of approximate regularized solutions which are solutions of a family of variational inequalities. We also prove convergence of an iterative method based on Uzawa's algorithm for implementation of our regularization procedure.

  9. Cancer-related fatigue shows a stable association with diurnal cortisol dysregulation in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martina E; Semik, Johanna; Habermann, Nina; Wiskemann, Joachim; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Steindorf, Karen

    2016-02-01

    Fatigue is a major burden for breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy. Yet, its pathophysiology is still not well understood. Hypothesized mechanisms include dysregulations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which may be reflected in alterations in the diurnal cortisol patterns. However, studies on the association between cortisol and fatigue during adjuvant cancer therapy are rare. We therefore assessed salivary cortisol at awakening, 0.5h post-awakening, noon, 5 pm and 10 pm/bedtime in 265 breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy at three timepoints. Cancer-related fatigue was assessed with the Fatigue Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ) covering the physical, affective, and cognitive fatigue dimensions. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed cross-sectionally at the three timepoints as well as longitudinally considering changes in cortisol and fatigue over time. The results showed that the physical dimension of cancer-related fatigue was significantly associated with increased evening cortisol levels and higher overall cortisol secretion. These associations were independent of depressive symptoms. Morning cortisol levels, the cortisol awakening response and the diurnal slope were not consistently associated with physical fatigue. Affective and cognitive fatigue showed no clear association with any of the cortisol parameters. In conclusion, the physical but not the affective or cognitive dimension of fatigue seems associated with cortisol dysregulations in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy, characterized by an unaffected cortisol level in the morning but blunted decline to the evening level. Research focusing on disturbances of the cortisol rhythm and HPA dysregulations during and after cancer treatment may open new strategies to reduce cancer-related fatigue.

  10. Stable superhydrophobic surface: fabrication of interstitial cottonlike structure of copper nanocrystals by magnetron sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxing Li, Bo Wang, Yi Liu, Tian Tan, Xuemei Song, Er Li and Hui Yan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A stable superhydrophobic copper surface was obtained by radio-frequency magnetic sputtering on Si (100 and quartz substrates. The water contact angle and sliding angle of the superhydrophobic copper surface were 160.5° and 3±1.9°, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM photos show that the superhydrophobic surface structure comprises many uniform nanocrystals with a diameter of about 100 nm. A brief explanation of the formation of this special microstructure and the mechanism of its wettability were proposed.

  11. Complete stable CMC surfaces with empty singular set in Sasakian sub-Riemannian 3-manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Rosales, César

    2010-01-01

    For constant mean curvature surfaces of class $C^2$ immersed inside Sasakian sub-Riemannian $3$-manifolds we obtain a formula for the second derivative of the area which involves horizontal analytical terms, the Webster scalar curvature of the ambient manifold, and the extrinsic shape of the surface. Then we prove classification results for complete surfaces with empty singular set which are stable, i.e., second order minima of the area under a volume constraint, inside the $3$-dimensional sub-Riemannian space forms. In the first Heisenberg group we show that such a surface is a vertical plane. In the sub-Riemannian hyperbolic $3$-space we give an upper bound for the mean curvature of such surfaces, and we characterize the horocylinders as the only ones with squared mean curvature $1$. Finally we deduce that any complete surface with empty singular set in the sub-Riemannian $3$-sphere is unstable.

  12. Adsorption of hydrogen on stable and metastable Ir(100) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman, Mohammad Alif; Klein, Andreas; Ferstl, Pascal; Valookaran, Abhilash; Gustafson, Johan; Schulte, Karina; Lundgren, Edvin; Heinz, Klaus; Schneider, Alexander; Mittendorfer, Florian; Hammer, Lutz; Knudsen, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Using the combination of high resolution core level spectroscopy and density functional theory we present a detailed spectroscopic study for all clean and hydrogen covered phases of Ir(100). The results are complemented by an investigation of the hydrogen desorption process from various phases using temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. In total, all experimentally determined core level shifts match very well with those predicted by density functional theory based on established structural models. In particular, we find for the (bridge site) adsorption on the unreconstructed 1×1 phase that the initial core level shift of surface Ir atoms is altered by +0.17 eV for each Ir-H bond formed. In the submonolayer regime we find evidence for island formation at low temperatures. For the H-induced deconstructed 5×1-H phase we identify four different surface core level shifts with two of them being degenerate. Finally, for the reconstructed 5×1-hex phase also four surface components are identified, which undergo a rather rigid core level shift of +0.15 eV upon hydrogen adsorption suggesting a similarly homogeneous charge transfer to all Ir surface atoms. Thermodesorption experiments for the 5×1-H phase reveal two different binding states for hydrogen independent of the total coverage. We conclude that the surface always separates into patches of fully covered deconstructed and uncovered reconstructed phases. We could also show by tunneling microscopy that with the desorption of the last hydrogen atom from the deconstructed unit cell the surface instantaneously reverts into the reconstructed state. Eventually, we could determine the saturation coverage upon molecular adsorption for all phases to be θmax1 × 1 - H = 1.0 ML , θmax5 × 1 - H = 0.8 ML , and θmax5 × 1 - hex - H ≥ 1.0 ML .

  13. Stable water isotope and surface heat flux simulation using ISOLSM: Evaluation against in-situ measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Mick Y.

    2015-04-01

    The stable isotopes of water are useful tracers of water sources and hydrological processes. Stable water isotope-enabled land surface modeling is a relatively new approach for characterizing the hydrological cycle, providing spatial and temporal variability for a number of hydrological processes. At the land surface, the integration of stable water isotopes with other meteorological measurements can assist in constraining surface heat flux estimates and discriminate between evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). However, research in this area has traditionally been limited by a lack of continuous in-situ isotopic observations. Here, the National Centre for Atmospheric Research stable isotope-enabled Land Surface Model (ISOLSM) is used to simulate the water and energy fluxes and stable water isotope variations. The model was run for a period of one month with meteorological data collected from a coastal sub-tropical site near Sydney, Australia. The modeled energy fluxes (latent heat and sensible heat) agreed reasonably well with eddy covariance observations, indicating that ISOLSM has the capacity to reproduce observed flux behavior. Comparison of modeled isotopic compositions of evapotranspiration (ET) against in-situ Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measured bulk water vapor isotopic data (10. m above the ground), however, showed differences in magnitude and temporal patterns. The disparity is due to a small contribution from local ET fluxes to atmospheric boundary layer water vapor (~1% based on calculations using ideal gas law) relative to that advected from the ocean for this particular site. Using ISOLSM simulation, the ET was partitioned into E and T with 70% being T. We also identified that soil water from different soil layers affected T and E differently based on the simulated soil isotopic patterns, which reflects the internal working of ISOLSM. These results highlighted the capacity of using the isotope-enabled models to discriminate

  14. Bioinspired self-repairing slippery surfaces with pressure-stable omniphobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tak-Sing; Kang, Sung Hoon; Tang, Sindy K Y; Smythe, Elizabeth J; Hatton, Benjamin D; Grinthal, Alison; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2011-09-21

    Creating a robust synthetic surface that repels various liquids would have broad technological implications for areas ranging from biomedical devices and fuel transport to architecture but has proved extremely challenging. Inspirations from natural nonwetting structures, particularly the leaves of the lotus, have led to the development of liquid-repellent microtextured surfaces that rely on the formation of a stable air-liquid interface. Despite over a decade of intense research, these surfaces are, however, still plagued with problems that restrict their practical applications: limited oleophobicity with high contact angle hysteresis, failure under pressure and upon physical damage, inability to self-heal and high production cost. To address these challenges, here we report a strategy to create self-healing, slippery liquid-infused porous surface(s) (SLIPS) with exceptional liquid- and ice-repellency, pressure stability and enhanced optical transparency. Our approach-inspired by Nepenthes pitcher plants-is conceptually different from the lotus effect, because we use nano/microstructured substrates to lock in place the infused lubricating fluid. We define the requirements for which the lubricant forms a stable, defect-free and inert 'slippery' interface. This surface outperforms its natural counterparts and state-of-the-art synthetic liquid-repellent surfaces in its capability to repel various simple and complex liquids (water, hydrocarbons, crude oil and blood), maintain low contact angle hysteresis (<2.5°), quickly restore liquid-repellency after physical damage (within 0.1-1 s), resist ice adhesion, and function at high pressures (up to about 680 atm). We show that these properties are insensitive to the precise geometry of the underlying substrate, making our approach applicable to various inexpensive, low-surface-energy structured materials (such as porous Teflon membrane). We envision that these slippery surfaces will be useful in fluid handling and

  15. RNA-stable-isotope probing shows utilization of carbon from inulin by specific bacterial populations in the rat large bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannock, Gerald W; Lawley, Blair; Munro, Karen; Sims, Ian M; Lee, Julian; Butts, Christine A; Roy, Nicole

    2014-04-01

    Knowledge of the trophisms that underpin bowel microbiota composition is required in order to understand its complex phylogeny and function. Stable-isotope ((13)C)-labeled inulin was added to the diet of rats on a single occasion in order to detect utilization of inulin-derived substrates by particular members of the cecal microbiota. Cecal digesta from Fibruline-inulin-fed rats was collected prior to (0 h) and at 6, 12, 18 and 24 h following provision of the [(13)C]inulin diet. RNA was extracted from these cecal specimens and fractionated in isopycnic buoyant density gradients in order to detect (13)C-labeled nucleic acid originating in bacterial cells that had metabolized the labeled dietary constituent. RNA extracted from specimens collected after provision of the labeled diet was more dense than 0-h RNA. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified from cDNA obtained from these fractions showed that Bacteroides uniformis, Blautia glucerasea, Clostridium indolis, and Bifidobacterium animalis were the main users of the (13)C-labeled substrate. Culture-based studies of strains of these bacterial species enabled trophisms associated with inulin and its hydrolysis products to be identified. B. uniformis utilized Fibruline-inulin for growth, whereas the other species used fructo-oligosaccharide and monosaccharides. Thus, RNA-stable-isotope probing (RNA-SIP) provided new information about the use of carbon from inulin in microbiota metabolism.

  16. Pinning and gas oversaturation imply stable single surface nanobubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2015-01-01

    Surface nanobubbles are experimentally known to survive for days at hydrophobic surfaces immersed in gas-oversaturated water. This is different from bulk nanobubbles, which are pressed out by the Laplace pressure against any gas oversaturation and dissolve in submilliseconds, as derived by Epstein a

  17. Facile synthesis of thermally stable poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-modified gold surfaces by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Sun, Kai; Wu, Zhaoqiang; Lu, Jianhong; Song, Bo; Tong, Weifang; Shi, Xiujuan; Chen, Hong

    2012-06-26

    Well-controlled polymerization of N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) on Au surfaces by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) was carried out at room temperature by a silanization method. Initial attempts to graft poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) layers from initiators attached to alkanethiol monolayers yielded PVP films with thicknesses less than 5 nm. The combined factors of the difficulty in the controllable polymerization of NVP and the instability of alkanethiol monolayers led to the difficulty in the controlled polymerization of NVP on Au surfaces. Therefore, the silanization method was employed to form an adhesion layer for initiator attachment. This method allowed well-defined ATRP polymerization to occur on Au surfaces. Water contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and reflectance Fourier transform infrared (reflectance FTIR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the modified surfaces. The PVP-modified gold surface remained stable at 130 °C for 3 h, showing excellent thermal stability. Thus, postfunctionalization of polymer brushes at elevated temperatures is made possible. The silanization method was also applied to modify SPR chips and showed potential applications in biosensors and biochips.

  18. Is bicarbonate stable in and on the calcite surface?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Rodriguez Blanco, Juan Diego; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2016-01-01

    We have used density functional theory with the COSMO-RS implicit solvent model to predict the pKa for the deprotonation of bicarbonate to carbonate, i.e. HCO3− CO32− + H+, when HCO3− is included in, and adsorbed on, a calcite surface. We have used cluster models (80–100 atoms) to represent...... the flat {10.4} surface, acute steps, obtuse steps, two types of kinks on the acute step and two types of kinks on the obtuse steps. Based on the predicted pKa values, which range from −6.0 to 2.4 depending on the surface site, we conclude that bicarbonate deprotonates to carbonate when it is in calcite...... even when pH in solution is very low. This is true for all surface sites, even for solutions where 2.4 calcite, the predicted pKa for deprotonation is 7.5, which is ∼3 pH units lower than in aqueous solution...

  19. Parabolic stable Higgs bundles over complete noncompact Riemann surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李嘉禹; 王友德

    1999-01-01

    Let M be an open Riemann surface with a finite set of punctures, a complete Poincar(?)-like metric is introduced near the punctures and the equivalence between the stability of an indecomposable parabolic Higgs bundle, and the existence of a Hermitian-Einstein metric on the bundle is established.

  20. A stable finite difference method for the elastic wave equation on complex geometries with free surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelo, D; Petersson, N A

    2007-12-17

    , they introduce a discretization, that use boundary-modified difference operators for the mixed derivatives in the governing equations. Nilsson et al. show that the method is second order accurate for problems with smoothly varying material properties and stable under standard CFL constraints, for arbitrarily varying material properties. In this paper we generalize the results of Nilsson et al. to curvilinear coordinate systems, allowing for simulations on non-rectangular domains. Using summation by parts techniques, we show that there exists a corresponding stable discretization of the free surface boundary condition on curvilinear grids. We also prove that the discretization is stable and energy conserving both in semi-discrete and fully discrete form. As for the Cartesian method in, [17], the stability and conservation results holds for arbitrarily varying material properties. By numerical experiments it is established that the method is second order accurate.

  1. Surface oceanographic fronts influencing deep-sea biological activity: Using fish stable isotopes as ecological tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzao, Maite; Navarro, Joan; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; de Sola, Luis Gil; Forero, Manuela G.

    2017-06-01

    Ecotones can be described as transition zones between neighbouring ecological systems that can be shaped by environmental gradients over a range of space and time scales. In the marine environment, the detection of ecotones is complex given the highly dynamic nature of marine systems and the paucity of empirical data over ocean-basin scales. One approach to overcome these limitations is to use stable isotopes from animal tissues since they can track spatial oceanographic variability across marine systems and, in turn, can be used as ecological tracers. Here, we analysed stable isotopes of deep-sea fishes to assess the presence of ecological discontinuities across the western Mediterranean. We were specifically interested in exploring the connection between deep-sea biological activity and particular oceanographic features (i.e., surface fronts) occurring in the pelagic domain. We collected samples for three different abundant deep-sea species in May 2004 from an experimental oceanographic trawling cruise (MEDITS): the Mictophydae jewel lanternfish Lampanyctus crocodilus and two species of the Gadidae family, the silvery pout Gadiculus argenteus and the blue whiting Micromesistius poutassou. The experimental survey occurred along the Iberian continental shelf and the upper and middle slopes, from the Strait of Gibraltar in the SW to the Cape Creus in the NE. The three deep-sea species were highly abundant throughout the study area and they showed geographic variation in their isotopic values, with decreasing values from north to south disrupted by an important change point around the Vera Gulf. Isotopic latitudinal gradients were explained by pelagic oceanographic conditions along the study area and confirm the existence of an ecotone at the Vera Gulf. This area could be considered as an oceanographic boundary where waters of Atlantic origin meet Mediterranean surface waters forming important frontal structures such as the Almeria-Oran front. In fact, our results

  2. Polyaniline hybridized surface defective ZnO nanorods with long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, Susanta; Khan, Hasmat [Sol-Gel Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CSIR-CGCRI), 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, P.O. Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India); Biswas, Indranil [Materials Characterization and Instrumentation Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CSIR-CGCRI), 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, P.O. Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India); Jana, Sunirmal, E-mail: sjana@cgcri.res.in [Sol-Gel Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CSIR-CGCRI), 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, P.O. Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Polyaniline (PANI) hybridized ZnO nanorods was synthesized by solution method. • Surface defects were found in the nanorods. • The hybrid material exhibited an enhancement in visible light absorption. • A long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity of the material was found. • Advancement in the properties would be PANI hybridization and surface defects. - Abstract: We report surfactant/template free precursor solution based synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) hybridized surface defective ZnO nanorods by a two-step process. Initially, ZnO nanorods have been prepared at 95 °C, followed by hybridization (coating) of PANI onto the ZnO via in situ polymerization of aniline monomer, forming ZnO-PANI nanohybrid (ZP). The structural properties of ZP have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. The presence of surface defects especially the oxygen vacancies in ZnO has been characterized by photoluminescence emission, high resolution TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman spectral measurements. The chemical interaction of PANI with ZnO has been examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and XPS analyses. A significant enhancement in visible absorption of ZP sample is found as evidenced from UV–vis diffused reflectance spectral study. BET nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm shows an improved textural property (pore size, pore volume) of ZP. Moreover, a long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity (PEC) of ZP is found compare to pristine ZnO. The synergic effect of PANI hybridization and the presence of surface defects in ZnO NRs can enhance the PEC by prolonging the recombination rate of photogenerated charge carriers. The effect can also provide large number of active sites to make electrolyte diffusion and mass transportation easier in the nanohybrid. This simple synthesis strategy can be adopted for PANI hybridization with different metal oxide semiconductors

  3. Simulations of seasonal variations of stable water isotopes in land surface process model CLM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XinPing; WANG XiaoYun; YANG ZongLiang; NIU GuoYue; Xie ZiChu

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we simulated and analyzed the monthly variations of stable water isotopes in different reservoirs at Manaus, Brazil, using the Community Land Model (CLM) that incorporates stable isotopic effects as a diagnostic tool for understanding stable water isotopic processes, filling the observational data gaps and predicting hydrometeorological processes. The simulation results show that the δO values in precipitation, vapor and surface runoff have distinct seasonality with the marked negative correlations with corresponding water amount. Compared with the survey results by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in co-operation with the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the simulations by CLM reveal the similar temporal distributions of the δO in precipitation. Moreover, the simulated amount effect between monthly δO and monthly precipitation amount, and MWL (meteoric water line) are all close to the measured values. However, the simulated seasonal difference in the δO in precipitation is distinctly smaller than observed one, and the simulated temporal distribution of the 8180 in precipitation displays the ideal bimodal seasonality rather than the observed single one. These mismatches are possibly related to the simulation capacity and the veracity in forcing data.

  4. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A. [and others

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  5. Pressurized laboratory experiments show no stable carbon isotope fractionation of methane during gas hydrate dissolution and dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, Laura L; Wilson, Rachel M; Chanton, Jeffrey P

    2012-01-15

    The stable carbon isotopic ratio of methane (δ(13)C-CH(4)) recovered from marine sediments containing gas hydrate is often used to infer the gas source and associated microbial processes. This is a powerful approach because of distinct isotopic fractionation patterns associated with methane production by biogenic and thermogenic pathways and microbial oxidation. However, isotope fractionations due to physical processes, such as hydrate dissolution, have not been fully evaluated. We have conducted experiments to determine if hydrate dissolution or dissociation (two distinct physical processes) results in isotopic fractionation. In a pressure chamber, hydrate was formed from a methane gas source at 2.5 MPa and 4 °C, well within the hydrate stability field. Following formation, the methane source was removed while maintaining the hydrate at the same pressure and temperature which stimulated hydrate dissolution. Over the duration of two dissolution experiments (each ~20-30 days), water and headspace samples were periodically collected and measured for methane concentrations and δ(13)C-CH(4) while the hydrate dissolved. For both experiments, the methane concentrations in the pressure chamber water and headspace increased over time, indicating that the hydrate was dissolving, but the δ(13)C-CH(4) values showed no significant trend and remained constant, within 0.5‰. This lack of isotope change over time indicates that there is no fractionation during hydrate dissolution. We also investigated previous findings that little isotopic fractionation occurs when the gas hydrate dissociates into gas bubbles and water due to the release of pressure. Over a 2.5 MPa pressure drop, the difference in the δ(13)C-CH(4) was dissociates and demonstrated that there is no fractionation when the hydrate dissolves. Therefore, measured δ(13)C-CH(4) values near gas hydrates are not affected by physical processes, and can thus be interpreted to result from either the gas source or

  6. Facile fabrication of large-scale stable superhydrophobic surfaces with carbon sphere films by burning rapeseed oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mengnan; He, Jinmei; Cao, Biyun

    2010-10-01

    Stable anti-corrosive superhydrophobic surfaces were successfully prepared with the carbon nanosphere films by means of depositing the soot of burning rapeseed oil. The method is extremely cheap, facile, time-saving and avoided any of the special equipments, special reagents and complex process control. The method is suitable for the large-scale preparation of superhydrophobic surface and the substrate can be easily changed. The as-prepared surfaces showed stable superhydrophobicity and anti-corrosive property even in many corrosive solutions, such as acidic or basic solutions over a wide pH range. The as-prepared superhydrophobic surface was carefully characterized by the field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope to confirm the synergistic binary geometric structures at micro- and nanometer scale. This result will open a new avenue in the superhydrophobic paint research with these easily obtained carbon nanospheres in the near future.

  7. Stable isotope composition of surface and groundwater in Baja California, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretzschmar, Thomas G. [CICESE, Carret. Ensenada-Tijuana No 3819, Ensenada 22860 (Mexico); Frommen, Theresa [FU Berlin Malteserstr. 74-100, 12249 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Based on a total of 135 stable isotope analysis (δ{sup 18}O, δD) carried out on surface and groundwater samples, as well as on rainwater samples between 2004 and 2011 in 5 different regions in Baja California, an isotopic evaluation of the region was established. The results showed a depletion gradient of -0.25 0/00 δ{sup 18}O per 100 m rise in elevation throughout the study area. Considering an unaltered δ{sup 18}O signature for the thermal springs, the recharge areas of these waters are at elevations over 1400 m outside of the present watersheds, indicating the presence of regional flow systems next to the local flow regime feeding the cold springs and wells. The Mesa de Andrade area has a completely different signature with values of -105 for δ{sup 18}O and -13 for δD. (authors)

  8. Stable isotope systematics of surface water bodies in the Himalayan and trans-Himalayan (Kashmir) region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kanchan Pandey; J T Padia; R Ramesh; K K Sharma

    2000-03-01

    Stable hydrogen (D) and oxygen (18O) isotope ratios of the headwaters of the Indus and its tributaries, surface ice in glaciers, saline and fresh water lakes and thermal springs in the Himalayan and Trans- Himalayan (Kashmir) region are reported. The D-18O relationship for the river samples shows a slope of 9.12 ± 0.29 which agrees well with the estimate of 8.99 ± 0.33 based on a simple Rayleigh fractionation model. The unique signature of a higher deuterium excess (d) of the `Western Disturbance' is preserved in these samples. An altitude effect of -0.9 per mil/km is observed in the 18O of Indus waters. At a lower altitude (Beas) the altitude effect is almost double, indicating that the altitude effect decreases with elevation in this region.

  9. Covalent and stable CuAAC modification of silicon surfaces for control of cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vutti, Surendra; Buch-Månson, Nina; Schoffelen, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    Stable primary functionalization of metal surfaces plays a significant role in reliable secondary attachment of complex functional molecules used for the interfacing of metal objects and nanomaterials with biological systems. In principle, this can be achieved through chemical reactions either......-transfer reaction. Subsequently, D-amino acid adhesion peptides could be immobilized on the surface by use of Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry. This enabled the study of cell adhesion to the metal surface. In contrast to unmodified surfaces, the peptide-modified surfaces were able to maintain cell adhesion during...

  10. Genes with stable DNA methylation levels show higher evolutionary conservation than genes with fluctuant DNA methylation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruijie; Lv, Wenhua; Luan, Meiwei; Zheng, Jiajia; Shi, Miao; Zhu, Hongjie; Li, Jin; Lv, Hongchao; Zhang, Mingming; Shang, Zhenwei; Duan, Lian; Jiang, Yongshuai

    2015-11-24

    Different human genes often exhibit different degrees of stability in their DNA methylation levels between tissues, samples or cell types. This may be related to the evolution of human genome. Thus, we compared the evolutionary conservation between two types of genes: genes with stable DNA methylation levels (SM genes) and genes with fluctuant DNA methylation levels (FM genes). For long-term evolutionary characteristics between species, we compared the percentage of the orthologous genes, evolutionary rate dn/ds and protein sequence identity. We found that the SM genes had greater percentages of the orthologous genes, lower dn/ds, and higher protein sequence identities in all the 21 species. These results indicated that the SM genes were more evolutionarily conserved than the FM genes. For short-term evolutionary characteristics among human populations, we compared the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density, and the linkage disequilibrium (LD) degree in HapMap populations and 1000 genomes project populations. We observed that the SM genes had lower SNP densities, and higher degrees of LD in all the 11 HapMap populations and 13 1000 genomes project populations. These results mean that the SM genes had more stable chromosome genetic structures, and were more conserved than the FM genes.

  11. On alpha stable distribution of wind driven water surface wave slope

    CERN Document Server

    Joelson, Maminirina

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new formulation of the probability distribution function of wind driven water surface slope with an $\\alpha$-stable distribution probability. The mathematical formulation of the probability distribution function is given under an integral formulation. Application to represent the probability of time slope data from laboratory experiments is carried out with satisfactory results. We compare also the $\\alpha$-stable model of the water surface slopes with the Gram-Charlier development and the non-Gaussian model of Liu et al\\cite{Liu}. Discussions and conclusions are conducted on the basis of the data fit results and the model analysis comparison.

  12. Stable water isotopes in the coupled atmosphere–land surface model ECHAM5-JSBACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Haese

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present first results of a new model development, ECHAM5-JSBACH-wiso, where we have incorporated the stable water isotopes H218O and HDO as tracers in the hydrological cycle of the coupled atmosphere–land surface model ECHAM5-JSBACH. The ECHAM5-JSBACH-wiso model was run under present-day climate conditions at two different resolutions (T31L19, T63L31. A comparison between ECHAM5-JSBACH-wiso and ECHAM5-wiso shows that the coupling has a strong impact on the simulated temperature and soil wetness. Caused by these changes of temperature and the hydrological cycle, the δ18O in precipitation also shows variations from −4.5‰ up to 4.5‰. One of the clearest anomalies is shown over North-East Asia where, depending on an increase of temperature, the δ18O in precipitation increases as well. In order to analyze the sensitivity of the fractionation processes over land, we compare a set of simulations with various implementations of water isotope fractionation processes over the land surface. The simulations allow us to distinguish between no fractionation, fractionation included in the evaporation flux (from bare soil and also fractionation included in both evaporation and transpiration (from water transport through plants fluxes. The simulated δ18O and δD in precipitation of these setups generally fit well with the observations and the best agreement between observation and simulation is given in the case where no fractionation over land surface is assumed.

  13. A stable high-order perturbation of surfaces method for numerical simulation of diffraction problems in triply layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Youngjoon; Nicholls, David P.

    2017-02-01

    The accurate numerical simulation of linear waves interacting with periodic layered media is a crucial capability in engineering applications. In this contribution we study the stable and high-order accurate numerical simulation of the interaction of linear, time-harmonic waves with a periodic, triply layered medium with irregular interfaces. In contrast with volumetric approaches, High-Order Perturbation of Surfaces (HOPS) algorithms are inexpensive interfacial methods which rapidly and recursively estimate scattering returns by perturbation of the interface shape. In comparison with Boundary Integral/Element Methods, the stable HOPS algorithm we describe here does not require specialized quadrature rules, periodization strategies, or the solution of dense non-symmetric positive definite linear systems. In addition, the algorithm is provably stable as opposed to other classical HOPS approaches. With numerical experiments we show the remarkable efficiency, fidelity, and accuracy one can achieve with an implementation of this algorithm.

  14. Microbial communities of the Lemon Creek Glacier show subtle structural variation yet stable phylogenetic composition over space and time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody Springer Sheik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers are geologically important yet transient ecosystems that support diverse, biogeochemically significant microbial communities. During the melt season glaciers undergo dramatic physical, geochemical and biological changes that exert great influence on downstream biogeochemical cycles. Thus, we sought to understand the temporal melt-season dynamics of microbial communities and associated geochemistry at the terminus of Lemon Creek Glacier (LCG in coastal southern Alaska. Due to late season snowfall, sampling of LCG occurred in three interconnected areas: proglacial Lake Thomas, the lower glacial outflow stream and the glacier’s terminus. LCG associated microbial communities were phylogenetically diverse and varied by sampling location. However, Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes dominated communities at all sampling locations. Strict anaerobic groups such as methanogens, SR1, and OP11 were also recovered from glacier outflows, indicating anoxic conditions in at least some portions of the LCG subglacial environment. Microbial community structure was significantly correlated with sampling location and sodium concentrations. Microbial communities sampled from terminus outflow waters exhibited day-to-day fluctuation in taxonomy and phylogenetic similarity. However, these communities were not significantly different from randomly constructed communities from all three sites. These results indicate that glacial outflows share a large proportion of phylogenetic overlap with downstream environments and that the observed significant shifts in community structure are driven by changes in relative abundance of different taxa, and not complete restructuring of communities. We conclude that LCG glacial discharge hosts a diverse and relatively stable microbiome that shifts at fine taxonomic scales in response to geochemistry and likely water residence time.

  15. Surfaces with combined microscale and nanoscale structures: a route to mechanically stable superhydrophobic surfaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, Jonas; Rühe, Jürgen

    2013-03-19

    Materials with superhydrophobic properties are usually generated by covering the surfaces with hydrophobic nanoscale rough features. A major problem, however, for any practical application of such strongly water-repellent surfaces is the mechanical fragility of the nanostructures. Even moderate forces caused by touching or rubbing the surfaces are frequently strong enough to destroy the nanostructures and lead to the loss of the superhydrophobic properties. In this article, we study the mechanical stability of superhydrophobic surfaces with three different topographies: nano- and microscale features and surfaces carrying a combination of both. The surfaces are generated by silicon etching and subsequent coating with a monolayer of a fluoropolymer (PFA). We perform controlled wear tests on the different surfaces and discuss the impact of wear on the wetting properties of the different surfaces.

  16. A highly stable nonbiofouling surface with well-packed grafted zwitterionic polysulfobetaine for plasma protein repulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yung; Liao, Shih-Chieh; Higuchi, Akon; Ruaan, Ruoh-Chyu; Chu, Chih-Wei; Chen, Wen-Yih

    2008-05-20

    An ideal nonbiofouling surface for biomedical applications requires both high-efficient antifouling characteristics in relation to biological components and long-term material stability from biological systems. In this study we demonstrate the performance and stability of an antifouling surface with grafted zwitterionic sulfobetaine methacrylate (SBMA). The SBMA was grafted from a bromide-covered gold surface via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization to form well-packed polymer brushes. Plasma protein adsorption on poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (polySBMA) grafted surfaces was measured with a surface plasmon resonance sensor. It is revealed that an excellent stable nonbiofouling surface with grafted polySBMA can be performed with a cycling test of the adsorption of three model proteins in a wide range of various salt types, buffer compositions, solution pH levels, and temperatures. This work also demonstrates the adsorption of plasma proteins and the adhesion of platelets from human blood plasma on the polySBMA grafted surface. It was found that the polySBMA grafted surface effectively reduces the plasma protein adsorption from platelet-poor plasma solution to a level superior to that of adsorption on a surface terminated with tetra(ethylene glycol). The adhesion and activation of platelets from platelet-rich plasma solution were not observed on the polySBMA grafted surface. This work further concludes that a surface with good hemocompatibility can be achieved by the well-packed surface-grafted polySBMA brushes.

  17. Stable water isotopes in the coupled atmosphere–land surface model ECHAM5-JSBACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Haese

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present first results of a new model development, ECHAM5-JSBACH-wiso, where we have incorporated the stable water isotopes H218O and HDO as tracers in the hydrological cycle of the coupled atmosphere–land surface model ECHAM5-JSBACH. The ECHAM5-JSBACH-wiso model was run under present-day climate conditions at two different resolutions (T31L19, T63L31. A comparison between ECHAM5-JSBACH-wiso and ECHAM5-wiso shows that the coupling has a strong impact on the simulated temperature and soil wetness. Caused by these changes of temperature and the hydrological cycle, the δ18O in precipitation also shows variations from −4‰ up to 4‰. One of the strongest anomalies is shown over northeast Asia where, due to an increase of temperature, the δ18O in precipitation increases as well. In order to analyze the sensitivity of the fractionation processes over land, we compare a set of simulations with various implementations of these processes over the land surface. The simulations allow us to distinguish between no fractionation, fractionation included in the evaporation flux (from bare soil and also fractionation included in both evaporation and transpiration (from water transport through plants fluxes. While the isotopic composition of the soil water may change for δ18O by up to +8&permil:, the simulated δ18O in precipitation shows only slight differences on the order of ±1‰. The simulated isotopic composition of precipitation fits well with the available observations from the GNIP (Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation database.

  18. Polyaniline hybridized surface defective ZnO nanorods with long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Susanta; Khan, Hasmat; Biswas, Indranil; Jana, Sunirmal

    2016-10-01

    We report surfactant/template free precursor solution based synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) hybridized surface defective ZnO nanorods by a two-step process. Initially, ZnO nanorods have been prepared at 95 °C, followed by hybridization (coating) of PANI onto the ZnO via in situ polymerization of aniline monomer, forming ZnO-PANI nanohybrid (ZP). The structural properties of ZP have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. The presence of surface defects especially the oxygen vacancies in ZnO has been characterized by photoluminescence emission, high resolution TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman spectral measurements. The chemical interaction of PANI with ZnO has been examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and XPS analyses. A significant enhancement in visible absorption of ZP sample is found as evidenced from UV-vis diffused reflectance spectral study. BET nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm shows an improved textural property (pore size, pore volume) of ZP. Moreover, a long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity (PEC) of ZP is found compare to pristine ZnO. The synergic effect of PANI hybridization and the presence of surface defects in ZnO NRs can enhance the PEC by prolonging the recombination rate of photogenerated charge carriers. The effect can also provide large number of active sites to make electrolyte diffusion and mass transportation easier in the nanohybrid. This simple synthesis strategy can be adopted for PANI hybridization with different metal oxide semiconductors towards enhancing PEC activity of the hybrid materials.

  19. Stable carbon isotope characteristics of different plant species and surface soil in arid regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianying MA; Wei SUN; Huiwen ZHANG; Dunsheng XIA; Chengbang AN; Fahu CHEN

    2009-01-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition in surface soil organic matter (δ13Csoil) contains integrative information on the carbon isotope composition of the standing terrestrial plants (δ13Cleaf). In order to obtain valuable vegetation information from the δ13C of terrestrial sediment, it is necessary to understand the relationship between the δ13C value in modem surface soil and the standing vegetation. In this paper, we studied the δ13C value in modem surface soil organic matter and standing vegetation in arid areas in China, Australia and the United States. The isotopic discrepancy between δ13Csoil andδ13Cleaf of the standing dominant vegetation was examined in those different arid regions. The results show that the δ13Csoil values were consistently enriched compared to the δ13Cleaf. The δ13Cleaf values were positively correlated with δ13Csoil, which suggests that the interference of microorganisms and hydrophytes on the isotopic composition of surface soil organic matter during soil organic matter formation could be ignored in arid regions. The averaged discrepancy between δ13Csoil and δ13Cleaf is about 1.71%0 in Tamarix L. in the Tarim Basin in China, 1.50 ‰ in Eucalytus near Orange in Australia and 1.22 ‰ in Artemisia in Saratoga in the United States, which are different from the results of other studies. The results indicate that the discrepancies in the δ13C value between surface soil organic matter and standing vegetation were highly influenced by the differences in geophysical location and the dominant species of the studied ecosystems. We suggest that caution should be taken when organic matter δ13C in terrestrial sediment is used to extract paleovegetation information (C3/C4 vegetation composition), as the δ13C in soil organic matter is not only determined by the ratio of C3/C4 species, but also profoundly affected by climate change induced variation in the δ13C in dominant species.

  20. Design and Fabrication of a Hybrid Superhydrophobic-Hydrophilic Surface That Exhibits Stable Dropwise Condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Bikash; Mac Giolla Eain, Marc; Xu, QianFeng; Egan, Vanessa M; Punch, Jeff; Lyons, Alan M

    2015-10-28

    Condensation of water vapor is an essential process in power generation, water collection, and thermal management. Dropwise condensation, where condensed droplets are removed from the surface before coalescing into a film, has been shown to increase the heat transfer efficiency and water collection ability of many surfaces. Numerous efforts have been made to create surfaces which can promote dropwise condensation, including superhydrophobic surfaces on which water droplets are highly mobile. However, the challenge with using such surfaces in condensing environments is that hydrophobic coatings can degrade and/or water droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces transition from the mobile Cassie to the wetted Wenzel state over time and condensation shifts to a less-effective filmwise mechanism. To meet the need for a heat-transfer surface that can maintain stable dropwise condensation, we designed and fabricated a hybrid superhydrophobic-hydrophilic surface. An array of hydrophilic needles, thermally connected to a heat sink, was forced through a robust superhydrophobic polymer film. Condensation occurs preferentially on the needle surface due to differences in wettability and temperature. As the droplet grows, the liquid drop on the needle remains in the Cassie state and does not wet the underlying superhydrophobic surface. The water collection rate on this surface was studied using different surface tilt angles, needle array pitch values, and needle heights. Water condensation rates on the hybrid surface were shown to be 4 times greater than for a planar copper surface and twice as large for silanized silicon or superhydrophobic surfaces without hydrophilic features. A convection-conduction heat transfer model was developed; predicted water condensation rates were in good agreement with experimental observations. This type of hybrid superhydrophobic-hydrophilic surface with a larger array of needles is low-cost, robust, and scalable and so could be used for heat

  1. Fabricating an enhanced stable superhydrophobic surface on copper plates by introducing a sintering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinyi; Yuan, Wei; Yan, Zhiguo; Zhou, Bo; Tang, Yong; Li, Zongtao

    2015-11-01

    The superhydrophobic surface has the potential for use in functional applications. This study reports a novel method for coupling a sintering process with a traditional technique based on the solution-immersion method to prepare a stable superhydrophobic surface. The use of a sintering process aids in the enhancement of the adhesive strength and acid resistance of the surface structure. The advantage of using this method lies in its flexibility in regulating the processing parameters and functional behaviours. The influences of different processing parameters were experimentally investigated. The surface treated with a sintering process remains superhydrophobic with a contact angle of >150° after immersion in an acid solution for 120 h. The sintered surface maintains good integrity after experiencing ultrasonic vibration for 5 min. The results indicate that the sintering temperature must be optimized to increase the adhesive strength and maintain sufficient hydrophobicity. The modification time is an important factor related to the level of hydrophobicity.

  2. FOX-superroots of Lotus corniculatus, overexpressing Arabidopsis full-length cDNA, show stable variations in morphological traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himuro, Yasuyo; Tanaka, Hidenori; Hashiguchi, Masatsugu; Ichikawa, Takanari; Nakazawa, Miki; Seki, Motoaki; Fujita, Miki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Matsui, Minami; Akashi, Ryo; Hoffmann, Franz

    2011-01-15

    Using the full-length cDNA overexpressor (FOX) gene-hunting system, we have generated 130 Arabidopsis FOX-superroot lines in bird's-foot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) for the systematic functional analysis of genes expressed in roots and for the selection of induced mutants with interesting root growth characteristics. We used the Arabidopsis-FOX Agrobacterium library (constructed by ligating pBIG2113SF) for the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of superroots (SR) and the subsequent selection of gain-of-function mutants with ectopically expressed Arabidopsis genes. The original superroot culture of L. corniculatus is a unique host system displaying fast root growth in vitro, allowing continuous root cloning, direct somatic embryogenesis and mass regeneration of plants under entirely hormone-free culture conditions. Several of the Arabidopsis FOX-superroot lines show interesting deviations from normal growth and morphology of roots from SR-plants, such as differences in pigmentation, growth rate, length or diameter. Some of these mutations are of potential agricultural interest. Genomic PCR analysis revealed that 100 (76.9%) out of the 130 transgenic lines showed the amplification of single fragments. Sequence analysis of the PCR fragments from these 100 lines identified full-length cDNA in 74 of them. Forty-three out of 74 full-length cDNA carried known genes. The Arabidopsis FOX-superroot lines of L. corniculatus, produced in this study, expand the FOX hunting system and provide a new tool for the genetic analysis and control of root growth in a leguminous forage plant.

  3. Femtosecond pulsed laser textured titanium surfaces with stable superhydrophilicity and superhydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-jia; Li, Huang; Huang, Li-jing; Ren, Nai-fei; Kong, Xia

    2016-12-01

    A facile and highly-efficient laser scanning process coupled with a simple silanization modification was used to prepare textured titanium (Ti) surfaces with stable superhydrophilicity and superhydrophobicity. Femtosecond pulsed laser scanning along two mutually perpendicular directions led to the formation of binary structures featuring micrometer-scale spikes covered with nanometer-scale ripples. The period of the spikes significantly increased and the period of the ripples irregularly changed in the narrow range of 550-600 nm with the increase of laser fluence. The obtained laser-textured Ti surfaces were hydrophilic or even superhydrophilic, and the superhydrophilic laser-textured Ti surface using a laser fluence of 1.5 J/cm2 was observed to retain its wetting property after 30 days of storage in ambient atmosphere. After silanization, all the laser-textured Ti surfaces exhibited high hydrophobicity or superhydrophobicity, and the superhydrophobic laser-textured Ti surfaces using laser fluences of 1.5 and 1.8 J/cm2 remained stable when stored in air for over 30 days. The results imply the potential applications of these surfaces in a variety of fields.

  4. Experimental Study of Stable Surfaces for Anti-Slug Control in Multi-phase Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon; Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic; Stampe, Kasper;

    2016-01-01

    Severe slugging flow is always challenging in oil & gas production, especially for the current offshore based production. The slugging flow can cause a lot of problems, such as those relevant to production safety, fatigue as well as capability. As one typical phenomenon in multi-phase flow dynamics......, the slug can be avoided or eliminated by proper facility design or control of operational conditions. Based on a testing facility which can emulate a pipeline-riser or a gas-lifted production well in a scaled-down manner, this paper experimentally studies the correlations of key operational parameters...... that the capability, performance and efficiency of anti-slug control can be dramatically improved if these stable surfaces can be experimentally determined beforehand. The paper concludes that obtaining the stable surface on the new developed map can significantly improve the production rate in a control scheme. Even...

  5. Control of Colloid Surface Chemistry through Matrix Confinement: Facile Preparation of Stable Antibody Functionalized Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skewis, Lynell R.; Reinhard, Björn M.

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe a simple yet efficient gel matrix assisted preparation method which improves synthetic control over the interface between inorganic nanomaterials and biopolymers and yields stable biofunctionalized silver nanoparticles. Covalent functionalization of the noble metal surface is aided by the confinement of polyethylene glycol acetate functionalized silver nanoparticles in thin slabs of a 1% agarose gel. The gel confined nanoparticles can be transferred between reaction and washing media simply by immersing the gel slab in the solution of interest. The agarose matrix retains nanoparticles but is swiftly penetrated by the antibodies of interest. The antibodies are covalently anchored to the nanoparticles using conventional crosslinking strategies, and the resulting antibody functionalized nanoparticles are recovered from the gel through electroelution. We demonstrate the efficacy of this nanoparticle functionalization approach by labeling specific receptors on cellular surfaces with functionalized silver nanoparticles that are stable under physiological conditions. PMID:20161660

  6. Hydrophobic/superhydrophobic oxidized metal surfaces showing negligible contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, Atsushi; Cheng, Dalton F; Yagihashi, Makoto

    2011-01-15

    Dynamic wettability of oxidized metal (aluminum and titanium) surfaces could be tuned by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D(4)(H)). This facile CVD method produces not only monomeric layers but also particulate films by changing the CVD temperature, resulting in a marked difference in the final wetting properties. In the samples prepared at 80°C for ~3 days, D(4)(H) layers with thicknesses of ~0.5 nm were formed on the surfaces without discernible change in surface morphology, as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. After this D(4)(H) monomeric layer formation, the hydrophilic oxidized aluminum and titanium surfaces became hydrophobic (advancing/receding water contact angles (θ(A)/θ(R))=102-104°/99-102°) showing essentially negligible contact angle hysteresis. Performing CVD of D(4)(H) at 180°C for ~1 day produced opaque film with particulate morphologies with diameters in the range of 500 nm to 4 μm observed on the surfaces. This geometric morphology enhanced the surface hydrophobicity (θ(A)/θ(R)=163°/160-161°). Droplets on these negligible-hysteresis surfaces moved very easily without "pinning".

  7. Stable functionalization of germanium surface and its application in biomolecules immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Qi [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.19A, Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Baojian [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Ye, Lin [Sate Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.19A, Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Tang, Teng; Huang, Shanluo; Du, Xiaowei [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.19A, Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Bian, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jishen [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Di, Zengfeng, E-mail: zfdi@mail.sim.ac.cn [Sate Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Jin, Qinghui [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhao, Jianlong, E-mail: jlzhao@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • An effective method to immobilize biomolecules on the functionalized Ge surface. • The surface of Ge was functionalized with 11-Mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUA). • Stable and uniform SAMs was obtained on Ge surface after 11-MUA treatment. • The functionalized Ge was employed as substrate for protein immobilization. • Paving the way of Ge for further applications in bioelectronics field. - Abstract: As a typical semiconductor material, germanium (Ge) has the potential to be utilized in microelectronics and bioelectronics. Herein, we present a simple and effective method to immobilize biomolecules on the surface of functionalized Ge. The surface oxide of Ge was removed with the pretreatment of hydrochloric acid and the Cl-terminated Ge reacted with 11-Mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUA). The surface of Ge was coated with 11-MUA self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) due to the bonding reaction between the sulfhydryl group of 11-MUA and Cl-terminated Ge. Furthermore, typical biomolecule, a green fluorescent protein was chosen to be immobilized on the surface of the functionalized Ge. Contact angle analysis, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study the characteristics including wettability, stability, roughness and component of the functionalized Ge, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy was utilized to indicate the efficiency of protein immobilization on the surface of the functionalized Ge. With these studies, stable and uniform functionalized monolayer was obtained on the surface of Ge after 11-MUA treatment and the functionalized Ge was effectively applied in protein immobilization. Furthermore, this study may pave the way for further applications such as the integration of bioelectronics and biosensors with the attractive semiconductor material-Ge in future work.

  8. A Trimeric Surfactant: Surface Micelles, Hydration-Lubrication, and Formation of a Stable, Charged Hydrophobic Monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Nir; Wu, Chunxian; Wang, Yilin; Klein, Jacob

    2016-11-15

    The surface structure of the trimeric surfactant tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)diethyltriamine trichloride (DTAD) on mica and the interactions between two such DTAD-coated surfaces were determined using atomic force microscopy and a surface force balance. In an aqueous solution of 3 mM, 5 times the critical aggregation concentration (CAC), the surfaces are coated with wormlike micelles or hemimicelles and larger (∼80 nm) bilayer vesicles. Repulsive normal interactions between the surfaces indicate a net surface charge and a solution concentration of ions close to that expected from the CAC. Moreover, this surface coating is strongly lubricating up to some tens of atmospheres, attributed to the hydration-lubrication mechanism acting at the exposed, highly hydrated surfactant headgroups. Upon replacement of the DTAD solution with surfactant-free water, the surface structures have changed on the DTAD monolayers, which then jump into adhesive contact on approach, both in water and following addition of 0.1 M NaNO3. This trimeric surfactant monolayer, which is highly hydrophobic, is found to be positively charged, which is evident from the attraction between the DTAD monolayer and negatively charged bare mica across water. These monolayers are stable over days even under a salt solution. The stability is attributed to the several stabilization pathways available to DTAD on the mica surface.

  9. Fabrication of hierarchical structures for stable superhydrophobicity on metallic planar and cylindrical inner surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiuqing; Wang, Li; Lv, Danhui; Wang, Quandai; Li, Liang; He, Ning; Lu, Bingheng

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the construction of stable superhydrophobicity on metallic wetting surfaces has gained increasing attention due to its potential wide applications. In this paper, we propose an economic fabricating method, which not only is suitable for metallic planar surfaces, but also could be applied onto cylindrical inner surfaces. It mainly involves two steps: etching micro-concaves by a movable mask electrochemical micromachining (EMM) technique and fabricating nanopillars of ZnO by a hydrothermal method. Then the influences of surface morphology on the static and dynamic behaviors of water droplets are investigated. The energy loss during impact on the surfaces is quantified in terms of the restitution coefficient for droplets bouncing off the surfaces. For hierarchical structures with excellent superhydrophobicity (contact angle ≈180° and sliding angle ≤1°), the droplet bounces off the surface several times, superior to the droplet's response on single nanopillars (contact angle ≈165.8° and sliding angle ≈6.29°) where droplet bounces off only for limited a number of times, and even far better than the dynamics of a liquid droplet impinging on microstructures (contact angle ≈132.1° and sliding angle >90°) where droplet does not rebound and remains pinned. The highest elasticity is obtained on the hierarchical surface, where the restitution coefficient can be as large as 0.94. The fabricating method is then applied onto the cylindrical inner surface and the wetting behavior is confirmed to be consistent with the planar surface. This method, which can be generalized to any kind of solid electroconductive metal or other surfaces with different shapes, could find wide practical applications in self-cleaning surfaces, chemical industry, microfluidic devices, mechanical engineering and aviation.

  10. Facile synthesis of three-dimensional ZnO nanostructure: realization of a multifunctional stable superhydrophobic surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: After comprehensive study of various superhydrophobic phenomena in nature, it is no longer a puzzle for researchers to realize such fetching surfaces. However, the different types of artificial surfaces may get wetted and lose its water repellence if there exist defects or the liquid is under pressure. With respect to the industry applications, in which the resistance of wetting transition is critical important, new nanostructure satisfied a certain geometric criterion should be designed to hold a stable gas film at the base area to avoid the wet transition. METHODOLOGY: A thermal deposition method was utilized to produce a thin ZnO seeds membrane on the aluminum foil. And then a chemical self-assemble technology was developed in present work to fabricate three-dimensional (3D hierarchical dune-like ZnO architecture based on the prepared seeds membrane. RESULTS: Hierarchical ZnO with micro scale dune-like structure and core-sharing nanosheets was generated. The characterization results showed that there exist plenty of gaps and interfaces among the micro-dune and nanosheets, and thus the surface area was enlarged by such a unique morphology. Benefited from this unique 3D ZnO hierarchical nanostructure, the obtained surface exhibited stable water repellency after modification with Teflon, and furthermore, based on solid theory analysis, such 3D ZnO nanostructure would exhibit excellent sensing performance.

  11. Surface evolution in stable magnetic fields: the case of the fully convective dwarf V374 Peg

    CERN Document Server

    Vida, K; K\\Hovári, Zs

    2010-01-01

    We present BV(RI)_C photometric measurements of the dM4-type V374 Peg covering ~430 days. The star has a mass of ~0.28M_Sun, so it is supposed to be fully convective. Previous observations detected almost-rigid-body rotation and stable, axisymmetric poloidal magnetic field. Our photometric data agree well with this picture, one persistent active nest is found on the stellar surface. Nevertheless, the surface is not static: night-to-night variations and frequent flaring are observed. The flares seem to be concentrated on the brighter part of the surface. The short-time changes of the light curve could indicate emerging flux ropes in the same region, resembling to the active nests on the Sun. We have observed flaring and quiet states of V374 Peg changing on monthly timescale.

  12. Surface modification of droplet polymeric microfluidic devices for the stable and continuous generation of aqueous droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Balamurugan; Kim, Namwon; Lee, Wonbae; Spivak, David A; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E; McCarley, Robin L; Soper, Steven A

    2011-06-21

    Droplet microfluidics performed in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic devices resulted in significant wall wetting by water droplets formed in a liquid-liquid segmented flow when using a hydrophobic carrier fluid such as perfluorotripropylamine (FC-3283). This wall wetting led to water droplets with nonuniform sizes that were often trapped on the wall surfaces, leading to unstable and poorly controlled liquid-liquid segmented flow. To circumvent this problem, we developed a two-step procedure to hydrophobically modify the surfaces of PMMA and other thermoplastic materials commonly used to make microfluidic devices. The surface-modification route involved the introduction of hydroxyl groups by oxygen plasma treatment of the polymer surface followed by a solution-phase reaction with heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl trichlorosilane dissolved in fluorocarbon solvent FC-3283. This procedure was found to be useful for the modification of PMMA and other thermoplastic surfaces, including polycyclic olefin copolymer (COC) and polycarbonate (PC). Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the fluorination of these polymers took place with high surface selectivity. This procedure was used to modify the surface of a PMMA droplet microfluidic device (DMFD) and was shown to be useful in reducing the wetting problem during the generation of aqueous droplets in a perfluorotripropylamine (FC-3283) carrier fluid and could generate stable segmented flows for hours of operation. In the case of PMMA DMFD, oxygen plasma treatment was carried out after the PMMA cover plate was thermally fusion bonded to the PMMA microfluidic chip. Because the appended chemistry to the channel wall created a hydrophobic surface, it will accommodate the use of other carrier fluids that are hydrophobic as well, such as hexadecane or mineral oils.

  13. Fungal surface protein mediated one-pot synthesis of stable and hemocompatible gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitching, Michael; Choudhary, Priyadarshani; Inguva, Saikumar; Guo, Yina; Ramani, Meghana; Das, Sujoy K; Marsili, Enrico

    2016-12-01

    Despite their large secretome and wide applications in bioprocesses, fungi remain underexplored in metal nanoparticles (MNP) biosynthesis. Previous studies have shown that cell surface proteins of Rhizopus oryzae play a crucial role in biomineralization of Au(III) to produce gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Therefore, it is hypothesized that purified cell surface protein may produce in vitro AuNPs with narrow size distribution for biomedical and biocatalytic applications. However, different protein extraction methods might affect protein stability and the AuNP biosynthesis process. Herein, we have explored the extraction of cell surface proteins from R. oryzae using common detergents and reducing agent (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) Triton X-100, and 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT)) and their effect on the size and shape of the biosynthetic AuNPs. The surface proteins extracted with reducing agent (DTT) and non-ionic detergent (Triton X-100) produce spherical AuNPs with a mean particle size of 16±7nm, and 19±4nm, respectively, while the AuNPs produced by the surface protein extracted by ionic detergent (SDS) are flower-like AuNPs with broader size distribution of 43±19nm. This synthetic approach does not require use of any harsh chemicals, multistep preparation and separation process, favouring environmental sustainability. The biosynthetic AuNPs thus formed, are stable in different physiological buffers and hemocompatible, making them suitable for biomedical applications.

  14. Electrostatic powder spraying process for the fabrication of stable superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guotuan; Tian, Yuping; Li, Zhantie; Lu, Dongfang

    2011-03-01

    Nano-sized Al2O3 particles were modified by heptadecafluorodecyl trimethoxysilane and 2,3-epoxy propoxy propyl trimethoxysilicane to make it both hydrophobic and reactive. The reactive nano-particles were mixed with polyester resin containing curing agents and electrostatic sprayed on stainless steel substrates to obtain stable superhydrophobic coatings after curing. The water contact angle (WCA) on the hybrid coating is influenced by the content of Al2O3 particles in the coating. As the Al2O3 concentration in the coating was increased from 0% to 8%, WCA increased from 68° to 165°. Surface topography of the coatings was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nano-particles covered on the coating surface formed continuous film with greatly enhanced roughness, which was found to be responsible for the superhydrophobicity. The method is simple and cost effective and can be used for preparing self-cleaning superhydrophobic coating on large areas.

  15. Lithium inclusion in indium metal-organic frameworks showing increased surface area and hydrogen adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Bosch

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of counterion exchange in two anionic In-Metal-Organic Frameworks (In-MOFs showed that partial replacement of disordered ammonium cations was achieved through the pre-synthetic addition of LiOH to the reaction mixture. This resulted in a surface area increase of over 1600% in {Li [In(1,3 − BDC2]}n and enhancement of the H2 uptake of approximately 275% at 80 000 Pa at 77 K. This method resulted in frameworks with permanent lithium content after repeated solvent exchange as confirmed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Lithium counterion replacement appears to increase porosity after activation through replacement of bulkier, softer counterions and demonstrates tuning of pore size and properties in MOFs.

  16. Surface chemistry for stable and smart molecular and biomolecular interfaces via photochemical grafting of alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Landis, Elizabeth C; Franking, Ryan; Hamers, Robert J

    2010-09-21

    Many emerging fields such as biotechnology and renewable energy require functionalized surfaces that are "smart" and highly stable. Surface modification schemes developed previously have often been limited to simple molecules or have been based on weakly bound layers that have limited stability. In this Account, we report on recent developments enabling the preparation of molecular and biomolecular interfaces that exhibit high selectivity and unprecedented stability on a range of covalent materials including diamond, vertically aligned carbon nanofibers, silicon, and metal oxides. One particularly successful pathway to ultrastable interfaces involves the photochemical grafting of organic alkenes to the surfaces. Bifunctional alkenes with a suitable functional group at the distal end can directly impart functionality and can serve as attachment points for linking complex structures such as DNA and proteins. The successful application of photochemical grafting to a surprisingly wide range of materials has motivated researchers to better understand the underlying photochemical reaction mechanisms. The resulting studies using experimental and computational methods have provided fundamental insights into the electronic structure of the molecules and the surface control photochemical reactivity. Such investigations have revealed the important role of a previously unrecognized process, photoelectron emission, in initiating photochemical grafting of alkenes to surfaces. Molecular and biomolecular interfaces formed on diamond and other covalent materials are leading to novel types of molecular electronic interfaces. For example, electrical, optical, or electromechanical structures that convert biological information directly into analytical signals allow for direct label-free detection of DNA and proteins. Because of the preferential adherence of molecules to graphitic edge-plane sites, the grafting of redox-active species to vertically aligned carbon nanofibers leads to

  17. TGP, an extremely stable, non-aggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W.; Don Paul, Craig; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Traore, Daouda A.K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. PMID:25287913

  18. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.

  19. TP53 mutations in de novo acute myeloid leukemia patients: longitudinal follow-ups show the mutation is stable during disease evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, H-A; Chou, W-C; Kuo, Y-Y; Liu, C-Y; Lin, L-I; Tseng, M-H; Chiang, Y-C; Liu, M-C; Liu, C-W; Tang, J-L; Yao, M; Li, C-C; Huang, S-Y; Ko, B-S; Hsu, S-C; Chen, C-Y; Lin, C-T; Wu, S-J; Tsay, W; Chen, Y-C; Tien, H-F

    2015-07-31

    The TP53 mutation is frequently detected in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with complex karyotype (CK), but the stability of this mutation during the clinical course remains unclear. In this study, TP53 mutations were identified in 7% of 500 patients with de novo AML and 58.8% of patients with CK. TP53 mutations were closely associated with older age, lower white blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts, FAB M6 subtype, unfavorable-risk cytogenetics and CK, but negatively associated with NPM1 mutation, FLT3/ITD and DNMT3A mutation. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that TP53 mutation was an independent poor prognostic factor for overall survival and disease-free survival among the total cohort and the subgroup of patients with CK. A scoring system incorporating TP53 mutation and nine other prognostic factors, including age, WBC counts, cytogenetics and gene mutations, into survival analysis proved to be very useful to stratify AML patients. Sequential study of 420 samples showed that TP53 mutations were stable during AML evolution, whereas the mutation was acquired only in 1 of the 126 TP53 wild-type patients when therapy-related AML originated from different clone emerged. In conclusion, TP53 mutations are associated with distinct clinic-biological features and poor prognosis in de novo AML patients and are rather stable during disease progression.

  20. Preparation of Stable Superhydrophobic Coatings on Wood Substrate Surfaces via Mussel-Inspired Polydopamine and Electroless Deposition Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaili Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA chemistry and electroless deposition approaches were used to prepare stable superhydrophobic coatings on wood surfaces. The as-formed PDA coating on a wood surface exhibited a hierarchical micro/nano roughness structure, and functioned as an “adhesive layer” between the substrate and a metallic film by the metal chelating ability of the catechol moieties on PDA, allowing for the formation of a well-developed micro/nanostructure hierarchical roughness. Additionally, the coating acted as a stable bridge between the substrate and hydrophobic groups. The morphology and chemical components of the prepared superhydrophobic wood surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The PDA and octadecylamine (OA modified surface showed excellent superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle (CA of about 153° and a rolling angle (RA of about 9°. The CA further increased to about 157° and RA reduced to about 5° with the Cu metallization. The superhydrophobic material exhibited outstanding stability in harsh conditions including ultraviolet aging, ultrasonic washing, strong acid-base and organic solvent immersion, and high-temperature water boiling. The results suggested that the PDA/OA layers were good enough to confer robust, degradation-resistant superhydrophobicity on wood substrates. The Cu metallization was likely unnecessary to provide significant improvements in superhydrophobic property. However, due to the amazing adhesive capacity of PDA, the electroless deposition technique may allow for a wide range of potential applications in biomimetic materials.

  1. Temperature stable mid-infrared GaInAsSb/GaSb Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikyo, A. B.; Marko, I. P.; Hild, K.; Adams, A. R.; Arafin, S.; Amann, M.-C.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    GaInAsSb/GaSb based quantum well vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) operating in mid-infrared spectral range between 2 and 3 micrometres are of great importance for low cost gas monitoring applications. This paper discusses the efficiency and temperature sensitivity of the VCSELs emitting at 2.6 μm and the processes that must be controlled to provide temperature stable operation. We show that non-radiative Auger recombination dominates the threshold current and limits the device performance at room temperature. Critically, we demonstrate that the combined influence of non-radiative recombination and gain peak – cavity mode de-tuning determines the overall temperature sensitivity of the VCSELs. The results show that improved temperature stable operation around room temperature can only be achieved with a larger gain peak – cavity mode de-tuning, offsetting the significant effect of increasing non-radiative recombination with increasing temperature, a physical effect which must be accounted for in mid-infrared VCSEL design.

  2. Characterizing interactions between surface water and groundwater in the Jialu River basin using major ion chemistry and stable isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Jialu River, a secondary tributary of the Huaihe River, has been severely contaminated for the major contaminant sources, such as a number of untreated or lightly treated sewage wastes in some cities. Groundwater along the river is not an isolated component of the hydrologic system, but instead connected with the surface water. This study aims to characterize the relationships between surface water (e.g. reservoirs, lakes and rivers and groundwater near the river in the shallow Quaternary aquifer. The concentration of Cl in North Zhengzhou City increased prominently due to the discharge of a large amount of domestic water. Nitrate and potassium show maximum concentrations in groundwater in Fugou County. These high levels can be attributed to the use of a large quantity of fertilizer over this region. The regional well had water with a constant stable isotopic signature, which illustrates that the groundwater never or rarely receive recharge from surface water. However, the groundwater of transitional well (location SY3 seemed to be recharged by river water via bank infiltration in September 2010. Fractional contributions of river water to the groundwater were calculated based on isotopic and chemical data using a mass-balance approach. Results show that the groundwater was approximately composed of 60–70% river water. These findings would be useful for a better understanding of hydrogeological processes at the river-aquifer interface and ultimately benefit water management in the future.

  3. Polyethyleneimine High-Energy Hydrophilic Surface Interfacial Treatment toward Efficient and Stable Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengwei; Liang, Chao; Zhang, Yiqiang; Li, Fengyu; Song, Yanlin; Shao, Guosheng

    2016-11-30

    The interfacial contact is critical for the performance of perovskite solar cells (PSCs), leading to dense perovskite thin films and efficient charge transport. In this contribution, an effective interfacial treatment solution using polyethyleneimine (PEI) was developed to improve the performance and stability of PSCs. Inserting PEI between the s-VOx and perovskite layers can produce a high-energy hydrophilic surface to facilitate the formation of a high-quality perovskite layer by the solution method. Accordingly, the surface coverage of perovskite film on the s-VOx layer increased from 80% to 95%, and the PCE of the device improved from 12.06% (with an average of 10.16%) to 14.4% (with an average value of 12.8%) under an irradiance of 100 mW cm(-2) AM 1.5G sunlight. More importantly, the stability of PSCs was further improved after adding another PEI layer between the electron transport layer and LiF/Al layer, less than 10% decay in efficiency during a 10-days observation. Since all layers of the PSCs were fabricated at low temperature (<150 °C), these PEI-treated PSCs based on the amorphous VOx layer have the potential to contribute significantly toward the development of efficient and stable solar cells on flexible substrates.

  4. Leishmania-specific surface antigens show sub-genus sequence variation and immune recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Depledge

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A family of hydrophilic acylated surface (HASP proteins, containing extensive and variant amino acid repeats, is expressed at the plasma membrane in infective extracellular (metacyclic and intracellular (amastigote stages of Old World Leishmania species. While HASPs are antigenic in the host and can induce protective immune responses, the biological functions of these Leishmania-specific proteins remain unresolved. Previous genome analysis has suggested that parasites of the sub-genus Leishmania (Viannia have lost HASP genes from their genomes. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used molecular and cellular methods to analyse HASP expression in New World Leishmania mexicana complex species and show that, unlike in L. major, these proteins are expressed predominantly following differentiation into amastigotes within macrophages. Further genome analysis has revealed that the L. (Viannia species, L. (V. braziliensis, does express HASP-like proteins of low amino acid similarity but with similar biochemical characteristics, from genes present on a region of chromosome 23 that is syntenic with the HASP/SHERP locus in Old World Leishmania species and the L. (L. mexicana complex. A related gene is also present in Leptomonas seymouri and this may represent the ancestral copy of these Leishmania-genus specific sequences. The L. braziliensis HASP-like proteins (named the orthologous (o HASPs are predominantly expressed on the plasma membrane in amastigotes and are recognised by immune sera taken from 4 out of 6 leishmaniasis patients tested in an endemic region of Brazil. Analysis of the repetitive domains of the oHASPs has shown considerable genetic variation in parasite isolates taken from the same patients, suggesting that antigenic change may play a role in immune recognition of this protein family. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings confirm that antigenic hydrophilic acylated proteins are expressed from genes in the same chromosomal

  5. Glacial-interglacial changes in the surface water characteristics of the Andaman Sea: Evidence from stable ratios of planktonic foraminifera

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S M Ahmad; D J Patil; P S Rao; B N Nath; B R Rao; G Rajagopalan

    2000-03-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of the planktonic foraminifera (Globigerinoides ruber) from a deep sea sediment core (GC-1) in the Andaman Sea show high glacial-to-Holocene 180 amplitude of 2.1% which is consistent with previously published records from this marginal basin and suggest increased salinity and/or decreased temperature in the glacial surface waters of this region. A pulse of 18O enrichment during the last deglaciation can be attributed to a Younger Dryas cooling event and/or to a sudden decrease of fresh water influx from the Irrawady and Salween rivers into the Andaman Sea. High 13C values observed during the isotopic stages 2 and 4 are probably due to the enhanced productivity during glacial times in the Andaman Sea.

  6. Stable modification of PDMS surface properties by plasma polymerization: application to the formation of double emulsions in microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Valessa; Tatoulian, Michaël; Li, Hong; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh; Ajdari, Armand; Tabeling, Patrick

    2006-06-06

    We describe a method based on plasma polymerization for the modification and control of the surface properties of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surfaces. By depositing plasma polymerized acrylic acid coatings on PDMS, we succeeded to fabricate stable (several days) hydrophilic and patterned hydrophobic/hydrophilic surfaces. We used this approach to generate direct and (for the first time in this material) double emulsions in PDMS microchannels.

  7. Core-shell hybrid nanomaterial based on prussian blue and surface active maghemite nanoparticles as stable electrocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, Massimiliano; Baratella, Davide; Salviulo, Gabriella; Polakova, Katerina; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Tucek, Jiri; Kaslik, Josef; Zboril, Radek; Vianello, Fabio

    2014-02-15

    A novel core-shell nanomaterial based on prussian blue (PB) coating on peculiar surface active maghemite nanoparticles (SAMNs), was developed. The synthetic process involves the direct crystallization of Fe(II)(CN)6(4-) onto the surface of SAMNs by simple incubation in water at controlled pH, demonstrating the presence of under-coordinated Fe(III) on nanoparticle surface. The coating reaction occurs in a narrow pH range and the synthetic procedure was optimized. The resulting SAMN@PB hybrid nanostructures were characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, Mössbauer, UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The nanomaterial, characterized by high stability in alkaline media, behave as excellent electro-catalyst for hydrogen peroxide reduction. The stability of SAMN@PB hybrid has been investigated as a function of pH, showing excellent stability up to pH 9.0 and demonstrating the feasibility of SAMNs, superficially derivatized with prussian blue, to produce an efficient and extremely stable nanostructured material. This maghemite supported nanostructured prussian blue was applied to develop a sensor, based on a simple carbon paste electrode, which was able to catalyze the electro-reduction of hydrogen peroxide, in aqueous solutions, buffered at pH 7.0, at low applied potentials (0.0 V vs. SCE). © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Realization of Multi-Stable Ground States in a Nematic Liquid Crystal by Surface and Electric Field Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwag, Jin Seog; Kim, Young-Ki; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2015-06-01

    Owing to the significant price drop of liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and the efforts to save natural resources, LCDs are even replacing paper to display static images such as price tags and advertising boards. Because of a growing market demand on such devices, the LCD that can be of numerous surface alignments of directors as its ground state, the so-called multi-stable LCD, comes into the limelight due to the great potential for low power consumption. However, the multi-stable LCD with industrial feasibility has not yet been successfully performed. In this paper, we propose a simple and novel configuration for the multi-stable LCD. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that a battery of stable surface alignments can be achieved by the field-induced surface dragging effect on an aligning layer with a weak surface anchoring. The simplicity and stability of the proposed system suggest that it is suitable for the multi-stable LCDs to display static images with low power consumption and thus opens applications in various fields.

  9. Characterizing interactions between surface water and groundwater in the Jialu River basin using major ion chemistry and stable isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Jialu River, a secondary tributary of the Huaihe River, has been severely contaminated from major contaminant sources, such as a number of untreated or lightly treated sewage waste in some cities. Groundwater along the river is not an isolated component of the hydrologic system, but is instead connected with the surface water. This study aims to investigate temporal and spatial variations in water chemistry affected by humans and to characterize the relationships between surface water (e.g. reservoirs, lakes and rivers and groundwater near the river in the shallow Quaternary aquifer. Concentration of Cl in north Zhengzhou City increased prominently due to the discharge of a large amount of domestic water. Nitrate and potassium show maximum concentrations in groundwater in Fugou County. These high levels can be attributed to the use of a large quantity of fertilizer over this region. Most surface water appeared to be continuously recharged from the surrounding groundwater (regional wells based on comparison surface water with groundwater levels, stable-isotopes and major ion signatures. However, the groundwater of a transitional well (location SY3 seemed to be recharged by river water via bank infiltration in September 2010. Fractional contributions of river water to the groundwater were calculated based on isotopic and chemical data using a mass-balance approach. Results show that the groundwater was approximately composed of 60–70% river water. These findings should be useful for a better understanding of hydrogeological processes at the river-aquifer interface and ultimately benefit water management in the future.

  10. Area inequalities for stable marginally outer trapped surfaces in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fajman, David

    2013-01-01

    We prove area inequalities for stable marginally outer trapped surfaces in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. Our inspiration comes on the one hand from a corresponding recent upper bound for the area in terms of the charges obtained by Dain, Jaramillo and Reiris [1] in the pure Einstein-Maxwell case without symmetries, and on the other hand from Yazadjiev's inequality [2] in the axially symmetric Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton case. The common issue in these proofs and in the present one is a functional ${\\mathscr W}$ of the matter fields for which the stability condition readily yields an {\\it upper} bound. On the other hand, the step which crucially depends on whether or not a dilaton field is present is to obtain a {\\it lower} bound for ${\\mathscr W}$ as well. We obtain the latter by first setting up a variational principle for ${\\mathscr W}$ with respect to the dilaton field $\\phi$, then by proving existence of a minimizer $\\psi$ as solution of the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations and finally by estimating...

  11. A Simple Experiment to Show Photodynamic Inactivation of Bacteria on Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminos, Daniel A.; Durantini, Edgardo N.

    2007-01-01

    New suitable approaches were investigated to visualize the photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of bacteria immobilized on agar surfaces. The PDI capacities of a cationic photosensitizer (5,10,15,20-tetra(4-N,N,N-trimethylammoniumphenyl)porphyrin) and an anionic photosensitizer (5,10,15,20-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin) were analyzed on a typical…

  12. Preparation of Stable Superhydrophobic Coatings on Wood Substrate Surfaces via Mussel-Inspired Polydopamine and Electroless Deposition Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Kaili Wang; Youming Dong; Wei Zhang; Shifeng Zhang; Jianzhang Li,

    2017-01-01

    Mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA) chemistry and electroless deposition approaches were used to prepare stable superhydrophobic coatings on wood surfaces. The as-formed PDA coating on a wood surface exhibited a hierarchical micro/nano roughness structure, and functioned as an “adhesive layer” between the substrate and a metallic film by the metal chelating ability of the catechol moieties on PDA, allowing for the formation of a well-developed micro/nanostructure hierarchical roughness. Additi...

  13. Clear-sky stable boundary layers with low winds over snow-covered surfaces Part I: A WRF model evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Vihma, T.; Anderson, P.S.; Bosveld, F.C.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we evaluated the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale meteorological model for stable conditions at clear skies with low wind speeds. Three contrasting terrains with snow covered surfaces are considered, namely Cabauw (Netherlands, snow over grass), Sodankylä (Finland, snow

  14. Variance Method to Determine Turbulent Fluxes of Momentum And Sensible Heat in The Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debruin, H.A.R.; Hartogensis, O.K.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is presented that in the stable atmospheric surface layer turbulent fluxes of heat and momentum can be determined from the standard deviations of longitudinal wind velocity and temperature, ¿u and ¿T respectively, measured at a single level. An attractive aspect of this method is that it yi

  15. Controls on the stable isotopes in precipitation and surface waters across the southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Yao, Tandong; Xie, Shiyou; He, You

    2017-02-01

    Constraining temporal and spatial variability in water stable isotopes (δ18O and δD) is requested for interpreting proxy records of paleoclimate/paleoaltimetry. The southeastern Tibetan Plateau (TP) receives large amounts of precipitation in both summer (JJAS) and spring (MAM) and this makes it different from most other parts of the TP where annual precipitation concentrates only in summer. However, our knowledge of controls on precipitation and surface runoff generation in this region is still far from sufficient. In this study, the δ18O and δD of precipitation and stream waters across the southeastern TP were analyzed to investigate moisture sources and empirical isotope-elevation relationships. Herein, seasonal precipitation patterns, moisture trajectories and precipitation isotopes suggest this region is seasonally dominated by the monsoon in summer and the southerlies (from the Bay of Bengal) or a mix of southerlies and westerlies in spring. Spatially, vertical variations in precipitation seasonality exert profound influences on isotopic variability for stream waters. Larger contributions of spring precipitation (with higher δ18O and d-excess (d-excess = δD-8δ18O) compared to summer precipitation) vs. summer precipitation in the surface runoff generation at lower elevations account for the uncommon altitudinal decrease in streamwater d-excess. Such a cause also contributes to the slightly greater vertical lapse rates of streamwater δ18O (-0.28 to -0.48‰/100 m) relative to the Himalayan front. In addition, although a robust δ18O-elevation relationship is demonstrated based upon our measured and other published data on a broad spatial scale (over a 5200 m elevation range), this relationship is found to deviate from the empirical/theoretical pattern in the Himalayan front, which is also caused by the substantial spring precipitation in the southeastern TP. It is suggested that long-term changes in δ18O or δD of paleowater in this region actually

  16. Stable anticipation synchronization in mutually coupled vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Two vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers(VCSELs) are mutually coupled through a partially transparent mirror (PTM) placed in the pathway. The PTM plays the role of external mirror,which controls the feedback strength and coupling strength.We numerically simulate this system by establishing a visible SIMULINK model.The results demonstrate that the anticipation synchronization is achieved and it can tolerate some extent frequency detuning.Moreover,the system shows similar chaos-pass filtering effect on unidirectionally coupled system even both VCSELs are modulated.This system allows simultaneously bidirectional secure message transmission on public channels.

  17. Highly stable hydrophilic surfaces of PDMS thin layer obtained by UV radiation and oxygen plasma treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes Atayde, Cleuson de; Doi, Ioshiaki [Center for Semiconductor Components, University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    Surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, Sylgard 184) was carried out by O{sub 2} plasma and UV in broadband mode/O{sub 2} plasma treatments with different exposure times, and studied in terms of hydrophilic stability. Water contact angle measurements, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used for the analysis of the modified surface and hydrophilic stability of the PDMS films. The results show reasonably good hydrophilic stability in the range of a week with a contact angle of around 70 for O{sub 2} plasma treated samples, whereas a more high hydrophilic stability, with a low contact angle of 65 up to 15 days, was observed for UV/O{sub 2} plasma treated PDMS. FTIR analysis of the samples reveals significant oxidation noted by large presence of Si-O-Si, and Si-OH bonds on the PDMS surface, which improves the affinity with water molecules and increases the hydrophilicy. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. A novel metamaterial filter with stable passband performance based on frequency selective surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Y. Fang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel metamaterial filter based on frequency selective surface (FSS is proposed. Using the mode matching method, we theoretically studied the transmission performance of the structure. Results show that, by rotating its neighboring elements 90 degree, the novel filter has a better stability to angle of incidence than traditional structures for TE and TM polarization. As the incident angles vary from 0 to 50 degrees, the metamaterial filter exhibits a transmittance higher than 0.98 and the center frequency slightly shifts downward (from 10 GHz to 0.96 GHz for TE polarization. For TM polarization, a transmittance of 0.98 is achieved and the center frequency retains 0.96 GHz with the varying of the incident angles. Furthermore, an experimental prototype fabricated was tested in a microwave chamber, and the measured results show good agreement with the simulated ones.

  19. First-Principles Study of Adsorption of Dimethyl Methylphosphonate on the TiO2 Anatase (001) Surface: Formation of a Stable Titanyl (Ti=O) Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    Anatase (001) Surface: Formation of a Stable Titanyl (TidO) Site V. M. Bermudez Electronics Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory...bond at a 5-fold-coordinated Ti5c site. Figure 1 shows a model 25 for the corresponding structure on anatase (101) and also identifies the T5c, Ti6c...the UHV experimental data, computational results for DMMP on OH-free rutile (110) and anatase (101) and (100) surfaces24,25 find that dissociation is

  20. The O and H stable isotope composition of freshwaters in the British Isles. 2. Surface waters and groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. G. Darling

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The utility of stable isotopes as tracers of the water molecule has a long pedigree. The study reported here is part of an attempt to establish a comprehensive isotopic 'baseline' for the British Isles as background data for a range of applications. Part 1 of this study (Darling and Talbot, 2003 considered the isotopic composition of rainfall in Britain and Ireland. The present paper is concerned with the composition of surface waters and groundwater. In isotopic terms, surface waters (other than some upland streams are poorly characterised in the British Isles; their potential variability has yet to be widely used as an aid in hydrological research. In what may be the first study of a major British river, a monthly isotopic record of the upper River Thames during 1998 was obtained. This shows high damping of the isotopic variation compared to that in rainfall over most of the year, though significant fluctuations were seen for the autumn months. Smaller rivers such as the Stour and Darent show a more subdued response to the balance between runoff and baseflow. The relationship between the isotopic composition of rainfall and groundwater is also considered. From a limited database, it appears that whereas Chalk groundwater is a representative mixture of weighted average annual rainfall, for Triassic sandstone groundwater there is a seasonal selection of rainfall biased towards isotopically-depleted winter recharge. This may be primarily the result of physical differences between the infiltration characteristics of rock types, though other factors (vegetation, glacial history could be involved. In the main, however, groundwaters appear to be representative of bulk rainfall within an error band of 0.5‰ δ18O. Contour maps of the δ18O and δ2H content of recent groundwaters in the British Isles show a fundamental SW-NE depletion effect modified by topography. The range of measured values, while much smaller than those for rainfall, still covers

  1. Surface mass balance and water stable isotopes derived from firn cores on three ice rises, Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Carmen P.; Schlosser, Elisabeth; Divine, Dmitry V.; Kohler, Jack; Martma, Tõnu; Eichler, Anja; Schwikowski, Margit; Isaksson, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    Three shallow firn cores were retrieved in the austral summers of 2011/12 and 2013/14 on the ice rises Kupol Ciolkovskogo (KC), Kupol Moskovskij (KM), and Blåskimen Island (BI), all part of Fimbul Ice Shelf (FIS) in western Dronning Maud Land (DML), Antarctica. The cores were dated back to 1958 (KC), 1995 (KM), and 1996 (BI) by annual layer counting using high-resolution oxygen isotope (δ18O) data, and by identifying volcanic horizons using non-sea-salt sulfate (nssSO42-) data. The water stable isotope records show that the atmospheric signature of the annual snow accumulation cycle is well preserved in the firn column, especially at KM and BI. We are able to determine the annual surface mass balance (SMB), as well as the mean SMB values between identified volcanic horizons. Average SMB at the KM and BI sites (0.68 and 0.70 mw. e. yr-1) was higher than at the KC site (0.24 mw. e. yr-1), and there was greater temporal variability as well. Trends in the SMB and δ18O records from the KC core over the period of 1958-2012 agree well with other previously investigated cores in the area, thus the KC site could be considered the most representative of the climate of the region. Cores from KM and BI appear to be more affected by local meteorological conditions and surface topography. Our results suggest that the ice rises are suitable sites for the retrieval of longer firn and ice cores, but that BI has the best preserved seasonal cycles of the three records and is thus the most optimal site for high-resolution studies of temporal variability of the climate signal. Deuterium excess data suggest a possible effect of seasonal moisture transport changes on the annual isotopic signal. In agreement with previous studies, large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns most likely provide the dominant influence on water stable isotope ratios preserved at the core sites.

  2. Experimental Oxidation of Iron Sulphides from Intertidal Surface Sediments: Stable Isotope Effects (S, O, C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersbach, F.; Böttcher, M. E.; Al-Raei, A. M.; Segl, M.

    2009-04-01

    Top intertidal sediments show a pronounced zone of activities of sulphate-reducing bacteria. Iron sulfides may be formed, but a substantial part is reoxidized to sulfate. Microbial or chemical reoxidation can be further enhanced by a resuspension of surface sediments by tidal currents or storms. The rates of the different processes depend on the site-secific sedimentological properties (e.g., grain size, iron and sulphur contents etc.). In the present study 3 different areas of the German Wadden Sea were studied: a mud flat in the Jade Bay, and sandy sediments in the intertidals of Spiekeroog and Sylt islands. The latter site is part of an in-situ lugworm-exclusion experiment. The goal was the experimental and field investigation of the fate of iron sulfides and the formation of sulphate upon resuspension of intertidal surface sediments in oxygenated seawater. All sites were geochemically analyzed for dissolved and solid phase iron, manganese, sulphur and carbon phases/species, and sulphate reduction rates were measured using radiotracers. Dissolved chloride and grain sizes analysis where additionally carried out. TOC, S and metal phase contents were higher in mud compared to sandy sediments. Field results demonstrate gross but only minor net sulphide production and a downcore increases in FeS contents, due to intense sulphide oxidation at the surface. Pyrite, on the other hand, was abundant through the sediments due to continuous sediment reworking. The fate of iron-sulphides and accumulation of sulphate as a function of time was followed in batch experiments using dark suspensions of surface sediments in site-bottom waters at room temperature. During the experiments, each sample was shaken continuously under exposition to oxygen, and sub-samples were taken at the beginning and after discrete time intervalls. A very fast oxidation rate of AVS led to a complete exhaustion within a day, whereas Cr(II)-reducible sulfur was inititially built up and then decreased

  3. Topology-guided design and syntheses of highly stable mesoporous porphyrinic zirconium metal-organic frameworks with high surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian-Fu; Feng, Dawei; Chen, Ying-Pin; Zou, Lanfang; Bosch, Mathieu; Yuan, Shuai; Wei, Zhangwen; Fordham, Stephen; Wang, Kecheng; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-01-14

    Through a topology-guided strategy, a series of Zr6-containing isoreticular porphyrinic metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), PCN-228, PCN-229, and PCN-230, with ftw-a topology were synthesized using the extended porphyrinic linkers. The bulky porphyrin ring ligand effectively prevents the network interpenetration which often appears in MOFs with increased linker length. The pore apertures of the structures range from 2.5 to 3.8 nm, and PCN-229 demonstrates the highest porosity and BET surface area among the previously reported Zr-MOFs. Additionally, by changing the relative direction of the terminal phenyl rings, this series replaces a Zr8 cluster with a smaller Zr6 cluster in a topologically identical framework. The high connectivity of the Zr6 cluster yields frameworks with enhanced stability despite high porosity and ultralarge linker. As a representative example, PCN-230, constructed with the most extended porphyrinic linker, shows excellent stability in aqueous solutions with pH values ranging from 0 to 12 and demonstrates one of the highest pH tolerances among all porphyrinic MOFs. This work not only presents a successful example of rational design of MOFs with desired topology, but also provides a strategy for construction of stable mesoporous MOFs.

  4. Facile Fabrication and Characterization of a PDMS-Derived Candle Soot Coated Stable Biocompatible Superhydrophobic and Superhemophobic Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, R; Majhy, B; Sen, A K

    2017-09-13

    We report a simple, inexpensive, rapid, and one-step method for the fabrication of a stable and biocompatible superhydrophobic and superhemophobic surface. The proposed surface comprises candle soot particles embedded in a mixture of PDMS+n-hexane serving as the base material. The mechanism responsible for the superhydrophobic behavior of the surface is explained, and the surface is characterized based on its morphology and elemental composition, wetting properties, mechanical and chemical stability, and biocompatibility. The effect of %n-hexane in PDMS, the thickness of the PDMS+n-hexane layer (in terms of spin coating speed) and sooting time on the wetting property of the surface is studied. The proposed surface exhibits nanoscale surface asperities (average roughness of 187 nm), chemical compositions of soot particles, very high water and blood repellency along with excellent mechanical and chemical stability and excellent biocompatibility against blood sample and biological cells. The water contact angle and roll-off angle is measured as 160° ± 1° and 2°, respectively, and the blood contact angle is found to be 154° ± 1°, which indicates that the surface is superhydrophobic and superhemophobic. The proposed superhydrophobic and superhemophobic surface offers significantly improved (>40%) cell viability as compared to glass and PDMS surfaces.

  5. Spatial distribution of benthic foraminiferal stable isotopes and dinocyst assemblages in surface sediments of the Trondheimsfjord, central Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Milzer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Instrumental records from the Norwegian Sea and the Trondheimsfjord show evidence that changes of bottom water temperature and salinity in the fjord are linked to the salinity and temperature variability of the North Atlantic Current (NAC. Changes in primary productivity and salinity in the surface and intermediate water masses in the Trondheimsfjord as well as the fjord sedimentary budget are mainly driven by changes in riverine input. In this study we use 59 surface sediment samples that are evenly distributed in the fjord to examine whether dinocyst assemblages and stable isotope ratios of benthic foraminifera reflect the present-day hydrology and can be used as palaeoceanographic proxies. In general, modern benthic δ18O and δ13C values decrease from the fjord entrance towards the fjord head with lowest values close to river inlets. This is essentially explained by gradients in the amounts of fresh water and terrigenous organic matter delivered from the hinterland. The distribution of benthic δ13C ratios across the fjord is controlled by the origin (terrigenous vs. marine of organic matter, local topography-induced variability in organic matter flux at the water–sediment interface, and organic matter degradation. The dinocyst assemblages display the variations in hydrography with respect to the prevailing currents, the topography, and the freshwater and nutrient supply from rivers. The strength and depth of the pycnocline in the fjord strongly vary seasonally and thereby affect water mass characteristics as well as nutrient availability, temporally creating local conditions that explain the observed species distribution. Our results prove that dinocyst assemblages and benthic foraminiferal isotopes reliably mirror the complex fjord hydrology and can be used as proxies of Holocene climatic variability.

  6. Exactly solvable model with stable and metalstable states for a polymer chain near an adsorbing surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klushin, L.I.; Skvortsov, A.M.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the conformational properties and transitions of an ideal polymer chain near a solid surface. The chain is tethered with one of its ends at distance z0 from an adsorbing surface. The surface is characterized by an adsorption parameter c. The exact expression for the partition function i

  7. Exactly solvable model with stable and metalstable states for a polymer chain near an adsorbing surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klushin, L.I.; Skvortsov, A.M.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the conformational properties and transitions of an ideal polymer chain near a solid surface. The chain is tethered with one of its ends at distance z0 from an adsorbing surface. The surface is characterized by an adsorption parameter c. The exact expression for the partition function

  8. Sources of mercury to San Francisco Bay surface sediment as revealed by mercury stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Gretchen E.; Blum, Joel D.; Marvin-DePasquale, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) concentrations and isotopic compositions were examined in shallow-water surface sediment (0–2 cm) from San Francisco (SF) Bay to determine the extent to which historic Hg mining contributes to current Hg contamination in SF Bay, and to assess the use of Hg isotopes to trace sources of contamination in estuaries. Inter-tidal and wetland sediment had total Hg (HgT) concentrations ranging from 161 to 1529 ng/g with no simple gradients of spatial variation. In contrast, inter-tidal and wetland sediment displayed a geographic gradient of δ202Hg values, ranging from -0.30% in the southern-most part of SF Bay (draining the New Almaden Hg District) to -0.99% in the northern-most part of SF Bay near the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta. Similar to SF Bay inter-tidal sediment, surface sediment from the Alviso Slough channel draining into South SF Bay had a δ202Hg value of -0.29%, while surface sediment from the Cosumnes River and Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta draining into north SF Bay had lower average δ202Hg values of -0.90% and -0.75%, respectively. This isotopic trend suggests that Hg-contaminated sediment from the New Almaden Hg District mixes with Hg-contaminated sediment from a low δ202Hg source north of SF Bay. Tailings and thermally decomposed ore (calcine) from the New Idria Hg mine in the California Coast Range had average δ202Hg values of -0.37 and +0.03%, respectively, showing that Hg calcination fractionates Hg isotopes resulting in Hg contamination from Hg(II) mine waste products with higher δ202Hg values than metallic Hg(0) produced from Hg mines. Thus, there is evidence for at least two distinct isotopic signals for Hg contamination in SF Bay: Hg associated with calcine waste materials at Hg mines in the Coast Range, such as New Almaden and New Idria; and Hg(0) produced from these mines and used in placer gold mines and/or in other industrial processes in the Sierra Nevada region and SF Bay area.

  9. Sources of mercury to San Francisco Bay surface sediment as revealed by mercury stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Gretchen E.; Blum, Joel D.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark

    2011-02-01

    Mercury (Hg) concentrations and isotopic compositions were examined in shallow-water surface sediment (0-2 cm) from San Francisco (SF) Bay to determine the extent to which historic Hg mining contributes to current Hg contamination in SF Bay, and to assess the use of Hg isotopes to trace sources of contamination in estuaries. Inter-tidal and wetland sediment had total Hg (Hg T) concentrations ranging from 161 to 1529 ng/g with no simple gradients of spatial variation. In contrast, inter-tidal and wetland sediment displayed a geographic gradient of δ 202Hg values, ranging from -0.30‰ in the southern-most part of SF Bay (draining the New Almaden Hg District) to -0.99‰ in the northern-most part of SF Bay near the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Similar to SF Bay inter-tidal sediment, surface sediment from the Alviso Slough channel draining into South SF Bay had a δ 202Hg value of -0.29‰, while surface sediment from the Cosumnes River and Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta draining into north SF Bay had lower average δ 202Hg values of -0.90‰ and -0.75‰, respectively. This isotopic trend suggests that Hg-contaminated sediment from the New Almaden Hg District mixes with Hg-contaminated sediment from a low δ 202Hg source north of SF Bay. Tailings and thermally decomposed ore (calcine) from the New Idria Hg mine in the California Coast Range had average δ 202Hg values of -0.37 and +0.03‰, respectively, showing that Hg calcination fractionates Hg isotopes resulting in Hg contamination from Hg(II) mine waste products with higher δ 202Hg values than metallic Hg(0) produced from Hg mines. Thus, there is evidence for at least two distinct isotopic signals for Hg contamination in SF Bay: Hg associated with calcine waste materials at Hg mines in the Coast Range, such as New Almaden and New Idria; and Hg(0) produced from these mines and used in placer gold mines and/or in other industrial processes in the Sierra Nevada region and SF Bay area.

  10. A high surface area Zr(IV)-based metal-organic framework showing stepwise gas adsorption and selective dye uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiu-Liang; Tong, Minman; Huang, Hongliang; Wang, Bin; Gan, Lei; Yang, Qingyuan; Zhong, Chongli; Li, Jian-Rong

    2015-03-01

    Exploitation of new metal-organic framework (MOF) materials with high surface areas has been attracting great attention in related research communities due to their broad potential applications. In this work, a new Zr(IV)-based MOF, [Zr6O4(OH)4(eddb)6] (BUT-30, H2eddb=4,4‧-(ethyne-1,2-diyl)dibenzoic acid) has been solvothermally synthesized, characterized, and explored for gases and dyes adsorptions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrates a three-dimensional cubic framework structure of this MOF, in which each Zr6O4(OH)4 building unit is linked by 12 linear eddb ligands. BUT-30 has been found stable up to 400 °C and has a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area as high as 3940.6 m2 g-1 (based on the N2 adsorption at 77 K) and total pore volume of 1.55 cm3 g-1. It is more interesting that this MOF exhibits stepwise adsorption behaviors for Ar, N2, and CO2 at low temperatures, and selective uptakes towards different ionic dyes.

  11. Non-Gaussian polymers described by alpha-stable chain statistics: Model, effective interactions in binary mixtures, and application to on-surface separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majka, M.; Góra, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The Gaussian chain model is the classical description of a polymeric chain, which provides analytical results regarding end-to-end distance, the distribution of segments around the mass center of a chain, coarse-grained interactions between two chains and effective interactions in binary mixtures. This hierarchy of results can be calculated thanks to the α stability of the Gaussian distribution. In this paper we show that it is possible to generalize the model of Gaussian chain to the entire class of α -stable distributions, obtaining the analogous hierarchy of results expressed by the analytical closed-form formulas in the Fourier space. This allows us to establish the α -stable chain model. We begin with reviewing the applications of Levy flights in the context of polymer sciences, which include: chains described by the heavy-tailed distributions of persistence length; polymers adsorbed to the surface; and the chains driven by a noise with power-law spatial correlations. Further, we derive the distribution of segments around the mass center of the α -stable chain and construct the coarse-grained interaction potential between two chains. These results are employed to discuss the model of binary mixture consisting of the α -stable chains. In what follows, we establish the spinodal decomposition condition generalized to the mixtures of the α -stable polymers. This condition is further applied to compare the on-surface phase separation of adsorbed polymers (which are known to be described with heavy-tailed statistics) with the phase separation condition in the bulk. Finally, we predict the four different scenarios of simultaneous mixing and demixing in the two- and three-dimensional systems.

  12. Colloidally stable surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles: Preparation, characterization and anti-tumor activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macková, Hana [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, AS CR, Heyrovsky Sq. 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Horák, Daniel, E-mail: horak@imc.cas.cz [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, AS CR, Heyrovsky Sq. 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Donchenko, Georgiy Viktorovich; Andriyaka, Vadim Ivanovich; Palyvoda, Olga Mikhailovna; Chernishov, Vladimir Ivanovich [Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, NASU, 9 Leontovich St., 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Chekhun, Vasyl Fedorovich; Todor, Igor Nikolaevich [R. E. Kavetsky Institute of Experimental Pathology, Oncology and Radiobiology, NASU, 45 Vasylkivska St., 03022 Kiev (Ukraine); Kuzmenko, Oleksandr Ivanovich [Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, NASU, 9 Leontovich St., 01601 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2015-04-15

    Maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles were obtained by co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides and subsequent oxidation with sodium hypochlorite and coated with poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) [P(DMAAm-AA)]. They were characterized by a range of methods including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), elemental analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements. The effect of superparamagnetic P(DMAAm-AA)-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles on oxidation of blood lipids, glutathione and proteins in blood serum was detected using 2-thiobarbituric acid and the ThioGlo fluorophore. Finally, mice received magnetic nanoparticles administered per os and the antitumor activity of the particles was tested on Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in male mice line C57BL/6 as an experimental in vivo metastatic tumor model; the tumor size was measured and the number of metastases in lungs was determined. Surface-modified γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles showed higher antitumor and antimetastatic activities than commercial CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles and the conventional antitumor agent cisplatin. - Highlights: • Maghemite nanoparticles were prepared and characterized. • Poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) coating was synthetized. • Blood lipid, glutathione and protein peroxidation/oxidation was determined. • Antitumor effect of coated particles on Lewis lung carcinoma in mice was observed.

  13. Long-Term Stable Surface Treatments on CdTe and CdZnTe Radiation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekarek, Jakub; Belas, Eduard; Zazvorka, Jakub

    2017-04-01

    The spectral resolution and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) room-temperature x-ray and gamma-ray detectors are often limited by high surface leakage current due to conducting surface species created during detector fabrication. Surface treatments play a major role in reduction of this surface leakage current. The effect of various types of surface etching and passivation on the leakage current and thereby the spectral energy resolution, CCE, and internal electric field profile of CdTe/CZT detectors has been studied. The main aim of this work is preparation of long-term stable detectors with strongly reduced leakage current. The time stability of the current-voltage characteristic and spectral resolution was investigated during 21 days and 1 year, respectively, after performing surface treatments. Our results suggest that the optimal detector preparation method is chemomechanical polishing in bromine-ethylene glycol solution followed by chemical etching in bromine-methanol solution then surface passivation in potassium hydroxide or ammonium fluoride (NH4F/H2O2). Detectors prepared using this optimal treatment exhibited low leakage current, high spectral resolution, and long-term stability compared with those subjected to other surface preparation methods.

  14. Long-Term Stable Surface Treatments on CdTe and CdZnTe Radiation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekarek, Jakub; Belas, Eduard; Zazvorka, Jakub

    2016-12-01

    The spectral resolution and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) room-temperature x-ray and gamma-ray detectors are often limited by high surface leakage current due to conducting surface species created during detector fabrication. Surface treatments play a major role in reduction of this surface leakage current. The effect of various types of surface etching and passivation on the leakage current and thereby the spectral energy resolution, CCE, and internal electric field profile of CdTe/CZT detectors has been studied. The main aim of this work is preparation of long-term stable detectors with strongly reduced leakage current. The time stability of the current-voltage characteristic and spectral resolution was investigated during 21 days and 1 year, respectively, after performing surface treatments. Our results suggest that the optimal detector preparation method is chemomechanical polishing in bromine-ethylene glycol solution followed by chemical etching in bromine-methanol solution then surface passivation in potassium hydroxide or ammonium fluoride (NH4F/H2O2). Detectors prepared using this optimal treatment exhibited low leakage current, high spectral resolution, and long-term stability compared with those subjected to other surface preparation methods.

  15. Fabrication of Water Jet Resistant and Thermally Stable Superhydrophobic Surfaces by Spray Coating of Candle Soot Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qahtan, Talal F; Gondal, Mohammed A; Alade, Ibrahim O; Dastageer, Mohammed A

    2017-08-08

    A facile synthesis method for highly stable carbon nanoparticle (CNP) dispersion in acetone by incomplete combustion of paraffin candle flame is presented. The synthesized CNP dispersion is the mixture of graphitic and amorphous carbon nanoparticles of the size range of 20-50 nm and manifested the mesoporosity with an average pore size of 7 nm and a BET surface area of 366 m(2)g(-1). As an application of this material, the carbon nanoparticle dispersion was spray coated (spray-based coating) on a glass surface to fabricate superhydrophobic (water contact angle > 150° and sliding angle water jet resistance and thermal stability up to 400 °C compared to the surfaces fabricated from direct candle flame soot deposition (candle-based coating). This study proved that water jet resistant and thermally stable superhydrophobic surfaces can be easily fabricated by simple spray coating of CNP dispersion gathered from incomplete combustion of paraffin candle flame and this technique can be used for different applications with the potential for the large scale fabrication.

  16. Cryogenic EBSD on ice: preserving a stable surface in a low pressure SEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weikusat, I.; Winter, D.A.M. de; Pennock, G.M.; Hayles, M.; Schneijdenberg, C.T.W.M.; Drury, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Naturally deformed ice contains subgrains with characteristic geometries that have recently been identified in etched surfaces using high-resolution light microscopy (LM). The probable slip systems responsible for these subgrain boundary types can be determined using electron backscattered diffracti

  17. Electromyographic analysis of trunk and lower extremity muscle activities during pulley-based shoulder exercises performed on stable and unstable surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Doochul; Cha, Jaeyun; Song, Changho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of an unstable support surface (USS) on the activities of trunk and lower extremity muscles during pulley-based shoulder exercise (PBSE). [Subjects] Twenty healthy college students were included in this study. [Methods] Surface EMG was carried out in twenty healthy adult men. The activities of trunk and lower extremity muscles performed during PBSE using a resistance of 14 kg on a stable or unstable support surface were compared. The PBSE included shoulder abduction, adduction, flexion, extension, internal rotation, and external rotation. [Results] On the unstable surface, the rectus abdominis and erector spinae showed significantly less activation during shoulder external rotation, but the extent of activation was not significantly different during other shoulder exercises. The external oblique and rectus femoris showed no significant difference during any shoulder exercises. The tibialis anterior showed significantly greater activation during all shoulder exercises, except flexion and extension. The gastrocnemius showed significantly greater activation during shoulder abduction, extension, and internal rotation. However, during shoulder adduction, flexion, and external rotation, the gastrocnemius showed no significant difference. [Conclusion] The use of USS to increase core stability during PBSE is probably not effective owing to compensatory strategies of the ankle.

  18. Surface-exposed glycoproteins of hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 show a common N-glycosylation profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Gianna; Balestrieri, Marco; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Pohlentz, Gottfried; Rossi, Mosè; Fiume, Immacolata; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella

    2013-06-07

    Cell surface proteins of hyperthermophilic Archaea actively participate in intercellular communication, cellular uptake, and energy conversion to sustain survival strategies in extreme habitats. Surface (S)-layer glycoproteins, the major component of the S-layers in many archaeal species and the best-characterized prokaryotic glycoproteins, were shown to have a large structural diversity in their glycan compositions. In spite of this, knowledge on glycosylation of proteins other than S-layer proteins in Archaea is quite limited. Here, the N-glycosylation pattern of cell-surface-exposed proteins of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 were analyzed by lectin affinity purification, HPAEC-PAD, and multiple mass spectrometry-based techniques. Detailed analysis of SSO1273, one of the most abundant ABC transporters present in the cell surface fraction of S. solfataricus, revealed a novel glycan structure composed of a branched sulfated heptasaccharide, Hex4(GlcNAc)2 plus sulfoquinovose where Hex is d-mannose and d-glucose. Having one monosaccharide unit more than the glycan of the S-layer glycoprotein of S. acidocaldarius, this is the most complex archaeal glycan structure known today. SSO1273 protein is heavily glycosylated and all 20 theoretical N-X-S/T (where X is any amino acid except proline) consensus sequence sites were confirmed. Remarkably, we show that several other proteins in the surface fraction of S. solfataricus are N-glycosylated by the same sulfated oligosaccharide and we identified 56 N-glycosylation sites in this subproteome.

  19. A stable lithium-rich surface structure for lithium-rich layered cathode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangryun; Cho, Woosuk; Zhang, Xiaobin; Oshima, Yoshifumi; Choi, Jang Wook

    2016-11-01

    Lithium ion batteries are encountering ever-growing demand for further increases in energy density. Li-rich layered oxides are considered a feasible solution to meet this demand because their specific capacities often surpass 200 mAh g-1 due to the additional lithium occupation in the transition metal layers. However, this lithium arrangement, in turn, triggers cation mixing with the transition metals, causing phase transitions during cycling and loss of reversible capacity. Here we report a Li-rich layered surface bearing a consistent framework with the host, in which nickel is regularly arranged between the transition metal layers. This surface structure mitigates unwanted phase transitions, improving the cycling stability. This surface modification enables a reversible capacity of 218.3 mAh g-1 at 1C (250 mA g-1) with improved cycle retention (94.1% after 100 cycles). The present surface design can be applied to various battery electrodes that suffer from structural degradations propagating from the surface.

  20. Stable climate and surface mass balance in Svalbard over 1979–2013 despite the Arctic warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lang

    2015-01-01

    (Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate global model (MARMIROC5 from the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project database, we have modelled the climate and surface mass balance of Svalbard at a 10 km resolution over 1979–2013. The integrated total surface mass balance (SMB over Svalbard modelled by MARERA is negative (−1.6 Gt yr−1 with a large interannual variability (7.1 Gt but, unlike over Greenland, there has been no acceleration of the surface melt over the past 35 years because of the recent change in atmospheric circulation bringing northwesterly flows in summer over Svalbard, contrasting the recent observed Arctic warming. However, in 2013, the atmospheric circulation changed to a south–southwesterly flow over Svalbard causing record melt, SMB (−20.4 Gt yr−1 and summer temperature. MIROC5 is significantly colder than ERA-Interim over 1980–2005 but MARMIROC5 is able to improve the near-surface MIROC5 results by simulating not significant SMB differences with MARERA over 1980–2005. On the other hand, MIROC5 does not represent the recent atmospheric circulation shift in summer and induces in MARMIROC5 a significant trend of decreasing SMB (−0.6 Gt yr−2 over 1980–2005.

  1. Oligocene sea water temperatures offshore Wilkes Land (Antarctica) indicate warm and stable glacial-interglacial variation and show no 'late Oligocene warming'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Julian; Bijl, Peter; Peterse, Francien; Schouten, Stefan; Salabarnada, Ariadna; Bohaty, Steven; Escutia, Carlota; Brinkhuis, Henk; Sangiorgi, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    At present, warming of the waters below the Antarctic ice shelves is a major contributor to the instability of the Antarctic cryosphere. In order to get insight into future melt behavior of the Antarctic ice sheet, it is important to look at past warm periods that can serve as an analogue for the future. The Oligocene ( 34-23 Ma) is a period within the range of CO2 concentrations predicted by the latest IPCC report for the coming century and is characterized by a very dynamic Antarctic ice sheet, as suggested by benthic δ18O records from ice-distal sites. We suspect that, like today, environmental changes in the Southern Ocean are in part responsible for this dynamicity. To gain more insight into this, we have reconstructed sea water temperatures (SWT) based on Thaumarchaeotal lipids (TEX86) for the Oligocene record obtained from the ice-proximal Site U1356 (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program), offshore Wilkes Land. Part of our record shows a strong coupling between the lithology and SWT, which we attribute to glacial-interglacial variation. Our data shows that both glacial and interglacial temperatures are relatively warm throughout the Oligocene: 14°C and 18°C respectively, which is consistent with previously published estimates based on UK'37 and clumped isotopes for the early Oligocene. Our SST records show only a minor decline between 30 and 24 Ma, and thus show no evidence for a 'late Oligocene warming' as was suggested based on benthic δ18O records from low latitudes. Instead, the discrepancy between our SST trend and the δ18O trend suggests that the late-Oligocene benthic δ18O decrease is likely related to a decline in ice volume. After 24 Ma, however, glacial-interglacial temperature variation appears to increase. In particular, some large temperature drops occur, one of which can be related to the Mi-1 event and a major expansion of the Antarctic ice sheet.

  2. Highly stable surface functionalization of microgas chromatography columns using layer-by-layer self-assembly of silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Shakeel, Hamza; Lovette, John; Rice, Gary W; Heflin, James R; Agah, Masoud

    2013-09-03

    A controllable and high-yield surface functionalization of silicon microchannels using layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly of SiO2 nanoparticles (SNPs) is presented. The application of SNPs (45 nm average diameter) coating as a stationary phase for chromatographic separation is also demonstrated with surface functionalization using chloroalkylsilanes. This method facilitates a simple, low-cost, and parallel processing scheme that also provides homogeneous and stable nanoparticle-based stationary phases with ease of control over the coating thickness. The SNP-functionalized microfabricated columns with either single capillary channels (1 m long, 150 μm wide, 240 μm deep) or very narrow multicapillary channels (25 cm long, 30 μm wide, 240 μm deep, 16 parallel channels) successfully separated a multicomponent gas mixture with a wide range of boiling points with high reproducibility.

  3. A SENSITIVE AND STABLE CONFOCAL FABRY-PEROT INTERFEROMETER FOR SURFACE ULTRASONIC VIBRATION DETECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING HONG-SHENG; TONG LI-GE; CHEN GENG-HUA

    2001-01-01

    A new confocal Fabry-Pérot interferometer (CFPI) has been constructed. By using both of the conjugate rays,the sensitivity of the system was doubled. Moreover, the negative feedback control loop of a single-chip microcomputer (MCS-51) was applied to stabilize the working point at an optimum position. The system has been used in detecting the piezoelectric ultrasonic vibration on the surface of an aluminium sample.

  4. Stable isotopic composition of deep sea gorgonian corals (Primnoa spp.): a new archive of surface processes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, O A; Heikoop, J M; Scott, D B; Risk, M J; Guilderson, T P; McKinney, R A

    2005-02-03

    The deep-sea gorgonian coral Primnoa spp. lives in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans at depths of 65-3200 m. This coral has an arborescent growth form with a skeletal axis composed of annual rings made from calcite and gorgonin. It has a lifespan of at least several hundred years. It has been suggested that isotopic profiles from the gorgonin fraction of the skeleton could be used to reconstruct long-term, annual-scale variations in surface productivity. We tested assumptions about the trophic level, intra-colony isotopic reproducibility, and preservation of isotopic signatures in a suite of modern and fossil specimens. Measurements of gorgonin {Delta}{sup 14}C and {delta}{sup 15}N indicate that Primnoa spp. feed mainly on zooplankton and/or sinking particulate organic matter (POM{sub SINK}), and not on suspended POM (POM{sub SUSP}) or dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Gorgonin {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N in specimens from NE Pacific shelf waters, NW Atlantic slope waters, the Sea of Japan, and a South Pacific (Southern Ocean sector) seamount were strongly correlated with Levitus 1994 surface apparent oxygen utilization (AOU; the best available measure of surface productivity), demonstrating coupling between skeletal isotopic ratios and biophysical processes in surface water. Time-series isotopic profiles from different sections along the same colony were identical for {delta}{sup 13}C, while {delta}{sup 15}N profiles became more dissimilar with increasing separation along the colony axis. Similarity in C:N, {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N between modern and fossil specimens suggest that isotopic signatures are preserved over millennial timescales. Finally, the utility of this new archive was demonstrated by reconstruction of 20th century bomb radiocarbon.

  5. Stable climate and surface mass balance in Svalbard over 1979–2013 despite the Arctic warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the help of the regional climate model MAR forced by the ERA-Interim reanalysis (MARERA and the MIROC5 global model (MARMIROC5 from the CMIP5 database, we have modelled the climate and surface mass balance of Svalbard at a 10 km resolution over 1979–2013. The integrated total SMB over Svalbard modelled by MARERA is negative (−1.6 Gt yr−1 with a large interannual variability (7.1 Gt but, unlike over Greenland, there has been no acceleration of the surface melt over the past 35 years because of the recent change in atmospheric circulation bringing northerly flows in summer over Svalbard, contrasting the recent observed Arctic warming. However, in 2013, the atmospheric circulation changed to a southwesterly flow over Svalbard causing a record of melt, SMB (−20.4 Gt yr−1 and summer temperature. MIROC5 is significantly colder than ERA-Interim over 1980–2005 but MARMIROC5 is able to improve the near-surface MIROC5 results by simulating not significant SMB differences with MARERA over 1980–2005. On the other hand, MIROC5 does not represent the recent atmospheric circulation shift in summer and induces in MARMIROC5 a significant trend of decreasing SMB (−0.6 Gt yr−2 over 1980–2005.

  6. Direct Covalent Grafting of Phytate to Titanium Surfaces through Ti-O-P Bonding Shows Bone Stimulating Surface Properties and Decreased Bacterial Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Alba; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel Ángel; Fernández-Calderón, María Coronada; Perelló, Joan; Isern, Bernat; González-Martín, María Luisa; Monjo, Marta; Ramis, Joana M

    2016-05-11

    Myo-inositol hexaphosphate, also called phytic acid or phytate (IP6), is a natural molecule abundant in vegetable seeds and legumes. Among other functions, IP6 inhibits bone resorption. It is adsorbed on the surface of hydroxyapatite, inhibiting its dissolution and decreasing the progressive loss of bone mass. We present here a method to directly functionalize Ti surfaces covalently with IP6, without using a cross-linker molecule, through the reaction of the phosphate groups of IP6 with the TiO2 layer of Ti substrates. The grafting reaction consisted of an immersion in an IP6 solution to allow the physisorption of the molecules onto the substrate, followed by a heating step to obtain its chemisorption, in an adaptation of the T-Bag method. The reaction was highly dependent on the IP6 solution pH, only achieving a covalent Ti-O-P bond at pH 0. We evaluated two acidic pretreatments of the Ti surface, to increase its hydroxylic content, HNO3 30% and HF 0.2%. The structure of the coated surfaces was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and ellipsometry. The stability of the IP6 coating after three months of storage and after sterilization with γ-irradiation was also determined. Then, we evaluated the biological effect of Ti-IP6 surfaces in vitro on MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells, showing an osteogenic effect. Finally, the effect of the surfaces on the adhesion and biofilm viability of oral microorganisms S. mutans and S. sanguinis was also studied, and we found that Ti-IP6 surfaces decreased the adhesion of S. sanguinis. A surface that actively improves osseointegration while decreasing the bacterial adhesion could be suitable for use in bone implants.

  7. Early visually evoked electrophysiological responses over the human brain (P1, N170 show stable patterns of face-sensitivity from 4 years to adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Kuefner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether the development of face recognition abilities truly reflects changes in how faces, specifically, are perceived, or rather can be attributed to more general perceptual or cognitive development is debated. Event-related potential (ERP recordings on the scalp offer promise for this issue because they allow brain responses to complex visual stimuli to be relatively well isolated from other sensory, cognitive and motor processes. ERP studies in 5-16 year-old children report large age-related changes in amplitude, latency (decreases and topographical distribution of the early visual components, the P1 and the occipito-temporal N170. To test the face specificity of these effects, we recorded high-density ERPs to pictures of faces, cars, and their phase-scrambled versions from 72 children between the ages of 4 and 17, and a group of adults. We found that none of the previously reported age-dependent changes in amplitude, latency or topography of the P1 or N170 were specific to faces. Most importantly, when we controlled for age-related variations of the P1, the N170 appeared remarkably similar in amplitude and topography across development, with much smaller age-related decreases in latencies than previously reported. At all ages the N170 showed equivalent face-sensitivity: it had the same topography and right hemisphere dominance, it was absent for meaningless (scrambled stimuli, and larger and earlier for faces than cars. The data also illustrate the large amount of inter-individual and inter-trial variance in young children’s data, which causes the N170 to merge with a later component, the N250 in grand-averaged data. Based on our observations, we suggest that the previously reported “bi-fid” N170 of young children is in fact the N250. Overall, our data indicate that the electrophysiological markers of face-sensitive perceptual processes are present from 4 years of age and do not appear to change throughout development.

  8. HpaA shows variable surface localization but the gene expression is similar in different Helicobacter pylori strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundström, A M; Blom, K; Sundaeus, V; Bölin, I

    2001-11-01

    Due to earlier contradictory results regarding the localization of the putative Helicobacter pylori adhesin A (HpaA), we aimed to compare the gene and protein expression and surface localization of HpaA in different H. pylori strains. Five H. pylori strains were cultivated for 11 days and analysed by Northern blot analysis, flow cytometry (FCM), semi-quantitative dot blot, colony blot, immuno-electron microscopy (IEM), and phase-contrast microscopy. The highest transcriptional activity of the hapA gene as observed after 3-4 days of cultivation and two mRNA transcripts of 1600 and 3100 nucleotides, respectively, were detected in all five strains with the hpaA probe. We also showed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) that the hpaA gene is co-transcribed with the downstream omp18 gene. The highest total HpaA protein production in bacteria occurred between day 3 and 7, as determined by semi-quantitative dot blot, and was similar in the different strains. The maximal proportion of cells with HpaA on the bacterial surface, detected by FCM, was for strain SS1, 90%; Hel 344, 60%; CCUG 17875, 61%; CCUG 17874, 86% and for strain AH 244 only 35%. By IEM HpaA was detected in all strains both on the bacterial surface and on the flagellar sheath. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Observation of Stable Low Surface Resistance in Large-Grain Niobium SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Huang, Shichun [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP)/Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou (China)

    2016-05-01

    Low surface resistance, or high unloaded quality factor (Q0), superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are being pursued actively nowadays as their application in large-scale CW SRF accelerators can save capital and operational cost in cryogenics. There are different options in realization of such cavities. One of them is the large-grain (LG) niobium cavity. In this contribution, we present new experimental results in evaluation of LG niobium cavities cooled down in the presence of an external magnetic field. High Q0 values are achieved even with an ambient magnetic field of up to 100 mG. More over, it is observed that these high Q0 values are super-robust against repeated quench, literally not affected at all after the cavity being deliberately quenched for hundreds of times in the presence of an ambient magnetic field of up to 200 mG.

  10. Bone cells in birds show exceptional surface area, a characteristic tracing back to saurischian dinosaurs of the late Triassic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Rensberger

    Full Text Available Dinosaurs are unique among terrestrial tetrapods in their body sizes, which range from less than 3 gm in hummingbirds to 70,000 kg or more in sauropods. Studies of the microstructure of bone tissue have indicated that large dinosaurs, once believed to be slow growing, attained maturity at rates comparable to or greater than those of large mammals. A number of structural criteria in bone tissue have been used to assess differences in rates of osteogenesis in extinct taxa, including counts of lines of arrested growth and the density of vascular canals.Here, we examine the density of the cytoplasmic surface of bone-producing cells, a feature which may set an upper limit to the rate of osteogenesis. Osteocyte lacunae and canaliculi, the cavities in bone containing osteocytes and their extensions, were measured in thin-sections of primary (woven and parallel fibered bone in a diversity of tetrapods. The results indicate that bone cell surfaces are more densely organized in the Saurischia (extant birds, extinct Mesozoic Theropoda and Sauropodomorpha than in other tetrapods, a result of denser branching of the cell extensions. The highest postnatal growth rates among extant tetrapods occur in modern birds, the only surviving saurischians, and the finding of exceptional cytoplasmic surface area of the cells that produce bone in this group suggests a relationship with bone growth rate. In support of this relationship is finding the lowest cell surface density among the saurischians examined in Dinornis, a member of a group of ratites that evolved in New Zealand in isolation from mammalian predators and show other evidence of lowered maturation rates.

  11. Surface transport and stable trapping of particles and cells by an optical waveguide loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellesø, Olav Gaute; Løvhaugen, Pål; Subramanian, Ananth Z; Wilkinson, James S; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh

    2012-09-21

    Waveguide trapping has emerged as a useful technique for parallel and planar transport of particles and biological cells and can be integrated with lab-on-a-chip applications. However, particles trapped on waveguides are continuously propelled forward along the surface of the waveguide. This limits the practical usability of the waveguide trapping technique with other functions (e.g. analysis, imaging) that require particles to be stationary during diagnosis. In this paper, an optical waveguide loop with an intentional gap at the centre is proposed to hold propelled particles and cells. The waveguide acts as a conveyor belt to transport and deliver the particles/cells towards the gap. At the gap, the diverging light fields hold the particles at a fixed position. The proposed waveguide design is numerically studied and experimentally implemented. The optical forces on the particle at the gap are calculated using the finite element method. Experimentally, the method is used to transport and trap micro-particles and red blood cells at the gap with varying separations. The waveguides are only 180 nm thick and thus could be integrated with other functions on the chip, e.g. microfluidics or optical detection, to make an on-chip system for single cell analysis and to study the interaction between cells.

  12. New non-covalent strategies for stable surface treatment of thermoplastic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Toralla, Karla; Champ, Jérôme; Mohamadi, Mohamad Reza; Braun, Olivier; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Descroix, Stéphanie

    2013-11-21

    In order to be more extensively used outside of research laboratories, lab-on-chip technologies must be mass-produced using low-cost materials such as thermoplastics. Thermoplastics, however, are generally hydrophobic in their native state, which makes them unsuitable for direct use with biological samples in aqueous solution, and thus require surface coating. This coating should be robust, inexpensive and simple to implement, in order not to hinder the industrial advantage of thermoplastic chips. Cyclic Olefin Copolymer (COC) is a particularly appealing polymer, but it is also difficult to functionalize due to its chemical inertness. Here we introduce and compare the performance of two new approaches for COC coating. One relies on the use of a commercial triblock copolymer, Pluronic® F127. The second approach uses new copolymers synthesized by radical polymerization, and consisting of a dimethylacrylamide (DMA) backbone carrying aliphatic side chains (C22). Two DMA-C22 copolymers were synthesized with various C22/DMA ratios: DMA-S at 0.175% and DMA-M at 0.35%. Different physicochemical properties of the polymers such as critical micellar concentration (CMC), water contact angle, electroosmosis were investigated. Coated COC chips were then tested for their ability to reduce the adsorption of proteins, microparticles, and for protein electrophoresis. For each application we found an optimal treatment protocol to considerably improve the performance of the thermoplastic chip. These treatments use physisorption in situ which requires no photografting or chemical reaction and can be performed by a simple incubation either after chip production, or just prior to use.

  13. Athletes who train on unstable compared to stable surfaces exhibit unique postural control strategies in response to balance perturbations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.S. Blaise Williams III; Nicholas G. Murray; Douglas W. Powell

    2016-01-01

    Background: Athletes have been shown to exhibit better balance compared to non-athletes (NON). However, few studies have investigated how the surface on which athletes train affects the strategies adopted to maintain balance. Two distinct athlete groups who experience different types of sport-specific balance training are stable surface athletes (SSA) such as basketball players and those who train on unstable surfaces (USA) such as surfers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of training surface on dynamic balance in athletes compared to NON. Methods: Eight NON, eight SSA, and eight USA performed five 20-s trials in each of five experimental conditions including a static condition and four dynamic conditions in which the support surface translated in the anteroposterior (AP) or mediolateral (ML) planes using positive or negative feedback paradigms. Approximate entropy (ApEn) and root mean square distance (RMS) of the center of pressure (CoP) were calculated for the AP and ML directions. Four 3 × 5 (group × condition) repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine significant effects of group and condition on variables of interest. Results: USA exhibited smaller ApEn values than SSA in the AP signals while no significant differences were observed in the ML CoP signals. Generally, the negative feedback conditions were associated with significantly greater RMS values than the positive feedback conditions. Conclusion: USA exhibit unique postural strategies compared to SSA. These unique strategies seemingly exhibit a direction-specific attribute and may be associated with divergent motor control strategies.

  14. The role of energetic ions from plasma in the creation of nanostructured materials and stable polymer surface treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilek, M.M.M. [Department of Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)]. E-mail: mmmb@physics.usyd.edu.au; Newton-McGee, K. [Department of Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McKenzie, D.R. [Department of Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McCulloch, D.G. [Department of Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2006-01-15

    Plasma processes for the synthesis of new materials as thin films have enabled the production of a wide variety of new materials. These include meta-stable phases, which are not readily found in nature, and more recently, materials with structure on the nanoscale. Study of plasma synthesis processes at the fundamental level has revealed that ion energy, depositing flux and growth surface temperature are the critical parameters affecting the microstructure and the properties of the thin film materials formed. In this paper, we focus on the role of ion flux and impact energy in the creation of thin films with nanoscale structure in the form of multilayers. We describe three synthesis strategies, based on the extraction of ions from plasma sources and involving modulation of ion flux and ion energy. The microstructure, intrinsic stress and physical properties of the multilayered samples synthesized are studied and related back to the conditions at the growth surface during deposition. When energetic ions of a non-condensing species are used, it is possible to place active groups on the surfaces of materials such as polymers. These active groups can then be used as bonding sites in subsequent chemical attachment of proteins or other macromolecules. If the energy of the non-condensing ions is increased to a few keV then modified layers buried under the surface can be produced. Here we describe a method by which the aging effect, which is often observed in plasma surface modifications on polymers, can be reduced and even eliminated using high energy ion bombardment.

  15. Stable carbon isotope ratios of archaeal GDGTs in the marine water column and surface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, A.; Hurley, S.; Close, H. G.; Jasper, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    Archaeal glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) lipids are ubiquitous throughout the marine environment and are preserved in sediments and sedimentary rocks on million-year timescales. Variations in the number of ring-containing GDGT isomers in sediments correlate with differences in overlying sea surface temperatures, a relationship formalized in the TEX86 paleotemperature proxy. Ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota are believed to be the major sources of these GDGTs, implying that the greatest production and export of GDGTs from the water column should be associated with the maximum expression of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes and maximum number of thaumarchaeal cells, both of which occur in the subsurface NO2- maximum near a depth of ca. 80-250 m. To examine the relationship between production and export of GDGTs from the water column, we measured the concentrations and δ13C values of GDGTs in suspended particulate matter (SPM) of the western South Atlantic Ocean and compared them to values from pure thaumarchaeal cultures and from available sediment core-tops from other locations. Thaumarchaeota are believed to fix the majority of their carbon directly from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). However, both the SPM and core-top δ13C values in some cases are moderately more 13C-depleted than would be predicted based on the 13C content of local DIC and the previously-published biosynthetic isotope fractionation (ɛ). This indicates that the average metabolism of the planktonic archaeal community either is mixotrophic (≥ 25% organic carbon assimilation) or that the published ɛ value for the model organism Nitrosopumilus maritimus may not be representative of the total autotrophic community. In addition to this offset, δ13C values of GDGTs in SPM inversely mirror DIC profiles, with lowest values in the nitrite maximum and higher values in the deeper water column, similar to the overall trends for bulk SPM. Finally, while individual GDGTs in SPM samples

  16. Fabricating a Homogeneously Alloyed AuAg Shell on Au Nanorods to Achieve Strong, Stable, and Tunable Surface Plasmon Resonances

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-08-13

    Colloidal metal nanocrystals with strong, stable, and tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) can be useful in a corrosive environment for many applications including field-enhanced spectroscopies, plasmon-mediated catalysis, etc. Here, a new synthetic strategy is reported that enables the epitaxial growth of a homogeneously alloyed AuAg shell on Au nanorod seeds, circumventing the phase segregation of Au and Ag encountered in conventional synthesis. The resulting core–shell structured bimetallic nanorods (AuNR@AuAg) have well-mixed Au and Ag atoms in their shell without discernible domains. This degree of mixing allows AuNR@AuAg to combine the high stability of Au with the superior plasmonic activity of Ag, thus outperforming seemingly similar nanostructures with monometallic shells (e.g., Ag-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Ag) and Au-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Au)). AuNR@AuAg is comparable to AuNR@Ag in plasmonic activity, but that it is markedly more stable toward oxidative treatment. Specifically, AuNR@AuAg and AuNR@Ag exhibit similarly strong signals in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy that are some 30-fold higher than that of AuNR@Au. When incubated with a H2O2 solution (0.5 m), the plasmonic activity of AuNR@Ag immediately and severely decayed, whereas AuNR@AuAg retained its activity intact. Moreover, the longitudinal SPR frequency of AuNR@AuAg can be tuned throughout the red wavelengths (≈620–690 nm) by controlling the thickness of the AuAg alloy shell. The synthetic strategy is versatile to fabricate AuAg alloyed shells on different shaped Au, with prospects for new possibilities in the synthesis and application of plasmonic nanocrystals.

  17. How Stable Is Stable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehr, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Provides a problem where students are asked to find the point at which a soda can floating in some liquid changes its equilibrium between stable and unstable as the soda is removed from the can. Requires use of Newton's first law, center of mass, Archimedes' principle, stable and unstable equilibrium, and buoyant force position. (MVL)

  18. Single-Molecule Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Spectrum of Non-Resonant Aromatic Amine Showing Raman Forbidden Bands

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Yuko S; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Zhang, Zhenglong; Kozu, Tomomi; Itoh, Tamitake; Nakanishi, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    We present the experimentally obtained single-molecule (SM) surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum of 4-aminibenzenethiol (4-ABT), also known as para-aminothiophenol (PATP). Measured at a 4-ABT concentration of 8 * 10^-10 M, the spectra show Raman forbidden modes. The SM-SERS spectrum of 4-ABT obtained using a non-resonant visible laser is different from the previously reported SERS spectra of 4-ABT, and could not be reconstructed using quantum mechanical calculations. Careful classical assignments (not based on quantum-mechanical calculations) are reported, and indicate that differences in the reported spectra of 4-ABT are mainly due to the appearance of Raman forbidden bands. The presence of Raman forbidden bands can be explained by the charge-transfer (CT) effect of 4-ABT adsorbed on the silver nanostructures, indicating a breakdown of Raman selection rules at the SERS hotspot.

  19. Effects of core strength training using stable versus unstable surfaces on physical fitness in adolescents: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Schellbach, Jörg; Klein, Katja; Prieske, Olaf; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Muehlbauer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that core strength training is an effective means to enhance trunk muscle strength (TMS) and proxies of physical fitness in youth. Of note, cross-sectional studies revealed that the inclusion of unstable elements in core strengthening exercises produced increases in trunk muscle activity and thus provide potential extra training stimuli for performance enhancement. Thus, utilizing unstable surfaces during core strength training may even produce larger performance gains. However, the effects of core strength training using unstable surfaces are unresolved in youth. This randomized controlled study specifically investigated the effects of core strength training performed on stable surfaces (CSTS) compared to unstable surfaces (CSTU) on physical fitness in school-aged children. Twenty-seven (14 girls, 13 boys) healthy subjects (mean age: 14 ± 1 years, age range: 13-15 years) were randomly assigned to a CSTS (n = 13) or a CSTU (n = 14) group. Both training programs lasted 6 weeks (2 sessions/week) and included frontal, dorsal, and lateral core exercises. During CSTU, these exercises were conducted on unstable surfaces (e.g., TOGU© DYNAIR CUSSIONS, THERA-BAND© STABILITY TRAINER). Significant main effects of Time (pre vs. post) were observed for the TMS tests (8-22%, f = 0.47-0.76), the jumping sideways test (4-5%, f = 1.07), and the Y balance test (2-3%, f = 0.46-0.49). Trends towards significance were found for the standing long jump test (1-3%, f = 0.39) and the stand-and-reach test (0-2%, f = 0.39). We could not detect any significant main effects of Group. Significant Time x Group interactions were detected for the stand-and-reach test in favour of the CSTU group (2%, f = 0.54). Core strength training resulted in significant increases in proxies of physical fitness in adolescents. However, CSTU as compared to CSTS had only limited additional effects (i.e., stand-and-reach test). Consequently, if the

  20. Variation of Stable Isotopes in Surface Snow along a Traverse from Coast to Plateau’s interior in East Antarctica and Its Climatic Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean; Jouzel; Michel; Stievenard

    2009-01-01

    The variations of stable water isotopes of surface snow in east Antarctic Ice Sheet, are discussed by a total of 251 samples, which were taken along a 330 km traverse from Zhongshan Station to the outer edge of the Antarctic plateau and from four snow pits excavated along the route. Analyzing results of the samples showed the expected linear relationship between the parameters ?D and ?18O with slope S1 and intercept d1. When the data set was examined using a sliding window with a width of 5 samples, it was found that there were two areas with different ratios of S1 and d1. The boundary between these two areas occurred at an elevation of about 2,000 m, suggesting two different sources of water vapour. Nearly half (47%) of the fresh-snow samples had negative deuterium excess (d=?D? 8?18O) values, but few of the snow pit samples did, suggesting that variations of ? are quickly smoothed by isotopic diffusion in the near-surface firn. Analysis of the phase relationship between ?D and deuterium excess in the snow pit stratigraphies showed that they were mostly in phase from Jan. 1994 to Sept. 1995, but mostly out of phase from Sept. 1995 to Jan. 1997.

  1. Metal nanoinks as chemically stable surface enhanced scattering (SERS) probes for the analysis of blue BIC ballpoint pens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyami, A; Saviello, D; McAuliffe, M A P; Mirabile, A; Lewis, L; Iacopino, D

    2017-06-07

    Metal nanoinks constituted by Ag nanoparticles and Au nanorods were employed as probes for the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) analysis of a blue BIC ballpoint pen. The dye components of the pen ink were first separated by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and subsequently analysed by SERS at illumination wavelengths of 514 nm and 785 nm. Compared to normal Raman conditions, enhanced spectra were obtained for all separated spots, allowing easy identification of phthalocyanine Blue 38 and triarylene crystal violet in the ink mixture. A combination of effects such as molecular resonance, electromagnetic and chemical effects were the contributing factors to the generation of spectra enhanced compared to normal Raman conditions. Enhancement factors (EFs) between 5 × 10(3) and 3 × 10(6) were obtained, depending on the combination of SERS probes and laser illumination used. In contrast to previous conflicting reports, the metal nanoinks were chemically stable, allowing the collection of reproducible spectra for days after deposition on TLC plates. In addition and in advance to previously reported SERS probes, no need for additional aggregating agents or correction of electrostatic charge was necessary to induce the generation of enhanced SERS spectra.

  2. Chemically stable Au nanorods as probes for sensitive surface enhanced scattering (SERS) analysis of blue BIC ballpoint pens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyami, Abeer; Saviello, Daniela; McAuliffe, Micheal A. P.; Cucciniello, Raffaele; Mirabile, Antonio; Proto, Antonio; Lewis, Liam; Iacopino, Daniela

    2017-08-01

    Au nanorods were used as an alternative to commonly used Ag nanoparticles as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) probes for identification of dye composition of blue BIC ballpoint pens. When used in combination with Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC), Au nanorod colloids allowed identification of the major dye components of the BIC pen ink, otherwise not identifiable by normal Raman spectroscopy. Thanks to their enhanced chemical stability compared to Ag colloids, Au nanorods provided stable and reproducible SERS signals and allowed easy identification of phthalocyanine and triarylene dyes in the pen ink mixture. These findings were supported by FTIR and MALDI analyses, also performed on the pen ink. Furthermore, the self-assembly of Au nanorods into large area ordered superstructures allowed identification of BIC pen traces. SERS spectra of good intensity and high reproducibility were obtained using Au nanorod vertical arrays, due to the high density of hot spots and morphological reproducibility of these superstructures. These results open the way to the employment of SERS for fast screening analysis and for quantitative analysis of pens and faded pens which are relevant for the fields of forensic and art conservation sciences.

  3. Simulation of large particle transport near the surface under stable conditions: comparison with the Hanford tracer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eugene; Larson, Timothy

    A plume model is presented describing the downwind transport of large particles (1-100 μm) under stable conditions. The model includes both vertical variations in wind speed and turbulence intensity as well as an algorithm for particle deposition at the surface. Model predictions compare favorably with the Hanford single and dual tracer experiments of crosswind integrated concentration (for particles: relative bias=-0.02 and 0.16, normalized mean square error=0.61 and 0.14, for the single and dual tracer experiments, respectively), whereas the US EPA's fugitive dust model consistently overestimates the observed concentrations at downwind distances beyond several hundred meters (for particles: relative bias=0.31 and 2.26, mean square error=0.42 and 1.71, respectively). For either plume model, the measured ratio of particle to gas concentration is consistently overestimated when using the deposition velocity algorithm of Sehmel and Hodgson (1978. DOE Report PNL-SA-6721, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA). In contrast, these same ratios are predicted with relatively little bias when using the algorithm of Kim et al. (2000. Atmospheric Environment 34 (15), 2387-2397).

  4. Full-Wave Analysis of Stable Cross Fractal Frequency Selective Surfaces Using an Iterative Procedure Based on Wave Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Silva Neto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a full-wave analysis of stable frequency selective surfaces (FSSs composed of periodic arrays of cross fractal patch elements. The shapes of these patch elements are defined conforming to a fractal concept, where the generator fractal geometry is successively subdivided into parts which are smaller copies of the previous ones (defined as fractal levels. The main objective of this work is to investigate the performance of FSSs with cross fractal patch element geometries including their frequency response and stability in relation to both the angle of incidence and polarization of the plane wave. The frequency response of FSS structures is obtained using the wave concept iterative procedure (WCIP. This method is based on a wave concept formulation and the boundary conditions for the FSS structure. Prototypes were manufactured and measured to verify the WCIP model accuracy. A good agreement between WCIP and measured results was observed for the proposed cross fractal FSSs. In addition, these FSSs exhibited good angular stability.

  5. Variance Method to Determine Turbulent Fluxes of Momentum And Sensible Heat in The Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, H. A. R.; Hartogensis, O. K.

    2005-08-01

    Evidence is presented that in the stable atmospheric surface layer turbulent fluxes of heat and momentum can be determined from the standard deviations of longitudinal wind velocity and temperature, σ u and σ T respectively, measured at a single level. An attractive aspect of this method is that it yields fluxes from measurements that can be obtained with two-dimensional sonic anemometers. These instruments are increasingly being used at official weather stations, where they replace the standard cup anemometer wind vane system. With methods such as the one described in this note, a widespread, good quality, flux network can be established, which would greatly benefit the modelling community. It is shown that a ‘variance’ dimensionless height (ζ σ) defined from σ u and σ T is highly related to the ‘conventional’ dimensionless stability parameter ζ=z/L, where z is height and L is the Obukhov length. Empirical functions for ζ σ are proposed that allow direct calculation of heat and momentum fluxes from σ u and σ T. The method performs fairly well also during a night of intermittent turbulence.

  6. Quantification of Gaseous Elemental Mercury Dry Deposition to Environmental Surfaces using Mercury Stable Isotopes in a Controlled Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, A. P.; Schauer, J. J.; Shafer, M. M.; Olson, M.; Robinson, M.; Vanderveer, P.; Creswell, J. E.; Parman, A.; Mallek, J.; Gorski, P.

    2009-12-01

    atmospheric turbulence and wind speed. GEM enriched in stable isotope 198 (GEM-198) was released into the room from source at elevated but environmentally relevant concentrations of GEM-198 for several days. Uptake of GEM-198 from deciduous and conifer trees, grass turf, 3 types of soil, sand, concrete, asphalt, and adsorbent coated deposition coupons were quantified over several days. Exposures were conducted between 10oC and 30oC, in dark and light conditions. Mercury was recovered from the samples using acidic digestions and surface leaches, and then analyzed for the content of GEM-198 by high resolution ICPMS. Experimental results demonstrated that uptake by White Ash, White Spruce, and Kentucky bluegrass were significantly higher than uptakes measured for two Wisconsin soils, peat, sand, concrete and asphalt at all of the conditions studied. Deposition resistances for surface transfer processes for were calculated for each of the substrates across the conditions studied for use in atmospheric model simulations.

  7. Sn surface-enriched Pt-Sn bimetallic nanoparticles as a selective and stable catalyst for propane dehydrogenation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Haibo

    2014-12-01

    A new one pot, surfactant-free, synthetic route based on the surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) concept has been developed for the synthesis of Sn surface-enriched Pt-Sn nanoparticles. Bu3SnH selectively reacts with [Pt]-H formed in situ at the surface of Pt nanoparticles, Pt NPs, obtained by reduction of K2PtCl4 by LiB(C2H5)3H. Chemical analysis, 1H MAS and 13C CP/MAS solid-state NMR as well as two-dimensional double-quantum (DQ) and triple-quantum (TQ) experiments show that organo-tin moieties Sn(n-C4H9) are chemically linked to the surface of Pt NPs to produce, in fine, after removal of most of the n-butyl fragment, bimetallic Pt-Sn nanoparticles. The Sn(n-CH2CH2CH2CH3) groups remaining at the surface are believed to stabilize the as-synthesized Pt-Sn NPs, enabling the bimetallic NPs to be well dispersed in THF. Additionally, the Pt-Sn nanoparticles can be supported on MgAl2O4 during the synthesis of the nanoparticles. Some of the Pt-Sn/MgAl2O4 catalyst thus prepared exhibits high activity in PROX of CO and an extremely high selectivity and stability in propane dehydrogenation to propylene. The enhanced activity in propane dehydrogenation is associated with the high concentration of inactive Sn at the surface of Pt nanoparticles which ”isolates” the active Pt atoms. This conclusion is confirmed by XRD, NMR, TEM, and XPS analysis.

  8. A stable metal-organic framework with suitable pore sizes and rich uncoordinated nitrogen atoms on the internal surface of micropores for highly efficient CO2 capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, S.J.; Krishna, R.; He, Y.B.; Qin, J.S.; Su, Z.M.; Li, S.L.; Xie, W.; Du, D.Y.; He, W.W.; Zhang, S.R.; Lan, Y.Q.

    2015-01-01

    An air-stable tetrazolate-containing framework, [ZN(2)L(2)]center dot 2DMF (NENU-520, H2L = 4-(1H-tetrazole-5-yl) biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid), with uncoordinated N atoms on its internal surface was solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. This metal-organic framework (MOF)

  9. The role of snow-surface coupling, radiation, and turbulent mixing in modeling a stable boundary layer over Arctic sea ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the understanding of the impact of small-scale processes in the polar climate, this study focuses on the relative role of snow-surface coupling, radiation and turbulent mixing in an Arctic stable boundary layer. We extend the GABLS1 (GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Study 1) model interco

  10. Generalised coexistence of a low work function and a stable surface : CaAl4 and BaAuIn3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijttewaal, M. A.; de Wijs, G. A.; de Groot, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    Cathodes are used in many devices ranging from microwave ovens to organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Crucial materials properties are a low work function (Phi) and a (relatively) stable surface. The relation between the two was not clear for more-complex metals. Our previous paper [M.A. Uijttewa

  11. Generalised coexistence of a low work function and a stable surface : CaAl4 and BaAuIn3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijttewaal, M. A.; de Wijs, G. A.; de Groot, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    Cathodes are used in many devices ranging from microwave ovens to organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Crucial materials properties are a low work function (Phi) and a (relatively) stable surface. The relation between the two was not clear for more-complex metals. Our previous paper [M.A.

  12. Stable compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accetta, F.S.; Gleiser, M.; Holman, R.; Kolb, E.W.

    1986-03-01

    We show that compactifications of theories with extra dimensions are unstable if due to monopole configurations of an antisymmetric tensor field balanced against one-loop Casimir corrections. In the case of ten dimensional supergravity, it is possible, at least for a portion of the phase space, to achieve a stable compactification without fine-tuning by including the contribution of fermionic condensates to the monopole configurations. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Fully integrated surface-subsurface flow modelling of groundwater-lake interaction in an esker aquifer: Model verification with stable isotopes and airborne thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala-aho, Pertti; Rossi, Pekka M.; Isokangas, Elina; Kløve, Bjørn

    2015-03-01

    Water resources management is moving towards integration, where groundwater (GW), surface water (SW) and related aquatic ecosystems are considered one management unit. Because of this paradigm shift, more information and new tools are needed to understand the ecologically relevant fluxes (water, heat, solutes) at the GW-SW interface. This study estimated the magnitude, temporal variability and spatial distribution of water fluxes at the GW-SW interface using a fully integrated hydrological modelling code (HydroGeoSphere). The model domain comprised a hydrologically complex esker aquifer in Northern Finland with interconnected lakes, streams and wetlands. The model was calibrated in steady state for soil hydraulic conductivity and anisotropy and it reproduced the hydraulic head and stream baseflow distribution throughout the aquifer in both transient and steady state modes. In a novel analysis, model outputs were compared with the locations and magnitude of GW discharge to lakes estimated using field techniques. Spatial occurrence of GW-lake interaction was interpreted from airborne thermal infrared imaging. The observed GW inflow locations coincided well with model nodes showing positive exchange flux between surface and subsurface domains. Order of magnitude of simulated GW inflow to lakes showed good agreement with flux values calculated with a stable water isotope technique. Finally, time series of GW inflow, extracted as model output, showed moderate annual variability and demonstrated different interannual inflow changes in seepage and drainage lakes of the aquifer. Overall, this study demonstrated the ability of a fully integrated numerical model to reproduce observed GW-SW exchange processes in a complex unconfined aquifer system. The model-based estimates obtained for GW influx magnitude and spatial distribution, along with information on GW quality can be used to estimate ecologically relevant fluxes in future water resources management.

  14. Hydrogeochemistry and quality of surface water and groundwater in the vicinity of Lake Monoun, West Cameroon: approach from multivariate statistical analysis and stable isotopic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamtchueng, Brice T; Fantong, Wilson Y; Wirmvem, Mengnjo J; Tiodjio, Rosine E; Takounjou, Alain F; Ndam Ngoupayou, Jules R; Kusakabe, Minoru; Zhang, Jing; Ohba, Takeshi; Tanyileke, Gregory; Hell, Joseph V; Ueda, Akira

    2016-09-01

    With the use of conventional hydrogeochemical techniques, multivariate statistical analysis, and stable isotope approaches, this paper investigates for the first time surface water and groundwater from the surrounding areas of Lake Monoun (LM), West Cameroon. The results reveal that waters are generally slightly acidic to neutral. The relative abundance of major dissolved species are Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Na(+) > K(+) for cations and HCO3 (-) ≫ NO3 (-) > Cl(-) > SO4 (2-) for anions. The main water type is Ca-Mg-HCO3. Observed salinity is related to water-rock interaction, ion exchange process, and anthropogenic activities. Nitrate and chloride have been identified as the most common pollutants. These pollutants are attributed to the chlorination of wells and leaching from pit latrines and refuse dumps. The stable isotopic compositions in the investigated water sources suggest evidence of evaporation before recharge. Four major groups of waters were identified by salinity and NO3 concentrations using the Q-mode hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). Consistent with the isotopic results, group 1 represents fresh unpolluted water occurring near the recharge zone in the general flow regime; groups 2 and 3 are mixed water whose composition is controlled by both weathering of rock-forming minerals and anthropogenic activities; group 4 represents water under high vulnerability of anthropogenic pollution. Moreover, the isotopic results and the HCA showed that the CO2-rich bottom water of LM belongs to an isolated hydrological system within the Foumbot plain. Except for some springs, groundwater water in the area is inappropriate for drinking and domestic purposes but good to excellent for irrigation.

  15. A stable, unbiased, long-term satellite based data record of sea surface temperature from ESA's Climate Change Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Nick; Good, Simon; Merchant, Chris

    2013-04-01

    The study of climate change demands long-term, stable observational records of climate variables such as sea surface temperature (SST). ESA's Climate Change Initiative was set up to unlock the potential of satellite data records for this purpose. As part of this initiative, 13 projects were established to develop the data records for different essential climate variables - aerosol, cloud, fire, greenhouse gases, glaciers, ice sheets, land cover, ocean colour, ozone, sea ice, sea level, soil moisture and SST. In this presentation we describe the development work that has taken place in the SST project and present new prototype data products that are available now for users to trial. The SST project began in 2010 and has now produced two prototype products. The first is a long-term product (covering mid-1991 - 2010 currently, but with a view to update this in the future), which prioritises length of data record and stability over other considerations. It is based on data from the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) and Advanced Very-High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) series of satellite instruments. The product aims to combine the favourable stability and bias characteristics of ATSR data with the geographical coverage achieved with the AVHRR series. Following an algorithm selection process, an optimal estimation approach to retrieving SST from the satellite measurements from both sensors was adopted. The retrievals do not depend on in situ data and so this data record represents an independent assessment of SST change. In situ data are, however, being used to validate the resulting data. The second data product demonstrates the coverage that can be achieved using the modern satellite observing system including, for example, geostationary satellite data. Six months worth of data have been processed for this demonstration product. The prototype SST products will be released in April to users to trial in their work. The long term product will be available as

  16. Surface chemistry of arenethiolate-capped PbS quantum dots and application as colloidally stable photovoltaic ink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giansante, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.giansante@iit.it [Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies @UNILE, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Barsanti 1, 73010 Arnesano, LE (Italy); NNL-CNR Istituto di Nanoscienze, Via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Carbone, Luigi [IPCF-CNR UOS di Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Giannini, Cinzia; Altamura, Davide [IC-CNR Istituto di Cristallografia, Via Amendola 122/O, 70126 Bari (Italy); Ameer, Zoobia [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica ‘E. De Giorgi’, Università del Salento, Via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Maruccio, Giuseppe [Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies @UNILE, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Barsanti 1, 73010 Arnesano, LE (Italy); NNL-CNR Istituto di Nanoscienze, Via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica ‘E. De Giorgi’, Università del Salento, Via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Loiudice, Anna [Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies @UNILE, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Barsanti 1, 73010 Arnesano, LE (Italy); Belviso, Maria R. [NNL-CNR Istituto di Nanoscienze, Via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Cozzoli, P. Davide [NNL-CNR Istituto di Nanoscienze, Via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica ‘E. De Giorgi’, Università del Salento, Via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Rizzo, Aurora [Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies @UNILE, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Barsanti 1, 73010 Arnesano, LE (Italy); NNL-CNR Istituto di Nanoscienze, Via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); and others

    2014-06-02

    Suitable post-synthesis surface modification of lead-chalcogenide quantum dots (QDs) is crucial to enable their integration in photovoltaic devices. We have developed a solution-phase ligand exchange strategy that exploits arenethiolate anions to replace the pristine oleate ligands on PbS QDs, while preserving the long-term colloidal stability of QDs and allowing their solution-based processability into photoconductive thin-films. Complete QD surface modification is demonstrated by IR spectroscopy analysis, whereas UV–Vis–NIR Absorption Spectroscopy provides quantitative evaluation of stoichiometry and thermodynamic stability of the resulting system. Arenethiolate ligands permit to reduce the inter-particle distance in PbS QD solids, leading to a drastic improvement of the photoinduced charge transport properties. Therefore, smooth dense-packed thin-films of arenethiolate-capped PbS QDs obtained via a single solution-processing step are integrated in heterojunction solar cells: such devices generate remarkable photocurrent densities (14 mA cm{sup −2}) and overall efficiencies (1.85%), which are outstanding for a single PbS QD layer. Solution-phase surface modification of QDs thus represents an effective intermediate step towards low-cost processing for all-inorganic and hybrid organic/inorganic QD-based photovoltaics. - Highlights: • We developed a solution-phase ligand exchange strategy on PbS quantum dots (QDs). • We evaluated stoichiometry and thermodynamic stability of the resulting system. • Arenethiolate ligands preserve the long-term colloidal stability of PbS QDs. • Arenethiolate ligands allow QD solution-casting into photoconductive thin-films. • Photovoltaic devices based on a single PbS QD layer show outstanding performances.

  17. PECVD-ONO: A New Deposited Firing Stable Rear Surface Passivation Layer System for Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hofmann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD stack layer system consisting of a-SiOx:H, a-SiNx:H, and a-SiOx:H is presented for silicon solar cell rear side passivation. Surface recombination velocities below 60 cm/s (after firing and below 30 cm/s (after forming gas anneal were achieved. Solar cell precursors without front and rear metallisation showed implied open-circuit voltages Voc values extracted from quasi-steady-state photoconductance (QSSPC measurements above 680 mV. Fully finished solar cells with up to 20.0% energy conversion efficiency are presented. A fit of the cell's internal quantum efficiency using software tool PC1D and a comparison to a full-area aluminium-back surface field (Al-BSF and thermal SiO2 is shown. PECVD-ONO was found to be clearly superior to Al-BSF. A separation of recombination at the metallised and the passivated area at the solar cell's rear is presented using the equations of Fischer and Kray. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA has been used to evaluate the hydrogen depth profile of the passivation layer system at different stages.

  18. Ultra-stable Molecule-Surface Architectures at Metal Oxides: Structure, Bonding, and Electron-transfer Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamers, Robert John

    2013-12-07

    Research funded by this project focused on the development of improved strategies for functionalization of metal oxides to enhance charge-transfer processes relevant to solar energy conversion. Initial studies included Fe2O3, WO3, TiO2, SnO2, and ZnO as model oxide systems; these systems were chosen due to differences in metal oxidation state and chemical bonding types in these oxides. Later studies focused largely on SnO2 and ZnO, as these materials show particularly promising surface chemistry, have high electron mobility, and can be readily grown in both spherical nanoparticles and as elongated nanorods. New molecules were synthesized that allowed the direct chemical assembly of novel nanoparticle ?dyadic? structures in which two different oxide materials are chemically joined, leading to an interface that enhances the separation of of charge upon illumination. We demonstrated that such junctions enhance photocatalytic efficiency using model organic compounds. A separate effort focused on novel approaches to linking dye molecules to SnO2 and ZnO as a way to enhance solar conversion efficiency. A novel type of surface binding through

  19. Quantification of long-term wastewater fluxes at the surface water/groundwater-interface: An integrative model perspective using stable isotopes and acesulfame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhardt, I., E-mail: i.engelhardt@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Bio- and Geosciences, Agrosphere — IBG-3 (Germany); Technical University of Darmstadt, Institute of Applied Geosciences (Germany); Barth, J.A.C. [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Bol, R. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Bio- and Geosciences, Agrosphere — IBG-3 (Germany); Schulz, M.; Ternes, T.A. [Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) (Germany); Schüth, C. [Technical University of Darmstadt, Institute of Applied Geosciences (Germany); van Geldern, R. [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The suitability of acesulfame to trace wastewater-related surface water fluxes from streams into the hyporheic and riparian zones over long-term periods was investigated. The transport behavior of acesulfame was compared with the transport of water stable isotopes (δ{sup 18}O or δ{sup 2}H). A calibrated model based on a joint inversion of temperature, acesulfame, and piezometric pressure heads was employed in a model validation using data sets of acesulfame and water stable isotopes collected over 5 months in a stream and groundwater. The spatial distribution of fresh water within the groundwater resulting from surface water infiltration was estimated by computing groundwater ages and compared with the predicted acesulfame plume obtained after 153 day simulation time. Both, surface water ratios calculated with a mixing equation from water stable isotopes and simulated acesulfame mass fluxes, were investigated for their ability to estimate the contribution of wastewater-related surface water inflow within groundwater. The results of this study point to limitations for the application of acesulfame to trace surface water–groundwater interactions properly. Acesulfame completely missed the wastewater-related surface water volumes that still remained in the hyporheic zone under stream-gaining conditions. In contrast, under stream-losing conditions, which developed after periods of stagnating hydraulic exchange, acesulfame based predictions lead to an overestimation of the surface water volume of up to 25% in the riparian zone. If slow seepage velocities prevail a proportion of acesulfame might be stored in smaller pores, while when released under fast flowing water conditions it will travel further downstream with the groundwater flow direction. Therefore, under such conditions acesulfame can be a less-ideal tracer in the hyporheic and riparian zones and additional monitoring with other environmental tracers such as water stable isotopes is highly recommended

  20. Finding generically stable measures

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    We discuss two constructions for obtaining generically stable Keisler measures in an NIP theory. First, we show how to symmetrize an arbitrary invariant measure to obtain a generically stable one from it. Next, we show that suitable sigma-additive probability measures give rise to generically stable measures. Also included is a proof that generically stable measures over o-minimal theories and the p-adics are smooth.

  1. Apple Pollination Biology for Stable and Novel Fruit Production: Search System for Apple Cultivar Combination Showing Incompatibility, Semicompatibility, and Full-Compatibility Based on the S-RNase Allele Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Matsumoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breeding and cultivation of new apple cultivars are among the most attractive and important issues for apple researchers. As almost all apple cultivars exhibit gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI, cross-pollination between genetically different cultivars and species is essential not only for stable fruit production, but also for breeding of new cultivars. For cross-pollination by insect or hand pollination, pollen viability and pistil fertility are key factors, but also the mechanism of GSI has to be taken into account. This paper reviews the germination rate of pollen after storage in different conditions, at different periods of flowering, and in combination with pistil fertility and cross-compatibility among wild-, crab-, and cultivated apples. Furthermore, suitable cultivar combinations for new attractive apple cultivars based on GSI are explored. Especially, details about S-genotypes of apple cultivars, which are present in recent cultivar catalogues, are introduced together with a newly established on-line searchable database of S-genotypes of cultivars, wild apples and crab apples that shows incompatibility, semicompatibility, and full-compatibility.

  2. Identifying hydrological pathways in the north basin of Lake Kivu using stable isotope ratios of meteoric recharge and surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagizi, Charles M.; Kasereka, Marcellin M.; Terzerand, Stefan; Cuoco, Emilio; Liotta, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    groundwater recharged at up to 3100 m. Both Kabuno Bay and the Main Basin of the CO2- and CH4-rich permanently stratified Lake Kivu (485m maximum depth) showed highly enriched surface waters. However the values significantly decrease with depth and were thus lower at the bottom. The δ2H and δ18O data revealed that subaerial rivers and shallow groundwater discharge in the upper layer of Lake Kivu, while the deep groundwater reaches the lake as lateral cold and hot springs inflows to the water column as well as hydrothermal water at the floor. Water of the upper layer of Lake Kivu is highly enriched by intense surface evaporation, whereas the intense water-rock interactions and hydrothermal activities within the aquifers could be responsible for the enrichment of waters transferred to the deep permanently stratified layer of Lake Kivu

  3. Antibody recognition force microscopy shows that outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Brian H; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Shi, Liang; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J; Wigginton, Nicholas S; Reardon, Catherine L; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Droubay, Timothy C; Boily, Jean-François; Lower, Steven K

    2009-05-01

    Antibody recognition force microscopy showed that OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells when Fe(III), including solid-phase hematite (Fe(2)O(3)), was the terminal electron acceptor. OmcA was localized to the interface between the cell and mineral. MtrC displayed a more uniform distribution across the cell surface. Both cytochromes were associated with an extracellular polymeric substance.

  4. Sources and accumulation of organic carbon in the Pearl River Estuary surface sediment as indicated by elemental, stable carbon isotopic, and carbohydrate compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. He

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic matter in surface sediments from the upper reach of the Pearl River Estuary and Lingdingyang Bay, as well as the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf was characterized by a variety of techniques, including elemental (C and N, stable carbon isotopic (δ 13C composition, as well as molecular-level analyses. Total organic carbon (TOC content was 1.61±1.20% in the upper reach down to 1.00±0.22% in Lingdingyang Bay and to 0.80±0.10% on the inner shelf and 0.58±0.06% on the outer shelf. δ13C values ranged from −25.11‰ to −21.28‰ across the studied area, with a trend of enrichment seaward. The spatial trend in C/N ratios mirrored that of δ13C, with a substantial decrease in C/N ratio from 10.9±1.3 in the Lingdingyang Bay surface sediments to 6.5±0.09 in the outer shelf surface sediments. Total carbohydrate yields ranged from 22.1 to 26.7 mg (100 mg OC−1, and typically followed TOC concentrations in the estuarine and shelf sediments, suggesting that the relative abundance of total carbohydrate was fairly constant in TOC. Total neutral sugars as detected by the nine major monosaccharides (lyxose, rhamnose, ribose, arabinose, fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, and glucose yielded between 4.0 and 18.6 mg (100 mg OC−1 in the same sediments, suggesting that a significant amount of carbohydrates were not neutral aldoses. The bulk organic matter properties, isotopic composition and C/N ratios, combined with molecular-level carbohydrate compositions were used to assess the sources and accumulation of terrestrial organic matter in the Pearl River Estuary and the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf. Results showed a mixture of terrestrial riverine organic carbon with in situ phytoplankton organic carbon in the areas studied. Using a two end-member mixing model based on δ13C values and C/N ratios, we estimated that the terrestrial organic carbon contribution to

  5. Show Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> Story: Show Time!The whole class presents the story"Under the Sea".Everyone is so excited and happy.Both Leo and Kathy show their parentsthe characters of the play."Who’s he?"asks Kathy’s mom."He’s the prince."Kathy replies."Who’s she?"asks Leo’s dad."She’s the queen."Leo replieswith a smile.

  6. Snobbish Show

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN PUMIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ The State Administration of Radio,Film and Television (SARFT),China's media watchdog,issued a new set of mles on June 9 that strictly regulate TV match-making shows,which have been sweeping the country's primetime programming. "Improper social and love values such as money worship should not be presented in these shows.Humiliation,verbal attacks and sex-implied vulgar content are not allowed" the new roles said.

  7. Cobalt(III)-Mediated Permanent and Stable Immobilization of Histidine-Tagged Proteins on NTA-Functionalized Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Seraphine V; Schenk, Franziska C; Spatz, Joachim P

    2016-02-24

    We present the cobalt(III)-mediated interaction between polyhistidine (His)-tagged proteins and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-modified surfaces as a general approach for a permanent, oriented, and specific protein immobilization. In this approach, we first form the well-established Co(2+) -mediated interaction between NTA and His-tagged proteins and subsequently oxidize the Co(2+) center in the complex to Co(3+) . Unlike conventionally used Ni(2+) - or Co(2+) -mediated immobilization, the resulting Co(3+) -mediated immobilization is resistant toward strong ligands, such as imidazole and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and washing off over time because of the high thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the Co(3+) complex. This immobilization method is compatible with a wide variety of surface coatings, including silane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on glass, thiol SAMs on gold surfaces, and supported lipid bilayers. Furthermore, once the cobalt center has been oxidized, it becomes inert toward reducing agents, specific and unspecific interactions, so that it can be used to orthogonally functionalize surfaces with multiple proteins. Overall, the large number of available His-tagged proteins and materials with NTA groups make the Co(3+) -mediated interaction an attractive and widely applicable platform for protein immobilization.

  8. Evolution of subpolar North Atlantic surface circulation since the early Holocene inferred from planktic foraminifera faunal and stable isotope records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staines-Urias, Francisca; Kuijpers, Antoon; Korte, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    of the Faroe Islands, are located in the transitional area where surface waters of subpolar and subtropical origin mix before entering the Arctic Mediterranean. In these areas, large-amplitude millennial variability in the characteristics of the upper-water column appears modulated by changes in the intensity...

  9. Stable Surface Expression of a Gene for Helicobacter pylori Toxic Porin Protein with pBAD Expression System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhixiang PENG; Xi WEI; Zhengmei LIN

    2009-01-01

    successive passages could express Hope protein, while only 1 from 5 E. coli colonies that contained lac operon-regulated plasmid encoding hopE gene could express HopE. Indi-rect immunofluorescence confirmed the expression of HopE on E. coli cell surface.

  10. Highly stable organic monolayers for reacting silicon with further functionalities: the effect of the C-C bond nearest the silicon surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puniredd, Sreenivasa Reddy; Assad, Ossama; Haick, Hossam

    2008-10-15

    Crystalline Si(111) surfaces have been alkylated in a two-step chlorination/alkylation process using various organic molecules having similar backbones but differing in their C-C bond closest to the silicon surface (i.e., C-C vs C=C vs C[triple bond]C bonds). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) data show that functionalization of silicon surfaces with propenyl magnesium bromide (CH3-CH=CH-MgBr) organic molecules gives nearly full coverage of the silicon atop sites, as on methyl- and propynyl-terminated silicon surfaces. Propenyl-terminated silicon surface shows less surface oxidation and is more robust against solvent attacks when compared to methyl- and propynyl-terminated silicon surfaces. We also show a secondary functionalization process of propenyl-terminated silicon surface with 4'-[3-Trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl]-benzoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester [TDBA-OSu] cross-linker. The Si-CH=CH-CH3 surfaces thus offer a means of attaching a variety of chemical moieties to a silicon surface through a short linking group, enabling applications in molecular electronics, energy conversion, catalysis, and sensing.

  11. Formation of ZnO-Cd(OH){sub 2} core-shell nanoparticles by sol-gel method: An approach to modify surface chemistry for stable and enhanced green emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Rupali, E-mail: rupalimishra@rediffmail.co [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Nanophosphor Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Yadav, Raghvendra S.; Pandey, Avinash C. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Nanophosphor Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Sanjay, Sharda. S. [Department of Chemistry, Ewing Christian College, Allahabad (India); Dar, Chitra [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India)

    2010-03-15

    We report the formation of highly stable and luminescent ZnO-Cd(OH){sub 2} core-shell nanoparticles by simple introduction of cadmium salt in the initial precursor solution, used to synthesize ZnO nanoparticles by sol-gel route. The cadmium to zinc salt concentration ratio has been also varied to control the growth of ZnO nanoparticles at the smaller particle size. Formation of ZnO-Cd(OH){sub 2} core-shell nanostructure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). UV-vis absorption spectroscopy exhibits blue-shift in absorption edge on increasing cadmium concentrations. The photoluminescence emission spectra showed the remarkably stable and enhanced visible (green) emission from suspended ZnO-Cd(OH){sub 2} nanoparticles in comparison to bare ZnO nanoparticles. It is postulated that Cd(OH){sub 2} layer at the surface of ZnO nanoparticles prevents the agglomeration of nanoparticles and efficiently assists the trapping of hole at the surface site, a first step necessary for visible emission. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) also supports our assumption about surface chemistry.

  12. Intracellular surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) with thermally stable gold nanoflowers grown from Pt and Pd seeds

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min

    2013-01-01

    SERS provides great sensitivity at low concentrations of analytes. SERS combined with near infrared (NIR)-resonant gold nanomaterials are important candidates for theranostic agents due to their combined extinction properties and sensing abilities stemming from the deep penetration of laser light in the NIR region. Here, highly branched gold nanoflowers (GNFs) grown from Pd and Pt seeds are prepared and their SERS properties are studied. The growth was performed at 80°C without stirring, and this high temperature growth method is assumed to provide great shape stability of sharp tips in GNFs. We found that seed size must be large enough (>30 nm in diameter) to induce the growth of those SERS-active and thermally stable GNFs. We also found that the addition of silver nitrate (AgNO3) is important to induce sharp tip growth and shape stability. Incubation with Hela cells indicates that GNFs are taken up and reside in the cytoplasm. SERS was observed in those cells incubated with 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen)-loaded GNFs. This journal is © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. EROBATIC SHOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Visitors look at plane models of the Commercial Aircraft Corp. of China, developer of the count,s first homegrown large passenger jet C919, during the Singapore Airshow on February 16. The biennial event is the largest airshow in Asia and one of the most important aviation and defense shows worldwide. A number of Chinese companies took part in the event during which Okay Airways, the first privately owned aidine in China, signed a deal to acquire 12 Boeing 737 jets.

  14. Stable Degeneracies for Ising Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    We introduce and consider the notion of stable degeneracies of translation invariant energy functions, taken at spin configurations of a finite Ising model. By this term we mean the lack of injectivity that cannot be lifted by changing the interaction. We show that besides the symmetry-induced degeneracies, related to spin flip, translation and reflection, there exist additional stable degeneracies, due to more subtle symmetries. One such symmetry is the one of the Singer group of a finite projective plane. Others are described by combinatorial relations akin to trace identities. Our results resemble traits of the length spectrum for closed geodesics on a Riemannian surface of constant negative curvature. There, stable degeneracy is defined w.r.t. Teichmüller space as parameter space.

  15. Surface complex formation between aliphatic nitrile molecules and transition metal atoms for thermally stable lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Hochun; Song, Hyun-Kon

    2014-06-11

    Non-flammability of electrolyte and tolerance of cells against thermal abuse should be guaranteed for widespread applications of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). As a strategy to improve thermal stability of LIBs, here, we report on nitrile-based molecular coverage on surface of cathode active materials to block or suppress thermally accelerated side reactions between electrode and electrolyte. Two different series of aliphatic nitriles were introduced as an additive into a carbonate-based electrolyte: di-nitriles (CN-[CH2]n-CN with n = 2, 5, and 10) and mono-nitriles (CH3-[CH2]m-CN with m = 2, 5, and 10). On the basis of the strong interaction between the electronegativity of nitrile functional groups and the electropositivity of cobalt in LiCoO2 cathode, aliphatic mono- and di-nitrile molecules improved the thermal stability of lithium ion cells by efficiently protecting the surface of LiCoO2. Three factors, the surface coverage θ, the steric hindrance of aliphatic moiety within nitrile molecule, and the chain polarity, mainly affect thermal tolerance as well as cell performances at elevated temperature.

  16. Chloride concentrations and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and groundwater in and near Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2005-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.

    2010-01-01

    Fish Creek, an approximately 25-kilometer long tributary to the Snake River, is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District, conducted a study to determine the interaction of local surface water and groundwater in and near Fish Creek. In conjunction with the surface water and groundwater interaction study, samples were collected for analysis of chloride and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water. Chloride concentrations ranged from 2.9 to 26.4 milligrams per liter (mg/L) near Teton Village, 1.2 to 4.9 mg/L near Resor's Bridge, and 1.8 to 5.0 mg/L near Wilson. Stable isotope data for hydrogen and oxygen in water samples collected in and near the three cross sections on Fish Creek are shown in relation to the Global Meteoric Water Line and the Local Meteoric Water Line.

  17. Searching for Stable SinCn Clusters: Combination of Stochastic Potential Surface Search and Pseudopotential Plane-Wave Car-Parinello Simulated Annealing Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry W. Burggraf

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available To find low energy SinCn structures out of hundreds to thousands of isomers we have developed a general method to search for stable isomeric structures that combines Stochastic Potential Surface Search and Pseudopotential Plane-Wave Density Functional Theory Car-Parinello Molecular Dynamics simulated annealing (PSPW-CPMD-SA. We enhanced the Sunders stochastic search method to generate random cluster structures used as seed structures for PSPW-CPMD-SA simulations. This method ensures that each SA simulation samples a different potential surface region to find the regional minimum structure. By iterations of this automated, parallel process on a high performance computer we located hundreds to more than a thousand stable isomers for each SinCn cluster. Among these, five to 10 of the lowest energy isomers were further optimized using B3LYP/cc-pVTZ method. We applied this method to SinCn (n = 4–12 clusters and found the lowest energy structures, most not previously reported. By analyzing the bonding patterns of low energy structures of each SinCn cluster, we observed that carbon segregations tend to form condensed conjugated rings while Si connects to unsaturated bonds at the periphery of the carbon segregation as single atoms or clusters when n is small and when n is large a silicon network spans over the carbon segregation region.

  18. Atomic structure of a stable high-index Ge surface: G2(103)-(4x1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seehofer, L.; Bunk, O.; Falkenberg, G.

    1997-01-01

    Based on scanning tunneling microscopy and surface X-ray diffraction, we propose a complex structural model for the Ge(103)-(4 x 1) reconstruction. Each unit cell contains two (103) double steps, which gives rise to the formation of stripes of Ge atoms oriented in the [] direction....... The stripes and the spaces between them are covered with threefold-coordinated Ge adatoms. Charge is transferred from the bulk-like edge atoms of the double steps to the adatoms. The formation of the reconstruction can be explained in terms of stress relief, charge transfer, and minimization of the dangling...

  19. Assessing the Role of Sewers and Atmospheric Deposition as Nitrate Contamination Sources to Urban Surface Waters using Stable Nitrate Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, M. T.; Elliott, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    Excess nitrate (NO3-) contributes to the overall degraded quality of streams in many urban areas. These systems are often dominated by impervious surfaces and storm sewers that can route atmospherically deposited nitrogen, from both wet and dry deposition, to waterways. Moreover, in densely populated watersheds there is the potential for interaction between urban waterways and sewer systems. The affects of accumulated nitrate in riverine and estuary systems include low dissolved oxygen, loss of species diversity, increased mortality of aquatic species, and general eutrophication of the waterbody. However, the dynamics of nitrate pollution from each source and it’s affect on urban waterways is poorly constrained. The isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate have been proven effective in helping to distinguish contamination sources to ground and surface waters. In order to improve our understanding of urban nitrate pollution sources and dynamics, we examined nitrate isotopes (δ15N and δ18O) in base- and stormflow samples collected over a two-year period from a restored urban stream in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (USA). Nine Mile Run drains a 1,600 hectare urban watershed characterized by 38% impervious surface cover. Prior work has documented high nitrate export from the watershed (~19 kg NO3- ha-1 yr-1). Potential nitrate sources to the watershed include observed sewer overflows draining directly to the stream, as well as atmospheric deposition (~23 kg NO3- ha-1 yr-1). In this and other urban systems with high percentages of impervious surfaces, there is likely minimal input from nitrate derived from soil or fertilizer. In this presentation, we examine spatial and temporal patterns in nitrate isotopic composition collected at five locations along Nine Mile Run characterized by both sanitary and combined-sewer cross-connections. Preliminary isotopic analysis of low-flow winter streamwater samples suggest nitrate export from Nine Mile Run is primarily influenced by

  20. Solution structure of the porcine sapovirus VPg core reveals a stable three-helical bundle with a conserved surface patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyo-Jeong; Min, Hye Jung; Yun, Hyosuk; Pelton, Jeffery G; Wemmer, David E; Cho, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Jeong-Sun; Lee, Chul Won

    2015-04-17

    Viral protein genome-linked (VPg) proteins play a critical role in the life cycle of vertebrate and plant positive-sense RNA viruses by acting as a protein primer for genome replication and as a protein cap for translation initiation. Here we report the solution structure of the porcine sapovirus VPg core (VPg(C)) determined by multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The structure of VPg(C) is composed of three α-helices stabilized by several conserved hydrophobic residues that form a helical bundle core similar to that of feline calicivirus VPg. The putative nucleotide acceptor Tyr956 within the first helix of the core is completely exposed to solvent accessible surface to facilitate nucleotidylation by viral RNA polymerase. Comparison of VPg structures suggests that the surface for nucleotidylation site is highly conserved among the Caliciviridae family, whereas the backbone core structures are different. These structural features suggest that caliciviruses share common mechanisms of VPg-dependent viral replication and translation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sources and accumulation of organic carbon in the Pearl River Estuary surface sediment as indicated by elemental, stable carbon isotopic, and carbohydrate compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, B.; Dai, M.; Huang, W.; Liu, Q.; Chen, H.; Xu, L.

    2010-10-01

    Organic matter in surface sediments from the upper reach of the Pearl River Estuary and Lingdingyang Bay, as well as the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf was characterized using a variety of techniques, including elemental (C and N) ratio, bulk stable organic carbon isotopic composition (δ13C), and carbohydrate composition analyses. Total organic carbon (TOC) content was 1.21±0.45% in the upper reach, down to 1.00±0.22% in Lingdingyang Bay and to 0.80±0.10% on the inner shelf and 0.58±0.06% on the outer shelf. δ13C values ranged from -25.1‰ to -21.3‰ in Lingdingyang Bay and the South China Sea shelf, with a trend of enrichment seawards. The spatial trend in C/N ratios mirrored that of δ13C, with a substantial decrease in C/N ratio offshore. Total carbohydrate yields ranged from 22.1 to 26.7 mg (100 mg OC)-1, and typically followed TOC concentrations in the estuarine and shelf sediments. Total neutral sugars, as detected by the nine major monosaccharides (lyxose, rhamnose, ribose, arabinose, fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, and glucose), were between 4.0 and 18.6 mg (100 mg OC)-1 in the same sediments, suggesting that significant amounts of carbohydrates were not neutral aldoses. Using a two end-member mixing model based on δ13C values and C/N ratios, we estimated that the terrestrial organic carbon contribution to the surface sediment TOC was ca. 78±11% for Lingdingyang Bay, 34±4% for the inner shelf, and 5.5±1% for the outer shelf. The molecular composition of the carbohydrate in the surface sediments also suggested that the inner estuary was rich in terrestrially derived carbohydrates but that their contribution decreased offshore. A relatively high abundance of deoxyhexoses in the estuary and shelf indicated a considerable bacterial source of these carbohydrates, implying that sediment organic matter had undergone extensive degradation and/or transformation during transport. Sediment budget based on calculated regional accumulation rates

  2. Sources and accumulation of organic carbon in the Pearl River Estuary surface sediment as indicated by elemental, stable carbon isotopic, and carbohydrate compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. He

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Organic matter in surface sediments from the upper reach of the Pearl River Estuary and Lingdingyang Bay, as well as the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf was characterized using a variety of techniques, including elemental (C and N ratio, bulk stable organic carbon isotopic composition (δ13C, and carbohydrate composition analyses. Total organic carbon (TOC content was 1.21±0.45% in the upper reach, down to 1.00±0.22% in Lingdingyang Bay and to 0.80±0.10% on the inner shelf and 0.58±0.06% on the outer shelf. δ13C values ranged from −25.1‰ to −21.3‰ in Lingdingyang Bay and the South China Sea shelf, with a trend of enrichment seawards. The spatial trend in C/N ratios mirrored that of δ13C, with a substantial decrease in C/N ratio offshore. Total carbohydrate yields ranged from 22.1 to 26.7 mg (100 mg OC−1, and typically followed TOC concentrations in the estuarine and shelf sediments. Total neutral sugars, as detected by the nine major monosaccharides (lyxose, rhamnose, ribose, arabinose, fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, and glucose, were between 4.0 and 18.6 mg (100 mg OC−1 in the same sediments, suggesting that significant amounts of carbohydrates were not neutral aldoses. Using a two end-member mixing model based on δ13C values and C/N ratios, we estimated that the terrestrial organic carbon contribution to the surface sediment TOC was ca. 78±11% for Lingdingyang Bay, 34±4% for the inner shelf, and 5.5±1% for the outer shelf. The molecular composition of the carbohydrate in the surface sediments also suggested that the inner estuary was rich in terrestrially derived carbohydrates but that their contribution decreased offshore. A relatively high abundance of deoxyhexoses in the estuary and shelf indicated a considerable bacterial source of these carbohydrates, implying that sediment organic matter had undergone extensive degradation and

  3. A new loess distribution map for the Carpathian Basin facilitates surface sediment transects and showing migration pathways for modern human dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmkuhl, Frank; Lindner, Heiko; Bösken, Janina; Zeeden, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Quaternary studies in the Carpathian Basin require a detailed knowledge of the distribution of surface sediments. Existing and often cited maps, such as Haase et al. (2007), are not detailed enough for various purposes and difficult in detail as a result of the basic input data and due to the used scale. In addition, many of the maps presenting the distribution of loess and other geological features in Europe display inconsistencies such as displacements, shifts or even abrupt delimitations of different geological units such as loess across national borders. In fact, if geoscientific data from different regions or countries are combined, national borders in many medium- and large-scale thematic datasets appear as artificial breaks. To create a higher resolution map showing the more detailed distribution of Quaternary surface sediments in the Carpathian Basin the spatial data from several countries were used and combined. Particularly some issues occurred because of the thematically content of the underlying international geodata, but also due to geodetical basics such as projections and linguistic barriers, respectively. In addition to maps, transects of surface sediments from the lowlands to the uplands are provided. Together these visualizations are used for discussing the loess distribution and possible origins. This map provides a valuable contribution to the potential migration route for the dispersal of the modern humans. We can show that the distribution of Aurignacian open air sites is connect to elevations between 200 and 500 m at the foothills of the mountains and often situated in loess environments.

  4. A ternary functional Ag@GO@Au sandwiched hybrid as an ultrasensitive and stable surface enhanced Raman scattering platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cong-yun; Hao, Rui; Zhao, Bin; Hao, Yao-wu; Liu, Ya-qing

    2017-07-01

    The graphene-mediated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates by virtues of plasmonic metal nanostructures and graphene or its derivatives have attracted tremendous interests which are expected to make up the deficiency of traditional plasmonic metal substrates. Herein, we designed and fabricated a novel ternary Ag@GO@Au sandwich hybrid wherein the ultrathin graphene oxide (GO) films were seamlessly wrapped around the hierarchical flower-like Ag particle core and meanwhile provided two-dimensional anchoring scaffold for the coating of Au nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coverage density of loading Au NPs could be readily controlled by tuning the dosage amount of Au particle solutions. These features endowed the sandwiched structures high enrichment capability for analytes such as aromatic molecules and astonishing SERS performance. The Raman signals were enormously enhanced with an ultrasensitive detection limit of rhodamine-6G (R6G) as low as 10-13 M based on the chemical enhancement from GO and multi-dimensional plasmonic coupling between the metal nanoparticles. In addition, the GO interlayer as an isolating shell could effectively prevent the metal-molecule direct interaction and suppress the oxidation of Ag after exposure at ambient condition which enabled the substrates excellent reproducibility with less than 6% signal variations and prolonged life-time. To evaluate the feasibility and the practical application for SERS detection in real-world samples based on GO sandwiched hybrid as SERS-active substrate, three different prohibited colorants with a series of concentrations were measured with a minimum detected concentration down to 10-9 M. Furthermore, the prepared GO sandwiched nanostructures can be used to identify different types of colorants existing in red wine, implying the great potential applications for single-particle SERS sensing of biotechnology and on-site monitoring in food security.

  5. Stable distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Janson, Svante

    2011-01-01

    We give some explicit calculations for stable distributions and convergence to them, mainly based on less explicit results in Feller (1971). The main purpose is to provide ourselves with easy reference to explicit formulas. (There are no new results.)

  6. Quantification of surface water and groundwater flows to open- and closed-basin lakes in a headwaters watershed using a descriptive oxygen stable isotope model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stets, Edward G.; Winter, T. C.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate quantification of hydrologic fluxes in lakes is important to resource management and for placing hydrologic solute flux in an appropriate biogeochemical context. Water stable isotopes can be used to describe water movements, but they are typically only effective in lakes with long water residence times. We developed a descriptive time series model of lake surface water oxygen-18 stable isotope signature (δL) that was equally useful in open- and closed-basin lakes with very different hydrologic residence times. The model was applied to six lakes, including two closed-basin lakes and four lakes arranged in a chain connected by a river, located in a headwaters watershed. Groundwater discharge was calculated by manual optimization, and other hydrologic flows were constrained by measured values including precipitation, evaporation, and streamflow at several stream gages. Modeled and observed δL were highly correlated in all lakes (r = 0.84–0.98), suggesting that the model adequately described δL in these lakes. Average modeled stream discharge at two points along the river, 16,000 and 11,800 m3 d−1, compares favorably with synoptic measurement of stream discharge at these sites, 17,600 and 13,700 m3 d−1, respectively. Water yields in this watershed were much higher, 0.23–0.45 m, than water yields calculated from gaged streamflow in regional rivers, approximately 0.10 m, suggesting that regional groundwater discharge supports water flux through these headwaters lakes. Sensitivity and robustness analyses also emphasized the importance of considering hydrologic residence time when designing a sampling protocol for stable isotope use in lake hydrology studies.

  7. Carboxymethylated lignins with low surface tension toward low viscosity and highly stable emulsions of crude bitumen and refined oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Ogunkoya, Dolanimi; Fang, Tiegang; Willoughby, Julie; Rojas, Orlando J

    2016-11-15

    Kraft and organosolv lignins were subjected to carboxymethylation to produce fractions that were soluble in water, displayed a minimum surface tension as low as 34mN/m (25°C) and a critical aggregation concentration of ∼1.5wt%. The carboxymethylated lignins (CML), which were characterized in terms of their degree of substitution ((31)P NMR), elemental composition, and molecular weight (GPC), were found suitable in the formulation of emulsions with bitumens of ultra-high viscosity, such as those from the Canadian oil sands. Remarkably, the interfacial features of the CML enabled fuel emulsions that were synthesized in a very broad range of internal phase content (30-70%). Cryo-replica transmission electron microscopy, which was used here the first time to assess the morphology of the lignin-based emulsions, revealed the droplets of the emulsion stabilized with the modified lignin. The observed drop size (diametersoperations for power generation, which also take advantage of the high heating value of the emulsion components. The ability of CML to stabilize emulsions and to contribute in their combustion was tested with light fuels (kerosene, diesel, and jet fuel) after formulation of high internal phase systems (70% oil) that enabled operation of a fuel engine. A significant finding is that under certain conditions and compared to the respective pure fuel, combustion of the O/W emulsions stabilized by CML presented lower NOx and CO emissions and maintained a relatively high combustion efficiency. The results highlight the possibilities in high volume application for lignin biomacromolecules.

  8. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3262, Farah (421) and Hokumat-e-pur-Chaman (422) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  9. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3468, Chak-e Wardak-Siyahgird (509) and Kabul (510) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  10. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3164, Lashkar Gah (605) and Kandahar (606) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  11. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3166, Jaldak (701) and Maruf-Nawa (702) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  12. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3568, Pul-e Khumri (503) and Charikar (504) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  13. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3466, La`l wa Sar Jangal (507) and Bamyan (508) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  14. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3268, Khayr Kot (521) and Urgun (522) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  15. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3564, Jowand (405) and Gurziwan (406) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  16. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3466, La`l wa Sar Jangal (507) and Bamyan (508) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  17. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3670, Jurm-Kishim (223) and Zebak (224) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  18. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3368, Ghazni (515) and Gardez (516) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  19. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3266, Uruzgan (519) and Moqur (520) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  20. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3164, Lashkar Gah (605) and Kandahar (606) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  1. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3366, Gizab (513) and Nawer (514) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  2. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3770, Faizabad (217) and Parkhaw (218) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  3. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3470, Jalalabad (511) and Chaghasaray (512) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  4. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3464, Shahrak (411) and Kasi (412) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  5. Hyperspectral Surface Materials Map of Quadrangle 3268, Khayr Kot (521) and Urgun (522) Quadrangles, Afghanistan, Showing Iron-bearing Minerals and Other Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  6. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3470, Jalalabad (511) and Chaghasaray (512) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  7. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3260, Dasht-e-Chah-e-Mazar (419) and Anar Darah (420) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  8. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3266, Uruzgan (519) and Moqur (520) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  9. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3568, Pul-e Khumri (503) and Charikar (504) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  10. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3562, Khawja-Jir (403) and Murghab (404) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  11. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3364, Pasaband (417) and Markaz-e Kajiran (418) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  12. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3770, Faizabad (217) and Parkhaw (218) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  13. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3162, Chakhansur (603) and Kotalak (604) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  14. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3562, Khawja-Jir (403) and Murghab (404) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  15. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3262, Farah (421) and Hokumat-e-pur-Chaman (422) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  16. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3264, Naw Zad-Musa Qala (423) and Dihrawud (424) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  17. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3570, Tagab-e-Munjan (505) and Asmar-Kamdesh (506) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  18. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3366, Gizab (513) and Nawer (514) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  19. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3464, Shahrak (411) and Kasi (412) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  20. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3570, Tagab-e-Munjan (505) and Asmar-Kamdesh (506) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  1. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3462, Herat (409) and Chishti Sharif (410) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  2. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3566, Sangcharak (501) and Sayghan-o-Kamard (502) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other material

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  3. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3564, Jowand (405) and Gurziwan (406) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  4. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3362, Shindand (415) and Tulak (416) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  5. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3468, Chak-e Wardak-Siyahgird (509) and Kabul (510) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  6. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3364, Pasaband (417) and Markaz-e Kajiran (418) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  7. Hyperspectral Surface Materials Map of Quadrangle 3566, Sangcharak (501) and Sayghan-o-Kamard (502) Quadrangles, Afghanistan, Showing Carbonates, Phyllosilicates, Sulfates, Altered Minerals, and Other Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  8. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3166, Jaldak (701) and Maruf-Nawa (702) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  9. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3162, Chakhansur (603) and Kotalak (604) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  10. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3264, Naw Zad-Musa Qala (423) and Dihrawud (424) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  11. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3362, Shindand (415) and Tulak (416) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  12. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3462, Herat (409) and Chishti Sharif (410) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  13. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3368, Ghazni (515) and Gardez (516) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  14. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3670, Jurm-Kishim (223) and Zebak (224) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  15. Repetitive Immunoassay with a Surface Acoustic Wave Device and a Highly Stable Protein Monolayer for On-Site Monitoring of Airborne Dust Mite Allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Koji; Miki, Daisuke; Kishikawa, Chisato; Yoshimura, Naoyuki; Miyajima, Kumiko; Arakawa, Takahiro; Yatsuda, Hiromi; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-10-20

    This work describes a sensor to be incorporated into the on-site monitoring system of airborne house dust mite (HDM) allergens. A surface acoustic wave (SAW) device was combined with self-assembled monolayers of a highly stable antibody capture protein on the SAW surface that have high resistance to pH change. A sandwich assay was used to measure a HDM allergen, Der f 1 derived from Dermatophagoides farinae. Capture antibodies were cross-linked to a protein G based capture layer (ORLA85) on the sensor surface, thereby only Der f 1 and detection antibodies were regenerated by changing pH, resulting in fast repetition of the measurement. The sensor was characterized through 10 repetitive measurements of Der f 1, which demonstrated high reproducibility of the sensor with the coefficient of variation of 5.6%. The limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor was 6.1 ng·mL(-1), encompassing the standard (20 ng·mL(-1)) set by the World Health Organization. Negligible sensor outputs were observed for five different major allergens including other HDM allergens which tend to have cross-reactivity to Der f 1 and their mixtures with Der f 1. Finally, the sensor lifetime was evaluated by conducting three measurements per day, and the sensor output did not substantially change for 4 days. These characteristics make the SAW immunosensor a promising candidate for incorporation into on-site allergen monitoring systems.

  16. Optimization of biobleaching of paper pulp in an expanded bed bioreactor with immobilized alkali stable xylanase by using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, Sundar Rajan; Dempsey, Michael; Krishnan, Chandraraj; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2008-11-01

    Purified alkali stable xylanase from Aspergillus fischeri was immobilized on polystyrene beads using diazotization method. An expanded bed bioreactor was developed with these immobilized beads to biobleach the paper pulp in continuous mode. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the biobleaching conditions. Temperature (degrees C), flow rate of pulp (ml/min) and concentration of the pulp (%) were selected as variables in this study. Optimal conditions for biobleaching process were reaction temperature 60 degrees C, flow rate of 2 ml/min and 5% (w/v) of pulp. The kappa number reduced from 66 in the unbleached pulp to 20 (reduction of 87%). This system proves to be a better option for the conventional chlorine based pulp bleaching.

  17. Using variances in hydrocarbon concentration and carbon stable isotope to determine the important influence of irrigated water on petroleum accumulation in surface soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Wang, Renqing; Yang, Juncheng; Hou, Hong; Du, Xiaoming; Dai, Jiulan

    2013-05-01

    Hunpu is a wastewater-irrigated area southwest of Shenyang. To evaluate petroleum contamination and identify its sources at the area, the aliphatic hydrocarbons and compound-specific carbon stable isotopes of n-alkanes in the soil, irrigation water, and atmospheric deposition were analyzed. The analyses of hydrocarbon concentrations and geochemical characteristics reveal that the water is moderately contaminated by degraded heavy oil. According to the isotope analysis, inputs of modern C3 plants and degraded petroleum are present in the water, air, and soil. The similarities and dissimilarities among the water, air, and soil samples were determined by concentration, isotope, and multivariate statistical analyses. Hydrocarbons from various sources, as well as the water/atmospheric deposition samples, are more effectively differentiated through principal component analysis of carbon stable isotope ratios (δ(13)C) relative to hydrocarbon concentrations. Redundancy analysis indicates that 57.1 % of the variance in the δ(13)C of the soil can be explained by the δ(13)C of both the water and air, and 35.5 % of the variance in the hydrocarbon concentrations of the soil can be explained by hydrocarbon concentrations of both the water and the air. The δ(13)C in the atmospheric deposition accounts for 28.2 % of the δ(13)C variance in the soil, which is considerably higher than the variance in hydrocarbon concentrations of the soil explained by hydrocarbon concentrations of the atmospheric deposition (7.7 %). In contrast to δ(13)C analysis, the analysis of hydrocarbon concentrations underestimates the effect of petroleum contamination in the irrigated water and air on the surface soil. Overall, the irrigated water exerts a larger effect on the surface soil than does the atmospheric deposition.

  18. Surface self-assembled PEGylation of fluoro-based PVDF membranes via hydrophobic-driven copolymer anchoring for ultra-stable biofouling resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nien-Jung; Yang, Hui-Shan; Chang, Yung; Tung, Kuo-Lun; Chen, Wei-Hao; Cheng, Hui-Wen; Hsiao, Sheng-Wen; Aimar, Pierre; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Lai, Juin-Yih

    2013-08-13

    Stable biofouling resistance is significant for general filtration requirements, especially for the improvement of membrane lifetime. A systematic group of hyper-brush PEGylated diblock copolymers containing poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) and polystyrene (PS) was synthesized using an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method and varying PEGMA lengths. This study demonstrates the antibiofouling membrane surfaces by self-assembled anchoring PEGylated diblock copolymers of PS-b-PEGMA on the microporous poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membrane. Two types of copolymers are used to modify the PVDF surface, one with different PS/PEGMA molar ratios in a range from 0.3 to 2.7 but the same PS molecular weights (MWs, ∼5.7 kDa), the other with different copolymer MWs (∼11.4, 19.9, and 34.1 kDa) but the similar PS/PEGMA ratio (∼1.7 ± 0.2). It was found that the adsorption capacities of diblock copolymers on PVDF membranes decreased as molar mass ratios of PS/PEGMA ratio reduced or molecular weights of PS-b-PEGMA increased because of steric hindrance. The increase in styrene content in copolymer enhanced the stability of polymer anchoring on the membrane, and the increase in PEGMA content enhanced the protein resistance of membranes. The optimum PS/PEGMA ratio was found to be in the range between 1.5 and 2.0 with copolymer MWs above 20.0 kDa for the ultrastable resistance of protein adsorption on the PEGylated PVDF membranes. The PVDF membrane coated with such a diblock copolymer owned excellent biofouling resistance to proteins of BSA and lysozyme as well as bacterium of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis and high stable microfiltration operated with domestic wastewater solution in a membrane bioreactor.

  19. Stability of the Encoding Plasmids and Surface Expression of CS6 Differs in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Encoding Different Heat-Stable (ST) Enterotoxins (STh and STp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Joshua; Von Mentzer, Astrid; Loayza Frykberg, Patricia; Aslett, Martin; Page, Andrew J; Sjöling, Åsa; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), one of the most common reasons of diarrhea among infants and children in developing countries, causes disease by expression of either or both of the enterotoxins heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST; divided into human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants), and colonization factors (CFs) among which CS6 is one of the most prevalent ETEC CFs. In this study we show that ETEC isolates expressing CS6+STh have higher copy numbers of the cssABCD operon encoding CS6 than those expressing CS6+STp. Long term cultivation of up to ten over-night passages of ETEC isolates harboring CS6+STh (n = 10) or CS6+STp (n = 15) showed instability of phenotypic expression of CS6 in a majority of the CS6+STp isolates, whereas most of the CS6+STh isolates retained CS6 expression. The observed instability was a correlated with loss of genes cssA and cssD as examined by PCR. Mobilization of the CS6 plasmid from an unstable CS6+STp isolate into a laboratory E. coli strain resulted in loss of the plasmid after a single over-night passage whereas the plasmid from an CS6+STh strain was retained in the laboratory strain during 10 passages. A sequence comparison between the CS6 plasmids from a stable and an unstable ETEC isolate revealed that genes necessary for plasmid stabilization, for example pemI, pemK, stbA, stbB and parM, were not present in the unstable ETEC isolate. Our results indicate that stable retention of CS6 may in part be affected by the stability of the plasmid on which both CS6 and STp or STh are located.

  20. On stable compact minimal submanifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Torralbo, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Stable compact minimal submanifolds of the product of a sphere and any Riemannian manifold are classified whenever the dimension of the sphere is at least three. The complete classification of the stable compact minimal submanifolds of the product of two spheres is obtained. Also, it is proved that the only stable compact minimal surfaces of the product of a 2-sphere and any Riemann surface are the complex ones.

  1. Unpredictably Stable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Failla, Virgilio; Melillo, Francesca; Reichstein, Toke

    2014-01-01

    Is entrepreneurship a more stable career choice for high employment turnover individuals? We find that a transition to entrepreneurship induces a shift towards stayer behavior and identify job matching, job satisfaction and lock-in effects as main drivers. These findings have major implications...

  2. The cataract-associated V41M mutant of human γS-crystallin shows specific structural changes that directly enhance local surface hydrophobicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharat, Somireddy Venkata; Shekhtman, Alexander; Pande, Jayanti, E-mail: jpande@albany.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We present NMR analysis of V41M, a cataract-causing mutant of human γS-crystallin. •Mutation alters strand–strand interactions throughout the N-terminal domain. •Mutation directly affects Trp46 due to key Met41-S–Trp46-pi interactions. •We identify the basis of the surface hydrophobicity increase and residues involved. -- Abstract: The major crystallins expressed in the human lens are γS-, γC- and γD-crystallins. Several mutations in γS-crystallin are associated with hereditary cataracts, one of which involves the substitution of a highly conserved Valine at position 41 to Methionine. According to a recent report, the mutant protein, V41M, shows lower stability and increased surface hydrophobicity compared to the wild-type, and a propensity for self-aggregation. Here we address the structural differences between the two proteins, with residue-level specificity using NMR spectroscopy. Based on the structural model of the mutant protein, our results clearly show that the mutation creates a major local perturbation almost at the junction of the first and second “Greek-key” motifs in the N-terminal domain. A larger section of the second motif (residues 44–86) appears to be mainly affected. Based on the sizeable chemical shift of the imino proton of the indole side-chain of Trp46 in V41M, we suggest that the sulphur atom of Met41 is involved in an S–π interaction with Trp46. This interaction would bring the last β-strand of the first “Greek-key” motif closer to the first β-strand of the second motif. This appears to lead to a domino effect, towards both the N- and C-terminal ends, even as it decays off substantially beyond the domain interface. During this process discreet hydrophobic surface patches are created, as revealed by ANS-binding. Such changes would not affect the secondary structure or cause a major change in the tertiary structure, but can lead to self-aggregation or aberrant binding interactions of the mutant

  3. Oxygen and silicon stable isotopes of diatom silica. Reconstructing changes in surface water hydrography and silicic acid utilization in the late Pleistocene subarctic Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Edith

    2014-03-05

    Deglacial variations in upper ocean nutrient dynamics and stratification in high latitudes, as well as associated changes in thermohaline overturning circulation, are thought to have played a key role in changing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. This thesis examines the relationship between past changes in subarctic Pacific upper ocean stratification and nutrient (silicic acid) utilization, using oxygen and silicon stable isotopes of diatom silica, for the first time at millennial-scale resolution and analyzed with a new and efficient instrumentation set-up. The isotopic data, presented in three manuscripts, show a consistent picture of millennial-scale variability in upper ocean stratification and silicic acid utilization during the last ∝50 ka BP, e.g. indicating that the subarctic Pacific was a source region for atmospheric CO{sub 2} during the last deglaciation (late Heinrich Stadial 1 and the Boelling/Alleroed). The presented results demonstrate the high potential of combined diatom oxygen and silicon stable isotope analysis especially for, but not restricted to, marine regions characterized by a low biogenic carbonate content like the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean.

  4. Transient and stable species kinetics in pulsed cc-rf CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2} plasmas and their relation to surface processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, O; Stepanov, S; Meichsner, J [Institute of Physics, University of Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Strasse 6, D-17487 Greifswald (Germany)

    2007-12-07

    Fluorocarbon plasmas are widely used in applications and as model systems for fundamental investigations of complex plasmas. In recent years pulsing of the rf discharge has been used as an additional parameter for process control, because many plasma parameters, e.g. densities and temperatures, become time dependent when the rf power is modulated. In this work tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy in the mid-IR (IR-TDLAS) was applied to measure time-resolved densities of the transient species CF and CF{sub 2} and that of the stable product C{sub 2}F{sub 4} in pulsed CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2} asymmetrical capacitively coupled radio-frequency plasmas at 13.56 MHz. Simultaneously, the thickness of amorphous thin fluorocarbon films (a-C:F) on the powered electrode was determined by means of in situ ellipsometry. Therefore, it was possible to study the correlation between gas phase species and thin film formation. The decay curves of the CF and CF{sub 2} densities in the off-phase of the pulsed rf plasma were fitted with a combination of first and second order processes involving the loss processes of these radicals in the gas phase and at the surfaces. Particularly, in the plasma off-phase, the loss of CF{sub 2} radicals forming C{sub 2}F{sub 4} was found to be dominant in the CF{sub 2} kinetics, but of minor importance for C{sub 2}F{sub 4} production. Plasma process parameters such as total pressure, gas composition, power and power modulation were varied to investigate the interaction between gas phase species and surfaces.

  5. 响应面法优化复合植物蛋白饮品的稳定体系%Optimization of stable system for blended plant protein drink using response surface methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伏金娣; 刘小杰; 马青

    2012-01-01

    用响应面方法对复合植物蛋白饮品的稳定体系进行了优化。先用全因子实验对稳定剂组分卡拉胶、瓜尔豆胶、黄原胶和结冷胶对复合植物蛋白饮品沉淀量的影响进行了评价,并找出主要影响因子为瓜尔豆胶和结冷胶,其它组分对沉淀量没有显著影响。采用中心组合设计及响应面分析确定主要影响因子的最佳浓度。稳定体系的最佳组成为(g/L):卡拉胶0.2、瓜尔豆胶0.5、黄原胶0.2、结冷胶0.5,此条件下复合植物蛋白饮品表现出良好的稳定性。%Response surface methodology was used to optimize stable system for blended plant protein drink. In the first optimization step the influence of carrageenan, guar gum, xanthan gum and gellan gum on precipitation of blended plant protein drink was evaluated using a full factorial design.Guar gum and gellan gum were main impact factor,and other components had no significant effect on precipitation.The optimal concentrations of guar gum and gellan gum were determined by a central composite design and response surface analysis.The best composition of stable system were(g/L) : carrageenan 0.2, guar gum 0.5, xanthan gum 0.2 and gellan gum 0.5.Blended plant protein drink showed good stability under these conditions.

  6. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  7. Carbon Dynamics of Surface Soil after Land Use Change in a Seasonal Tropical Forest in North-eastern Thailand: Application of a Stable Carbon Isotope Mixing Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, M.; Visaratana, T.; Sukchan, S.; Thaingam, R.; Okada, N.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, soil is vital to the mitigation of climate change. In tropical forests, the soil contains an estimated 216 Gt of carbon, equivalent to half of the total carbon in the tropical forest ecosystem. Little is known regarding changes in soil carbon following land use changes in tropical regions. We examined the differences in carbon dynamics in a chronosequence of Acacia mangium plantations established on grasslands following the deforestation of natural forest in north-eastern Thailand. The study site was located at the Sakaerat Silvicultural Research Station (14º28'06.1″N, 101º54'15.0″E; altitude 420 m asl), Nakhon Rachasima Province, north-eastern Thailand. Mean annual air temperature was 26ºC, and annual precipitation was 1,100 mm, with a dry (November-April) and wet (May-October) season. Soil carbon and the stable carbon isotope ratio (d13C) in the surface soil (0-5 and 5-10 cm deep) were determined at 12 and 24 years following establishment of A. mangium plantations, as well as for secondary forest and grassland. Using the stable carbon isotope mixing model based on differences in the natural abundance of d13C in plants with C3 (i.e., trees) and C4 (i.e., grasses) pathways for CO2 fixation, the amount of soil carbon derived from the plantations, forest, and grassland was calculated. Soil carbon at a depth of 10 cm was higher in the secondary forest (1,929 gCm-2) and grassland (2,508 gCm-2) than in the plantations (1,703 gCm-2 at 12 years, 1,673gCm-2 at 24 years). Soil carbon derived from A. mangium was 67% (0-5 cm deep) and 62% (5-10 cm deep) of total soil carbon at 12 years, and was 100% (0-5 cm deep) and 90% (5-10 cm deep) at 24 years in the plantations. We found that most of the soil carbon at a depth of 0-5 cm in the young plantation changed from grass-derived to tree-derived carbon within a relatively short period of 24 years. Because of changes in soil carbon, exotic, fast growing plantations like those of A. mangium are needed to quickly

  8. Ric-3 chaperone-mediated stable cell-surface expression of the neuronal a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in mammalian cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana Sofia VALLfiS; Ana M ROCCAMO; Francisco J BARRANTES

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Studies of the a7-type neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR), one of the receptor forms involved in many physiologically relevant processes in the central nervous system, have been hampered by the inability of this homomeric protein to assemble in most heterologous expression systems. In a recent study, it was shown that the chaperone Ric-3 is necessary for the maturation and functional expression of a7-type AChRs'11. The current work aims at obtaining and characterizing a cell line with high functional expression of the human a7 AChR.Methods: Ric-3 cDNA was incorporated into SHE-Pl-ha7 cells expressing the a7-type AChR. Functional studies were undertaken using single-channel patch-clamp recordings. Equilibrium and kinetic [125I]a-bungarotoxin binding assays, as well as fluorescence microscopy using fluorescent a-bungarotoxin, anti-a7 antibody, and GFP-a7 were performed on the new clone.Results: The human a7-type AChR was stably expressed in a new cell line, which we coined SHE-PI-ha7-Ric-3, by co-expression of the chaperone Ric-3. Cell-surface AChRs exhibited [125I]aBTX saturable binding with an apparent KD of about 55 nmol/L. Fluorescence microscopy revealed dispersed and micro-clustered AChR aggregates at the surface of SHE-PI-ha7-Ric-3 cells. Larger micron-sized clusters were observed in the absence of receptor-clustering proteins or upon aggregation with anti-a7 antibodies, hi contrast, chaperone-less SHE-PI-ha7 cells expressed only intracellular a.7 AChRs and failed to produce detectable single-channel currents.Conclusion: The production of a stable and functional cell line of neuroepithelial lineage with robust cell-surface expression of neuronal a7-type AChR, as reported here, constitutes an important advance in the study of homomeric receptors in mammalian cells.

  9. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  10. Stable Recursive Subhomogeneous Algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Hutian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce stable recursive subhomogeneous algebras (SRSHAs), which is analogous to recursive subhomogeneous algebras (RSHAs) introduced by N. C. Phillips in the studies of free minimal integer actions on compact metric spaces. The difference between the stable version and the none stable version is that the irreducible representations of SRSHAs are infinite dimensional, but the irreducible representations of the RSHAs are finite dimensional. While RSHAs play an important role in the study of free minimal integer actions on compact metric spaces, SRSHAs play an analogous role in the study of free minimal actions by the group of the real numbers on compact metric spaces. In this paper, we show that simple inductive limits of SRSHAs with no dimension growth in which the connecting maps are injective and non-vanishing have topological stable rank one.

  11. Development of shelf-stable, ready-to-eat (RTE) shrimps ( Litopenaeus vannamei ) using water activity lowering agent by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongbo; Xue, Changhu; Xue, Yong; Su, Wei; Li, Zhaojie; Cong, Haihua

    2013-12-01

    Three water-activity-lowering agents (composite phosphate, sorbitol and glycerol) were used to develop a kind of shelf-stable, ready-to-eat (RTE) shrimp. Formula of water-activity- lowering agents was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) using a central composite design. Model equation was proposed with regard to the contents of composite phosphate (X1), sorbitol (X 2) and glycerol (X3) : [Formula: see text]. The model with a very low probability value (P < 0.0003) was highly significant and the value of lack-of-fit was 0.4028, indicating that the model could predict water activity of shrimps using different agents. Composite phosphate of 0.22%, sorbitol of 3.12% and glycerol of 2.51% were found to be the optimal condition to obtain the lowest water activity of 0.884. Compared to the control shrimps, RTE shrimps treated with water-activity-lowering agents had a longer shelflife and higher sensorial acceptability. During storage at temperature of 35 °C, the quality of RTE shrimps in term of appearance, flavor and texture was found to be superior to the untreated ones. Texture profile, TBARS value, contents of astaxanthin and free amino acid of treated samples were found to be decreased slower from origin value compared to that of untreated samples. These RTE shrimps were biologically safe and sensorially acceptable after 30 days of storage at temperature of 35 °C. Briefly, the application of water-activity-lowering agents extent the shelflife of RTE shrimps obviously and would be beneficial for the exploitation of white shrimp.

  12. 微纳复合结构表面稳定润湿状态及转型过程的热力学分析∗%Thermo dynamic analysis of stable wetting states and wetting transition of micro/nanoscale structured surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Superhydrophobicity of biological surfaces with micro/nanoscale hierarchical roughness has recently been given great attention and widely reported in many experimental studies due to the unique wettability. For example, the dual-scale structure of the lotus leaf not only shows high contact angle and low contact angle hysteresis but also presents good stability and mechanical properties. Though lots of experimental studies on the wettability of artificial hierarchical rough surface have been carried out, a thorough analysis on the contribution of micro- and nano-scaled roughness to the metastable wetting states and their transition is still lack. In this paper, a thermodynamic approach is applied to analyze all the wetting states (including four stable wetting states and five transition states) of a water droplet on a surface with micro/nanoscale hierarchical roughness, and the corresponding free energy expressions and apparent contact angle equations are deduced. The stable wetting states are confirmed by the principle of minimum free energy. And the calculated results by these state equations can fit well with the experimental results reported in the literature when compared with the previous models. Meanwhile, the influence of micro/nanoscale roughness on the stable wetting states and metastable-stable transition has been analyzed thermodynamically. It is found that there is a synergistic effect of micro and nanoscale roughness on wettability, which nlay result in many different wetting states. There are four wetting states during increasing relative pitch of a microscaled structure at a given nanoscaled structure, but two wetting states can be obtained as increasing relative pitch of nanoscaled structure at a given microscaled structure. The change of nondimensional energy and nondimensional energy barrier in the metastable-stable transition process of water droplet wetting micro and nanoscaled structure is quantitatively analyzed. Results indicate that the

  13. Analysis of cosmid clones of nuclear DNA from Trypanosome brucei shows that the genes for variant surface glycoproteins are clustered in the genome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Valerio (Dinko); T. de Lange; P. Borst (Piet); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); L.H.T. van der Ploeg

    1982-01-01

    textabstractTrypanosoma brucei contains more than a hundred genes coding for the different variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs). Activation of some of these genes involves the duplication of the gene (the basic copy or BC) and transposition of the duplicate to an expression site (yielding the expres

  14. Fusion peptide P15-CSP shows antibiofilm activity and pro-osteogenic activity when deposited as a coating on hydrophilic but not hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian; Contreras-Garcia, Angel; LoVetri, Karen; Yakandawala, Nandadeva; Wertheimer, Michael R; De Crescenzo, Gregory; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2015-12-01

    In the context of porous bone void filler for oral bone reconstruction, peptides that suppress microbial growth and promote osteoblast function could be used to enhance the performance of a porous bone void filler. We tested the hypothesis that P15-CSP, a novel fusion peptide containing collagen-mimetic osteogenic peptide P15, and competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), a cationic antimicrobial peptide, has emerging properties not shared by P15 or CSP alone. Peptide-coated surfaces were tested for antimicrobial activity toward Streptoccocus mutans, and their ability to promote human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment, spreading, metabolism, and osteogenesis. In the osteogenesis assay, peptides were coated on tissue culture plastic and on thin films generated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to have hydrophilic or hydrophobic character (water contact angles 63°, 42°, and 92°, respectively). S. mutans planktonic growth was specifically inhibited by CSP, whereas biofilm formation was inhibited by P15-CSP. MSC adhesion and actin stress fiber formation was strongly enhanced by CSP, P15-CSP, and fibronectin coatings and modestly enhanced by P15 versus uncoated surfaces. Metabolic assays revealed that CSP was slightly cytotoxic to MSCs. MSCs developed alkaline phosphatase activity on all surfaces, with or without peptide coatings, and consistently deposited the most biomineralized matrix on hydrophilic surfaces coated with P15-CSP. Hydrophobic thin films completely suppressed MSC biomineralization, consistent with previous findings of suppressed osteogenesis on hydrophobic bioplastics. Collective data in this study provide new evidence that P15-CSP has unique dual capacity to suppress biofilm formation, and to enhance osteogenic activity as a coating on hydrophilic surfaces.

  15. Photocatalytic activities of tin(IV) oxide surface-modified titanium(IV) dioxide show a strong sensitivity to the TiO 2 crystal form

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Qiliang; Fujishima, Musashi; Nolan, Michael; Iwaszuk, Anna; Tada, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    Surface modification of rutile TiO2 with extremely small SnO2 clusters gives rise to a great increase in its UV light activity for degradation of model organic water pollutants, while the effect is much smaller for anatase TiO2. This crystal form sensitivity is rationalized in terms of the difference in the electronic modification of TiO2 through the interfacial Sn−O−Ti bonds. The increase in the density of states near the conduction band minimum of rutile by hybridization with the SnO2 clust...

  16. Biocompatible photocrosslinked poly(ester anhydride) based on functionalized poly(epsilon-caprolactone) prepolymer shows surface erosion controlled drug release in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönkäre, J; Hakala, R A; Vlasova, M A; Huotari, A; Kilpeläinen, M; Kiviniemi, A; Meretoja, V; Herzig, K H; Korhonen, H; Seppälä, J V; Järvinen, K

    2010-09-15

    Star-shaped poly(epsilon-caprolactone) oligomers functionalized with succinic anhydride were used as prepolymers to prepare photocrosslinked poly(ester anhydride) to evaluate their in vivo drug delivery functionality and biocompatibility. Thus, in this work, erosion, drug release and safety of the photocrosslinked poly(ester anhydride) were examined in vitro and in vivo. A small water-soluble drug, propranolol HCl (M(w) 296 g/mol, solubility 50 mg/ml), was used as the model drug in an evaluation of the erosion controlled release. Drug-free and drug-loaded (10-60% w/w) poly(ester anhydride) discoids eroded in vitro (pH 7.4 buffer, +37 degrees C) linearly within 24-48 h. A strong correlation between the polymer erosion and the linear drug release in vitro was observed, indicating that the release had been controlled by the erosion of the polymer. Similarly, in vivo studies (s.c. implantation of discoids in rats) indicated that surface erosion controlled drug release from the discoids (drug loading 40% w/w). Oligomers did not decrease cell viability in vitro and the implanted discoids (s.c., rats) did not evoke any cytokine activity in vivo. In summary, surface erosion controlled drug release and the safety of photocrosslinked poly(ester anhydride) were demonstrated in this study.

  17. Thermodynamically Stable Pickering Emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sacanna, S.; Kegel, W.K.; Philipse, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    We show that under appropriate conditions, mixtures of oil, water, and nanoparticles form thermodynamically stable oil-in-water emulsions with monodisperse droplet diameters in the range of 30–150 nm. This observation challenges current wisdom that so-called Pickering emulsions are at most metastabl

  18. Stable Flows over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannik Matuschke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the notion of stability is extended to network flows over time. As a useful device in our proofs, we present an elegant preflow-push variant of the Gale-Shapley algorithm that operates directly on the given network and computes stable flows in pseudo-polynomial time, both in the static flow and the flow over time case. We show periodical properties of stable flows over time on networks with an infinite time horizon. Finally, we discuss the influence of storage at vertices, with different results depending on the priority of the corresponding holdover edges.

  19. The use of a well-defined surface organometallic complex as a probe molecule: [(SiO)TaVCl2Me2] shows different isolated silanol sites on the silica surface

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yin

    2014-01-01

    TaVCl2Me3 reacts with silica(700) and produces two different [(SiO)TaVCl2Me2] surface organometallic species, suggesting a heterogeneity of the highly dehydroxylated silica surface, which was studied with a combined experimental and theoretical approach. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  20. The fabrication of stable superhydrophobic surfaces using a thin Au/Pd coating over a hydrophilic 3C-SiC nanorod network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Afzal [Materials Science Centre, IIT Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Sohail, Shiraz [Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Jacob, Chacko, E-mail: cxj14_holiday@yahoo.com [Materials Science Centre, IIT Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Superhydrophobicity achieved using a metallic coating on a nanorod surface of 3C-SiC. • Hierarchical nanostructures made up of nanorod network with thin Au/Pd coating. • Surface adsorbed organic contaminants further lowered the surface energy. • High water contact angle (160°) and very low sliding angle (<5°) of a water droplet. • Reproducibility of the results was checked over a period of 14 months. - Abstract: In this work, it has been demonstrated that for hydrophilic materials, like SiC, etc., superhydrophobicity can be achieved by coating them with a material like Au/Pd with surface adsorbed organic contaminants, rather than modifying them by fluoropolymers as is usually done. Dense and randomly aligned 3C-SiC nanorods were grown in a cold-wall APCVD reactor using Ni as a catalyst which formed a network of micro/nano air pockets and exhibited superhydrophobic behavior when modified by an Au/Pd metal alloy coating by forming hierarchical nanostructures with surface adsorbed organic contaminants. A high water contact angle (160°), very low sliding angle (<5°), rebounding and a rubber ball-like behavior of a water droplet were observed on such a metal (Au/Pd) modified surface of 3C-SiC nanorods. The durability of the surface and reproducibility of the results was checked over a period of about 14 months under ambient atmosphere at room temperature, which demonstrates the long term stability of these superhydrophobic surfaces.

  1. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  2. Stable solid-phase Rh antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yared, M A; Moise, K J; Rodkey, L S

    1997-12-01

    Numerous investigators have attempted to isolate the Rh antigens in a stable, immunologically reactive form since the discovery of the Rh system over 56 years ago. We report here a successful and reproducible approach to solubilizing and adsorbing the human Rh antigen(s) to a solid-phase matrix in an antigenically active form. Similar results were obtained with rabbit A/D/F red blood cell antigens. The antigen preparation was made by dissolution of the red blood cell membrane lipid followed by fragmentation of the residual cytoskeleton in an EDTA solution at low ionic strength. The antigenic activity of the soluble preparations was labile in standard buffers but was stable in zwitterionic buffers for extended periods of time. Further studies showed that the antigenic activity of these preparations was enhanced, as was their affinity for plastic surfaces, in the presence of acidic zwitterionic buffers. Adherence to plastic surfaces at low pH maintained antigenic reactivity and specificity for antibody was retained. The data show that this approach yields a stable form of antigenically active human Rh D antigen that could be used in a red blood cell-free assay for quantitative analysis of Rh D antibody and for Rh D antibody immunoadsorption and purification.

  3. Stable charged cosmic strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, H; Quandt, M; Graham, N

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≈10(-18)  m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  4. Decomposability for stable processes

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yizao; Roy, Parthanil

    2011-01-01

    We characterize all possible independent symmetric $\\alpha$-stable (S$\\alpha$S) components of a non--Gaussian S$\\alpha$S process, $0<\\alpha<2$. In particular, we characterize the independent stationary S$\\alpha$S components of a stationary S$\\alpha$S process. One simple consequence of our characterization is that all stationary components of the S$\\alpha$S moving average processes are trivial. As a main application, we show that the standard Brown--Resnick process has a moving average representation. This complements a result of Kabluchko et al. (2009), who obtained mixed moving average representations for these processes. We also develop a parallel characterization theory for max-stable processes.

  5. How stable are the 'stable ancient shields'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Giulio; Mattila, Jussi

    2014-05-01

    "Archean cratons are relatively flat, stable regions of the crust that have remained undeformed since the Precambrian, forming the ancient cores of the continents" (King, EPSL, 2005). While this type of statement is supported by a wealth of constraints in the case of episodes of thoroughgoing ductile deformation affecting shield regions of Archean and also Peleoproterozoic age, a growing amount of research indicates that shields are not nearly as structurally stable within the broad field of environmental conditions leading to brittle deformation. In fact, old crystalline basements usually present compelling evidence of long brittle deformation histories, often very complex and challenging to unfold. Recent structural and geochronological studies point to a significant mechanical instability of the shield areas, wherein large volumes of 'stable' rocks actually can become saturated with fractures and brittle faults soon after regional cooling exhumes them to below c. 300-350° C. How cold, rigid and therefore strong shields respond to applied stresses remains, however, still poorly investigated and understood. This in turn precludes a better definition of the shallow rheological properties of large, old crystalline blocks. In particular, we do not yet have good constraints on the mechanisms of mechanical reactivation that control the partial (if not total) accommodation of new deformational episodes by preexisting structures, which remains a key to untangle brittle histories lasting several hundred Myr. In our analysis, we use the Svecofennian Shield (SS) as an example of a supposedly 'stable' region with Archean nucleii and Paleoproterozoic cratonic areas to show how it is possible to unravel the details of brittle histories spanning more than 1.5 Gyr. New structural and geochronological results from Finland are integrated with a review of existing data from Sweden to explore how the effects of far-field stresses are partitioned within a shield, which was growing

  6. Compression Maps and Stable Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Kenneth L

    2011-01-01

    Balanced relations were defined by G. Abrams to extend the convolution product used in the construction of incidence rings. We define stable relations,which form a class between balanced relations and preorders. We also define a compression map to be a surjective function between two sets which preserves order, preserves off-diagonal relations, and has the additional property every transitive triple is the image of a transitive triple. We show a compression map preserves the balanced and stable properties but the compression of a preorder may be stable and not transitive. We also cover an example of a stable relation which is not the compression of a preorder. In our main theorem we provide necessary and sufficient conditions for a finite stable relation to be the compression of a preorder.

  7. Kinetic Stable Delaunay Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Pankaj K; Guibas, Leonidas J; Kaplan, Haim; Koltun, Vladlen; Rubin, Natan; Sharir, Micha

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of maintaining the Euclidean Delaunay triangulation $\\DT$ of a set $P$ of $n$ moving points in the plane, along algebraic trajectories of constant description complexity. Since the best known upper bound on the number of topological changes in the full $\\DT$ is nearly cubic, we seek to maintain a suitable portion of it that is less volatile yet retains many useful properties. We introduce the notion of a stable Delaunay graph, which is a dynamic subgraph of the Delaunay triangulation. The stable Delaunay graph (a) is easy to define, (b) experiences only a nearly quadratic number of discrete changes, (c) is robust under small changes of the norm, and (d) possesses certain useful properties. The stable Delaunay graph ($\\SDG$ in short) is defined in terms of a parameter $\\alpha>0$, and consists of Delaunay edges $pq$ for which the angles at which $p$ and $q$ see their Voronoi edge $e_{pq}$ are at least $\\alpha$. We show that (i) $\\SDG$ always contains at least roughly one third of the Del...

  8. Stable line defects in silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dibyajyoti; Parida, Prakash; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-11-01

    Line defects in two-dimensional (2D) materials greatly modulate various properties of their pristine form. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations, we investigate the structural reconstructions of different kinds of grain boundaries in the silicene sheets. It is evident that depending upon the presence of silicon adatoms and edge shape of grain boundaries (i.e., armchair or zigzag), stable extended line defects (ELDs) can be introduced in a controlled way. Further studies show the stability of these line-defects in silicene, grown on Ag(111) surface at room-temperature. Importantly, unlike most of the 2D sheet materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, 5-5-8 line defects modify the nonmagnetic semimetallic pristine silicene sheet to spin-polarized metal. As ferromagnetically ordered magnetic moments remain strongly localized at the line defect, a one-dimensional spin channel gets created in silicene. Interestingly, these spin channels are quite stable because, unlike the edge of nanoribbons, structural reconstruction or contamination cannot destroy the ordering of magnetic moments here. Zigzag silicene nanoribbons with a 5-5-8 line defect also exhibit various interesting electronic and magnetic properties depending upon their width as well as the nature of the magnetic coupling between edge and defect spin states. Upon incorporation of other ELDs, such as 4-4-4 and 4-8 defects, 2D sheets and nanoribbons of silicene show a nonmagnetic metallic or semiconducting ground state. Highlighting the controlled formation of ELDs and consequent emergence of technologically important properties in silicene, we propose new routes to realize silicene-based nanoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  9. On Boolean Stable Laws

    CERN Document Server

    Arizmendi, Octavio

    2012-01-01

    We determine which Boolean stable law is freely infinitely divisible and which is not. Some positive Boolean stable laws and a mixture of them have completely monotonic densities and they are both freely and classically infinitely divisible. Freely infinitely divisible Boolean stable laws and the corresponding free stable laws are non trivial examples whose free divisibility indicators are infinity.

  10. Geochemistry of organic carbon and nitrogen in surface sediments of coastal Bohai Bay inferred from their ratios and stable isotopic signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuelu; Yang, Yuwei; Wang, Chuanyuan

    2012-06-01

    Total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN) and their δ(13)C and δ(15)N values were determined for 42 surface sediments from coastal Bohai Bay in order to determine the concentration and identify the source of organic matter. The sampling sites covered both the marine region of coastal Bohai Bay and the major rivers it connects with. More abundant TOC and TN in sediments from rivers than from the marine region reflect the situation that most of the terrestrial organic matter is deposited before it meets the sea. The spatial variation in δ(13)C and δ(15)N signatures implies that the input of organic matter from anthropogenic activities has a more significant influence on its distribution than that from natural processes. Taking the area as a whole, surface sediments in the marine region of coastal Bohai Bay are dominated by marine derived organic carbon, which on average accounts for 62±11% of TOC.

  11. Surface enrichment of Pt in stable Pt-Ir nano-alloy particles on MgAl 2 O 4 spinel in oxidizing atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wei-Zhen; Nie, Lei; Cheng, Yingwen; Kovarik, Libor; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong

    2017-04-01

    With the capability of MgAl2O4 spinel {111} nano-facets in stabilizing small Rh, Ir and Pt particles, bimetallic Ir-Pt catalysts on the same support were investigated, aiming at further lowering the catalyst cost by substituting expensive Pt with cheaper Ir in the bulk. Small Pt-Ir nano-alloy particles (< 2nm) were successfully stabilized on the spinel {111} nano-facets as expected. Interestingly, methanol oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) rate on the surface Pt atoms increases with oxidizing aging but decreases upon reducing treatment, where Ir is almost inactive under the same reaction conditions. Up to three times enhancement in Pt exposure was achieved when the sample was oxidized at 800 °C in air for 1 week and subsequently reduced by H2 for 2 h, demonstrating successful surface enrichment of Pt on Pt-Ir nano-alloy particles. A dynamic stabilization mechanism involving wetting\

  12. Nuclear physics and stable isotopes; Physique nucleaire et isotopes stables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutte, D. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee

    1994-12-31

    The aim of this paper is to show that fundamental research in nuclear physics requires utilization of stable isotopes; stable isotopes are essential as target material since a large quantity of nucleus have to be studied in order to appreciate all the complexity of the nuclear structure, but also as a tool, such as beams, for the same purpose. Examples are given with samarium, tin and germanium isotopes. 7 figs.

  13. Very long-chain fatty acid-containing lipids rather than sphingolipids per se are required for raft association and stable surface transport of newly synthesized plasma membrane ATPase in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaigg, Barbara; Toulmay, Alexandre; Schneiter, Roger

    2006-11-10

    The proton-pumping H+-ATPase, Pma1p, is an abundant and very long lived polytopic protein of the yeast plasma membrane. Pma1p constitutes a major cargo of the secretory pathway and thus serves as a model to study plasma membrane biogenesis. Pma1p associates with detergent-resistant membrane domains (lipid "rafts") already in the ER, and a lack of raft association correlates with mistargeting of the protein to the vacuole, where it is degraded. We are analyzing the role of specific lipids in membrane domain formation and have previously shown that surface transport of Pma1p is independent of newly synthesized sterols but that sphingolipids with C26 very long chain fatty acid are crucial for raft association and surface transport of Pma1p (Gaigg, B., Timischl, B., Corbino, L., and Schneiter, R. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 22515-22522). We now describe a more detailed analysis of the function that sphingolipids play in this process. Using a yeast strain in which the essential function of sphingolipids is substituted by glycerophospholipids containing C26 very long chain fatty acids, we find that sphingolipids per se are dispensable for raft association and surface delivery of Pma1p but that the C26 fatty acid is crucial. We thus conclude that the essential function of sphingolipids for membrane domain formation and stable surface delivery of Pma1p is provided by the C26 fatty acid that forms part of the yeast ceramide.

  14. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  15. Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina) Updated:Sep 19,2016 You may have heard the term “angina pectoris” or “stable angina” in your doctor’s office, but ...

  16. Preferred extensions as stable models

    CERN Document Server

    Nieves, Juan Carlos; Cortés, Ulises

    2008-01-01

    Given an argumentation framework AF, we introduce a mapping function that constructs a disjunctive logic program P, such that the preferred extensions of AF correspond to the stable models of P, after intersecting each stable model with the relevant atoms. The given mapping function is of polynomial size w.r.t. AF. In particular, we identify that there is a direct relationship between the minimal models of a propositional formula and the preferred extensions of an argumentation framework by working on representing the defeated arguments. Then we show how to infer the preferred extensions of an argumentation framework by using UNSAT algorithms and disjunctive stable model solvers. The relevance of this result is that we define a direct relationship between one of the most satisfactory argumentation semantics and one of the most successful approach of non-monotonic reasoning i.e., logic programming with the stable model semantics.

  17. Stable canonical rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iemhoff, R.; Bezhanishvili, N.; Bezhanishvili, Guram

    2016-01-01

    We introduce stable canonical rules and prove that each normal modal multi-conclusion consequence relation is axiomatizable by stable canonical rules. We apply these results to construct finite refutation patterns for modal formulas, and prove that each normal modal logic is axiomatizable by stable

  18. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar re

  19. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar re

  20. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar

  1. The distribution of radioactive ( 3H, 14C) and stable ( 2H, 18O) isotopes in precipitation, surface and groundwaters of NW Yugoslavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvatinčić, Nada; Krajcar-Bronić, Ines; Pezdič, Jože; Srdoč, Dušan; Obelić, Bogomil

    1986-11-01

    The isotopic measurements ( 2H, 3H, 18O) of precipitiation in Zagreb (since 1976) and Ljubljana (since 1981) in NW Yugoslavia show seasonal variations typical of the Northern hemisphere. Continuous measurements of tritium concentration in the Sava River ca 10 km upstream from Zagreb have been performed since 1976. Data show a smooth line without periodical changes, but a steady decrease is obvious. The sampling place is situated ca 30 km downstream from the Kr\\vsko Nuclear Power Plant. No change in tritium concentration due to the operation of the power plant has been observed. A comprehensive program of monitoring of the 14C activity in air CO 2 as well as in vegetables, cereals and tree-rings in the surroundings of the Nuclear Power Plant Kr\\vsko has been carried out since 1984. The measurement of 2H and 18O in karst springs of the Korana River catchmet area (Plitvice National Park) gave a meteoric water line equal to δ2H = 7.9 δ18O + 8.5, which is typical of the NW part of Yugoslavia. A fairly constant concentration of 2H and 18O in spring water indicates a thorough mixing of water in the karst aquifers. The mean residence time (MRT) of karst water was determined by measuring monthly tritium activity of spring water. The MRT is very short, ranging between 1 and 4 years on average.

  2. Targeted disruption of a ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (RESA)-like export protein gene in Plasmodium falciparum confers stable chondroitin 4-sulfate cytoadherence capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goel, Suchi; Muthusamy, Arivalagan; Miao, Jun

    2014-01-01

    . In this study, microarray transcriptome analysis showed that the absence of a gene cluster, comprising kahrp, pfemp3, and four other genes, results in the loss of parasitized erythrocytes adhering to chondroitin 4-sulfate (C4S). The role of one of these genes, PF3D7_0201600/PFB0080c, which encodes PHISTb......The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family proteins mediate the adherence of infected erythrocytes to microvascular endothelia of various organs, including the placenta, thereby contributing to cerebral, placental, and other severe malaria pathogenesis. Several...... that the loss of PFB0080c markedly compromises the var gene switching process, leading to a marked reduction in the switching rate and additional PfEMP1 expression by a minor population of parasites. PFB0080c interacts with VAR2CSA and modulates knob-associated Hsp40 expression. Thus, PFB0080c may regulate VAR2...

  3. Air-Stable Surface-Passivated Perovskite Quantum Dots for Ultra-Robust, Single- and Two-Photon-Induced Amplified Spontaneous Emission

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Jun

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate ultra-air- and photostable CsPbBr3 quantum dots (QDs) by using an inorganic–organic hybrid ion pair as the capping ligand. This passivation approach to perovskite QDs yields high photoluminescence quantum yield with unprecedented operational stability in ambient conditions (60 ± 5% lab humidity) and high pump fluences, thus overcoming one of the greatest challenges impeding the development of perovskite-based applications. Due to the robustness of passivated perovskite QDs, we were able to induce ultrastable amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in solution processed QD films not only through one photon but also through two-photon absorption processes. The latter has not been observed before in the family of perovskite materials. More importantly, passivated perovskite QD films showed remarkable photostability under continuous pulsed laser excitation in ambient conditions for at least 34 h (corresponds to 1.2 × 108 laser shots), substantially exceeding the stability of other colloidal QD systems in which ASE has been observed.

  4. Stable lepton mass matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Domcke, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    We study natural lepton mass matrices, obtained assuming the stability of physical flavour observables with respect to the variations of individual matrix elements. We identify all four possible stable neutrino textures from algebraic conditions on their entries. Two of them turn out to be uniquely associated to specific neutrino mass patterns. We then concentrate on the semi-degenerate pattern, corresponding to an overall neutrino mass scale within the reach of future experiments. In this context we show that i) the neutrino and charged lepton mixings and mass matrices are largely constrained by the requirement of stability, ii) naturalness considerations give a mild preference for the Majorana phase most relevant for neutrinoless double-beta decay, $\\alpha \\sim \\pi/2$, and iii) SU(5) unification allows to extend the implications of stability to the down quark sector. The above considerations would benefit from an experimental determination of the PMNS ratio $|U_{32}/U_{31}|$, i.e. of the Dirac phase $\\delta...

  5. Hadamard Factorization of Stable Polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loredo-Villalobos, Carlos Arturo; Aguirre-Hernández, Baltazar

    2011-11-01

    The stable (Hurwitz) polynomials are important in the study of differential equations systems and control theory (see [7] and [19]). A property of these polynomials is related to Hadamard product. Consider two polynomials p,q ∈ R[x]:p(x) = anxn+an-1xn-1+...+a1x+a0q(x) = bmx m+bm-1xm-1+...+b1x+b0the Hadamard product (p × q) is defined as (p×q)(x) = akbkxk+ak-1bk-1xk-1+...+a1b1x+a0b0where k = min(m,n). Some results (see [16]) shows that if p,q ∈R[x] are stable polynomials then (p×q) is stable, also, i.e. the Hadamard product is closed; however, the reciprocal is not always true, that is, not all stable polynomial has a factorization into two stable polynomials the same degree n, if n> 4 (see [15]).In this work we will give some conditions to Hadamard factorization existence for stable polynomials.

  6. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3260, Dasht-e-Chah-e-Mazar (419) and Anar Darah (420) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  7. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3666 and 3766, Balkh (219), Mazar-e Sharif (220), Qarqin (213), and Hazara Toghai (214) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  8. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3668 and 3768, Baghlan (221), Taluqan (222), Imam Sahib (215), and Rustaq (216) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  9. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 2962 and 3062, Gawdezereh (615), Galachah (616), Chahar Burjak (609), and Khan Neshin (610) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefen, Todd M.; King, Trude V.V.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  10. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3360 and 3460, Kawir-e Naizar (413), Kohe-Mahmudo-Esmailjan (414), Kol-e Namaksar (407), and Ghoriyan (408) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  11. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3664 and 3764, Char Shengo (123), Shibirghan (124), Jalajin (117), and Kham-Ab (118) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  12. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3666 and 3766, Balkh (219), Mazar-e Sharif (220), Qarqin (213), and Hazara Toghai (214) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  13. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3360 and 3460, Kawir-e Naizar (413), Kohe-Mahmudo-Esmailjan (414), Kol-e Namaksar (407), and Ghoriyan (408) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  14. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3664 and 3764, Char Shengo (123), Shibirghan (124), Jalajin (117), and Kham-Ab (118) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  15. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 2962 and 3062, Gawdezereh (615), Galachah (616), Chahar Burjak (609), and Khan Neshin (610) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  16. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 3668 and 3768, Baghlan (221), Taluqan (222), Imam Sahib (215), and Rustaq (216) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  17. Stable umbral chromospheric structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, V. M. J.; Scullion, E.; Mathioudakis, M.; Kiselman, D.; Gallagher, P. T.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: We seek to understand the morphology of the chromosphere in sunspot umbra. We investigate if the horizontal structures observed in the spectral core of the Ca II H line are ephemeral visuals caused by the shock dynamics of more stable structures, and examine their relationship with observables in the H-alpha line. Methods: Filtergrams in the core of the Ca II H and H-alpha lines as observed with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope are employed. We utilise a technique that creates composite images and tracks the flash propagation horizontally. Results: We find 0.̋15 wide horizontal structures, in all of the three target sunspots, for every flash where the seeing is moderate to good. Discrete dark structures are identified that are stable for at least two umbral flashes, as well as systems of structures that live for up to 24 min. We find cases of extremely extended structures with similar stability, with one such structure showing an extent of 5''. Some of these structures have a correspondence in H-alpha, but we were unable to find a one-to-one correspondence for every occurrence. If the dark streaks are formed at the same heights as umbral flashes, there are systems of structures with strong departures from the vertical for all three analysed sunspots. Conclusions: Long-lived Ca II H filamentary horizontal structures are a common and likely ever-present feature in the umbra of sunspots. If the magnetic field in the chromosphere of the umbra is indeed aligned with the structures, then the present theoretical understanding of the typical umbra needs to be revisited. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Stable superstring relics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.; Coriano, C. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Inst. for Fundamental Theory; Faraggi, A.E. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Inst. for Fundamental Theory]|[Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States). School of Natural Sciences

    1996-05-15

    The authors investigate the cosmological constraints on exotic stable matter states which arise in realistic free fermionic superstring models. These states appear in the superstring models due to a ``Wilson-line`` breaking of the unifying non-Abelian gauge symmetry. In the models that they consider the unifying SO(10) gauge symmetry is broken at the string level to SO(6) x SO(4), SU(5) x U(1) or SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1). The exotic matter states are classified according to the patterns of the SO(10) symmetry breaking. In SO(6) x XO(4) and SU(5) x U(1) type models one obtains fractionally charged states with Q{sub e.m.} = {+-}1/2. In SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) type models one also obtains states with the regular charges under the Standard Model gauge group but with ``fractional`` charges under the U(1){sub z{prime}} symmetry. These states include down-like color triplets and electroweak doublets, as well as states which are Standard Model singlets. By analyzing the renormalizable and nonrenormalizable terms of the superpotential in a specific superstring model, the authors show that these exotic states can be stable. They investigate the cosmological constraints on the masses and relic density of the exotic states. They propose that, while the abundance and the masses of the fractionally charged states are highly constrained, the Standard Model-like states, and in particular the Standard Model singlet, are good dark matter candidates.

  19. Nutrient concentrations in surface water and groundwater, and nitrate source identification using stable isotope analysis, in the Barnegat Bay-Little Egg Harbor watershed, New Jersey, 2010–11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieben, Christine M.; Baker, Ronald J.; Nicholson, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Five streams in the Barnegat Bay-Little Egg Harbor (BB-LEH) watershed in southern New Jersey were sampled for nutrient concentrations and stable isotope composition under base-flow and stormflow conditions, and during the growing and nongrowing seasons, to help quantify and identify sources of nutrient loading. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of total nitrogen, ammonia, nitrate plus nitrite, organic nitrogen, total phosphorus, and orthophosphate, and for nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios. Concentrations of total nitrogen in the five streams appear to be related to land use, such that streams in subbasins characterized by extensive urban development (and historical agricultural land use)—North Branch Metedeconk and Toms Rivers—exhibited the highest total nitrogen concentrations (0.84–1.36 milligrams per liter (mg/L) in base flow). Base-flow total nitrogen concentrations in these two streams were dominated by nitrate; nitrate concentrations decreased during storm events as a result of dilution by storm runoff. The two streams in subbasins with the least development—Cedar Creek and Westecunk Creek—exhibited the lowest total nitrogen concentrations (0.16–0.26 mg/L in base flow), with organic nitrogen as the dominant species in both base flow and stormflow. A large proportion of these subbasins lies within forested parts of the Pinelands Area, indicating the likelihood of natural inputs of organic nitrogen to the streams that increase during periods of storm runoff. Base-flow total nitrogen concentrations in Mill Creek, in a moderately developed basin, were 0.43 to 0.62 mg/L and were dominated by ammonia, likely associated with leachate from a landfill located upstream. Total phosphorus and orthophosphate were not found at detectable concentrations in most of the surface-water samples, with the exception of samples collected from the North Branch Metedeconk River, where concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 0.09 mg/L for total phosphorus and 0

  20. An inexpensive and simple method for thermally stable immobilization of DNA on an unmodified glass surface: UV linking of poly(T)10-poly(C)10-tagged DNA probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðnason, Haukur; Dufva, Hans Martin; Bang, Dang Duong;

    2008-01-01

    be linked by UV light irradiation onto a plain, unmodified glass surface. Probes immobilized onto unmodified glass microscope slides performed similarly to probes bound to commercial amino-silane-coated slides and had comparable detection limits. The TC-tagged probes linked to unmodified glass did not show...

  1. X-ray absorption and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) show the presence of Cr{sup +} at the surface and in the bulk of CrF{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez-Mier, J. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, 04510 México DF, México (Mexico); Olalde-Velasco, P. [The Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Swiss Light Source. Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Yang, W.-L.; Denlinger, J. [The Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-07-23

    X-Ray absorption and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra of CrF{sub 2} recorded at the chromium L{sub 2,3} are presented. An atomic multiplet crystal field calculation is compared with the experimental data. Experiment and theory are in agreement once the calculation includes three chromium oxidation states, namely Cr{sup +}, Cr{sup 2+}, and Cr{sup 3+}. X-Ray absorption allows a direct determination of the surface oxidation, while the RIXS spectra shows the presence of these three oxidation states in the sample bulk. To give a quantitative interpretation of the RIXS data the effect of the incomming and outgoing photon penetration depth and self-absorption must be considered. For the much simpler case of MnF{sub 2}, with only one metal oxidation state, the measured RIXS spectra relative intensities are found to be proportional to the square of the sample attenuation length.

  2. Appendix to Health and Safety Laboratory environmental quarterly report. [Fallout radionuclides deposited and in surface air at various world sites; /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr in milk and drinking water in New York City; and stable Pb in surface air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, E.P. Jr.

    1977-07-01

    Tabulated data are presented on the deposition of fallout /sup 89/Sr and /sup 90/Sr at various world land sites through 1976; the ..gamma.. spectra and content of /sup 7/Be, /sup 95/Zr, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 144/Ce, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 239/Pu, and stable Pb in samples of surface air collected during 1966 at various world sites; and the content of fallout /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr in samples of drinking water and milk collected in New York City through 1976. (CH)

  3. The Health Show

    OpenAIRE

    Swann, David

    2011-01-01

    Dr David Swann interviewed on The Health Show, Series 1, Episode 5, 2011 for BBC World about the award-winning 21st Century Nursing Bag. BBC World News reaches 241million people every week, available in 296 million homes, 1.8 million hotel rooms and has the highest average viewership on a weekday of any international news channel. The Health Show is a new 26-part series for BBC World News covering the most important news stories from around the world.

  4. Population Games, Stable Games, and Passivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Fox

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The class of “stable games”, introduced by Hofbauer and Sandholm in 2009, has the attractive property of admitting global convergence to equilibria under many evolutionary dynamics. We show that stable games can be identified as a special case of the feedback-system-theoretic notion of a “passive” dynamical system. Motivated by this observation, we develop a notion of passivity for evolutionary dynamics that complements the definition of the class of stable games. Since interconnections of passive dynamical systems exhibit stable behavior, we can make conclusions about passive evolutionary dynamics coupled with stable games. We show how established evolutionary dynamics qualify as passive dynamical systems. Moreover, we exploit the flexibility of the definition of passive dynamical systems to analyze generalizations of stable games and evolutionary dynamics that include forecasting heuristics as well as certain games with memory.

  5. Stable Principal Component Pursuit

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zihan; Wright, John; Candes, Emmanuel; Ma, Yi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the problem of recovering a low-rank matrix (the principal components) from a high-dimensional data matrix despite both small entry-wise noise and gross sparse errors. Recently, it has been shown that a convex program, named Principal Component Pursuit (PCP), can recover the low-rank matrix when the data matrix is corrupted by gross sparse errors. We further prove that the solution to a related convex program (a relaxed PCP) gives an estimate of the low-rank matrix that is simultaneously stable to small entrywise noise and robust to gross sparse errors. More precisely, our result shows that the proposed convex program recovers the low-rank matrix even though a positive fraction of its entries are arbitrarily corrupted, with an error bound proportional to the noise level. We present simulation results to support our result and demonstrate that the new convex program accurately recovers the principal components (the low-rank matrix) under quite broad conditions. To our knowledge, this is...

  6. On some topological properties of stable measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Krabbe

    1996-01-01

    Summary The paper shows that the set of stable probability measures and the set of Rational Beliefs relative to a given stationary measure are closed in the strong topology, but not closed in the topology of weak convergence. However, subsets of the set of stable probability measures which...... system and such that each subset consists of stable measures. The uniformity requirement has a natural interpretation in terms of plausibility of Rational Beliefs...

  7. A Fashion Show

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>Story: The yearly fashion show day.The children take turns to walk on the stage and show the class their favorite clothes.Now it’s Joe’s and Phoebe’s turn.Joe walks on the stage and says,“My shorts are blue.Do you like my blue shorts?”On the other side of the stage, Phoebe is wearing her favorite pink skirt.“My skirt is pink.Do you like my pink skirt?”asks

  8. On not showing scalps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    proposed by Janet Marstine, the editor of the Routledge Companion to Museum Ethics, I show how the museum succeeded in engaging users in questions of museum ethics. However, this specific debate on human remains in museums developed into an encounter between a global, museological discourse...

  9. Violence and TV Shows

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZTÜRK, Yrd. Doç. Dr. Şinasi

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to discuss theories on theviolent effects of TV shows on viewers, especiallyon children. Therefore, this study includes a briefdiscussion of definitions of violence, discussionof violence theories, main results of researcheson televised violence, measuring TV violence,perception of televised violence, individualdifferences and reactions to TV violence,aggressiveness and preferences for TV violence.

  10. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  11. A Visionary Show

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Seduction. Distinction. Relax. Pulsation. These are the "style universes" on display at Première Vision, heralded as "The World’s Premiere Fabric Show." Started more than 35 years ago by 15 French weavers, Première Vision has expanded beyond its

  12. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  13. Engineering Stable Hollow Capsules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ Scientists at the CAS Institute of Chemistry have been succeeded in fabricating stable hollow capsules by extending covalent layer-by-layer self-assembly(CSA)technique from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional systems.

  14. Shanghai Shows Its Heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The city known as China’s economic powerhouse showed a more caring face as host of the Special Olympic Games Between October 2 and 11,the Special Olympics Summer Games were hosted in Shanghai,the first time the 40-year-old athletic com- petition for people with intellectual disabilities came to a developing country. This Special Olympics was also larger than all previous games in temps of the number of athletes.

  15. Not a "reality" show.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show.

  16. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2017-02-15

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other. Electrostatic stabilization of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute-solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute-solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  17. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B.; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2017-02-01

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other. Electrostatic stabilization of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute–solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute–solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  18. Showing Value (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available When Su Cleyle and I first decided to start Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, one of the things we agreed upon immediately was that the journal be open access. We knew that a major obstacle to librarians using the research literature was that they did not have access to the research literature. Although Su and I are both academic librarians who can access a wide variety of library and information literature from our institutions, we belong to a profession where not everyone has equal access to the research in our field. Without such access to our own body of literature, how can we ever hope for practitioners to use research evidence in their decision making? It would have been contradictory to the principles of evidence based library and information practice to do otherwise.One of the specific groups we thought could use such an open access venue for discovering research literature was school librarians. School librarians are often isolated and lacking access to the research literature that may help them prove to stakeholders the importance of their libraries and their role within schools. Certainly, school libraries have been in decline and the use of evidence to show value is needed. As Ken Haycock noted in his 2003 report, The Crisis in Canada’s School Libraries: The Case for Reform and Reinvestment, “Across the country, teacher-librarians are losing their jobs or being reassigned. Collections are becoming depleted owing to budget cuts. Some principals believe that in the age of the Internet and the classroom workstation, the school library is an artifact” (9. Within this context, school librarians are looking to our research literature for evidence of the impact that school library programs have on learning outcomes and student success. They are integrating that evidence into their practice, and reflecting upon what can be improved locally. They are focusing on students and showing the impact of school libraries and

  19. Public medical shows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre.

  20. Efficient Methods for Stable Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    are used, corresponding to the common values used in digital signal processing. Five new functions for discrete/quantized stable distributions were...written. • sgendiscrete generates discrete stable random variates. It works by generating continuous stable random variables using the Chambers- Mallows ...with stable distributions. It allows engineers and scientists to analyze data and work with stable distributions within the common matlab environment

  1. The Great Cometary Show

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave

  2. Stable generalized complex structures

    CERN Document Server

    Cavalcanti, Gil R

    2015-01-01

    A stable generalized complex structure is one that is generically symplectic but degenerates along a real codimension two submanifold, where it defines a generalized Calabi-Yau structure. We introduce a Lie algebroid which allows us to view such structures as symplectic forms. This allows us to construct new examples of stable structures, and also to define period maps for their deformations in which the background three-form flux is either fixed or not, proving the unobstructedness of both deformation problems. We then use the same tools to establish local normal forms for the degeneracy locus and for Lagrangian branes. Applying our normal forms to the four-dimensional case, we prove that any compact stable generalized complex 4-manifold has a symplectic completion, in the sense that it can be modified near its degeneracy locus to produce a compact symplectic 4-manifold.

  3. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process...

  4. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  5. Stable isotope studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  6. Stable Unhappy Marriages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Tim B.; Albrecht, Stan L.

    1991-01-01

    Examined prevalence and determinants of stable unhappy marriage using data from national survey. Results indicated age, lack of prior marital experience, commitment to marriage as an institution, low social activity, lack of control over one's life, and belief that divorce would detract from happiness were all predictive of stability in unhappy…

  7. 2005 Economy: Stable Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ 2005 is the fifth year of China's Tenth Five-Year Plan, it is an important year to implement commitment for entering into WTO as well as a key year for deepening macro-control. With further deepening of macro control and development of regional economy, Chinese economy will operate in a more healthy and stable way.

  8. 2005 Economy: Stable Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

      2005 is the fifth year of China's Tenth Five-Year Plan, it is an important year to implement commitment for entering into WTO as well as a key year for deepening macro-control. With further deepening of macro control and development of regional economy, Chinese economy will operate in a more healthy and stable way.……

  9. The Stable Concordance Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, M. Kate

    2013-01-01

    The concordance genus of a knot is the least genus of any knot in its concordance class. Although difficult to compute, it is a useful invariant that highlights the distinction between the three-genus and four-genus. In this paper we define and discuss the stable concordance genus of a knot, which describes the behavior of the concordance genus under connected sum.

  10. Farsightedly stable networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herings, P.J.J.; Mauleon, A.; Vannetelbosch, V.; Carraro, C.

    2015-01-01

    A set of networks G is pairwise farsightedly stable (i) if all possible farsighted pairwise deviations from any network g  G to a network outside G are deterred by the threat of ending worse off or equally well off, (ii) if there exists a farsighted improving path from any network outside the set l

  11. Online BCI with Stable Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we show that the estimated intra-cranial sources using source localization on EEG signals can be used for online Brain Computer Interation (BCI) and the discriminant sources remain stable over days. Classifiers are trained on discriminant sources obtained for Error-related Potential (ErrP) based BCI on day 1 and then tested online on day 2. The results for nine subjects show that the source localization with discriminant sources can be used for online detection of ErrPs. Furthe...

  12. Relationship Between Water-Stable Aggregates and Nutrients in Black Soils After Reclamation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qiang; YU Wan-Tai; ZHAO Shao-Hua; ZHANG Lu

    2007-01-01

    Water-stable aggregates, which are an index for the evaluation of the structural properties of the soil, are affected by many factors. Zhaoguang Farm, Longzhen Farm, and Jiusan Farm were chosen as the representative study sites in the region of black soils, a typical soil resource in Northeast China. The variation in the content of>0.25 mm water-stable aggregates and its relationship with the nutrients in black soil were investigated after different years of reclamation. The results showed that the>0.25 mm water-stable aggregates were more in the surface than in the subsurface soil and they changed in the following order: Longzhen Farm>Zhaoguang Farm>Jiusan Farm. The water-stable aggregates decreased sharply at the initial stage of reclamation and then became stable gradually with time. They were significantly correlated with the contents of organic C, total N, total P, and CEC in black soil, with the correlation coefficients r being 0.76, 0.68, 0.61, and 0.81 (P<0.01), respectively; however, their relationships with available P, available K, and total K were unclear. These showed that organic matter was the cementation of soil water-stable aggregates. Increasing decompositions and decreasing inputs of organic matter after reclamation were responsible for the amount of reduction of the water-stable aggregates. Thus, to maintain good soil aggregate structure, attention should be paid to improvement of soil nutrient status, especially the supply of organic C and N.

  13. Stable local oscillator module.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-11-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) multi-chip module (MCM). It is a follow-on report to SAND2006-6414, Stable Local Oscillator Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. This report describes the development of an MCM-based version of the complete StaLO, fabricated on an alumina thick film hybrid substrate.

  14. Stable doping of carbon nanotubes via molecular self assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.; Chen, Y.; Podzorov, V., E-mail: podzorov@physics.rutgers.edu [Department of Physics and Institute for Advanced Materials and Devices for Nanotechnology, Rutgers University, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Cook, A.; Zakhidov, A. [Department of Physics and NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States)

    2014-10-14

    We report a novel method for stable doping of carbon nanotubes (CNT) based on methods of molecular self assembly. A conformal growth of a self-assembled monolayer of fluoroalkyl trichloro-silane (FTS) at CNT surfaces results in a strong increase of the sheet conductivity of CNT electrodes by 60–300%, depending on the CNT chirality and composition. The charge carrier mobility of undoped partially aligned CNT films was independently estimated in a field-effect transistor geometry (~100 cm²V⁻¹s⁻¹). The hole density induced by the FTS monolayer in CNT sheets is estimated to be ~1.8 ×10¹⁴cm⁻². We also show that FTS doping of CNT anodes greatly improves the performance of organic solar cells. This large and stable doping effect, easily achieved in large-area samples, makes this approach very attractive for applications of CNTs in transparent and flexible electronics.

  15. Stable Spirocyclic Meisenheimer Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Guirado

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Meisenheimer complexes are important intermediates in Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution Reactions (SNAr. They are formed by the addition of electron rich species to polynitro aromatic compounds or aromatic compounds with strong electron withdrawing groups. It is possible to distinguish two types of Meisenheimer or σ-complexes, the σHcomplex or σX-complex (also named ipso, depending on the aromatic ring position attacked by the nucleophile (a non-substituted or substituted one, respectively. Special examples of σX- or ipso-complexes are formed through intermediate spiro adducts, via intramolecular SNAr. Some of these spirocyclic Meisenheimer complexes, a type of σXcomplex, are exceptionally stable in solution and/or as solids. They can be isolated and characterized using X-ray, and various spectroscopic techniques such as NMR, UV-Vis, IR, and fluorescence. A few of these stable spirocyclic Meisenheimer complexes are zwitterionic and exhibit interesting photophysical and redox properties. We will review recent advances, synthesis and potential applications of these stable spirocyclic Meisenheimer complexes.

  16. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  17. Deposition of radionuclides and stable elements in Tokai-mura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Takashi; Amano, Hikaru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    This report presents the data of deposition of radionuclides (Sep. 1993-March 2001) and stable elements (Sep. 1993-Oct. 1995) in Tokai-mura. To evaluate the migration of radionuclides and stable elements from the atmosphere to the ground surface, atmospheric deposition samples were collected from Sep. 1993 to March 2001 with three basins (distance to grand surface were 1.5 m, 4 m, 10 m) set up in the enclosure of JAERI in Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, Japan. Monthly samples were evaporated to dryness to obtain residual samples and measured with a well type Ge detector for {sup 7}Be, {sup 40}K, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 210}Pb. According to the analysis of radioactivity, clear seasonal variations with spring peaks of deposition weight (dry) and deposition amounts of all objective radionuclides were found. Correlation analysis of deposition data also showed that these radionuclides can be divided into two groups. A part of dried sample was irradiated to reactor neutrons at JRR-4 for determination of stable element's deposition. (author)

  18. In situ controllable synthesis of novel surface plasmon resonance-enhanced Ag2WO4/Ag/Bi2MoO6 composite for enhanced and stable visible light photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jiali; Dai, Kai; Zhang, Jinfeng; Lu, Luhua; Liang, Changhao; Geng, Lei; Wang, Zhongliao; Yuan, Guangyu; Zhu, Guangping

    2017-01-01

    A novel hierarchical Ag2WO4/Ag/Bi2MoO6 ternary visible-light-driven photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by in situ doping Ag2WO4 with Bi2MoO6 nanosheets through a facile hydrothermal and photochemical process. The morphology, structure, optical performance and crystallinity of the products were measured by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that Ag2WO4/Ag was uniformly dispersed on the surface of Bi2MoO6 nanosheets. The photocatalytic performance of Ag2WO4/Ag/Bi2MoO6 heterostructures was evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under 410 nm LED arrays. The ternary Ag2WO4/Ag/Bi2MoO6 nanocomposite exhibits higher photocatalytic activity than Bi2MoO6 and Ag2WO4. The synergistic effect of Ag2WO4 and Bi2MoO6 could generated more heterojunctions which promoted photoelectrons transfer from Ag2WO4 to Bi2MoO6, leading to the improvement of photocatalytic performance by photoelectrons-holes recombination suppression. At the same time, the surface plasmon resonance of Ag2WO4/Ag/Bi2MoO6 is another crucial reason for the high photocatalytic performance of organic pollutants degradation. And the 20 wt% Ag2WO4-loaded Bi2MoO6 shows the optimal photocatalytic performance in the degradation of MB. In addition, the ternary composites can be easily reclaimed by precipitation and exhibits high stability of photocatalytic degradation after five recycles.

  19. Self-assembly of various Au nanocrystals on functionalized water-stable PVA/PEI nanofibers: a highly efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates with high density of "hot" spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Han; Du, MingLiang; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Pan; Bao, ShiYong; Zou, Meiling; Fu, YaQin; Yao, JuMing

    2014-04-15

    We have demonstrated a facile approach for the fabrication of flexible and reliable sulfydryl functionalized PVA/PEI nanofibers with excellent water stability for the self-assembly of Au nanocrystals, such as Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), Au nanoflowers (AuNFs) and Au nanorods (AuNRs), used as the highly efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates for the detection of rhodamine B (RhB). Various methods were employed to cross-link the PVA nanofibers with better morphology and porous structures after immersing in water for desired times. Various SERS-active Au nanocrystals, such as AuNPs, AuNFs, and AuNRs have been successfully synthesized. After the grafting of MPTES on the cross-linked PVA/PEI nanofibers, the Au nanocrystals can easily be self-assembled on the surfaces of the nanofibers because of the strong interactions of the Au-S chemical bondings. The Au nanocrystals self-assembled throughout the PVA/PEI nanofibers used as SERS substrates all exhibit enhanced SERS signals of RhB compared with their individual nanocrystals. It is mainly due to the close interparticle distance, mutual orientation and high density of "hot" spots, that can strongly affect the overall optical response and the SERS enhancement. By changing the amounts of the self-assembled AuNFs on the nanofibers, we can control the density of the "hot" spots. With the increased amounts of the AuNFs throughout the nanofibers, the SERS substrates show enhanced Raman signals of the RhB, indicating that the increased density of "hot" spots can directly lead to the SERS enhancement. The AuNFs/(PVA/PEI) SERS substrates show good sensitivity, reliability and low detection limit (10(-9) M). The presented approach can be broadly applicable to the assembly of different types of plasmonic nanostructures and these novel materials with strong SERS enhancement can be applied in bioanalysis and biosensors.

  20. On Stable Marriages and Greedy Matchings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manne, Fredrik; Naim, Md; Lerring, Hakon; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2016-12-11

    Research on stable marriage problems has a long and mathematically rigorous history, while that of exploiting greedy matchings in combinatorial scientific computing is a younger and less developed research field. In this paper we consider the relationships between these two areas. In particular we show that several problems related to computing greedy matchings can be formulated as stable marriage problems and as a consequence several recently proposed algorithms for computing greedy matchings are in fact special cases of well known algorithms for the stable marriage problem. However, in terms of implementations and practical scalable solutions on modern hardware, the greedy matching community has made considerable progress. We show that due to the strong relationship between these two fields many of these results are also applicable for solving stable marriage problems.

  1. Stable Stationary Harmonic Maps to Spheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Hua LIN; Chang You WANG

    2006-01-01

    For k ≥ 3, we establish new estimate on Hausdorff dimensions of the singular set of stable-stationary harmonic maps to the sphere Sk. We show that the singular set of stable-stationary harmonic maps from B5 to S3 is the union of finitely many isolated singular points and finitely many Holder continuous curves. We also discuss the minimization problem among continuous maps from Bn to S2.

  2. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B.; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dimitri V.

    2017-02-16

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes1, 2, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other2. Electrostatic stabilization3, 4 of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains2, 5. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute–solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute–solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  3. Stable isotope measurements of evapotranspiration partitioning in a maize field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Patrick; Parajka, Juraj; Oismüller, Markus; Strauss, Peter; Heng, Lee; Blöschl, Günter

    2017-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the most important processes in describing land surface - atmosphere interactions as it connects the energy and water balances. Furthermore knowledge of the individual components of evapotranspiration is important for ecohydrological modelling and agriculture, particularly for irrigation efficiency and crop productivity. In this study, we tested the application of the stable isotope method for evapotranspiration partitioning to a maize crop during the vegetative stage, using sap flow sensors as a comparison technique. Field scale ET was measured using an eddy covariance device and then partitioned using high frequency in-situ measurements of the isotopic signal of the canopy water vapor. The fraction of transpiration (Ft) calculated with the stable isotope method showed good agreement with the sap flow method. High correlation coefficient values were found between the two techniques, indicating the stable isotope method can successfully be applied in maize. The results show the changes in transpiration as a fraction of evapotranspiration after rain events and during the subsequent drying conditions as well as the relationship between transpiration and solar radiation and vapor pressure deficit.

  4. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high-inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  5. Properties of stable nonstoichiometric nanoceria produced by thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yuan-Pei; Sohn, Hong Yong; Mohassab, Yousef; Liu, Qingcai; Xu, Baoqiang

    2017-08-01

    Thermally stable blue nonstoichiometric nanoceria was produced by feeding nanoceria with an average size of 50 nm into a DC thermal plasma reactor. The effects of different plasma power levels and atmospheres were investigated. XRD results showed the ceria lattice parameter increased with plasma power. SEM and TEM results showed that the shape of nanoparticles changed after plasma treatment; the blue nonstoichiometric nanoceria had highly regular shapes such as triangular pyramids and polyhedral in contrast to the irregular shape of the raw nanoceria. Significant downshift was found in the Raman spectra of the plasma products, with a 7.9-cm-1 shift compared with raw nanoceria, which was explained by the reduction of Ce4+. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that the Ce3+ fraction increased from 14% in the raw nanoceria to 38-39% for the product CeO2- x , indicating the high reduction state on the ceria surface. It was determined that this blue nonstoichiometric nanoceria was stable up to 400 °C in air, but the color changed to pale yellow after 4 h at 500 °C in air indicating oxidation to CeO2. Additionally, this novel stable nano-CeO2- x caused a red shift in the UV-visible absorption results; a 48-nm red shift occurred for the nonstoichiometric nanoceria produced at 15 kW compared with the raw nanoceria. The band gap was calculated to be 2.5 eV while it was 3.2 eV for the raw nanoceria, indicating that this novel stable blue nonstoichiometric nanoceria should be a promising material for optical application.

  6. Stable lithium electrodeposition in liquid and nanoporous solid electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Yingying

    2014-08-10

    Rechargeable lithium, sodium and aluminium metal-based batteries are among the most versatile platforms for high-energy, cost-effective electrochemical energy storage. Non-uniform metal deposition and dendrite formation on the negative electrode during repeated cycles of charge and discharge are major hurdles to commercialization of energy-storage devices based on each of these chemistries. A long-held view is that unstable electrodeposition is a consequence of inherent characteristics of these metals and their inability to form uniform electrodeposits on surfaces with inevitable defects. We report on electrodeposition of lithium in simple liquid electrolytes and in nanoporous solids infused with liquid electrolytes. We find that simple liquid electrolytes reinforced with halogenated salt blends exhibit stable long-term cycling at room temperature, often with no signs of deposition instabilities over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge and thousands of operating hours. We rationalize these observations with the help of surface energy data for the electrolyte/lithium interface and impedance analysis of the interface during different stages of cell operation. Our findings provide support for an important recent theoretical prediction that the surface mobility of lithium is significantly enhanced in the presence of lithium halide salts. Our results also show that a high electrolyte modulus is unnecessary for stable electrodeposition of lithium.

  7. Stable lithium electrodeposition in liquid and nanoporous solid electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A.

    2014-10-01

    Rechargeable lithium, sodium and aluminium metal-based batteries are among the most versatile platforms for high-energy, cost-effective electrochemical energy storage. Non-uniform metal deposition and dendrite formation on the negative electrode during repeated cycles of charge and discharge are major hurdles to commercialization of energy-storage devices based on each of these chemistries. A long-held view is that unstable electrodeposition is a consequence of inherent characteristics of these metals and their inability to form uniform electrodeposits on surfaces with inevitable defects. We report on electrodeposition of lithium in simple liquid electrolytes and in nanoporous solids infused with liquid electrolytes. We find that simple liquid electrolytes reinforced with halogenated salt blends exhibit stable long-term cycling at room temperature, often with no signs of deposition instabilities over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge and thousands of operating hours. We rationalize these observations with the help of surface energy data for the electrolyte/lithium interface and impedance analysis of the interface during different stages of cell operation. Our findings provide support for an important recent theoretical prediction that the surface mobility of lithium is significantly enhanced in the presence of lithium halide salts. Our results also show that a high electrolyte modulus is unnecessary for stable electrodeposition of lithium.

  8. Stable cosmic vortons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaud, Julien; Radu, Eugen; Volkov, Mikhail S

    2013-10-25

    We present solutions in the gauged U(1)×U(1) model of Witten describing vortons-spinning flux loops stabilized against contraction by the centrifugal force. Vortons were heuristically described many years ago; however, the corresponding field theory solutions were not obtained and so the stability issue remained open. We construct explicitly a family of stationary vortons characterized by their charge and angular momentum. Most of them are unstable and break in pieces when perturbed. However, thick vortons with a small radius preserve their form in the 3+1 nonlinear dynamical evolution. This gives the first ever evidence of stable vortons and impacts several branches of physics where they could potentially exist. These range from cosmology, since vortons could perhaps contribute to dark matter, to QCD and condensed matter physics.

  9. Paleoproxies: Heavy Stable Isotope Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, T. F.; Hippler, D.; Siebert, C.; Kramers, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    potential to solve this problem for a given set of samples and thus to model the ocean system more accurately in different scales. Besides all complications some important applications of heavy stable isotopes as paleoproxies already emerge. Pilot studies indicate that Mo isotopes may present a proxy for the extend of anoxic condition in past oceans. On a finer scale the same system appears to provide a measure of (bio)-chemical redox-changes related to diagenesis. The Ca isotope system may complement more classical sea surface temperature proxies in particular environments. Promising results exist for polar waters (N. pachy left), as well as indications on the seasonality under global greenhouse conditions ~110-50 Ma ago. However, the heavily species dependent Ca isotope fractionation can not be interpreted by just adopting concepts and findings from the oxygen system. While a complication to the ease of use as SST proxy, this species dependence offers pathways to unravel different modes of bio-calcifications. Given the complexity of the matter, collaboration of specialists of different fields will be needed to develop successful process-related hypotheses and diagnostic tools.

  10. Bi-stable optical actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  11. Study on Modification of Ultra-Stable Zeolite Prepared by Hydrothermal Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Weilin; Zhou Lingping; Shen Shimin; Li Zheng; Zhu Yuxia; Tian Huiping; Long Jun

    2007-01-01

    The ultra-stable zeolite DASY-0.0 was prepared by hydrothermal method in commercial scale.Its structure was further modified via the treatment for cleaning of pores(CP).The zeolite samples before and after CP treating were analyzed and characterized by XRF,XRD,NMR,IR,BET and DTA.The results showed that,in comparison with the conventional ultra-stable zeolite DASY-0.0 prepared by the hydrothermal process,the CP-modified zeolite SOY0 exhibited a higher relative crystallinity.a larger surface area and pore volume,a higher thermal stability and contained less amorphous non-framework Al.

  12. Stable configurations of graphene on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Shenoy, Bhamy Maithry; Mahapatra, D. Roy; Ravikumar, Abhilash; Hegde, G. M.; Rizwan, M. R.

    2017-08-01

    Integration of graphene on silicon-based nanostructures is crucial in advancing graphene based nanoelectronic device technologies. The present paper provides a new insight on the combined effect of graphene structure and silicon (001) substrate on their two-dimensional anisotropic interface. Molecular dynamics simulations involving the sub-nanoscale interface reveal a most favourable set of temperature independent orientations of the monolayer graphene sheet with an angle of ∽15° between its armchair direction and [010] axis of the silicon substrate. While computing the favorable stable orientations, both the translation and the rotational vibrations of graphene are included. The possible interactions between the graphene atoms and the silicon atoms are identified from their coordination. Graphene sheet shows maximum bonding density with bond length 0.195 nm and minimum bond energy when interfaced with silicon substrate at 15° orientation. Local deformation analysis reveals probability distribution with maximum strain levels of 0.134, 0.047 and 0.029 for 900 K, 300 K and 100 K, respectively in silicon surface for 15° oriented graphene whereas the maximum probable strain in graphene is about 0.041 irrespective of temperature. Silicon-silicon dimer formation is changed due to silicon-carbon bonding. These results may help further in band structure engineering of silicon-graphene lattice.

  13. Air-stable n-type colloidal quantum dot solids

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Zhijun

    2014-06-08

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) offer promise in flexible electronics, light sensing and energy conversion. These applications rely on rectifying junctions that require the creation of high-quality CQD solids that are controllably n-type (electron-rich) or p-type (hole-rich). Unfortunately, n-type semiconductors made using soft matter are notoriously prone to oxidation within minutes of air exposure. Here we report high-performance, air-stable n-type CQD solids. Using density functional theory we identify inorganic passivants that bind strongly to the CQD surface and repel oxidative attack. A materials processing strategy that wards off strong protic attack by polar solvents enabled the synthesis of an air-stable n-type PbS CQD solid. This material was used to build an air-processed inverted quantum junction device, which shows the highest current density from any CQD solar cell and a solar power conversion efficiency as high as 8%. We also feature the n-type CQD solid in the rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of atmospheric NO2. This work paves the way for new families of electronic devices that leverage air-stable quantum-tuned materials. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. Stable isotopes. Applications and production; Les isotopes stables. Applications - production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, S.; Louvet, P.; Soulie, E. [eds.

    1994-12-31

    This conference presents 46 communications concerning stable isotope production, utilization and application, grouped in 6 sessions and posters. The various themes are: biological applications (pharmacology, medical diagnosis, metabolism and protein studies, toxicity and response studies, labelled compounds), analysis procedures (NMR analysis for macromolecules, tracer studies), nuclear applications (utilization of stable isotopes in nuclear reactors), biological, physical and chemical applications (mass transfer, mobility, crystallography, isotopic exchange), stable isotope production (ion chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, cryogenic distillation).

  15. Porous Aluminas: The bio template method for the synthesis of stable high surface area aluminas; Aluminas porosas: El metodo de bio-replica para la sintesis de aluminas estables de alta superficie especifica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez Guerrero, M.; Perez Maqueda, L.; Pena Castro, P.; Pascual Cosp, J.

    2013-07-01

    Development of porous alumina has been the objective of numerous studies in recent decades, due to the intrinsic properties of aluminium oxide, such as high melting point, low thermal conductivity, chemical inertness and corrosion resistance which, in addition to a high surface area and permeability, make aluminas being used for many different industrial and technical applications. The crystallographic and textural stability of alumina acquires significant importance in those processes involving high temperatures; however, most of the synthesis methods yield metastable oxides of little interest in high-temperature processes due to the transformation to alpha phase, with the consequent reduction in surface area. The present article reviews diverse procedures for obtaining porous alumina with high specific surface area, including methods and strategies for preparing high surface alpha-alumina. Within this framework, the paper analyzes the results obtained through bio replica of lignocellulose materials. This technology allows preparing aluminas with the complex structural hierarchy of the lignocellulose templates. (Author)

  16. High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    A new third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially NonOscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme for scalar and vector linear hyperbolic equations with piecewise continuous initial conditions is developed. The new scheme is proven to be stable in the energy norm for both continuous and discontinuous solutions. In contrast to the existing high-resolution shock-capturing schemes, no assumption that the reconstruction should be total variation bounded (TVB) is explicitly required to prove stability of the new scheme. A rigorous truncation error analysis is presented showing that the accuracy of the 3rd-order ESWENO scheme is drastically improved if the tuning parameters of the weight functions satisfy certain criteria. Numerical results show that the new ESWENO scheme is stable and significantly outperforms the conventional third-order WENO finite difference scheme of Jiang and Shu in terms of accuracy, while providing essentially nonoscillatory solutions near strong discontinuities.

  17. Stability properties of nonlinear dynamical systems and evolutionary stable states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleria, Iram, E-mail: iram@fis.ufal.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-970 Maceió-AL (Brazil); Brenig, Leon [Faculté des Sciences, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Rocha Filho, Tarcísio M.; Figueiredo, Annibal [Instituto de Física and International Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Universidade de Brasília, 70919-970 Brasília-DF (Brazil)

    2017-03-18

    Highlights: • We address the problem of equilibrium stability in a general class of non-linear systems. • We link Evolutionary Stable States (ESS) to stable fixed points of square quasi-polynomial (QP) systems. • We show that an interior ES point may be related to stable interior fixed points of QP systems. - Abstract: In this paper we address the problem of stability in a general class of non-linear systems. We establish a link between the concepts of asymptotic stable interior fixed points of square Quasi-Polynomial systems and evolutionary stable states, a property of some payoff matrices arising from evolutionary games.

  18. Momentum Transport and Stable Modes in Kelvin-Helmholtz Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, A E; Zweibel, E G

    2016-01-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, which arises in astrophysical and fusion systems where turbulent momentum transport is important, has an unstable and a stable mode at the same scales. We show that in KH turbulence, as in other types of turbulence, the stable mode affects transport, nonlinearly removing energy from the inertial-range cascade to small scales. We quantify energy transfer to stable modes and its associated impact on turbulent amplitudes and transport, demonstrating that stable modes regulate transfer in KH systems. A quasilinear momentum transport calculation is performed to quantify the reduction in momentum transport due to stable modes.

  19. Wetting failure of hydrophilic surfaces promoted by surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Peng; Wang, Qing

    2014-06-01

    Wetting failure is of vital importance to many physical phenomena, such as industrial coating and drop emission. Here we show when and how the surface roughness promotes the destabilization of a moving contact line on a hydrophilic surface. Beyond the balance of the driving force and viscous resistance where a stable wetting interface is sustained, wetting failure occurs and is modified by the roughness of the surface. The promoting effect arises only when the wetting velocity is high enough to create a gas-liquid-solid composite interface in the vicinity of the moving contact line, and it is a function of the intrinsic contact angle and proportion of solid tops. We propose a model to explain splashes of rough solid spheres impacting into liquids. It reveals a novel concept that dynamic wetting on hydrophilic rough surfaces can be similar to that on hydrophobic surfaces, and brings a new way to design surfaces with specific wetting properties.

  20. Surface Modification of PDMS and Plastics with Zwitterionic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Mutsuo; Kurosawa, Shigeru

    2017-07-01

    Surface modification of PDMS, polycarbonate, and acrylic resin was examined using various methacryl polymers bearing sulfobetaine, phosphoryl choline, and oligoethylene glycol units. We have found that zwitterionic polymers are adsorbed on the PDMS surface treated with plasma. The surface of PDMS is stable to keep high hydrophilicity after a month of the modification. On the other hand, one of sulfobetaine polymers showed distinguished adsorption behavior in the case of polycarbonate surface treated with plasma. Suppression effect for nonspecific adsorption of BSA was evaluated using polycarbonate and acrylic resin modified with the polymers. The modified surfaces showed suppression effect for nonspecific adsorption of BSA compared with the surface only treated with plasma.

  1. Dynamically Stable Legged Locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-27

    preferred direction of travel. We decided early on not to build a self contained machine. Thcrcfore the hydraulic and pneumatic power supplies ave ...model’s motion. Running from leIt to right, the left-nost drawing shows rnodel’s configuration just blbre IrOUCIIDOWN, the center dr• aving shows...of phYsiologically motivated mathematical model;. ir human postura ! control. Ph.D. Th., The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 1977. 39. Camana

  2. Miniaturizable Ion-Selective Arrays Based on Highly Stable Polymer Membranes for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mònica Mir; Roberto Lugo; Islam Bogachan Tahirbegi; Josep Samitier

    2014-01-01

    Poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) is the most common polymer matrix used in the fabrication of ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). However, the surfaces of PVC-based sensors have been reported to show membrane instability. In an attempt to overcome this limitation, here we developed two alternative methods for the preparation of highly stable and robust ion-selective sensors. These platforms are based on the selective electropolymerization of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), where the sulfur at...

  3. Moving stable solitons in Galileon theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masoumi, Ali, E-mail: ali@phys.columbia.edu [Physics Department and ISCAP, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Xiao Xiao, E-mail: xx2146@columbia.edu [Physics Department and ISCAP, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2012-08-29

    Despite the no-go theorem Endlich et al. (2011) which rules out static stable solitons in Galileon theory, we propose a family of solitons that evade the theorem by traveling at the speed of light. These domain-wall-like solitons are stable under small fluctuations-analysis of perturbation shows neither ghost-like nor tachyon-like instabilities, and perturbative collision of these solitons suggests that they pass through each other asymptotically, which maybe an indication of the integrability of the theory itself.

  4. Mechanisms for stable sonoluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenner, Michael P.; Lohse, Detlef; Oxtoby, David; Dupont, Todd F.

    1996-01-01

    A gas bubble trapped in water by an oscillating acoustic field is expected to either shrink or grow on a diffusive time scale, depending on the forcing strength and the bubble size. At high ambient gas concentration this has long been observed. However, recent sonoluminescence experiments show that

  5. Influence of horse stable environment on human airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pringle John

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many people spend considerable amount of time each day in equine stable environments either as employees in the care and training of horses or in leisure activity. However, there are few studies available on how the stable environment affects human airways. This study examined in one horse stable qualitative differences in indoor air during winter and late summer conditions and assessed whether air quality was associated with clinically detectable respiratory signs or alterations to selected biomarkers of inflammation and lung function in stable personnel. Methods The horse stable environment and stable-workers (n = 13 in one stable were investigated three times; first in the winter, second in the interjacent late summer and the third time in the following winter stabling period. The stable measurements included levels of ammonia, hydrogen sulphide, total and respirable dust, airborne horse allergen, microorganisms, endotoxin and glucan. The stable-workers completed a questionnaire on respiratory symptoms, underwent nasal lavage with subsequent analysis of inflammation markers, and performed repeated measurements of pulmonary function. Results Measurements in the horse stable showed low organic dust levels and high horse allergen levels. Increased viable level of fungi in the air indicated a growing source in the stable. Air particle load as well as 1,3-β-glucan was higher at the two winter time-points, whereas endotoxin levels were higher at the summer time-point. Two stable-workers showed signs of bronchial obstruction with increased PEF-variability, increased inflammation biomarkers relating to reported allergy, cold or smoking and reported partly work-related symptoms. Furthermore, two other stable-workers reported work-related airway symptoms, of which one had doctor's diagnosed asthma which was well treated. Conclusion Biomarkers involved in the development of airway diseases have been studied in relation to

  6. INVARIANTS UNDER STABLE EQUIVALENCES OF MORITA TYPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fang; Sun Longgang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study some invariants of associative algebras under stable equivalences of Morita type.First of all,we show that,if two finite-dimensional selfinjective k-algebras are stably equivalent of Morita type,then their orbit algebras are isomorphic.Secondly,it is verified that the quasitilted property of an algebra is invariant under stable equivalences of Morita type.As an application of this result,it is obtained that if an algebra is of finite representation type,then its tilted property is invariant under stable equivalences of Morita type; the other application to partial tilting modules is given in Section 4. Finally,we prove that when two finite-dimensional k-algebras are stably equivalent of Morita type,their repetitive algebras are also stably equivalent of Morita type under certain conditions.

  7. Epitaxial growth of thermally stable cobalt films on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, N.; Laux, M.; Stöckl, J.; Kollamana, J.; Seidel, J.; Großmann, N.; Fetzer, R.; Kelly, L. L.; Wei, Z.; Stadtmüller, B.; Cinchetti, M.; Aeschlimann, M.

    2016-10-01

    Ferromagnetic thin films play a fundamental role in spintronic applications as a source for spin polarized carriers and in fundamental studies as ferromagnetic substrates. However, it is challenging to produce such metallic films with high structural quality and chemical purity on single crystalline substrates since the diffusion barrier across the metal-metal interface is usually smaller than the thermal activation energy necessary for smooth surface morphologies. Here, we introduce epitaxial thin Co films grown on an Au(111) single crystal surface as a thermally stable ferromagnetic thin film. Our structural investigations reveal an identical growth of thin Co/Au(111) films compared to Co bulk single crystals with large monoatomic Co terraces with an average width of 500 Å, formed after thermal annealing at 575 K. Combining our results from photoemission and Auger electron spectroscopy, we provide evidence that no significant diffusion of Au into the near surface region of the Co film takes place for this temperature and that no Au capping layer is formed on top of Co films. Furthermore, we show that the electronic valence band is dominated by a strong spectral contribution from a Co 3d band and a Co derived surface resonance in the minority band. Both states lead to an overall negative spin polarization at the Fermi energy.

  8. Detecting stable phase structures in EEG signals to classify brain activity amplitude patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yusely RUIZ; Guang LI; Walter J. FREEMAN; Eduardo GONZALEZ

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining an electrocorticograms (ECoG) signal requires an invasive procedure in which brain activity is recorded from the cortical surface. In contrast, obtaining electroencephalograms (EEG) recordings requires the non-invasive procedure of recording the brain activity from the scalp surface, which allows EEG recordings to be performed more easily on healthy humans. In this work, a technique previously used to study spatial-temporal patterns of brain activity on animal ECoG was adapted for use on EEG. The main issues are centered on solving the problems introduced by the increment on the interelectrode distance and the procedure to detect stable frames. The results showed that spatial patterns of beta and gamma activity can also be extracted from the EEG signal by using stable frames as time markers for feature extraction. This adapted technique makes it possible to take advantage of the cognitive and phenomenological awareness of a normal healthy subject.

  9. Highly stable, mesoporous mixed lanthanum-cerium oxides with tailored structure and reducibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Shuang; Broitman, Esteban; Wang, Yanan; Cao, Anmin; Veser, Goetz

    2011-05-01

    Pure and mixed lanthanum and cerium oxides were synthesized via a reverse microemulsion-templated route. This approach yields highly homogeneous and phase-stable mixed oxides with high surface areas across the entire range of La:Ce ratios from pure lanthana to pure ceria. Surprisingly, all mixed oxides show the fluorite crystal structure of ceria, even for lanthanum contents as high as 90%. Varying the La:Ce ratio not only allows tailoring of the oxide morphology (lattice parameter, pore structure, particle size, and surface area), but also results in a fine-tuning of the reducibility of the oxide which can be explained by the creation of oxygen vacancies in the ceria lattice upon La addition. Such finely controlled syntheses, which enable the formation of stable, homogeneous mixed oxides across the entire composition range, open the path towards functional tailoring of oxide materials, such as rational catalyst design via fine-tuning of redox activity.

  10. The Complexity of Approximately Counting Stable Matchings

    CERN Document Server

    Chebolu, Prasad; Martin, Russell

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the complexity of approximately counting stable matchings in the $k$-attribute model, where the preference lists are determined by dot products of "preference vectors" with "attribute vectors", or by Euclidean distances between "preference points" and "attribute points". Irving and Leather proved that counting the number of stable matchings in the general case is $#P$-complete. Counting the number of stable matchings is reducible to counting the number of downsets in a (related) partial order and is interreducible, in an approximation-preserving sense, to a class of problems that includes counting the number of independent sets in a bipartite graph ($#BIS$). It is conjectured that no FPRAS exists for this class of problems. We show this approximation-preserving interreducibilty remains even in the restricted $k$-attribute setting when $k \\geq 3$ (dot products) or $k \\geq 2$ (Euclidean distances). Finally, we show it is easy to count the number of stable matchings in the 1-attribute dot-product ...

  11. High and stable photoelectrochemical activity of ZnO/ZnSe/CdSe/Cu(x)S core-shell nanowire arrays: nanoporous surface with Cu(x)S as a hole mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wei-Xin; Yu, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Wei-De

    2015-06-14

    Advanced materials for electrocatalytic and photoelectrochemical water splitting are key for taking advantage of renewable energy. In this study, ZnO/ZnSe/CdSe/Cu(x)S core-shell nanowire arrays with a nanoporous surface were fabricated via ion exchange and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) processes. The ZnO/ZnSe/CdSe/Cu(x)S sample displays a high photocurrent density of 12.0 mA cm(-2) under AM 1.5G illumination, achieves the highest IPCE value of 89.5% at 500 nm at a bias potential of 0.2 V versus Ag/AgCl, and exhibits greatly improved photostability. The functions of the ZnSe, CdSe, and Cu(x)S layers in the ZnO/ZnSe/CdSe/Cu(x)S heterostructure were clarified. ZnSe is used as a passivation layer to reduce the trapping and recombination of charge carriers at the interfaces of the semiconductors. CdSe functions as a highly efficient visible light absorber and builds heterojunctions with the other components to improve the separation and transportation of the photoinduced electrons and holes. Cu(x)S serves as a passivation layer and an effective p-type hole mediator, which passivates the defects and surface states of the semiconductors and forms p-n junctions with CdSe to promote the hole transportation at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface. The nanoporous surface of the ZnO/ZnSe/CdSe/Cu(x)S core-shell nanowire arrays, together with the tunnel transportation of the charge carriers in the thin films of ZnSe and CdSe, also facilitates the kinetics of photoelectrochemical reactions and improves the optical absorption as well.

  12. Identifying nitrate sources and transformations in surface water by combining dual isotopes of nitrate and stable isotope mixing model in a watershed with different land uses and multi-tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Lu, Baohong

    2017-04-01

    Nitrate is essential for the growth and survival of plants, animals and humans. However, excess nitrate in drinking water is regarded as a health hazard as it is linked to infant methemoglobinemia and esophageal cancer. Revealing nitrate characteristics and identifying its sources are fundamental for making effective water management strategies, but nitrate sources in multi-tributaries and mixed land covered watersheds remain unclear. It is difficult to determine the predominant NO3- sources using conventional water quality monitoring techniques. In our study, based on 20 surface water sampling sites for more than two years' monitoring from April 2012 to December 2014, water chemical and dual isotopic approaches (δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3-) were integrated for the first time to evaluate nitrate characteristics and sources in the Huashan watershed, Jianghuai hilly region, East China. The results demonstrated that nitrate content in surface water was relatively low in the downstream (<10 mg/L), but spatial heterogeneities were remarkable among different sub-watersheds. Extremely high nitrate was observed at the source of the river in one of the sub-watersheds, which exhibited an exponential decline along the stream due to dilution, absorption by aquatic plants, and high forest cover. Although dramatically decline of nitrate occurred along the stream, denitrification was not found in surface water by analyzing δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3- relationship. Proportional contributions of five potential nitrate sources (i.e., precipitation; manure and sewage; soil nitrogen; nitrate fertilizer; nitrate derived from ammonia fertilizer and rainfall) were estimated using a Bayesian isotope mixing model. Model results indicated nitrate sources varied significantly among different rainfall conditions, land use types, as well as anthropologic activities. In summary, coupling dual isotopes of nitrate (δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3-, simultaneously) with a Bayesian isotope mixing model offers

  13. Planning a Successful Tech Show

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikirk, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Tech shows are a great way to introduce prospective students, parents, and local business and industry to a technology and engineering or career and technical education program. In addition to showcasing instructional programs, a tech show allows students to demonstrate their professionalism and skills, practice public presentations, and interact…

  14. Stable Isotope Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Using Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Lovato, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seepage from enhanced oil recovery, carbon storage, and natural gas sites can emit trace gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen sulfide. Trace gas emission at these locations demonstrate unique light stable isotope signatures that provide information to enable source identification of the material. Light stable isotope detection through surface monitoring, offers the ability to distinguish between trace gases emitted from sources such as, biological (fertilizers and wastes), mineral (coal or seams), or liquid organic systems (oil and gas reservoirs). To make light stable isotope measurements, we employ the ultra-sensitive technique, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS). FMS is an absorption technique with sensitivity enhancements approximately 100-1000x more than standard absorption spectroscopy with the advantage of providing stable isotope signature information. We have developed an integrated in situ (point source) system that measures carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sulfide with isotopic resolution and enhanced sensitivity. The in situ instrument involves the continuous collection of air and records the stable isotope ratio for the gas being detected. We have included in-line flask collection points to obtain gas samples for validation of isotopic concentrations using our in-house isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS). We present calibration curves for each species addressed above to demonstrate the sensitivity and accuracy of the system. We also show field deployment data demonstrating the capabilities of the system in making live dynamic measurements from an active source.

  15. Preferred extensions as stable models

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Given an argumentation framework AF, we introduce a mapping function that constructs a disjunctive logic program P, such that the preferred extensions of AF correspond to the stable models of P, after intersecting each stable model with the relevant atoms. The given mapping function is of polynomial size w.r.t. AF. In particular, we identify that there is a direct relationship between the minimal models of a propositional formula and the preferred extensions of an argumentation framework by w...

  16. Risk Aversion in Game Shows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    We review the use of behavior from television game shows to infer risk attitudes. These shows provide evidence when contestants are making decisions over very large stakes, and in a replicated, structured way. Inferences are generally confounded by the subjective assessment of skill in some games......, and the dynamic nature of the task in most games. We consider the game shows Card Sharks, Jeopardy!, Lingo, and finally Deal Or No Deal. We provide a detailed case study of the analyses of Deal Or No Deal, since it is suitable for inference about risk attitudes and has attracted considerable attention....

  17. Measuring performance at trade shows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kåre

    2004-01-01

    Trade shows is an increasingly important marketing activity to many companies, but current measures of trade show performance do not adequately capture dimensions important to exhibitors. Based on the marketing literature's outcome and behavior-based control system taxonomy, a model is built...... that captures a outcome-based sales dimension and four behavior-based dimensions (i.e. information-gathering, relationship building, image building, and motivation activities). A 16-item instrument is developed for assessing exhibitors perceptions of their trade show performance. The paper presents evidence...

  18. Self-templated chemically stable hollow spherical covalent organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandambeth, Sharath; Venkatesh, V.; Shinde, Digambar B.; Kumari, Sushma; Halder, Arjun; Verma, Sandeep; Banerjee, Rahul

    2015-04-01

    Covalent organic frameworks are a family of crystalline porous materials with promising applications. Although active research on the design and synthesis of covalent organic frameworks has been ongoing for almost a decade, the mechanisms of formation of covalent organic frameworks crystallites remain poorly understood. Here we report the synthesis of a hollow spherical covalent organic framework with mesoporous walls in a single-step template-free method. A detailed time-dependent study of hollow sphere formation reveals that an inside-out Ostwald ripening process is responsible for the hollow sphere formation. The synthesized covalent organic framework hollow spheres are highly porous (surface area ~1,500 m2 g-1), crystalline and chemically stable, due to the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding. These mesoporous hollow sphere covalent organic frameworks are used for a trypsin immobilization study, which shows an uptake of 15.5 μmol g-1 of trypsin.

  19. Preparation and performance of novel thermal stable composite nanofiltration membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunrui WU; Shouhai ZHANG; Fajie YANG; Chun YAN; Xigao JIAN

    2008-01-01

    The novel thermal stable composite nanofiltra-tion membranes were prepared through the interfacial polymerization of piperazine and trimesoyl chloride on the poly (phthalazinone ether) ultrafiltration substrate. The effects of polymerization and testing conditions on membrane performance were studied. The surface morphologies of the substrate and the composite mem-branes were observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The separation properties of membranes for dyes and salts were tested. The composite membranes show good ther-mal stability. The rejection for Na2SO4 was kept over 96%, 1.0 MPa and 80℃. When tested at 1.0 MPa and 60℃, the rejection of the composite membrane for dyes was kept at the rejection for NaCl was lower than 20%.

  20. The inductive, steady-state sustainment of stable spheromaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, A. C.; Jarboe, T. R.; Morgan, K. D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Hansen, C. J.; Everson, C. J.; Penna, J. M.; Nelson, B. A.

    2016-10-01

    Inductive helicity injection current drive with imposed perturbations has led to the breakthrough of spheromak sustainment while maintaining stability. Sustained spheromaks show coherent, imposed plasma motion and low plasma-generated mode activity, indicating stability. Additionally, record current gain of 3.9 has been achieved with evidence of pressure confinement. The Helicity Injected Torus - Steady Inductive (HIT-SI) experiment studies efficient, steady-state current drive for magnetic confinement plasmas using a novel experimental method which is ideal for low aspect ratio, toroidal geometries and is compatible with closed flux surfaces. Analysis of surface magnetic probes indicates large n = 0 and 1 toroidal Fourier mode amplitudes and little energy in higher modes. Biorthogonal decomposition shows that almost all of the n = 1 energy is imposed by the injectors, rather than plasma-generated. Ion Doppler spectroscopy (IDS) measurements show coherent, imposed plasma motion of +/-2.5 cm in the region inside r 10 cm (a = 23 cm) and the size of the separate spheromak is consistent with that predicted by Imposed-dynamo Current Drive (IDCD). Coherent motion indicates that the spheromak is stable and a lack of plasma-generated n = 1 energy indicates that the maximum q is maintained below 1 for stability during sustainment.

  1. Tokyo Motor Show 2003; Tokyo Motor Show 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joly, E.

    2004-01-01

    The text which follows present the different techniques exposed during the 37. Tokyo Motor Show. The report points out the great tendencies of developments of the Japanese automobile industry. The hybrid electric-powered vehicles or those equipped with fuel cells have been highlighted by the Japanese manufacturers which allow considerable budgets in the research of less polluting vehicles. The exposed models, although being all different according to the manufacturer, use always a hybrid system: fuel cell/battery. The manufacturers have stressed too on the intelligent systems for navigation and safety as well as on the design and comfort. (O.M.)

  2. Generically stable and smooth measures in NIP theories

    CERN Document Server

    Hrushovski, Ehud; Simon, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    We study stable like behaviour in first order theories without the independence property. We introduce generically stable measures, give characterizatiions, and show their ubiquity. We also introduce generic compact domination. We also prove the approximate definability of arbitrary Borel probability measures on definable sets in the real and p-adic fields.

  3. Risk Aversion in Game Shows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Lau, Morten I.; Rutström, E. Elisabet

    2008-01-01

    , and the dynamic nature of the task in most games. We consider the game shows Card Sharks, Jeopardy!, Lingo, and finally Deal Or No Deal. We provide a detailed case study of the analyses of Deal Or No Deal, since it is suitable for inference about risk attitudes and has attracted considerable attention....

  4. Phyllodes tumor showing intraductal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makidono, Akari; Tsunoda, Hiroko; Mori, Miki; Yagata, Hiroshi; Onoda, Yui; Kikuchi, Mari; Nozaki, Taiki; Saida, Yukihisa; Nakamura, Seigo; Suzuki, Koyu

    2013-07-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare fibroepithelial lesion and particularly uncommon in adolescent girls. It is thought to arise from the periductal rather than intralobular stroma. Usually, it is seen as a well-defined mass. Phyllodes tumor showing intraductal growth is extremely rare. Here we report a girl who has a phyllodes tumor with intraductal growth.

  5. Pembrolizumab Shows Promise for NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Data from the KEYNOTE-001 trial show that pembrolizumab improves clinical outcomes for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, and is well tolerated. PD-L1 expression in at least 50% of tumor cells correlated with improved efficacy.

  6. Create a Polarized Light Show.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson that introduces students to polarized light using a problem-solving approach. After illustrating the concept using a slinky and poster board with a vertical slot, students solve the problem of creating a polarized light show using Polya's problem-solving methods. (MDH)

  7. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  8. Optimization of Parameters of Asymptotically Stable Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Guerman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with numerical methods of parameter optimization for asymptotically stable systems. We formulate a special mathematical programming problem that allows us to determine optimal parameters of a stabilizer. This problem involves solutions to a differential equation. We show how to chose the mesh in order to obtain discrete problem guaranteeing the necessary accuracy. The developed methodology is illustrated by an example concerning optimization of parameters for a satellite stabilization system.

  9. Reality show: um paradoxo nietzschiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Feldman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    O fenômeno dos reality shows - e a subseqüente relação entre imagem e verdade - assenta-se sobre uma série de paradoxos. Tais paradoxos podem ser compreendidos à luz do pensamento do filósofo alemão Friedrich Nietzsche, que, através dos usos de formulações paradoxais, concebia a realidade como um mundo de pura aparência e a verdade como um acréscimo ficcional, como um efeito. A ficção é então tomada, na filosofia de Nietzsche, não em seu aspecto falsificante e desrealizador - como sempre pleiteou nossa tradição metafísica -, mas como condição necessária para que certa espécie de invenção possa operar como verdade. Sendo assim, a própria expressão reality show, através de sua formulação paradoxal, engendra explicitamente um mundo de pura aparência, em que a verdade, a parte reality da proposição, é da ordem do suplemento, daquilo que se acrescenta ficcionalmente - como um adjetivo - a show. O ornamento, nesse caso, passa a ocupar o lugar central, apontando para o efeito produzido: o efeito-de-verdade. Seguindo, então, o pensamento nietzschiano e sua atualização na contemporaneidade, investigaremos de que forma os televisivos “shows de realidade” operam paradoxalmente, em consonância com nossas paradoxais práticas culturais.

  10. Large-eddy simulation of the very stable boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinita, M. J.; Matheou, G.

    2016-12-01

    The stable boundary layer is ubiquitous and typically forms at night when the ground radiatively cools and in polar regions throughout the day. Stable stratification and the associated reduction in the energetic scales in combination with the large anisotropy of turbulent motions challenge numerical models. This modeling difficulty also affects large-eddy simulation (LES) methods leading to scarce LES results for very stable conditions. In contrast, the NWP of convective flows has greatly benefited from the ample availability of high quality LES data. In order to overcome these limitations, a novel LES model setup is developed to enable the modeling of very stable boundary layers. A series of Ekman layer-type boundary layers at various surface cooling rates, geotropic winds and latitudes (rotation rates) is presented. A temperature surface condition is applied in the LES. The surface heat flux is dynamically computed byresolving the surface layer since the often-used Monin-Obukhov similarity theory cannot represent very stable conditions. Depending on the conditions, the LES gracefully transitions to a direct numerical simulation (DNS) where the flow becomes fully resolved. Two stability regimes can be discerned based on vertical profiles of the Richardson number. Overall, the model predicts that turbulence is very resilient with respect to stability. Temperature and velocity fluctuations persist even at high Richardson numbers. The nature of the fluctuations, i.e., due to turbulence/overturning or waves, is discussed. Scaling relations and spectra are also presented and discussed.

  11. Stable clocks and general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Will, C M

    1995-01-01

    We survey the role of stable clocks in general relativity. Clock comparisons have provided important tests of the Einstein Equivalence Principle, which underlies metric gravity. These include tests of the isotropy of clock comparisons (verification of local Lorentz invariance) and tests of the homogeneity of clock comparisons (verification of local position invariance). Comparisons of atomic clocks with gravitational clocks test the Strong Equivalence Principle by bounding cosmological variations in Newton's constant. Stable clocks also play a role in the search for gravitational radiation: comparision of atomic clocks with the binary pulsar's orbital clock has verified gravitational-wave damping, and phase-sensitive detection of waves from inspiralling compact binaries using laser interferometric gravitational observatories will facilitate extraction of useful source information from the data. Stable clocks together with general relativity have found important practical applications in navigational systems s...

  12. Stable and Continuous Long-term Enzymatic Reaction using an Enzyme-Nanofiber Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Hyung; Hwang, Ee Taek; Kim, Byoung Chan; Lee, Sun Mi; Sang, Byoung-In; Choi, Yong Su; Kim, Jungbae; Gu, Man Bock

    2007-07-01

    This study shows the preparation and application of enzyme-nanofiber composites for long-term stable operation. The enzyme-nanofiber composite was prepared by coating an enzyme-aggregate, the esterase from Rhizopus oryzae, on the surface of the nanofibers. The activity and stability of the esterase-nanofiber composite was evaluated by measuring the production of p-nitrophenol from the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate. It was found that enzyme-nanofiber was very stable, even when the fibers were shaken in glasses, preserving 80 % of the initial activity for 100 days. In addition, the enzyme nanofiber composite was repeatedly used in 30 cycles of substrate hydrolysis and still remained active. Consequently, the esterase-nanofiber composite was finally employed to find its feasibility of long-term and stable continuous substrate hydrolysis reaction. In the sample reactor, the production of p-nitrophenol was consistent for 400 hr. Additionally, it was found that the production of p-nitrophenol proportionally decreased as the dilution rate was increased, showing the relationship between the efficiency of hydrolysis and the retention time within the reactor. This study demonstrates that the enzyme-nanofiber composite can be used in both repeated-batch and continuous modes for long-term stable operation.

  13. Surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2015-07-01

    Surface nanobubbles are nanoscopic gaseous domains on immersed substrates which can survive for days. They were first speculated to exist about 20 years ago, based on stepwise features in force curves between two hydrophobic surfaces, eventually leading to the first atomic force microscopy (AFM) image in 2000. While in the early years it was suspected that they may be an artifact caused by AFM, meanwhile their existence has been confirmed with various other methods, including through direct optical observation. Their existence seems to be paradoxical, as a simple classical estimate suggests that they should dissolve in microseconds, due to the large Laplace pressure inside these nanoscopic spherical-cap-shaped objects. Moreover, their contact angle (on the gas side) is much smaller than one would expect from macroscopic counterparts. This review will not only give an overview on surface nanobubbles, but also on surface nanodroplets, which are nanoscopic droplets (e.g., of oil) on (hydrophobic) substrates immersed in water, as they show similar properties and can easily be confused with surface nanobubbles and as they are produced in a similar way, namely, by a solvent exchange process, leading to local oversaturation of the water with gas or oil, respectively, and thus to nucleation. The review starts with how surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets can be made, how they can be observed (both individually and collectively), and what their properties are. Molecular dynamic simulations and theories to account for the long lifetime of the surface nanobubbles are then reported on. The crucial element contributing to the long lifetime of surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets is pinning of the three-phase contact line at chemical or geometric surface heterogeneities. The dynamical evolution of the surface nanobubbles then follows from the diffusion equation, Laplace's equation, and Henry's law. In particular, one obtains stable surface nanobubbles when the gas influx from

  14. Picasso on Show in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A staff member of the National Picasso Museum of France checks one of the great Spanish artist Pablo Picasso’s works at the China Pavilion inside the site of the 2010 World Expo in Shanghai on October 12.Sixty-two priceless paintings and statues selected from the works of the renowned artist have been brought to the pavilion for an upcoming exhibition to premiere on October 18.Besides these representative masterpieces,50 valuable photographs showing the artist’s whole life will also be presented.The exhibition’s estimated value is 678 million euros ($934 million).It will be held until January 10,2012.

  15. Reality shows: uma abordagem psicossocial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Pereira Bueno Millan

    Full Text Available Desde os primórdios da civilização, o ser humano mostra necessidade de representar cenicamente seus dramas pessoais e vicissitudes existenciais. O "reality show" é uma das versões pós-modernas da encenação da vida humana. Este artigo, por meio de uma pesquisa bibliográfica, analisa criticamente as relações existentes entre o "reality show" e aspectos psicossociais do comportamento humano. Conclui-se que tais programas televisivos são o retrato da contemporaneidade, ou seja, revelam a morte do sujeito, a fugacidade das experiências vividas, a desvalorização da história e o culto à imagem e à superficialidade. Por meio da sedução do espectador, mobilizam-se aspectos primitivos de seu psiquismo, fazendo com que ele se sinta narcisicamente poderoso e onipotente e se acredite dono do destino dos participantes do programa. Sugerem-se novos estudos que contribuam para a reflexão crítica e maior conscientização.

  16. "Medicine show." Alice in Doctorland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    This is an excerpt from the script of a 1939 play provided to the Institute of Social Medicine and Community Health by the Library of Congress Federal Theater Project Collection at George Mason University Library, Fairfax, Virginia, pages 2-1-8 thru 2-1-14. The Federal Theatre Project (FTP) was part of the New Deal program for the arts 1935-1939. Funded by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) its goal was to employ theater professionals from the relief rolls. A number of FTP plays deal with aspects of medicine and public health. Pageants, puppet shows and documentary plays celebrated progress in medical science while examining social controversies in medical services and the public health movement. "Medicine Show" sharply contrasts technological wonders with social backwardness. The play was rehearsed by the FTP but never opened because funding ended. A revised version ran on Broadway in 1940. The preceding comments are adapted from an excellent, well-illustrated review of five of these plays by Barabara Melosh: "The New Deal's Federal Theatre Project," Medical Heritage, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Jan/Feb 1986), pp. 36-47.

  17. Monitoring of stable glaucoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. Holtzer-Goor (Kim); N.S. Klazinga (Niek); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); H.G. Lemij (Hans); T. Plochg; E. van Sprundel (Esther)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA high workload for ophthalmologists and long waiting lists for patients challenge the organization of ophthalmic care. Tasks that require less specialized skills, like the monitoring of stable (well controlled) glaucoma patients could be substituted from ophthalmologists to other profes

  18. Bayesian stable isotope mixing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper we review recent advances in Stable Isotope Mixing Models (SIMMs) and place them into an over-arching Bayesian statistical framework which allows for several useful extensions. SIMMs are used to quantify the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixtur...

  19. Stable Networks and Convex Payoffs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilles, R.P.; Sarangi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Recently a variety of link-based stability concepts have emerged in the literature on game theoretic models of social network formation.We investigate two basic formation properties that establish equivalence between some well known types of stable networks and their natural extensions.These propert

  20. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    CERN Document Server

    Sernelius, Bo E

    2009-01-01

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a 87 Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can exp...

  1. Stability of Picard Bundle Over Moduli Space of Stable Vector Bundles of Rank Two Over a Curve

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indranil Biswas; Tomás L Gómez

    2001-08-01

    Answering a question of [BV] it is proved that the Picard bundle on the moduli space of stable vector bundles of rank two, on a Riemann surface of genus at least three, with fixed determinant of odd degree is stable.

  2. Stable equilibria of elliptic roly-poly toys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok-In

    2016-11-01

    As an instructive (gravitational potential) energy approach, we show that the elliptic roly-poly has a richer and more useful profile (including the tilted configuration) of stable equilibria than conventional spherical or cylindrical roly-polys.

  3. Stable carbon isotope ratios from archaeological charcoal as palaeoenvironmental indicators

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hall, G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential to provide environmental proxies using stable carbon isotopes from modern and archaeological charcoal is explored. Experiments on modern Podocarpus (Yellowwoods) show that δ13C values of stems, branches and charcoal preserve proxy...

  4. Role of stable modes in zonal flow regulated ITG turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makwana, Kirit; Terry, Paul; Hatch, David; Pueschel, M. J.

    2012-10-01

    Stable modes are studied in zonal flow regulated ITG turbulence using the gyrokinetic code GENE. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) modes are employed to investigate the eigenmode space of the distribution function. Both the unstable and stable POD modes show strong nonlinear energy transfer via three wave interactions that include zonal modes. The zonal mode itself absorbs a small fraction of the energy injected by the unstable mode. The remaining energy is deposited in the stable modes of non-zonal wavenumbers that are involved in the three wave coupling. These stable modes lie mostly within the wavenumber range of the instability. This indicates that zonal flows mediate energy transfer from unstable to stable modes, leading to saturation. The amplitude attenuation rate (AAR) of POD modes shows an equipartition across a large range of stable modes. This rate is balanced by three wave correlations of the POD modes and their time dependent amplitudes. These correlations are large if they involve zonal modes and they also show an equipartition for higher mode numbers. A similar analysis using linear eigenmodes also shows rough equipartition among the linear modes. Thus, AAR provides a handle to collectively describe the multitude of stable modes in a gyrokinetic simulation.

  5. Stable Stratification Effects on Flow and Pollutant Dispersion in Boundary Layers Entering a Generic Urban Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, J. M.; Pourquie, M. J. B. M.; Jonker, H. J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) are used to investigate the effect of stable stratification on rural-to-urban roughness transitions. Smooth-wall turbulent boundary layers are subjected to a generic urban roughness consisting of cubes in an in-line arrangement. Two line sources of pollutant are added to investigate the effect on pollutant dispersion. Firstly, the LES method is validated with data from wind-tunnel experiments on fully-developed flow over cubical roughness. Good agreement is found for the vertical profiles of the mean streamwise velocity component and mean Reynolds stress. Subsequently, roughness transition simulations are done for both neutral and stable conditions. Results are compared with fully-developed simulations with conventional double-periodic boundary conditions. In stable conditions, at the end of the domain the streamwise velocity component has not yet reached the fully-developed state even though the surface forces are nearly constant. Moreover, the internal boundary layer is shallower than in the neutral case. Furthermore, an investigation of the turbulence kinetic energy budget shows that the buoyancy destruction term is reduced in the internal boundary layer, above which it is equal to the undisturbed (smooth wall) value. In addition, in stable conditions pollutants emitted above the urban canopy enter the canopy farther downstream due to decreased vertical mixing. Pollutants emitted below the top of the urban canopy are 85 % higher in concentration in stable conditions mostly due to decreased advection. If this is taken into account concentrations remain 17 % greater in stable conditions due to less rapid internal boundary-layer growth. Finally, it is concluded that in the first seven streets the vertical advective pollutant flux is significant, in contrast to the fully-developed case.

  6. Quantifying uncertainty in stable isotope mixing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul; Syme, James; Heikoop, Jeffrey; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna; Perkins, George; Newman, Brent; Chrystal, Abbey E.; Hagerty, Shannon B.

    2015-05-01

    Mixing models are powerful tools for identifying biogeochemical sources and determining mixing fractions in a sample. However, identification of actual source contributors is often not simple, and source compositions typically vary or even overlap, significantly increasing model uncertainty in calculated mixing fractions. This study compares three probabilistic methods, Stable Isotope Analysis in R (SIAR), a pure Monte Carlo technique (PMC), and Stable Isotope Reference Source (SIRS) mixing model, a new technique that estimates mixing in systems with more than three sources and/or uncertain source compositions. In this paper, we use nitrate stable isotope examples (δ15N and δ18O) but all methods tested are applicable to other tracers. In Phase I of a three-phase blind test, we compared methods for a set of six-source nitrate problems. PMC was unable to find solutions for two of the target water samples. The Bayesian method, SIAR, experienced anchoring problems, and SIRS calculated mixing fractions that most closely approximated the known mixing fractions. For that reason, SIRS was the only approach used in the next phase of testing. In Phase II, the problem was broadened where any subset of the six sources could be a possible solution to the mixing problem. Results showed a high rate of Type I errors where solutions included sources that were not contributing to the sample. In Phase III some sources were eliminated based on assumed site knowledge and assumed nitrate concentrations, substantially reduced mixing fraction uncertainties and lowered the Type I error rate. These results demonstrate that valuable insights into stable isotope mixing problems result from probabilistic mixing model approaches like SIRS. The results also emphasize the importance of identifying a minimal set of potential sources and quantifying uncertainties in source isotopic composition as well as demonstrating the value of additional information in reducing the uncertainty in calculated

  7. Shelf Stable Epoxy Repair Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    manufacturing operations are more efficient , discarding less expired film. Commercial and military aircraft repair operations at Boeing experience very similar...successfully encapsulated at concentrations greater than 50 wt% within four N N = CC Infoscitex Corporation Shelf Stable Epoxy Resin Adhesive WP-1763 8...affects the composition of the encapsulant , which in turn affects the ability of the encapsulant to wet the core phase, the barrier properties of the

  8. Prices Up and Volumes Stable

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2011 First Half China Garment Industry Report Exports Grew at a Slower Pace China Customs reported the garment & accessories export value of $51.286 billion for the first five months of this year, up 23.12% y/y, accounting for 56.28 percent of the total, 5% lower than the previous year’s points.Despite sales prices increase, sales volume remain stable. From Jan. to May

  9. Phases of stable representations of quivers

    CERN Document Server

    Engenhorst, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    We consider stable representations of non-Dynkin quivers with respect to a central charge. On one condition the existence of a stable representation with self-extensions implies the existence of infinitely many stables without self-extensions. In this case the phases of the stable representations approach one or two limit points. In particular, the phases are not dense in two arcs.

  10. Degradation changes stable carbon isotope depth profiles in palsa peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Palsa peatlands are a significant carbon pool in the global carbon cycle and are projected to change by global warming due to accelerated permafrost thaw. Our aim was to use stable carbon isotopes as indicators of palsa degradation. Depth profiles of stable carbon isotopes generally reflect organic matter dynamics in soils with an increase of δ13C values during aerobic decomposition and stable or decreasing δ13C values with depth during anaerobic decomposition. Stable carbon isotope depth profiles of undisturbed and degraded sites of hummocks as well as hollows at three palsa peatlands in northern Sweden were used to investigate the degradation processes. The depth patterns of stable isotopes clearly differ between intact and degraded hummocks at all sites. Erosion and cryoturbation at the degraded sites significantly changes the stable carbon isotope depth profiles. At the intact hummocks the uplifting of peat material by permafrost is indicated by a turning in the δ13C depth trend and this assessment is supported by a change in the C / N ratios. For hollows isotope patterns were less clear, but some hollows and degraded hollows in the palsa peatlands show differences in their stable carbon isotope depth profiles indicating enhanced degradation rates. We conclude that the degradation of palsa peatlands by accelerated permafrost thawing could be identified with stable carbon isotope depth profiles. At intact hummocks δ13C depth patterns display the uplifting of peat material by a change in peat decomposition processes.

  11. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 2964, 2966, 3064, and 3066, Shah-Esmail (617), Reg-Alaqadari (618), Samandkhan-Karez (713), Laki-Bander (611), Jahangir-Naweran (612), and Sreh-Chena (707) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  12. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 2964, 2966, 3064, and 3066, Shah-Esmail (617), Reg-Alaqadari (618), Samandkhan-Karez (713), Laki-Bander (611), Jahangir-Naweran (612), and Sreh-Chena (707) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefen, Todd M.; King, Trude V.V.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  13. Analysis of Stable Isotope Contents of Surface and Underground ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sam Eshun

    (2H/1H) ratios relative to a standard called Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW) (Craig, ... 1998 from a rain gauge installed by the Meteorological Office. ..... A geochemical model for the arid Ti-Tree Basin, Central Australia, In Water-Rock.

  14. Stable hovering of a jellyfish-like flying machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristroph, Leif; Childress, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Ornithopters, or flapping-wing aircraft, offer an alternative to helicopters in achieving manoeuvrability at small scales, although stabilizing such aerial vehicles remains a key challenge. Here, we present a hovering machine that achieves self-righting flight using flapping wings alone, without relying on additional aerodynamic surfaces and without feedback control. We design, construct and test-fly a prototype that opens and closes four wings, resembling the motions of swimming jellyfish more so than any insect or bird. Measurements of lift show the benefits of wing flexing and the importance of selecting a wing size appropriate to the motor. Furthermore, we use high-speed video and motion tracking to show that the body orientation is stable during ascending, forward and hovering flight modes. Our experimental measurements are used to inform an aerodynamic model of stability that reveals the importance of centre-of-mass location and the coupling of body translation and rotation. These results show the promise of flapping-flight strategies beyond those that directly mimic the wing motions of flying animals. PMID:24430122

  15. Generation of stable overlaps between antiparallel filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Johann, D; Kruse, K

    2015-01-01

    During cell division, sister chromatids are segregated by the mitotic spindle, a bipolar assembly of interdigitating antiparallel polar filaments called microtubules. Establishing a stable overlap region is essential for maintenance of bipolarity, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a particle-based stochastic model, we find that the interplay of motors and passive cross linkers can robustly generate partial overlaps between antiparallel filaments. Our analysis shows that motors reduce the overlap in a length-dependent manner, whereas passive cross linkers increase it independently of the length. In addition to maintaining structural integrity, passive cross linkers can thus also have a dynamic role for size regulation.

  16. Assessment of stable isotope incorporation into recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Luo, Quanzhou; Apostol, Izydor; Luo, Shun; Jerums, Matthew; Huang, Gang; Jiang, Xinzhao Grace; Gastwirt, Jessica; Savjani, Nimesh; Lewis, Jeffrey; Keener, Ronald; Wypych, Jette

    2013-02-15

    Stable isotope labeling combined with mass spectrometry has been widely used in a diverse set of applications in the biochemistry and biomedical fields. When stable isotope-labeled proteins are produced via metabolic labeling of cell culture, a comprehensive assessment of the labeling pattern is imperative. In this study, we present a set of mass spectrometry-based bioanalytical tools developed for quantitatively tracing the levels of the stable isotopes incorporated into the recombinant proteins (monoclonal antibodies and Fc fusion proteins expressed in different host systems) that include total mass analysis, peptide mapping analysis, and amino acid analysis. We show that these three mass spectrometry-based analytical methods have distinctive advantages and limitations and that they are mutually complementary in evaluating the quality of stable isotope-labeled proteins. In addition, we show that the analytical techniques developed here are powerful tools to provide valuable insights into studying cell metabolism and performing flux analysis during cell culture.

  17. Equilibrium contact angle or the most-stable contact angle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes Ruiz-Cabello, F J; Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A

    2014-04-01

    It is well-established that the equilibrium contact angle in a thermodynamic framework is an "unattainable" contact angle. Instead, the most-stable contact angle obtained from mechanical stimuli of the system is indeed experimentally accessible. Monitoring the susceptibility of a sessile drop to a mechanical stimulus enables to identify the most stable drop configuration within the practical range of contact angle hysteresis. Two different stimuli may be used with sessile drops: mechanical vibration and tilting. The most stable drop against vibration should reveal the changeless contact angle but against the gravity force, it should reveal the highest resistance to slide down. After the corresponding mechanical stimulus, once the excited drop configuration is examined, the focus will be on the contact angle of the initial drop configuration. This methodology needs to map significantly the static drop configurations with different stable contact angles. The most-stable contact angle, together with the advancing and receding contact angles, completes the description of physically realizable configurations of a solid-liquid system. Since the most-stable contact angle is energetically significant, it may be used in the Wenzel, Cassie or Cassie-Baxter equations accordingly or for the surface energy evaluation.

  18. Engineering stable topography in dense bio-mimetic 3D collagen scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Alekseeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Topographic features are well known to influence cell behaviour and can provide a powerful tool for engineering complex, functional tissues. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of formation of a stable micro-topography on plastic compressed (PC collagen gels. The uni-directional fluid flow that accompanies PC of collagen gels creates a fluid leaving surface (FLS and a non-fluid leaving surface (non-FLS. Here we tested the hypothesis that the resulting anisotropy in collagen density and stiffness between FLS and non-FLS would influence the fidelity and stability of micro-grooves patterned on these surfaces. A pattern template of parallel-aligned glass fibres was introduced to the FLS or non-FLS either at the start of the compression or halfway through, when a dense FLS had already formed. Results showed that both early and late patterning of the FLS generated grooves that had depth (25 ±7 µm and 19 ±8 µm, respectively and width (55 ±11 µm and 50 ±12 µm, respectively which matched the glass fibre diameter (50 µm. In contrast, early and late patterning of the non-FLS gave much wider (151 ±50 µm and 89 ±14 µm, respectively and shallower (10 ±2.7 µm and 13 ±3.5 µm, respectively grooves than expected. The depth to width ratio of the grooves generated on the FLS remained unaltered under static culture conditions over 2 weeks, indicating that grooves were stable under long term active cell-mediated matrix remodelling. These results indicate that the FLS, characterised by a higher matrix collagen density and stiffness than the non-FLS, provides the most favourable mechanical surface for precise engineering of a stable micro-topography in 3D collagen hydrogel scaffolds.

  19. Stable extensions by line bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Teixidor-i-Bigas, M

    1997-01-01

    Let C be an algebraic curve of genus g. Consider extensions E of a vector bundle F'' of rank n'' by a vector bundle F' of rank n'. The following statement was conjectured by Lange: If 0stable. We prove this result for the generic curve when F' is a line bundle. Our method uses a degeneration argument to a reducible curve.

  20. SYSTEMS OF ECOLOGICALLY STABLE CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Energy saving, reduction of carbon dioxide emission, preserving environment are topical issues of modern construction. Future-oriented, ecologically stable construction (ESC means the necessity to consider the questions of environmental protection, ecology and social protection in the process of planning and performing the works. The systems of ESC are realized in the projects initiated by the leading companies producing heat-efficient construction products and in particular autoclave gas concrete blocks and wide range of products on the basis of rock wool.

  1. Stable Hemiaminals: 2-Aminopyrimidine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kwiecień

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stable hemiaminals can be obtained in the one-pot reaction between 2-aminopyrimidine and nitrobenzaldehyde derivatives. Ten new hemiaminals have been obtained, six of them in crystal state. The molecular stability of these intermediates results from the presence of both electron-withdrawing nitro groups as substituents on the phenyl ring and pyrimidine ring, so no further stabilisation by intramolecular interaction is required. Hemiaminal molecules possess a tetrahedral carbon atom constituting a stereogenic centre. As the result of crystallisation in centrosymmetric space groups both enantiomers are present in the crystal structure.

  2. A parallel approach to the stable marriage problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes two parallel algorithms for the stable marriage problem implemented on a MIMD parallel computer. The algorithms are tested against sequential algorithms on randomly generated and worst-case instances. The results clearly show that the combination fo a very simple problem...... and a commercial MIMD system results in parallel algorithms which are not competitive with sequential algorithms wrt. practical performance. 1 Introduction In 1962 the Stable Marriage Problem was....

  3. Methyl modified MOF-5: a water stable hydrogen storage material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Grzech, Anna; Mulder, Fokko M; Dingemans, Theo J

    2011-05-14

    Water stable methyl modified MOF-5s have been synthesized via a solvothermal route. Methyl- and 2,5-dimethyl-modified MOF-5s show the same topology and hydrogen uptake capability as that of MOF-5. The H(2) uptake capacity of MOF-5, however, drops rapidly when exposed to the ambient air, whereas the H(2) uptake capacities of the methyl modified MOF-5s remain stable for 4 days. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  4. Characters of surface deformation and surface wave in thermal capillary convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN; Li; KANG; Qi; HU; Wenrei

    2006-01-01

    In the field of fluid mechanics, free surface phenomena is one of the most important physical processes. In the present research work, the surface deformation and surface wave caused by temperature difference of sidewalls in a rectangular cavity have been investigated. The horizontal cross-section of the container is 52 mm×42 mm, and there is a silicon oil layer of height 3.5 mm in the experimental cavity. Temperature difference between the two side walls of the cavity is increased gradually, and the flow on the liquid layer will develop from stable convection to un-stable convection. An optical diagnostic system consisting of a modified Michelson interferometer and image processor has been developed for study of the surface deformation and surface wave of thermal capillary convection. The Fourier transformation method is used to interferometer fringe analysis. The quantitative results of surface deformation and surface wave have been calculated from a serial of the interference fringe patterns. The characters of surface deformation and surface wave have been obtained. They are related with temperature gradient and surface tension. Surface deformation is fluctuant with time, which shows the character of surface wave. The cycle period of the wave is 4.8 s, and the amplitudes are from 0 to 0.55 μm. The phase of the wave near the cool side of the cavity is opposite and correlative to that near the hot side. The present experiment proves that the surface wave of thermal capillary convection exists on liquid free surface, and it is wrapped in surface deformation.

  5. Persistence Length of Stable Microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Taviare; Mirigian, Matthew; Yasar, M. Selcuk; Ross, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Microtubules are a vital component of the cytoskeleton. As the most rigid of the cytoskeleton filaments, they give shape and support to the cell. They are also essential for intracellular traffic by providing the roadways onto which organelles are transported, and they are required to reorganize during cellular division. To perform its function in the cell, the microtubule must be rigid yet dynamic. We are interested in how the mechanical properties of stable microtubules change over time. Some ``stable'' microtubules of the cell are recycled after days, such as in the axons of neurons or the cilia and flagella. We measured the persistence length of freely fluctuating taxol-stabilized microtubules over the span of a week and analyzed them via Fourier decomposition. As measured on a daily basis, the persistence length is independent of the contour length. Although measured over the span of the week, the accuracy of the measurement and the persistence length varies. We also studied how fluorescently-labeling the microtubule affects the persistence length and observed that a higher labeling ratio corresponded to greater flexibility. National Science Foundation Grant No: 0928540 to JLR.

  6. Stable Imaging for Astronomy (SIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Mathilde; Ottogalli, Sebastien; Preis, Olivier; Bresson, Yves; Rivet, Jean-Pierre; Abe, Lyu; Vakili, Farrokh

    2014-07-01

    One of the most challenging fields of astronomical instrumentation is probably high-contrast imaging since it ultimately combines ultra-high sensitivity at low flux and the ability to cope with photon flux contrasts of several hundreds of millions or even more. These two aspects implicitly require that high-contrast instruments should be highly stable in the sense of the reproducibility of their measurements at different times, but also, continuously stable over time. In most high contrast instruments or experiments, their sensitivity is broken after at most tens of minutes of operation due to uncontrolled and unknown behaviour of the whole experiment regarding the environmental conditions. In this paper, we introduce a general approach of an exhaustive stability study for high-contrast imaging that has been initiated at Lagrange Laboratory, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA). On a practical ground, one of the fundamental issues of this study is the metrology, which is the basis of all reproducible measurements. We describe a small experiment designed to understand the behaviour of one of our ultra-precise metrology tools (a commercial sub-nanometric 3-way interferometer) and derive the conditions under which its operation delivers reliable results. The approach will apply to the high-contrast imaging test-bench SPEED, under development at OCA.

  7. Thermally Stable, Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Renee M.; Fedorov, Alexey; Keitz, Benjamin K.

    2011-01-01

    Highly thermally stable N-aryl,N-alkyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ruthenium catalysts were designed and synthesized for latent olefin metathesis. These catalysts showed excellent latent behavior toward metathesis reactions, whereby the complexes were inactive at ambient temperature and initiated at elevated temperatures, a challenging property to achieve with second generation catalysts. A sterically hindered N-tert-butyl substituent on the NHC ligand of the ruthenium complex was found to induce latent behavior toward cross-metathesis reactions, and exchange of the chloride ligands for iodide ligands was necessary to attain latent behavior during ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). Iodide-based catalysts showed no reactivity toward ROMP of norbornene-derived monomers at 25 °C, and upon heating to 85 °C gave complete conversion of monomer to polymer in less than 2 hours. All of the complexes were very stable to air, moisture, and elevated temperatures up to at least 90 °C, and exhibited a long catalyst lifetime in solution at elevated temperatures. PMID:22282652

  8. Construction of a System for the Stable Expression of Foreign Genes in Dunaliella salina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENGDe-Gui; HANYan; WANGYi-Qin; WANGPeng; ZHANGLi-Ming; LIWen-Bin; SUNYong-Ru

    2004-01-01

    A stable transformation system for the expression of foreign genes in the unicellular greenmarine alga (Dunaliella salina Teod.) was established. Using electroporation, the alga was transformed witha plasmid containing the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) gene and the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase(CAT) gene as a selectable gene. PCR and Southern blotting analysis indicated that the HBsAEgene wasintegrated into the D. salina genome. Northern dotting analysis showed that the HBsAg gene was expressedat the mRNA level. The stable expression of HBsAg protein in transformants was confirmed by HBsAgenzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (HBsAg EUSA) and Western blotting analysis. Also, PCR and Southernblotting analyses showed that the CA Tgene was integrated into the D, salina genome, and CAT EUSAindicated that CAT protein was stably expressed in the cells. The introduced HBsAg DNA and HBsAgprotein expression were stably maintained for at least 60 generations in media devoid of chloramphenicol.This is the first report of the stable expression of foreign genes in D. salina.

  9. Chemical surface management for micro PCR in silicon chip thermocyclers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felbel, Jana; Bieber, Ivonne; Koehler, Johann M.

    2002-11-01

    Silicon, silicon dioxide, glass and other key materials of micro system technology show an inhibiting effect on PCR. This negative influence becomes seriously, if devices are miniaturized, particularly in case of flow-through devices due to their high surface to volume ratio. In contrast, alkyl-substituted surfaces do not inhibit the reaction. Although the silanization improves the compatibility, the suppression of inhibition by wall surface treatment was not stable over longer time intervals. Therefore, the stability of chemical surface modifications was studied in dependence of silanization, material, pH, temperature and buffer composition. The efficiency of surface covering by molecular substitution was characterized by wetting experiments as well as by PCR test runs. The results show that the surface treatment can be optimized by the choice of silanization agents and the concentration of surface active additives.

  10. Gaudin subalgebras and stable rational curves

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, Leonardo; Veselov, Alexander P

    2010-01-01

    Gaudin subalgebras are abelian Lie subalgebras of maximal dimension spanned by generators of the Kohno-Drinfeld Lie algebra t_n. We show that Gaudin subalgebras form a variety isomorphic to the moduli space of stable curves of genus zero with n+1 marked points. In particular, this gives an embedding of the moduli space in a Grassmannian of (n-1)-planes in an n(n-1)/2-dimensional space. We show that the sheaf of Gaudin subalgebras over the moduli space is isomorphic to a sheaf of twisted first order differential operators. For each representation of the Kohno--Drinfeld Lie algebra with fixed central character, we obtain a sheaf of commutative algebras whose spectrum is a coisotropic subscheme of a twisted version of the logarithmic cotangent bundle of the moduli space.

  11. Embryotoxicity of stable isotopes and use of stable isotopes in studies of teratogenetic mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielmann, H.; Nau, H.

    1986-07-01

    Experiments on teratogenic effects of stable isotopes from our own and other laboratories are evaluated. In the first series of investigations, the enrichment of the stable isotope /sup 13/C derived from U-/sup 13/C-glucose was studied in mouse embryos at various stages of development, including limb buds in organ culture. Preimplantation mouse embryos incubated in vitro in /sup 13/C-enriched medium for 48 hours showed normal development during subsequent differentiation in vitro and also in vivo after embryo transfer to faster mothers. These embryos were 15% to 20% enriched in /sup 13/C. Administration of U-13-C-glucose to pregnant mice during organogenesis led to an increase of the absolute /sup 13/C content of the embryo for several days after the end of isotope administration, whereas the enrichment in maternal tissue decreased. No alterations of embryonic development were detected due to stable isotope enrichment. Development of cultured mouse limb buds was unaffected by incubation with 82 mol% U-/sup 13/C-glucose as judged from morphologic and biochemical criteria. The second part of the article describes the value of deuterium-labeled drugs as probes into the mechanism of activation of teratogenic metabolites. A comparison of the pharmacokinetics as well as the teratogenicity between cyclophosphamide and some specific deuterium-labeled analogues showed that the isotope effect observed can be related to a particular metabolic pathway crucial for teratogenic activation by this drug.

  12. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  13. Super-stable Poissonian structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we characterize classes of Poisson processes whose statistical structures are super-stable. We consider a flow generated by a one-dimensional ordinary differential equation, and an ensemble of particles ‘surfing’ the flow. The particles start from random initial positions, and are propagated along the flow by stochastic ‘wave processes’ with general statistics and general cross correlations. Setting the initial positions to be Poisson processes, we characterize the classes of Poisson processes that render the particles’ positions—at all times, and invariantly with respect to the wave processes—statistically identical to their initial positions. These Poisson processes are termed ‘super-stable’ and facilitate the generalization of the notion of stationary distributions far beyond the realm of Markov dynamics.

  14. Stable States of Biological Organisms

    CERN Document Server

    Yukalov, V I; Yukalova, E P; Henry, J -Y; Cobb, J P

    2009-01-01

    A novel model of biological organisms is advanced, treating an organism as a self-consistent system subject to a pathogen flux. The principal novelty of the model is that it describes not some parts, but a biological organism as a whole. The organism is modeled by a five-dimensional dynamical system. The organism homeostasis is described by the evolution equations for five interacting components: healthy cells, ill cells, innate immune cells, specific immune cells, and pathogens. The stability analysis demonstrates that, in a wide domain of the parameter space, the system exhibits robust structural stability. There always exist four stable stationary solutions characterizing four qualitatively differing states of the organism: alive state, boundary state, critical state, and dead state.

  15. Topological Surface States in Dense Solid Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Ivan I; Hemley, Russell J

    2016-11-11

    Metallization of dense hydrogen and associated possible high-temperature superconductivity represents one of the key problems of physics. Recent theoretical studies indicate that before becoming a good metal, compressed solid hydrogen passes through a semimetallic stage. We show that such semimetallic phases predicted to be the most stable at multimegabar (∼300  GPa) pressures are not conventional semimetals: they exhibit topological metallic surface states inside the bulk "direct" gap in the two-dimensional surface Brillouin zone; that is, metallic surfaces may appear even when the bulk of the material remains insulating. Examples include hydrogen in the Cmca-12 and Cmca-4 structures; Pbcn hydrogen also has metallic surface states but they are of a nontopological nature. The results provide predictions for future measurements, including probes of possible surface superconductivity in dense hydrogen.

  16. Ambient-stable tetragonal phase in silver nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yugang; Ren, Yang; Liu, Yuzi; Wen, Jianguo; Okasinski, John S; Miller, Dean J

    2012-07-24

    Crystallization of noble metal atoms usually leads to the highly symmetric face-centred cubic phase that represents the thermodynamically stable structure. Introducing defective microstructures into a metal crystal lattice may induce distortions to form non-face-centered cubic phases when the lateral dimensions of objects decrease down to nanometre scale. However, stable non-face-centered cubic phases have not been reported in noble metal nanoparticles. Here we report that a stable body-centred tetragonal phase is observed in silver nanoparticles with fivefold twinning even at ambient conditions. The body-centered tetragonal phase originates from the distortion of cubic silver lattices due to internal strains in the twinned nanoparticles. The lattice distortion in the centre of such a nanoparticle is larger than that in the surfaces, indicating that the nanoparticle is composed of a highly strained core encapsulated in a less-strained sheath that helps stabilize the strained core.

  17. Stable and sporadic symbiotic communities of coral and algal holobionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Eric R; Barott, Katie L; Nulton, Jim; Vermeij, Mark Ja; Rohwer, Forest L

    2016-05-01

    Coral and algal holobionts are assemblages of macroorganisms and microorganisms, including viruses, Bacteria, Archaea, protists and fungi. Despite a decade of research, it remains unclear whether these associations are spatial-temporally stable or species-specific. We hypothesized that conflicting interpretations of the data arise from high noise associated with sporadic microbial symbionts overwhelming signatures of stable holobiont members. To test this hypothesis, the bacterial communities associated with three coral species (Acropora rosaria, Acropora hyacinthus and Porites lutea) and two algal guilds (crustose coralline algae and turf algae) from 131 samples were analyzed using a novel statistical approach termed the Abundance-Ubiquity (AU) test. The AU test determines whether a given bacterial species would be present given additional sampling effort (that is, stable) versus those species that are sporadically associated with a sample. Using the AU test, we show that coral and algal holobionts have a high-diversity group of stable symbionts. Stable symbionts are not exclusive to one species of coral or algae. No single bacterial species was ubiquitously associated with one host, showing that there is not strict heredity of the microbiome. In addition to the stable symbionts, there was a low-diversity community of sporadic symbionts whose abundance varied widely across individual holobionts of the same species. Identification of these two symbiont communities supports the holobiont model and calls into question the hologenome theory of evolution.

  18. Manipulation and gender neutrality in stable marriage procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Pini, Maria; Venable, Brent; Walsh, Toby

    2009-01-01

    The stable marriage problem is a well-known problem of matching men to women so that no man and woman who are not married to each other both prefer each other. Such a problem has a wide variety of practical applications ranging from matching resident doctors to hospitals to matching students to schools. A well-known algorithm to solve this problem is the Gale-Shapley algorithm, which runs in polynomial time. It has been proven that stable marriage procedures can always be manipulated. Whilst the Gale-Shapley algorithm is computationally easy to manipulate, we prove that there exist stable marriage procedures which are NP-hard to manipulate. We also consider the relationship between voting theory and stable marriage procedures, showing that voting rules which are NP-hard to manipulate can be used to define stable marriage procedures which are themselves NP-hard to manipulate. Finally, we consider the issue that stable marriage procedures like Gale-Shapley favour one gender over the other, and we show how to us...

  19. Assessing anthropogenic pressures on groundwater using stable OH isotopes: perspectives and issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrel, Philippe; Ollivier, Patrick; Flehoc, Christine; Hube, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Large developments of isotope hydrogeology were done and well-established techniques mainly applying stable isotopes of the water molecule (hydrogen and oxygen) are now used largely to trace water provenance but also recharge processes. New methods allow the use of non-traditional isotopes (metals, compound specific stable isotope analysis CSIA...) to trace anthropogenic pressures in surface- and groundwater. Groundwater contamination in large industrial sites may come from several origins such as leakage from tanks during the production process of chemical products, liquid storage tanks, solid end product or past accumulated product in soil which is released over the time. The understanding of the origin and the further evolution of the chemical contamination in groundwater in an industrial site issued from past or current industrial activities is essential for the industrial companies regarding their environmental policies. The objective of this study was to use with an innovative way the stable isotopes of the water molecule as a low cost tool to trace pollutant plumes in groundwater and help to a better management of contaminated industrial sites. We present data on stable isotopes O and H in an European region where electrochemistry plants occur. For confidentiality purposes, the sites remain anonymous. Present day industrial activities have a direct impact on the groundwater over the site and migration of the contaminant(s) plume out of the site is supposed. We first characterize the natural groundwater background through the O-H characterization of surface water, lakes, thermal waters and regional shallow aquifers. High and low altitude recharge can be demonstrated in the area. Secondly, we used the stable isotope of the water molecule to trace over the site the impact of the Cl-rich liquor manufacturing process. Large deuterium enrichment was evidenced in the groundwater and the high values can be related to a direct contamination of the groundwater through

  20. Stable microbial community composition on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela eMusilova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The first molecular-based studies of microbes in snow and on glaciers have only recently been performed on the vast Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS. Aeolian microbial seeding is hypothesized to impact on glacier surface community compositions. Localized melting of glacier debris (cryoconite into the surface ice forms cryoconite holes, which are considered ‘hot spots’ for microbial activity on glaciers. To date, few studies have attempted to assess the origin and evolution of cryoconite and cryoconite hole communities throughout a melt season. In this study, a range of experimental approaches was used for the first time to study the inputs, temporal and structural transformations of GrIS microbial communities over the course of a whole ablation season. Small amounts of aeolian (wind and snow microbes were potentially seeding the stable communities that were already present on the glacier (composed mainly of Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Actinobacteria. However, the dominant bacterial taxa in the aeolian samples (Firmicutes did not establish themselves in local glacier surface communities. Cryoconite and cryoconite hole community composition remained stable throughout the ablation season following the fast community turnover, which accompanied the initial snow melt. The presence of stable communities in cryoconite and cryoconite holes on the GrIS will allow future studies to assess glacier surface microbial diversity at individual study sites from sampling intervals of short duration only. Aeolian inputs also had significantly different organic δ13C values (-28.0 to -27.0‰ from the glacier surface values (-25.7 to -23.6‰, indicating that in situ microbial processes are important in fixing new organic matter and transforming aeolian organic carbon. The continuous productivity of stable communities over one melt season makes them important contributors to biogeochemical nutrient cycling on glaciers.

  1. Stable microbial community composition on the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, Michaela; Tranter, Martyn; Bennett, Sarah A; Wadham, Jemma; Anesio, Alexandre M

    2015-01-01

    The first molecular-based studies of microbes in snow and on glaciers have only recently been performed on the vast Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). Aeolian microbial seeding is hypothesized to impact on glacier surface community compositions. Localized melting of glacier debris (cryoconite) into the surface ice forms cryoconite holes, which are considered 'hot spots' for microbial activity on glaciers. To date, few studies have attempted to assess the origin and evolution of cryoconite and cryoconite hole communities throughout a melt season. In this study, a range of experimental approaches was used for the first time to study the inputs, temporal and structural transformations of GrIS microbial communities over the course of a whole ablation season. Small amounts of aeolian (wind and snow) microbes were potentially seeding the stable communities that were already present on the glacier (composed mainly of Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria). However, the dominant bacterial taxa in the aeolian samples (Firmicutes) did not establish themselves in local glacier surface communities. Cryoconite and cryoconite hole community composition remained stable throughout the ablation season following the fast community turnover, which accompanied the initial snow melt. The presence of stable communities in cryoconite and cryoconite holes on the GrIS will allow future studies to assess glacier surface microbial diversity at individual study sites from sampling intervals of short duration only. Aeolian inputs also had significantly different organic δ(13)C values (-28.0 to -27.0‰) from the glacier surface values (-25.7 to -23.6‰), indicating that in situ microbial processes are important in fixing new organic matter and transforming aeolian organic carbon. The continuous productivity of stable communities over one melt season makes them important contributors to biogeochemical nutrient cycling on glaciers.

  2. Stable magnesium peroxide at high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Sergey S; Zhu, Qiang; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Oganov, Artem R; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2015-09-01

    Rocky planets are thought to comprise compounds of Mg and O as these are among the most abundant elements, but knowledge of their stable phases may be incomplete. MgO is known to be remarkably stable to very high pressure and chemically inert under reduced condition of the Earth's lower mantle. However, in exoplanets oxygen may be a more abundant constituent. Here, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in laser-heated diamond anvil cells, we show that MgO and oxygen react at pressures above 96 GPa and T = 2150 K with the formation of I4/mcm MgO2. Raman spectroscopy detects the presence of a peroxide ion (O2(2-)) in the synthesized material as well as in the recovered specimen. Likewise, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirms that the recovered sample has higher oxygen content than pure MgO. Our finding suggests that MgO2 may be present together or instead of MgO in rocky mantles and rocky planetary cores under highly oxidized conditions.

  3. Stable magnesium peroxide at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Sergey S.; Zhu, Qiang; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Oganov, Artem R.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2015-09-01

    Rocky planets are thought to comprise compounds of Mg and O as these are among the most abundant elements, but knowledge of their stable phases may be incomplete. MgO is known to be remarkably stable to very high pressure and chemically inert under reduced condition of the Earth’s lower mantle. However, in exoplanets oxygen may be a more abundant constituent. Here, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in laser-heated diamond anvil cells, we show that MgO and oxygen react at pressures above 96 GPa and T = 2150 K with the formation of I4/mcm MgO2. Raman spectroscopy detects the presence of a peroxide ion (O22-) in the synthesized material as well as in the recovered specimen. Likewise, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirms that the recovered sample has higher oxygen content than pure MgO. Our finding suggests that MgO2 may be present together or instead of MgO in rocky mantles and rocky planetary cores under highly oxidized conditions.

  4. Highly thermal-stable ferromagnetism by a natural composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tianyu; Gou, Junming; Hu, Shanshan; Liu, Xiaolian; Wu, Chen; Ren, Shuai; Zhao, Hui; Xiao, Andong; Jiang, Chengbao; Ren, Xiaobing; Yan, Mi

    2017-01-01

    All ferromagnetic materials show deterioration of magnetism-related properties such as magnetization and magnetostriction with increasing temperature, as the result of gradual loss of magnetic order with approaching Curie temperature TC. However, technologically, it is highly desired to find a magnetic material that can resist such magnetism deterioration and maintain stable magnetism up to its TC, but this seems against the conventional wisdom about ferromagnetism. Here we show that a Fe-Ga alloy exhibits highly thermal-stable magnetization up to the vicinity of its TC, 880 K. Also, the magnetostriction shows nearly no deterioration over a very wide temperature range. Such unusual behaviour stems from dual-magnetic-phase nature of this alloy, in which a gradual structural-magnetic transformation occurs between two magnetic phases so that the magnetism deterioration is compensated by the growth of the ferromagnetic phase with larger magnetization. Our finding may help to develop highly thermal-stable ferromagnetic and magnetostrictive materials.

  5. Stable Isotopes and Oral Tori in Greenlandic Norse and Inuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, M.; Lynnerup, N.; Scott, G. R.

    2017-01-01

    that estimated stable carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions for a Greenlandic Norse sample makes it possible to compare directly PT and MT expression with the relative degree of marine protein intake. For comparative purposes, parallel observations were made on a Greenlandic Inuit sample. Some researchers...... suggest the intake of marine resources could impact bone development, including torus expression, but our analysis found no significant correlation between PT or MT expression and δ13C and δ15N values in the Norse. In the Inuit, PT expression also showed no relationship to stable isotope compositions. MT...... size in the Inuit did, however, show a significant inverse relationship with δ13C and δ15N values. As MT size goes up, stable isotope compositions go down. Compared with contemporary European populations, the Greenlandic Norse show very positive isotope compositions, but the Inuit, with their high...

  6. Atomic force microscopy of polymer and oligomer surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Winkel, A K

    2001-01-01

    The surface of ultra-thin films of polyethylene, isotactic polypropylene, polybutene, isotactic polystyrene and polytetrafluoroethylene was studied using an atomic force microscope and resolution of individual molecules was achieved. Comparison of the images with Connolly surfaces enabled identification of which plane was observed in the AFM images, with greater accuracy than conclusions drawn on the basis of surface feature measurement alone. In particular, the results from the experiments with polybutene show that for samples aged sufficiently so that the stable phase is expected in the bulk, this phase is also stable on the surface. The samples were aged sufficiently to ensure that the bulk would be in the stable phase. It is found that this phase is also stable on the surface. Additionally, the annealing behaviour of once folded crystals of the long-chain alkane, C sub 1 sub 6 sub 2 H sub 3 sub 2 sub 6 , is examined in situ, in real time, by atomic force microscopy. Regions of thickening material can be c...

  7. Facile synthesis of stable superhydrophobic nanocomposite based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokarian, Zahra; Rasuli, Reza; Abedini, Yousefali

    2016-04-01

    A facile approach to fabricate a stable superhydrophobic composite comprising multi-walled carbon nanotubes and silicone rubber has been reported. Contact angle of de-ionized water droplets on the prepared surface was measured with the value of near 159°; while water droplets easily rolled off and bounced on it. Surface free energy of the superhydrophobic coating was examined by three methods about 26 mJ/m2. The prepared film shows good stability under high stress conditions such as ultraviolet exposure, heating, pencil hardness test, attacking with different pH value and ionic-strength solutions. In addition, remarkable stability of the coating was observed after soaking in condensed hydrochloric acid, 5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution, boiling water and tape test.

  8. Assessing the Amazon Basin Circulation with Stable Water Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffie, K.; Henderson-Sellers, A.

    2004-05-01

    The isotopic abundances of Oxygen-18 (δ 18O) and Deuterium (δ D) over the Amazon are used to constrain simulations of the water cycle in this, the largest river basin in the world. Tracking the two stable but rare isotopes of water (1HD16O and 1H218O) makes it possible to trace Amazonian regional evaporative and condensation processes. This offers isotopic constraints on regional to global-scale atmospheric moisture budgets. Based on data in the Global Network on Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) database, we analyse the simulation of the land surface hydrology and water cycling. Temporal changes between 1965 and 2000 in stable water isotopic signatures in the Amazon have been used to evaluate global climate model (GCM) predictions revealing notable anomalies. For example, the differences in the wet season deuterium excess between Belem and Manaus are consistent with recent GCM simulations only if there has been a relative increase in evaporation from non-fractionating water sources over this period. Despite earlier predictions that land-use change signals would be found, late twentieth century data reveal no significant change in dry season isotopic characteristics. On the other hand, more recent isotopic data do show trends at stations in the Andes, where as much as 88% of the rainfall is thought to be derived from recycled moisture. At Izobamba the wet season depletions are enhanced (greater depletion) and the dry season ones decreased (less depletion). At Bogota only the wet months show statistically significant changes - also an enhancement. More depletion in the wet months is consistent with reductions in non-fractioning recycling such as through transpiration and in full re-evaporation of canopy-intercepted rainfall. These data might be linked to deforestation impacts. Results of GCM and simpler model simulations of the Amazon suggest that the recent stable isotope record is consistent with the predicted effects of forest removal, perhaps combined with

  9. Stable piecewise polynomial vector fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Pessoa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Let $N={y>0}$ and $S={y<0}$ be the semi-planes of $mathbb{R}^2$ having as common boundary the line $D={y=0}$. Let $X$ and $Y$ be polynomial vector fields defined in $N$ and $S$, respectively, leading to a discontinuous piecewise polynomial vector field $Z=(X,Y$. This work pursues the stability and the transition analysis of solutions of $Z$ between $N$ and $S$, started by Filippov (1988 and Kozlova (1984 and reformulated by Sotomayor-Teixeira (1995 in terms of the regularization method. This method consists in analyzing a one parameter family of continuous vector fields $Z_{epsilon}$, defined by averaging $X$ and $Y$. This family approaches $Z$ when the parameter goes to zero. The results of Sotomayor-Teixeira and Sotomayor-Machado (2002 providing conditions on $(X,Y$ for the regularized vector fields to be structurally stable on planar compact connected regions are extended to discontinuous piecewise polynomial vector fields on $mathbb{R}^2$. Pertinent genericity results for vector fields satisfying the above stability conditions are also extended to the present case. A procedure for the study of discontinuous piecewise vector fields at infinity through a compactification is proposed here.

  10. Turbulent transitions in the stable boundary layer: Couette and Poiseuille flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Amber M.; Monahan, Adam H.

    2016-11-01

    The stable boundary layer (SBL) can be classified into two distinct regimes. The weakly stable regime (WSBL) which occurs in the presence of moderate to strong pressure gradients or cloudy skies and is characterized by continuous turbulent mixing, and the very stable regime (VSBL) which occurs in the presence of weak pressure gradients or clear skies and turbulence weakens to the point of collapse. Modelling and observational results indicate that transitions from the WSBL to the VSBL occur when the maximum sustainable heat flux (MSHF), or shear capacity, is exceeded. The collapse of turbulence in the SBL is investigated using a one dimensional model of Couette flow with a constant heat flux. We show that the MSHF framework for predicting turbulent collapse is qualitatively robust to the choice of turbulence parameterization and extend these earlier stability analyses by numerically determining the unstable modes along the unstable branch. To explore transitions between the VSBL and the WSBL we extend the model to include a horizontal pressure gradient and a surface radiation scheme. Analysis of the Poiseuille flow demonstrates how the idealized energy/momentum budget model with parameterized turbulence can reproduce the regime transitions present in atmospheric data. We acknowledge support from NSERC and the computing facilities of Westgrid and Compute Canada.

  11. Dynamic Analysis of Micro-machined Diamagnetic Stable Permanent Magnet Levitation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A novel micro-machined diamagnetic stable-levitation system (MDSLS) which is composed of a free permanent magnetic rotor, a ring lifting permanent magnet and two diamagnetic stabilizers was presented. The static and dynamic stable characters of MDSLS were analyzed. The coupled non-linear differential equations were used to describe six-degree-of-freedom motion of the levitated rotor, and the equivalent surface current and combined diamagnetic image current method were utilized to model the interaction forces and torques between the lifting permanent magnet and rotor permanent magnet and also between the rotor permanent magnet and diamagnetic substrates. Because of difficulty to get analytical solution, the numerical calculation based on Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the dynamic model. The vibration frequencies were identified by fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis. According to their resonance characteristics and parameters, the translational and angular dynamic stiffness were also calculated. The results show that the levitation of the rotor in MDSLS is stable, and the MDSLS is potential for the application in levitation inertial sensor.

  12. Surface-atmosphere decoupling limits accumulation at Summit, Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkelhammer, Max; Noone, David C; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Bailey, Adriana; Cox, Christopher J; O'Neill, Michael S; Schneider, David; Steffen, Konrad; White, James W C

    2016-04-01

    Despite rapid melting in the coastal regions of the Greenland Ice Sheet, a significant area (~40%) of the ice sheet rarely experiences surface melting. In these regions, the controls on annual accumulation are poorly constrained owing to surface conditions (for example, surface clouds, blowing snow, and surface inversions), which render moisture flux estimates from myriad approaches (that is, eddy covariance, remote sensing, and direct observations) highly uncertain. Accumulation is partially determined by the temperature dependence of saturation vapor pressure, which influences the maximum humidity of air parcels reaching the ice sheet interior. However, independent proxies for surface temperature and accumulation from ice cores show that the response of accumulation to temperature is variable and not generally consistent with a purely thermodynamic control. Using three years of stable water vapor isotope profiles from a high altitude site on the Greenland Ice Sheet, we show that as the boundary layer becomes increasingly stable, a decoupling between the ice sheet and atmosphere occurs. The limited interaction between the ice sheet surface and free tropospheric air reduces the capacity for surface condensation to achieve the rate set by the humidity of the air parcels reaching interior Greenland. The isolation of the surface also acts to recycle sublimated moisture by recondensing it onto fog particles, which returns the moisture back to the surface through gravitational settling. The observations highlight a unique mechanism by which ice sheet mass is conserved, which has implications for understanding both past and future changes in accumulation rate and the isotopic signal in ice cores from Greenland.

  13. Brain surface parameterization using Riemann surface structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yalin; Gu, Xianfeng; Hayashi, Kiralee M; Chan, Tony F; Thompson, Paul M; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2005-01-01

    We develop a general approach that uses holomorphic 1-forms to parameterize anatomical surfaces with complex (possibly branching) topology. Rather than evolve the surface geometry to a plane or sphere, we instead use the fact that all orientable surfaces are Riemann surfaces and admit conformal structures, which induce special curvilinear coordinate systems on the surfaces. Based on Riemann surface structure, we can then canonically partition the surface into patches. Each of these patches can be conformally mapped to a parallelogram. The resulting surface subdivision and the parameterizations of the components are intrinsic and stable. To illustrate the technique, we computed conformal structures for several types of anatomical surfaces in MRI scans of the brain, including the cortex, hippocampus, and lateral ventricles. We found that the resulting parameterizations were consistent across subjects, even for branching structures such as the ventricles, which are otherwise difficult to parameterize. Compared with other variational approaches based on surface inflation, our technique works on surfaces with arbitrary complexity while guaranteeing minimal distortion in the parameterization. It also offers a way to explicitly match landmark curves in anatomical surfaces such as the cortex, providing a surface-based framework to compare anatomy statistically and to generate grids on surfaces for PDE-based signal processing.

  14. Stable Oxygen-18 and Deuterium Isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sascha

    The application of stable Oxygen-18 (18O) and Deuterium (2H) isotopes, as a tracer for fluxes between different compartments of the water cycle was subject of the present PhD-thesis. During a three year period, temporal data from a wide range of water cycle constituents was collected from...... the Skjern River catchment, Denmark. The presented applications focused on studying the isotopic 'input signal' to the hydrosphere in the form of precipitation, the isotopic 'output signal' with its related dynamic processes at a coastal saltwater-freshwater interface (groundwater isotopes) and the temporal...... development within a given lowland headwater catchment (stream water isotopes). Based on our investigations on the precipitation isotopic composition a local meteoric water line (LMWL) was constructed and expressed as: δ2H=7.4 δ18O + 5.36‰. Moreover, we showed that under maritime temperature climate influence...

  15. Towards stable silicon nanoarray hybrid solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W W; Wu, K J; Wang, K; Shi, T F; Wu, L; Li, S X; Teng, D Y; Ye, C H

    2014-01-16

    Silicon nanoarray hybrid solar cells benefit from the ease of fabrication and the cost-effectiveness of the hybrid structure, and represent a new research focus towards the utilization of solar energy. However, hybrid solar cells composed of both inorganic and organic components suffer from the notorious stability issue, which has to be tackled before the hybrid solar cells could become a viable alternative for harvesting solar energy. Here we show that Si nanoarray/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cells with improved stability can be fabricated via eliminating the water inclusion in the initial formation of the heterojunction between Si nanoarray and PEDOT:PSS. The Si nanoarray hybrid solar cells are stable against rapid degradation in the atmosphere environment for several months without encapsulation. This finding paves the way towards the real-world applications of Si nanoarray hybrid solar cells.

  16. Highly stable piezoelectrically tunable optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Möhle, Katharina; Döringshoff, Klaus; Nagel, Moritz; Peters, Achim

    2013-01-01

    We have implemented highly stable and tunable frequency references using optical high finesse cavities which incorporate a piezo actuator. As piezo material we used ceramic PZT, crystalline quartz, or PZN-PT single crystals. Lasers locked to these cavities show a relative frequency stability better than 1 x 10^{-14}, which is most likely not limited by the piezo actuators. The piezo cavities can be electrically tuned over more than one free spectral range (> 1.5 GHz) with only a minor decrease in frequency stability. Furthermore, we present a novel cavity design, where the piezo actuator is prestressed between the cavity spacer components. This design features a hermetically sealable intra cavity volume suitable for, e.g., cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  17. 5-Formylcytosine can be a stable DNA modification in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Martin; Uribe-Lewis, Santiago; Yang, Xiaoping; Burgess, Heather E; Iurlaro, Mario; Reik, Wolf; Murrell, Adele; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2015-08-01

    5-Formylcytosine (5fC) is a rare base found in mammalian DNA and thought to be involved in active DNA demethylation. Here, we show that developmental dynamics of 5fC levels in mouse DNA differ from those of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), and using stable isotope labeling in vivo, we show that 5fC can be a stable DNA modification. These results suggest that 5fC has functional roles in DNA that go beyond being a demethylation intermediate.

  18. Electrochemical Nucleation of Stable N2 Nanobubbles at Pt Nanoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianjin; Wiedenroth, Hilke S; German, Sean R; White, Henry S

    2015-09-23

    Exploring the nucleation of gas bubbles at interfaces is of fundamental interest. Herein, we report the nucleation of individual N2 nanobubbles at Pt nanodisk electrodes (6–90 nm) via the irreversible electrooxidation of hydrazine (N2H4 → N2 + 4H(+) + 4e(–)). The nucleation and growth of a stable N2 nanobubble at the Pt electrode is indicated by a sudden drop in voltammetric current, a consequence of restricted mass transport of N2H4 to the electrode surface following the liquid-to-gas phase transition. The critical surface concentration of dissolved N2 required for nanobubble nucleation, CN2,critical(s), obtained from the faradaic current at the moment just prior to bubble formation, is measured to be ∼0.11 M and is independent of the electrode radius and the bulk N2H4 concentration. Our results suggest that the size of stable gas bubble nuclei depends only on the local concentration of N2 near the electrode surface, consistent with previously reported studies of the electrogeneration of H2 nanobubbles. CN2,critical(s) is ∼160 times larger than the N2 saturation concentration at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The residual current for N2H4 oxidation after formation of a stable N2 nanobubble at the electrode surface is proportional to the N2H4 concentration as well as the nanoelectrode radius, indicating that the dynamic equilibrium required for the existence of a stable N2 nanobubble is determined by N2H4 electrooxidation at the three phase contact line.

  19. Stable Myoelectric Control of a Hand Prosthesis using Non-Linear Incremental Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjan eGijsberts

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stable myoelectric control of hand prostheses remains an open problem. The only successful human-machine interface is surface electromyography, typically allowing control of a few degrees of freedom. Machine learning techniques may have the potential to remove these limitations, but their performance is thus far inadequate: myoelectric signals change over time under the influence of various factors, deteriorating control performance. It is therefore necessary, in the standard approach, to regularly retrain a new model from scratch.We hereby propose a non-linear incremental learning method in which occasional updates with a modest amount of novel training data allow continual adaptation to the changes in the signals. In particular, Incremental Ridge Regression and an approximation of the Gaussian Kernel known as Random Fourier Features are combined to predict finger forces from myoelectric signals, both finger-by-finger and grouped in grasping patterns.We show that the approach is effective and practically applicable to this problem by first analyzing its performance while predicting single-finger forces. Surface electromyography and finger forces were collected from 10 intact subjects during four sessions spread over two different days; the results of the analysis show that small incremental updates are indeed effective to maintain a stable level of performance.Subsequently, we employed the same method on-line to teleoperate a humanoid robotic arm equipped with a state-of-the-art commercial prosthetic hand. The subject could reliably grasp, carry and release everyday-life objects, enforcing stable grasping irrespective of the signal changes, hand/arm movements and wrist pronation and supination.

  20. Stable myoelectric control of a hand prosthesis using non-linear incremental learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsberts, Arjan; Bohra, Rashida; Sierra González, David; Werner, Alexander; Nowak, Markus; Caputo, Barbara; Roa, Maximo A.; Castellini, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Stable myoelectric control of hand prostheses remains an open problem. The only successful human–machine interface is surface electromyography, typically allowing control of a few degrees of freedom. Machine learning techniques may have the potential to remove these limitations, but their performance is thus far inadequate: myoelectric signals change over time under the influence of various factors, deteriorating control performance. It is therefore necessary, in the standard approach, to regularly retrain a new model from scratch. We hereby propose a non-linear incremental learning method in which occasional updates with a modest amount of novel training data allow continual adaptation to the changes in the signals. In particular, Incremental Ridge Regression and an approximation of the Gaussian Kernel known as Random Fourier Features are combined to predict finger forces from myoelectric signals, both finger-by-finger and grouped in grasping patterns. We show that the approach is effective and practically applicable to this problem by first analyzing its performance while predicting single-finger forces. Surface electromyography and finger forces were collected from 10 intact subjects during four sessions spread over two different days; the results of the analysis show that small incremental updates are indeed effective to maintain a stable level of performance. Subsequently, we employed the same method on-line to teleoperate a humanoid robotic arm equipped with a state-of-the-art commercial prosthetic hand. The subject could reliably grasp, carry and release everyday-life objects, enforcing stable grasping irrespective of the signal changes, hand/arm movements and wrist pronation and supination. PMID:24616697

  1. Stable myoelectric control of a hand prosthesis using non-linear incremental learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsberts, Arjan; Bohra, Rashida; Sierra González, David; Werner, Alexander; Nowak, Markus; Caputo, Barbara; Roa, Maximo A; Castellini, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Stable myoelectric control of hand prostheses remains an open problem. The only successful human-machine interface is surface electromyography, typically allowing control of a few degrees of freedom. Machine learning techniques may have the potential to remove these limitations, but their performance is thus far inadequate: myoelectric signals change over time under the influence of various factors, deteriorating control performance. It is therefore necessary, in the standard approach, to regularly retrain a new model from scratch. We hereby propose a non-linear incremental learning method in which occasional updates with a modest amount of novel training data allow continual adaptation to the changes in the signals. In particular, Incremental Ridge Regression and an approximation of the Gaussian Kernel known as Random Fourier Features are combined to predict finger forces from myoelectric signals, both finger-by-finger and grouped in grasping patterns. We show that the approach is effective and practically applicable to this problem by first analyzing its performance while predicting single-finger forces. Surface electromyography and finger forces were collected from 10 intact subjects during four sessions spread over two different days; the results of the analysis show that small incremental updates are indeed effective to maintain a stable level of performance. Subsequently, we employed the same method on-line to teleoperate a humanoid robotic arm equipped with a state-of-the-art commercial prosthetic hand. The subject could reliably grasp, carry and release everyday-life objects, enforcing stable grasping irrespective of the signal changes, hand/arm movements and wrist pronation and supination.

  2. Ribavirin shows immunomodulatory effects on activated microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Danijela; Stojiljkovic, Mirjana; Lavrnja, Irena; Parabucki, Ana; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda; Herdegen, Thomas; Pekovic, Sanja

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Ribavirin (RBV) is synthetic purine nucleoside analogue, licensed as anti-viral drug that displays immunomodulatory actions on various immune cells. Our previous ex vivo studies have demonstrated immunosuppressive effects of RBV on reactive T-lymphocytes in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Here, we examined the effects of RBV on inflammatory response of microglia. RBV potency to down-regulate microglia inflammatory response was assessed by measuring microglia cell body size, and the production of nitric oxide (NO) and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. RBV exerted cytotoxic effects on LPS-stimulated microglia, leaving non-stimulated microglia unaffected. The exposure of activated microglia to RBV led to: decrease in the level of NO as a result of decreased cell number, lower average cell surface, the reduction of membrane ruffling, the suppression of interleukin-6 release and promoted interleukin-10 production. On the other hand, RBV promoted LPS-induced interleukin-1 beta release. Our results imply that RBV is a complex immunomodulator showing both anti- and pro-inflammatory effects on activated microglia.

  3. Stable colloidal Co-Pd nanocatalysts for carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenguer, A.; Golovko, V.B.; Johnson, B.F.G.; Robertson, John [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cantoro, M.; Hofmann, S.; Wirth, C.T. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    The standard preparation method for catalysts for surface-bound growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) is to sputter or evaporate the metal catalyst (Fe, Co, and Ni) onto the surface. A lower cost method for large areas is to use liquid delivery. Colloids have the advantage of containing the catalyst in nanocluster form. Our previously developed colloidal catalysts were successful for growth but had limited shelf-life due to oxidation and coagulation. Here, we develop an air-stable colloidal catalyst with long shelf-life of many months to years. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  5. China National Textile & Apparel Council Lastest Data Showing:Performance Stable in the First Half of 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    According to data collected from statistics-worthy Chinese textile enterprises surveyed by China National Textile and Apparel Council,from Jan.to Jun.,2011,the industry witnessed a balanced production to sales ratio and the prof-itability has improved signiFicantly.

  6. Oxygen Atom Adsorption and Diffusion on Pd Low-index Surfaces and (311) Stepped Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG, Ze-Xin(王泽新); JIA, Xiang-Feng(贾祥凤); TIAN, Feng-Hui(田凤惠); CHEN, Shou-Gang(陈守刚)

    2004-01-01

    The 5-parameter Morse potential (5-MP for short) of the interaction system between an oxygen atom and palladium surface clusters was constructed. The adsorption and diffusion of an oxygen atom on low index surfaces Pd (100), Pd (111), Pd (110) and Pd (311) stepped surface were investigated in detail with 5-MP. It is found that fcc and hcp sites on the (111) surface and (111) microfacets are equivalent. The calculation results show that O atom adsorbs in the three-fold hollow site, and the long-bridge site is a stable site both in regular Pd (110) surface and in the (1×2) missing-row reconstruction structure. Moreover, in the study of O-Pd (311) surface system, We conclude that there are two stable adsorption states (four-fold site: H4, three-fold site: Hh) on O-Pd (311) surface and the three-fold site (Hf) is the metastable adsorption. At low coverage oxygen atom favors the four-fold hollow site (H4).

  7. Morse theory and stable pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Wentworth, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    We study the Morse theory of the Yang-Mills-Higgs functional on the space of pairs $(A,\\Phi)$, where $A$ is a unitary connection on a rank 2 hermitian vector bundle over a compact Riemann surface, and $\\Phi$ is a holomorphic section of $(E, d_A")$. We prove that a certain explicitly defined substratification of the Morse stratification is perfect in the sense of $\\G$-equivariant cohomology, where $\\G$ denotes the unitary gauge group. As a consequence, Kirwan surjectivity holds for pairs. It also follows that the twist embedding into higher degree induces a surjection on equivariant cohomology. This may be interpreted as a rank 2 version of the analogous statement for symmetric products of Riemann surfaces. Finally, we compute the $\\G$-equivariant Poincar\\'e polynomial of the space of $\\tau$-semistable pairs. In particular, we recover an earlier result of Thaddeus. The analysis provides an interpretation of the Thaddeus flips in terms of a variation of Morse functions.

  8. AQUEOUS STABLE FREE RADICAL POLYMERIZATION PROCESSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea R. Szkurhan; Michael K. Georges

    2004-01-01

    An overview of aqueous polymerizations, which include emulsion, miniemulsion and suspension polymerizations,under stable free radical polymerization (SFRP) conditions is presented. The success of miniemulsion and suspension SFRP polymerizations is contrasted with the difficulties associated with obtaining a stable emulsion polymerization. A recently developed unique microprecipitation technique is referenced as a means of making submicron sized particles that can be used to achieve a stable emulsion SFRP process.

  9. Formation of graphene on Ru(0001) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Yi; Shi Dong-Xia; Gao Hong-Jun

    2007-01-01

    We report on the formation of a graphene monolayer on a Ru(0001) surface by annealing the Ru(0001) crystal.The samples are characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). STM images show that the Moiré pattern is caused by the graphene layer mismatched with the underlying Ru(0001) surface and has an N × N superlattice. It is further found that the graphene monolayer on a Ru(0001) surface is very stable at high temperatures. Our results provide a simple and convenient method to produce a graphene monolayer on the Ru(0001) surface, which is used as a template for fabricating functional nanostructures needed in future nano devices and catalysis.

  10. The trend of stable isotope separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonekawa, Shigeru [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Kamisaibara, Okayama (Japan). Ningyo Toge Works; Aoki, Eiji; Yato, Yumio

    1994-12-01

    Recently, stable isotopes are used in the field of medical science, nuclear physics, environmental science and agriculture. This report reviews the present status of stable isotope enrichment in ORNL, Urenco, Russia and PNC. Further the utilization method of the stable isotopes in the field of medical science, nuclear power and material science are described, and the application possibility of Laser separation method and Gas Centrifuge method are estimated. There are many overseas actual results of stable isotope separation with Gas Centrifuge method, therefore this method is possible enough in principle. (author).

  11. Myocardial perfusion SPECT in stable angina;Place de la scintigraphie myocardique dans l'angor stable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, P.; Jacob, T. [HP Clairval, Service de medecine nucleaire, 13 - Marseille (France); Lecorff, G.; Bouvier, J.L.; Novella, P.; Bechet, V.; Pelet, V. [HP Clairval, Service de cardiologie, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2010-03-15

    We study the precise contribution of myocardial scintigraphy in the therapeutic management of stable coronary artery disease. Until recently, treatment was focused on revascularization, often by coronary angioplasty.Recent studies have challenged this practice by showing the absence of superiority of angioplasty compared to optimal medical therapy.The problem now is to define for each stable coronary artery disease, and individually, the best of both treatment options. In this spirit, the functional approach to coronary artery disease by myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is most interesting.The diagnostic performance, including sensitivity and negative predictive value, and the prognostic value of the technique are clearly established. Recent studies show that a therapeutic decision based on a functional approach to the patient is valid.We need to know this development in cardiology for best position in the multidisciplinary discussions, myocardial scintigraphy as a functional approach to stable coronary artery disease. (N.C.)

  12. Stable helical solitons in optical media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boris Malomed; G D Peng; P L Chu; Isaac Towers; Alexander V Buryak; Rowland A Sammut

    2001-11-01

    We present a review of new results which suggest the existence of fully stable spinning solitons (self-supporting localised objects with an internal vorticity) in optical fibres with self-focusing Kerr (cubic) nonlinearity, and in bulk media featuring a combination of the cubic self-defocusing and quadratic nonlinearities. Their distinctive difference from other optical solitons with an internal vorticity, which were recently studied in various optical media, theoretically and also experimentally, is that all the spinning solitons considered thus far have been found to be unstable against azimuthal perturbations. In the first part of the paper, we consider solitons in a nonlinear optical fibre in a region of parameters where the fibre carries exactly two distinct modes, viz., the fundamental one and the first-order helical mode. From the viewpoint of application to communication systems, this opens the way to doubling the number of channels carried by a fibre. Besides that, these solitons are objects of fundamental interest. To fully examine their stability, it is crucially important to consider collisions between them, and their collisions with fundamental solitons, in (ordinary or hollow) optical fibres. We introduce a system of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations for the fundamental and helical modes with nonstandard values of the cross-phase-modulation coupling constants, and show, in analytical and numerical forms, results of collisions between solitons carried by the two modes. In the second part of the paper, we demonstrate that the interaction of the fundamental beam with its second harmonic in bulk media, in the presence of self-defocusing Kerr nonlinearity, gives rise to the first ever example of completely stable spatial ring-shaped solitons with intrinsic vorticity. The stability is demonstrated both by direct simulations and by analysis of linearized equations.

  13. Inheritance study on the stable herbicide resistance of transgenic rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUMingguo; HUAZhihua; LINJianrong; XUERui; WANGXiaoling; HUANGDanian

    1999-01-01

    The transgene technology showed a potentiality in crop improvement such as disease and insect resistance, anti-adversity, and grain quality. The inheritance of bar gene for herbicide BASTA resistance in stable transformed rice lines was studied for an understanding of the foreign gene inheritance pattern.

  14. A comparison of stable platform and strapdown airborne gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glennie, C.L.; Schwarz, K.P.; Bruton, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    To date, operational airborne gravity results have been obtained using either a damped two-axis stable platform gravimeter system such as the LaCoste and Romberg (LCR) S-model marine gravimeter or a strapdown inertial navigation system (INS), showing comparable accuracies. In June 1998 three flig...

  15. Activating piezoelectric crystal surface by silanization for microgravimetric immunobiosensor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, C R; Mishra, G C

    1996-01-01

    The development of a microgravimetric immunobiosensor using a piezoelectric quartz crystal as a detector requires a stable and reproducible immobilization method for ligand binding. The method of silanization using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) has been widely used for activating the carrier surface. In the present study, APTES deposition on a piezoelectric crystal surface was studied under various solvent conditions. A fluorescence method, using fluorescence isothiocyanate as a dye, was demonstrated for the quantification of amino groups on the silanized piezoelectric crystal surface. The optimum binding conditions of APTES deposition on a piezoelectric crystal surface were incorporated for the covalent immobilization of protein on the crystal surface in developing a stable and sensitive microgravimetric immunobiosensor. Determination of immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration was performed using APTES modified piezoelectric crystals coated with protein G. The resonant frequency shift, resulting from the formation of protein G-IgG complex on the crystal surface, correlated with the concentration of IgG in the range 10 ng/ml to 0.1 mg/ml. The APTES modified, protein G coated crystal were found to be quite stable and did not show a significant loss of sensitivity even after 12 weeks of storage at 4 degrees C in a desiccator.

  16. On fundamental groups related to the Hirzebruch surface F1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; FRIEDMAN; Mina; TEICHER

    2008-01-01

    Given a projective surface and a generic projection to the plane,the braid monodromy factorization(and thus,the braid monodromy type)of the complement of its branch curve is one of the most important topological invariants,stable on deformations.From this factorization,one can compute the fundamental group of the complement of the branch curve,either in C2 or in CP2.In this article,we show that these groups,for the Hirzebruch surface F1,(a,b),are almost-solvable.That is, they are an extension of a solvable group,which strengthen the conjecture on degeneratable surfaces.

  17. On fundamental groups related to the Hirzebruch surface F1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael FRIEDMAN; Mina TEICHER

    2008-01-01

    Given a.projective surface and a generic projection to the plane,the braid monodromy factorization (and thus,the braid monodromy type) of the complement of its branch curve is one of the most important topological invariants,stable on deformations.From this factorization,one can compute the fundamental group of the complement of the branch curve,either in C2 or in CP2.In this article,we show that these groups,for the Hirzebruch surface F1,(a,b),are almost-solvable.That is,they are an extension of a solvable group,which strengthen the conjecture on degeneratable surfaces.

  18. Immobilized silver nanoparticles enhance contact killing and show highest efficacy: elucidation of the mechanism of bactericidal action of silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Shekhar; Mukherji, Soumyo; Mukherji, Suparna

    2013-08-21

    Antimicrobial materials with immobilized/entrapped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are of considerable interest. There is significant debate on the mode of bactericidal action of AgNPs, and both contact killing and/or ion mediated killing have been proposed. In this study, AgNPs were immobilized on an amine-functionalized silica surface and their bactericidal activity was studied concurrently with the silver release profile over time. This was compared with similar studies performed using colloidal AgNPs and AgCl surfaces that released Ag ions. We conclude that contact killing is the predominant bactericidal mechanism and surface immobilized nanoparticles show greater efficacy than colloidal AgNPs, as well as a higher concentration of silver ions in solution. In addition, the AgNP immobilized substrate was used multiple times with good efficacy, indicating this immobilization protocol is effective for retaining AgNPs while maintaining their disinfection potential. The antibacterial surface was found to be extremely stable in aqueous medium and no significant leaching (∼1.15% of total silver deposited) of the AgNPs was observed. Thus, immobilization of AgNPs on a surface may promote reuse, reduce environmental risks associated with leaching of AgNPs and enhance cost effectiveness.

  19. Stable isotope customer list and summary of shipments - FY 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.C. (comp.)

    1983-12-01

    This compilation is published as an aid to those concerned with the separation and sale of stable isotopes. The information is divided into four sections: (1) alphabetical list of domestic and foreign customers, showing the stable isotopes purchased during the fiscal year; (2) alphabetical list of isotopes, cross-referenced to customer numbers and divided into domestic and foreign categories; (3) alphabetical list of states and countries, cross-referenced to customer numbers and indicating geographical concentrations of isotope users; and (4) tabulation of the shipments, quantities, and dollars for domestic, foreign, and project categories for each isotope.

  20. Stable Isotope Customer List and Summary of Shipments. FY 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tracy, J. G. [comp.

    1985-11-01

    This compilation is published as an aid to those concerned with the separation and sale of stable isotopes. The information is divided into four sections: (1) alphabetical list of domestic and foreign customers, showing the stable isotopes purchased during the fiscal year; (2) alphabetical list of isotopes, cross-referenced to customer numbers and divided into domestic and foreign categories; (3) alphabetical list of states and countries, cross-referenced to customer numbers and indicating geographical concentrations of isotope users; and (4) tabulation of the shipments, quantities, and dollars for domestic, foreign, and project categories for each isotope.

  1. Fiber Optic Cable Thermal Preparation to Ensure Stable Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoames Jr, William J.; Chuska, Rick F.; LaRocca, Frank V.; Switzer, Robert C.; Macmurphy, Shawn L.; Ott, Melanie N.

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic cables are widely used in modern systems that must provide stable operation during exposure to changing environmental conditions. For example, a fiber optic cable on a satellite may have to reliably function over a temperature range of -50 C up to 125 C. While the system requirements for a particular application will dictate the exact method by which the fibers should be prepared, this work will examine multiple ruggedized fibers prepared in different fashions and subjected to thermal qualification testing. The data show that if properly conditioned the fiber cables can provide stable operation, but if done incorrectly, they will have large fluctuations in transmission.

  2. On the existence of stable seasonally varying Arctic sea ice

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, W

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework lower order thermodynamic theories for the climatic evolution of Arctic sea ice we isolate the conditions required for the existence of stable seasonally-varying ice states. This is done by constructing a two-season model from the continuously evolving theory of Eisenman and Wettlaufer (2009) and showing that the necessary and sufficient condition for stable seasonally-varying states resides in the relaxation of the constant annual average short-wave radiative forcing. This forcing is examined within the scenario of greenhouse gas warming, as a function of which stability conditions are discerned.

  3. FaSa: A Fast and Stable Quadratic Placement Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU WenTing(侯文婷); HONG XianLong(洪先龙); WU WeiMin(吴为民); CAI YiCi(蔡懿慈)

    2003-01-01

    Placement is a critical step in VLSI design because it dominates overall speed andquality of design flow. In this paper, a new fast and stable placement algorithm called FaSa is pro-posed. It uses quadratic programming model and Lagrange multiplier method to solve placementproblems. And an incremental LU factorization method is used to solve equations for speeding up.The experimental results show that FaSa is very stable, much faster than previous algorithms andits total wire length is comparable with other algorithms.

  4. Stable isotopic characterisation of francolite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, J. M.; Benmore, R. A.; Coleman, M. L.; Soldi, C.; Yeh, H.-W.; O'Brien, G. W.

    1986-02-01

    Stable isotopic data are presented for 112 samples of francolite from 18 separate phosphate deposits. Values of δ 13C and δ 34S in most offshore deposits suggest formation within oxic or suboxic environments either by carbonate replacement or direct precipitation of francolite from water of normal marine compositions. The exceptions are concretionary francolite from Namibia, which has an isotopic composition in keeping with its formation within organic-rich sediments, and that from offshore Morocco, which has an isotopic signature of the anoxic/suboxic interface. Onshore deposits from Jordan, Mexico, South Africa and, possibly, the Permian Phosphoria Formation in the western U.S.A., are substantially depleted in 18O: they appear to be too altered for deductions to be made about their environments of formation. In other onshore deposits which are unaltered, or minimally altered, the isotopic composition suggests that some formed within sulphate-reducing sediments (Sedhura, Morocco) whilst francolite from the Georgina Basin of Australia formed at the oxic/anoxic boundary, where oxidation of biogenic H 2S decreases the δ 34S of pore water. In general, pelletal samples show non-oxic isotopic signatures, whilst non-pelletal samples show oxic isotopic signatures, but samples from Namibia, Peru (Ica Plateau) and the Californian and Moroccan margins are exceptions to this rule. Morphology may therefore be a misleading indicator of francolite genesis as no definitive relation exists between phosphorite type and isotopic signature.

  5. High order stiffly stable linear multistep methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, C.N.

    1979-01-01

    Stiffly stable linear k-step methods of order k for the initial-value problem are studied. Examples for k = 1, 2, and 3 were discovered by use of Adams-type methods. A large family of stiffly stable linear 7-step methods of order 7 was also found.

  6. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the pharmacok

  7. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the

  8. K-causality coincides with stable causality

    OpenAIRE

    Minguzzi, E

    2008-01-01

    It is proven that K-causality coincides with stable causality, and that in a K-causal spacetime the relation K^+ coincides with the Seifert's relation. As a consequence the causal relation "the spacetime is strongly causal and the closure of the causal relation is transitive" stays between stable causality and causal continuity.

  9. Dark energy stars: Stable configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Bhar, Piyali; Rahaman, Farook; Banerjee, Ayan

    2016-01-01

    In present paper a spherically symmetric stellar configuration has been analyzed by assuming the matter distribution of the stellar configuration is anisotropic in nature and compared with the realistic objects, namely, the low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and X-ray pulsars. The analytic solution has been obtained by utilizing the dark energy equation of state for the interior solution corresponding to the Schwarzschild exterior vacuum solution at the junction interface. Several physical properties like energy conditions, stability, mass-radius ratio, and surface redshift are described through mathematical calculations as well as graphical plots. It is found that obtained mass-radius ration of the compact stars candidates like 4U 1820-30, PSR J 1614-2230, Vela X-1 and Cen X-3 are very much consistent with the observed data by Gangopadhyay et al. (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 431, 3216 (2013)). So our proposed model would be useful in the investigation of the possible clustering of dark energy.

  10. Preparation of thermally stable nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite by hydrothermal method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash Parthiban, S; Elayaraja, K; Girija, E K; Yokogawa, Y; Kesavamoorthy, R; Palanichamy, M; Asokan, K; Narayana Kalkura, S

    2009-12-01

    Thermally stable hydroxyapatite (HAp) was synthesized by hydrothermal method in the presence of malic acid. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was done on the synthesized powders. These analyses confirmed the sample to be free from impurities and other phases of calcium phosphates, and were of rhombus morphology along with nanosized particles. IR and Raman analyses indicated the adsorption of malic acid on HAp. Thermal stability of the synthesized HAp was confirmed by DTA and TGA. The synthesized powders were thermally stable upto 1,400 degrees C and showed no phase change. The proposed method might be useful for producing thermally stable HAp which is a necessity for high temperature coating applications.

  11. Emergence of plant and rhizospheric microbiota as stable interactomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Prasun; Bhuyan, Soubhagya Kumar; Yadava, Pramod Kumar; Varma, Ajit; Tuteja, Narendra

    2017-03-01

    The growing human population and depletion of resources have necessitated development of sustainable agriculture. Beneficial plant-microbe associations have been known for quite some time now. To maintain sustainability, one could show better reliance upon beneficial attributes of the rhizosphere microbiome. To harness the best agronomic traits, understanding the entire process of recruitment, establishment, and maintenance of microbiota as stable interactome within the rhizosphere is important. In this article, we highlight the process of recruitment and establishment of microbiota within rhizosphere. Further, we have discussed the interlinkages and the ability of multiple (microbial and plant) partners to interact with one another forming a stable plant holobiont system. Lastly, we address the possibility of exploring the knowledge gained from the holobiont system to tailor the rhizosphere microbiome for better productivity and maintenance of agroecosystems. The article provide new insights into the broad principles of stable plant-microbe interactions which could be useful for sustaining agriculture and food security.

  12. Effectiveness of Ivabradine in Treating Stable Angina Pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Liwen; Ke, Dazhi; Chen, Qingwei; Li, Guiqiong; Deng, Wei; Wu, Zhiqin

    2016-04-01

    Many studies show that ivabradine is effective for stable angina.This meta-analysis was performed to determine the effect of treatment duration and control group type on ivabradine efficacy in stable angina pectoris.Relevant articles in the English language in the PUBMED and EMBASE databases and related websites were identified by using the search terms "ivabradine," "angina," "randomized controlled trials," and "Iva." The final search date was November 2, 2015.Articles were included if they were published randomized controlled trials that related to ivabradine treatment of stable angina pectoris.Patients with stable angina pectoris were included.The patients were classified according to treatment duration (ivabradine and control groups, respectively. The ivabradine group had significantly longer exercise duration when they had been treated for at least 3 months, but not when treatment time was less than 3 months. Ivabradine significantly improved time to angina onset regardless of treatment duration. Control group type did not influence the effect of exercise duration (significant) or time to angina onset (significant).Compared with beta-blocker and placebo, ivabradine improved exercise duration and time to onset of angina in patients with stable angina. However, its ability to improve exercise duration only became significant after at least 3 months of treatment.

  13. Thermodynamically Stable Pickering Emulsions Stabilized by Janus Dumbbells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Fuquan; Park, Bum Jun; Lee, Daeyeon

    2013-03-01

    Janus particles have two sides with different, often opposite, surface properties. Janus dumbbell is one type of Janus particles that consists of two partially fused spherical lobes. It is possible to independently control the geometry and surface wettability of Janus dumbbells. Janus dumbbells can also be produced in a large quantity, making them useful for practical applications such as emulsion stabilization. In this work, we calculate the free energy of emulsion formation using amphiphilic Janus dumbbells as solid surfactants. In contrast to kinetically stable emulsions stabilized by homogeneous particles, emulsion stabilized by Janus dumbbells can be thermodynamically stable. There also exists an optimal radius of droplets that can be stabilized by infinite or limited number of amphiphilic dumbbells in the continuous phase. We demonstrate that the optimal radius of dumbbell-stabilized droplets can be predicted based on the volume of the dispersed phase and the volume fraction of dumbbells in the continuous phase. We believe our calculation will provide guidelines for using Janus dumbbells as colloid surfactants to generate stable emulsions.

  14. Role of bacteria in the oviposition behaviour and larval development of stable flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, A; Broce, A; Zurek, L

    2006-03-01

    Stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), are the most important pests of cattle in the United States. However, adequate management strategies for stable flies, especially for pastured cattle, are lacking. Microbial/symbiont-based approaches offer novel venues for management of insect pests and/or vector-borne human and animal pathogens. Unfortunately, the fundamental knowledge of stable fly-microbial associations and their effect on stable fly biology is lacking. In this study, stable flies laid greater numbers of eggs on a substrate with an active microbial community (> 95% of total eggs oviposited) than on a sterilized substrate. In addition, stable fly larvae could not develop in a sterilized natural or artificial substrate/medium. Bacteria were isolated and identified from a natural stable fly oviposition/developmental habitat and their individual effect on stable fly oviposition response and larval development was evaluated in laboratory bioassays. Of nine bacterial strains evaluated in the oviposition bioassays, Citrobacter freundii stimulated oviposition to the greatest extent. C. freundii also sustained stable fly development, but to a lesser degree than Serratia fanticola. Serratia marcescens and Aeromonas spp. neither stimulated oviposition nor supported stable fly development. These results demonstrate a stable fly bacterial symbiosis; stable fly larval development depends on a live microbial community in the natural habitat, and stable fly females are capable of selecting an oviposition site based on the microbially derived stimuli that indicate the suitability of the substrate for larval development. This study shows a promising starting point for exploiting stable fly-bacterial associations for development of novel approaches for stable fly management.

  15. Competition for nutrient and light: stable coexistence, alternative stable states, or competitive exclusion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passarge, J.; Hol, S.; Escher, M.; Huisman, J.

    2006-01-01

    Competition theory has put forward three contrasting hypotheses: Competition for nutrients and light may lead to (i) stable coexistence of species, (ii) alternative stable states, or (iii) competitive exclusion. This paper presents a detailed investigation of competition among phytoplankton species

  16. Competition for nutrients and light: Stable coexistence, alternative stable states or competitive exclusion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passarge, J.; Hol, S.; Escher, M.; Huisman, J.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract. Competition theory has put forward three contrasting hypotheses: Competition for nutrients and light may lead to (i) stable coexistence of species, (ii) alternative stable states, or (iii) competitive exclusion. This paper presents a detailed investigation of competition among phytoplankto

  17. Constructing stable 3D hydrodynamical models of giant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Springel, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions require stable models of stars as initial conditions. Such initial models, however, are difficult to construct for giant stars because of the wide range in spatial scales of the hydrostatic equilibrium and in dynamical timescales between the core and the envelope of the giant. They are needed for, e.g., modeling the common envelope phase where a giant envelope encompasses both the giant core and a companion star. Here, we present a new method of approximating and reconstructing giant profiles from a stellar evolution code to produce stable models for multi-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. We determine typical stellar stratification profiles with the one-dimensional stellar evolution code mesa. After an appropriate mapping, hydrodynamical simulations are conducted using the moving-mesh code arepo. The giant profiles are approximated by replacing the core of the giant with a point mass and by constructing a suitable continuation of the profile to the center. Different reconstruction methods are tested that can specifically control the convective behaviour of the model. After mapping to a grid, a relaxation procedure that includes damping of spurious velocities yields stable models in three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. Initially convectively stable configurations lead to stable hydrodynamical models while for stratifications that are convectively unstable in the stellar evolution code, simulations recover the convective behaviour of the initial model and show large convective plumes with Mach numbers up to 0.8. Examples are shown for a 2 M⊙ red giant and a 0.67 M⊙ asymptotic giant branch star. A detailed analysis shows that the improved method reliably provides stable models of giant envelopes that can be used as initial conditions for subsequent hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions involving giant stars.

  18. A well-defined mesoporous amine silica surface via a selective treatment of SBA-15 with ammonia

    KAUST Repository

    Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, Anissa

    2012-01-01

    2D double-quantum 1H- 1H NMR unambiguously shows that the "isolated" Si-OH surface silanols of dehydroxylated SBA-15 are converted upon treatment with ammonia into single silylamine surface site Si-NH 2. The "gem" di-silanols (Si(OH) 2) remain intact. Treatment using HMDS produces (Si(OSiMe 3) 2) but leaves Si-NH 2 untouched. The resulting surface is hydrophobic and stable. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

  19. Inkjet printing for direct micropatterning of a superhydrophobic surface: Toward biomimetic fog harvesting surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lianbin

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces with hydrophilic micro-sized patterns is highly desirable, but a one-step, mask-free method to produce such surfaces has not previously been reported. We have developed a direct method to produce superhydrophilic micropatterns on superhydrophobic surfaces based on inkjet printing technology. This work was inspired by the efficient fog-harvesting behavior of Stenocara beetles in the Namib Desert. A mussel-inspired ink consisting of an optimized solution of dopamine was applied directly by inkjet printing to superhydrophobic surfaces. Stable Wenzel\\'s microdroplets of the dopamine solution with well-defined micropatterns were obtained on these surfaces. Superhydrophilic micropatterns with well-controlled dimensions were then readily achieved on the superhydrophobic surfaces by the formation of polydopamine via in situ polymerization. The micropatterned superhydrophobic surfaces prepared by this inkjet printing method showed enhanced water collection efficiency compared with uniform superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic surfaces. This method can be used for the facile large-scale patterning of superhydrophobic surfaces with high precision and superior pattern stability and is therefore a key step toward patterning superhydrophobic surfaces for practical applications. This journal is

  20. Part III. Kinetics of the (Zn - Coating Deposition During Stable and Meta-Stable Solidifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wołczyński W.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Two different steel substrates are applied to the hot dip (Zn - coating formation. The influence of the substrate composition on the (Zn - coating thickening is recorded. Morphologies of both coatings are compared to each other. The transition from stable into meta-stable solidification is revealed. The criterion for the competition between stable and meta-stable solidification is applied to justify the analyzed transition.