WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface shear viscosity

  1. Surface Shear Viscosity and Phase Transitions of Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relini, A.; Ciuchi, F.; Rolandi, R.

    1995-08-01

    The canal method has been employed to measure the in-plane steady shear viscosity of monolayers of bolaform lipids extracted from the membrane of the thermophilic microorganism Sulfolobus solfataricus. Monolayers were formed with the polar lipid extract (PLE), which is a mixture of several bolaform lipids, each one endowed with two nonequivalent polar headgroups. Viscosities were obtained from the measured flows by using the equation introduced by Joly; this equation contains a semiempirical parameter A, which takes into account the monolayer-subphase mechanical coupling. Measuring the flows for two different substances (PLE and oleic acid) and channel widths, the monolayer viscosities and the parameter A were determined at the same time. The analysis of the viscosity data according to the free area model shows evidences of the molecular conformational changes matching monolayer phase transitions.

  2. Shear viscosity of nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Magner, A G; Grygoriev, U V; Plujko, V A

    2016-01-01

    Shear viscosity $\\eta$ is calculated for the nuclear matter described as a system of interacting nucleons with the van der Waals (VDW) equation of state. The Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation is solved in terms of the plane waves of the collective overdamped motion. In the frequent collision regime, the shear viscosity depends on the particle number density $n$ through the mean-field parameter $a$ which describes attractive forces in the VDW equation. In the temperature region $T=15\\div 40$~MeV, a ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density $s$ is smaller than 1 at the nucleon number density $n =(0.5\\div 1.5)\\,n^{}_0$, where $n^{}_0=0.16\\,$fm$^{-3}$ is the particle density of equilibrium nuclear matter at zero temperature. A minimum of the $\\eta/s$ ratio takes place somewhere in a vicinity of the critical point of the VDW system. Large values of $\\eta/s\\gg 1$ are however found in both the low density, $n\\ll n^{}_0$, and high density, $n>2n^{}_0$, regions. This makes the ideal hydrodynamic approach ina...

  3. Shear Viscosity from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Mages, Simon W; Fodor, Zoltán; Schäfer, Andreas; Szabó, Kálmán

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the transport properties of the the quark-gluon plasma is becoming increasingly important to describe current measurements at heavy ion collisions. This work reports on recent efforts to determine the shear viscosity h in the deconfined phase from lattice QCD. The main focus is on the integration of the Wilson flow in the analysis to get a better handle on the infrared behaviour of the spectral function which is relevant for transport. It is carried out at finite Wilson flow time, which eliminates the dependence on the lattice spacing. Eventually, a new continuum limit has to be carried out which sends the new regulator introduced by finite flow time to zero. Also the non-perturbative renormalization strategy applied for the energy momentum tensor is discussed. At the end some quenched results for temperatures up to 4 : 5 T c are presented

  4. Shear viscosity of liquid mixtures Mass dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Kaushal, R

    2002-01-01

    Expressions for zeroth, second, and fourth sum rules of transverse stress autocorrelation function of two component fluid have been derived. These sum rules and Mori's memory function formalism have been used to study shear viscosity of Ar-Kr and isotopic mixtures. It has been found that theoretical result is in good agreement with the computer simulation result for the Ar-Kr mixture. The mass dependence of shear viscosity for different mole fraction shows that deviation from ideal linear model comes even from mass difference in two species of fluid mixture. At higher mass ratio shear viscosity of mixture is not explained by any of the emperical model.

  5. Viscosity of dilute suspensions of rigid bead arrays at low shear: accounting for the variation in hydrodynamic stress over the bead surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Stuart A; Pei, Hongxia

    2009-06-11

    In this work, we examine the viscosity of a dilute suspension of irregularly shaped particles at low shear. A particle is modeled as a rigid array of nonoverlapping beads of variable size and geometry. Starting from a boundary element formalism, approximate account is taken of the variation in hydrodynamic stress over the surface of the individual beads. For a touching dimer of two identical beads, the predicted viscosity is lower than the exact value by 5.2%. The methodology is then applied to several other model systems including tetramers of variable conformation and linear strings of touching beads. An analysis is also carried out of the viscosity and translational diffusion of several dilute amino acids and diglycine in water. It is concluded that continuum hydrodynamic modeling with stick boundary conditions is unable to account for the experimental viscosity and diffusion data simultaneously. A model intermediate between "stick" and "slip" could possibly reconcile theory and experiment.

  6. Shear Viscosity of a Unitary Fermi Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Wlazłowski, Gabriel; Magierski, Piotr; Drut, Joaquín E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first ab initio determination of the shear viscosity eta of the Unitary Fermi Gas, based on finite temperature quantum Monte Carlo calculations and the Kubo linear-response formalism. We determine the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s. The minimum of eta/s appears to be located above the critical temperature for the superfluid-to-normal phase transition with the most probable value being eta/s approx 0.2 hbar/kB, which almost saturates...

  7. Shear Viscosity in a Gluon Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    The relation of the shear viscosity coefficient to the recently introduced transport rate is derived within relativistic kinetic theory. We calculate the shear viscosity over entropy ratio \\eta/s for a gluon gas, which involves elastic gg-> gg perturbative QCD (PQCD) scatterings as well as inelastic ggggg PQCD bremsstrahlung. For \\alpha_s=0.3 we find \\eta/s=0.13 and for \\alpha_s=0.6, \\eta/s=0.076. The small \\eta/s values, which suggest strongly coupled systems, are due to the gluon bremsstrah...

  8. Viscosity measurement in thin lubricant films using shear ultrasonic reflection

    OpenAIRE

    S. Kasolang; Dwyer-Joyce, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    When a shear ultrasonic wave is incident on a solid and liquid boundary, the proportion that is reflected depends on the liquid viscosity. This is the basis for some instruments for on-line measurement of bulk liquid viscosity. In machine elements, the lubricant is usually present in a thin layer between two rubbing solid surfaces. The thin film has a different response to an ultrasonic shear wave than liquid in bulk. In this work, this response is investigated with the aim of measuring visco...

  9. Bulk and shear viscosity in Hagedorn fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfik, A.; Wahba, M. [Egyptian Center for Theoretical Physics (ECTP), MTI University, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo (Egypt)

    2010-11-15

    Assuming that the Hagedorn fluid composed of known particles and resonances with masses m <2 GeV obeys the first-order theory (Eckart) of relativistic fluid, we discuss the transport properties of QCD confined phase. Based on the relativistic kinetic theory formulated under the relaxation time approximation, expressions for bulk and shear viscosity in thermal medium of hadron resonances are derived. The relaxation time in the Hagedorn dynamical fluid exclusively takes into account the decay and eventually van der Waals processes. We comment on the in-medium thermal effects on bulk and shear viscosity and averaged relaxation time with and without the excluded-volume approach. As an application of these results, we suggest the dynamics of heavy-ion collisions, non-equilibrium thermodynamics and the cosmological models, which require thermo- and hydro-dynamics equations of state. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Bulk and Shear Viscosity in Hagedorn Fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A

    2010-01-01

    Assuming that the Hagedorn fluid composed of known particles and resonances with masses $m<2\\,$GeV obeys the {\\it first-order} theory (Eckart) of relativistic fluid, we discuss the transport properties of QCD confined phase. Based on the relativistic kinetic theory formulated under the relaxation time approximation, expressions for bulk and shear viscosity in thermal medium are derived. The relaxation time in the Hagedorn dynamical fluid exclusively takes into account the decay and eventually van der Waals processes. We comment on the {\\it in-medium} thermal effects on bulk and shear viscosities and averaged relaxation time with and without the excluded-volume approach. As an application of these results, we suggest the dynamics of heavy-ion collisions, non-equlibrium thermodynamics and the cosmological models, which require thermo and hydrodynamics equations of state.

  11. Shear Viscosity Coefficient from Microscopic Models

    CERN Document Server

    Muronga, A

    2004-01-01

    The transport coefficient of shear viscosity is studied for a hadron matter through microscopic transport model, the Ultra--relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD), using the Green--Kubo formulas. Molecular--dynamical simulations are performed for a system of light mesons in a box with periodic boundary conditions. Starting from an initial state composed of $\\pi, \\eta ,\\omega ,\\rho ,\\phi$ with a uniform phase--space distribution, the evolution takes place through elastic collisions, production and annihilation. The system approaches a stationary state of mesons and their resonances, which is characterized by common temperature. After equilibration, thermodynamic quantities such as the energy density, particle density, and pressure are calculated. From such an equilibrated state the shear viscosity coefficient is calculated from the fluctuations of stress tensor around equilibrium using Green--Kubo relations. We do our simulations here at zero net baryon density so that the equilibration times depend o...

  12. Surface dilatational viscosity of Langmuir monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Juan; Vogel, Michael; Hirsa, Amir

    2003-11-01

    With increased interest in microfluidic systems, interfacial phenomena is receiving more attention. As the length scales of fluid problems decrease, the surface to volume ratio increases and the coupling between interfacial flow and bulk flow becomes increasingly dominated by effects due to intrinsic surface viscosities (shear and dilatational), in comparison to elastic effects (due to surface tension gradients). The surface shear viscosity is well-characterized, as cm-scale laboratory experiments are able to isolate its effects from other interfacial processes (e.g., in the deep-channel viscometer). The same is not true for the dilatational viscosity, because it acts in the direction of surface tension gradients. Their relative strength scale with the capillary number, and for cm-scale laboratory flows, surface tension effects tend to dominate. In microfluidic scale flows, the scaling favors viscosity. We have devised an experimental apparatus which is capable of isolating and enhancing the effects of dilatational viscosity at the cm scales by driving the interface harmonically in time, while keeping the interface flat. In this talk, we shall present both the theory for how this works as well as experimental measurements of surface velocity from which we deduce the dilatational viscosity of several monolayers on the air-water interface over a substantial range of surface concentrations. Anomalous behavior over some range of concentration, which superficially indicates negative viscosity, maybe explained in terms of compositional effects due to large spatial and temporal variations in concentration and corresponding viscosity.

  13. Relativistic r-modes and shear viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, L; Miralles, J A; Ferrari, V

    2006-01-01

    We derive the relativistic equations for stellar perturbations, including in a consistent way shear viscosity in the stress-energy tensor, and we numerically integrate our equations in the case of large viscosity. We consider the slow rotation approximation, and we neglect the coupling between polar and axial perturbations. In our approach, the frequency and damping time of the emitted gravitational radiation are directly obtained. We find that, approaching the inviscid limit from the finite viscosity case, the continuous spectrum is regularized. Constant density stars, polytropic stars, and stars with realistic equations of state are considered. In the case of constant density stars and polytropic stars, our results for the viscous damping times agree, within a factor two, with the usual estimates obtained by using the eigenfunctions of the inviscid limit. For realistic neutron stars, our numerical results give viscous damping times with the same dependence on mass and radius as previously estimated, but sys...

  14. Bulk viscosity-driven suppression of shear viscosity effects on the flow harmonics at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Noronha-Hostler, J; Grassi, F

    2014-01-01

    The interplay between shear and bulk viscosities on the flow harmonics, $v_n$'s, at RHIC is investigated using the newly developed relativistic 2+1 hydrodynamical code v-USPhydro that includes bulk and shear viscosity effects both in the hydrodynamic evolution and also at freeze-out. While shear viscosity is known to attenuate the flow harmonics, we find that the inclusion of bulk viscosity decreases the shear viscosity-induced suppression of the flow harmonics bringing them closer to their values in ideal hydrodynamical calculations. Depending on the value of the bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\zeta/s$, in the quark-gluon plasma, the bulk viscosity-driven suppression of shear viscosity effects on the flow harmonics may require a re-evaluation of the previous estimates of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\eta/s$, of the quark-gluon plasma previously extracted by comparing hydrodynamic calculations to heavy ion data.

  15. Notes on shear viscosity bound violation in anisotropic models

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Xian-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The shear viscosity bound violation in Einstein gravity for anisotropic black branes is discussed, with the aim of constraining the deviation of the shear viscosity-entropy density ratio from the shear viscosity bound using causality and thermodynamics analysis. The results show that no stringent constraints can be imposed. The diffusion bound in anisotropic phases is also studied. Ultimately, it is concluded that shear viscosity violation always occurs in cases where the equation of motion of the metric fluctuations cannot be written in a form identical to that of the minimally coupled massless scalar fields.

  16. The shear viscosity of gauge theory plasma with chemical potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Benincasa, P; Naryshkin, R; Benincasa, Paolo; Buchel, Alex; Naryshkin, Roman

    2007-01-01

    We consider strongly coupled gauge theory plasma with conserved global charges that allow for a dual gravitational description. We study the shear viscosity of the gauge theory plasma in the presence of chemical potentials for these charges. Using gauge theory/string theory correspondence we prove that at large 't Hooft coupling the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density is universal.

  17. The shear viscosity of gauge theory plasma with chemical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Paolo; Buchel, Alex; Naryshkin, Roman

    2007-02-01

    We consider strongly coupled gauge theory plasma with conserved global charges that allow for a dual gravitational description. We study the shear viscosity of the gauge theory plasma in the presence of chemical potentials for these charges. Using gauge theory/string theory correspondence we prove that at large 't Hooft coupling the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density is universal.

  18. Shear viscosity of nanofluids mixture%纳米流体黏度特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌智勇; 邹涛; 丁建宁; 程广贵; 张忠强; 孙东建; 钱龙

    2012-01-01

    The influences of temperature, chemical dispersant, and volume fraction of nanoparticles on the shear viscosity of the nanoparticle-fluid mixture were experimentally investigated. The nanofluids including different types of nanoparticles were prepared by a two-steps method. The results showed that the shear viscosity of the mixture decreased with increasing temperature below a threshold of 60℃ . Interestingly, the viscosity of Cu-water and Al2O3-water nanofluids increased with increasing temperature above 60℃ . The Brownian motion was enhanced as temperature increased, and the moving of the nanoparticles covering surfactants would increase the viscosity. The viscosity hysteresis between the heating and cooling processes could be observed obviously. The shear viscosity of CuO-water nanofluid in this experiment was in good agreement with fluid dynamics continuum theory for the fluids without dispersant. After the dispersant was added in CuO-water nanofluid, the experimental value of shear viscosity was larger than the theoretical data. And the varying trend of viscosity was consistent with that of the dispersant. The use of surfactant had an important role in the calculation of viscosity. The viscosity of nanofluids increased with increasing particle volume fraction, but the viscosity increments for the nanofluids with the same particle volume fraction were not the same. So density, surface electrical and diameter of the nanoparticles should be considered when calculating the viscosity of nanofluids.

  19. Shear viscosities of photons in strongly coupled plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di-Lun Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the shear viscosity of thermalized photons in the quark gluon plasma (QGP at weak coupling and N=4 super Yang–Mills plasma (SYMP at both strong and weak couplings. We find that the shear viscosity due to the photon–parton scattering up to the leading order of electromagnetic coupling is suppressed when the coupling of the QGP/SYMP is increased, which stems from the blue-shift of the thermal-photon spectrum at strong coupling. In addition, the shear viscosity rapidly increases near the deconfinement transition in a phenomenological model analogous to the QGP.

  20. Shear viscosities of photons in strongly coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di-Lun; Müller, Berndt

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the shear viscosity of thermalized photons in the quark gluon plasma (QGP) at weak coupling and N = 4 super Yang-Mills plasma (SYMP) at both strong and weak couplings. We find that the shear viscosity due to the photon-parton scattering up to the leading order of electromagnetic coupling is suppressed when the coupling of the QGP/SYMP is increased, which stems from the blue-shift of the thermal-photon spectrum at strong coupling. In addition, the shear viscosity rapidly increases near the deconfinement transition in a phenomenological model analogous to the QGP.

  1. The shear viscosity of gauge theory plasma with chemical potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benincasa, Paolo [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Buchel, Alex [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada) and Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario N2J 2W9 (Canada)]. E-mail: abuchel@perimeterinstitute.ca; Naryshkin, Roman [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Physics Department, Taras Shevchenko Kiev National University, Prosp. Glushkova 6, Kiev 03022 (Ukraine)

    2007-02-08

    We consider strongly coupled gauge theory plasma with conserved global charges that allow for a dual gravitational description. We study the shear viscosity of the gauge theory plasma in the presence of chemical potentials for these charges. Using gauge theory/string theory correspondence we prove that at large 't Hooft coupling the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density is universal.

  2. Improved acoustic viscosimeter technique. [for determining fluid shear viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, M. R.; Moeller, R. P.; Carome, E. F.

    1976-01-01

    An improved technique has been developed for studies of the shear viscosity of fluids. It utilizes an acoustic resonator as a four-terminal electrical device; the resonator's amplitude response may be determined directly and simply related to the fluid's viscosity. The use of this technique is discussed briefly and data obtained in several fluids is presented.

  3. Shear time dependent viscosity of polystyrene-ethylacrylate based shear thickening fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Xuan, Shouhu; Jiang, Wanquan; Cao, Saisai; Gong, Xinglong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the influence of the shear rate and shear time on the transient viscosity of polystyrene-ethylacrylate based shear thickening fluid (STF) is investigated. If the shear rate is stepwise changed, it is found that both the viscosity and critical shear rate are affected by the shear time. Above the critical shear rate, the viscosity of the STF with larger power law exponent (n) increases faster. However, the viscosity tends to decrease when the shear time is long enough. This phenomenon can be responsible for the reversible structure buildup and the break-down process. An effective volume fraction (EVF) mechanism is proposed to analyze the shear time dependent viscosity and it is found that viscosity changes in proportion to EVF. To further clarify the structure evolution, a structural kinetic model is studied because the structural kinetic parameter (λ) could describe the variation in the effective volume fraction. The theoretical results of the structural kinetic model agree well with the experimental results. With this model, the change in viscosity and EVF can be speculated from the variation of λ and then the structure evolution can be better illustrated.

  4. Sensor for Viscosity and Shear Strength Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, J.; Moore, J.E. Jr.; Ebadian, M.A.; Jones, W.K.

    1998-10-20

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. The work for this project will be performed in three phases. The first phase, carried out in FY96, involved (1) an evaluation of acoustic and other methods for viscosity measurement; (2) measurement of the parameters of slurries over the range of percent solids found in tanks and transport systems; (3) a comparison of physical properties (e.g., viscosity and density) to percent solids found composition; and (4) the design of a prototype sensor. The second phase (FY97) will involve the fabrication of a prototype hybrid sensor to measure the viscosity and mechanical properties of slurries in remote, high-radiation environments. Two different viscometer designs are being investigated in this study: a magnetostrictive pulse wave guide viscometer; an oscillating cylinder viscometer. In FY97, the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), which has printed circuit, thick film, thin film, and co-fired ceramic fabrication capability, will fabricate five probes for demonstration after technology selection and evaluation.

  5. Shear Viscosity of Turbulent Chiral Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Das, Amita; Kaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the difference between the chemical potentials of left-handed and right-handed particles in a parity violating (chiral) plasma can lead to an instability. We show that the chiral instability may drive turbulent transport. Further we estimate the anomalous viscosity of chiral plasma arising from the enhanced collisionality due to turbulence.

  6. GodunovSPH with shear viscosity : implementation and tests

    CERN Document Server

    Cha, Seung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The acceleration and energy dissipation terms due to the shear viscosity have been implemented and tested in GodunovSPH. The double summation method has been employed to avoid the well known numerical noise of the second derivative in particle based codes. The plane Couette flow with various initial and boundary conditions have been used as tests, and the numerical and analytical results show a good agreement. Not only the viscosity--only calculation, but the full hydrodynamics simulations have been performed, and they show expected results as well. The very low kinematic viscosity simulations show a turbulent pattern when the Reynolds number exceeds $\\sim$$10^2$. The critical value of the Reynolds number at the transition point of the laminar and turbulent flows coincides with the previous works approximately. A smoothed dynamic viscosity has been suggested to describe the individual kinematic viscosity of particles. The infinitely extended Couette flow which has two layers of different viscosities has been ...

  7. Shear Viscosity of Liquid Potassium and Cesium: a Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Nadège; Xu, Hong; Wax, Jean-François

    2017-08-01

    The density and temperature dependences of the shear viscosity of liquid potassium and cesium are studied. The stress autocorrelation function is calculated from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Using the Green-Kubo formula, the shear viscosity is obtained. Interionic interactions are calculated by Fiolhais potential and are validated by comparison between simulation and experimental data along the liquid-gas coexistence curve for K and Cs. For both metals, three isochors and one isotherm are investigated. The recently proposed relation in [Phys. Rev. B 93, 214203 (2016)] is tested in the cases of K and Cs and it appears that this function reproduces qualitatively and quantitatively well the behavior of each element.

  8. Nonlocal transport and the hydrodynamic shear viscosity in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Iacopo; Tomadin, Andrea; Geim, Andre K.; Polini, Marco

    2015-10-01

    Motivated by recent experimental progress in preparing encapsulated graphene sheets with ultrahigh mobilities up to room temperature, we present a theoretical study of dc transport in doped graphene in the hydrodynamic regime. By using the continuity and Navier-Stokes equations, we demonstrate analytically that measurements of nonlocal resistances in multiterminal Hall bar devices can be used to extract the hydrodynamic shear viscosity of the two-dimensional (2D) electron liquid in graphene. We also discuss how to probe the viscosity-dominated hydrodynamic transport regime by scanning probe potentiometry and magnetometry. Our approach enables measurements of the viscosity of any 2D electron liquid in the hydrodynamic transport regime.

  9. Shear viscosity of $\\beta$-stable nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Benhar, Omar

    2009-01-01

    Viscosity plays a critical role in determining the stability of rotating neutron stars. We report the results of a calculation of the shear viscosity of $\\beta$~-~stable matter, carried out using an effective interaction based on a state-of-the-art nucleon-nucleon potential and the formalism of correlated basis functions. Within our approach the equation of state, determining the proton fraction, and the nucleon-nucleon scattering probability are consistently obtained from the same dynamical model. The results show that, while the neutron contribution to the viscosity is always dominant, above nuclear saturation density the electron contribution becomes appreciable.

  10. Sensor for viscosity and shear strength measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dillion, J.; Moore, J.; Jones, K.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. Two different viscometer techniques are being investigated in this study, based on: magnetostrictive pulse generated acoustic waves; and an oscillating cylinder. Prototype sensors have been built and tested which are based on both techniques. A base capability instrumentation system has been designed, constructed, and tested which incorporates both of these sensors. It requires manual data acquisition and off-line calculation. A broad range of viscous media has been tested using this system. Extensive test results appear in this report. The concept for each technique has been validated by these test results. This base capability system will need to be refined further before it is appropriate for field tests. The mass of the oscillating system structure will need to be reduced. A robust acoustic probe assembly will need to be developed. In addition, in March 1997 it was made known for the first time that the requirement was for a deliverable automated viscosity instrumentation system. Since then such a system has been designed, and the hardware has been constructed so that the automated concept can be proved. The rest of the hardware, which interfaced to a computer, has also been constructed and tested as far as possible. However, for both techniques the computer software for automated data acquisition, calculation, and logging had not been completed before funding and time ran out.

  11. Shear viscosity of the $\\Phi^4$ theory from classical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Homor, M M

    2015-01-01

    Shear viscosity of the classical $\\Phi^4$ theory is measured using classical microcanonical simulation. To calculate the Kubo formula, we measure the energy-momentum tensor correlation function, and apply the Green-Kubo relation. Being a classical theory, the results depend on the cutoff which should be chosen in the range of the temperature. Comparison with experimentally accessible systems is also performed.

  12. Bulk and shear viscosities for the Gribov-Zwanziger plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florkowski Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the Gribov-Zwanziger plasma is introduced and used to calculate the bulk and shear viscosities of the system of gluons. The kinetic coeffcients are obtained in two different ways which are shown to yield equivalent results.

  13. GodunovSPH with shear viscosity: implementation and tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seung-Hoon; Wood, Matt A.

    2016-05-01

    The acceleration and energy dissipation terms due to the shear viscosity have been implemented and tested in GodunovSPH. The double summation method has been employed to avoid the well-known numerical noise of the second derivative in particle based codes. The plane Couette flow with various initial and boundary conditions have been used as tests, and the numerical and analytical results show a good agreement. Not only the viscosity-only calculation, but the full hydrodynamics simulations have been performed, and they show expected results as well. The very low kinematic viscosity simulations show a turbulent pattern when the Reynolds number exceeds ˜102. The critical value of the Reynolds number at the transition point of the laminar and turbulent flows coincides with the previous works approximately. A smoothed dynamic viscosity has been suggested to describe the individual kinematic viscosity of particles. The infinitely extended Couette flow which has two layers of different viscosities has been simulated to check the smoothed dynamic viscosity, and the result agrees well with the analytic solution. In order to compare the standard smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and GodunovSPH, the two layers test has been performed again with a density contrast. GodunovSPH shows less dispersion than the standard SPH, but there is no significant difference in the results. The results of the viscous ring evolution has also been presented as well, and the numerical results agrees with the analytic solution.

  14. Probing the shear viscosity of an active nematic film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillamat, Pau; Ignés-Mullol, Jordi; Shankar, Suraj; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Sagués, Francesc

    2016-12-01

    In vitro reconstituted active systems, such as the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-driven microtubule bundle suspension developed by the Dogic group [T. Sanchez, D. T. Chen, S. J. DeCamp, M. Heymann, and Z. Dogic, Nature (London) 491, 431 (2012), 10.1038/nature11591], provide a fertile testing ground for elucidating the phenomenology of active liquid crystalline states. Controlling such novel phases of matter crucially depends on our knowledge of their material and physical properties. In this Rapid Communication, we show that the shear viscosity of an active nematic film can be probed by varying its hydrodynamic coupling to a bounding oil layer. Using the motion of disclinations as intrinsic tracers of the flow field and a hydrodynamic model, we obtain an estimate for the shear viscosity of the nematic film. Knowing this now provides us with an additional handle for robust and precision tunable control of the emergent dynamics of active fluids.

  15. Geometry-dependent viscosity reduction in sheared active fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Słomka, Jonasz

    2016-01-01

    We investigate flow pattern formation and viscosity reduction mechanisms in active fluids by studying a generalized Navier-Stokes model that captures the experimentally observed bulk vortex dynamics in microbial suspensions. We present exact analytical solutions including stress-free vortex lattices and introduce a computational framework that allows the efficient treatment of previously intractable higher-order shear boundary conditions. Large-scale parameter scans identify the conditions for spontaneous flow symmetry breaking, geometry-dependent viscosity reduction and negative-viscosity states amenable to energy harvesting in confined suspensions. The theory uses only generic assumptions about the symmetries and long-wavelength structure of active stress tensors, suggesting that inviscid phases may be achievable in a broad class of non-equilibrium fluids by tuning confinement geometry and pattern scale selection.

  16. Prediction of Anomalous Blood Viscosity in Confined Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiébaud, Marine; Shen, Zaiyi; Harting, Jens; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2014-06-01

    Red blood cells play a major role in body metabolism by supplying oxygen from the microvasculature to different organs and tissues. Understanding blood flow properties in microcirculation is an essential step towards elucidating fundamental and practical issues. Numerical simulations of a blood model under a confined linear shear flow reveal that confinement markedly modifies the properties of blood flow. A nontrivial spatiotemporal organization of blood elements is shown to trigger hitherto unrevealed flow properties regarding the viscosity η, namely ample oscillations of its normalized value [η]=(η-η0)/(η0ϕ) as a function of hematocrit ϕ (η0=solvent viscosity). A scaling law for the viscosity as a function of hematocrit and confinement is proposed. This finding can contribute to the conception of new strategies to efficiently detect blood disorders, via in vitro diagnosis based on confined blood rheology. It also constitutes a contribution for a fundamental understanding of rheology of confined complex fluids.

  17. Accelerating cosmological expansion from shear and bulk viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2015-01-01

    The dissipation of energy from local velocity perturbations in the cosmological fluid affects the time evolution of spatially averaged fluid dynamic fields and the cosmological solution of Einstein's field equations. We show how this backreaction effect depends on shear and bulk viscosity and other material properties of the dark sector, as well as the spectrum of perturbations. If sufficiently large, this effect could account for the acceleration of the cosmological expansion.

  18. Accelerating Cosmological Expansion from Shear and Bulk Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2015-03-01

    The dissipation of energy from local velocity perturbations in the cosmological fluid affects the time evolution of spatially averaged fluid dynamic fields and the cosmological solution of Einstein's field equations. We show how this backreaction effect depends on shear and bulk viscosity and other material properties of the dark sector, as well as the spectrum of perturbations. If sufficiently large, this effect could account for the acceleration of the cosmological expansion.

  19. Moving forward to constrain the shear viscosity of QCD matter

    OpenAIRE

    Denicol, Gabriel; Monnai, Akihiko; Schenke, Bjoern

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that measurements of rapidity differential anisotropic flow in heavy ion collisions can constrain the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio {\\eta}/s of QCD matter. Comparing results from hydrodynamic calculations with experimental data from RHIC, we find evidence for a small {\\eta}/s $\\approx$ 0.04 in the QCD cross-over region and a strong temperature dependence in the hadronic phase. A temperature independent {\\eta}/s is disfavored by the data....

  20. Shear viscosity and chemical equilibration of the QGP

    CERN Document Server

    Plumari, Salvatore; Colonna, Maria; Scardina, Francesco; Greco, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated, in the frame work of the transport approach, different aspects of the QGP created in Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. The shear viscosity $\\eta$ has been calculated by using the Green-Kubo relation at the cascade level. We have compared the numerical results for $\\eta$ obtained from the Green-Kubo correlator with the analytical formula in both the Relaxation Time Approximation (RTA) and the Chapman-Enskog approximation (CE). From this comparison we show that in the range of temperature explored in a Heavy Ion collision the RTA underestimates the viscosity by about a factor of 2, while a good agreement is found between the CE approximation and Gree-Kubo relation already at first order of approximation. The agreement with the CE approximation supplies an analytical formula that allows to develop kinetic transport theory at fixed shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\eta/s$. We show some results for the build up of anisotropic flows $v_{2}$ in a transport approach at fix...

  1. Holographic Shear Viscosity in Hyperscaling Violating Theories without Translational Invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, Yi; Zhou, Zhenhua

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, $\\eta/s$, in hyperscaling violating geometry with lattice structure. We show that the scaling relation with hyperscaling violation gives a strong constraint to the mass of graviton and usually leads to a power law of temperature, $\\eta/s\\sim T^\\kappa$. Remarkably, we find the exponent $\\kappa$ can be greater than two such that the new bound for viscosity raised in arXiv:1601.02757 is violated. Our above observation is testified by constructing specific solutions with UV completion in various holographic models. Finally, we compare the boundedness of $\\kappa$ with the behavior of entanglement entropy and conjecture a relation between them.

  2. The Shear Viscosity in an Anisotropic Unitary Fermi Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, Rickmoy; Trivedi, Sandip P

    2016-01-01

    We consider a system consisting of a strongly interacting, ultracold unitary Fermi gas under harmonic confinement. Our analysis suggests the possibility of experimentally studying, in this system, an anisotropic shear viscosity tensor driven by the anisotropy in the trapping potential. In particular, we suggest that this experimental setup could mimic some features of anisotropic geometries that have recently been studied for strongly coupled field theories which have a gravitational dual. Results using the AdS/CFT correspondence in these theories show that in systems with a background linear potential, certain viscosity components can be made much smaller than the entropy density, parametrically violating the KSS bound. This intuition, along with results from a Boltzmann analysis that we perform, suggests that a violation of the KSS bound can perhaps occur in the unitary Fermi gas system when it is subjected to a suitable anisotropic trapping potential. We give a concrete proposal for an experimental setup w...

  3. Extended Chaplygin gas equation of state with bulk and shear viscosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Jalil

    2014-03-01

    In this note extended Chaplygin gas equation of state includes bulk and shear viscosities suggested. Bulk viscosity assumed as power law form of density and shear viscosity considered as a constant. We study evolution of dark energy density numerically for several forms of scale factor, and analytically under some assumptions corresponding to early universe. We found our model is stable for infinitesimal viscous parameters.

  4. Shear viscosity at the Ising-nematic quantum critical point in two dimensional metals

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Aavishkar A; Sachdev, Subir

    2016-01-01

    In a strongly interacting quantum liquid without quasiparticles, general scaling arguments imply that the dimensionless ratio $(k_B /\\hbar)\\, \\eta/s$, where $\\eta$ is the shear viscosity and $s$ is the entropy density, is a universal number. We compute the shear viscosity of the Ising-nematic critical point of metals in spatial dimension $d=2$ by an expansion below $d=5/2$. The anisotropy associated with directions parallel and normal to the Fermi surface leads to a violation of the scaling expectations: $\\eta$ scales in the same manner as a chiral conductivity, and the ratio $\\eta/s$ diverges as $T^{-2/z}$, where $z$ is the dynamic critical exponent for fermionic excitations dispersing normal to the Fermi surface.

  5. Novel Rotating Hairy Black Hole in (2+1)-Dimensions and Shear Viscosity to Entropy Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, J.; Heshmatian, S.

    2014-08-01

    The novel rotating hairy black hole metric in (2 + 1) dimensions, which is an exact solution to the field equations of the Einstein-scalar AdS theory with a non-minimal coupling, considered in this paper and some hydrodynamics quantities such as diffusion constant and shear viscosity investigated. By using thermodynamics quantities such as temperature and entropy we can use diffusion constant to obtain shear viscosity and then calculate shear viscosity to entropy ratio.

  6. Shear viscosity in holography and effective theory of transport without translational symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Burikham, Piyabut

    2016-01-01

    We study the shear viscosity in an effective hydrodynamic theory and holographic model where the translational symmetry is broken by massless scalar fields. We identify the shear viscosity, $\\eta$, from the coefficient of the shear tensor in the modified constitutive relation, constructed from thermodynamic quantities, fluid velocity and the scalar fields, which break the translational symmetry explicitly. Our construction of constitutive relation is inspired by those derived from the fluid/gravity correspondence in the weakly disordered limit $m/T \\ll 1$. We found that the shear viscosity - entropy density ratio violate the KSS bound even when the translational symmetry is weakly broken. At the leading order in disorder strength, as the energy density is fixed and the disorder strength increases, we observe that the shear viscosity remains unchanged while the entropy grows larger, resulting in the violation of the bound. At higher order correction in $m/T$, we show that the shear viscosity from the constitut...

  7. Intrinsic Viscosity of Flexible Polymers in Unbounded and Bounded Newtonian Shear Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Johannes; Brinke, G. ten

    1991-01-01

    The zero-shear-rate intrinsic viscosity of a polymer in an athermal and THETA solvent in free space and confined in a slit is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations of self-avoiding random walks on a simple cubic lattice. The intrinsic viscosity in a Newtonian shear flow is calculated by Zimm's alg

  8. Effect of Shear and Bulk Viscosities on Interacting Modified Chaplygin Gas Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, J.; Pourhassan, B.; Amani, Ali R.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we study interacting modified Chaplygin gas (MCG) which has shear and bulk viscosities. We consider sign-changeable interaction between MCG and matter, then investigate the effects of shear and bulk viscosities on the cosmological parameters such as energy, density, Hubble expansion parameter, scale factor and deceleration parameter.

  9. Critical behavior of 2,6-dimethylpyridine-water: Measurements of specific heat, dynamic light scattering, and shear viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzaev, S. Z.; Behrends, R.; Heimburg, Thomas Rainer

    2006-01-01

    2,6-dimethylpyridine-water, specific heat, dynamic light scattering, shear viscosity Udgivelsesdato: 14 April......2,6-dimethylpyridine-water, specific heat, dynamic light scattering, shear viscosity Udgivelsesdato: 14 April...

  10. Composition and Temperature Dependence of Shear Viscosity of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    model for viscosity of liquids , we feel that this is a very good correlation between molecular structure and viscosity, and it appears then that the...B. Thole, "The Viscosity of Liquids ," Longmans, Green and Co., London (1914). 15. W. R. Gambill, Chem. Eng, 66, 151 (1959) 16. P. K. Katti and M. M

  11. ON THE EDDY VISCOSITY MODEL OF PERIODIC TURBULENT SHEAR FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新军; 罗纪生; 周恒

    2003-01-01

    Physical argument shows that eddy viscosity is essentially different from molecular viscosity. By direct numerical simulation, it was shown that for periodic turbulent flows, there is phase difference between Reynolds stress and rate of strain. This finding posed great challenge to turbulence modeling, because most turbulence modeling, which use the idea of eddy viscosity, do not take this effect into account.

  12. Effect of the shear viscosity on plasma sheath in an oblique magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Li, Jing-Ju; Ma, J. X.

    2016-12-01

    In a magnetized plasma sheath, strong velocity shear exists owing to the three-dimensional nature of ion velocity. Thus, the ion viscosity should have an important effect on the sheath structure, which has not been studied. This article presents the study of the effect of ion shear viscosity on the sheath in an oblique magnetic field within the framework of classical cross-field transport. It is shown that the inclusion of the shear viscosity in the ion momentum equation results in a significant reduction in the sheath thickness. It is also shown that the "generalized Bohm criterion" is not affected by the shear viscosity within the present model. However, additional boundary conditions such as the velocity shear arise in the viscous case. The appropriate boundary conditions are formulated, accounting for E × B and diamagnetic drifts at the sheath edge, which affects the criterion and sheath profiles.

  13. Effect of molecular diameters on state-to-state transport properties: The shear viscosity coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2015-09-01

    Shear viscosity coefficient is calculated for both equilibrium and strongly non-equilibrium state-to-state vibrational distributions taking into account increasing diameters of vibrationally excited molecules. Under conditions of local thermal equilibrium, the effect of vibrational excitation on the shear viscosity coefficient is found to be negligible for temperatures below 5000 K. For T > 10 000 K, the contribution of excited states becomes important. Under non-equilibrium conditions characteristic for shock heated and supersonic expanding flows vibrational level populations deviate strongly from the Boltzmann distribution. Nevertheless, estimated coupled effect of molecular size and non-Boltzmann distributions on the shear viscosity coefficient is negligible.

  14. Tunable shear thickening: from understanding suspension thickening to controlling viscosity on the fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Itai; Lin, Neil; Ness, Chris; Sun, Jin; Cates, Mike; Guy, Ben; Hermes, Michiel; Poon, Wilson

    2016-11-01

    Whether contact forces play a role in shear thickening of colloidal systems where hydrodynamic contributions are thought to dominate remains highly controversial. By performing shear reversal experiments on silica and latex colloidal particles, we directly measure the hydrodynamic and contact force contributions to the suspension viscosity. We find that contact forces are not only present, but dominate the shear thickening response. More importantly, this finding directly suggests a strategy for active controlling the thickening viscosities of dense suspensions. We demonstrate that by strategic imposition of a high-frequency and low-amplitude shear perturbation orthogonal to the primary shearing flow, we can largely eradicate thickening. The orthogonal shear effectively becomes a regulator for controlling thickening in the suspension, allowing the viscosity to be reduced by up to two decades on demand.

  15. Dynamics of a high viscosity layer in response to shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaili, Ehsan; Staples, Anne

    2016-11-01

    We use the Shan-Chen multicomponent Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to investigate the time evolution of a thin liquid film (phase I) coating a solid surface under the action of a shearing force imposed by a surrounding fluid (phase II), whose viscosity is significantly lower than that of the film. The goal of this study is to use LBM to capture the contact line motion and interfacial dynamics for an oil-like liquid film which is driven by the upper phase (water) movement as a first approach to modeling thin film dewetting in wave swept marine environments. Lubrication theory is used to validate the results for the driven thin film, and the LBM simulations investigate the effects of the upper phase movement, lower phase thickness, and angle of the imposed shearing force on the thin film profile. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1437387.

  16. Micro-Viscometer for Measuring Shear-Varying Blood Viscosity over a Wide-Ranging Shear Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Jun; Lee, Seung Yeob; Jee, Solkeun; Atajanov, Arslan; Yang, Sung

    2017-06-20

    In this study, a micro-viscometer is developed for measuring shear-varying blood viscosity over a wide-ranging shear rate. The micro-viscometer consists of 10 microfluidic channel arrays, each of which has a different micro-channel width. The proposed design enables the retrieval of 10 different shear rates from a single flow rate, thereby enabling the measurement of shear-varying blood viscosity with a fixed flow rate condition. For this purpose, an optimal design that guarantees accurate viscosity measurement is selected from a parametric study. The functionality of the micro-viscometer is verified by both numerical and experimental studies. The proposed micro-viscometer shows 6.8% (numerical) and 5.3% (experimental) in relative error when compared to the result from a standard rotational viscometer. Moreover, a reliability test is performed by repeated measurement (N = 7), and the result shows 2.69 ± 2.19% for the mean relative error. Accurate viscosity measurements are performed on blood samples with variations in the hematocrit (35%, 45%, and 55%), which significantly influences blood viscosity. Since the blood viscosity correlated with various physical parameters of the blood, the micro-viscometer is anticipated to be a significant advancement for realization of blood on a chip.

  17. Shear viscosities and normal stress differences of rigid liquid-crystalline polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, Y.G.; den Otter, Wouter K.; Briels, Willem J.

    2006-01-01

    Shear viscosities as well as first and second normal stress differences of solutions of rigid spherocylindrical colloids are investigated by Brownian dynamics simulations for aspect ratios L/D in a range from 25 to 60 and scaled volume fractions L/D from 0.5 to 4.5. Shear thinning behavior is

  18. Modified expression for the effective viscosity in the semi-dilute shear flows of fiber suspension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lingxin; LIN Jianzhong; SHI Xing

    2004-01-01

    The available expressions for the effective viscosity can not provide good predictions compared with the experiment data measured in the semi-dilute shear flows of fiber suspension with small aspect ratio. The departure of the theoretical prediction from the measured data increases with the decrease of the fiber aspect ratio. Therefore, by experiment for the fiber with 20 μm diameter, a new expression for the effective viscosity in the semi-dilute shear flows of fiber suspension with small aspect ratio is proposed, the relationship between the shear viscosity of fiber suspensions and the fiber concentration is given. The results show that the effective viscosity is not a linear function of the fiber concentration.

  19. The fundamental difference between shear alpha viscosity and turbulent magnetorotational stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias; Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations of turbulent, magnetized, differentially rotating flows driven by the magnetorotational instability are often used to calculate the effective values of alpha viscosity that is invoked in analytical models of accretion discs. In this paper we use various dynamical models...... of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic stresses, as well as numerical simulations of shearing boxes, to show that angular momentum transport in MRI-driven accretion discs cannot be described by the standard model for shear viscosity. In particular, we demonstrate that turbulent magnetorotational stresses...... are not linearly proportional to the local shear and vanish identically for angular velocity profiles that increase outwards....

  20. Computation of shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions by SRD-MD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laganapan, A. M. K.; Videcoq, A., E-mail: arnaud.videcoq@unilim.fr; Bienia, M. [SPCTS, UMR 7315, ENSCI, CNRS, Centre Européen de la Céramique, 12 rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges Cedex (France); Ala-Nissila, T. [COMP CoE at the Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 11000, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912-1843 (United States); Bochicchio, D.; Ferrando, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNR-IMEM, via Dodecaneso 33, Genova I-16146 (Italy)

    2015-04-14

    The behaviour of sheared colloidal suspensions with full hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) is numerically studied. To this end, we use the hybrid stochastic rotation dynamics-molecular dynamics (SRD-MD) method. The shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions is computed for different volume fractions, both for dilute and concentrated cases. We verify that HIs help in the collisions and the streaming of colloidal particles, thereby increasing the overall shear viscosity of the suspension. Our results show a good agreement with known experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies. This work demonstrates the ability of SRD-MD to successfully simulate transport coefficients that require correct modelling of HIs.

  1. The effects of non-Newtonian viscosity on the deformation of red blood cells in a shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesay, Juldeh

    2005-11-01

    The analyses of the effects of non-Newtonian viscosity on the membrane of red blood cells (RBCs) suspended in a shear flow are presented. The specific objective is to investigate the mechanical deformation on the surfaces of an ellipsoidal particle model. The hydrodynamic stresses and other forces on the surface of the particle are used to determine the cell deformation. We extended previous works, which were based on the Newtonian fluid models, to the non-Newtonian case, and focus on imposed shear rate values between 1 and 100 per second. Two viscosity models are investigated, which respectively correspond to a normal person and a patient with cerebrovascular accident (CVA). The results are compared with those obtained assuming a Newtonian model. We observed that the orientation of the cell influences the deformation and the imposed shear rate drives the local shear rate distribution along the particle surface. The integral particle deformation for the non-Newtonian models in the given shear rate regime is higher than that for the Newtonian reference model. Finally, the deformation of the cell surface decreases as the dissipation ratio increases.

  2. Measuring shear viscosity using transverse momentum correlations in relativistic nuclear collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Sean; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed

    2006-10-20

    Elliptic flow measurements at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider suggest that quark-gluon fluid flows with very little viscosity compared to weak-coupling expectations, challenging theorists to explain why this fluid is so nearly "perfect." It is therefore vital to find quantitative experimental information on the viscosity of the fluid. We propose that measurements of transverse momentum fluctuations can be used to determine the shear viscosity. We use current data to estimate the viscosity-to-entropy ratio in the range from 0.08 to 0.3 and discuss how future measurements can reduce this uncertainty.

  3. Bare Shear Viscosity and Anomalous Fall Rate of Oil Droplets in Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Rodney

    2011-11-01

    Experimental evidence of Kim and Fedele (1982) indicates a breakdown of the Millikan Law for the fall rate of oil droplets in Nitrogen gas over a pressure range of 1-15 atm. The discrepancy is most pronounced for smallest, 0.1 micron radius droplets for which the fall rate increases with pressure. The opposite behavior was observed by Millikan with larger drops in air of pressure at most one atm. We explain these results by arguing that the particle's motion, in particular Stokes' drag formula, is determined by the so-called bare shear viscosity which applies to micro fluid flows. This is in contrast with the usual theory which uses a renormalized shear viscosity and which is well approximated by the Enskog value. A mode coupling formula for the bare shear viscosity is discussed and a graphical comparison is made with the experimental results. Basically an increase in gas pressure produces a decrease in the bare shear viscosity and thus the fall rate increases. The idea that the shear viscosity is smaller for micro flows is consistent with the intuitive belief that on small enough spatial and time scales, fluid flows are conservative without dissipation.

  4. On Regularity of Incompressible Fluid with Shear Dependent Viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongjun YUAN; Qiu MENG

    2012-01-01

    The authors consider a non-Newtonian fluid governed by equations with p-structure in a cubic domain.A fluid is said to be shear thinning (or pseudo-plastic) if 1 <p < 2,and shear thickening (or dilatant) if p > 2.The case p > 2 is considered in this paper.To improve the regularity results obtained by Crispo,it is shown that the second-order derivatives of the velocity and the first-order derivative of the pressure belong to suitable spaces,by appealing to anisotropic Sobolev embeddings.

  5. Global Scaling Symmetry, Noether Charge and Universality of Shear Viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Hai-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was established in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton gravity that the KSS viscosity/entropy ratio associated with AdS planar black holes can be viewed as the boundary dual to the generalized Smarr relation of the black holes in the bulk. In this paper we establish this relation in Einstein gravity with general minimally-coupled matter, and also in theories with an additional non-minimally coupled scalar field. We consider two examples for explicit demonstrations.

  6. Global scaling symmetry, Noether charge, and universality of shear viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Shan

    2016-05-01

    Recently, it was established in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton gravity that the Kovtun-Son-Starinets viscosity/entropy ratio associated with anti-de Sitter planar black holes can be viewed as the boundary dual to the generalized Smarr relation of the black holes in the bulk. In this paper, we establish this relation in Einstein gravity with general minimally coupled matter and also in theories with an additional nonminimally coupled scalar field. We consider two examples for explicit demonstrations.

  7. A Proposal for measuring Anisotropic Shear Viscosity in Unitary Fermi Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, Rickmoy; Trivedi, Sandip P

    2016-01-01

    We present a proposal to measure anisotropic shear viscosity in a strongly interacting, ultra-cold, unitary Fermi gas confined in a harmonic trap. We introduce anisotropy in this setup by strongly confining the gas in one of the directions with relatively weak confinement in the remaining directions. This system has a close resemblance to anisotropic strongly coupled field theories studied recently in the context of gauge-gravity duality. Computations in such theories (which have gravity duals) revealed that some of the viscosity components of the anisotropic shear viscosity tensor can be made much smaller than the entropy density, thus parametrically violating the bound proposed by Kovtun, Son and Starinets (KSS): $\\frac {\\eta} {s} \\geq \\frac{1}{4 \\pi}$. A Boltzmann analysis performed in a system of weakly interacting particles in a linear potential also shows that components of the viscosity tensor can be reduced. Motivated by these exciting results, we propose two hydrodynamic modes in the unitary Fermi ga...

  8. Phonon contribution to the shear viscosity of a superfluid Fermi gas in the unitarity limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannarelli, Massimo [I.N.F.N., Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Manuel, Cristina [Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (IEEC/CSIC), Campus Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Tolos, Laura, E-mail: tolos@ice.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (IEEC/CSIC), Campus Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    We present a detailed analysis of the contribution of small-angle Nambu–Goldstone boson (phonon) collisions to the shear viscosity, η, in a superfluid atomic Fermi gas close to the unitarity limit. We show that the experimental values of the shear viscosity coefficient to entropy ratio, η/s, obtained at the lowest reached temperature can be reproduced assuming that phonons give the leading contribution to η. The phonon contribution is evaluated considering 1↔2 processes and taking into account the finite size of the experimental system. In particular, for very low temperatures, T≲0.1T{sub F}, we find that phonons are ballistic and the contribution of phonons to the shear viscosity is determined by the processes that take place at the interface between the superfluid and the normal phase. This result is independent of the detailed form of the phonon dispersion law and leads to two testable predictions: the shear viscosity should correlate with the size of the optical trap and it should decrease with decreasing temperature. For higher temperatures the detailed form of the phonon dispersion law becomes relevant and, within our model, we find that the experimental data for η/s can be reproduced assuming that phonons have an anomalous dispersion law. -- Highlights: •We study the contribution of phonons to shear viscosity of a cold Fermi gas at unitary. •The shear viscosity to entropy ratio (η/s) is reproduced for T<∼0.1T{sub F}. •For very low temperatures η/s correlates with the size of the optical trap. •We explain η/s for T>∼0.1T{sub F} assuming an anomalous dispersion law for phonons.

  9. Shear viscosity and normal pressure differences in the scope of the extended Kirkwood-Smoluchowski equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, H.-M.

    1993-03-01

    The potential contribution to the viscosity in liquids is calculated from the pair-correlation function, which may be obtained by solving the extended Kirkwood-Smoluchowski (KS) equation. A secondary boundary condition near the hard core (r=1+) for the excess pair probability current density in the relative pair space is derived rigorously and applied to the extended KS equation. The intermolecular potential consists of hard core plus arbitrary soft tail. The viscosity coefficients calculated in this work prove to be essentially functions of the square root of the shear rate rather than functions of the shear rate itself. We give the explicit representation for the viscosity coefficients in the case of hard spheres. The shear thinning of the shear viscosity is recovered. The viscosity of the normal pressure difference 1/2(pxx-pyy) is found to be positive. The normal pressure difference of the second kind 1/2[pzz-1/2(pxx+pyy)] vanishes in the first-order perturbation calculation with respect to the deformation.

  10. Effect of internal viscosity on Brownian dynamics of DNA molecules in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Dong; Melnik, Roderick V N

    2007-04-01

    The results of Brownian dynamics simulations of a single DNA molecule in shear flow are presented taking into account the effect of internal viscosity. The dissipative mechanism of internal viscosity is proved necessary in the research of DNA dynamics. A stochastic model is derived on the basis of the balance equation for forces acting on the chain. The Euler method is applied to the solution of the model. The extensions of DNA molecules for different Weissenberg numbers are analyzed. Comparison with the experimental results available in the literature is carried out to estimate the contribution of the effect of internal viscosity.

  11. Effective shear viscosity and dynamics of suspensions of micro-swimmers at moderate concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, Lipnikov [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gyrya, V [PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.; Aronson, I [ANL; Berlyand, L [PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, there have been a number of experimental studies suggesting that a suspension of self-propelled bacteria (microswimmers in general) may have an effective viscosity significantly smaller than the viscosity of the ambient fluid. This is in sharp contrast with suspensions of hard passive inclusions, whose presence always increases the viscosity. Here we present a 2D model for a suspension of microswimmers in a fluid and analyze it analytically in the dilute regime (no swimmer-swimmer interactions) and numerically using a Mimetic Finite Difference discretization. Our analysis shows that in the dilute regime the effective shear viscosity is not affected by self-propulsion. But at the moderate concentrations (due to swimmer-swimmer interactions) the effective viscosity decreases linearly as a function of the propulsion strength of the swimmers. These findings prove that (i) a physically observable decrease of viscosity for a suspension of self-propelled bacteria can be explained purely by hydrodynamic interactions and (ii) self-propulsion and interaction of swimmers are both essential to the reduction of the effective shear viscosity. We performed a number of numerical experiments analyzing the dynamics of swimmers resulting from pairwise interactions. The numerical results agree with the physically observed phenomena (e.g., attraction of swimmer to swimmer and swimmer to the wall). This is viewed as an additional validation of the model and the numerical scheme.

  12. PEG-albumin supraplasma expansion is due to increased vessel wall shear stress induced by blood viscosity shear thinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Krishna; Tsai, Amy G; Cabrales, Pedro; Meng, Fantao; Acharya, Seetharama A; Tartakovsky, Daniel M; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2012-06-15

    We studied the extreme hemodilution to a hematocrit of 11% induced by three plasma expanders: polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated albumin (PEG-Alb), 6% 70-kDa dextran, and 6% 500-kDa dextran. The experimental component of our study relied on microelectrodes and cardiac output to measure both the rheological properties of plasma-expander blood mixtures and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in vessel walls. The modeling component consisted of an analysis of the distribution of wall shear stress (WSS) in the microvessels. Our experiments demonstrated that plasma expansion with PEG-Alb caused a state of supraperfusion with cardiac output 40% above baseline, significantly increased NO vessel wall bioavailability, and lowered peripheral vascular resistance. We attributed this behavior to the shear thinning nature of blood and PEG-Alb mixtures. To substantiate this hypothesis, we developed a mathematical model of non-Newtonian blood flow in a vessel. Our model used the Quemada rheological constitutive relationship to express blood viscosity in terms of both hematocrit and shear rate. The model revealed that the net effect of the hemodilution induced by relatively low-viscosity shear thinning PEG-Alb plasma expanders is to reduce overall blood viscosity and to increase the WSS, thus intensifying endothelial NO production. These changes act synergistically, significantly increasing cardiac output and perfusion due to lowered overall peripheral vascular resistance.

  13. Anisotropic shear viscosity of a strongly coupled non-Abelian plasma from magnetic branes

    CERN Document Server

    Critelli, R; Zaniboni, M; Noronha, J

    2014-01-01

    Recent estimates for the electromagnetic fields produced in the early stages of non-central ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions indicate the presence of magnetic fields $B\\sim \\mathcal{O}(0.1-15\\,m_\\pi^2)$, where $m_\\pi$ is the pion mass. It is then of special interest to study the effects of strong (Abelian) magnetic fields on the transport coefficients of strongly coupled non-Abelian plasmas, such as the quark-gluon plasma formed in heavy ion collisions. In this work we study the anisotropy in the shear viscosity induced by an external magnetic field in a strongly coupled $\\mathcal{N} = 4$ SYM plasma. Due to the spatial anisotropy created by the magnetic field, the most general viscosity tensor has 5 shear viscosity coefficients and 2 bulk viscosities. We use the holographic correspondence to evaluate two of the shear viscosities, $\\eta_{\\perp} \\equiv \\eta_{xyxy}$ (perpendicular to the magnetic field) and $\\eta_{\\parallel} \\equiv \\eta_{xzxz}=\\eta_{yzyz}$ (parallel to the field). When $B\

  14. Diffusion Constant and Shear Viscosity in the Charged 3D Hairy Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Jalil

    2014-06-01

    A charged hairy black hole in 3 dimensions considered to study hydrodynamics. Specially, we calculate diffusion constant and obtain the effect of black hole electric charge and scalar charge on it. This parameter help us to obtain information about black hole and will be useful to study shear viscosity of dual picture by using AdS/CFT.

  15. Shear viscosity of pionic and nucleonic components from their different possible mesonic and baryonic thermal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi, E-mail: sabyaphy@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Teorica

    2015-12-15

    Owing to the Kubo relation, the shear viscosities of pionic and nucleonic components have been evaluated from their corresponding retarded correlators of viscous stress tensor in the static limit, which become non-divergent only for the non-zero thermal widths of the constituent particles. In the real-time thermal field theory, the pion and nucleon thermal widths have respectively been obtained from the pion self-energy for different meson, baryon loops, and the nucleon self-energy for different pion-baryon loops. We have found non-monotonic momentum distributions of pion and nucleon thermal widths, which have been integrated out by their respective Bose-enhanced and Pauli-blocked phase space factors during evaluation of their shear viscosities. The viscosity to entropy density ratio for this mixed gas of pion-nucleon system decreases and approaches its lower bound as the temperature and baryon chemical potential increase within the relevant domain of hadronic matter. (author)

  16. Shear viscosity and spin-diffusion coefficient of a two-dimensional Fermi gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Using kinetic theory, we calculate the shear viscosity and the spin-diffusion coefficient as well as the associated relaxation times for a two-component Fermi gas in two dimensions, as a function of temperature, coupling strength, polarization, and mass ratio of the two components. It is demonstr......Using kinetic theory, we calculate the shear viscosity and the spin-diffusion coefficient as well as the associated relaxation times for a two-component Fermi gas in two dimensions, as a function of temperature, coupling strength, polarization, and mass ratio of the two components....... It is demonstrated that the minimum value of the viscosity decreases with the mass ratio, since Fermi blocking becomes less efficient. We furthermore analyze recent experimental results for the quadrupole mode of a two-dimensional gas in terms of viscous damping, obtaining a qualitative agreement using no fitting...

  17. Shear wave dispersion ultrasonic vibrometry for measuring prostate shear stiffness and viscosity: an in vitro pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G; Urban, M W; Fatemi, M; Greenleaf, J F

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports shear stiffness and viscosity "virtual biopsy" measurements of the three excised noncancerous human prostates using a new tool known as shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) in vitro. Improved methods for prostate guided-biopsy are required to effectively guide needle biopsy to the suspected site. In addition, tissue stiffness measurement helps in identifying a suspected site to perform biopsy because stiffness has been shown to correlate with pathologies, such as cancerous tissue. More importantly, early detection of prostate cancer may guide minimally invasive therapy and eliminate insidious procedures. In this paper, "virtual biopsies" were taken in multiple locations in three excised prostates; SDUV shear elasticity and viscosity measurements were performed at the selected "suspicious" locations within the prostates. SDUV measurements of prostate elasticity and viscosity are generally in agreement with preliminary values previously reported in the literature. It is, however, important to emphasize here that the obtained viscoelastic parameters values are local, and not a mean value for the whole prostate.

  18. Near-surface viscosity effects on capillary rise of water in nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Truong Quoc; Barisik, Murat; Kim, BoHung

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present an approach for predicting nanoscale capillary imbibitions using the Lucas-Washburn (LW) theory. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the effects of surface forces on the viscosity of liquid water. This provides an update to the modified LW equation that considered only a nanoscale slip length. An initial water nanodroplet study was performed to properly elucidate the wetting behavior of copper and gold surfaces. Intermolecular interaction strengths between water and corresponding solid surfaces were determined by matching the contact angle values obtained by experimental measurements. The migration of liquid water into copper and gold capillaries was measured by MD simulations and was found to differ from the modified LW equation. We found that the liquid layering in the vicinity of the solid surface induces a higher density and viscosity, leading to a slower MD uptake of fluid into the capillaries than was theoretically predicted. The near-surface viscosity for the nanoscale-confined water was defined and calculated for the thin film of water that was sheared between the two solid surfaces, as the ratio of water shear stress to the applied shear rate. Considering the effects of both the interface viscosity and slip length of the fluid, we successfully predicted the MD-measured fluid rise in the nanotubes.

  19. Low temperatures shear viscosity of a two-component dipolar Fermi gas with unequal population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsheshdar, E.; Yavari, H.; Zangeneh, Z.

    2016-07-01

    By using the Green's functions method and linear response theory we calculate the shear viscosity of a two-component dipolar Fermi gas with population imbalance (spin polarized) in the low temperatures limit. In the strong-coupling Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) region where a Feshbach resonance gives rise to tightly bound dimer molecules, a spin-polarized Fermi superfluid reduces to a simple Bose-Fermi mixture of Bose-condensed dimers and the leftover unpaired fermions (atoms). The interactions between dimer-atom, dimer-dimer, and atom-atom take into account to the viscous relaxation time (τη) . By evaluating the self-energies in the ladder approximation we determine the relaxation times due to dimer-atom (τDA) , dimer-dimer (τcDD ,τdDD) , and atom-atom (τAA) interactions. We will show that relaxation rates due to these interactions τDA-1 ,τcDD-1, τdDD-1, and τAA-1 have T2, T4, e - E /kB T (E is the spectrum of the dimer atoms), and T 3 / 2 behavior respectively in the low temperature limit (T → 0) and consequently, the atom-atom interaction plays the dominant role in the shear viscosity in this rang of temperatures. For small polarization (τDA ,τAA ≫τcDD ,τdDD), the low temperatures shear viscosity is determined by contact interaction between dimers and the shear viscosity varies as T-5 which has the same behavior as the viscosity of other superfluid systems such as superfluid neutron stars, and liquid helium.

  20. Measurement of the viscosity-density product using multiple reflections of ultrasonic shear horizontal waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Margaret S; Adamson, Justus D; Bond, Leonard J

    2006-12-22

    We have developed an on-line computer-controlled sensor, based on ultrasound reflection measurements, to determine the product of the viscosity and density of a liquid or slurry for Newtonian fluids and the shear impedance of the liquid for non-Newtonian fluids. A 14 MHz shear wave transducer is bonded to one side of a 45-90 degrees fused silica wedge and the base is in contract with the liquid. Twenty-eight echoes were observed due to the multiple reflections of an ultrasonic shear horizontal (SH) wave within the wedge. The fast Fourier transform of each echo was obtained for a liquid and for water, which serves as the calibration fluid, and the reflection coefficient at the solid-liquid interface was obtained. Data were obtained for 11 sugar water solutions ranging in concentration from 10% to 66% by weight. The viscosity values are shown to be in good agreement with those obtained independently using a laboratory viscometer. The data acquisition time is 14s and this can be reduced by judicious selection of the echoes for determining the reflection coefficient. The measurement of the density results in a determination of the viscosity for Newtonian fluids or the shear wave velocity for non-Newtonian fluids. The sensor can be deployed for process control in a pipeline, with the base of the wedge as part of the pipeline wall, or immersed in a tank.

  1. Stress-strain curves of adsorbed protein layers at the air/water interface measured with surface shear rheology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, A.; Bos, M.; Stuart, M.C.; Vliet, T. van

    2002-01-01

    Interfacial shear properties of adsorbed protein layers at the air/water interface were determined using a Couette-type surface shear rheometer. Such experiments are often used to determine a steady-state ratio between stress and rate of strain, which is then denoted as "surface shear viscosity". Ho

  2. Dynamic analysis of polymeric fluid in shear flow for dumbbell model with internal viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓东; R.V.N.MELNIK

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic analysis of semi-flexible polymers,such as DNA molecules,is an important multiscale problem with a wide range of applications in science and bioengineering.In this contribution,a dumbbell model with internal viscosity was studied in steady shear flows of polymeric fluid.The tensors with moments other than second moment were approximated in the terms of second moment tensor.Then,the nonlinear algebraic equation of the second moment conformation tensor was calculated in closed form.Finally,substituting the resulting conformation tensor into the Kramers equation of Hookean spring force,the constitutive equations were obtained.The shear material properties were discussed for different internal viscosities and compared with the results of Brownian dynamics simulation.

  3. Analytical formulas for shear and bulk viscosities in relativistic gaseous mixtures with constant cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Moroz, O

    2014-01-01

    Using Mathematica package, we derive analytical closed-form expressions for the shear and the bulk viscosity coefficients in multicomponent relativistic gases with constant cross sections, being the relativistic generalization for the hard spheres model. Some of them are cumbersome and require symbolic manipulations in an algebraic package. The constant cross sections are of the elastic processes, while the inelastic (or number-changing) processes (collisions or decays) are considered only partly. As examples, we find explicit expressions of the correct single-component first-order shear viscosity coefficient and some explicit analytical results for the binary mixture. These formulas have numerous applications in approximate nonequilibrium descriptions of gases of particles or quasiparticles with averaged (temperature dependent) cross sections. In addition to this, we present formulas for collision rates and some other related formulas. This paper is a shortened version of a previous one.

  4. Correlation of shear and dielectric ion viscosity of dental resins - Influence of composition, temperature and filler content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Selig, Daniela; Duvenbeck, Fabian; Moeginger, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    Shear viscosity and ion viscosity of uncured visible light-curing (VLC) resins and resin based composites (RBC) are correlated with respect to the resin composition, temperature and filler content to check where Dielectric Analysis (DEA) investigations of VLC RBC generate similar results as viscosity measurements. Mixtures of bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) as well as the pure resins were investigated and compared with two commercial VLC dental resins and RBCs (VOCO, Arabesk Top and Grandio). Shear viscosity data was obtained using a Haake Mars III, Thermo Scientific. Ion viscosity measurements performed by a dielectric cure analyzer (DEA 231/1 Epsilon with Mini IDEX-Sensor, Netzsch-Gerätebau). Shear viscosity depends reciprocally on the mobility of molecules, whereas the ion viscosity also depends on the ion concentration as it is affected by both ion concentration and mixture viscosity. Except of pure TEGDMA, shear and ion viscosities depend on the resin composition qualitatively in a similar manner. Furthermore, shear and ion viscosities of the commercial VLC dental resins and composites exhibited the same temperature dependency regardless of filler content. Application of typical rheological models (Kitano and Quemada) revealed that ion viscosity measurements can be described with respect to filler contents of up to 30vol.%. Rheological behavior of a VLC RBC can be characterized by DEA under the condition that the ion concentration is kept constant. Both methods address the same physical phenomenon - motion of molecules. The proposed relations allows for calculating the viscosity of any Bis-GMA-TEGDMA mixture on the base of the viscosities of the pure components. This study demonstrated the applicability of DEA investigations of VLC RBCs with respect to quality assurance purposes. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Accurate Determination of the Shear Viscosity of the One-Component Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Daligault, Jerome; Baalrud, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    The shear viscosity coefficient of the one-component plasma is calculated with unprecedented accuracy using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and the Green-Kubo relation. Numerical and statistical uncertainties and their mitigation for improving accuracy are analyzed. In the weakly coupled regime, our the results agree with the Landau-Spitzer prediction. In the moderately and strongly coupled regimes, our results are found in good agreement with recent results obtained for the Yukawa one-component plasma using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics. A practical formula is provided for evaluating the viscosity coefficient across coupling regimes, from the weakly-coupled regime up to solidification threshold. The results are used to test theoretical predictions of the viscosity coefficients found in the literature.

  6. Computing bulk and shear viscosities from simulations of fluids with dissipative and stochastic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gerhard; Schmid, Friederike

    2016-05-28

    Exact values for bulk and shear viscosity are important to characterize a fluid, and they are a necessary input for a continuum description. Here we present two novel methods to compute bulk viscosities by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of steady-state systems with periodic boundary conditions - one based on frequent particle displacements and one based on the application of external bulk forces with an inhomogeneous force profile. In equilibrium simulations, viscosities can be determined from the stress tensor fluctuations via Green-Kubo relations; however, the correct incorporation of random and dissipative forces is not obvious. We discuss different expressions proposed in the literature and test them at the example of a dissipative particle dynamics fluid.

  7. The Shear Viscosity to Entropy Density Ratio of Trapped Fermions in the Unitarity Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We extract the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio \\eta/s of cold fermionic atoms in the unitarity limit from experimental data on the damping of collective excitations. We find that near the critical temperature \\eta/s is roughly equal to 1/2 in units of \\hbar/k_B. With the possible exception of the quark gluon plasma, this value is closer to the conjectured lower bound 1/(4\\pi) than any other known liquid.

  8. Towards precise calculation of transport coefficients in the hadron gas. The shear and the bulk viscosities

    CERN Document Server

    Moroz, Oleg N

    2011-01-01

    The shear and the bulk viscosities of the hadron gas at low temperatures are studied in the model with constant elastic cross sections being relativistic generalization of the hard spheres model. One effective radius ${r=0.4 fm}$ is chosen for all elastic collisions. Only elastic collisions are considered which are supposed to be dominant at temperatures ${T\\leq 120-140 MeV}$. The calculations are done in the framework of the Boltzmann equation with the Boltzmann statistics distribution functions and the ideal gas equation of state. The applicability of these approximations is discussed. It's found that the bulk viscosity of the hadron gas is much larger than the bulk viscosity of the pion gas while the shear viscosity is found to be less sensitive to the mass spectrum of hadrons. The constant cross sections and the Boltzmann statistics approximation allows one not only to conduct precise numerical calculations of transport coefficients in the hadron gas but also to obtain some relatively simple relativistic ...

  9. Influence of shear viscosity of quark-gluon plasma on elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, H; Denicol, G S; Huovinen, P; Molnár, E; Rischke, D H

    2011-05-27

    We investigate the influence of a temperature-dependent shear viscosity over entropy density ratio η/s on the transverse momentum spectra and elliptic flow of hadrons in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We find that the elliptic flow in √S(NN)=200  GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC is dominated by the viscosity in the hadronic phase and in the phase transition region, but largely insensitive to the viscosity of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). At the highest LHC energy, the elliptic flow becomes sensitive to the QGP viscosity and insensitive to the hadronic viscosity.

  10. The Measurement of Wall Shear Stress in the Low-Viscosity Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamec J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on quantitative evaluation of the value of the wall shear stress in liquids with low viscosity by means of the method of the hot film anemometry in a laminar and turbulent flow. Two systems for calibration of probes are described in the paper. The first of these uses an innovative method of probe calibration using a known flow in a cylindrical gap between two concentric cylinders where the inner cylinder is rotated and a known velocity profile and shear rate, or shear stress profile, is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations. This method is usable for lower values of the wall shear stress, particularly in the areas of laminar flow. The second method is based on direct calibration of the probes using a floating element. This element, with a size of 120x80 mm, is part of a rectangular channel. This method of calibration enables the probe calibration at higher shear rates and is applicable also to turbulent flow. Values obtained from both calibration methods are also compared with results of measurements of the wall shear stress in a straight smooth channel for a certain range of Reynolds numbers and compared with analytical calculations. The accuracy of the method and the influence of various parasitic phenomena on the accuracy of the measured results were discussed. The paper describes in particular the influence of geometric purity of the probe location, the impact of various transfer phenomena, requirements for the measured liquid and layout of the experiment.

  11. Pressure-dependent surface viscosity and its surprising consequences in interfacial lubrication flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikantan, Harishankar; Squires, Todd M.

    2017-02-01

    The surface shear rheology of many insoluble surfactants depends strongly on the surface pressure (or concentration) of that surfactant. Here we highlight the dramatic consequences that surface-pressure-dependent surface viscosities have on interfacially dominant flows, by considering lubrication-style geometries within high Boussinesq (Bo) number flows. As with three-dimensional lubrication, high-Bo surfactant flows through thin gaps give high surface pressures, which in turn increase the local surface viscosity, further amplifying lubrication stresses and surface pressures. Despite their strong nonlinearity, the governing equations are separable, so that results from two-dimensional Newtonian lubrication analyses may be immediately adapted to treat surfactant monolayers with a general functional form of ηs(Π ) . Three paradigmatic systems are analyzed to reveal qualitatively new features: a maximum, self-limiting value for surfactant fluxes and particle migration velocities appears for Π -thickening surfactants, and kinematic reversibility is broken for the journal bearing and for suspensions more generally.

  12. Comment on ``Use of the McQuarrie equation for the computation of shear viscosity via equilibrium molecular dynamics''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael P.; Brown, David; Masters, Andrew J.

    1994-03-01

    In a recent paper, Chialvo and Debenedetti [Phys. Rev. A 43, 4289 (1991)] consider single-particle and collective expressions due, respectively, to McQuarrie [Statistical Mechanics (Harper and Row, New York, 1976)] and Helfand [Phys. Rev. 119, 1 (1960)] for the calculation of shear viscosities in molecular-dynamics simulations. We point out an error in the discussion of origin independence in this paper, and show that the prescriptions set out in it are not related to the shear viscosity.

  13. Spray pattern and droplet size analyses for high-shear viscosity determination of aqueous suspension corticosteroid nasal sprays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Justin; Pandey, Preetanshu; Tat, Henry; Willson, Jennifer; Donovan, Brent

    2008-09-01

    Aqueous suspension corticosteroid nasal sprays exhibit the rheological property of shear thinning, meaning they exhibit a decrease in viscosity upon application of shear. Most rheological methods are limited in the amount of shear that can be applied to samples (approximately 1,000 s(-1)) and thus can only approximate the viscosities at the high-shear conditions of nasal spray devices (approximately 10(5)-10(6) s(-1)). In the current work, spray area and droplet size were shown to demonstrate viscosity dependence. Three Newtonian fluids were used to determine equations to approximate viscosity at the spray nozzle from correlations to spray area and droplet size using a standard 100 microL Pfeiffer nasal spray pump. Several shear-thinning solutions, including four commercial aqueous suspension corticosteroid nasal sprays and three aqueous Avicel (1, 2, and 3%, wt/wt) samples, were analyzed to demonstrate the ability of spray area and droplet size analysis to estimate high-shear viscosities. The calculated viscosity values trend in accordance with the rheometer data along with the ability to distinguish differences between all samples analyzed.

  14. Shear Viscosity to Entropy Density Ratio in Higher Derivative Gravity with Momentum Dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yi-Li

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that there is a new bound for the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio that reads $\\eta/s\\gtrsim (T/\\Delta)^2$ as $T/\\Delta\\to 0$, where $\\Delta$ is a scale present in the zero temperature IR theory. In this paper, we investigate $\\eta/s$ in linear scalar fields modified Gauss-Bonnet theory that breaks translation invariance. We first calculate $\\eta/s$ both analytically and numerically and show its relationship with temperature in log-log plot. Our results are in good agreement with the new viscosity bound above. The causality is also considered in this work. We then find that there will be no causality violation if the linear scalar field is added and hence the constraint for the Gauss-Bonnet coupling $\\lambda$ vanishes.

  15. Ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density in multifragmentation of Au + Au

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, C. L; Ma, Y. G.; Fang, D. Q.; Li, S.X.; G.Q. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The ratio of the shear viscosity ($\\eta$) to entropy density ($s$) for the intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions has been calculated by using the Green-Kubo method in the framework of the quantum molecular dynamics model. The theoretical curve of $\\eta/s$ as a function of the incident energy for the head-on Au+Au collisions displays that a minimum region of $\\eta/s$ has been approached at higher incident energies, where the minimum $\\eta/s$ value is about 7 times Kovtun-Son- Starinets (KSS...

  16. Power Law of Shear Viscosity in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion model

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, Yi; Zhou, Zhenhua

    2016-01-01

    We construct charged black hole solutions with hyperscaling violation in the infrared(IR) region in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion theory and investigate the temperature behavior of the ratio of holographic shear viscosity to the entropy density. When translational symmetry breaking is relevant in the IR, the power law of the ratio is testified numerically at low temperature $T$, namely, $\\eta/s\\sim T^\\kappa$, where the values of exponent $\\kappa$ coincide with the analytical results. We also find that the exponent $\\kappa$ is not affected by irrelevant current, but is reduced by the relevant current.

  17. Shear viscosity $\\eta$ to electric conductivity $\\sigma_{el}$ ratio for the Quark-Gluon Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Puglisi, A.; Plumari, S.; Greco, V.

    2014-01-01

    The transport coefficients of strongly interacting matter are currently subject of intense theoretical and phenomenological studies due to their relevance for the characterization of the quark-gluon plasma produced in ultra relativistic heavy-ion collisions (uRHIC). We discuss the connection between the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\eta/s$, and the electric conductivity, $\\sigma_{el}$. Once the relaxation time is tuned to have a minimum value of $\\eta/s=1/4\\pi$ near the critical...

  18. Nonperturbative calculation of the shear viscosity in hot $\\phi^{4}$ theory in real time

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, E; Wang, Enke; Heinz, Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    Starting from the Kubo formula we calculate the shear viscosity in hot phi**4 theory nonperturbatively by resumming ladders with a real-time version of the Bethe-Salpeter equation at finite temperature. In the weak coupling limit, the generalized Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem is shown to decouple the Bethe-Salpeter equations for the different real-time components of the 4-point function. The resulting scalar integral equation is identical with the one obtained by Jeon using diagrammatic ``cutting rules'' in the Imaginary Time Formalism.

  19. Measurement on Effective Shear Viscosity Coefficient of Iron under Shock Compression at 100 GPa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yi-Lei; LIU Fu-Sheng; ZHANG Ming-Jian; MA Xiao-Juan; LI Ying-Lei; ZHANG Ji-Chun

    2009-01-01

    The oscillatory damping curve of a shock front propagating in iron shocked to 103 GPa is measured by use of two-stage light-gas gun and electric pin techniques. The corresponding effective shear viscosity coefficient is deduced to be about 2000 Pa.s from Miller and Ahrens' formula.The result is consistent with that of Mineev's data at 31GPa,while it is higher by five orders than the predictions based on the static measurements at about 5 GPa and 2000K and molecular dynamic simulation up to 135-375 GPa and 4300-6000 K,and the discussions are presented.

  20. Shear viscosity to relaxation time ratio in SU(3) lattice gauge theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kohno, Yasuhiro; Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2011-01-01

    We evaluate the ratio of the shear viscosity to the relaxation time of the shear flux above but near the critical temperature $T_c$ in SU(3) gauge theory on the lattice. The ratio is related to Kubo's canonical correlation of the energy-momentum tensor in Euclidean space with the relaxation time approximation and an appropriate regularization. Using this relation, the ratio is evaluated by direct measurements of the Euclidean observables on the lattice. We obtained the ratio with reasonable statistics for the range of temperature $1.3T_c \\lesssim T \\lesssim 4T_c$. We also found that the characteristic speed of the transverse plane wave in gluon media is almost constant, $v \\simeq 0.5$, for $T \\gtrsim 1.5T_c$, which is compatible with the causality in the second order dissipative hydrodynamics.

  1. Thermodynamic scaling of the shear viscosity of Mie n-6 fluids and their binary mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delage-Santacreu, Stephanie [Laboratoire de Mathématiques et leurs Applications (UMR-5142 with CNRS), Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, BP 1155, F-64013 PAU Cedex (France); Galliero, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.galliero@univ-pau.fr; Hoang, Hai; Bazile, Jean-Patrick; Boned, Christian [Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes et leurs Reservoirs (UMR-5150 with CNRS and TOTAL), Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, BP 1155, F-64013 PAU Cedex (France); Fernandez, Josefa [Laboratorio de Propiedades Termofisicas, Universidade Santiago de Compostela, Campus Vida, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2015-05-07

    In this work, we have evaluated the applicability of the so-called thermodynamic scaling and the isomorph frame to describe the shear viscosity of Mie n-6 fluids of varying repulsive exponents (n = 8, 12, 18, 24, and 36). Furthermore, the effectiveness of the thermodynamic scaling to deal with binary mixtures of Mie n-6 fluids has been explored as well. To generate the viscosity database of these fluids, extensive non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for various thermodynamic conditions. Then, a systematic approach has been used to determine the gamma exponent value (γ) characteristic of the thermodynamic scaling approach for each system. In addition, the applicability of the isomorph theory with a density dependent gamma has been confirmed in pure fluids. In both pure fluids and mixtures, it has been found that the thermodynamic scaling with a constant gamma is sufficient to correlate the viscosity data on a large range of thermodynamic conditions covering liquid and supercritical states as long as the density is not too high. Interestingly, it has been obtained that, in pure fluids, the value of γ is directly proportional to the repulsive exponent of the Mie potential. Finally, it has been found that the value of γ in mixtures can be deduced from those of the pure component using a simple logarithmic mixing rule.

  2. Shear behavior of squalane and tetracosane under extreme confinement. III. Effect of confinement on viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, S.A.; Cochran, H.D.; Cummings, P.T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States)]|[Chemical Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6268 (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This study uses nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation to explore the rheology of confined liquid alkanes. Two alkanes that differ in molecular structural complexity are examined: tetracosane (C{sub 24}H{sub 50}), which is a linear alkane, and squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}), which has six symmetrically placed methyl branches along a 24 carbon backbone. These model lubricants are confined between model walls that have short chains tethered to them, thus screening the wall details. This paper, the third of a three part series, compares the viscosities of the confined fluids to those of the bulk fluids. The alkanes are described by a well-documented potential model that has been shown to reproduce bulk experimental viscosity and phase equilibria measurements. Details of the simulation method, and structural information can be found in the preceding two papers of this series. The measured strain rates in these simulations range between 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 11} s{sup {minus}1}, which is typical of a number of practical applications. The confined fluids undergo extensive shear thinning, showing a power-law behavior. Comparison of results for the confined fluid to those for the bulk fluid reveal that, for the conditions examined, there is no difference between the bulk and confined viscosities for these alkanes. This observation is in contrast to experimental results at much lower strain rates (10{endash}10{sup 5} s{sup {minus}1}), which indicate the viscosities of the confined fluid to be much larger than the bulk viscosities. In making the comparison, we have carefully accounted for slip at the wall and have performed simulations of the bulk fluid at the same conditions of strain rate, temperature, and pressure as for the corresponding confined fluid. The viscosity is found to be independent of the wall spacing. The calculated power-law exponents are similar to experimentally observed values. We also note that the exponent increases with increasing density of the

  3. Comment on ``Relationship between McQuarrie and Helfand equations for the determination of shear viscosity from equilibrium molecular dynamics''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael P.

    1994-10-01

    In a recent paper, Chialvo, Cummings, and Evans [Phys. Rev. E 47, 1702 (1993)] attempt to relate single-particle and collective expressions, due, respectively, to McQuarrie [Statistical Mechanics (Harper and Row, New York, 1976)] and Helfand [Phys. Rev. 119, 1 (1960)] for the calculation of shear viscosities in molecular dynamics simulations. We point out that their analysis does not correspond to the simulation algorithm they actually use, that the system-size dependence they derive and the extrapolation procedure they propose are incorrect, and that they have established no relation between their analysis and the shear viscosity. Our own analysis explains the simulation results in terms of the artificial way that periodic box boundary crossings are handled. We find no support for a link between the McQuarrie formula and any valid statistical mechanical expression for the shear viscosity.

  4. Relationship between McQuarrie and Helfand equations for the determination of shear viscosity from equilibrium molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chialvo, Ariel A.; Cummings, Peter T.; Evans, Denis J.

    1993-03-01

    A proof of the validity of the Chialvo-Debenedetti conjecture [Phys. Rev. A 43, 4289 (1991)], the crucial element to achieve an equivalence between the McQuarrie [Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1976)] and Helfand [Phys. Rev. 119, 1 (1960)] shear-viscosity equations, is presented here. Some theoretical consequences of that validity are also discussed, such as the unification of most shear-viscosity expressions into one given by Andrews for first-order transport coefficients [J. Chem. Phys. 47, 3161 (1967)]. The system-size dependence of the McQuarrie shear-viscosity values is analyzed and an extrapolation method is proposed and tested to determine the asymptotic values.

  5. Shear-viscosity-to-entropy-density ratio and phase transition in multifragmentation of quasiprojectile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Cheng; Wen, Pei-Wei [Beijing Normal University, The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing (China); Liu, Hang [Texas Advanced Computing Center University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States); Zhang, Feng-Shou [Beijing Normal University, The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing (China); National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, Lanzhou (China)

    2016-09-15

    Heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energy are studied by the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model in the company of the GEMINI model. The present study mainly focuses on the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter. We calculate the shear-viscosity-to-entropy-density ratio η/s, γ{sub 2} and the multiplicity of intermediate-mass fragment (M{sub IMF}) in finite-size nuclear sources. At excitation energy 8 MeV a minimum of η/s is found in the coexistence phase of intermediate-mass fragments and light particles. At similar excitation energy a maximum of the M{sub IMF} is also observed at the same density condition which is an indication of the liquid-gas phase transition. (orig.)

  6. Power law of shear viscosity in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yi; Xian, Zhuoyu; Zhou, Zhenhua

    2017-02-01

    We construct charged black hole solutions with hyperscaling violation in the infrared (IR) region in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion theory and investigate the temperature behavior of the ratio of holographic shear viscosity to the entropy density. When translational symmetry breaking is relevant in the IR, the power law of the ratio is verified numerically at low temperature T, namely, η/s ∼ T κ , where the values of exponent κ coincide with the analytical results. We also find that the exponent κ is not affected by irrelevant current, but is reduced by the relevant current. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275208, 11575195), Opening Project of Shanghai Key Laboratory of High Temperature Superconductors (14DZ2260700) and Jiangxi Young Scientists (JingGang Star) Program and 555 Talent Project of Jiangxi Province

  7. A critical analysis of the models connecting molecular mass distribution and shear viscosity functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastics having various short and long-chain branches, characterized by the melt index measured at the processing temperature – according to their average molecular mass – can be processed using universal principles, independently of their chemical composition. The average molecular mass is the result of a molecular mass distribution, being the fingerprint of the chemical synthetic technology. The actual shape of the shear viscosity function aiming at the quantitative characterization of viscous flow, containing material-dependent parameters, depends on the ratio of high and low molecular mass fractions, the width of the molecular mass distribution function and on the number of short and long chain branches. This publication deals with the critical analysis of the mathematical methods of transforming these two curves of basic importance into each other.

  8. Sheared E×B flow and plasma turbulence viscosity in a Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Regnoli, G.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The relationship between electromagnetic turbulence and sheared plasma flow in Reversed Field Pinch configuration is addressed. The momentum balance equation for a compressible plasma is considered and the terms involved are measured in the outer region of Extrap-T2R RFP device. It results that electrostatic fluctuations determine the plasma flow through the electrostatic component of Reynolds Stress tensor. This term involves spatial and temporal scales comparable to those of MHD activity. The derived experimental perpendicular viscosity is consistent with anomalous diffusion, the latter being discussed in terms of electrostatic turbulence background and coherent structures emerging from fluctuations. The results indicate a dynamical interplay between turbulence, anomalous transport and mean E×B profiles. The momentum balance has been studied also in non-stationary condition during the application of Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive, which is known to reduce the amplitude of MHD modes.

  9. Measurement of viscosity and shear wave velocity of a liquid or slurry for on-line process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Margaret Stautberg; Bamberger, Judith Ann

    2002-08-01

    An on-line sensor to measure the density of a liquid or slurry, based on longitudinal wave reflection at the solid-fluid interface, has been developed by the staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of this research is to employ shear wave reflection at the solid-fluid interface to provide an on-line measurement of viscosity as well. Both measurements are of great interest for process control in many industries. Shear wave reflection measurements were conducted for a variety of liquids. By analyzing multiple reflections within the solid (only 0.63 cm thick-similar to pipe wall thickness) we increased the sensitivity of the measurement. At the sixth echo, sensitivity was increased sufficiently and this echo was used for fluid interrogation. Shear wave propagation of ultrasound in liquids is dependent upon the viscosity and the shear modulus. The data are analyzed using the theory for light liquids (such as water and sugar water solutions) and also using the theory for highly viscous liquids (such as silicone oils). The results show that, for light liquids, the shear wave reflection measurements interrogate the viscosity. However, for highly viscous liquids, it is the shear wave modulus that dominates the shear wave reflection. Since the density is known, the shear wave velocity in the liquid can be determined from the shear wave modulus. The results show that shear wave velocities in silicone oils are very small and range from 315 to 2389 cm/s. Shear wave reflection measurements are perhaps the only way that shear wave velocity in liquids can be determined, because the shear waves in liquids are highly attenuated. These results show that, depending on the fluid characteristics, either the viscosity or the shear wave velocity can be used for process control. There are several novel features of this sensor: (1) The sensor can be mounted as part of the wall of a pipeline or tank or submerged in a tank. (2) The sensor is very compact and can be

  10. Surface tension, viscosity, and rheology of water-based nanofluids: a microscopic interpretation on the molecular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gui; Duan, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Dong

    2014-09-01

    Nanofluids are suspensions of nanometer-sized particles which significantly modify the properties of the base fluids. Nanofluids exhibit attractive properties, such as high thermal conductivity, tunable surface tension, viscosity, and rheology. Various attempts have been made to understand the mechanisms for these property modifications caused by adding nanoparticles; however, due to the lack of direct nanoscale evidence, these explanations are still controversial. This work calculated the surface tension, viscosity, and rheology of gold-water nanofluids using molecular dynamics simulations which provide a microscopic interpretation for the modified properties on the molecular level. The gold-water interaction potential parameters were changed to mimic various nanoparticle types. The results show that the nanoparticle wettability is responsible for the modified surface tension. Hydrophobic nanoparticles always tend to stay on the free surface so they behave like a surfactant to reduce the surface tension. Hydrophilic nanoparticles immersed into the bulk fluid impose strong attractive forces on the water molecules at the free surface which reduces the free surface thickness and increases the surface tension of the nanofluid. Solid-like absorbed water layers were observed around the nanoparticles which increase the equivalent nanoparticle radius and reduce the mobility of the nanoparticles within the base fluid which increases the nanofluid viscosity. The results show the water molecule solidification between two or many nanoparticles at high nanoparticle loadings, but the solidification effect is suppressed for shear rates greater than a critical shear rate; thus Newtonian nanofluids can present shear-thinning non-Newtonian behavior.

  11. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danov, K.D.; Kralchevsky, P.A.; Radulova, G.M.; Basheva, E.S.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Pelan, E.G.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, Esh and ¿sh,

  12. Thermodynamic properties and shear viscosity over entropy density ratio of nuclear fireball in a quantum-molecular dynamics model

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, C L; Fang, D Q; Zhang, G Q

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamic and transport properties of nuclear fireball created in the central region of heavy-ion collisions below 200 MeV/nucleon are investigated within the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamic (IQMD) model. These properties include time evolutions of the density, temperature, chemical potential, entropy density ($s$) and shear viscosity ($\\eta$) as well as density and temperature dependencies of the ratio of shear viscosity over entropy density ($\\eta/s$) etc. Based on the shear viscosity parametrization developed by Danilewicz and entropy density which is obtained by a generalized hot Thomas Fermi formalism, the ratio of shear viscosity over entropy density is calculated in the whole collision process as well as in the freeze-out stage. With the collision goes on, a transient minimal $\\eta/s$ with the value around 5/$4\\pi$ occurs in the largest compression stage. While, the relationship of $\\eta/s$ to tempertaure ($T$) in the freeze-out stage displays a local minimum which is about 9-10 times $...

  13. Effects of Shear Dependent Viscosity and Variable Thermal Conductivity on the Flow and Heat Transfer in a Slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Miao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the effects of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity on the heat transfer in the pressure-driven fully developed flow of a slurry (suspension between two horizontal flat plates. The fluid is assumed to be described by a constitutive relation for a generalized second grade fluid where the shear viscosity is a function of the shear rate, temperature and concentration. The heat flux vector for the slurry is assumed to follow a generalized form of the Fourier’s equation where the thermal conductivity k depends on the temperature as well as the shear rate. We numerically solve the governing equations of motion in the non-dimensional form and perform a parametric study to see the effects of various dimensionless numbers on the velocity, volume fraction and temperature profiles. The different cases of shear thinning and thickening, and the effect of the exponent in the Reynolds viscosity model, for the temperature variation in viscosity, are also considered. The results indicate that the variable thermal conductivity can play an important role in controlling the temperature variation in the flow.

  14. Surface reproduction of elastomeric materials: viscosity and groove shape effects

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood, N.; Abu Kasim, N.H.; Azuddin, M.; Kasim, N.L. Abu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of viscosity and type of grooves on surface detail reproduction of elastomeric impression materials. Methods: Express putty/light-, Impregum medium- and heavy/light-bodied and Aquasil medium- and putty/light-bodied elastomeric impression materials were chosen for this study. Five impressions were made using a cylindrical aluminum reference block with U- and V- shaped grooves and to produce 35 master dies. Each master die was immersed in distilled water at 370...

  15. Influence of Liquid Viscosity on Droplet Impingement on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Pearson, John T; Webb, Brent W

    2010-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video describes droplet impingement experiments performed on superhydrophobic surfaces. When droplets of pure water are impinged upon superhydrophobic surfaces, a region of thin coherent jets are observed for Weber numbers between 5 and 15. Also, peripheral splashing is observed for Weber numbers above about 200. When the viscosity of the droplet is increased by mixing glycerol with the water, the thin jets are not observed and peripheral splashing is delayed somewhat. In the Weber number range where pure water droplets are observed to splash peripherally, the water/glycerol droplets are observed to have two-pronged jets.

  16. Temperature dependence of density, thermal expansion coefficient and shear viscosity of supercooled glycerol as a reflection of its structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazhnov, Ivan V; Malomuzh, Nikolay P; Lishchuk, Sergey V

    2004-10-01

    The relationship of the microstructure of supercooled, highly viscous glycerol to the temperature dependence of its density, thermal expansion coefficient, and shear viscosity are discussed. The character of this temperature dependence at the transition from low viscosity state to the solid amorphous state (solidified state without nuclei) is described with help of function psi, which can be interpreted as the effective number of degrees of freedom responsible for the change of viscosity of glycerol over a broad range; these degrees of freedom are those related to the alpha-relaxation process. It is shown that the change in effective activation energy of the viscosity is completely determined by the parameter psi. The change in the shear viscosity of glycerol due to the influence of the solid-phase nuclei is considered. It is shown that the introduction of the parameter phi, equal to the specific volume occupied by the nuclei of the solid phase, together with psi provides a natural explanation of the temperature dependence of density and thermal expansion coefficients of glycerol in its liquid, solid amorphous, glassy, and crystal states. The peculiarities of the temperature dependence of phi(T) and psi(T) for glycerol and o-terphenyl are compared.

  17. Thermal conductivity, shear and bulk viscosities for a relativistic binary mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moratto, Valdemar; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, we deal with a binary mixture of diluted relativistic gases within the framework of the kinetic theory. The analysis is made within the framework of the Boltzmann equation. We assume that the gas is under the influence of an isotropic Schwarzschild metric and is composed of particles with speeds comparable with the light speed. Taking into account the constitutive equations for the laws of Fourier and Navier-Stokes, we obtain expressions for the thermal conductivity, the shear, and bulk viscosities. To evaluate the integrals we assume a hard-sphere interaction along with non-disparate masses for the particles of each component. We show the analytical expressions and the behavior of the transport coefficients with respect to a relativistic parameter which gives the ratio of the rest energy of the particles to the thermal energy of the gas. We also determine the dependence of the transport coefficients with respect to the gravitational potential and demonstrate that the corresponding one component limit is recovered by considering particles with equal masses, in accordance with the kinetic theory of a single fluid.

  18. Shear viscosity of QGP and the anisotropic flows within an event by event transport approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plumari S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have employed a relativistic kinetic transport approach that incorporates initial state fluctuations to study the effect of a temperature dependent shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s(T on the build-up of the anisotropic flows υn(pT. We find that at LHC energies and for ultra-central collisions (0 – 0.2% the υn(pT have a stronger sensitivity to the T dependence of η/s in the QGP phase and this sensitivity increases with the order of the harmonic n. Moreover we have studied the correlation between the initial spatial anisotropies ϵn and the final flow coefficients 〈υn〉 for different centralities and for the two beam energies. The study shows that at LHC energies there is more correlation than at RHIC energies. In particular at LHC energies and for ultra-central collisions the linear correlation coefficient C(ϵn, υn ≈ 1 for n = 2, 3, 4 and 5 suggesting that the 〈υn〉 are strongly related to the initial value of ϵn.

  19. Shear viscosity η to electric conductivity σel ratio for the quark–gluon plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Puglisi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The transport coefficients of strongly interacting matter are currently subject of intense theoretical and phenomenological studies due to their relevance for the characterization of the quark–gluon plasma produced in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions (uRHIC. We discuss the connection between the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, η/s, and the electric conductivity, σel. Once the relaxation time is tuned to have a minimum value of η/s=1/4π near the critical temperature Tc, one simultaneously predicts σel/T very close to recent lQCD data. More generally, we discuss why the ratio of (η/s/(σel/T supplies a measure of the quark to gluon scattering rates whose knowledge would allow to significantly advance in the understanding of the QGP phase. We also predict that (η/s/(σel/T, independently on the running coupling αs(T, should increase up to about ∼20 for T→Tc, while it goes down to a nearly flat behavior around ≃4 for T≥4Tc. Therefore we in general predict a stronger T dependence of σel/T with respect to η/s that in a quasi-particle approach is constrained by lQCD thermodynamics. A conformal theory, instead, predicts a similar T dependence of η/s and σel/T.

  20. Vanishing viscosity as a selection principle for the Euler equations: The case of 3D shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Bardos, Claude; Wiedemann, Emil

    2012-01-01

    We show that for a certain family of initial data, there exist non-unique weak solutions to the 3D incompressible Euler equations satisfying the weak energy inequality, whereas the weak limit of every sequence of Leray-Hopf weak solutions for the Navier-Stokes equations, with the same initial data, and as the viscosity tends to zero, is uniquely determined and equals the shear flow solution of the Euler equations. This simple example suggests that, also in more general situations, the vanishing viscosity limit of the Navier-Stokes equations could serve as a uniqueness criterion for weak solutions of the Euler equations.

  1. The wall shear force on a liquid droplet adhering to a solid surface under an imposed shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabtay, Royi; Frankel, Itzchak

    2011-11-01

    We focus on large droplet viscosities typical of those appearing in the upper respiratory tract of CF or chronically ventilated patients. To further simplify the problem we assume vanishingly small capillary numbers and consider (non-deformable) hemispherical droplets. Under these assumptions the problem decouples into (i) the external problem of imposed shear flow over a planar solid wall with a hemispherical protuberance which is simulated by means of a commercially available finite - volume code and (ii) the inner Stokes flow animated by the now prescribed shear stress distribution over the liquid surface. The latter problem is addressed through use of series expansions in spherical harmonics. The interaction between the caterpillar inner - fluid motion and the solid substrate results in a shear force adding to the external - flow drag force acting in the downstream direction. Throughout the range of outer - flow Reynolds numbers considered (0.05-50) this interaction contributes over 35% of the total hydrodynamic force acting to dislodge the droplet.

  2. Calculation of the transport properties of carbon dioxide. I. Shear viscosity, viscomagnetic effects, and self-diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Steffen; Bich, Eckard; Vogel, Eckhard; Dickinson, Alan S.; Vesovic, Velisa

    2002-08-01

    Transport properties of pure carbon dioxide have been calculated from the intermolecular potential using the classical trajectory approach. Results are reported for shear viscosity, viscomagnetic coefficients, and self-diffusion in the dilute-gas limit and in the temperature range of 200-1500 K for the three recently proposed carbon dioxide potential energy hypersurfaces. Agreement with the measurements is, in general, within the experimental error. The calculations indicate that the corrections in the second-order approximation and those due to the angular-momentum polarization for the viscosity are small, Bukowski [et al.] potential energy hypersurface (1999) with the experimental viscosity data is consistent with the rigid-rotor assumption made in the calculations being reasonable for the three properties considered.

  3. Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasonic Vibrometry (SDUV) for measuring prostate shear stiffness and viscosity – An in vitro pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Mitri, F. G.; Urban, M.W.; Fatemi, M.; Greenleaf, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports shear stiffness and viscosity “virtual biopsy” measurements of three excised non-cancerous human prostates using shearwave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) in vitro. Improved methods for prostate guided-biopsy are required to effectively guide needle biopsy to the suspected site. In addition, tissue stiffness measurement helps identifying a suspected site to perform biopsy because stiffness has been shown to correlate with pathology. More importantly, early detection...

  4. Experimental study on the relationship between the frequency-dependent shear viscosity and the intermediate scattering function of representative viscous liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-11-01

    The frequency-dependent shear viscosity of two representative viscous liquids, o-terphenyl and glycerin, was experimentally determined at several temperatures and compared with the intermediate scattering functions reported in the literature. A comparison based on mode-coupling theory succeeded in relating the frequency-dependent shear viscosity with the intermediate scattering function at the main peak of the static structure factor. It suggests that the slow relaxation mode of the shear viscosity of both liquids is governed by the density fluctuation at the main peak of the static structure factor, in spite of the differences in the details of their intermolecular interactions.

  5. Use of the McQuarrie equation for the computation of shear viscosity via equilibrium molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chialvo, Ariel A.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    1991-04-01

    To date, the calculation of shear viscosity for soft-core fluids via equilibrium molecular dynamics has been done almost exclusively using the Green-Kubo formalism. The alternative mean-squared displacement approach has not been used, except for hard-sphere fluids, in which case the expression proposed by Helfand [Phys. Rev. 119, 1 (1960)] has invariably been selected. When written in the form given by McQuarrie [Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1976), Chap. 21], however, the mean-squared displacement approach offers significant computational advantages over both its Green-Kubo and Helfand counterparts. In order to achieve comparable statistical significance, the number of experiments needed when using the Green-Kubo or Helfand formalisms is more than an order of magnitude higher than for the McQuarrie expression. For pairwise-additive systems with zero linear momentum, the McQuarrie method yields frame-independent shear viscosities. The hitherto unexplored McQuarrie implementation of the mean-squared displacement approach to shear-viscosity calculation thus appears superior to alternative methods currently in use.

  6. Population-balance description of shear-induced clustering, gelation and suspension viscosity in sheared DLVO colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattuada, Marco; Zaccone, Alessio; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-06-28

    Application of shear flow to charge-stabilized aqueous colloidal suspensions is ubiquitous in industrial applications and as a means to achieve controlled field-induced assembly of nanoparticles. Yet, applying shear flow to a charge-stabilized colloidal suspension, which is initially monodisperse and in quasi-equilibrium leads to non-trivial clustering phenomena (and sometimes to a gelation transition), dominated by the complex interplay between DLVO interactions and shear flow. The quantitative understanding of these strongly nonequilibrium phenomena is still far from being complete. By taking advantage of a recent shear-induced aggregation rate theory developed in our group, we present here a systematic numerical study, based on the governing master kinetic equation (population-balance) for the shear-induced clustering and breakup of colloids exposed to shear flow. In the presence of sufficiently stable particles, the clustering kinetics is characterized by an initial very slow growth, controlled by repulsion. During this regime, particles are slowly aggregating to form clusters, the reactivity of which increases along with their size growth. When their size reaches a critical threshold, a very rapid, explosive-like growth follows, where shear forces are able to overcome the energy barrier between particles. This stage terminates when a dynamic balance between shear-induced aggregation and cluster breakage is reached. It is also observed that these systems are characterized by a cluster mass distribution that for a long time presents a well-defined bimodality. The model predictions are quantitatively in excellent agreement with available experimental data, showing how the theoretical picture is able to quantitatively account for the underlying nonequilibrum physics.

  7. Population-balance description of shear-induced clustering, gelation and suspension viscosity in sheared DLVO colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattuada, Marco; Zaccone, Alessio; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    Application of shear flow to charge-stabilized aqueous colloidal suspensions is ubiquitous in industrial applications and as a means to achieve controlled field-induced assembly of nanoparticles. Yet, applying shear flow to a charge-stabilized colloidal suspension, which is initially monodisperse and in quasi-equilibrium leads to non-trivial clustering phenomena (and sometimes to a gelation transition), dominated by the complex interplay between DLVO interactions and shear flow. The quantitative understanding of these strongly nonequilibrium phenomena is still far from being complete. By taking advantage of a recent shear-induced aggregation rate theory developed in our group, we present here a systematic numerical study, based on the governing master kinetic equation (population-balance) for the shear-induced clustering and breakup of colloids exposed to shear flow. In the presence of sufficiently stable particles, the clustering kinetics is characterized by an initial very slow growth, controlled by repulsion. During this regime, particles are slowly aggregating to form clusters, the reactivity of which increases along with their size growth. When their size reaches a critical threshold, a very rapid, explosive-like growth follows, where shear forces are able to overcome the energy barrier between particles. This stage terminates when a dynamic balance between shear-induced aggregation and cluster breakage is reached. It is also observed that these systems are characterized by a cluster mass distribution that for a long time presents a well-defined bimodality. The model predictions are quantitatively in excellent agreement with available experimental data, showing how the theoretical picture is able to quantitatively account for the underlying nonequilibrum physics.

  8. Shear viscosity of a two-dimensional emulsion of drops using a multiple-relaxation-time-step lattice Boltzmann method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, I; Xu, X; Burgin, K

    2017-02-01

    An extended Benzi-Dellar lattice Boltzmann equation scheme [R. Benzi, S. Succi, and M. Vergassola, Europhys. Lett. 13, 727 (1990)EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/13/8/010; R. Benzi, S. Succi, and M. Vergassola, Phys. Rep. 222, 145 (1992)PRPLCM0370-157310.1016/0370-1573(92)90090-M; P. J. Dellar, Phys. Rev. E 65, 036309 (2002)1063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.65.036309] is developed and applied to the problem of confirming, at low Re and drop fluid concentration, c, the variation of effective shear viscosity, η_{eff}=η_{1}[1+f(η_{1},η_{2})c], with respect to c for a sheared, two-dimensional, initially crystalline emulsion [here η_{1} (η_{2}) is the fluid (drop fluid) shear viscosity]. Data obtained with our enhanced multicomponent lattice Boltzmann method, using average shear stress and hydrodynamic dissipation, agree well once appropriate corrections to Landau's volume average shear stress [L. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Fluid Mechanics, 6th ed. (Pergamon, London, 1966)] are applied. Simulation results also confirm the expected form for f(η_{i},η_{2}), and they provide a reasonable estimate of its parameters. Most significantly, perhaps, the generality of our data supports the validity of Taylor's disputed simplification [G. I. Taylor, Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 138, 133 (1932)1364-502110.1098/rspa.1932.0175] to reduce the effect of one hydrodynamic boundary condition (on the continuity of the normal contraction of stress) to an assumption that interfacial tension is sufficiently strong to maintain a spherical drop shape.

  9. Shear viscosity of a two-dimensional emulsion of drops using a multiple-relaxation-time-step lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, I.; Xu, X.; Burgin, K.

    2017-02-01

    An extended Benzi-Dellar lattice Boltzmann equation scheme [R. Benzi, S. Succi, and M. Vergassola, Europhys. Lett. 13, 727 (1990), 10.1209/0295-5075/13/8/010; R. Benzi, S. Succi, and M. Vergassola, Phys. Rep. 222, 145 (1992), 10.1016/0370-1573(92)90090-M; P. J. Dellar, Phys. Rev. E 65, 036309 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevE.65.036309] is developed and applied to the problem of confirming, at low Re and drop fluid concentration, c , the variation of effective shear viscosity, ηeff=η1[1 +f (η1,η2) c ] , with respect to c for a sheared, two-dimensional, initially crystalline emulsion [here η1 (η2) is the fluid (drop fluid) shear viscosity]. Data obtained with our enhanced multicomponent lattice Boltzmann method, using average shear stress and hydrodynamic dissipation, agree well once appropriate corrections to Landau's volume average shear stress [L. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Fluid Mechanics, 6th ed. (Pergamon, London, 1966)] are applied. Simulation results also confirm the expected form for f (ηi,η2) , and they provide a reasonable estimate of its parameters. Most significantly, perhaps, the generality of our data supports the validity of Taylor's disputed simplification [G. I. Taylor, Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 138, 133 (1932), 10.1098/rspa.1932.0175] to reduce the effect of one hydrodynamic boundary condition (on the continuity of the normal contraction of stress) to an assumption that interfacial tension is sufficiently strong to maintain a spherical drop shape.

  10. Pressure-dependent surface viscosity and its surprising consequences in interfacial flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikantan, Harishankar; Squires, Todd

    2016-11-01

    The surface shear viscosity of a surfactant monolayer almost always depends strongly on surface pressure, and this oft-ignored rheological feature significantly alters fluid flow and dynamics of particles on the interface. In order to illustrate the qualitatively new phenomena that arise out of pressure-dependent rheology, we focus here on a series of analytically tractable yet paradigmatic examples of lubrication geometries. Thin-gap flows naturally amplify pressure changes, and thus exemplify the effects of pressure-dependent viscosity. We show that much of the mathematical machinery from Newtonian lubrication analyses can be modified in a relatively straightforward manner in such systems. Our analysis reveals novel features such as a self-limiting flux when a surfactant is pumped through a narrow channel, a maximum approach velocity in squeeze flows due to divergent inter-particle forces, and forces perpendicular to the direction of motion that breaks symmetries associated with Newtonian analogs. We discuss the broader implications of these phenomena, especially with regard to interfacial suspension mechanics for which these lubrication geometries provide a convenient limit.

  11. The effect of shear and extensional viscosities on atomization of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids in ultrasonic inhaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniarz-Press, L; Sosnowski, T R; Matuszak, M; Ochowiak, M; Jabłczyńska, K

    2015-05-15

    The paper contains results of the experimental study on atomization process of aqueous solutions of glycerol and aqueous solutions of glycerol-polyacrylamide (Rokrysol WF1) in an ultrasonic inhaler. In experiments the different concentration aqueous solutions of glycerol and glycerol-polyacrylamide have been tested. The results have been obtained by the use of laser diffraction technique. The differences between characteristics of ultrasonic atomization for test liquids have been observed. The analysis of drop size histograms shows that the different sizes of drops have been formed during atomization process. The present study confirmed the previous reports which suggested that the drops size changes with the increase in viscosity of solution changes in spray characteristics were also observed. It has been shown that the shear and extensional viscosities affect the process of atomization.

  12. About a mechanism of the influence of shear stress for viscosity of the blood in vessels of small diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Лев Николаевич Катюхин

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed a physiological and experimentally confirmed explanation of Fåhraeus-Lindqvist-effect in capillaries using the profile analyses of osmotic deformability of red blood cells. It was shown the dose-dependent change of the erythrocytes deformability in the stage of isotropic spheres after forming artificial water pores (nystatin and occlusion (PbCl2 of available pores. The Sigma-effect reducing of hematocrit and viscosity in a shear flow of blood through the vessels of a small diameter was conditioned by the interchange of liquid phase between the erythrocyte and the plasma.

  13. Fractal Description of the Shearing-Surface of Tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bing-cheng; JING Chang; REN Zhao-hui; REN Li-yi

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the basic methods are introduced to calculate the fractal dimensions of the shearing surface of some tools. The fractal dimension of the shearing surface of experimental sampling is obtained and the fractal characteristics are also discussed. We can apply the fractal method to identify types of tools used by burglars and to do the job of individual recognition. New theories and methods are provided to measure and process the shearing surface profile of tools.

  14. Instability of a dissipative restricted non-static axial collapse with shear viscosity in f(R) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M.; Yousaf, Z., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk, E-mail: zeeshan.math@pu.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore-54590, Pakistan. (Pakistan)

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates stability regions for a non-static restricted class of axially symmetric geometry filled with anisotropic, heat radiating and shearing viscous fluid that collapses non-adiabatically. In this context, dynamical equations as well as collapse equation are constructed through perturbation scheme with f(R) = R+εR{sup 2} model. We then develop dynamical instability regions at Newtonian and post-Newtonian eras. It is concluded that pressure anisotropy and heat dissipation increases the instability regions of the collapsing system while shearing viscosity as well as f(R) dark sourced terms decrease them during collapse. Finally, we calculate our results under constant curvature condition and GR limit, i.e., f(R)→R.

  15. Holographic fluid with bulk viscosity, perturbation of pressure and energy density at finite cutoff surface in the Einstein gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Ning

    2014-01-01

    Using the gravity/fluid correspondence in our paper, we investigate the holographic fluid at finite cutoff surface in the Einstein gravity. After constructing the first order perturbative solution of the Schwarzschild-AdS black brane solution in the Einstein gravity, we focus on the stress-energy tensor of the dual fluid with transport coefficients at the finite cutoff surface. Besides the pressure and energy density of dual fluid are obtained, the shear viscosity is also obtained. The most important results are that we find that if we adopt different conditions to fix the undetermined parameters contained in the stress-energy tensor of the dual fluid, the pressure and energy density of the dual fluid can be perturbed. Particularly, the bulk viscosity of the dual fluid can also be given in this case.

  16. Role of viscosity and surface tension of zebrafish embryonic tissues in tissue flows during gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoetz, E. M.; Bacarian, T.; Steinberg, M. S.; Burdine, R. D.; Bialek, W.; Heisenberg, C. P.; Foty, R. A.; Julicher, F.

    2007-03-01

    At the onset of gastrulation in zebrafish, complex flows and cell movements occur, which are not well understood. Here, we study the material properties of zebrafish embryonic tissues which are important for the tissue dynamics. We found that these tissues behave viscoelastic and exhibit liquid-like properties on long time scales. They relax internal stress caused by compressive forces or, in the absence of external forces, round up and fuse into spheres to minimize their free surface. Quantitative differences in the adhesivity between different types of tissues result in their immiscibility and sorting behavior analogous to that of ordinary immiscible liquids. When mixed, cells segregate into discrete phases, and the position adopted correlates with differences in the aggregate surface tensions for these phases. Surface tensions were measured with a tissue surface tensiometer. Aggregates were compressed and their force response and shape were recorded as a function of time. From the analysis of the force-relaxation curves, we determined the surface tensions, relaxation times, tissue viscosities and shear moduli. Furthermore, by 4D-cell tracking, we measured kinetic parameters such as cell speed, directionality and persistence of cell movement.

  17. SU(3) Polyakov linear-sigma model: bulk and shear viscosity of QCD matter in finite magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser; Hussein, T M

    2016-01-01

    Due to off-center relativistic motion of the charged spectators and the local momentum-imbalance of the participants, a short-lived huge magnetic field is likely generated, especially in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. In determining the temperature dependence of bulk and shear viscosities of the QCD matter in vanishing and finite magnetic field, we utilize mean field approximation to the SU($3$) Polyakov linear-sigma model (PLSM). We compare between the results from two different approaches; Green-Kubo correlation and Boltzmann master equation with Chapman-Enskog expansion. We find that both approaches have almost identical results, especially in the hadron phase. In the temperature dependence of bulk and shear viscosities relative to thermal entropy at the critical temperature, there is a rapid decrease in the chiral phase-transition and in the critical temperature with increasing magnetic field. As the magnetic field strength increases, a peak appears at the critical temperature ($T_c$). This can be und...

  18. Local shear viscosity of strongly inhomogeneous dense fluids: from the hard-sphere to the Lennard-Jones fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Hai; Galliero, Guillaume

    2013-12-04

    This work aims at providing a tractable approach to model the local shear viscosity of strongly inhomogeneous dense fluids composed of spherical molecules, in which the density variations occur on molecular distance. The proposed scheme, which relies on the local density average model, has been applied to the quasi-hard-sphere, the Week-Chandler-Andersen and the Lennard-Jones fluids. A weight function has been developed to deal with the hard-sphere fluid given the specificities of momentum exchange. To extend the approach to the smoothly repulsive potential, we have taken into account that the non-local contributions to the viscosity due to the interactions of particles separated by a given distance are temperature dependent. Then, using a simple perturbation scheme, the approach is extended to the Lennard-Jones fluids. It is shown that the viscosity profiles of inhomogeneous dense fluids deduced from this approach are consistent with those directly computed by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. Non Existence of Shear in Bianchi Type-Ⅲ String Cosmological Models with Bulk Viscosity and Time-Dependent A Term

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. K. Tiwari; Sonia Sharma

    2011-01-01

    We study the non existence of shear in locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type-Ⅲ string cosmological models with bulk viscosity and variable cosmological term Λ. Exact solutions of the field equations are obtained by assuming the conditions: the bulk viscosity is proportional to the expansion scalar, ε ∝ θ, expansion scalar is proportional to shear scalar, θ ∝ σ, and Λ is proportional to the Hubble parameter. The coefficient of bulk viscosity is assumed to be a power function of mass density. The corresponding physical interpretations of the cosmological solutions are also discussed.%@@ We study the non existence of shear in locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type-M string cosmological models with bulk viscosity and variable cosmological term Λ.Exact solutions of the field equations are obtained by assuming the conditions: the bulk viscosity is proportional to the expansion scalar, ξ∝θ, expansion scalar is proportional to shear scalar, θ∝σ, and A is proportional to the Hubble parameter.The coefficient of bulk viscosity is assumed to be a power function of mass density.The corresponding physical interpretations of the cosmological solutions are also discussed.

  20. Prediction of viscosities and surface tensions of fuels using a new corresponding states model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queimada, A.J.; Rolo, L.I.; Caco, A.I.

    2006-01-01

    While some properties of diesels are cheap, easy and fast to measure, such as densities, others such as surface tensions and viscosities are expensive and time consuming. A new approach that uses some basic information such as densities to predict viscosities and surface tensions is here proposed...

  1. Absolute Viscosities of Vegetable Oils at Different Temperatures and Shear Rate Range of 64.5 to 4835 s−1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemuel M. Diamante

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to determine the effect of higher shear rates (64.5 to 4835 s−1 on the absolute viscosities of different vegetable oils at different temperatures (26 to 90°C. The absolute viscosities of the different vegetable oils were determined using a Lamy Viscometer RM100, a rotating viscometer with coaxial cylinder. The torque of each sample at different temperatures was recorded at different shear rates. Based on the rheograms (plot of mean shear stress against shear rate, all of the vegetable oils studied were found to be Newtonian fluids. Rice bran oil was the most viscous (0.0398 Pa·s at 38°C while walnut oil was the least viscous (0.0296 Pa·s at 38°C among the oils studied. The higher shear range used did not significantly affect the absolute viscosities of the vegetable oils at the different temperatures. The absolute viscosities of the vegetable oils decreased with increasing temperature and can be fitted with an Arrhenius type relationship. The activation energies for the different vegetable oils ranged from 21 to 30 kJ/mole. The peanut and safflower oils had the highest and lowest activation energies, respectively. This means that greater energy was needed to effect a viscosity change in the peanut oil.

  2. Probing the dynamics of high-viscosity entangled polymers under shear using Neutron Spin Echo spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawecki, M.; Gutfreund, P.; Adlmann, F. A.; Lindholm, E.; Longeville, S.; Lapp, A.; Wolff, M.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron Spin Echo spectroscopy provides unique insight into molecular and submolecular dynamics as well as intra- and inter-molecular interactions in soft matter. These dynamics may change drastically under shear flow. In particular in polymer physics a stress plateau is observed, which might be explained by an entanglement-disentanglement transition. However, such a transition is difficult to identify directly by experiments. Neutron Spin Echo has been proven to provide information about entanglement length and degree by probing the local dynamics of the polymer chains. Combining shear experiments and neutron spin echo is challenging since, first the beam polarisation has to be preserved during scattering and second, Doppler scattered neutrons may cause inelastic scattering. In this paper we present a new shear device adapted for these needs. We demonstrate that a high beam polarisation can be preserved and present first data on an entangled polymer solution under shear. To complement the experiments on the dynamics we present novel SANS data revealing shear- induced conformational changes in highly entangled polymers.

  3. Nonlinear coupling of acoustic and shear mode in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with a density dependent viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, S.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2016-09-01

    The nonlinear propagation of low frequency waves, in a collisionless, strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) with a density dependent viscosity, has been studied with a proper Galilean invariant generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model. The well known reductive perturbation technique (RPT) has been employed in obtaining the solutions of the longitudinal and transverse perturbations. It has been found that the nonlinear propagation of the acoustic perturbations govern with the modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation and are decoupled from the sheared fluctuations. In the regions, where transversal gradients of the flow exists, coupling between the longitudinal and transverse perturbations occurs due to convective nonlinearity which is true for the homogeneous case also. The results, obtained here, can have relative significance to astrophysical context as well as in laboratory plasmas.

  4. The lower bound violation of shear viscosity to entropy ratio due to logarithmic correction in STU model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourhassan, Behnam [Damghan University, School of Physics, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faizal, Mir [University of British Columbia-Okanagan, Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, Kelowna, BC (Canada); University of Lethbridge, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lethbridge, AB (Canada)

    2017-02-15

    In this paper, we analyze the effects of thermal fluctuations on a STU black hole. We observe that these thermal fluctuations can affect the stability of a STU black hole. We will also analyze the effects of these thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a STU black hole. Furthermore, in the Jacobson formalism such a modification will produce a deformation of the geometry of the STU black hole. Hence, we use the AdS/CFT correspondence to analyze the effect of such a deformation on the dual quark-gluon plasma. So, we explicitly analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the shear viscosity to entropy ratio in the quark-gluon plasma, and we analyze the effects of thermal fluctuations on this ratio. (orig.)

  5. Influence of the viscosity and the substrate on the surface hydrophobicity of polyurethane coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meincken, M. [Department of Chemistry and Polymer Science, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)]. E-mail: mmein@sun.ac.za; Klash, A. [Department of Chemistry and Polymer Science, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); Seboa, S. [Department of Chemistry and Polymer Science, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); Sanderson, R.D. [Department of Chemistry and Polymer Science, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

    2006-11-15

    Tailor-made polyurethane (PU) dispersions were synthesized as coatings for paperboard for dry food packaging. For this purpose a low moisture-vapor transmission rate and a high surface hydrophobicity are desirable characteristics, which are both met by PU. However, it was found that the surface hydrophobicity of water-borne PU dispersions depends strongly on the viscosity of the dispersion. This dependency was studied by static contact angle measurements (SCA) as well as a novel technique using digital pulsed-force mode atomic force microscopy (DPFM-AFM). Comparison of the results validated that DPFM-AFM is a valuable tool to characterize the surface hydrophilicity. Both techniques confirmed that the surface hydrophobicity varies with the viscosity and that an optimum viscosity for the PU coating with a maximum surface hydrophobicity can consequently be determined. It was found that both lower as well as higher viscosities led to a less hydrophobic surface.

  6. Gas bubble retention and its effect on waste properties: Retention mechanisms, viscosity, and tensile and shear strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Powell, M.R. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Several of the underground nuclear storage tanks at Hanford have been placed on a flammable gas watch list, because the waste is either known or suspected to generate, store, and episodically release flammable gases. Because retention and episodic release of flammable gases from these tanks containing radioactive waste slurries are critical safety concerns, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the episodic gas release from these storage tanks. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNL Flammable Gas project. Previous investigations have concluded that gas bubbles are retained by the slurry or sludge that has settled at the bottom of the tanks; however, the mechanisms responsible for the retention of these bubbles are not well understood. Understanding the rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles and the dynamics of how these bubbles are released from the waste. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, specifically its viscosity and tensile and shear strengths, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. The objectives of this study were to conduct experiments and develop theories to understand better how bubbles are retained by slurries and sludges, to measure the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of simulated slurries, and to measure the effect of gas bubbles on the tensile and shear strengths of simulated slurries and sludges. In addition to accomplishing these objectives, this study developed correlations, based on the new experimental data, that can be used in large-scale computations of waste tank physical phenomena.

  7. Shear viscosity of hard chain fluids through molecular dynamics simulation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratanapisit, J.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we represent the viscosity of hard chain fluids. This study was initiated with an investigation of the equilibrium molecular dynamic simulations of pure hard-sphere molecules. The natural extension of that work was to hard chain fluids. The hard chain model is one in which each molecule is represented as a chain of freely jointed hard spheres that interact on a site-site basis. The major use of the results from this study lie in the future development of a transport perturbation theory in which the hard chain serves as the reference. Our results show agreement to within the combined uncertainties with the previous studies. Comparisons have also been made to a modified Enskog theory. Results show the failure of the Enskog theory to predict the high density viscosity and that the theory fails more rapidly with density as the chain length increases. We attribute this to a failure of the molecular chaos assumption used in the Enskog theory. Further comparisons are made to real fluids using the SAFT-MET and TRAPP approaches. As expected, the hard sphere model is not appropriate to estimate properties of real fluids. However, the hard sphere model provides the good starting point to serve as the reference basis to study chain molecule systems.

  8. Estimation of Rate of Strain Magnitude and Average Viscosity in Turbulent Flow of Shear Thinning and Yield Stress Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawko, Robert; Thompson, Chris P.

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a series of numerical simulations of non-Newtonian fluids in high Reynolds number flows in circular pipes. The fluids studied in the computations have shear-thinning and yield stress properties. Turbulence is described using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the Boussinesq eddy viscosity hypothesis. The evaluation of standard, two-equation models led to some observations regarding the order of magnitude as well as probabilistic information about the rate of strain. We argue that an accurate estimate of the rate of strain tensor is essential in capturing important flow features. It is first recognised that an apparent viscosity comprises two flow dependant components: one originating from rheology and the other from the turbulence model. To establish the relative significance of the terms involved, an order of magnitude analysis has been performed. The main observation supporting further discussion is that in high Reynolds number regimes the magnitudes of fluctuating rates of strain and fluctuating vorticity dominate the magnitudes of their respective averages. Since these quantities are included in the rheological law, the values of viscosity obtained from the fluctuating and mean velocity fields are different. Validation against Direct Numerical Simulation data shows at least an order of magnitude discrepancy in some regions of the flow. Moreover, the predictions of the probabilistic analysis show a favourable agreement with statistics computed from DNS data. A variety of experimental, as well as computational data has been collected. Data come from the latest experiments by Escudier et al. [1], DNS from Rudman et al. [2] and zeroth-order turbulence models of Pinho [3]. The fluid rheologies are described by standard power-law and Herschel-Bulkley models which make them suitable for steady state calculations of shear flows. Suitable regularisations are utilised to secure numerical stability. Two new models have been

  9. Effect of Lubricant Viscosity and Surface Roughness on Coefficient of Friction in Rolling Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.G. Ghalme

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of surface roughness and lubricant viscosity on coefficient of friction in silicon nitride- steel rolling contact. Two samples of silicon nitride with two different values of surface roughness were tested against steel counter face. The test was performed on four ball tester in presence of lubricant with two different values of viscosity. Taguchi technique a methodology in design of experiment implemented to plan the experimentation and same is utilized to evaluate the interacting effect of surface roughness and lubricant viscosity. Analysis of experimental results presents a strong interaction between surface roughness and lubricant viscosity on coefficient of friction in rolling contact.

  10. Nonequilibrium Brownian dynamics analysis of negative viscosity induced in a magnetic fluid subjected to both ac magnetic and shear flow fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Hisao; Maekawa, Toru; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2002-06-01

    We study the rheological and magnetic characteristics of a magnetic fluid. The system, which we investigate, is as follows. Ferromagnetic particles are dispersed in a solvent, which is subjected to both ac magnetic and shear flow fields. The translational and rotational motions of particles are calculated by the Brownian dynamics method based on Langevin equations and the rheological and magnetic characteristics of the magnetic fluid system are estimated. First, we investigate the rheological and magnetic characteristics of the system in a dc magnetic field and then we analyze the effect of an ac magnetic field on those characteristics. We find that the negative viscosity effect is induced at a certain frequency range of the ac magnetic field. We also find that there are two main mechanisms responsible for the occurrence of negative viscosity. (1) Resonance between the rotational motions of the dipoles of particles and the fluctuation of ac magnetic fields occurs when applied magnetic fields are weak compared to the shear rate, in which case particles can still rotate in magnetic fields. Beyond this resonance frequency, negative viscosity appears. (2) The magnetic dipole moments of particles are forced to stay in the direction of the magnetic field when strong magnetic fields are applied in relatively low shear flow fields. However, negative viscosity occurs when the frequency of external magnetic fields exceeds a critical value, in which case the dipoles rotate continuously in a shear flow without stopping. In both cases, the mean angular velocity of the particles becomes higher than that of the solvent.

  11. Power-law electrokinetic behavior as a direct probe of effective surface viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Yuki; Netz, Roland R.; Bonthuis, Douwe Jan

    2017-02-01

    An exact solution to the Poisson-Boltzmann and Stokes equations is derived to describe the electric double layer with inhomogeneous dielectric and viscosity profiles in a lateral electric field. In the limit of strongly charged surfaces and low salinity, the electrokinetic flow magnitude follows a power law as a function of the surface charge density. Remarkably, the power-law exponent is determined by the interfacial dielectric constant and viscosity, the latter of which has eluded experimental determination. Our approach provides a novel method to extract the effective interfacial viscosity from standard electrokinetic experiments. We find good agreement between our theory and experimental data.

  12. Turbulent mass transfer through a flat shear-free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnaudet, Jacques; Calmet, Isabelle

    2006-04-01

    Mass transfer through the flat shear-free surface of a turbulent open-channel flow is investigated over a wide range of Schmidt number (1 ≤ Sc ≤ 200) by means of large-eddy simulations using a dynamic subgrid-scale model. In contrast with situations previously analysed using direct numerical simulation, the turbulent Reynolds number Re is high enough for the near-surface turbulence to be fairly close to isotropy and almost independent of the structure of the flow in the bottom region (the statistics of the velocity field are identical to those described by I. Calmet & J. Magnaudet J. Fluid Mech. vol. 474, 2003, p. 355). The main statistical features of the concentration field are analysed in connection with the structure of the turbulent motion below the free surface, characterized by a velocity macroscale u and an integral length scale L. All near-surface statistical profiles are found to be Sc-independent when plotted vs. the dimensionless coordinate Sc({1) / 2}yu/nu (y is the distance to the surface and nu is the kinematic viscosity). Mean concentration profiles are observed to be linear throughout an inner diffusive sublayer whose thickness is about one Batchelor microscale, i.e. LSc({) - 1 / 2 }Re({) - 3 / 4}. In contrast, the concentration fluctuations are found to reach their maximum near the edge of the outer diffusive layer which scales as LSc({) - 1 / 2}Re({) - 1 / 2}. Instantaneous views of the near-surface isovalues of the concentration and vertical velocity are used to reveal the influence of the Schmidt number. In particular, it is observed that at high Schmidt number, the tiny concentration fluctuations that subsist in the diffusive sublayer just mirror the divergence of the two-component surface velocity field. Co-spectra of concentration and vertical velocity fluctuations indicate that the main contribution to the turbulent mass flux is provided by eddies whose horizontal size is close to L, which strongly supports the view that the mass

  13. Surface Forces on a Deforming Ellipsoid in Shear Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kightley, E P; Evans, J A; Bortz, D M

    2016-01-01

    We present a model for computing the surface force density on a fluid ellipsoid in simple shear flow, which we derive by coupling existing models for the shape of a fluid droplet and the surface force density on a solid ellipsoid. The primary contribution of this coupling is to develop a method to compute the force acting against a plane intersecting the ellipsoid, which we call the fragmentation force. The model can be used to simulate the motion, shape, surface force density, and breakage of fluid droplets and colloidal aggregates in shear flow.

  14. Shear and Bulk Viscosities of Quark Matter from Quark-Meson Fluctuations in the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Roy, Victor; Serna, Fernando E; Krein, Gastão

    2015-01-01

    We have calculated the temperature dependence of shear $\\eta$ and bulk $\\zeta$ viscosities of quark matter due to quark-meson fluctuations. The quark thermal width originating from quantum fluctuations of quark-$\\pi$ and quark-$\\sigma$ loops at finite temperature is calculated with the formalism of real-time thermal field theory. Temperature-dependent constituent-quark and meson masses, and quark-meson couplings are obtained in the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. We found a non-trivial influence of the temperature-dependent masses and couplings on the Landau-cut structure of the quark self-energy. Our results for the ratios $\\eta/s$ and $\\zeta/s$, where $s$ is the entropy density (also determined in the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model in the quasi-particle approximation), are in fair agreement with results of the literature obtained from different models and techniques. In particular, our result for $\\eta/s$ has a minimum very close to the conjectured AdS/CFT lower bound, $\\eta/s = 1/4\\pi$.

  15. Shear and bulk viscosities of quark matter from quark-meson fluctuations in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Peixoto, Thiago C.; Roy, Victor; Serna, Fernando E.; Krein, Gastão

    2016-04-01

    We have calculated the temperature dependence of shear η and bulk ζ viscosities of quark matter due to quark-meson fluctuations. The quark thermal width originating from quantum fluctuations of quark-π and quark-σ loops at finite temperature is calculated with the formalism of real-time thermal field theory. Temperature-dependent constituent-quark and meson masses and quark-meson couplings are obtained in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We found a nontrivial influence of the temperature-dependent masses and couplings on the Landau-cut structure of the quark self-energy. Our results for the ratios η /s and ζ /s , where s is the entropy density (also determined in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the quasiparticle approximation), are in fair agreement with results of the literature obtained from different models and techniques. In particular, our result for η /s has a minimum very close to the quantum lower bound, η /s =1 /4 π .

  16. Influence of shear velocity on frictional characteristics of rock surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T N Singh; A K Verma; Tanmay Kumar; Avi Dutt

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the fundamental issues related with the effect of shear velocity on frictional characteristics at the interface of rock surfaces is an important issue. In this paper, strain-rate dependence on friction is investigated in relation to sliding behaviour under normal load. The phenomenon of stick-slip of granite and shaly sandstone with a tribometer at constant rate of strain under normal loads was observed. Friction at the interface of the rock samples was developed by increasing shear strain at a constant rate by applying constant velocity using the tribometer. For shaly sandstone, state parameters ( and ) played a major role in determining the friction values and roughness of the contact surfaces as well. Higher values of for shaly sandstone may be attributed to the fact that its surface had a greater number of pronounced asperities. Rubbing between the surfaces does not mean that surface becomes smoother. This is because of variation of friction between surfaces.

  17. Theoretical Insights into Three Types of Oxidized Starch-Based Adhesives: Chemical Stability, Water Resistance, and Shearing Viscosity from a Molecular Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Junxi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the origin and difference associated with chemical stability, water resistance, and shearing viscosity of three types of different oxidized modified starch-based adhesives, a detailed theoretical investigation from a molecular viewpoint has been performed using the AM1 semiempirical level and the DFT-B3LYP level, respectively. As a result, our findings suggest that, by Mulliken population analysis (MPA, frontier orbital analysis, and electrostatic potential (EP analysis based on B3LYP/6-31G calculations, the chemical stability, water resistance, and shearing viscosity of the oxidized modified starch-based adhesives are uniformly improved and corresponding difference for each property presents an identical order: the oxidized grafted cross-linked starch-based adhesive > the oxidized grafted starch-based adhesive > the oxidized starch-based adhesive, which is well consistent with experimental results.

  18. Surface micromachined differential piezoelectric shear-stress sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Randall P.; Kim, Donghwan; Gawalt, David P.; Hall, Neal A.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to measure viscous wall shear stress in high-speed flows is important for verifying simulated results typically obtained from direct numerical simulation in the aerodynamics research community, and robust sensors are required to measure wall shear reliably under such high-speed conditions. This letter summarizes the design, fabrication, and testing of a surface micromachined piezoelectric shear-stress sensor which uses a thin piezoelectric film to generate a voltage proportional to an applied shear stress without additional moving parts. A differential-cell architecture is used to enhance selectivity to shear stress while canceling normal-stress sensitivity. The conceptual design, fabrication details, and experimental measurements of device sensitivity are presented. A finite element model is used to validate the device performance against measurements, and to provide insight into the potential and electric fields underlying the device concept. The potential for understanding device behavior and optimization through modeling is illustrated using finite element analysis results. The minimum detectable shear stress for the sensor is estimated to be 52.9 mPa  √Hz-1 at 1.5 kHz.

  19. Acoustic characteristics of bubble bursting at the surface of a high-viscosity liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiao-Bo; Zhang Jian-Run; Li Pu

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic pressure model of bubble bursting is proposed.An experiment studying the acoustic characteristics of the bursting bubble at the surface of a high-viscosity liquid is reported.It is found that the sudden bursting of a bubble at the high-viscosity liquid surface generates N-shape wave at first,then it transforms into a jet wave.The fundamental frequency of the acoustic signal caused by the bursting bubble decreases linearly as the bubble size increases.The results of the investigation can be used to understand the acoustic characteristics of bubble bursting.

  20. Development of Maximum Bubble Pressure Method for Surface Tension Measurement of High Viscosity Molten Silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Osamu; Iwamoto, Hirone; Sakashita, Ryota; Iseki, Chiaki; Zhu, Hongmin

    2017-07-01

    A surface tension measurement method based on the maximum bubble pressure (MBP) method was developed in order to precisely determine the surface tension of molten silicates in this study. Specifically, the influence of viscosity on surface tension measurements was quantified, and the criteria for accurate measurement were investigated. It was found that the MBP apparently increased with an increase in viscosity. This was because extra pressure was required for the flowing liquid inside the capillary due to viscous resistance. It was also expected that the extra pressure would decrease by decreasing the fluid velocity. For silicone oil with a viscosity of 1000 \\hbox {mPa}{\\cdot }\\hbox {s}, the error on the MBP could be decreased to +1.7 % by increasing the bubble detachment time to 300 \\hbox {s}. However, the error was still over 1 % even when the bubble detachment time was increased to 600 \\hbox {s}. Therefore, a true value of the MBP was determined by using a curve-fitting technique with a simple relaxation function, and that was succeeded for silicone oil at 1000 \\hbox {mPa}{\\cdot } \\hbox {s} of viscosity. Furthermore, for silicone oil with a viscosity as high as 10 000 \\hbox {mPa}{\\cdot }\\hbox {s}, the apparent MBP approached a true value by interrupting the gas introduction during the pressure rising period and by re-introducing the gas at a slow flow rate. Based on the fundamental investigation at room temperature, the surface tension of the \\hbox {SiO}2-40 \\hbox {mol}%\\hbox {Na}2\\hbox {O} and \\hbox {SiO}2-50 \\hbox {mol}%\\hbox {Na}2\\hbox {O} melts was determined at a high temperature. The obtained value was slightly lower than the literature values, which might be due to the influence of viscosity on surface tension measurements being removed in this study.

  1. The effects of viscosity on sound radiation near solid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morfey, C.L.; Sorokin, Sergey; Gabard, G.

    2012-01-01

    Although the acoustic analogy developed by Lighthill, Curle, and Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings for sound generation by unsteady flow past solid surfaces is formally exact, it has become accepted practice in aeroacoustics to use an approximate version in which viscous quadrupoles are neglected. Here...

  2. Importance of physical vs. chemical interactions in surface shear rheology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, P.A.; Kosters, H.; Egmond, M.R.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2006-01-01

    The stability of adsorbed protein layers against deformation has in literature been attributed to the formation of a continuous gel-like network. This hypothesis is mostly based on measurements of the increase of the surface shear elasticity with time. For several proteins this increase has been att

  3. Effects of bulk and free surface shear flows on amyloid fibril formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada, David; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2008-11-01

    Amyloid diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's, among others, are characterized by the conversion of monomers to oligomers (precursors) and then to amyloid fibrils. Besides factors such as concentration, pH, and ionic strength, evidence exists that shearing flow strongly influences amyloid formation in vitro. Also, during fibrillation in the presence of either gas or solid surfaces, both the polarity and roughness of the surfaces play a significant role in the kinetics of the fibrillation process. By studying the nucleation and growth of a model system (insulin fibrils) in a well-defined flow field, we can identify the flow and interfacial conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics. The present flow system consists of an annular region, bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders and driven by rotation of the floor, with either a hydrophobic (air) or hydrophilic (solid) interface. We show both the combined and separated effects of shear and interfacial hydrophobicity on the fibrillation process, and the use of interfacial shear viscosity as a parameter for quantifying the oligomerization process.

  4. Surface Shear, Persistent Wave Groups and Rogue Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chafin, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of waves with surface flows by considering the full set of conserved quantities, subtle but important surface elevations induced by wave packets and by directly considering the necessary forces to prevent packet spreading in the deep water limit. Narrow surface shear flows are shown to exert strong localizing and stabilizing forces on wavepackets to maintain their strength and amplify their intensity even in the linear regime. Necessary criticisms of some earlier notions of stress and angular momentum of waves are included and we argue that nonlinearity enters the system in a way that makes the formation of rogue waves nonperturbative. Quantitative bounds on the surface shear flow necessary to stabilize packets of any wave amplitude are given.

  5. Acoustomicrofluidic application of quasi-shear surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darinskii, A N; Weihnacht, M; Schmidt, H

    2017-02-20

    The paper analyzes the possibility of using predominantly boundary polarized surface acoustic waves for actuating fluidic effects in microchannels fabricated inside containers made of PDMS. The aim is to remove a shortcoming peculiar to conventionally utilized predominantly vertically polarized waves. Such waves strongly attenuate while they propagate under container side walls because of the leakage into them. Due to a specific feature of PDMS - extremely small shear elastic modulus - losses of boundary polarized modes should be far smaller. The amplitude of vertical mechanical displacements can be increased right inside the channel owing to the scattering of acoustic fields. As an example, the predominantly vertically polarized surface wave on 128YX LiNbO3 is compared with the quasi-shear leaky wave on 64YX LiNbO3. Our computations predict that, given the electric power supplied to the launching transducer, the quasi-shear wave will drive the fluid more efficiently than the surface wave on 128YX LiNbO3 when the container wall thickness is larger than 25-30 wavelengths, if there are no additional scatterers inside the channel. In the presence of a scatterer, such as a thin gold strip, the quasi-shear wave can be more efficient when the wall thickness exceeds 10-15 wavelengths.

  6. Solubility of N2O in and density, viscosity, and surface tension of aqueous piperazine solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, P. W.; Hogendoorn, K. J.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    The physical solubility of N2O in and the density and viscosity of aqueous piperazine solutions have been measured over a temperature range of (293.15 to 323.15) K for piperazine concentrations ranging from about (0.6 to 1.8) kmol·mr-3. Furthermore, the present study contains experimental surface

  7. Solubility of N2O in and density, viscosity, and surface tension of aqueous piperazine solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, P. W.; Hogendoorn, K. J.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    The physical solubility of N2O in and the density and viscosity of aqueous piperazine solutions have been measured over a temperature range of (293.15 to 323.15) K for piperazine concentrations ranging from about (0.6 to 1.8) kmol·mr-3. Furthermore, the present study contains experimental surface t

  8. Analysis of the transient rotating cylinder apparatus for the measurement of liquid-liquid interface shear viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Westborg, H

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of the transient rotating cylinder apparatus for the measurement of liquid-liquid interface viscosity is given. An analytical expression that allows the determination of the interfacial viscosity from observations of the interface movement is given. The expression is presented...... in tabular form for selected values of the physical parameters of the two phases, and suggestions for apparatus design are given....

  9. [Effect of surface modified nano-diamond on viscosity of dental adhesives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Juan; Liang, Jie; Hu, Ai-yun; Liu, Xue-heng

    2012-06-01

    Different surface modified ultrafine-diamond (UFD) was added into dental adhesives as filler ,then the influence of dental adhesive properties was observed. The main matrix of dental adhesive was high polymer resin. Different content of non-modified UFD(n-UFD) or modified UFD(m-UFD) were added into dental adhesives, then the viscosity of materials were measured. The data was processed with SPSS17.0 software package. The viscosity of dental adhesives was decreased when the proportion of UFD was less than 0.1wt%, especially when it was 0.1wt%; but was significantly improved when the proportion was more than 0.1wt%. The effect of UFD and surface-modified UFD on the viscosity was significantly different. The results show that silane coupling was chemically-grafted on the surface of UFD, the dispersion and stability of UFD in ethanol was improved; And a quantity of UFD with special content could reduce the viscosity of dental adhesives and improve the flowability obviously. The m-UFD was superior to n-UFD.

  10. Viscosity of particle laden films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timounay, Yousra; Rouyer, Florence

    2017-06-01

    We perform retraction experiments on soap films where large particles bridge the two interfaces. Local velocities are measured by PIV during the unstationnary regime. The velocity variation in time and space can be described by a continuous fluid model from which effective viscosity (shear and dilatational) of particulate films is measured. The 2D effective viscosity of particulate films η2D increases with particle surface fraction ϕ: at low ϕ, it tends to the interfacial dilatational viscosity of the liquid/air interfaces and it diverges at the critical particle surface fraction ϕc ≃ 0.84. Experimental data agree with classical viscosity laws of hard spheres suspensions adapted to the 2D geometry, assuming viscous dissipation resulting from the squeeze of the liquid/air interfaces between the particles. Finally, we show that the observed viscous dissipation in particulate films has to be considered to describe the edge velocity during a retraction experiment at large particle coverage.

  11. Estimation of the shear viscosity from 3FD simulations of Au + Au collisions at √(s{sub NN}) = 3.3-39 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Yu.B. [National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' , (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Soldatov, A.A. [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' , (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-15

    An effective shear viscosity in central Au+Au collisions is estimated in the range of incident energies 3.3 GeV≤√(s{sub NN})≤39 GeV. The simulations are performed within a three-fluid model employing three different equations of state with and without the deconfinement transition. In order to estimate this effective viscosity, we consider the entropy produced in the 3FD simulations as if it is generated within the conventional one-fluid viscous hydrodynamics. It is found that the effective viscosity within the different considered scenarios is very similar at the expansion stage of the collision: as a function of temperature (T) the viscosity-to-entropy ratio behaves as η/s∝1/T{sup 4}; as a function of the net-baryon density (n{sub B}), η/s∝1/s, i.e. it is mainly determined by the density dependence of the entropy density. The above dependences take place along the dynamical trajectories of Au+Au collisions. At the final stages of the expansion the η/s values are ranged from ∝0.05 at the highest considered energies to ∝.5 at the lowest ones. (orig.)

  12. Estimation of the Shear Viscosity from 3FD Simulations of Au+Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$ 3.3--39 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Yu B

    2016-01-01

    An effective shear viscosity in central Au+Au collisions is estimated in the range of incident energies 3.3 GeV $\\le \\sqrt{s_{NN}}\\le$ 39 GeV. The simulations are performed within a three-fluid model employing three different equations of state with and without the deconfinement transition. In order to estimate this effective viscosity, we consider the entropy produced in the 3FD simulations as if it is generated within the conventional one-fluid viscous hydrodynamics. It is found that the effective viscosity within different considered scenarios is very similar at the expansion stage of the collision: as a function of temperature ($T$) the viscosity-to-entropy ratio behaves as $\\eta/s \\sim 1/T^4$; as a function of net-baryon density ($n_B$), $\\eta/s \\sim 1/s$, i.e. it is mainly determined by the density dependence of the entropy density. The above dependencies take place along the dynamical trajectories of Au+Au collisions. At the final stages of the expansion the $\\eta/s$ values are ranged from $\\sim$0.05 a...

  13. Deformation mechanism of leukocyte adhering to vascular surface under steady shear flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Xiaoheng; WANG; Xiong; YIN; Hongmei; CHEN; Huaiqing

    2004-01-01

    The adhesion of leukocytes to vascular surface is an important biomedical problem and has drawn extensive attention. In this study, we propose a compound drop model to simulate a leukocyte with a nucleus adhering to the surface of blood vessel under steady shear flow. A two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is conducted to determine the local distribution of pressure on the surface of the adherent model cell. By introducing the parameter of deformation index (DI), we investigate the deformation of the leukocyte and its nucleus under controlled conditions. Our numerical results show that: (i) the leukocyte is capable of deformation under external exposed flow field. The deformation index increases with initial contact angle and Reynolds number of external exposed flow. (ii) The nucleus deforms with the cell, and the deformation index of the leukocyte is greater than that of the nucleus. The leukocyte is more deformable while the nucleus is more capable of resisting external shear flow. (iii) The leukocyte and the nucleus are not able to deform infinitely with the increase of Reynolds number because the deformation index reaches a maximum. (iv) Pressure distribution confirms that there exists a region downstream of the cell, which produces high pressure to retard continuous deformation and provide a positive lift force on the cell. Meanwhile, we have measured the deformation of human leukocytes exposed to shear flow by using a flow chamber system. We found that the numerical results are well consistent with those of experiment. We conclude that the nucleus with high viscosity plays a particular role in leukocyte deformation.

  14. Dilatational viscosity of dilute particle-laden fluid interface at different contact angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishchuk, Sergey V.

    2016-12-01

    We consider a solid spherical particle adsorbed at a flat interface between two immiscible fluids and having arbitrary contact angle at the triple contact line. We derive analytically the flow field corresponding to dilatational surface flow in the case of a large ratio of dynamic shear viscosities of two fluids. Considering a dilute assembly of such particles we calculate numerically the dependence on the contact angle of the effective surface dilatational viscosity particle-laden fluid interface. The effective surface dilatational viscosity is proportional to the size and surface concentration of particles and monotonically increases with the increase in protrusion of particles into the fluid with larger shear viscosity.

  15. Stability of shear shallow water flows with free surface

    CERN Document Server

    Chesnokov, Alexander; Gavrilyuk, Sergey; Pavlov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Stability of inviscid shear shallow water flows with free surface is studied in the framework of the Benney equations. This is done by investigating the generalized hyperbolicity of the integrodifferential Benney system of equations. It is shown that all shear flows having monotonic convex velocity profiles are stable. The hydrodynamic approximations of the model corresponding to the classes of flows with piecewise linear continuous and discontinuous velocity profiles are derived and studied. It is shown that these approximations possess Hamiltonian structure and a complete system of Riemann invariants, which are found in an explicit form. Sufficient conditions for hyperbolicity of the governing equations for such multilayer flows are formulated. The generalization of the above results to the case of stratified fluid is less obvious, however, it is established that vorticity has a stabilizing effect.

  16. Active Control of Shear Thickening in Suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Neil Y C; Cates, Michael E; Sun, Jin; Cohen, Itai

    2016-01-01

    Shear thickening, an increase of viscosity with shear rate, is a ubiquitous phenomena in suspended materials that has implications for broad technological applications. Controlling this thickening behavior remains a major challenge and has led to empirical strategies ranging from altering the particle surfaces and shape to modifying the solvent properties. However, none of these methods allow for active control of flow properties during shear itself. Here, we demonstrate that by strategic imposition of a high-frequency and low-amplitude shear perturbation orthogonal to the primary shearing flow, we can largely eradicate shear thickening. The orthogonal shear effectively becomes a regulator for controlling thickening in the suspension, allowing the viscosity to be reduced by up to two decades on demand. In a separate setup, we show that such effects can be induced by simply agitating the sample transversely to the primary shear direction. Overall, the ability of in situ manipulation of shear thickening paves a...

  17. Shear and Bulk Viscosities of a Weakly Coupled Quark Gluon Plasma with Finite Chemical Potential and Temperature---Leading-Log Results

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Song, Yu-Kun; Wang, Qun

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the shear (eta) and bulk (zeta) viscosities of a weakly coupled quark gluon plasma at the leading-log order with finite temperature T and quark chemical potential mu. We find that the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s increases monotonically with mu and eventually scales as (mu/T)^2 at large mu. In contrary, zeta/s is insensitive to mu. Both eta/s and zeta/s are monotonically decreasing functions of the quark flavor number N_f when N_f \\geq 2. This property is also observed in pion gas systems. Our perturbative calculation suggests that QCD becomes the most perfect (i.e. with the smallest eta/s) at mu=0 and N_f = 16 (the maximum N_f with asymptotic freedom). It would be interesting to test whether the currently smallest eta/s computed close to the phase transition with mu=0 and N_f = 0 can be further reduced by increasing N_f.

  18. Estimation of liquid properties by inverse problem analysis based on shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kento; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    A shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor can detect liquid properties, such as viscosity, density, permittivity, and conductivity. The advantage of using the SH-SAW sensors is the simultaneous detection of the mechanical and electrical properties of liquids. In this paper, we proposed a method of estimating the density and viscosity of liquids based on the inverse problem analysis. Glycerol or ethanol aqueous solutions were measured. The estimated and literature values were compared. For glycerol aqueous solutions, when the concentration is low, those values agree well. However, when the concentration is high, those values did not agree because the bulk modulus of glycerin solutions cannot be assumed as constant. On the other hand, as the bulk modulus of ethanol aqueous solutions can be assumed to be the same as that of water, the deviations between those values were small. Therefore, the proposed method is effective when the bulk modulus is assumed as constant.

  19. VELOCITY IN A LIQUID SUBJECTED TO A SHEAR FORCE AT THE LIQUID SURFACE WITH A RECEDING VELOCITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴子牛

    2003-01-01

    The development of the Stokes layer in a liquid subjected to a constant shear force at the liquid surface with mass erosion is studied in this paper.It is shown that the velocity in the Stokes layer is weakened by surface receding and the relative decrease of the maximal liquid velocity due to surface recession is a unique function of the time normalized by the recession/diffusion balance time scale,defined as the ratio between the kinematic viscosity and the square of the receding velocity.At a time much larger than the diffusion/recession balance time scale,the role of the surface receding is rather important:instead of being pushed into the liquid at the receding velocity,the development of the Stokes layer is effectively prohibited by surface receding.

  20. VELOCITY IN A LIQUID SUBJECTED TO A SHEAR FORCE AT THE LIQUID SURFACE WITH A RECEDING VELOCITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴子牛

    2003-01-01

    The development of the Stokes layer in a liquid subjected to a constant shear force at the liquid surface with mass erosion is studied in this paper. It is shown that the velocity in the Stokes layer is weakened by surface receding and the relative decrease of the maximal liquid velocity due to surface recession is a unique function of the time normalized by the recession/ditftmion balance time scale, defined as the ratio between the kinematic viscosity and the square of the receding velocity. At a time much larger than the diffusion/recession balance time scale, the role of the surface receding is rather important: instead of being pushed into the liquid at the receding velocity, the development of the Stokes layer is effectively prohibited by surface receding.

  1. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets. Copyright © 2014

  2. Effect of fracture surface roughness on shear crack growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, T.S.; Watt, D.W. (New Hampshire Univ., Durham, NH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Mendelsohn, D.A. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Engineering Mechanics)

    1992-12-01

    A model of fracture surface interference for Mode I fatigue crack profiles was developed and evaluated. Force required to open the crack faces is estimated from point contact expressions for Mode I stress intensity factor. Force transfer across contacting asperities is estimated and used to calculate Mode II resistance stress intensity factor (applied factor is sum of effective and resistance factors). Electro-optic holographic interferometry was used to measure 3-D displacement field around a Mode I fatigue pre-crack in Al loaded in Mode II shear. Induced Mode I crack face displacements were greater than Mode II displacements. Plane stress shear lip caused displacement normal to surface as the crack faces are displaced. Algorithms are being developed to track the displacements associated with the original coordinate system in the camera. A 2-D boundary element method code for mixed mode I and II loading of a rough crack (sawtooth asperity model) has been completed. Addition of small-scale crack tip yielding and a wear model are completed and underway, respectively.

  3. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  4. Quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen J.; Wiczer, James J.; Cernosek, Richard W.; Frye, Gregory C.; Gebert, Charles T.; Casaus, Leonard; Mitchell, Mary A.

    1998-01-01

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  5. Effect of Viscosity on Free-Surface Waves in Oseen Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢东强

    2004-01-01

    Based on the complex dispersion relation for the two-dimensional free-surface waves generated by a moving body in the steady Oseen flows, the effect of viscosity on wavelength and wave amplitude was investigated by means of an asymptotic method and a numerical analysis. A comparison between the asymptotic and numerical analysis for the viscous decay factor demonstrates the validity of the perturbation expansions for the wave profile. The numerical result shows that the wavelength of viscous wave is slightly elongated in comparison with that of inviscid wave.

  6. Phosphorescent Molecular Butterflies with Controlled Potential-Energy Surfaces and Their Application as Luminescent Viscosity Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chenkun; Yuan, Lin; Yuan, Zhao; Doyle, Nicholas Kelly; Dilbeck, Tristan; Bahadur, Divya; Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Dearden, Albert; Huang, Chen; Ma, Biwu

    2016-09-06

    We report precise manipulation of the potential-energy surfaces (PESs) of a series of butterfly-like pyrazolate-bridged platinum binuclear complexes, by synthetic control of the electronic structure of the cyclometallating ligand and the steric bulkiness of the pyrazolate bridging ligand. Color tuning of dual emission from blue/red, to green/red and red/deep red were achieved for these phosphorescent molecular butterflies, which have two well-controlled energy minima on the PESs. The environmentally dependent photoluminescence of these molecular butterflies enabled their application as self-referenced luminescent viscosity sensor.

  7. Near surface shear wave velocity in Bucharest, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. von Steht

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bucharest, the capital of Romania with nearly 2 1/2 million inhabitants, is endangered by the strong earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone. To obtain information on the near surface shear-wave velocity Vs structure and to improve the available microzonations we conducted seismic refraction measurements in two parks of the city. There the shallow Vs structure is determined along five profiles, and the compressional-wave velocity (Vp structure is obtained along one profile. Although the amount of data collected is limited, they offer a reasonable idea about the seismic velocity distribution in these two locations. This knowledge is useful for a city like Bucharest where seismic velocity information so far is sparse and poorly documented. Using sledge-hammer blows on a steel plate and a 24-channel recording unit, we observe clear shear-wave arrivals in a very noisy environment up to a distance of 300 m from the source. The Vp model along profile 1 can be correlated with the known near surface sedimentary layers. Vp increases from 320 m/s near the surface to 1280 m/s above 55–65 m depth. The Vs models along all five profiles are characterized by low Vs (<350 m/s in the upper 60 m depth and a maximum Vs of about 1000 m/s below this depth. In the upper 30 m the average Vs30 varies from 210 m/s to 290 m/s. The Vp-Vs relations lead to a high Poisson's ratio of 0.45–0.49 in the upper ~60 m depth, which is an indication for water-saturated clayey sediments. Such ground conditions may severely influence the ground motion during strong Vrancea earthquakes.

  8. Pinning down QCD-matter shear viscosity in A + A collisions via EbyE fluctuations using pQCD + saturation + hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, H.; Eskola, K. J.; Paatelainen, R.; Tuominen, K.

    2016-12-01

    We compute the initial energy densities produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions from NLO perturbative QCD using a saturation conjecture to control soft particle production, and describe the subsequent space-time evolution of the system with hydrodynamics, event by event. The resulting centrality dependence of the low-pT observables from this pQCD + saturation + hydro ("EKRT") framework are then compared simultaneously to the LHC and RHIC measurements. With such an analysis we can test the initial state calculation, and constrain the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity-to-entropy ratio η / s of QCD matter. Using these constraints from the current RHIC and LHC measurements we then predict the charged hadron multiplicities and flow coefficients for the 5 TeV Pb + Pb collisions.

  9. Acoustic scaling of anisotropic flow in shape-engineered events: implications for extraction of the specific shear viscosity of the quark gluon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Roy A.; Reynolds, D.; Taranenko, A.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alexander, J. M.; Liu, Fu-Hu; Gu, Yi; Mwai, A.

    2016-10-01

    It is shown that the acoustic scaling patterns of anisotropic flow for different event shapes at a fixed collision centrality (shape-engineered events), provide robust constraints for the event-by-event fluctuations in the initial-state density distribution from ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. The empirical scaling parameters also provide a dual-path method for extracting the specific shear viscosity {(η /s)}{QGP} of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) produced in these collisions. A calibration of these scaling parameters via detailed viscous hydrodynamical model calculations, gives {(η /s)}{QGP} estimates for the plasma produced in collisions of Au + Au (\\sqrt{{s}{NN}}=0.2 {TeV}) and Pb + Pb (\\sqrt{{s}{NN}}=2.76 {TeV}). The estimates are insensitive to the initial-state geometry models considered.

  10. Pinning down QCD-matter shear viscosity in A+A collisions via EbyE fluctuations using pQCD + saturation + hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Niemi, H; Paatelainen, R; Tuominen, K

    2015-01-01

    We compute the initial energy densities produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions from NLO perturbative QCD using a saturation conjecture to control soft particle production, and describe the subsequent space-time evolution of the system with hydrodynamics, event by event. The resulting centrality dependence of the low-$p_T$ observables from this pQCD + saturation + hydro ("EKRT") framework are then compared simultaneously to the LHC and RHIC measurements. With such an analysis we can test the initial state calculation, and constrain the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity-to-entropy ratio $\\eta/s$ of QCD matter. Using these constraints from the current RHIC and LHC measurements we then predict the charged hadron multiplicities and flow coefficients for the 5.023 TeV Pb+Pb collisions.

  11. Boundary-layer phenomena for the cylindrically symmetric Navier-Stokes equations of compressible heat-conducting fluids with large data at vanishing shear viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xia; Zhang, Jianwen

    2016-08-01

    This paper concerns the asymptotic behavior of the solution to an initial-boundary value problem of the cylindrically symmetric Navier-Stokes equations with large data for compressible heat-conducting ideal fluids, as the shear viscosity μ goes to zero. A suitable corrector function (the so-called boundary-layer type function) is constructed to eliminate the disparity of boundary values. As by-products, the convergence rates of the derivatives in L 2 are obtained and the boundary-layer thickness (BL-thickness) of the value O≤ft({μα}\\right) with α \\in ≤ft(0,1/2\\right) is shown by an alternative method, compared with the results proved in Jiang and Zhang (2009 SIAM J. Math. Anal. 41 237-68) and Qin et al (2015 Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 216 1049-86).

  12. Surface waves on arbitrary vertically-sheared currents

    CERN Document Server

    Smeltzer, Benjamin K

    2016-01-01

    We study dispersion properties of linear surface gravity waves propagating in an arbitrary direction atop a current profile of arbitrary depth-varying magnitude using a piecewise linear approximation, and develop a robust numerical framework for practical calculation. The method has been much used in the past in 2D, and we herein extend and apply it to 3D problems. Being valid for all wavelengths without loss of accuracy, the scheme is particularly well suited to solve problems involving Fourier transformations in the horizontal plane. We examine the group and phase velocities over different wavelength regimes and current profiles, highlighting characteristics due to the depth-variable vorticity. We show an example application to ship waves on an arbitrary current profile, and demonstrate qualitative differences in the wake patterns between a concave down profile when compared to a constant shear profile with equal depth-averaged vorticity. New insight is given concerning the nature of extra spurious solution...

  13. Empirical correlation of the surface tension versus the viscosity for saturated normal liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xia; Mulero, A

    2016-01-01

    In 1966 Pelofsky proposed an empirical linear correlation between the natural logarithm of the surface tension and the reciprocal viscosity, which seems to work adequately for a wide range of fluids. In particular, it has been shown that it is useful in the case of n-alkanes and their binary and ternary mixtures. More recently however, it has been found not to work for several ionic liquids unless the reciprocal viscosity is raised to a power. The exponent of this power was fixed to be 0.3, at least for the studied ionic fluids. In the present work, the performance and accuracy of both the original Pelofsky correlation and the modified expression including the exponent are studied for 56 non-ionic fluids of different kinds over a broad range of temperatures. Also, the temperature range is delimited for which each expression reproduces the surface tension values with average absolute deviations below 1%. The needed coefficients are given for both the broad and the delimited temperature range for each expressio...

  14. In situ droplet surface tension and viscosity measurements in gas metal arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, B.; Siewert, E.; Schein, J.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptation of a drop oscillation technique that enables in situ measurements of thermophysical properties of an industrial pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process. Surface tension, viscosity, density and temperature were derived expanding the portfolio of existing methods and previously published measurements of surface tension in pulsed GMAW. Natural oscillations of pure liquid iron droplets are recorded during the material transfer with a high-speed camera. Frame rates up to 30 000 fps were utilized to visualize iron droplet oscillations which were in the low kHz range. Image processing algorithms were employed for edge contour extraction of the droplets and to derive parameters such as oscillation frequencies and damping rates along different dimensions of the droplet. Accurate surface tension measurements were achieved incorporating the effect of temperature on density. These are compared with a second method that has been developed to accurately determine the mass of droplets produced during the GMAW process which enables precise surface tension measurements with accuracies up to 1% and permits the study of thermophysical properties also for metals whose density highly depends on temperature. Thermophysical properties of pure liquid iron droplets formed by a wire with 1.2 mm diameter were investigated in a pulsed GMAW process with a base current of 100 A and a pulse current of 600 A. Surface tension and viscosity of a sample droplet were 1.83 ± 0.02 N m-1 and 2.9 ± 0.3 mPa s, respectively. The corresponding droplet temperature and density are 2040 ± 50 K and 6830 ± 50 kg m-3, respectively.

  15. Oscillating sources in a shear flow with a free surface

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2016-01-01

    We report on progress on the free surface flow in the presence of submerged oscillating line sources (2D) or point sources (3D) when a simple shear flow is present varying linearly with depth. Such sources are in routine use as Green functions in the realm of potential theory for calculating wave-body interactions, but no such theory exists in for rotational flow. We solve the linearized problem in 2D and 3D from first principles, based on the Euler equations, when the sources are at rest relative to the undisturbed surface. Both in 2D and 3D a new type of solution appears compared to irrotational case, a critical layer-like flow whose surface manifestation ("wave") drifts downstream from the source at the velocity of the flow at the source depth. We analyse the additional vorticity in light of the vorticity equation and provide a simple physical argument why a critical layer is a necessary consequence of Kelvin's circulation theorem. In 3D a related critical layer phenomenon occurs at every depth, whereby a ...

  16. Viscosity model of high-viscosity dispersing system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏先福; 王娜; 黄蓓青; 孙承博

    2008-01-01

    High-viscosity dispersing system is formed by dispersing the solid particles in the high-viscosity continuous medium.It is very easy to form the three-dimensional network structure for solid particles in the system and the rheology behavior becomes complicated.The apparent viscosity of this dispersing system always has the connection with the volume ratio and the shear rate.In order to discuss the rheology behavior and put up the viscosity model,the suspension of silicon dioxide and silicon oil were prepared.Through testing the viscosity,the solid concentration and the shear rate,the effects of the ratio and the shear rate on viscosity was analyzed,the model of the high-viscosity dispersing system was designed and the model with the printing ink were validated.The experiment results show that the model is applicable to the high-viscosity dispersing systems.

  17. Numerical simulation of peristaltic flow of a biorheological fluid with shear-dependent viscosity in a curved channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N; Javid, K; Sajid, M; Anwar Bég, O

    2016-01-01

    Peristaltic motion of a non-Newtonian Carreau fluid is analyzed in a curved channel under the long wavelength and low Reynolds number assumptions, as a simulation of digestive transport. The flow regime is shown to be governed by a dimensionless fourth-order, nonlinear, ordinary differential equation subject to no-slip wall boundary conditions. A well-tested finite difference method based on an iterative scheme is employed for the solution of the boundary value problem. The important phenomena of pumping and trapping associated with the peristaltic motion are investigated for various values of rheological parameters of Carreau fluid and curvature of the channel. An increase in Weissenberg number is found to generate a small eddy in the vicinity of the lower wall of the channel, which is enhanced with further increase in Weissenberg number. For shear-thinning bio-fluids (power-law rheological index, n Weissenberg number displaces the maximum velocity toward the upper wall. For shear-thickening bio-fluids, the velocity amplitude is enhanced markedly with increasing Weissenberg number.

  18. Effects of pouring temperature and slurry viscosity on heat transfer and surface roughness in lost foam casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayganpour, A.; Idris, M. H.; Izman, S.; Farahany, S.

    2012-06-01

    The effects of pouring temperature and slurry viscosity in terms of heat transfer on surface roughness during lost foam casting (LFC) of LM6 alloy were investigated experimentally. Heat transfer of molten materials is an important factors to changes the microstructure which is considered in the present study. It is primarily dependent on the pouring temperature, casting thickness, mould material, mould temperature and surrounding medium. The pouring temperature changed from 700 to740°C and slurry viscosity altered from 20 to 36 sec. A full 2-level factorial design experimental technique was used to identify the significant factors that effect on surface roughness of castings. The results show that surface roughness improved by lower pouring temperature, whereas slurry viscosity has less influence on the quality of surface.

  19. New correlations between viscosity and surface tension for saturated normal fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Mengmeng; Mulero, A

    2016-01-01

    New correlations between viscosity and surface tension are proposed and checked for saturated normal fluids. The proposed correlations contain three or four adjustable coefficients for every fluid. They were obtained by fitting 200 data points, ranging from the triple point to a point very near to the critical one. Forty substances were considered, including simple fluids (such as rare gases), simple hydrocarbons, refrigerants, and some other substances such as carbon dioxide and water. Two correlation models with three adjustable coefficients were checked, and the results showed that the one based on the modified Pelofsky expression gives the better overall results. A new 4-coefficient correlation is then proposed which clearly improves the results, giving the lowest overall deviations for 32 out of the 40 substances considered and absolute average deviations below 10% for all of them.

  20. Improved Correlation for Viscosity from Surface Tension Data for Saturated Normal Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Jianxiang

    2016-01-01

    Several correlations between viscosity and surface tension for saturated normal fluids have been proposed in the literature. Usually, they include three or four adjustable coefficients for every fluid and give generally good results. In this paper we propose a new and improved four-coefficient correlation which was obtained by fitting data ranging from the triple point to a point very near to the critical one. Fifty four substances were considered, including simple fluids (such as rare gases), simple hydrocarbons, refrigerants, and some other substances such as carbon dioxide, water or ethanol. The new correlation clearly improves the results obtained with those previously available since it gives absolute average deviations below1% for 40 substances and below 2.1% for 10 substances more.

  1. Effect of Viscosity on the GTA Welds Bead Penetration in Relation with Surface Tension Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Touileb

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study the effect of the viscous dissipation on the surface tension and its role on the shape of weld pool. Experiments were conducted on four different casts of ferritic stainless steel with different content in the sulfur and titanium. The results show in particular that the presence of titanium solid compounds affects the role of sulfur as surfactant element. Titanium in the presence of carbon and oxygen, titanium forms solid compounds which affect the Marangoni convection due to the sulfur element in the weld pool. The viscous dissipation due to these compounds alters the flow rate of the molten metal. We expect that the viscosity of metal liquid was altered by these solid compounds. The viscous dissipation due to these compounds contributes to heat the molten metal leading to larger weld bead.

  2. Succeed escape: Flow shear promotes tumbling of Escherichia colinear a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Understanding how bacteria move close to a surface under various stimuli is crucial for a broad range of microbial processes including biofilm formation, bacterial transport and migration. While prior studies focus on interactions between single stimulus and bacterial suspension, we emphasize on compounding effects of flow shear and solid surfaces on bacterial motility, especially reorientation and tumble. We have applied microfluidics and digital holographic microscopy to capture a large number (>105) of 3D Escherichia coli trajectories near a surface under various flow shear. We find that near-surface flow shear promotes cell reorientation and mitigates the tumble suppression and re-orientation confinement found in a quiescent flow, and consequently enhances surface normal bacterial dispersion. Conditional sampling suggests that two complimentary hydrodynamic mechanisms, Jeffrey Orbit and shear-induced flagella unbundling, are responsible for the enhancement in bacterial tumble motility. These findings imply that flow shear may mitigate cell trapping and prevent biofilm initiation.

  3. Surface waves on currents with arbitrary vertical shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Benjamin K.; Ellingsen, Simen Å.

    2017-04-01

    We study dispersion properties of linear surface gravity waves propagating in an arbitrary direction atop a current profile of depth-varying magnitude using a piecewise linear approximation and develop a robust numerical framework for practical calculation. The method has been much used in the past for the case of waves propagating along the same axis as the background current, and we herein extend and apply it to problems with an arbitrary angle between the wave propagation and current directions. Being valid for all wavelengths without loss of accuracy, the scheme is particularly well suited to solve problems involving a broad range of wave vectors, such as ship waves and Cauchy-Poisson initial value problems. We examine the group and phase velocities over different wavelength regimes and current profiles, highlighting characteristics due to the depth-variable vorticity. We show an example application to ship waves on an arbitrary current profile and demonstrate qualitative differences in the wake patterns between concave down and concave up profiles when compared to a constant shear profile with equal depth-averaged vorticity. We also discuss the nature of additional solutions to the dispersion relation when using the piecewise-linear model. These are vorticity waves, drifting vortical structures which are artifacts of the piecewise model. They are absent for a smooth profile and are spurious in the present context.

  4. Online measurements of surface tensions and viscosities based on the hydrodynamics of Taylor flow in a microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanhong; Guo, Chaohong; Jiang, Yuyan; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Lei

    2016-11-01

    This paper demonstrates an online measurement technique which can measure both surface tension and viscosity for confined fluids in microfluidic systems. The surface tension and viscosity are determined by monitoring the liquid film thickness deposited in a microchannel based on the hydrodynamics of Taylor flow. Measurements were carried out for pure liquids and binary aqueous liquid mixtures. The results agreed well with reference data and theoretical models. This novel method has considerable potential for measuring dynamic interfacial tension of complex mixtures. Furthermore, it offers opportunity for integrating property measurement with two-phase flow in microchannel, opening new lines of applications.

  5. Broad belts of shear zones: The common form of surface rupture produced by the 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.M.; Cruikshank, K.M. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Richard H. Jahns Engineering Geology Lab.; Fleming, R.W. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Surface rupturing during the 28 June 1992, Landers, California earthquake, east of Los Angeles, accommodated right-lateral offsets up to about 6 m along segments of distinct, en echelon fault zones with a total length of about 80 km. The offsets were accommodated generally not by faults -- distinct slip surfaces -- but rather by shear zones, tabular bands of localized shearing. In long, straight stretches of fault zones at Landers the rupture is characterized by telescoping of shear zones and intensification of shearing: broad shear zones of mild shearing, containing narrow shear zones of more intense shearing, containing even-narrower shear zones of very intense shearing, which may contain a fault. Thus the ground ruptured across broad belts of shearing with subparallel walls, oriented NW. Each broad belt consists of a broad zone of mild shearing, extending across its entire width (50 to 200 m), and much narrower (a few m wide) shear zones that accommodate most of the offset of the belt and are portrayed by en echelon tension cracks. In response to right-lateral shearing, the slices of ground bounded by the tension cracks rotated in a clockwise sense, producing left lateral shearing, and the slices were forced against the walls of the shear zone, producing thrusting. Even narrower shear zones formed within the narrow shear zones, and some of these were faults. Although the narrower shear zones probably are indicators to right-lateral fault segments at depth, the surface rupturing during the earthquake is characterized not by faulting, but by zones of shearing at various scales. Furthermore, understanding of the formation of the shear zones may be critical to understanding of earthquake faulting because, where faulting is associated with the formation of a shear zone, the faulting occurs late in the development of the shear zone. The faulting occurs after a shear zone or a belt of shear zones forms.

  6. Density, viscosity, surface tension, and spectroscopic properties for binary system of 1,2-ethanediamine + diethylene glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lihua; Zhang, Jianbin, E-mail: tadzhang@pku.edu.cn; Li, Qiang; Guo, Bo; Zhao, Tianxiang; Sha, Feng

    2014-08-20

    Graphical abstract: Excess property of the binary system 1,2-ethanediamine (EDA) + diethylene glycol (DEG). - Highlights: • Densities and viscosities of EDA + DEG at 298.15–318.150 K were listed. • Thermodynamics data of EDA + DEG at 298.15–318.15 K were calculated. • Surface tension of EDA + DEG at 298.15 K was measured. • Intermolecular interaction of EDA with DEG was discussed. - Abstract: This paper reports density and viscosity data at T = 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, and 318.15 K and surface tension data at 298.15 K for the binary system 1,2-ethanediamine (EDA) + diethylene glycol (DEG) as a function of composition under atmospheric pressure. From the experimental density and viscosity data, the excess molar volume and viscosity deviation were calculated, and the results were fitted to a Redlich–Kister equation to obtain the coefficients and to estimate the standard deviations between the experimental and calculated quantities. Based on the kinematic viscosity data, enthalpy of activation for viscous flow, entropy of activation for the viscous flow, and Gibbs energies of activation of viscous flow were calculated. In addition, based on Fourier transform infrared spectra, UV–vis spectra, and electrical conductivity for the system EDA + DEG with various concentrations, intermolecular interaction of EDA with DEG was discussed.

  7. Monitoring polymer properties using shear horizontal surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Dana Y; Millard, Paul J; Pereira da Cunha, Mauricio

    2009-10-01

    Real-time, nondestructive methods for monitoring polymer film properties are increasingly important in the development and fabrication of modern polymer-containing products. Online testing of industrial polymer films during preparation and conditioning is required to minimize material and energy consumption, improve the product quality, increase the production rate, and reduce the number of product rejects. It is well-known that shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) propagation is sensitive to mass changes as well as to the mechanical properties of attached materials. In this work, the SH-SAW was used to monitor polymer property changes primarily dictated by variations in the viscoelasticity. The viscoelastic properties of a negative photoresist film were monitored throughout the ultraviolet (UV) light-induced polymer cross-linking process using SH-SAW delay line devices. Changes in the polymer film mass and viscoelasticity caused by UV exposure produced variations in the phase velocity and attenuation of the SH-SAW propagating in the structure. Based on measured polymer-coated delay line scattering transmission responses (S(21)) and the measured polymer layer thickness and density, the viscoelastic constants c(44) and eta(44) were extracted. The polymer thickness was found to decrease 0.6% during UV curing, while variations in the polymer density were determined to be insignificant. Changes of 6% in c(44) and 22% in eta(44) during the cross-linking process were observed, showing the sensitivity of the SH-SAW phase velocity and attenuation to changes in the polymer film viscoelasticity. These results indicate the potential for SH-SAW devices as online monitoring sensors for polymer film processing.

  8. Shear driven droplet shedding and coalescence on a superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtadernejad, S.; Tembely, M.; Jadidi, M.; Esmail, N.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2015-03-01

    The interest on shedding and coalescence of sessile droplets arises from the importance of these phenomena in various scientific problems and industrial applications such as ice formation on wind turbine blades, power lines, nacelles, and aircraft wings. It is shown recently that one of the ways to reduce the probability of ice accretion on industrial components is using superhydrophobic coatings due to their low adhesion to water droplets. In this study, a combined experimental and numerical approach is used to investigate droplet shedding and coalescence phenomena under the influence of air shear flow on a superhydrophobic surface. Droplets with a size of 2 mm are subjected to various air speeds ranging from 5 to 90 m/s. A numerical simulation based on the Volume of Fluid method coupled with the Large Eddy Simulation turbulent model is carried out in conjunction with the validating experiments to shed more light on the coalescence of droplets and detachment phenomena through a detailed analysis of the aerodynamics forces and velocity vectors on the droplet and the streamlines around it. The results indicate a contrast in the mechanism of two-droplet coalescence and subsequent detachment with those related to the case of a single droplet shedding. At lower speeds, the two droplets coalesce by attracting each other with successive rebounds of the merged droplet on the substrate, while at higher speeds, the detachment occurs almost instantly after coalescence, with a detachment time decreasing exponentially with the air speed. It is shown that coalescence phenomenon assists droplet detachment from the superhydrophobic substrate at lower air speeds.

  9. Surface Effect on Vibration of Y-SWCNTs Embedded on Pasternak Foundation Conveying Viscose Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghorbanpour-Arani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface and small scale effects on free transverse vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT fitted with Y-junction at downstream end conveying viscose fluid is investigated in this article based on Euler-Bernoulli beam (EBB model. Nonlocal elasticity theory is employed to consider small scale effects due to its simplicity and efficiency. The energy method and Hamilton’s principle are used to establish the corresponding motion equation. To discretize and solve the governing equation of motion the Galerkin method is applied. Moreover, the small-size effect, angle of Y-junction, surface layer and Pasternak elastic foundation are studied in detail. Regarding fluid flow effects, it has been concluded that the fluid flow is an effective factor on increasing the instability of Y-SWCNT. Results show that increasing the angle of Y-junction enhances the flutter fluid velocity where the first and second modes are merged. This work could be used in medical application and design of nano-electromechanical devices such as measuring the density of blood flowing through such nanotubes.

  10. Surface Modification Approach to TiO2 Nanofluids with High Particle Concentration, Low Viscosity, and Electrochemical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sujat; Govindarajan, Vijay; Pelliccione, Christopher J; Wang, Jie; Miller, Dean J; Timofeeva, Elena V

    2015-09-23

    This study presents a new approach to the formulation of functional nanofluids with high solid loading and low viscosity while retaining the surface activity of nanoparticles, in particular, their electrochemical response. The proposed methodology can be applied to a variety of functional nanomaterials and enables exploration of nanofluids as a medium for industrial applications beyond heat transfer fluids, taking advantage of both liquid behavior and functionality of dispersed nanoparticles. The highest particle concentration achievable with pristine 25 nm titania (TiO2) nanoparticles in aqueous electrolytes (pH 11) is 20 wt %, which is limited by particle aggregation and high viscosity. We have developed a scalable one-step surface modification procedure for functionalizing those TiO2 nanoparticles with a monolayer coverage of propyl sulfonate groups, which provides steric and charge-based separation of particles in suspension. Stable nanofluids with TiO2 loadings up to 50 wt % and low viscosity are successfully prepared from surface-modified TiO2 nanoparticles in the same electrolytes. Viscosity and thermal conductivity of the resulting nanofluids are evaluated and compared to nanofluids prepared from pristine nanoparticles. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the surface-modified titania nanoparticles retain more than 78% of their electrochemical response as compared to that of the pristine material. Potential applications of the proposed nanofluids include, but are not limited to, electrochemical energy storage and catalysis, including photo- and electrocatalysis.

  11. Surface mixed layer deepening through wind shear alignment in a seasonally stratified shallow sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, B. J.; Rippeth, T. P.; Simpson, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    Inertial oscillations are a ubiquitous feature of the surface ocean. Here we combine new observations with a numerical model to investigate the role of inertial oscillations in driving deepening of the surface mixed layer in a seasonally stratified sea. Observations of temperature and current structure, from a mooring in the Western Irish Sea, reveal episodes of strong currents (>0.3 m s-1) lasting several days, resulting in enhanced shear across the thermocline. While the episodes of strong currents are coincident with windy periods, the variance in the shear is not directly related to the wind stress. The shear varies on a subinertial time scale with the formation of shear maxima lasting several hours occurring at the local inertial period of 14.85 h. These shear maxima coincide with the orientation of the surface current being at an angle of approximately 90° to the right of the wind direction. Observations of the water column structure during windy periods reveal deepening of the surface mixed layer in a series of steps which coincide with a period of enhanced shear. During the periods of enhanced shear gradient, Richardson number estimates indicate Ri-1 ≥ 4 at the base of the surface mixed layer, implying the deepening as a result of shear instability. A one-dimensional vertical exchange model successfully reproduces the magnitude and phase of the shear spikes as well as the step-like deepening. The observations and model results therefore identify the role of wind shear alignment as a key entrainment mechanism driving surface mixed layer deepening in a shallow, seasonally stratified sea.

  12. Extensional flow of low-viscosity fluids in capillary bridges formed by pulsed surface acoustic wave jetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, P K; McDonnell, A G; Prabhakar, R; Yeo, L Y; Friend, J, E-mail: james.friend@monash.edu.au [MicroNanophysics Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia); Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    Forming capillary bridges of low-viscosity ({approx}<10 mPa s) fluids is difficult, making the study of their capillary-thinning behavior and the measurement of the fluid's extensional viscosity difficult as well. Current techniques require some time to form a liquid bridge from the stretching of a droplet. Rapidly stretching a liquid bridge using these methods can cause its breakup if the viscosity is too low. Stretching more slowly allows the bridge to thin and break up before a suitable bridge geometry can be established to provide reliable and accurate rheological data. Using a pulsed surface acoustic wave to eject a jet from a sessile droplet, a capillary bridge may be formed in about 7.5 ms, about seven times quicker than current methods. With this approach, capillary bridges may be formed from Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids having much lower viscosities-water, 0.04% by weight solution of high-molecular-weight (7 MDa) polystyrene in dioctyl phthalate and 0.25% fibrinogen solution in demineralized water, for example. Details of the relatively simple system used to achieve these results are provided, as are experimental results indicating deviations from a Newtonian response by the low-viscosity non-Newtonian fluids used in our study.

  13. COMPARISON OF THE SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF BRACKETS USING TWO SURFACE CONDITIONING METHODS FOR PORCELAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Ballesteros-Pinzón, Claudia; Bermúdez-Lozano, Jesús A.; Coronel-Corzo, Nelly; de-León-Goenaga, Edwin; Delgado, Linda P.; Báez-Quintero, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: During 2010 the degree research “Comparison of the shear bond strength of brackets using two surface conditioning methods for porcelain” was carried out at Universidad Cooperativa de Colombia in Bogota. Objective: To determine the shear bond strength of metal brackets cemented on porcelain using two surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: Forty human premolars were used and prepared for further cementing porcelain-metal crowns. There were two groups of 20 teeth each...

  14. Surface and downhole shear wave seismic methods for thick soil site investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, J.A.; Benjumea, B.; Harris, J.B.; Miller, R.D.; Pullan, S.E.; Burns, R.A.; Good, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Shear wave velocity-depth information is required for predicting the ground motion response to earthquakes in areas where significant soil cover exists over firm bedrock. Rather than estimating this critical parameter, it can be reliably measured using a suite of surface (non-invasive) and downhole (invasive) seismic methods. Shear wave velocities from surface measurements can be obtained using SH refraction techniques. Array lengths as large as 1000 m and depth of penetration to 250 m have been achieved in some areas. High resolution shear wave reflection techniques utilizing the common midpoint method can delineate the overburden-bedrock surface as well as reflecting boundaries within the overburden. Reflection data can also be used to obtain direct estimates of fundamental site periods from shear wave reflections without the requirement of measuring average shear wave velocity and total thickness of unconsolidated overburden above the bedrock surface. Accurate measurements of vertical shear wave velocities can be obtained using a seismic cone penetrometer in soft sediments, or with a well-locked geophone array in a borehole. Examples from thick soil sites in Canada demonstrate the type of shear wave velocity information that can be obtained with these geophysical techniques, and show how these data can be used to provide a first look at predicted ground motion response for thick soil sites. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. Effects of Environmental Oxygen Content and Dissolved Oxygen on the Surface Tension and Viscosity of Liquid Nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, M. P.; Rogers, J. R.; Kumar, V.; Rodriguez, J.; Xiao, X.; Matson, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has recently added an oxygen partial pressure controller. This system allows the oxygen partial pressure within the vacuum chamber to be measured and controlled in the range from approximately 10^{-28} {to} 10^{-9} bar, while in a vacuum atmosphere. The oxygen control system installed in the ESL laboratory's main chamber consists of an oxygen sensor, oxygen pump, and a control unit. The sensor is a potentiometric device that determines the difference in oxygen activity in two gas compartments (inside the chamber and the air outside of the chamber) separated by an electrolyte. The pump utilizes coulometric titration to either add or remove oxygen. The system is controlled by a desktop control unit, which can also be accessed via a computer. The controller performs temperature control for the sensor and pump, has a PID-based current loop and a control algorithm. Oxygen partial pressure has been shown to play a significant role in the surface tension of liquid metals. Oxide films or dissolved oxygen may lead to significant changes in surface tension. The effects on surface tension and viscosity by oxygen partial pressure in the surrounding environment and the melt dissolved oxygen content will be evaluated, and the results will be presented. The surface tension and viscosity will be measured at several different oxygen partial pressures while the sample is undercooled. Surface tension and viscosity will be measured using the oscillating droplet method.

  16. A study on the impact of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose on the viscosity of PEG melt suspensions using surface plots and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ching Mien; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah

    2015-04-01

    An understanding of the rheological behaviour of polymer melt suspensions is crucial in pharmaceutical manufacturing, especially when processed by spray congealing or melt extruding. However, a detailed comparison of the viscosities at each and every temperature and concentration between the various grades of adjuvants in the formulation will be tedious and time-consuming. Therefore, the statistical method, principal component analysis (PCA), was explored in this study. The composite formulations comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) of ten different grades (K100 LV, K4M, K15M, K100M, E15 LV, E50 LV, E4M, F50 LV, F4M and Methocel VLV) at various concentrations were prepared and their viscosities at different temperatures determined. Surface plots showed that concentration of HPMC had a greater effect on the viscosity compared to temperature. Particle size and size distribution of HPMC played an important role in the viscosity of melt suspensions. Smaller particles led to a greater viscosity than larger particles. PCA was used to evaluate formulations of different viscosities. The complex viscosity profiles of the various formulations containing HPMC were successfully classified into three clusters of low, moderate and high viscosity. Formulations within each group showed similar viscosities despite differences in grade or concentration of HPMC. Formulations in the low viscosity cluster were found to be sprayable. PCA was able to differentiate the complex viscosity profiles of different formulations containing HPMC in an efficient and time-saving manner and provided an excellent visualisation of the data.

  17. Estimation of the shear stress on the surface of an aortic valve leaflet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, M W; LaBorde, D V; Yoganathan, A P

    1999-01-01

    The limited durability of xenograft heart valves and the limited supply of allografts have sparked interest in tissue engineered replacement valves. A bioreactor for tissue engineered valves must operate at conditions that optimize the biosynthetic abilities of seeded cells while promoting their adherence to the leaflet matrix. An important parameter is shear stress, which is known to influence cellular behavior and may thus be crucial in bioreactor optimization. Therefore, an accurate estimate of the shear stress on the leaflet surface would not only improve our understanding of the mechanical environment of aortic valve leaflets, but it would also aid in bioreactor design. To estimate the shear stress on the leaflet surface, two-component laser-Doppler velocimetry measurements have been conducted inside a transparent polyurethane valve with a trileaflet structure similar to the native aortic valve. Steady flow rates of 7.5, 15.0, and 22.5 L/min were examined to cover the complete range possible during the cardiac cycle. The laminar shear stresses were calculated by linear regression of four axial velocity measurements near the surface of the leaflet. The maximum shear stress recorded was 79 dyne/cm2, in agreement with boundary layer theory and previous experimental and computational studies. This study has provided a range of shear stresses to be explored in bioreactor design and has defined a maximum shear stress at which cells must remain adherent upon a tissue engineered construct.

  18. Effect of viscosity ratio on the motion of drops flowing on an inclined surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberuee, M.; Mortazavi, S.

    2017-06-01

    The flow of two-dimensional drops on an inclined channel is studied by numerical simulations at finite Reynolds numbers. The effect of viscosity ratio on the behaviour of the two-phase medium is examined. The flow is driven by the acceleration due to gravity, and there is no pressure gradient along the flow direction. An implicit version of the finite difference/front-tracking method was developed and used in the present study. The lateral migration of a drop is studied first. It is found that the equilibrium position of a drop moves away from the channel floor as the viscosity ratio increases. However, the trend reverses beyond a certain viscosity ratio. Simulations with 40 drops in a relatively large channel show that there exists a limiting viscosity ratio where the drops behave like solid particles, and the effect of internal circulation of drops becomes negligible. This limiting condition resembles the granular flow regime except that the effect of interstitial fluid is present. The limiting viscosity ratio depends on the flow conditions (80 for Re=10 , and 200 for Re=20 ). There are two peaks in the areal fraction distribution of drops across the channel which is different from granular flow regime. It is also found that the peak in areal fraction distribution of drops moves away from the channel floor as the inclination angle of the channel increases.

  19. Extensional flow of low-viscosity fluids in capillary bridges formed by pulsed surface acoustic wave jetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, P. K.; McDonnell, A. G.; Prabhakar, R.; Yeo, L. Y.; Friend, J.

    2011-02-01

    Forming capillary bridges of low-viscosity (lsim10 mPa s) fluids is difficult, making the study of their capillary-thinning behavior and the measurement of the fluid's extensional viscosity difficult as well. Current techniques require some time to form a liquid bridge from the stretching of a droplet. Rapidly stretching a liquid bridge using these methods can cause its breakup if the viscosity is too low. Stretching more slowly allows the bridge to thin and break up before a suitable bridge geometry can be established to provide reliable and accurate rheological data. Using a pulsed surface acoustic wave to eject a jet from a sessile droplet, a capillary bridge may be formed in about 7.5 ms, about seven times quicker than current methods. With this approach, capillary bridges may be formed from Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids having much lower viscosities—water, 0.04% by weight solution of high-molecular-weight (7 MDa) polystyrene in dioctyl phthalate and 0.25% fibrinogen solution in demineralized water, for example. Details of the relatively simple system used to achieve these results are provided, as are experimental results indicating deviations from a Newtonian response by the low-viscosity non-Newtonian fluids used in our study.

  20. Effect of Viscosities on the Surface Morphology and Crystallographic Properties of Hydroxyapatite Coated Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyungho; Lim, Hyunpil; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Park, Sangwon; Jeong, Cheolwoong; Lee, Kwangmin

    2015-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on biomaterials is crucial for bone growth. TiO2 naotubes having a larger specific area can also improve an osseointegration. In this study, anodized TiO2 nanotubes were coated with HA using sol-gel method with different viscosities of solution. Morphological characterization and crystal structures of the coated specimens were measured via field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffractometer, and fourier transforrm infrared spectroscopy. Nanosized hydroxyapatite particles were observed with sol viscosities at 1.95 cP and 0.94 cP inside the TiO2 nanotubes. When coated with the lower viscosity of solution, the TiO2 nanotubes were clearly observed. The crystallinity of HA increased as the temperature of heat treatment increased. The HA phase on the specimen was identified by PO4(3-) and OH-ion peaks in FT-IR spectra.

  1. Development of high viscosity coatings for advanced Space Shuttle applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalini, S. H.; Banas, R.; Creedon, J.

    1979-01-01

    Laboratory studies for increasing the thermal resistance of high viscosity coatings for silica reusable surface insulation are presented. The coatings are intended for the reentry temperature associated with advanced Space Shuttle applications which will involve aerodynamic shear forces during entry from earth orbits. Coating viscosity was increased by (1) reduction in the concentration of the low viscosity additive B2O3; (2) reduction in the particle size of the constituent powders in coatings; and (3) addition of a high viscosity glass former (GeO2). A coating system was produced by combining the three methods which showed apparent higher viscosity than the current coating, while satisfying all the current Shuttle Orbiter coating requirements.

  2. Quality factor due to roughness scattering of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves in nanoresonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we study the quality factor associated with dissipation due to scattering of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves by random self-affine roughness. It is shown that the quality factor is strongly influenced by both the surface roughness exponent H and the roughness amplitude w to late

  3. Viscosities of the quasigluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Bluhm, M; Redlich, K

    2010-01-01

    We investigate bulk and shear viscosities of the gluon plasma within relaxation time approximation to an effective Boltzmann-Vlasov type kinetic theory by viewing the plasma as describable in terms of quasigluon excitations with temperature dependent self-energies. The found temperature dependence of the transport coefficients agrees fairly well with available lattice QCD results. The impact of some details in the quasigluon dispersion relation on the specific shear viscosity is discussed.

  4. Shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to coping materials with different pre-surface treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar, Norsamihah; Ahmad, Marlynda

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Pre-surface treatments of coping materials have been recommended to enhance the bonding to the veneering ceramic. Little is known on the effect on shear bond strength, particularly with new coping material. The aim of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to three coping materials: i) metal alloy (MA), ii) zirconia oxide (ZO), and iii) lithium disilicate (LD) after various pre-surface treatments. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-two (n = 32) discs were prepared for each coping material. Four pre-surface treatments were prepared for each sub-group (n = 8); a) no treatment or control (C), b) sandblast (SB), c) acid etch (AE), and d) sandblast and acid etch (SBAE). Veneering ceramics were applied to all discs. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons tests. RESULTS Mean shear bond strengths were obtained for MA (19.00 ± 6.39 MPa), ZO (24.45 ± 5.14 MPa) and LD (13.62 ± 5.12 MPa). There were statistically significant differences in types of coping material and various pre-surface treatments (P<.05). There was a significant correlation between coping materials and pre-surface treatment to the shear bond strength (P<.05). CONCLUSION Shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to zirconia oxide was higher than metal alloy and lithium disilicate. The highest shear bond strengths were obtained in sandblast and acid etch treatment for zirconia oxide and lithium disilicate groups, and in acid etch treatment for metal alloy group. PMID:27826383

  5. Bulk Viscosity of dual Fluid at Finite Cutoff Surface via Gravity/Fluid correspondence in Einstein-Maxwell Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Ning

    2014-01-01

    Basing the previous paper arXiv:1207.5309, we investigate the probability to find out the bulk viscosity of dual fluid at the finite cutoff surface via gravity/fluid correspondence in Einstein-Maxwell Gravity. We find that if we adopt new conditions to fix the undetermined parameters contained in the stress tensor and charged current of the dual fluid, two new terms could appear in the stress tensor of the dual fluid. One new term is related to the bulk viscosity term, while the other could be related to the perturbation of energy density. In addition, since the parameters contained in the charged current are the same, the charged current is not changed.

  6. Surface modes in sheared boundary layers over impedance linings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambley, E. J.

    2013-08-01

    Surface modes, being duct modes localized close to the duct wall, are analysed within a lined cylindrical duct with uniform flow apart from a thin boundary layer. As well as full numerical solutions of the Pridmore-Brown equation, simplified mathematical models are given where the duct lining and boundary layer are lumped together and modelled using a single boundary condition (a modification of the Myers boundary condition previously proposed by the author), from which a surface mode dispersion relation is derived. For a given frequency, up to six surface modes are shown to exist, rather than the maximum of four for uniform slipping flow. Not only is the different number and behaviour of surface modes important for frequency-domain mode-matching techniques, which depend on having found all relevant modes during matching, but the thin boundary layer is also shown to lead to different convective and absolute stability than for uniform slipping flow. Numerical examples are given comparing the predictions of the surface mode dispersion relation to full solutions of the Pridmore-Brown equation, and the accuracy with which surface modes are predicted is shown to be significantly increased compared with the uniform slipping flow assumption. The importance of not only the boundary layer thickness but also its profile (tanh or linear) is demonstrated. A Briggs-Bers stability analysis is also performed under the assumption of a mass-spring-damper or Helmholtz resonator impedance model.

  7. Effects of radiation and variable viscosity on unsteady MHD flow of a rotating fluid from stretching surface in porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Rashad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on the study of unsteady magnetohydrodynamics boundary-layer flow and heat transfer for a viscous laminar incompressible electrically conducting and rotating fluid due to a stretching surface embedded in a saturated porous medium with a temperature-dependent viscosity in the presence of a magnetic field and thermal radiation effects. The fluid viscosity is assumed to vary as an inverse linear function of temperature. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in the energy equation. With appropriate transformations, the unsteady MHD boundary layer equations are reduced to local nonsimilarity equations. Numerical solutions of these equations are obtained by using the Runge–Kutta integration scheme as well as the local nonsimilarity method with second order truncation. Comparisons with previously published work have been conducted and the results are found to be in excellent agreement. A parametric study of the physical parameters is conducted and a representative set of numerical results for the velocity in primary and secondary flows as well as the local skin-friction coefficients and the local Nusselt number are illustrated graphically to show interesting features of Darcy number, viscosity-variation, magnetic field, rotation of the fluid, and conduction radiation parameters.

  8. Effect of surface tension, viscosity, and process conditions on polymer morphology deposited at the liquid-vapor interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Patrick D; Bradley, Laura C; Gupta, Malancha

    2013-09-17

    We have observed that the vapor-phase deposition of polymers onto liquid substrates can result in the formation of polymer films or particles at the liquid-vapor interface. In this study, we demonstrate the relationship between the polymer morphology at the liquid-vapor interface and the surface tension interaction between the liquid and polymer, the liquid viscosity, the deposition rate, and the deposition time. We show that the thermodynamically stable morphology is determined by the surface tension interaction between the liquid and the polymer. Stable polymer films form when it is energetically favorable for the polymer to spread over the surface of the liquid, whereas polymer particles form when it is energetically favorable for the polymer to aggregate. For systems that do not strongly favor spreading or aggregation, we observe that the initial morphology depends on the deposition rate. Particles form at low deposition rates, whereas unstable films form at high deposition rates. We also observe a transition from particle formation to unstable film formation when we increase the viscosity of the liquid or increase the deposition time. Our results provide a fundamental understanding about polymer growth at the liquid-vapor interface and can offer insight into the growth of other materials on liquid surfaces. The ability to systematically tune morphology can enable the production of particles for applications in photonics, electronics, and drug delivery and films for applications in sensing and separations.

  9. Modeling, design, packing and experimental analysis of liquid-phase shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Thomas B

    using uniform-electrode and shear-horizontal mode configurations on potassium-niobate, langasite, and quartz substrates. Optimum configurations are determined yielding maximum sensitivity. Results show mode propagation-loss and sensitivity to viscosity are correlated by a factor independent of substrate material. The analysis is useful for designing devices meeting sensitivity and signal level requirements. A novel, rapid and precise microfluidic chamber alignment/bonding method was developed for SAW platforms. The package is shown to have little effect on device performance and permits simple macrofluidic interfacing. Lastly, prototypes were designed, fabricated, and tested for viscosity and biosensor applications; results show ability to detect as low as 1% glycerol in water and surface-bound DNA crosslinking.

  10. Surface-mounted bender elements for measuring horizontal shear wave velocity of soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-guo ZHOU; Yun-min CHEN; Yoshiharu ASAKA; Tohru ABE

    2008-01-01

    The bender element testing features its in-plane directivity,which allows using bender elements to measure the shear wave velocities in a wider range of in-plane configurations besides the standard tip-to-tip alignment.This paper proposed a novel bender element testing technique for measuring the horizontal shear wave velocity of soils,where the bender elements are surface-mounted and the axes of the source and receiver elements are parallel to each other.The preliminary tests performed on model ground of silica sand showed that,by properly determining the travel distance and time of the shear waves,the surface-mounted bender elements can perform as accurately as the conventional "tip-to-tip" configuration.Potentially,the present system provides a promising nondestructive tool for characterizing geomaterials and site conditions both in laboratory and in the fields.

  11. Influence of surface treatment on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ione Helena Vieira Portella Brunharo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to micro-hybrid and micro-particulate resins under different surface treatment methods was assessed. METHODS: Two hundred and eighty test samples were divided into 28 groups (n = 10, where 140 specimens were filled with Durafill micro-particulate resin and 140 with Charisma composite. In 140 samples, a coupling agent (silane was applied. The surface treatment methods were: Phosphoric and hydrofluoric acid etching, sodium bicarbonate and aluminum oxide blasting, stone and burs. A Universal Instron Machine was used to apply an occlusal shear force directly to the resin composite bracket surface at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The means were compared using analysis of variance and multivariate regression to assess the interaction between composites and surface treatment methods. RESULTS: Means and standard deviations for the groups were: Sodium bicarbonate jet 11.27±2.78; burs 9.26±3.01; stone 7.95±3.67; aluminum oxide blasting 7.04±3.21; phosphoric acid 5.82±1.90; hydrofluoric acid 4.54±2.87, and without treatment 2.75±1.49. An increase of 1.94 MPa in shear bond strength was seen in Charisma groups. Silane agent application reduced the Charisma shear bond strength by 0.68 Mpa, but increased Durafill means for bicarbonate blasting (0.83, burs (0.98 and stone drilling (0.46. CONCLUSION: The sodium bicarbonate blasting, burs and stone drilling methods produced adequate shear bond strength and may be suitable for clinical use. The Charisma micro hybrid resin composite showed higher shear bond means than Durafill micro particle composite.

  12. Survismeter, 3-in-1 Instrument for Simultaneous Measurements of Surface Tension, Inter Facial Tension (IFT and Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Singh

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents Inter Facial Tension (IFT (ift, N m-1 of benzene-water; surface tensions (, N m-1 and viscosities (, N s m-2 of ethanol, glycerol, ethyl acetate, n-hexane, diethyl ether, chloroform, benzene, carbon tetrachloride [CCl4], formic acid, measured with Survismeter with ± 1.1x10-5 N m-1, ± 1.3x10-5 N m-1 and ± 1.1x10-6 N s m-2 accuracies respectively. Also the surface tension and viscosities of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC, dodecylbenzenesulfonicacid (DBSA and tetramethylammoniumhydroxide (TMAH in aqueous media have been measured with survismeter at 298.15 K. IFT of water and benzene interface was determined with survismeter. The survismeter saves resources, user’s efforts and infrastructure more than 80 % as compared to usual methods and prevents 80% disposal of materials to environment. It very accurately measures surface tension and IFT of volatile and poisonous liquids at any desired temperatures as liquids are jacked (jacketed in closed glass made bulbs.

  13. Biomechanics of cell rolling: shear flow, cell-surface adhesion, and cell deformability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C; Lei, X X

    2000-01-01

    The mechanics of leukocyte (white blood cell; WBC) deformation and adhesion to endothelial cells (EC) has been investigated using a novel in vitro side-view flow assay. HL-60 cell rolling adhesion to surface-immobilized P-selectin was used to model the WBC-EC adhesion process. Changes in flow shear stress, cell deformability, or substrate ligand strength resulted in significant changes in the characteristic adhesion binding time, cell-surface contact and cell rolling velocity. A 2-D model indicated that cell-substrate contact area under a high wall shear stress (20 dyn/cm2) could be nearly twice of that under a low stress (0.5 dyn/cm2) due to shear flow-induced cell deformation. An increase in contact area resulted in more energy dissipation to both adhesion bonds and viscous cytoplasm, whereas the fluid energy that inputs to a cell decreased due to a flattened cell shape. The model also predicted a plateau of WBC rolling velocity as flow shear stresses further increased. Both experimental and computational studies have described how WBC deformation influences the WBC-EC adhesion process in shear flow.

  14. Effect of Different Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Veneering Composite to Polyetherketone Core Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Pourkhalili

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective:The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of different surface treatment methods on shear bond strength of the veneering composite to polyetheretherketone (PEEK core material. Materials and Methods::In this in vitro, experimental study, 60 PEEK discs were fabricated, polished with silicon carbide abrasive paper and divided into five surface treatment groups (n=12 namely air abrasion with 110µm alumina particles at 0.2MPa pressure for 10 seconds, 98% sulfuric acid etching for one minute, air abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching, application of cyanoacrylate resin and a no surface treatment control group. Visio.link adhesive and GC Gradia veneering composite were applied on PEEK surfaces and light-cured. Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine and the data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results:The mean ± standard deviation (SD values of shear bond strength of the veneering composite to PEEK surfaces were 8.85±3.03, 15.6±5.02, 30.42±5.43, 26.14±4.33 and 5.94±4.49MPa in the control, air-abrasion, sulfuric acid etching, air-abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching and cyanoacrylate resin groups, respectively. The control and cyanoacrylate groups had significant differences with air abrasion, sulfuric acid etching and air abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching groups in terms of shear bond strength (P<0.0001. Higher bond strength values were noted in sulfuric acid etching, air-abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching and air abrasion groups compared to the control and cyanoacrylate groups (P<0.0001. Conclusion:Sulfuric acid etching, air abrasion and a combination of both are recommended as efficient surface treatments to increase the shear bond strength of the veneering composite to PEEK core material.

  15. A NEW APPROACH TO CALCULATION OF THE ELLIPTICAL BEARING OF MULTI-SHEARING-SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin GÜLLÜ

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new approach is proposed in the calculation of performance characteristics of elliptic bearings of Multi-Shearing-Surface (MSS type which has widely been used yet. The number of researches available in this area are far below the needs. This paper presents the proposed approach and the performance of bearings without use of superposition.

  16. Notes on the Surface Velocity Profile and Horizontal Shear across the Width of the Gulf Stream

    OpenAIRE

    Arx, William S. Von

    2011-01-01

    During a cruise across the Gulf Stream in October 1950 measurements of surface velocity were made both with the Loran-space-dead method and the electromagnetic method. A short account of the results is given with special reference to the velocity profile and the horizontal shear across the Gulf Stream.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1952.tb01006.x

  17. Monte Carlo study of the shear modulus at the surface of a Lennard-Jones crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eerden, J. P. v. d.; Knops, H. J. F.; Roos, A.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we give a microscopic definition of local elastic constants. We apply this to the numerical evaluation of the shear modulus of an interface which is sharp as compared with the interaction range. The algorithm is applied to a study of the (001) face of a face-centered-cubic (fcc) Lennard-Jones crystal. The vanishing of the shear modulus gives an estimate of the melting temperature of the first layer which is well below the bulk triple point. Some theoretical aspects of surface melting are briefly discussed.

  18. Development of Stokes flow solver against a large contrast in viscosity: toward plate-mantle simulation with free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuichi, M.

    2009-12-01

    We are interested in solving a large-scale plate-mantle simulation enables capture of the large and complex deformation of a subducting plate. In our earlier study (Furuichi, et al 2008), we developed a numerical method toward plate-mantle simulation especially for the highly parallel vector supercomputer system (e.g. Earth Simulator). Our scheme is based on the finite volume method combines (i) the multigrid technique together with ACuTE smoother algorithm (Kameyama et al., 2005), and (ii) the low diffusive CIP-CSLR advection. The validity test of our simulation code by using a fluid rope coiling event (Furuichi, et al 2009) showed that our method enable us to reproduce large non-linear deformation problems of a rigid plate surrounded by soft material without serious quantitative errors. Then as a next step, I am trying to create a Stokes flow solver scalable against a large jump in a viscosity profile, for moving surface (geometrically free boundary) problems. It is for solving the Stokes flow motion under the same condition as real earth. In this presentation, I propose to apply BFBt preconditioner and AMG techniques for the problems of large viscosity contrast and moving free surface boundary condition respectively. I would like to show some numerical experiments for a self-gravitating motion of the layered Stokes flow.

  19. Helioseismic Imaging of Supergranulation throughout the Sun’s Near-Surface Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Benjamin J.; Hindman, Bradley W.; Toomre, Juri

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of the Sun’s sub-surface convective flows and provide evidence that the pattern of supergranulation is driven at the surface. The pattern subsequently descends slowly throughout the near-surface shear layer in a manner that is inconsistent with a 3D cellular structure. The flow measurements are obtained through the application of a new helioseismic technique based on traditional ring analysis. We measure the flow field over the course of eleven days and perform a correlation analysis between all possible pairs of depths and temporal separations. In congruence with previous studies, we find that the supergranulation pattern remains coherent at the surface for slightly less than two days and the instantaneous surface pattern is imprinted to a depth of 7 Mm. However, these correlation times and depths are deceptive. When we admit a potential time lag in the correlation, we find that peak correlation in the convective flows descends at a rate of 10-40 m s-1 (or equivalently 1-3 Mm per day). Furthermore, the correlation extends throughout all depths of the near-surface shear layer. This pattern-propagation rate is well matched by estimates of the speed of downflows obtained through the anelastic approximation. Direct integration of the measured speed indicates that the supergranulation pattern that first appears at the surface eventually reaches the bottom of the near-surface shear layer a month later. Thus, the downflows have a Rossby radius of deformation equal to the depth of the shear layer and we suggest that this equality may not be coincidental.

  20. 血液黏滞系数对颅内大型动脉瘤剪切力的影响%Impact of blood viscosity on wall shear stress of large intracranial aneurysms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴京; 刘爱华; 赵艺; 符策基; 彭汤明; 钱增辉; 康慧斌; 吴中学

    2015-01-01

    Objective To simulate the computational hemodynamics of large intracranial aneurysms and analyze the impact of blood viscosity on wall shear stress.Methods Eight large intracranial aneurysms at internal carotid artery between June 2013 and July 2013 were studied retrospectively.Among them,3 aneurysms were ruptured and 5 were unruptured.Pulsatile CFD simulations were carried out using three levels of blood viscosity (0.002,0.004,0.012 Pa·s).For each aneurysm model,the average wall shear stress (WSS) predicted by the three blood viscosity levels were compared.Results Blood viscosity has significant impaction on average wall shear stress of intracranial aneurysms and parent artery.Average wall shear stress increased significantly with the increase of blood viscosity.When blood viscosity was 0.002,0.004,0.012 Pa·s,the average wall shear stress of aneurysms was (2.79 ±2.23),(5.27 ±3.72) and (11.05 ± 7.56) Pa,respectively.The average wall shear stress of parent artery was (5.61 ± 2.59),(9.56 ± 3.74) and (22.56 ± 12.41) Pa respectively.A reduction in wall shear stress between the parent artery and the aneurysm sac was found in all the cases.Conclusion Abnormal increase or decrease in blood viscosity may aggravate vascular wall damage and increase the risk of aneurysmal rupture.It is necessary to adopt patient-specific value of blood viscosity in future hemodynamic studies of intracranial aneurysms.%目的 应用血流动力学数值模拟技术分析不同血液黏滞系数对颅内大型动脉瘤剪切力水平的影响.方法 收集我院2013年6月至2013年7月收治的8例颅内大型囊性动脉瘤患者脑血管三维影像数据,其中破裂动脉瘤3例,未破裂动脉瘤5例.应用CFD ICEM软件对动脉瘤三维模型进行网格划分,再进行流体力学数值模拟计算.在血液黏滞系数为0.002、0.004和0.012 Pa·s 3种水平时对颅内大型动脉瘤进行血流动力学数值模拟运算并比较动脉瘤及载

  1. Influence of Hot-Etching Surface Treatment on Zirconia/Resin Shear Bond Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Lv

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effect of hot-etching surface treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia ceramics and two commercial resin cements. Ceramic cylinders (120 units; length: 2.5 mm; diameter: 4.7 mm were randomly divided into 12 groups (n = 10 according to different surface treatments (blank control; airborne-particle-abrasion; hot-etching and different resin cements (Panavia F2.0; Superbond C and B and whether or not a thermal cycling fatigue test (5°–55° for 5000 cycles was performed. Flat enamel surfaces, mounted in acrylic resin, were bonded to the zirconia discs (diameter: 4.7 mm. All specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. All data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and multiple-comparison least significant difference tests (α = 0.05. Hot-etching treatment produced higher bond strengths than the other treatment with both resin cements. The shear bond strength of all groups significantly decreased after the thermal cycling test; except for the hot-etching group that was cemented with Panavia F2.0 (p < 0.05. Surface treatment of zirconia with hot-etching solution enhanced the surface roughness and bond strength between the zirconia and the resin cement.

  2. Bonding to a porcelain surface: Factors affecting the shear bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishir Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bonding to porcelain veneers, crowns or restorations is a major challenge for an orthodontist. A study was undertaken wherein, the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets on porcelain were compared and the effects of debonding on the debonded surfaces were evaluated. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 acrylic duplicate samples were fabricated from a therapeutically extracted maxillary first premolar, duly prepared for metal crown with porcelain facing. The samples were divided into two equal groups for bonding of metal and ceramic brackets. The shear bond strength of the samples was measured with a universal testing machine. Results: The metal brackets showed shear bond strengths with a mean of 12.21 ± 1.4 MPa, whereas the ceramic brackets displayed shear bond strengths with a mean of 17.45 ± 2.36 MPa. Visual and scanning electron microscope examination revealed multiple failure patterns with more of porcelain fractures in the ceramic brackets group. Conclusion: Bonding of metal and ceramic brackets to porcelain can be achieved with bond strengths comparable to that when bonded to enamel surface. Porcelain fractures are more commonly associated with debonding of ceramic brackets.

  3. Modeling of Surface Tension and Viscosity for Non-electrolyte Systems by Means of the Equation of State for Square-well Chain Fluids with Variable Interaction Range

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jinlong; HE Changchun; MA Jun; PENG Changjun; LIU Honglai; HU Ying

    2011-01-01

    The equation of state(EOS)for square-well chain fluid with variable range(SWCF-VR) developed in our previous work based on statistical mechanical theory for chemical association is employed for the correlations of surface tension and viscosity of common fluids and ionic liquids(ILs).A model of surface tension for multi-component mixtures is presented by combining the SWCF-VR EOS and the scaled particle theory and used to produce the surface tension of binary and ternary mixtures.The predicted surface tensions are in excellent agreement with the experimental data with an overall average absolute relative deviation(AAD)of 0.36%.A method for the calculation of dynamic viscosity of common fluids and ILs at high pressure is presented by combining Eyring’s rate theory of viscosity and the SWCF-VR EOS.The calculated viscosities are in good agreement with the experimental data with the overall AAD of 1.44% for 14 fluids in 84 cases.The salient feature is that the molecular parameters used in these models are self-consistent and can be applied to calculate different thermodynamic properties such as pVT,vapor-liquid equilibrium,caloric properties,surface tension,and viscosity.

  4. Radiative Bulk Viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, X

    2001-01-01

    Viscous resistance to changes in the volume of a gas arises when different degrees of freedom have different relaxation times. Collisions tend to oppose the resulting departures from equilibrium and, in so doing, generate entropy. Even for a classical gas of hard spheres, when the mean free paths or mean flight times of constituent particles are long, we find a nonvanishing bulk viscosity. Here we apply a method recently used to uncover this result for a classical rarefied gas to radiative transfer theory and derive an expression for the radiative stress tensor for a gray medium with absorption and Thomson scattering. We determine the transport coefficients through the calculation of the comoving entropy generation. When scattering dominates absorption, the bulk viscosity becomes much larger than either the shear viscosity or the thermal conductivity.

  5. Turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with shear-dependent slip length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosh Aghdam, Sohrab; Seddighi, Mehdi; Ricco, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by recent experimental evidence, shear-dependent slip length superhydrophobic surfaces are studied. Lyapunov stability analysis is applied in a 3D turbulent channel flow and extended to the shear-dependent slip-length case. The feedback law extracted is recognized for the first time to coincide with the constant-slip-length model widely used in simulations of hydrophobic surfaces. The condition for the slip parameters is found to be consistent with the experimental data and with values from DNS. The theoretical approach by Fukagata (PoF 18.5: 051703) is employed to model the drag-reduction effect engendered by the shear-dependent slip-length surfaces. The estimated drag-reduction values are in very good agreement with our DNS data. For slip parameters and flow conditions which are potentially realizable in the lab, the maximum computed drag reduction reaches 50%. The power spent by the turbulent flow on the walls is computed, thereby recognizing the hydrophobic surfaces as a passive-absorbing drag-reduction method, as opposed to geometrically-modifying techniques that do not consume energy, e.g. riblets, hence named passive-neutral. The flow is investigated by visualizations, statistical analysis of vorticity and strain rates, and quadrants of the Reynolds stresses. Part of this work was funded by Airbus Group. Simulations were performed on the ARCHER Supercomputer (UKTC Grant).

  6. Mass sensitivity of layered shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave devices for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Trinchi, Adrian; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Holland, Anthony; Galatsis, Kosmas

    2001-11-01

    Layered Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices that allow the propagation of Love mode acoustic waves will be studied in this paper. In these devices, the substrate allows the propagation of Surface Skimming Bulks Waves (SSBWs). By depositing layers, that the speed of Shear Horizontal (SH) acoustic wave propagation is less than that of the substrate, the propagation mode transforms to Love mode. Love mode devices which will be studied in this paper, have SiO2 and ZnO acoustic guiding layers. As Love mode of propagation has no movement of particles component normal to the active sensor surface, they can be employed for the sensing applications in the liquid media.

  7. Helioseismic Imaging of Supergranulation throughout the Sun's Near-Surface Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Bradley; Greer, Benjamin; Toomre, Juri

    2016-05-01

    We present measurements of the Sun's sub-surface convective flows and provide evidence that the pattern of supergranulation is driven at the surface. The pattern subsequently descends slowly throughout the near-surface shear layer in a manner that is inconsistent with a 3-D cellular structure. The flow measurements are obtained through the application of a new helioseismic technique based on traditional ring analysis. We measure the flow field over the course of eleven days and perform a correlation analysis between all possible pairs of depths and temporal separations. In congruence with previous studies, we find that the supergranulation pattern remains coherent at the surface for slightly less than two days and the instantaneous surface pattern is imprinted to a depth of 7 Mm. However, these correlation times and depths are deceptive. When we admit a potential time lag in the correlation, we find that peak correlation in the convective flows descends at a rate of 10 - 30 m s-1 (or equivalently 1 - 3 Mm per day). Furthermore, the correlation extends throughout all depths of the near-surface shear layer. This pattern-propagation rate is well matched by estimates of the speed of down flows obtained through the anelastic approximation. Direct integration of the measured speed indicates that the supergranulation pattern that first appears at the surface eventually reaches the bottom of the near-surface shear layer a month later. Thus, the transit time is roughly equal to a solar rotation period and we suggest this equality may not be coincidental.

  8. Direct ambient noise tomography for 3-D near surface shear velocity structure: methodology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has provided essential constraints on crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure in global seismology. Recent studies demonstrate that high frequency (e.g., ~ 1 Hz) surface waves between receivers at short distances can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation and then be used for imaging near surface or shallow crustal shear velocity structures. This approach provides important information for strong ground motion prediction in seismically active area and overburden structure characterization in oil and gas fields. Here we propose a new tomographic method to invert all surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wavespeed without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency-dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. The wavelet coefficients of the velocity model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, and upon iterations the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated from the newly obtained velocity model. We apply this new method to determine the 3-D near surface wavespeed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan, Hefei urban area and a shale and gas production field in China using the high-frequency interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion data extracted from ambient noisecross-correlation. The results reveal strong effects of off-great-circle propagation of high-frequency surface waves in these regions with above 30% shear wavespeed variations. The proposed approach is more efficient and robust than the traditional two-step surface wave tomography for imaging complex

  9. Effect of dentin surface roughness on the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Poursoltan, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to investigate whether dentin surface preparation with diamond rotary instruments of different grit sizes affects the shear bond strength of resin-bonded restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS The buccal enamel of 60 maxillary central incisors was removed with a low speed diamond saw and wet ground with silicon carbide papers. The polished surfaces of the teeth were prepared with four groups of rotary diamond burs with super-coarse (SC), coarse (C), medium (M), and fine (F) grit sizes. Following surface preparation, 60 restorations were casted with nickel-chromium alloy and bonded with Panavia cement. To assess the shear bond strength, the samples were mounted on a universal testing machine and an axial load was applied along the cement-restoration interface at the crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The acquired data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS The mean ± SD shear bond strengths (in MPa) of the study groups were 17.75 ± 1.41 for SC, 13.82 ± 1.13 for C, 10.40 ± 1.45 for M, and 7.13 ± 1.18 for F. Statistical analysis revealed the significant difference among the study groups such that the value for group SC was significantly higher than that for group F (P<.001). CONCLUSION Dentin surface roughness created by diamond burs of different grit sizes considerably influences the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations. PMID:27350858

  10. Surface morphology of platelet adhesion influenced by activators, inhibitors and shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Melanie Groan

    Platelet activation involves multiple events, one of which is the generation and release of nitric oxide (NO), a platelet aggregation inhibitor. Platelets simultaneously send and receive various agents that promote a positive and negative feedback control system during hemostasis. Although the purpose of platelet-derived NO is not fully understood, NO is known to inhibit platelet recruitment. NO's relatively large diffusion coefficient allows it to diffuse more rapidly than platelet agonists. It may thus be able to inhibit recruitment of platelets near the periphery of a growing thrombus before agonists have substantially accumulated in those regions. Results from two studies in our laboratory differed in the extent to which platelet-derived NO decreased platelet adhesion. Frilot studied the effect of L-arginine (L-A) and NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA) on platelet adhesion to collagen under static conditions in a Petri dish. Eshaq examined the percent coverage on collagen-coated and fibrinogen-coated microchannels under shear conditions with different levels of L-A and Adenosine Diphosphate (ADP). Frilot's results showed no effect of either L-A or L-NMMA on surface coverage, thrombus size or serotonin release, while Eshaq's results showed a decrease in surface coverage with increased levels of L-A. A possible explanation for these contrasting results is that platelet-derived NO may be more important under flow conditions than under static conditions. For this project, the effects of L-A. ADP and L-NMMA on platelet adhesion were studied at varying shear stresses on protein-coated glass slides. The surface exposed to platelet-rich-plasma in combination with each chemical solution was observed under AFM, FE-SEM and fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons of images obtained with these techniques confirmed the presence of platelets on the protein coatings. AFM images of fibrinogen and collagen-coated slides presented characteristic

  11. Oscillating line source in a shear flow with a free surface: critical layer-like contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2016-01-01

    The linearized water-wave radiation problem for an oscillating submerged line source in an inviscid shear flow with a free surface is investigated analytically at finite, constant depth in the presence of a shear flow varying linearly with depth. The surface velocity is taken to be zero relative to the oscillating source, so that Doppler effects are absent. The radiated wave out from the source is calculated based on Euler's equation of motion with the appropriate boundary and radiation conditions, and differs substantially from the solution obtained by assuming potential flow. To wit, an additional wave is found in the downstream direction in addition to the previously known dispersive wave solutions; this wave is non-dispersive and we show how it is the surface manifestation of a critical layer-like flow generated by the combination of shear and mass flux at the source, passively advected with the flow. As seen from a system moving at the fluid velocity at the source's depth, streamlines form closed curves ...

  12. Effect of LASER Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramic Surface to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Shahabi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Reliable bonding between tooth substrate and zirconia-based ceramic restorations is always of great importance. The laser might be useful for treatment of ceramic surfaces. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic surface to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 40 Cercon zirconia ceramic blocks were fabricated. The surface treatment was performed using sandblasting with 50-micrometer Al2O3, CO2 laser, or Nd:YAG laser in each test groups. After that, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement. The shear bond strength of ceramics to dentin was determined and failure mode of each specimen was analyzed by stereo-microscope and SEM investigations. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparisons. The surface morphology of one specimen from each group was investigated under SEM. Results: The mean shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to dentin was 7.79±3.03, 9.85±4.69, 14.92±4.48 MPa for CO2 irradiated, Nd:YAG irradiated, and sandblasted specimens, respectively. Significant differences were noted between CO2 (P=0.001 and Nd:YAG laser (P=0.017 irradiated specimens with sandblasted specimens. No significant differences were observed between two laser methods (P=0.47. The mode of bond failure was predominantly adhesive in test groups (CO2 irradiated specimens: 75%, Nd:YAG irradiated: 66.7%, and sandblasting: 41.7%. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the present study, surface treatment of zirconia ceramics using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers was not able to produce adequate bond strength with dentin surfaces in comparison to sandblasting technique. Therefore, the use of lasers with the mentioned parameters may not be recommended for the surface treatment of Cercon ceramics.

  13. Effects of surface oxide species and contents on SiC slurry viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NING Shufan; LI Hongyan; CHEN Wei; LIU Bin; CHEN Shoutian

    2005-01-01

    The disadvantageous effects of colloidal SiO2 layer and micro-content of metal oxide adsorbed on SiC powder surface on SiC slurry stable dispersion were studied, and the novel method to avoid this disadvantage was proposed. By acidwashing, on the one hand, because the maximum Zeta potential of SiC powder increases to 72.49 mV with the decreasing content of metal oxide adsorbed on the SiC powder surface, the repulsion force between SiC powders that dispersed in slurry is enhanced, thus the SiC powder can be fully dispersed in slurry. On the other hand, after HF acidwashing, with the OH- group adsorbed on SiC powder surface destroyed and replaced by the F- ion, the hydrogen bond adsorbed on the OH-group is also destroyed. Therefore, the surface property of the SiC powder is changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic;H2O that adsorbed on SiC powder surface is released and can flow freely, and it actually increases the content of the effective flow phase in the slurry. These changes of SiC powder surface property can be proved by XPS and FTIR analysis. Fivolume fraction of SiC powder in the slurry is maximized to 61.5 vol.%.

  14. Fast relaxation of a hexagonal Poiseuille shear-induced near-surface phase in a threadlike micellar solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W A; Butler, P D; Magid, L J; Han, Z; Slawecki, T M

    1999-08-01

    The dynamics of near-surface conformations in complex fluids under flow should dramatically affect their rheological properties. We have made the first measurements resolving the decay kinetics of a hexagonal phase induced in a threadlike polyionic micellar system under Poiseuille shear near a quartz surface. Upon cessation of shearing flow, this minimum interference crystalline phase formed within approximately 20 microm of the surface "melts" to a metastable two-dimensional liquid of aligned micelles in approximately 0.7 s. This is some three orders of magnitude shorter than the time required for bulk (Couette) shear-aligned micelles in this system to reach a fully entangled state.

  15. New ultrasonic Bleustein-Gulyaev wave method for measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiełczyński, P.; Szalewski, M.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, a new method for measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure is presented. To this end the authors have applied an ultrasonic method using the Bleustein-Gulyaev (BG) surface acoustic wave. By applying the perturbation method, we can prove that the change in the complex propagation constant of the BG wave produced by the layer of liquid loading the waveguide surface is proportional to the shear mechanical impedance of the liquid. In the article, a measuring setup employing the BG wave for the purpose of measuring the viscosity of liquids at high pressure (up to 1GPa) is presented. The results of high-pressure viscosity measurements of triolein and castor oil are also presented. In this paper the model of a Newtonian liquid was applied. Using this new method it is also possible to measure the viscosity of liquids during the phase transition and during the decompression process (hysteresis of the dependence of viscosity on pressure).

  16. Influence of Pre-Sintered Zirconia Surface Conditioning on Shear Bond Strength to Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomofumi Sawada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite on zirconia surface to which a specific conditioner was applied before sintering. After sintering of either conditioner-coated or uncoated specimens, both groups were divided into three subgroups by their respective surface modifications (n = 10 per group: no further treatment; etched with hydrofluoric acid; and sandblasted with 50 µm Al2O3 particles. Surfaces were characterized by measuring different surface roughness parameters (e.g., Ra and Rmax and water contact angles. Half of the specimens underwent thermocycling (10,000 cycles, 5–55 °C after self-adhesive resin cement build-up. The SBSs were measured using a universal testing machine, and the failure modes were analyzed by microscopy. Data were analyzed by nonparametric and parametric tests followed by post-hoc comparisons (α = 0.05. Conditioner-coated specimens increased both surface roughness and hydrophilicity (p < 0.01. In the non-thermocycled condition, sandblasted surfaces showed higher SBSs than other modifications, irrespective of conditioner application (p < 0.05. Adhesive fractures were commonly observed in the specimens. Thermocycling favored debonding and decreased SBSs. However, conditioner-coated specimens upon sandblasting showed the highest SBS (p < 0.05 and mixed fractures were partially observed. The combination of conditioner application before sintering and sandblasting after sintering showed the highest shear bond strength and indicated improvements concerning the failure mode.

  17. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadizenouz, Ghazaleh; Esmaeili, Behnaz; Taghvaei, Arnica; Jamali, Zahra; Jafari, Toloo; Amiri Daneshvar, Farshid; Khafri, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1); air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2); irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3); roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4); and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5). Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm) was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6). A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05). Results. One-way ANOVA indicated significant differences between the groups (P < 0.05). SBS of controls was significantly lower than the other groups; differences between groups 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were not significant. Surface treatment with diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid resulted in the highest bond strength. Conclusion. All the surface treatments used in this study improved the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite resin used. PMID:27092209

  18. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Ahmadizenouz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1; air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2; irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3; roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4; and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5. Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6. A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05. Results. One-way ANOVA indicated significant differences between the groups (P < 0.05. SBS of controls was significantly lower than the other groups; differences between groups 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were not significant. Surface treatment with diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid resulted in the highest bond strength. Conclusion. All the surface treatments used in this study improved the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite resin used.

  19. Effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of denture teeth to denture base resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Bahrani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Debonding of denture teeth from denture bases is the most common failure in removable dentures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of denture teeth to heat-polymerized and autopolymerized denture base resins. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 60 maxillary central incisor acrylic teeth were divided into two groups. Group M was polymerized with heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Meliodent by compression molding technique and group F was processed by autopolymerized acrylic resin (Futura Gen by injection molding technique. Within each group, specimens were divided into three subgroups according to the teeth surface treatments (n = 10: (1 ground surface as the control group (M 1 and F 1 , (2 ground surface combined with monomer application (M 2 and F 2 , and (3 airborne particle abrasion by 50 μm Al 2 O 3 (M 3 and F 3 . The shear bond strengths of the specimens were tested by universal testing machine with crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey′s honestly significant difference (HSD tests (P < 0.05. Results: The mean shear bond strengths of the studied groups were 96.40 ± 14.01, 124.70 ± 15.64, and 118 ± 16.38 N for M 1 , M 2 , and M 3 and 87.90 ± 13.48, 117 ± 13.88, and 109.70 ± 13.78 N for F 1 , F 2 , and F 3 , respectively. The surface treatment of the denture teeth significantly affected their shear bond strengths to the both the denture base resins (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences between the groups treated by monomer or airborne particle abrasion (P = 0.29. The highest percentage of failure mode was mixed in Meliodent and adhesive in Futura Gen. Conclusion: Monomer application and airborne particle abrasion of the ridge lap area of the denture teeth improved their shear bond strengths to the denture base resins regardless of the type of polymerization.

  20. Enhancing the formation and shear resistance of nitrifying biofilms on membranes by surface modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lackner, Susanne; Holmberg, Maria; Terada, Akihiko;

    2009-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) membranes and polyethylene (PE) surfaces were modified to enhance formation and shear resistance of nitrifying biofilms for wastewater treatment applications. A combination of plasma polymerization and wet chemistry was employed to ultimately introduce poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG...... similar trends: biofilms on -PEG-NH2 modified surfaces were much stronger compared to the other modifications and the unmodified reference surfaces. Electrostatic interactions between the protonated amino group and negatively charged bacteria as well as PEG chain density which can affect the surface...... structure might be possible explanations of the superiority of the -PEG-NH2 modification. The success of the-PEG-NH2 modification was independent of the original surface and might, therefore, be used in wastewater treatment bioreactors to improve reactor performance by making biofilm formation more stable...

  1. Platelets interact with tissue factor immobilized on surfaces: effects of shear rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonda, R; Lopez-Vilchez, I; Navalon, F; Pino, M; Hernandez, M R; Escolar, G; Galan, A M

    2008-01-01

    While procoagulant activities of Tissue Factor (TF) have been widely investigated, its possible pro-adhesive properties towards platelets have not been studied in detail. We explored the interaction of platelets with human Tissue Factor (hTF) firmly adsorbed on a synthetic surface of polyvinilidene difluoride (PVDF) using different shear rates. For studies at 250 and 600 s(-1), TF firmly adsorbed was exposed to flowing anticoagulated blood in flat perfusion devices. Deposition of platelets and fibrin were evaluated by morphometric, immunocytochemical and ultrastructural methods. Prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2) levels were also measured. Experiments at 5000 s(-1), were performed on the Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA-100) with experimental cartridges with collagen (COL) or collagen-hTF (COL + TF). Haemostatic effect of recombinant activated FVIIa (rFVIIa) was assessed in the same experimental settings. Platelet deposition on hTF reached 19.8 +/- 1.3% and 26.1 +/- 3.4% of the total surface, at 250 and 600 s(-1), respectively. Fibrin formation was significantly higher at 250 s(-1) than at 600 s(-1) (P hTF (154.09 +/- 14.69 s vs. 191.45 +/- 16.09 s COL alone; P hTF is an adhesive substrate for platelets and suggest that the von Willebrand factor could mediate these interactions. At low and intermediate shear rates, rFVIIa enhanced the procoagulant action of hTF, but this effect was not observed at very high shear rates.

  2. Shear velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of Madagascar derived from surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Martin J.; Wysession, Michael E.; Aleqabi, Ghassan; Wiens, Douglas A.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Shore, Patrick; Rambolamanana, Gérard; Andriampenomanana, Fenitra; Rakotondraibe, Tsiriandrimanana; Tucker, Robert D.; Barruol, Guilhem; Rindraharisaona, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    The crust and upper mantle of the Madagascar continental fragment remained largely unexplored until a series of recent broadband seismic experiments. An island-wide deployment of broadband seismic instruments has allowed the first study of phase velocity variations, derived from surface waves, across the entire island. Late Cenozoic alkaline intraplate volcanism has occurred in three separate regions of Madagascar (north, central and southwest), with the north and central volcanism active until Madagascar velocity structure. Shallow (upper 10 km) low-shear-velocity regions correlate well with sedimentary basins along the west coast. Upper mantle low-shear-velocity zones that extend to at least 150 km deep underlie the north and central regions of recent alkali magmatism. These anomalies appear distinct at depths <100 km, suggesting that any connection between the zones lies at depths greater than the resolution of surface-wave tomography. An additional low-shear velocity anomaly is also identified at depths 50-150 km beneath the southwest region of intraplate volcanism. We interpret these three low-velocity regions as upwelling asthenosphere beneath the island, producing high-elevation topography and relatively low-volume magmatism.

  3. Multiple resonances of a moving, oscillating surface disturbance on a shear current

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We consider waves radiated by a disturbance of oscillating strength moving at constant velocity along the free surface of a shear flow which, when undisturbed, has uniform horizontal vorticity of magnitude $S$. When no current is present the problem is a classical one and much studied, and in deep water a resonance is known to occur when $\\tau=|\\boldsymbol{V}|\\omega_0/g$ equals the critical value $1/4$ ($\\boldsymbol{V}$: velocity of disturbance, $\\omega_0$: oscillation frequency, $g$: gravitational acceleration). We show that the presence of the sub-surface shear current can change this picture radically. Not only does the resonant value of $\\tau$ depend strongly on the angle between $\\boldsymbol{V}$ and the current's direction and the "shear-Froude number" $\\mathrm{Frs}=|\\boldsymbol{V}|S/g$; when $\\mathrm{Frs}>1/3$, multiple resonant values --- as many as $4$ --- can occur for some directions of motion. At sufficiently large values of $\\mathrm{Frs}$, the smallest resonance frequency tends to zero, representi...

  4. Squirming through shear-thinning fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Datt, Charu; Elfring, Gwynn J; Pak, On Shun

    2015-01-01

    Many microorganisms find themselves immersed in fluids displaying non-Newtonian rheological properties such as viscoelasticity and shear-thinning viscosity. The effects of viscoelasticity on swimming at low Reynolds numbers have already received considerable attention, but much less is known about swimming in shear-thinning fluids. A general understanding of the fundamental question of how shear-thinning rheology influences swimming still remains elusive. To probe this question further, we study a spherical squirmer in a shear-thinning fluid using a combination of asymptotic analysis and numerical simulations. Shear-thinning rheology is found to affect a squirming swimmer in nontrivial and surprising ways; we predict and show instances of both faster and slower swimming depending on the surface actuation of the squirmer. We also illustrate that while a drag and thrust decomposition can provide insights into swimming in Newtonian fluids, extending this intuition to problems in complex media can prove problemat...

  5. AFM quantitative analysis and determination of shear angle of {259}f martensitic surface relief

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An attentive observation and quantitative analysis of {259}f martensitic surface relief in an Fe-23Ni-0.55C alloy are made by means of an atomic force microscope (AFM), and different martensitic variants' shear angles are determined in this paper. The experiments show that {259}f martensitic surface relief exhibits regular shape in many cases, which is in agreement with the prediction of invariant plane strain (IPS). Generally, {259}f martensitic surface relief appears to be "N"-shaped, but it is tent-shaped in the case of zigzag-shaped martensite. The compressed deformation of parent phase diminishes the surface relief in size but with little change of its relief angle. {259}f martensitic surface relief, large or small, has approximately the same relief angles, exhibiting a good "self-similar fractal". The determined values of different {259}f martensitic variants' shear angles are in fine agreement with the prediction of Wechsler-Liberman-Read (W-L-R) theory, with only a slight difference of less than 3.65°.

  6. Uniform Regularity and Vanishing Viscosity Limit for the Free Surface Navier-Stokes Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masmoudi, Nader; Rousset, Frederic

    2016-09-01

    We study the inviscid limit of the free boundary Navier-Stokes equations. We prove the existence of solutions on a uniform time interval by using a suitable functional framework based on Sobolev conormal spaces. This allows us to use a strong compactness argument to justify the inviscid limit. Our approach does not rely on the justification of asymptotic expansions. In particular, we get a new existence result for the Euler equations with free surface from the one for Navier-Stokes.

  7. Commensurability Effects in Viscosity of Nanoconfined Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neek-Amal, Mehdi; Peeters, Francois M; Grigorieva, Irina V; Geim, Andre K

    2016-03-22

    The rate of water flow through hydrophobic nanocapillaries is greatly enhanced as compared to that expected from macroscopic hydrodynamics. This phenomenon is usually described in terms of a relatively large slip length, which is in turn defined by such microscopic properties as the friction between water and capillary surfaces and the viscosity of water. We show that the viscosity of water and, therefore, its flow rate are profoundly affected by the layered structure of confined water if the capillary size becomes less than 2 nm. To this end, we study the structure and dynamics of water confined between two parallel graphene layers using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the shear viscosity is not only greatly enhanced for subnanometer capillaries, but also exhibits large oscillations that originate from commensurability between the capillary size and the size of water molecules. Such oscillating behavior of viscosity and, consequently, the slip length should be taken into account in designing and studying graphene-based and similar membranes for desalination and filtration.

  8. Impact of a Liquid Drop on a Granular Medium: inertia, viscosity and surface tension effects on the drop deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Nefzaoui, Elyes

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study of liquid drop impacts on a granular medium is proposed. Four fluids were used to vary physical properties: pure distilled water, water with glycerol at 2 concentrations 1:1 and 1:2 v/v and water with Tween 20 at the concentration of 0.1g/l. The drop free fall height was varied to obtain a Weber number (We) between 10 and 2000. Results showed that obtained crater morphologies highly depend on the impacting drop kinetic energy E_{K}. Different behaviours during the drop spreading, receding and absorption are highlighted as function of the fluids viscosity and surface tension. Experimental absorption times are also commented and compared with a simplified theoretical model. Drops maximal extensions and craters diameters were found to scale as $We^{1/5}$ and $E_K^{1/5}$ respectively. In both cases, found dependencies are smaller than those reported in literature: $We^{1/4}$ for drop impacts on solid or granular surfaces and $E_K^{1/4}$ for spherical solid impacts on granular media.

  9. ZBLAN Viscosity Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, William

    2001-01-01

    The past year's contribution from Dr. Kaukler's experimental effort consists of these 5 parts: a) Construction and proof-of-concept testing of a novel shearing plate viscometer designed to produce small shear rates and operate at elevated temperatures; b) Preparing nonlinear polymeric materials to serve as standards of nonlinear Theological behavior; c) Measurements and evaluation of above materials for nonlinear rheometric behavior at room temperature using commercial spinning cone and plate viscometers available in the lab; d) Preparing specimens from various forms of pitch for quantitative comparative testing in a Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer, Thermal Mechanical Analyzer; and Archeological Analyzer; e) Arranging to have sets of pitch specimens tested using the various instruments listed above, from different manufacturers, to form a baseline of the viscosity variation with temperature using the different test modes offered by these instruments by compiling the data collected from the various test results. Our focus in this project is the shear thinning behavior of ZBLAN glass over a wide range of temperature. Experimentally, there are no standard techniques to perform such measurements on glasses, particularly at elevated temperatures. Literature reviews to date have shown that shear thinning in certain glasses appears to occur, but no data is available for ZBLAN glass. The best techniques to find shear thinning behavior require the application of very low rates of shear. In addition, because the onset of the thinning behavior occurs at an unknown elevated temperature, the instruments used in this study must provide controlled low rates of shear and do so for temperatures approaching 600 C. In this regard, a novel shearing parallel plate viscometer was designed and a prototype built and tested.

  10. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadizenouz, Ghazaleh; Esmaeili, Behnaz; Taghvaei, Arnica; Jamali, Zahra; Jafari, Toloo; Amiri Daneshvar, Farshid; Khafri, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1); air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2); irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3); roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4); and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5). Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm) was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6). A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P composite resin used.

  11. Shear-bond-strength of orthodontic brackets to aged nano-hybrid composite-resin surfaces using different surface preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtas, Hatice Kubra; Akin, Mehmet; Ileri, Zehra; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different surface preparation methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic metal brackets to aged nano-hybrid resin composite surfaces in vitro. A total of 100 restorative composite resin discs, 6 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were obtained and treated with an ageing procedure. After ageing, the samples were randomly divided as follows according to surface preparation methods: (1)Control, (2)37% phosphoric acid gel, (3)Sandblasting, (4)Diamond bur, (5)Air-flow and 20 central incisor teeth were used for the control etched group. SBS test were applied on bonded metal brackets to all samples. SBS values and residual adhesives were evaluated. Analysis of variance showed a significant difference (phybrid composite resin surfaces.

  12. Shear horizontal surface acoustic waves in a magneto-electro-elastic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Shahin; Shodja, Hossein M.

    2016-04-01

    Propagation of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves (SHSAWs) within a functionally graded magneto-electro-elastic (FGMEE) half-space was previously presented (Shodja HM, Eskandari S, Eskandari M. J. Eng. Math. 2015, 1-18) In contrast, the current paper considers propagation of SHSAWs in a medium consisting of an FGMEE layer perfectly bonded to a homogeneous MEE substrate. When the FGMEE layer is described by some special inhomogeneity functions - all the MEE properties have the same variation in depth which may or may not be identical to that of the density - we obtain the exact closed-form solution for the MEE fields. Additionally, certain special inhomogeneity functions with monotonically decreasing bulk shear wave velocity in depth are considered, and the associated boundary value problem is solved using power series solution. This problem in the limit as the layer thickness goes to infinity collapses to an FGMEE half-space with decreasing bulk shear wave velocity in depth. It is shown that in such a medium SHSAW does not propagate. Using power series solution we can afford to consider some FGMEE layers of practical importance, where the composition of the MEE obeys a prescribed volume fraction variation. The dispersive behavior of SHSAWs in the presence of such layers is also examined.

  13. Viscosity and surface tension effects during multiphase flow in propped fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzikowski, Michał; Dąbrowski, Marcin

    2017-04-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2 was proposed as an important mechanism to reduce its emission into atmosphere. CO2 exhibits a higher affinity to organic matter than methane molecules and, potentially, it could be pumped and stored in shale reservoirs while enhancing late stage shale gas production. A successful analysis of CO2 sequestration in low matrix permeability rocks such as shales requires a thorough understanding of multiphase flow in stimulated rock fractures, which provide most significant pathways for fluids in such systems. Multiphase fracture flows are also of great relevance to brine, oil and gas migration in petroleum systems, water and stream circulation in geothermal reservoirs, and chemical transport of non-aqueous phase liquids in shallow hydrogeological systems, particularly in partially saturated zones. There are various physical models that describe phenomena taking place during multiphase flow through porous media. One of key aspects that need to be considered are pore-scale effects related to capillarity. Unfortunately, detailed models that describe motion and evolution of phase or component boundary require direct numerical simulations and spatial resolutions that are hard to reach when considering industrial relevant systems. Main aim of the presented work was the development of reduced 2.5D models based on Brinkman approximation of thin domain flow that would be able to capture local scale phenomena without expensive 3D simulations. Presented approach was designed specifically to tackle incompressible and immiscible systems and is based on Continuous Surface Force approach presented by Brackbill et al., implemented using Lattice Boltzmann Method. Presented approach where firstly validated against standard test cases with known classical solution and known experimental data. In the second part, we present and discuss two component, immiscible permeability data for rough and propped fracture obtained with our code for a rage of proppants

  14. What Supergranule Flow Models Tell Us About the Sun's Surface Shear Layer and Magnetic Flux Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David

    2011-01-01

    Models of the photospheric flows due to supergranulation are generated using an evolving spectrum of vector spherical harmonics up to spherical harmonic wavenumber l1500. Doppler velocity data generated from these models are compared to direct Doppler observations from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. The models are adjusted to match the observed spatial power spectrum as well as the wavenumber dependence of the cell lifetimes, differential rotation velocities, meridional flow velocities, and relative strength of radial vs. horizontal flows. The equatorial rotation rate as a function of wavelength matches the rotation rate as a function of depth as determined by global helioseismology. This leads to the conclusions that the cellular structures are anchored at depths equal to their widths, that the surface shear layer extends to at least 70 degrees latitude, and that the poleward meridional flow decreases in amplitude and reverses direction at the base of the surface shear layer (approx.35 Mm below the surface). Using the modeled flows to passively transport magnetic flux indicates that the observed differential rotation and meridional flow of the magnetic elements are directly related to the differential rotation and meridional flow of the convective pattern itself. The magnetic elements are transported by the evolving boundaries of the supergranule pattern (where the convective flows converge) and are unaffected by the weaker flows associated with the differential rotation or meridional flow of the photospheric plasma.

  15. Measurement of Plasma Clotting Using Shear Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Tatsuya; Kondoh, Jun; Oonishi, Tomoko; Hosokawa, Kazuya

    2013-07-01

    The monitoring of blood coagulation is important during operation. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied to monitor plasma clotting. An SH-SAW sensor with a metallized surface for mechanical perturbation detection can detect plasma clotting. As plasma clotting is a gel formation reaction, the SH-SAW sensor detects viscoelastic property changes. On the other hand, an SH-SAW sensor with a free surface for electrical perturbation detection detects only the liquid mixing effect. No electrical property changes due to plasma clotting are obtained using this sensor. A planar electrochemical sensor is also used to monitor plasma clotting. In impedance spectral analysis, plasma clotting is measured. However, in the measurement of time responses, no differences between clotting and nonclotting are obtained. Therefore, the SH-SAW sensor is useful for monitoring plasma clotting.

  16. Excitation and propagation of shear-horizontal-type surface and bulk acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, K Y; Yamaguchi, M

    2001-09-01

    This paper reviews the basic properties of shear-horizontal (SH)-type surface acoustic waves (SAWs) and bulk acoustic waves (BAWs). As one of the simplest cases, the structure supporting Bleustein-Gulyaev-Shimizu waves is considered, and their excitation and propagation are discussed from various view points. First, the formalism based on the complex integral theory is presented, where the surface is assumed to be covered with an infinitesimally thin metallic film, and it is shown how the excitation and propagation of SH-type waves are affected by the surface perturbation. Then, the analysis is extended to a periodic grating structure, and the behavior of SH-type SAWs under the grating structure is discussed. Finally, the origin of the leaky nature is explained.

  17. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumerlato, Marina; de Lima, Eduardo Martinelli; Osorio, Leandro Berni; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; de Menezes, Luciane Macedo; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Methods: One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48): Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3, two drillings were done with a spherical diamond bur; Group 4, sandblasting was performed with 50-µm aluminum oxide. Before the experiment, half of the samples stayed immersed in distilled water at 37oC for 90 days. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT and shear strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine. SBS were compared by surface treatment and by ageing with two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey’s test. ARI scores were compared between surface treatments with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn’s test. Results: Surface treatments on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets (p< 0.01), result not observed with ageing (p= 0.45). Groups II, III, and IV showed higher SBS and greater ARI than the Group 1 (p< 0.05). SBS was greater in the groups 3 and 4 (drilling, sandblasting) than in the Group 2 (grinding) (p< 0.05). SBS and ARI showed a positive correlation (Spearman’s R2= 0.57; p< 0.05). Conclusion: Surface treatment on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets, however ageing did not show any relevance. Sandblasting and drilling showed greater SBS than grinding. There was a positive correlation between SBS and ARI.

  18. A microstructure- and surface energy-dependent third-order shear deformation beam model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.-L.; Zhang, G. Y.

    2015-08-01

    A new non-classical third-order shear deformation model is developed for Reddy-Levinson beams using a variational formulation based on Hamilton's principle. A modified couple stress theory and a surface elasticity theory are employed. The equations of motion and complete boundary conditions for the beam are obtained simultaneously. The new model contains a material length scale parameter to account for the microstructure effect and three surface elastic constants to describe the surface energy effect. Also, Poisson's effect is incorporated in the new beam model. The current non-classical model recovers the classical elasticity-based third-order shear deformation beam model as a special case when the microstructure, surface energy and Poisson's effects are all suppressed. In addition, the newly developed beam model includes the models considering the microstructure dependence or the surface energy effect alone as limiting cases and reduces to two existing models for Bernoulli-Euler and Timoshenko beams incorporating the microstructure and surface energy effects. To illustrate the new model, the static bending and free vibration problems of a simply supported beam loaded by a concentrated force are analytically solved by directly applying the general formulas derived. For the static bending problem, the numerical results reveal that both the deflection and rotation of the simply supported beam predicted by the current model are smaller than those predicted by the classical model. Also, it is observed that the differences in the deflection and rotation predicted by the two beam models are very large when the beam thickness is sufficiently small, but they are diminishing with the increase in the beam thickness. For the free vibration problem, it is found that the natural frequency predicted by the new model is higher than that predicted by the classical beam model, and the difference is significant for very thin beams. These predicted trends of the size effect at the

  19. Pressure Effect on Extensional Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Kjær, Erik Michael

    1999-01-01

    The primary object of these experiments was to investigate the influence of hydrostatic pressure on entrance flow. The effect of pressure on shear and extensional viscosity was evaluated using an axis symmetric capillary and a slit die where the hydrostatic pressure was raised with valves...

  20. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  1. Influence of ceramic surface treatment on shear bond strength of ceramic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Fernandes Ramos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare four different surface treatment methods and determine which produces adequate bond strength between ceramic brackets and facets of porcelain (feldspathic, and evaluate the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scores. Materials and Methods: Ten facets of porcelain specimens with glazed surfaces were used for each group. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following treatment conditions of the porcelain surface: (1 no surface treatment (control group, (2 fine diamond bur + orthophosphoric acid gel 37%, (3 hydrofluoric acid (HFL 10%, and (4 HFL 10% + silane. Ceramic brackets were bonded with the adhesive cement Transbond XT. The shear bond strength values were measured on a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: There was a significant difference (P<0.05 between the control group and all other groups. There was no significant difference (P<0.05 between treated porcelain surface with diamond bur + orthophosphoric acid gel 37% (4.8 MPa and HFL 10% (6.1 MPa, but the group treated with HFL 10% had clinically acceptable bond strength values. The group treated with HFL 10% + silane (17.5 MPa resulted in a statistically significant higher tensile bond strength (P<0.05. In group 4, 20% of the porcelain facets displayed damage. Conclusion: Etching of the surface with HFL increased the bond strength values. Silane application was recommended to bond a ceramic bracket to the porcelain surface in order to achieve bond strengths that are clinically acceptable.

  2. Evaluation of shear bond strength of composite resin to nonprecious metal alloys with different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassini E.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Replacing fractured ceramometal restorations may be the best treatment option, but it is costly. Many different bonding systems are currently available to repair the fractured ceramometal restorations. This study compared the shear bond strength of composite to a base metal alloy using 4 bonding systems.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, fifty discs, casted in a Ni-Cr-Be base metal alloy (Silvercast, Fulldent,were ground with 120, 400 and 600 grit sandpaper and divided equally into 5 groups receiving 5 treatments for veneering. Conventional feldspathic porcelain (Ceramco2, Dentsply Ceramco was applied on control group (PFM or group1 and the remaining metal discs were air- abraded for 15 seconds with 50 mm aluminum oxide at 45 psi and washed for 5 seconds under tap water.Then the specimens were dried by compressed air and the  groups were treated with one of the bonding systems as follows: All-Bond 2 (AB, Ceramic Primer (CP, Metal Primer II (MP and Panavia F2 (PF. An opaque composite (Foundation opaque followed by a hybrid composite (Gradia Direct was placed on the treated metal surface and light cured separately. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 370C and thermocycled prior to shear strength testing. Fractured specimens were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis was performed with one way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance.Results: Mean shear bond strengths of the groups in MPa were as follows: PFM group 38.6±2, All-Bond 2 17.06±2.85, Ceramic Primer 14.72±1.2, Metal Primer II 19.04±2.2 and Panavia F2 21.37±2.1. PFM group exhibited the highest mean shear bond strength and Ceramic Primer showed the lowest. Tukey's HSD test revealed the mean bond strength of the PFM group to be significantly higher than the other groups (P<0.001. The data for the PF group was significantly higher than AB and CP groups (P<0.05 and the shear

  3. Estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity by inversion of Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The shear-wave (S-wave) velocity of near-surface materials (soil, rocks, pavement) and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many groundwater, engineering, and environmental studies. Rayleigh-wave phase velocity of a layered-earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth properties: P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and thickness of layers. Analysis of the Jacobian matrix provides a measure of dispersion-curve sensitivity to earth properties. S-wave velocities are the dominant influence on a dispersion curve in a high-frequency range (>5 Hz) followed by layer thickness. An iterative solution technique to the weighted equation proved very effective in the high-frequency range when using the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques. Convergence of the weighted solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Synthetic examples demonstrated calculation efficiency and stability of inverse procedures. We verify our method using borehole S-wave velocity measurements.Iterative solutions to the weighted equation by the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques are derived to estimate near-surface shear-wave velocity. Synthetic and real examples demonstrate the calculation efficiency and stability of the inverse procedure. The inverse results of the real example are verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements.

  4. A shear wave ground surface vibration technique for the detection of buried pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Papandreou, B.

    2014-07-01

    A major UK initiative, entitled 'Mapping the Underworld' aims to develop and prove the efficacy of a multi-sensor device for accurate remote buried utility service detection, location and, where possible, identification. One of the technologies to be incorporated in the device is low-frequency vibro-acoustics; the application of this technology for detecting buried infrastructure, in particular pipes, is currently being investigated. Here, a shear wave ground vibration technique for detecting buried pipes is described. For this technique, shear waves are generated at the ground surface, and the resulting ground surface vibrations measured. Time-extended signals are employed to generate the illuminating wave. Generalized cross-correlation functions between the measured ground velocities and a reference measurement adjacent to the excitation are calculated and summed using a stacking method to generate a cross-sectional image of the ground. To mitigate the effects of other potential sources of vibration in the vicinity, the excitation signal can be used as an additional reference when calculating the cross-correlation functions. Measurements have been made at two live test sites to detect a range of buried pipes. Successful detection of the pipes was achieved, with the use of the additional reference signal proving beneficial in the noisier of the two environments.

  5. A global shear velocity model of the mantle from normal modes and surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    durand, S.; Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.; Lambotte, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new global shear wave velocity model of the mantle based on the inversion of all published normal mode splitting functions and the large surface wave dataset measured by Debayle & Ricard (2012). Normal mode splitting functions and surface wave phase velocity maps are sensitive to lateral heterogeneities of elastic parameters (Vs, Vp, xi, phi, eta) and density. We first only consider spheroidal modes and Rayleigh waves and restrict the inversion to Vs, Vp and the density. Although it is well known that Vs is the best resolved parameter, we also investigate whether our dataset allows to extract additional information on density and/or Vp. We check whether the determination of the shear wave velocity is affected by the a priori choice of the crustal model (CRUST2.0 or 3SMAC) or by neglecting/coupling poorly resolved parameters. We include the major discontinuities, at 400 and 670 km. Vertical smoothing is imposed through an a priori gaussian covariance matrix on the model and we discuss the effect of coupling/decoupling the inverted structure above and below the discontinuities. We finally discuss the large scale structure of our model and its geodynamical implications regarding the amount of mass exchange between the upper and lower mantle.

  6. Detection of cells captured with antigens on shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Hsu-Chao; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-02-01

    Techniques to separate cells are widely applied in immunology. The technique to separate a specific antigen on a microfluidic platform involves the use of a shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave (SH-SAW) sensor. With specific antibodies conjugated onto the surface of the SH-SAW sensors, this technique can serve to identify specific cells in bodily fluids. Jurkat cells, used as a target in this work, provide a model of cells in small abundance (1:1000) for isolation and purification with the ultimate goal of targeting even more dilute cells. T cells were separated from a mixed-cell medium on a chip (Jurkat cells/K562 cells, 1/1000). A novel microchamber was developed to capture cells during the purification, which required a large biosample. Cell detection was demonstrated through the performance of genetic identification on the chip.

  7. Progression towards optimization of viscosity of highly concentrated carbonaceous solid-water slurries by incorporating and modifying surface chemistry parameters with and without additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Amrita

    Carbonaceous solid-water slurries (CSWS) are concentrated suspensions of coal, petcoke bitumen, pitch etc. in water which are used as feedstock for gasifiers. The high solid loading (60-75 wt.%) in the slurry increases CSWS viscosity. For easier handling and pumping of these highly loaded mixtures, low viscosities are desirable. Depending on the nature of the carbonaceous solid, solids loading in the slurry and the particle size distribution, viscosity of a slurry can vary significantly. Ability to accurately predict the viscosity of a slurry will provide a better control over the design of slurry transport system and for viscosity optimization. The existing viscosity prediction models were originally developed for hard-sphere suspensions and therefore do not take into account surface chemistry. As a result, the viscosity predictions using these models for CSWS are not very accurate. Additives are commonly added to decrease viscosity of the CSWS by altering the surface chemistry. Since additives are specific to CSWS, selection of appropriate additives is crucial. The goal of this research was to aid in optimization of CSWS viscosity through improved prediction and selection of appropriate additive. To incorporate effect of surface chemistry in the models predicting suspension viscosity, the effect of the different interfacial interactions caused by different surface chemistries has to be accounted for. Slurries of five carbonaceous solids with varying O/C ratio (to represent different surface chemistry parameters) were used for the study. To determine the interparticle interactions of the carbonaceous solids in water, interfacial energies were calculated on the basis of surface chemistries, characterized by contact angles and zeta potential measurements. The carbonaceous solid particles in the slurries were assumed to be spherical. Polar interaction energy (hydrophobic/hydrophilic interaction energy), which was observed to be 5-6 orders of magnitude higher than the

  8. Analysis shear wave velocity structure obtained from surface wave methods in Bornova, Izmir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamuk, Eren, E-mail: eren.pamuk@deu.edu.tr; Akgün, Mustafa, E-mail: mustafa.akgun@deu.edu.tr [Department of Geophysical Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey); Özdağ, Özkan Cevdet, E-mail: cevdet.ozdag@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylul University Rectorate, Izmir (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Properties of the soil from the bedrock is necessary to describe accurately and reliably for the reduction of earthquake damage. Because seismic waves change their amplitude and frequency content owing to acoustic impedance difference between soil and bedrock. Firstly, shear wave velocity and depth information of layers on bedrock is needed to detect this changing. Shear wave velocity can be obtained using inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods (MASW- the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves, ReMi-Refraction Microtremor, SPAC-Spatial Autocorrelation). While research depth is limeted in active source study, a passive source methods are utilized for deep depth which is not reached using active source methods. ReMi method is used to determine layer thickness and velocity up to 100 m using seismic refraction measurement systems.The research carried out up to desired depth depending on radius using SPAC which is utilized easily in conditions that district using of seismic studies in the city. Vs profiles which are required to calculate deformations in under static and dynamic loads can be obtained with high resolution using combining rayleigh wave dispersion curve obtained from active and passive source methods. In the this study, Surface waves data were collected using the measurements of MASW, ReMi and SPAC at the İzmir Bornova region. Dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods were combined in wide frequency band and Vs-depth profiles were obtained using inversion. Reliability of the resulting soil profiles were provided by comparison with theoretical transfer function obtained from soil paremeters and observed soil transfer function from Nakamura technique and by examination of fitting between these functions. Vs values are changed between 200-830 m/s and engineering bedrock (Vs>760 m/s) depth is approximately 150 m.

  9. Vesicle dynamics in shear and capillary flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2005-11-01

    The deformation of vesicles in flow is studied by a mesoscopic simulation technique, which combines multi-particle collision dynamics for the solvent with a dynamically triangulated surface model for the membrane. Shape transitions are investigated both in simple shear flows and in cylindrical capillary flows. We focus on reduced volumes, where the discocyte shape of fluid vesicles is stable, and the prolate shape is metastable. In simple shear flow at low membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from discocyte to prolate with increasing shear rate, while at high membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from prolate to discocyte, or tumbling motion accompanied by oscillations between these two morphologies. In capillary flow, at small flow velocities the symmetry axis of the discocyte is found not to be oriented perpendicular to the cylinder axis. With increasing flow velocity, a transition to a prolate shape occurs for fluid vesicles, while vesicles with shear-elastic membranes (like red blood cells) transform into a coaxial parachute-like shape.

  10. On the Viscosity of Emulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Kroy, K; Djabourov, M; Kroy, Klaus; Capron, Isabelle; Djabourov, Madeleine

    1999-01-01

    Combining direct computations with invariance arguments, Taylor's constitutive equation for an emulsion can be extrapolated to high shear rates. We show that the resulting expression is consistent with the rigorous limits of small drop deformation and that it bears a strong similarity to an a priori unrelated rheological quantity, namely the dynamic (frequency dependent) linear shear response. More precisely, within a large parameter region the nonlinear steady-state shear viscosity is obtained from the real part of the complex dynamic viscosity, while the first normal stress difference is obtained from its imaginary part. Our experiments with a droplet phase of a binary polymer solution (alginate/caseinate) can be interpreted by an emulsion analogy. They indicate that the predicted similarity rule generalizes to the case of moderately viscoelastic constituents that obey the Cox-Merz rule.

  11. Technical Note: New methodology for measuring viscosities in small volumes characteristic of environmental chamber particle samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Renbaum-Wolff

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Herein, a method for the determination of viscosities of small sample volumes is introduced, with important implications for the viscosity determination of particle samples from environmental chambers (used to simulate atmospheric conditions. The amount of sample needed is < 1 μl, and the technique is capable of determining viscosities (η ranging between 10−3 and 103 Pascal seconds (Pa s in samples that cover a range of chemical properties and with real-time relative humidity and temperature control; hence, the technique should be well-suited for determining the viscosities, under atmospherically relevant conditions, of particles collected from environmental chambers. In this technique, supermicron particles are first deposited on an inert hydrophobic substrate. Then, insoluble beads (~1 μm in diameter are embedded in the particles. Next, a flow of gas is introduced over the particles, which generates a shear stress on the particle surfaces. The sample responds to this shear stress by generating internal circulations, which are quantified with an optical microscope by monitoring the movement of the beads. The rate of internal circulation is shown to be a function of particle viscosity but independent of the particle material for a wide range of organic and organic-water samples. A calibration curve is constructed from the experimental data that relates the rate of internal circulation to particle viscosity, and this calibration curve is successfully used to predict viscosities in multicomponent organic mixtures.

  12. Shearing stability of lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  13. Shearing stability of lubricants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-03-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  14. Effect of sandblasting on surface roughness of zirconia-based ceramics and shear bond strength of veneering porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Zhang, Zutai; Zheng, Dongxiang; Ding, Ning; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of sandblasting on the surface roughness of zirconia and the shear bond strength of the veneering porcelain. Pre-sintered zirconia plates were prepared and divided into four groups. Group A were not treated at all; group B were first sandblasted under 0.2 MPa pressure and then densely sintered; group C and D were sintered first, and then sandblasted under 0.2 MPa and 0.4 MPa pressures respectively. Surface roughness was measured and 3D roughness was reconstructed for the specimens, which were also analyzed with X-ray diffractometry. Finally after veneering porcelain sintering, shear bond tests were conducted. Sandblasting zirconia before sintering significantly increased surface roughness and the shear bond strength between zirconia and veneering porcelain (pzirconia before sintering is a useful method to increase surface roughness and could successfully improve the bonding strength of veneering porcelain.

  15. Shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to zirconia core after different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmali, Omer; Akin, Hakan; Ozdemir, Ali Kemal

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments: sandblasting, liners, and different laser irradiations on shear bond strength (SBS) of pre-sintered zirconia to veneer ceramic. The SBS between veneering porcelain and zirconium oxide (ZrO2) substructure was weak. Various surface treatment methods have been suggested for zirconia to obtain high bond strength to veneering porcelain. There is no study that evaluated the bond strength between veneering porcelain and the different surface treatments on pre-sintered ZrO2 substructure. Two hundred specimens with 7 mm diameter and 3 mm height pre-sintered zirconia blocks were fabricated. Specimens were randomly divided into 10 groups (n=20) according to surface treatments applied. Group C, untreated (Control); Group E, erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiated; Group N, neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiated; Group SB, sandblasted; Group L, liner applied; Group NL, Nd:YAG laser irradiated+liner applied; Group EL, Er:YAG laser irradiated+liner applied; Group SN, sandblasted+Nd:YAG laser irradiated; Group SE, sandblasted+Er:YAG laser irradiated; and Group SL, sandblasted+liner applied. The disks were then veneered with veneering porcelain. Before the experiment, specimens were steeped in 37°C distilled water for 24 h. All specimens were thermocycled for 5000 cycles between 5°C and 55°C with a 30 sec dwell time. Shear bond strength test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The fractured specimens were examined under a stereomicroscope to evaluate the fracture pattern. Surface treatments significantly changing the topography of the yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramic according to scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images. The highest mean bond strength value was obtained in Group SE, and the lowest bond strength value was observed in NL group. Bond strength values of the other groups were similar to each other. This

  16. Rivulet flow round a horizontal cylinder subject to a uniform surface shear stress

    KAUST Repository

    Paterson, C.

    2014-09-14

    © 2014 © The Author, 2014. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. The steady flow of a slowly varying rivulet with prescribed flux in the azimuthal direction round a large stationary horizontal cylinder subject to a prescribed uniform azimuthal surface shear stress is investigated. In particular, we focus on the case where the volume flux is downwards but the shear stress is upwards, for which there is always a solution corresponding to a rivulet flowing down at least part of one side of the cylinder. We consider both a rivulet with constant non-zero contact angle but slowly varying width (that is, de-pinned contact lines) and a rivulet with constant width but slowly varying contact angle (that is, pinned contact lines), and show that they have qualitatively different behaviour. When shear is present, a rivulet with constant non-zero contact angle can never run all the way from the top to the bottom of the cylinder, and so we consider the scenario in which an infinitely wide two-dimensional film of uniform thickness covers part of the upper half of the cylinder and \\'breaks\\' into a single rivulet with constant non-zero contact angle. In contrast, a sufficiently narrow rivulet with constant width can run all the way from the top to the bottom of the cylinder, whereas a wide rivulet can do so only if its contact lines de-pin, and so we consider the scenario in which the contact lines of a wide rivulet de-pin on the lower half of the cylinder.

  17. Enhancing the formation and shear resistance of nitrifying biofilms on membranes by surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Susanne; Holmberg, Maria; Terada, Akihiko; Kingshott, Peter; Smets, Barth F

    2009-08-01

    Polypropylene (PP) membranes and polyethylene (PE) surfaces were modified to enhance formation and shear resistance of nitrifying biofilms for wastewater treatment applications. A combination of plasma polymerization and wet chemistry was employed to ultimately introduce poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) chains with two different functional groups (-PEG-NH(2) and -PEG-CH(3)). Biofilm growth experiments using a mixed nitrifying bacterial culture revealed that the specific combination of PEG chains with amino groups resulted in most biofilm formation on both PP and PE samples. Detachment experiments showed similar trends: biofilms on -PEG-NH(2) modified surfaces were much stronger compared to the other modifications and the unmodified reference surfaces. Electrostatic interactions between the protonated amino group and negatively charged bacteria as well as PEG chain density which can affect the surface structure might be possible explanations of the superiority of the -PEG-NH(2) modification. The success of the-PEG-NH(2) modification was independent of the original surface and might, therefore, be used in wastewater treatment bioreactors to improve reactor performance by making biofilm formation more stable and predictable.

  18. Effect of Four Methods of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaei, Soghra; Aghili, Hossein Agha; Davari, Abdolrahim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Providing reliable attachment between bracket base and zirconia surface is a prerequisite for exertion of orthodontic force. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of four zirconium surface treatment methods on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: One block of zirconium was trimmed into four zirconium surfaces, which served as our four study groups and each had 18 metal brackets bonded to them. Once the glazed layer was removed, the first group was etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (HF), and the remaining three groups were prepared by means of sandblasting and 1W, and 2W Er: YAG laser, respectively. After application of silane, central incisor brackets were bonded to the zirconium surfaces. The SBS values were measured by a Dartec testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD for multiple comparisons. Results: The highest SBS was achieved in the sandblasted group (7.81±1.02 MPa) followed in a descending order by 2W laser group (6.95±0.87 MPa), 1W laser group (6.87±0.92 MPa) and HF acid etched group (5.84±0.78 MPa). The differences between the study groups were statistically significant except between the laser groups (Pacid etching for zirconium surface treatment prior to bracket bonding. PMID:26622283

  19. Comparing shear-wave velocity profiles inverted from multichannel surface wave with borehole measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Hunter, J.A.; Harris, J.B.; Ivanov, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent field tests illustrate the accuracy and consistency of calculating near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). S-wave velocity profiles (S-wave velocity vs. depth) derived from MASW compared favorably to direct borehole measurements at sites in Kansas, British Columbia, and Wyoming. Effects of changing the total number of recording channels, sampling interval, source offset, and receiver spacing on the inverted S-wave velocity were studied at a test site in Lawrence, Kansas. On the average, the difference between MASW calculated Vs and borehole measured Vs in eight wells along the Fraser River in Vancouver, Canada was less than 15%. One of the eight wells was a blind test well with the calculated overall difference between MASW and borehole measurements less than 9%. No systematic differences were observed in derived Vs values from any of the eight test sites. Surface wave analysis performed on surface data from Wyoming provided S-wave velocities in near-surface materials. Velocity profiles from MASW were confirmed by measurements based on suspension log analysis. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Shear rheology of lipid monolayers and insights on membrane fluidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Gabriel; López-Montero, Iván; Monroy, Francisco; Langevin, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    The concept of membrane fluidity usually refers to a high molecular mobility inside the lipid bilayer which enables lateral diffusion of embedded proteins. Fluids have the ability to flow under an applied shear stress whereas solids resist shear deformations. Biological membranes require both properties for their function: high lateral fluidity and structural rigidity. Consequently, an adequate account must include, in addition to viscosity, the possibility for a nonzero shear modulus. This knowledge is still lacking as measurements of membrane shear properties have remained incomplete so far. In the present contribution we report a surface shear rheology study of different lipid monolayers that model distinct biologically relevant situations. The results evidence a large variety of mechanical behavior under lateral shear flow. PMID:21444777

  1. Carboxymethylated lignins with low surface tension toward low viscosity and highly stable emulsions of crude bitumen and refined oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Ogunkoya, Dolanimi; Fang, Tiegang; Willoughby, Julie; Rojas, Orlando J

    2016-11-15

    Kraft and organosolv lignins were subjected to carboxymethylation to produce fractions that were soluble in water, displayed a minimum surface tension as low as 34mN/m (25°C) and a critical aggregation concentration of ∼1.5wt%. The carboxymethylated lignins (CML), which were characterized in terms of their degree of substitution ((31)P NMR), elemental composition, and molecular weight (GPC), were found suitable in the formulation of emulsions with bitumens of ultra-high viscosity, such as those from the Canadian oil sands. Remarkably, the interfacial features of the CML enabled fuel emulsions that were synthesized in a very broad range of internal phase content (30-70%). Cryo-replica transmission electron microscopy, which was used here the first time to assess the morphology of the lignin-based emulsions, revealed the droplets of the emulsion stabilized with the modified lignin. The observed drop size (diametersoperations for power generation, which also take advantage of the high heating value of the emulsion components. The ability of CML to stabilize emulsions and to contribute in their combustion was tested with light fuels (kerosene, diesel, and jet fuel) after formulation of high internal phase systems (70% oil) that enabled operation of a fuel engine. A significant finding is that under certain conditions and compared to the respective pure fuel, combustion of the O/W emulsions stabilized by CML presented lower NOx and CO emissions and maintained a relatively high combustion efficiency. The results highlight the possibilities in high volume application for lignin biomacromolecules.

  2. Motion of cells sedimenting on a solid surface in a laminar shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, O; Pierres, A; Foa, C; Delaage, M; Bongrand, P

    1992-01-01

    Cell adhesion often occurs under dynamic conditions, as in flowing blood. A quantitative understanding of this process requires accurate knowledge of the topographical relationships between the cell membrane and potentially adhesive surfaces. This report describes an experimental study made on both the translational and rotational velocities of leukocytes sedimenting of a flat surface under laminar shear flow. The main conclusions are as follows: (a) Cells move close to the wall with constant velocity for several tens of seconds. (b) The numerical values of translational and rotational velocities are inconsistent with Goldman's model of a neutrally buoyant sphere in a laminar shear flow, unless a drag force corresponding to contact friction between cells and the chamber floor is added. The phenomenological friction coefficient was 7.4 millinewton.s/m. (c) Using a modified Goldman's theory, the width of the gap separating cells (6 microns radius) from the chamber floor was estimated at 1.4 micron. (d) It is shown that a high value of the cell-to-substrate gap may be accounted for by the presence of cell surface protrusions of a few micrometer length, in accordance with electron microscope observations performed on the same cell population. (e) In association with previously reported data (Tissot, O., C. Foa, C. Capo, H. Brailly, M. Delaage, and P. Bongrand. 1991. Biocolloids and Biosurfaces. In press), these results are consistent with the possibility that cell-substrate attachment be initiated by the formation of a single molecular bond, which might be considered as the rate limiting step.

  3. Guided shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors for chemical and biochemical detection in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josse, F; Bender, F; Cernose, R W

    2001-12-15

    The design and performance of guided shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (guided SH-SAW) devices on LiTaO3 substrates are investigated for high-sensitivity chemical and biochemical sensors in liquids. Despite their structural similarity to Rayleigh SAW, SH-SAWs often propagate slightly deeper within the substrate, hence preventing the implementation of high-sensitivity detectors. The device sensitivity to mass and viscoelastic loading is increased using a thin guiding layer on the device surface. Because of their relatively low shear wave velocity, various polymers including poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and cyanoethyl cellulose (cured or cross-linked) are investigated as the guiding layers to trap the acoustic energy near the sensing surface. The devices have been tested in biosensing and chemical sensing experiments. Suitable design principles for these applications are discussed with regard to wave guidance, electrical passivation of the interdigital transducers from the liquid environments, acoustic loss, and sensor signal distortion. In biosensing experiments, using near-optimal PMMA thickness of approximately 2 microm, mass sensitivity greater than 1500 Hz/(ng/mm2) is demonstrated, resulting in a minimum detection limit less than 20 pg/mm2. For chemical sensor experiments, it is found that optimal waveguide thickness must be modified to account for the chemically sensitive layer which also acts to guide the SH-SAW. A detection limit of 780 (3 x peak-to-peak noise) or 180 ppb (3 x rms noise) is estimated from the present measurements for some organic compounds in water.

  4. Research on viscosity of metal at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Liu, F.; Ma, X.; Zhang, M.

    2016-11-01

    A new experimental technique, the flyer-impact method, is proposed in this article to investigate the viscosity coefficient of shocked metals. In this technique, a shock wave with a sinusoidal perturbation on the front is induced by the sinusoidal profile of the impact surface of the sample by use of a two-stage light-gas gun, and the oscillatory damping process of the perturbation amplitude is monitored by electric pins. The damping processes of aluminum at 78 and 101 GPa and iron at 159 and 103 GPa are obtained by this technique, which supplement the existing data by measuring the viscosity coefficient via a dynamic high-pressure method. Applying the formula of Miller and Ahrens to fit the experimental data, the shear viscosity coefficients of aluminum at 78 and 101 GPa are 1350 ± 500 and 1200 ± 500 Pa s, respectively, and those of iron at 159 and 103 GPa are 1150 ± 1000 and 4800 ± 1000 Pa s, respectively. The values measured by the flyer-impact method, approximately 103 Pa s, are consistent with those measured by Sakharov's method, while still greatly differing from those measured by static high-pressure methods. In dynamic high-pressure experiments, the shear viscosity is related to dislocation motion in the solid material, while that in static high-pressure experiments is related to the diffusion motion of atoms or molecules in liquids. Therefore, there are different physical meanings of shear viscosity in dynamic and static high-pressure experiments, and there is no comparability among these results.

  5. Effect of uniform electric field on the drop deformation in simple shear flow and emulsion shear rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Chakraborty, Suman

    2017-07-01

    Electrohydrodynamic deformation and orientation of a neutrally buoyant, leaky dielectric, Newtonian drop suspended in another immiscible, leaky dielectric, Newtonian medium is analyzed under the combined influence of uniform electric field and simple shear flow. Application of uniform electric field, perpendicular to the direction of shear flow, not only deforms the drop but also modifies the rheological behavior of a dilute emulsion. In the creeping flow limit, an analytical solution for the deformed drop shape is obtained when the drop shape remains nearly spherical and the surface charge convection is weak. The effective shear rheology is obtained for a dilute emulsion of non-interacting drops by calculating the one-particle contribution to the emulsion stress. The results show that the combined influence of uniform electric field and shear flow is not a simple linear superposition of the independent contributions from electric field and shear flow. Application of uniform electric field always leads to larger drop deformation with drop inclination more towards the direction of velocity gradient for the particular case of perfectly dielectric drops. Presence of surface charge convection for a leaky dielectric drop can increase or decrease the drop deformation with the drop inclination more towards either the direction of shear flow or velocity gradient. The effective shear viscosity and normal stress differences are found to be independent of shear rate. These quantities are significantly affected by the surface charge convection and shape deformation. Shape deformation always increases the effective viscosity of a dilute emulsion composed of perfectly dielectric drops. Interestingly, for a dilute emulsion composed of leaky dielectric drops, results show that the combined influence of charge convection and shape deformation can augment or decrease the effective shear viscosity.

  6. Surface acoustic load sensing using a face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2012-11-01

    Pb(In(0.5)Nb(0.5))O(3)-Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-PbTiO(3) (PIN-PMN-PT) resonators for surface acoustic load sensing are presented in this paper. Different acoustic loads are applied to thickness mode, thickness-shear mode, and face-shear mode resonators, and the electrical impedances at resonance and anti-resonance frequencies are recorded. More than one order of magnitude higher sensitivity (ratio of electrical impedance change to surface acoustic impedance change) at the resonance is achieved for the face-shear-mode resonator compared with other resonators with the same dimensions. The Krimholtz, Leedom, and Matthaei (KLM) model is used to verify the surface acoustic loading effect on the electrical impedance spectrum of face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonators. The demonstrated high sensitivity of face-shear mode resonators to surface loads is promising for a broad range of applications, including artificial skin, biological and chemical sensors, touch screens, and other touch-based sensors.

  7. Comment on "The effect of variable viscosity on the flow and heat transfer on a continuous stretching surface"

    CERN Document Server

    Pantokratoras, A

    2007-01-01

    The problem of forced convection along an isothermal, constantly moving plate is a classical problem of fluid mechanics that has been solved for the first time in 1961 by Sakiadis (1961). Thereafter, many solutions have been obtained for different aspects of this class of boundary layer problems. Solutions have been appeared including mass transfer, varying plate velocity, varying plate temperature, fluid injection and fluid suction at the plate. The work by Hassanien (1997) belongs to the above class of problems, including a linearly varying velocity and the variation of fluid viscosity with temperature. The author obtained similarity solutions considering that viscosity varies as an inverse function of temperature. However, the Prandtl number, which is a function of viscosity, has been considered constant across the boundary layer. It has been already confirmed in the literature that the assumption of constant Prandtl number leads to unrealistic results (Pantokratoras, 2004, 2005). The objective of the pres...

  8. Fast relaxation of a hexagonal Poiseuille shear-induced near-surface phase in a threadlike micellar solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, W.A. [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6393 (United States); Butler, P.D.; Slawecki, T.M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Magid, L.J.; Han, Z. [Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    1999-08-01

    The dynamics of near-surface conformations in complex fluids under flow should dramatically affect their rheological properties. We have made the first measurements resolving the decay kinetics of a hexagonal phase induced in a threadlike polyionic micellar system under Poiseuille shear near a quartz surface. Upon cessation of shearing flow, this minimum interference crystalline phase formed within {approximately}20 {mu}m of the surface {open_quotes}melts{close_quotes} to a metastable two-dimensional liquid of aligned micelles in {approximately}0.7 s. This is some three orders of magnitude shorter than the time required for bulk (Couette) shear-aligned micelles in this system to reach a fully entangled state. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. High-shear-rate capillary viscometer for inkjet inks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xi [FUJIFILM Dimatix, Inc., Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States); Carr, Wallace W.; Bucknall, David G. [School of Polymer, Textile, and Fiber Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Morris, Jeffrey F. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Benjamin Levich Institute for Physico-Chemical Hydrodynamics, City College of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    A capillary viscometer developed to measure the apparent shear viscosity of inkjet inks at high apparent shear rates encountered during inkjet printing is described. By using the Weissenberg-Rabinowitsch equation, true shear viscosity versus true shear rate is obtained. The device is comprised of a constant-flow generator, a static pressure monitoring device, a high precision submillimeter capillary die, and a high stiffness flow path. The system, which is calibrated using standard Newtonian low-viscosity silicone oil, can be easily operated and maintained. Results for measurement of the shear-rate-dependent viscosity of carbon-black pigmented water-based inkjet inks at shear rates up to 2x10{sup 5} s{sup -1} are discussed. The Cross model was found to closely fit the experimental data. Inkjet ink samples with similar low-shear-rate viscosities exhibited significantly different shear viscosities at high shear rates depending on particle loading.

  10. Raman study of lysozyme amyloid fibrils suspended on super-hydrophobic surfaces by shear flow

    KAUST Repository

    Moretti, Manola

    2017-05-19

    The shear flow generated at the rim of a drop evaporating on a micro-fabricated super-hydrophobic surface has been used to suspend and orient single/few lysozyme amyloid fibrils between two pillars for substrate-free characterization. Micro Raman spectroscopy performed on extended fibers evidenced a shift of the Amide I band main peak to the value attributed to β-sheet secondary structure, characteristic of the amyloid fibers. In addition, given the orientation sensitivity of the anisotropic molecule, the Raman signal of the main secondary structure was nicely enhanced for a fiber alignment parallel to the polarization direction of the laser. The substrate-free sample generated by this suspending technique is suitable for other structural analysis methods, where fiber crystals are investigated. It could be further employed for generation of arrays and patterns in a controllable fashion, where bio-compatible material is needed.

  11. Densities, viscosities, refractive indices, and surface tensions for binary and ternary mixtures of 2-propanol, tetrahydropyran, and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Y.-C. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Providence University, Shalu 43301, Taiwan (China); Tu, C.-H., E-mail: chtu@pu.edu.t [Department of Applied Chemistry, Providence University, Shalu 43301, Taiwan (China)

    2011-02-15

    Densities, viscosities, refractive indices, and surface tensions of the ternary system (2-propanol + tetrahydropyran + 2,2,4-trimethylpentane) at T = 303.15 K and its constituent binary systems (2-propanol + tetrahydropyran, 2-propanol + 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, and tetrahydropyran + 2,2,4-trimethylpentane) at T = (293.15, 303.15, 313.15, and 323.15) K were measured at atmospheric pressure. Densities were determined using a vibrating-tube densimeter. Viscosities were measured with an automatic microviscometer based on the rolling-ball principle. Refractive indexes were measured using a digital Abbe-type refractometer. Surface tensions were determined by the Wilhelmy-plate method. From these data, excess molar volumes, deviations in viscosity, deviations in refractive index, and deviations in surface tension were calculated. The results for the binary and ternary systems were fitted to the Redlich-Kister equation and the variable-degree polynomials in terms of compositions, respectively. The experimental and calculated quantities are used to study the nature of mixing behaviour between mixture components.

  12. Viscosidade extensional e em cisalhamento de suspensões acidificadas de amido de amaranto e caseinato de sódio Extensional and shear viscosity of acidified amaranth starch-sodium caseinate suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Gozzo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Foram avaliadas as viscosidades extensional e em cisalhamento de suspensões acidificadas de amido de amaranto-caseinato de sódio. Sistemas mistos de amido de amaranto-caseinato de sódio acidificados com glucona-delta-lactona (GDL foram estudados por ensaios reológicos em compressão biaxial e cisalhamento. Os efeitos da velocidade de acidificação (lenta e rápida e pH final (neutro e no ponto isoelétrico da caseína foram avaliados considerando as interações entre os biopolímeros e sua consequente influência nos parâmetros reológicos. Todas as amostras apresentaram comportamento pseudoplástico, no entanto, a adição de caseinato de sódio nas suspensões de amido, em pH neutro, promoveu um efeito negativo sobre a viscosidade aparente. Amostras acidificadas apresentaram um aumento na complexidade do sistema devido à formação da rede de amido e caseína, observando que a força necessária para o escoamento foi sempre maior para as amostras contendo concentrações maiores de caseinato. Isso mostra que a agregação e gelificação da proteína promovidas pela acidificação, impediram a microsseparação de fases. Esta rede foi mais forte em sistemas gelificados lentamente, devido à formação de uma rede de proteína mais organizada. Apesar da técnica de compressão biaxial imperfeita ser limitada para avaliação de determinados sistemas, neste estudo, mostrou ser um modo prático e eficiente de se mensurar o comportamento reológico.Extensional and shear viscosity of acidified amaranth starch-sodium caseinate suspensions were evaluated. Mixed systems of amaranth starch-sodium caseinate acidified with glucone-delta-lactone (GDL were studied using rheological measurements under biaxial compression and shear. The effects of the acidification rate (slow and fast and final pH (neutral and isoelectric point of casein were evaluated considering the interactions between biopolymers and their influence on the rheological parameters

  13. Viscosity of aqueous and cyanate ester suspensions containing alumina nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, Katherine [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The viscosities of both aqueous and cyanate ester monomer (BECy) based suspensions of alumina nanoparticle were studied. The applications for these suspensions are different: aqueous suspensions of alumina nanoparticles are used in the production of technical ceramics made by slip casting or tape casting, and the BECy based suspensions are being developed for use in an injection-type composite repair resin. In the case of aqueous suspensions, it is advantageous to achieve a high solids content with low viscosity in order to produce a high quality product. The addition of a dispersant is useful so that higher solids content suspensions can be used with lower viscosities. For BECy suspensions, the addition of nanoparticles to the BECy resin is expected to enhance the mechanical properties of the cured composite. The addition of saccharides to aqueous suspensions leads to viscosity reduction. Through DSC measurements it was found that the saccharide molecules formed a solution with water and this resulted in lowering the melting temperature of the free water according to classic freezing point depression. Saccharides also lowered the melting temperature of the bound water, but this followed a different rule. The shear thinning and melting behaviors of the suspensions were used to develop a model based on fractal-type agglomeration. It is believed that the structure of the particle flocs in these suspensions changes with the addition of saccharides which leads to the resultant viscosity decrease. The viscosity of the BECy suspensions increased with solids content, and the viscosity increase was greater than predicted by the classical Einstein equation for dilute suspensions. Instead, the Mooney equation fits the viscosity behavior well from 0-20 vol% solids. The viscosity reduction achieved at high particle loadings by the addition of benzoic acid was also investigated by NMR. It appears that the benzoic acid interacts with the surface of the alumina particle which may

  14. Viscosity of aqueous and cyanate ester suspensions containing alumina nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, Katherine [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The viscosities of both aqueous and cyanate ester monomer (BECy) based suspensions of alumina nanoparticle were studied. The applications for these suspensions are different: aqueous suspensions of alumina nanoparticles are used in the production of technical ceramics made by slip casting or tape casting, and the BECy based suspensions are being developed for use in an injection-type composite repair resin. In the case of aqueous suspensions, it is advantageous to achieve a high solids content with low viscosity in order to produce a high quality product. The addition of a dispersant is useful so that higher solids content suspensions can be used with lower viscosities. For BECy suspensions, the addition of nanoparticles to the BECy resin is expected to enhance the mechanical properties of the cured composite. The addition of saccharides to aqueous suspensions leads to viscosity reduction. Through DSC measurements it was found that the saccharide molecules formed a solution with water and this resulted in lowering the melting temperature of the free water according to classic freezing point depression. Saccharides also lowered the melting temperature of the bound water, but this followed a different rule. The shear thinning and melting behaviors of the suspensions were used to develop a model based on fractal-type agglomeration. It is believed that the structure of the particle flocs in these suspensions changes with the addition of saccharides which leads to the resultant viscosity decrease. The viscosity of the BECy suspensions increased with solids content, and the viscosity increase was greater than predicted by the classical Einstein equation for dilute suspensions. Instead, the Mooney equation fits the viscosity behavior well from 0-20 vol% solids. The viscosity reduction achieved at high particle loadings by the addition of benzoic acid was also investigated by NMR. It appears that the benzoic acid interacts with the surface of the alumina particle which may

  15. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to enamel under different surface treatment conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Melo Pithon

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to enamel and the adhesive remnant index (ARI of both metallic and polycarbonate brackets bonded under different conditions. Ninety bovine permanent mandibular incisors were embedded in acrylic resin using PVC rings as molds and assigned to 6 groups (n=15. In Groups 1 (control and 3, metallic and polycarbonate orthodontic brackets were, respectively, bonded to the enamel surfaces using Transbond XT composite according to the manufacturer's recommendations. In Groups 2 and 4, both types of brackets were bonded to enamel with Transbond XT composite, but XT primer was replaced by the OrthoPrimer agent. In Groups 5 and 6, the polycarbonate bracket bases were sandblasted with 50-mm aluminum-oxide particle stream and bonded to the enamel surfaces prepared under the same conditions described in Groups 3 and 4, respectively. After bonding, the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 hours and then submitted to shear bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results (MPa showed no statistically significant difference between Groups 4 and 6 (p>0.05. Likewise, no statistically significant differences (p>0.05 were found among Groups 1, 2, and 5, although their results were significantly lower than those of Groups 4 and 6 (p<0.05. Group 3 had statistically significant lower bond strength than Groups 2, 4, and 6, but no statistically significant differences were found on comparison to Groups 1 and 5. A larger number of fractures at the bracket/composite interface were evidenced by the ARI scores. OrthoPrimer bonding agent yielded higher bond strength in the groups using either conventional or sandblasted polycarbonate brackets, which was not observed in the groups using metallic brackets.

  16. SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF BRACKETS BONDED TO PORCELAIN SURFACE: IN VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidan Alakuş Sabuncuoğlu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the effects of different porcelain surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength (SBS and fracture mode of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: Seventy feldspathic porcelain disk samples mounted in acrylic resin blocks were divided into seven groups (n=10 according to type of surface treatment: I, Diamond bur; II, Orthosphoric acid (OPA; III, hydrofluoric acid (HFA; IV, sandblasted with aluminum oxide (SB; V, SB+HFA; VI, Neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG laser; VII, Erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG laser. Brackets were affixed to treated all-porcelain surfaces with a silane bonding agent and adhesive resin and subjected to SBS testing. Specimens were evaluated according to the adhesive remnant index (ARI, and failure modes were assessed quantitatively under a stereomicroscope and morphologically under a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance and the post-hoc Tukey test, with the significance level set at 0.05. Results: The highest SBS values were observed for Group V, with no significant difference between Groups V and III. SBS values for Group I were significantly lower than those of all other groups tested. The porcelain/resin interface was the most common site of failure in Group V (40% and Group III (30%, whereas other groups showed various types of bond failure, with no specific location pre-dominating, but with some of the adhesive left on the porcelain surfaces (ARI scores 2 or 3 in most cases. Conclusion: The current findings indicate that a diamond bur alone is unable to sufficiently etch porcelain surfaces for bracket bonding. Moreover, SB and HFA etching used in combination results in a significantly higher shear-bond strength than HFA or SB alone. Finally, laser etching with either an Nd:YAG or Er:YAG laser was found to be more effective and less time-consuming than both HFA acid and SB for the treatment of deglazed

  17. Surface chemistry regulates the sensitivity and tolerability of osteoblasts to various magnitudes of fluid shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Jinfeng; Xing, Juan; Wang, Yuanliang; Luo, Yanfeng

    2016-12-01

    Scaffolds provide a physical support for osteoblasts and act as the medium to transfer mechanical stimuli to cells. To verify our hypothesis that the surface chemistry of scaffolds regulates the perception of cells to mechanical stimuli, the sensitivity and tolerability of osteoblasts to fluid shear stress (FSS) of various magnitudes (5, 12, 20 dynes/cm(2) ) were investigated on various surface chemistries (-OH, -CH3 , -NH2 ), and their follow-up effects on cell proliferation and differentiation were examined as well. The sensitivity was characterized by the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) while the tolerability was by cellular membrane integrity. The cell proliferation was characterized by S-phase cell fraction and the differentiation by ALP activity and ECM expression (fibronectin and type I collagen). As revealed, osteoblasts demonstrated higher sensitivity and lower tolerability on OH and CH3 surfaces, yet lower sensitivity and higher tolerability on NH2 surfaces. Observations on the focal adhesion formation, F-actin organization and cellular orientation before and after FSS exposure suggest that the potential mechanism lies in the differential control of F-actin organization and focal adhesion formation by surface chemistry, which further divergently mediates the sensitivity and tolerability of ROBs to FSS and the follow-up cell proliferation and differentiation. These findings are essentially valuable for design/selection of desirable surface chemistry to orchestrate with FSS stimuli, inducing appropriate cell responses and promoting bone formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2978-2991, 2016.

  18. Capture and On-chip analysis of Melanoma Cells Using Tunable Surface Shear forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Simon Chang-Hao; Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Dey, Shuvashis; Carrascosa, Laura G.; Christophi, Christopher; Cebon, Jonathan; Shiddiky, Muhammad J. A.; Behren, Andreas; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    With new systemic therapies becoming available for metastatic melanoma such as BRAF and PD-1 inhibitors, there is an increasing demand for methods to assist with treatment selection and response monitoring. Quantification and characterisation of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) has been regarded as an excellent non-invasive candidate but a sensitive and efficient tool to do these is lacking. Herein we demonstrate a microfluidic approach for melanoma cell capture and subsequent on-chip evaluation of BRAF mutation status. Our approach utilizes a recently discovered alternating current electrohydrodynamic (AC-EHD)-induced surface shear forces, referred to as nanoshearing. A key feature of nanoshearing is the ability to agitate fluid to encourage contact with surface-bound antibody for the cell capture whilst removing nonspecific cells from the surface. By adjusting the AC-EHD force to match the binding affinity of antibodies against the melanoma-associated chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (MCSP), a commonly expressed melanoma antigen, this platform achieved an average recovery of 84.7% from biological samples. Subsequent staining with anti-BRAFV600E specific antibody enabled on-chip evaluation of BRAFV600E mutation status in melanoma cells. We believe that the ability of nanoshearing-based capture to enumerate melanoma cells and subsequent on-chip characterisation has the potential as a rapid screening tool while making treatment decisions.

  19. Displacement of liquid droplets on a surface by a shearing air flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J; Wilson, M C T; Kapur, N

    2011-04-01

    The motion of droplets on surfaces is crucial to the performance of a wide range of processes; this study examines the initiation of droplet motion through a shearing mechanism generated here by a controlled air flow. Systematic experiments are carried out for a range of fluids and well defined surfaces. A model is postulated that balances surface tension forces at the contact line and the drag force due to the air motion. Experiments reveal that the critical velocity at which droplet motion is initiated depends on the contact angle and the droplet size. Visualizations highlight three modes of motion: (I) the droplet retains a footprint similar to that at the point of motion; (II) a tail exists at the rear of the droplet; (III) a trail remains behind the droplet (that can shed smaller droplets). The predictions of droplet initiation velocity are good for type I motion, in accordance with the assumptions inherent within the model. This model confirms the dominant physics associated with the initiation of droplet motion and provides a useful predictive expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Competing effects of viscosity and surface-tension depression on the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of laboratory surrogates for oligomers in atmospheric aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Shiraiwa, M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.; Schilling, K.; Berkemeier, T.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of oligomers in biomass burning aerosol, as well as secondary organic aerosol derived from other sources, influences particle viscosity and can introduce kinetic limitations to water uptake. This, in turn, impacts aerosol optical properties and the efficiency with which these particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). To explore the influence of organic-component viscosity on aerosol hygroscopicity, the water-uptake behavior of aerosol systems comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and mixtures of PEG and ammonium sulfate (AS) was measured under sub- and supersaturated relative humidity (RH) conditions. Experiments were conducted with systems containing PEG with average molecular weights ranging from 200 to 10,000 g/mol, corresponding to a range in viscosity of 0.004 - 4.5 Pa s under dry conditions. While evidence suggests that viscous aerosol components can suppress water uptake at RH activity with increasing PEG molecular weight was observed. We attribute this to an increase in the efficiency with which PEG serves as a surfactant with increasing molecular weight. This effect is most pronounced for PEG-AS mixtures and, in fact, a modest increase in CCN activity is observed for the PEG 10,000-AS mixture as compared to pure AS, as evidenced by a 4% reduction in critical activation diameter. Experimental results are compared with calculations of hygroscopic growth at thermodynamic equilibrium using the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients model and the potential influence of kinetic limitations to observed water uptake is further explored with the Kinetic Multi-Layer Model of Gas-Particle Interactions. Results suggest the competing effects of organic-component viscosity and surface-tension depression may lead to RH-dependent differences in hygroscopicity for oligomers and other surface-active compounds present in atmospheric aerosols, for which PEG serves as a surrogate in these experiments.

  1. Fractal properties of isovelocity surfaces in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.; Foss, John F.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Karyakin, Mikhail Yu.

    1993-08-01

    The fractal properties of isovelocity surfaces are studied in three high Reynolds number (Rλ≊2.0×102-3.2×103) laboratory shear flows using the standard box-counting method. The fractal dimension D=-d(log Nr)/d(log r) was estimated within the range of box sizes r from several Kolmogorov scales up to several integral scales (Nr is the number of boxes with size r required to cover the line intersection of an isovelocity surface). The inertial subrange was of particular interest in this investigation. Measurements were carried out for external intermittency factors γ≊0.6-1.0. The data were processed using threshold levels U±2.5u' (U and u' denote mean and rms values of longitudinal velocity). Over the parameters studied, no wide range of constant fractal dimension was found. On the other hand, the accuracy of constant fractal dimension approximation with D≊0.4 over the inertial subranges was shown to be similar to that of the Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 30, 301 (1941)] ``two-thirds law.''

  2. Effect of Four Methods of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Zirconium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soghra Yassaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Providing reliable attachment between bracket base and zirconia surface is a prerequisite for exertion of orthodontic force. The purpose of the present study was to eval- uate the effect of four zirconium surface treatment methods on shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: One block of zirconium was trimmed into four zirconium sur- faces, which served as our four study groups and each had 18 metal brackets bonded to them. Once the glazed layer was removed, the first group was etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (HF, and the other three groups were prepared by means of sandblasting and 1 W, and 2 W Er: YAG laser, respectively. After application of silane, central incisor brackets were bonded to the zirconium surfaces. The SBS values were measured by a Dartec testing ma- chine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min.Results: The highest SBS was achieved in the sandblasted group (7.81±1.02 MPa followed in a descending order by 2 W laser group (6.95±0.87 MPa, 1 W laser group (6.87±0.92MPa and HF acid etched group (5.84±0.78 MPa. The differences between the study groups, were statistically significant except between the laser groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: In terms of higher bond strength and safety, sandblasting and Er: YAG laser irradiation with power output of 1 W and 2 W can be considered more appropriate alterna- tives to HF acid etching for zirconium surface treatment prior to bracket bonding.

  3. Shear bond strength of a self-etched resin cement to an indirect composite: effect of different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harorli, O T; Barutcugil, C; Kirmali, O; Kapdan, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of resin cement (Rely X-U200) bonded to differently conditioned indirect composite samples. Sixty-six composite resin specimens (5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were prepared with an indirect composite resin (Grandia) and randomly divided into six groups. Surfaces of the samples were treated with one of the following treatments; %37 phosphoric acid etching, sandblasting, 1,5 W, 2 W and 3 W erbium, chromium: Yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser application. An untreated group was used as a control. In each group surface of the sample was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. The remaining samples (n = 60) were built up with a self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X-U200) 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm height. After 24 h water storage at 37°C, the prepared specimens were submitted to shear bond strength test. One-way analysis of variance was used to analyze the bond strength values of different groups. Highest shear bond strength values were observed in sandblasting group however there were not statistical difference among the tested surface treatment methods. In Shear bond strength of resin, cement was independent of the surface conditioning methods applied on tested indirect resin composite.

  4. Variation in wind speed and surface shear stress from open floor to porous parallel windbreaks: A wind tunnel study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, De-Xin; Zhong, Ye; Jin, Chang-Jie; Wang, An-Zhi; Wu, Jia-Bing; Shi, Ting-Ting; Zhu, Ting-Yao

    2009-08-01

    As vegetative windbreaks become established on a large scale in agricultural ecosystems, understanding the influence of windbreak networks on the momentum budget of the atmospheric boundary layer becomes important. The authors conducted a wind tunnel experiment to study the variation of wind speed profile and surface shear stress of wind flow passing from an open surface to another with parallel windbreaks. Five spacing (L = 5, 10, 15, 20, 30 h, wherein h is the windbreak height) windbreak arrays with moderate porosity (aerodynamic porosity α = 0.501) were used in the experiments. Both near-floor and over-array wind speed measurements showed that airflow will approach equilibrium state behind a special windbreak of the array, varying from 4th to 9th windbreak when the spacing change from 30 to 5 h. Within the range of L/h values investigated, arrays with narrower spacing cause higher friction velocity and roughness length, which were up to 2.26 and nearly 100 times those observed over open floor, respectively. A semiempirical momentum budget model is developed on the arrayed surface to estimate windbreak drag and shear stress on the protected floor. Windbreak drag accounts for more than 80% of shear stress on the arrayed surface, and the shear stress on protected floor is less than 20% when L/h < 40 based on the model estimation. The sum of the two estimated components agrees well with the estimates obtained from over-array wind profiles.

  5. Variable Viscosity on Magnetohydrodynamic Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer over an Unsteady Stretching Surface with Hall Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motsa SS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of magnetohydrodynamic flow and heat transfer of a viscous, incompressible, and electrically conducting fluid past a semi-infinite unsteady stretching sheet is analyzed numerically. The problem was studied under the effects of Hall currents, variable viscosity, and variable thermal diffusivity. Using a similarity transformation, the governing fundamental equations are approximated by a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The resultant system of ordinary differential equations is then solved numerically by the successive linearization method together with the Chebyshev pseudospectral method. Details of the velocity and temperature fields as well as the local skin friction and the local Nusselt number for various values of the parameters of the problem are presented. It is noted that the axial velocity decreases with increasing the values of the unsteadiness parameter, variable viscosity parameter, or the Hartmann number, while the transverse velocity increases as the Hartmann number increases. Due to increases in thermal diffusivity parameter, temperature is found to increase.

  6. Shear Viscosity of Aluminium under Shock Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fu-Sheng; YANG Mei-Xia; LIU Qi-Wen; CHEN Jun-Xiang; JING Fu-Qian

    2005-01-01

    @@ Based on the Newtonian viscous fluid model and the analytic perturbation theory of Miller and Ahrens for the oscillatory damping of a sinusoidal shock front, a flyer-impact technique is developed to investigate the effecti veviscosity of shocked aluminium.

  7. Surface Tension and Viscosity of the Ni-Based Superalloys LEK94 and CMSX-10 Measured by the Oscillating Drop Method on Board a Parabolic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Rainer K.; Fecht, Hans-Jörg; Lohöfer, Georg

    2017-02-01

    The surface tension and viscosity of the Ni-based superalloys LEK94 and CMSX-10 were measured by the oscillating drop method in a containerless electromagnetic processing device on board a parabolic flight airplane. Surface oscillations were recorded by 150 and 200 Hz frame rate digital cameras positioned in two perpendicular directions and by the inductive coupling between the oscillating sample surface and the oscillating circuit of the radio frequency heating and positioning generator. The surface tension as a function of temperature of LEK94 and CMSX-10 was obtained as σ( T) = 1.73 - 4.51 × 10-4 [ T—1656 K (1383 °C)] Nm-1 and σ( T) = 1.71 - 5.80 × 10-4 [( T—1683 K (1410 °C)] Nm-1, respectively. The viscosity at the liquidus temperatures as 9.8 and 7.8 mPa.s, respectively. In addition, some basic thermophysical properties such as solidus and liquidus temperatures, densities at room temperature, and thermal expansion in the solid phase are reported.

  8. Late-Time Mixing Sensitivity to Initial Broadband Surface Roughness in High-Energy-Density Shear Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flippo, K. A.; Doss, F. W.; Kline, J. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Capelli, D.; Cardenas, T.; DeVolder, B.; Fierro, F.; Huntington, C. M.; Kot, L.; Loomis, E. N.; MacLaren, S. A.; Murphy, T. J.; Nagel, S. R.; Perry, T. S.; Randolph, R. B.; Rivera, G.; Schmidt, D. W.

    2016-11-23

    Using a large volume high-energy-density fluid shear experiment (8.5 cm3) at the National Ignition Facility, we have demonstrated for the first time the ability to significantly alter the evolution of a supersonic sheared mixing layer by controlling the initial conditions of that layer. By altering the initial surface roughness of the tracer foil, we demonstrate the ability to transition the shear mixing layer from a highly ordered system of coherent structures to a randomly ordered system with a faster growing mix layer, indicative of strong mixing in the layer at a temperature of several tens of electron volts and at near solid density. Simulations using a turbulent-mix model show good agreement with the experimental results and poor agreement without turbulent mix.

  9. Conditions of viscosity measurement for detecting irradiated peppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Toru; Todoriki, Setsuko; Okadome, Hiroshi; Kohyama, Kaoru

    1995-04-01

    Viscosity of gelatinized suspensions of black and white peppers decreased depending upon dose. The viscosity was influenced by gelatinization and viscosity measurement conditions. The difference between unirradiated pepper and an irradiated one was larger at a higher pH and temperature for gelatinization. A viscosity parameter normalized with the starch content of pepper sample and the viscosity of a 5% suspension of corn starch could get rid of the influence of the conditions for viscosity measurement such as a type of viscometer, shear rate and temperature.

  10. Evaluation of shear bond strength of porcelain bonded to laser welded titanium surface and determination of mode of bond failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Narendra P; Dandekar, Minal; Nadiger, Ramesh K; Guttal, Satyabodh S

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of porcelain to laser welded titanium surface and to determine the mode of bond failure through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrophotometry (EDS). Forty five cast rectangular titanium specimens with the dimension of 10 mm x 8 mm x 1 mm were tested. Thirty specimens had a perforation of 2 mm diameter in the centre. These were randomly divided into Group A and B. The perforations in the Group B specimens were repaired by laser welding using Cp Grade II titanium wire. The remaining 15 specimens were taken as control group. All the test specimens were layered with low fusing porcelain and tested for shear bond strength. The debonded specimens were subjected to SEM and EDS. Data were analysed with 1-way analysis of variance and Student's t-test for comparison among the different groups. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed no statistically significant difference in shear bond strength values at a 5% level of confidence. The mean shear bond strength values for control group, Group A and B was 8.4 +/- 0.5 Mpa, 8.1 +/- 0.4 Mpa and 8.3 +/- 0.3 Mpa respectively. SEM/EDS analysis of the specimens showed mixed and cohesive type of bond failure. Within the limitations of the study laser welding did not have any effect on the shear bond strength of porcelain bonded to titanium.

  11. Inertial effects on thin-film wave structures with imposed surface shear on an inclined plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapuratharasu, M.; Hibberd, S.; Hubbard, M. E.; Power, H.

    2016-06-01

    This study provides an extended approach to the mathematical simulation of thin-film flow on a flat inclined plane relevant to flows subject to high surface shear. Motivated by modelling thin-film structures within an industrial context, wave structures are investigated for flows with moderate inertial effects and small film depth aspect ratio ε. Approximations are made assuming a Reynolds number, Re ∼ O(ε-1) and depth-averaging used to simplify the governing Navier-Stokes equations. A parallel Stokes flow is expected in the absence of any wave disturbance and a generalisation for the flow is based on a local quadratic profile. This approach provides a more general system which includes inertial effects and is solved numerically. Flow structures are compared with studies for Stokes flow in the limit of negligible inertial effects. Both two-tier and three-tier wave disturbances are used to study film profile evolution. A parametric study is provided for wave disturbances with increasing film Reynolds number. An evaluation of standing wave and transient film profiles is undertaken and identifies new profiles not previously predicted when inertial effects are neglected.

  12. Temperature dependence of immunoreactions using shear horizontal surface acoustic wave immunosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogai, Takashi; Yatsuda, Hiromi; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the temperature dependence of immunoreactions, which are antibody-antigen reactions, on a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) immunosensor is described. The immunosensor is based on a reflection-type delay line on a 36° Y-cut 90° X-propagation quartz substrate, where the delay line is composed of a floating electrode unidirectional transducer (FEUDT), a grating reflector, and a sensing area between them. In order to evaluate the temperature dependence of immunoreactions, human serum albumin (HSA) antigen-antibody reactions are investigated. The SH-SAW immunosensor chip is placed in a thermostatic chamber and the changes in the SH-SAW velocity resulting from the immunoreactions are measured at different temperatures. As a result, it is observed that the HSA immunoreactions are influenced by the ambient temperature and that higher temperatures provide more active reactions. In order to analyze the immunoreactions, an analytical approach using an exponential fitting method for changes in SH-SAW velocity is employed.

  13. Drag reduction by the introduction of shear-free surfaces in a turbulent channel flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AJAY KUMAR SOOD; MURALI R CHOLEMARI; BALAJI SRINIVASAN

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a novel technique for drag reduction in turbulent flows is presented. The technique involves the modification of the large scales of turbulent flows and is a passive approach. The lateral transport of momentum, which is a dominant mechanism in turbulence, is attenuated by the introduction of moving shearfree surfaces (SFSes). This brings about a reduction in the drag. 2D simulations have been carried out for aturbulent channel flow using shear stress transport (SST) Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) model and validated with the available experimental results. The interaction between the plates and the fluid is two way,and is enforced either by the use of a rigid body solver with moving mesh, or by considering the SFSes to befixed at particular locations and then updating the velocities of the plates at those locations. The latter is equivalent to solving a fully developed flow in the moving mesh case. The number, shape, size and placement of the SFSes strongly influence the amount of drag reduction. The phenomenon is confirmed to be governed by a ‘slow’ turbulent time scale. Further, the efficacy of the method is seen to depend on the ratio of two time scales – an advection time scale indicating the ‘resident time’ near an SFS, and the turbulent time scale. In addition, the effectiveness of the approach is improved by judicious placement of multiple SFSes in the flow.

  14. Thermo-Oxidative Stability of Graphite/PMR-15 Composites: Effect of Fiber Surface Modification on Composite Shear Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhukar, Madhu S.; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Papadopolous, Demetrios S.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to establish a correlation between the weight loss of a polyimide (PMR- 15) matrix and graphite fibers and the in-plane shear properties of their unidirectional composites subjected to different isothermal aging times up to 1000 hr at 316 C. The role of fiber surface treatment on the composite degradation during the thermo-oxidative aging was investigated by using A4 graphite fibers with three surface modifications: untreated (AU-4), surface treated (AS-4), and surface treated and sized with an epoxy-compatible sizing (AS-4G). The weight loss of the matrix fibers, and composites was determined during the aging. The effect of thermal aging was seen in all the fiber samples in terms of weight loss and reduction in fiber diameter. Calculated values of weight loss fluxes for different surfaces of rectangular unidirectional composite plates showed that the largest weight loss occurred at those cut surfaces where fibers were perpendicular to the surface. Consequently, the largest amount of damage was also noted on these cut surfaces. Optical observation of the neat matrix and composite plates subjected to different aging times revealed that the degradation (such as matrix microcracking and void growth) occurred in a thin surface layer near the specimen edges. The in-plane shear modulus of the composites was unaffected by the fiber surface treatment and the thermal aging. The shear strength of the composites with the untreated fibers was the lowest and it decreased with aging. A fracture surface examination of the composites with untreated fibers suggested that the weak interface allowed the oxidation reaction to proceed along the interface and thus expose the inner material to further oxidation. The results indicated that the fiber-matrix interface affected the composite degradation process during its thermal aging and that the the weak interface accelerated the composite degradation.

  15. Oseen流动中粘性对自由表面波的影响%Effect of Viscosity on Free-Surface Waves in Oseen Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢东强

    2004-01-01

    Based on the complex dispersion relation for the two-dimensional free-surface waves generated by a moving body in the steady Oseen flows, the effect of viscosity on wavelength and wave amplitude was investigated by means of an asymptotic method and a numerical analysis.A comparison between the asymptotic and numerical analysis for the viscous decay factor demonstrates the validity of the perturbation expansions for the wave profile.The numerical result shows that the wavelength of viscous wave is slightly elongated in comparison with that of inviscid wave.

  16. Eddy viscosity of core flow inferred from comparison between time evolutions of the length-of-day and a core surface flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, M.

    2016-12-01

    Diffusive processes of large scales in the Earth's core are dominated not by the molecular diffusion but by the eddy diffusion. To carry out numerical simulations of realistic geodynamo models, it is important to adopt appropriate parameters. However, the eddy viscous diffusion, or the eddy viscosity, is not a property of the core fluid but of the core flow. Hence it is significant to estimate the eddy viscosity from core flow models. In fact, fluid motion near the Earth's core surface provides useful information on core dynamics, features of the core-mantle boundary (CMB), and core-mantle coupling, for example. Such core fluid motion can be estimated from spatial and temporal distributions of the geomagnetic field. Most of core surface flow models rely on the frozen-flux approximation (Roberts and Scott, 1965), in which the magnetic diffusion is neglected. It should be noted, however, that there exists a viscous boundary layer at the CMB, where the magnetic diffusion may play an important role in secular variations of geomagnetic field. Therefore, a new approach to estimation of core surface flow has been devised by Matsushima (2015). That is, the magnetic diffusion is explicitly incorporated within the viscous boundary layer, while it is neglected below the boundary layer at the CMB which is assumed to be a spherical surface. A core surface flow model between 1840 and 2015 has been derived from a geomagnetic field model, COV-OBS.x1 (Gillet et al., 2015). Temporal variations of core flows contain information on phenomena in relation with core-mantle coupling, such as the LOD (length-of-day), and spin-up/spin-down of core flows. In particular, core surface flows inside the viscous boundary layer at the CMB may reveal an interesting feature in relation with Earth's rotation. We have examined time series of the LOD and vorticity derived from the core surface flow model. We have found a possible correlation between the LOD and the axial component of global vorticity

  17. Anomalous Viscosity of the Quark-Gluon Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Juhee

    2013-01-01

    The shear viscosity of the quark-gluon plasma is predicted to be lower than the collisional viscosity for weak coupling. The estimated ratio of the shear viscosity to entropy density is rather close to the ratio calculated by N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory for strong coupling, which indicates that the quark-gluon plasma might be strongly coupled. However, in presence of momentum anisotropy, the Weibel instability can arise and affect transport properties. Shear viscosity can be lowered by enhanced collisionality due to turbulence, but the decorrelation time and its relation to underlying dynamics and color-magnetic fields have not been calculated self-consistently. In this paper, we use resonance broadening theory for strong turbulence to calculate the anomalous viscosity of the quark-gluon plasma for nonequilibrium. For saturated Weibel instability, we estimate the scalings of the decorrelation rate and viscosity and compare these with collisional transport. This calculation yields an explicit connection betw...

  18. Shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite on dentin surface as a result of scrubbing pressure and duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferry Jaya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-adhering flowable composite is a combination of composite resin and adhesive material. Its application needs scrubbing process on the dentin surface, but sometimes it is difficult to determine the pressure and duration of scrubbing. Purpose: This study was aimed to analyze the effect of scrubbing pressure and duration on shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite to dentin surface Methods: Fifty four mandibulary third molar were cut to get the dentin surface and divided into nine groups (n = 6. Dentin surface was scrubbed with 1, 2, and 3 grams of scrubbing pressure, each for 15, 20, and 25 seconds respectively. surface was scrubbed with 1, 2, and 3 grams of scrubbing pressure, each for 15, 20, and 25 seconds respectively. Composite resin was applied incrementally and polymerized for 20 seconds. All specimens were immersed in saline solution at 37º C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was tested for all specimens by using Universal Testing Machine (Shimadzu AG-5000E, Japan at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute and analyzed by ANOVA and Post Hoc Test Bonferonni. The interface between self-adhering flowable interface between self-adhering flowable composite and dentin was observed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (JEOL JSM 6510LA. Results: The highest shear bond strength was obtained by 3 grams scrubbing pressure for 25 seconds or equal to applying the brush applicator in 0º relative to dentin surface. Conclusion: Increasing the scrubbing pressure and duration will increase the shear bond strength of self adhering flowable composite resin to dentinal surface. The highest shear bond strength was obtained when the applicator in 0º relative to dentin surface. Latar belakang: Self-adhering flowable composite merupakan gabungan resin komposit dengan material adhesif yang dalam penggunaannya memerlukan teknik scrubbing pada permukaan dentin, namun sulit untuk menentukan besar tekanan yang tepat saat scrubbing. Tujuan

  19. OCT-based quantification of flow velocity, shear force, and power generated by a biological ciliated surface (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Loewenberg, Michael; Choma, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    In cilia-driven fluid flow physiology, quantification of flow velocity, shearing force, and power dissipation is important in defining abnormal ciliary function. The capacity to generate flow can be robustly described in terms of shearing force. Dissipated power can be related to net ATP consumption by ciliary molecular motors. To date, however, only flow velocity can be routinely quantified in a non-invasive, non-contact manner. Additionally, traditional power-based metrics rely on metabolic consumption that reflects energy consumption not just from cilia but also from all active cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the estimation of all three of these quantities (flow velocity, shear force, and power dissipation) using only optical coherence tomography (OCT). Specifically, we develop a framework that can extract force and power information from vectorial flow velocity fields obtained using OCT-based methods. We do so by (a) estimating the viscous stress tensor from flow velocity fields to estimate shearing force and (b) using the viscous stress tensor to estimate the power dissipation function to infer total mechanical power. These estimates have the advantage of (a) requiring only a single modality, (b) being non-invasive in nature, and (c) being reflective of only the net power work generated by a ciliated surface. We demonstrate our all-optical approach to the estimation of these parameters in the Xenopus animal model system under normal and increased viscous loading. Our preliminary data support the hypothesis that the Xenopus ciliated surface can increase force output under loading conditions.

  20. 燃油碳烟颗粒的表面特性与润滑油黏度行为%Effect of surface properties of fuel soot particles on viscosity of lubricating oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘天霞; 宋汝鸿; 胡恩柱; 徐玉福; 胡献国

    2015-01-01

    function with increasing soot content at 40℃. The relative viscosity of oil contaminated by DS was higher than that of BS in case of the same soot contents. The oil contaminated with high concentration soot had the advantage of clearly identified shear thinning behavior, which was more severely in LP contaminated by DS. The main surface elements of BS and DS were carbon and oxygen. The surface oxygen content of DS was less than that of BS. There were some O-containing functional groups on the surfaces of BS and DS. The surface property analysis showed that the specific surface area and the surface energy of DS were higher than those of BS. The lipophilicity of DS was less than that of BS. The DS was apt to agglomerate into larger agglomeration particles in LP, which was the main reason for the fact of DS affecting LP viscosity more severely compared with BS.

  1. Viscosity anomaly in core-softened liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Fomin, Yu. D.; Ryzhov, V. N.

    2013-01-01

    The present article presents a molecular dynamics study of several anomalies of core-softened systems. It is well known that many core-softened liquids demonstrate diffusion anomaly. Usual intuition relates the diffusion coefficient to shear viscosity via Stockes-Einstein relation. However, it can break down at low temperature. In this respect it is important to see if viscosity also demonstrates anomalous behavior.

  2. Shear bond, wettability and AFM evaluations on CO2 laser-irradiated CAD/CAM ceramic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gamal, Ahmed; Medioni, Etienne; Rocca, Jean Paul; Fornaini, Carlo; Muhammad, Omid H; Brulat-Bouchard, Nathalie

    2017-03-09

    The purpose of this study is to determine the CO2 laser irradiation in comparison with sandblasting (Sb), hydrofluoric acid (Hf) and silane coupling agent (Si) on shear bond strength (SBS), roughness (Rg) and wettability (Wt) of resin cement to CAD/CAM ceramics. Sixty (CAD/CAM) ceramic discs were prepared and distributed into six different groups: group A, control lithium disilicate (Li); group B, control zirconia (Zr); group C, Li: CO2/HF/Si; group D, Li: HF/Si; group E, Zr: CO2/Sb/Si; group F, Zr: Sb/Si. Result showed significant difference between irradiated and non-irradiated in terms of shear bond strength for zirconia ceramics (p value = 0.014). Moreover, partial surface wettability for irradiated and non-irradiated ceramics. Irradiated surface demonstrated more rough surface in lithium disilicate than zirconia ceramics. CO2 irradiation could increase shear bond strength, surface roughness and wettability for both CAD/CAM ceramics.

  3. A Study on Effect of Surface Treatments on the Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Acrylic Resin Denture Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Gupta, Tapas K; Banerjee, Ardhendu

    2011-03-01

    Visible light-cured composite resins have become popular in prosthetic dentistry for the replacement of fractured/debonded denture teeth, making composite denture teeth on partial denture metal frameworks, esthetic modification of denture teeth to harmonize with the characteristics of adjacent natural teeth, remodelling of worn occlusal surfaces of posterior denture teeth etc. However, the researches published on the bond strength between VLC composite resins and acrylic resin denture teeth is very limited. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of five different methods of surface treatments on acrylic resin teeth on the shear bond strength between light activated composite resin and acrylic resin denture teeth. Ninety cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were done upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into six groups, containing 15 samples each. Over all the treated and untreated surfaces of all groups, light-cured composite resin was applied. The shear strengths were measured in a Universal Testing Machine using a knife-edge shear test. Data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and mean values were compared by the F test. Application of bonding agent with prior treatment of methyl methacrylate on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin.

  4. Near Surface Shear Wave Velocity Model of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, S.; Craig, M. S.; Hayashi, K.; Galvin, J. L.; Deqiang, C.; Jones, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface wave measurements (MASW) and microtremor array measurements (MAM) were performed at twelve sites across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to obtain high resolution shear wave velocity (VS) models. Deeper surveys were performed at four of the sites using the two station spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method. For the MASW and MAM surveys, a 48-channel seismic system with 4.5 Hz geophones was used with a 10-lb sledgehammer and a metal plate as a source. Surveys were conducted at various locations on the crest of levees, the toe of the levees, and off of the levees. For MASW surveys, we used a record length of 2.048 s, a sample interval of 1 ms, and 1 m geophone spacing. For MAM, ambient noise was recorded for 65.536 s with a sampling interval of 4 ms and 1 m geophone spacing. VS was determined to depths of ~ 20 m using the MASW method and ~ 40 m using the MAM method. Maximum separation between stations in the two-station SPAC surveys was typically 1600 m to 1800 m, providing coherent signal with wavelengths in excess of 5 km and depth penetration of as much as 2000 m. Measured values of VS30 in the study area ranged from 97 m/s to 257 m/s, corresponding to NEHRP site classifications D and E. Comparison of our measured velocity profiles with available geotechnical logs, including soil type, SPT, and CPT, reveals the existence of a small number of characteristic horizons within the upper 40m in the Delta: levee fill material, peat, transitional silty sand, and eolian sand at depth. Sites with a peat layer at the surface exhibited extremely low values of VS. Based on soil borings, the thickness of peat layers were approximately 0 m to 8 m. The VS for the peat layers ranged from 42 m/s to 150 m/s while the eolian sand layer exhibited VS ranging from of 220 m/s to 370 m/s. Soft near surface soils present in the region pose an increased earthquake hazard risk due to the potential for high ground accelerations.

  5. Shear Bond Strength of a Resin Cement to Different Alloys Subjected to Various Surface Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Ezoji

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Micromechanical retention of resin cements to alloys is an important factor affecting the longevity of metal base restorations. This study aimed to compare the bond strength and etching pattern of a newly introduced experimental etchant gel namely Nano Met Etch with those of conventional surface treatment techniques for nickel-chrome (Ni-Cr and high noble alloys. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 discs (8×10×15 mm were cast with Ni-Cr (n=20, high noble BegoStar (n=50 and gold coin alloys (n=50. Their Surfaces were ground with abrasive papers. Ni-Cr specimens received sandblasting and etching. High noble alloy specimens (begoStar and gold coin received sandblasting, sandblasting-alloy primer, etching, etch-alloy primer and alloy primer alone. Cylindrical specimens of Panavia were bonded to surfaces using Tygon tubes. Specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength testing after storing at 37°C for 24 hours.Results: In gold coin group, the highest bond strength was achieved after sandblasting (25.82±1.37MPa, P<0.001 and etching+alloy primer (26.60 ± 5.47 MPa, P<0.01. The lowest bond strength belonged to sandblasting+alloy primer (17.79±2.96MPa, P<0.01. In BegoStar group, the highest bond strength was obtained in the sandblasted group (38.40±3.29MPa, P<0.001 while the lowest bond strength was detected in the sandblast+ alloy primer group (15.38±2.92MPa, P<0.001. For the Ni-Cr alloy, bond strength in the etched group (20.79±2.01MPa was higher than that in the sandblasted group (18.25±1.82MPa (P<0.01.Conclusions: For the Ni-Cr alloy, etching was more efficient than sandblasting but for the high noble alloys, higher Au content increased the efficacy of etching.

  6. Water Waves from General, Time-Dependent Surface Pressure Distribution in the Presence of a Shear Current

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We obtain a general solution for the water waves resulting from a general, time-dependent surface pressure distribution, in the presence of a shear current of uniform vorticity beneath the surface, in three dimensions. Linearized governing equations and boundary conditions including the effects of gravity, a distributed external pressure disturbance, and constant finite depth, are solved analytically, and particular attention is paid to classic initial value problems: an initial pressure impulse and a steady pressure distribution which appears suddenly. In the present paper, good agreement with previous results is demonstrated. We subsequently show both analytically and numerically how transient waves from a suddenly appearing steady pressure distribution vanis for large times, and steady ship waves remain. The transient contribution to wave resistance was derived. The results show that a shear current has significant impact on the transient wave motions, resulting in asymmetry between upstream and downstream...

  7. Critical shear stress on the surface of a cuttings bed; Tensao critica de cisalhamento na superficie de um leito de cascalhos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Luciana Mancor [Universidade Estadual Norte Fluminense (UENF), Macae, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Engenharia de Petroleo]. E-mail: luciana@lenep.uenf.br; Campos, Wellington [PETROBRAS, S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas]. E-mail: campos@cenpes.petrobras.com.br; Braga, Luiz Carvalho [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica (CEFET), Macae, RJ (Brazil). Unidade de Ensino Descentralizada]. E-mail: luiz@lenep.uenf.br

    2000-07-01

    The cuttings transport during the drilling of highly inclined and horizontal wells is hindered by the creation of a cuttings bed in the annulus. In this work, it is shown that the equilibrium height of this bed can be determined from the shear stress on its surface. This fact enables the formulation of a methodology for evaluating the equilibrium height of the cuttings bed through the introduction of a new concept, that of critical shear stress. This is the shear stress that acts on the bed surface at the imminence of movement of the particles on the bed surface. The use of the methodology requires the determination of the acting shear stress and of the required critical shear stress. The acting shear stress is calculated by means of a computer program that solve the motion differential equations in the annular space; covering the cases of the laminar and turbulent flow regimes. The actuating shear stress is a function of flow rate and of the annular geometry in the presence of a cuttings bed; it is also a function of the physical properties of the fluid. On the other hand, the required critical shear stress is a function of the particles diameters and physical properties of the fluid and particles. A mechanistic model for the critical shear stress is also presented. (author)

  8. Yam tuber mucilage as a candidate substance for saliva substitute: in vitro study of its viscosity and influences on lysozyme and peroxidase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Hong-Seop; Park, Moon-Soo; Chang, Ji-Youn; Kim, Yoon-Young

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the viscosity of yam tuber mucilage (YTM) and its effects on lysozyme and peroxidase activities in solution phase and on surface phase. Two kinds of YTM were extracted, one containing both protein and carbohydrate and the other containing mainly carbohydrate. Hen egg-white lysozyme and bovine lactoperoxidase were used as lysozyme and peroxidase sources, respectively. Viscosity was measured with a cone-and-plate digital viscometer. Lysozyme activity was determined using the turbidimetric method, and peroxidase activity was determined using the NbsSCN assay. Hydroxyapatite beads were used as a solid phase. The viscosity values of YTM followed a pattern of a non-Newtonian fluid. The carbohydrate concentration affected the viscosity values at all shear rates, while the protein concentration affected the viscosity values at low shear rates. It could be suggested that YTM composed of 1.0 mg/ml protein and 1.0 mg/ml carbohydrate has viscosity values similar to those of unstimulated whole saliva at shear rates present at routine oral functions. Hydroxyapatite-adsorbed YTM significantly increased the adsorption and subsequent enzymatic activities of lysozyme, but not those of peroxidase. Yam tuber mucilage has viscoelastic properties similar to those of human saliva and enhances the enzymatic activity of lysozyme on hydroxyapatite surfaces. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effects of shear stress on the microalgae Chaetoceros muelleri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michels, M.H.A.; Goot, van der A.J.; Norsker, N.H.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of shear stress on the viability of Chaetoceros muelleri was studied using a combination of a rheometer and dedicated shearing devices. Different levels of shear stress were applied by varying the shear rates and the medium viscosities. It was possible to quantify the effect of shear

  10. Viscosity to entropy ratio of QGP in relativistic heavy ion collisions: The second-order viscose hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabi Pari, Sharareh; Taghavi Shahri, Fatemeh; Javidan, Kurosh

    2016-10-01

    The nuclear suppression factor RAA and elliptic flow ν2 are calculated by considering the effects of shear viscosity to the entropy density ratio η/s, using the viscose hydrodynamics at the first- and second-orders of approximation and considering temperature dependent coupling αs(T). It is shown that the second-order viscose hydrodynamics (varying shear viscosity to entropy ratio) with averaged value of 4πη/s = 1.5 ± 0.1 gives the best results of RAA and ν2 in comparison to the experimental data.

  11. The effects of viscosity on circumplanetary disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Fu Bu; Hsien Shang; Feng Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The effects of viscosity on the circumplanetary disks residing in the vicinity of protoplanets are investigated through two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations with the shearing sheet model.We find that viscosity can considerably affect properties of the circumplanetary disk when the mass of the protoplanet Mp (<) 33 M(⊙),where M(⊙) is the Earth's mass.However,effects of viscosity on the circumplanetary disk are negligibly small when the mass of the protoplanet Mp(>) 33 M(⊙).We find that when Mp(<) 33 M(⊙),viscosity can markedly disrupt the spiral structure of the gas around the planet and smoothly distribute the gas,which weakens the torques exerted on the protoplanet.Thus,viscosity can slow the migration speed of a protoplanet.After including viscosity,the size of the circumplanetary disk can be decreased by a factor of (>) 20%.Viscosity helps to transport gas into the circumplanetary disk from the differentially rotating circumstellar disk.The mass of the circumplanetary disk can be increased by a factor of 50% after viscosity is taken into account when Mp(<) 33 M(⊙).Effects of viscosity on the formation of planets and satellites are briefly discussed.

  12. High-viscosity fluid threads in weakly diffusive microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubaud, T.; Mason, T. G.

    2009-07-01

    We provide an overview of the flow dynamics of highly viscous miscible liquids in microfluidic geometries. We focus on the lubricated transport of high-viscosity fluids interacting with less viscous fluids, and we review methods for producing and manipulating single and multiple core-annular flows, i.e. viscous threads, in compact and plane microgeometries. In diverging slit microchannels, a thread's buckling instabilities can be employed for generating ordered and disordered miscible microstructures, as well as for partially blending low- and high-viscosity materials. The shear-induced destabilization of a thread that flows off-center in a square microchannel is examined as a means for continuously producing miscible dispersions. We show original compound threads and viscous dendrites that are generated using three fluids, each of which has a large viscosity contrast with the others. Thread motions in zones of microchannel extensions are examined in both miscible and immiscible environments. We demonstrate that high-viscosity fluid threads in weakly diffusive microfluidic systems correspond to the viscous primary flow and can be used as a starting point for studying and understanding the destabilizing effects of interfacial tension as well as diffusion. Characteristic of lubricated transport, threads facilitate the transport of very viscous materials in small fluidic passages, while mitigating dissipation. Threads are also potentially promising for soft material synthesis and diagnostics with independent control of the thread specific surface and residence time in micro-flow reactors.

  13. Comparative evaluation of aqueous humor viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kyshia; Carter, Renee; Tully, Thomas; Negulescu, Ioan; Storey, Eric

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate aqueous humor viscosity in the raptor, dog, cat, and horse, with a primary focus on the barred owl (Strix varia). Twenty-six raptors, ten dogs, three cats, and one horse. Animals were euthanized for reasons unrelated to this study. Immediately, after horizontal and vertical corneal dimensions were measured, and anterior chamber paracentesis was performed to quantify anterior chamber volume and obtain aqueous humor samples for viscosity analysis. Dynamic aqueous humor viscosity was measured using a dynamic shear rheometer (AR 1000 TA Instruments, New Castle, DE, USA) at 20 °C. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, unpaired t-tests, and Tukey's test to evaluate the mean ± standard deviation for corneal diameter, anterior chamber volume, and aqueous humor viscosity amongst groups and calculation of Spearman's coefficient for correlation analyses. The mean aqueous humor viscosity in the barred owl was 14.1 centipoise (cP) ± 9, cat 4.4 cP ± 0.2, and dog 2.9 cP ± 1.3. The aqueous humor viscosity for the horse was 1 cP. Of the animals evaluated in this study, the raptor aqueous humor was the most viscous. The aqueous humor of the barred owl is significantly more viscous than the dog (P humor viscosity of the raptor, dog, cat, and horse can be successfully determined using a dynamic shear rheometer. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  14. Effect of four different surface treatments on shear bond strength of three porcelain repair systems: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Gourav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ceramic fracture in metal ceramic restorations are serious and pose an aesthetic and functional dilemma both for the patients and the dentist. This has created a demand for the development of practical repair options which do not necessitate the removal and remake of entire restorations. Aim: To evaluate and compare the effect of four different surface treatments on shear bond strength of metal ceramic specimens with three commercially available porcelain repair systems. Materials and Methods: Specimens were fabricated with a base-metal ceramic alloy and divided into three groups, to evaluate three porcelain repair systems. Each group was divided into four subgroups based on surface treatment (A sandblasting, (B sandblasting followed by etching with 9% HF (Hydrofluoric acid on surrounding ceramic, (C Use of a diamond bur on exposed metal followed by etching with 37% H 3 PO 4 and (D Control groups (D 1 , D 2 , D 3 for three groups of porcelain repair system which was not subjected to further treatment after finishing with 240 grit silicon carbide paper grinding. Shear bond strength of each group of specimens based on surface treatment were evaluated with a universal testing machine after storing in distilled water for 7 days. One way ANOVA and Tukey-HSD procedure were used to compare the mean values between and among the groups. Results: The mean shear bond strength of group III (10.402 ± 1.055 were significantly higher than group I (8.647 ± 0.990 and group II (8.099 ± 0.600 for all surface treatments. However the mean values of shear bond strength of sub-group A were significantly higher than sub-group C and D but were not significantly higher than sub-group B. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that in fractured metal ceramic restorations the exposed metal surface treated with sandblasting or sandblasting and etching the surrounding ceramic surface with HF can increase the shear bond strength of the repaired metal

  15. Hydrodynamic Study of a Hollow Fiber Membrane System Using Experimental and Numerical Derived Surface Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Hunze, M.; Nopens, I.

    2012-01-01

    : 0.25 – 0.49 Pa) with an error of less than 5 %; (ii) high shear stresses (i.e. 90th percentile) predictions were much less accurate (model: 0.60 – 1.23 Pa; experimental: 1.04 – 1.90 Pa) with an error up to 38 %. This was attributed to the fact that the CFD model only considers the two-phase flow (50......Computational Fluids Dynamics (CFD) models can be used to gain insight into the shear stresses induced by air sparging on submerged hollow fiber Membrane BioReactor (MBR) systems. It was found that the average range of shear stresses obtained by the CFD model (0.30 – 0.60 Pa) and experimentally (0.......39 – 0.69 Pa) were in good agreement, with an error less that 15 %. Based on comparison of the cumulative frequency distribution of shear stresses from experiments and simulation: (i) moderate shear stresses (i.e. 50th percentile) were found to be accurately predicted (model: 0.24 – 0.45 Pa; experimental...

  16. Hydrodynamic Study of a Hollow Fiber Membrane System Using Experimental and Numerical Derived Surface Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Hunze, M.; Nopens, I.

    2012-01-01

    Computational Fluids Dynamics (CFD) models can be used to gain insight into the shear stresses induced by air sparging on submerged hollow fiber Membrane BioReactor (MBR) systems. It was found that the average range of shear stresses obtained by the CFD model (0.30 – 0.60 Pa) and experimentally (0.......39 – 0.69 Pa) were in good agreement, with an error less that 15 %. Based on comparison of the cumulative frequency distribution of shear stresses from experiments and simulation: (i) moderate shear stresses (i.e. 50th percentile) were found to be accurately predicted (model: 0.24 – 0.45 Pa; experimental......: 0.25 – 0.49 Pa) with an error of less than 5 %; (ii) high shear stresses (i.e. 90th percentile) predictions were much less accurate (model: 0.60 – 1.23 Pa; experimental: 1.04 – 1.90 Pa) with an error up to 38 %. This was attributed to the fact that the CFD model only considers the two-phase flow (50...

  17. The Contribution of Cell Surface Components to the Neutrophil Mechanosensitivity to Shear Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Akenhead

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses the regulation of neutrophils by fluid shear stress in the context of factors that may govern cell mechanosensitivity and its influence on cell functions. There is substantial evidence that mechanoreceptors located on the peripheral membrane contribute to the ability of shear stress to regulate cell activity. In the case of neutrophils, the formyl peptide receptor (FPR and the CD18 integrins on the cell membrane have been shown to provide neutrophils with the ability to sense shear stresses in their local environment and alter their physiological state, accordingly. This configuration is also found for other types of cells, although they involve different cell-specific mechanoreceptors. Moreover, from an examination of the neutrophil mechanotransducing capacity, it is apparent that cellular mechanosensitivity depends on a number of factors that, if altered, contribute to dysregulation and ultimately pathophysiology. To exemplify this, we first describe the neutrophil responses to shear exposure. We then review two neutrophil mechanoreceptors, specifically FPR and CD18 integrins, which participate in controlling cell activity levels under physiological conditions. Next, we discuss the various factors that may alter neutrophil mechanosensitivity to shear stress and how these may underlie the circulatory pathobiology of two cardiovascular disease states: hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. Based on the material presented, it is conceivable that cell mechanosensitivity is a powerful global metric that permits a more efficient approach to understanding the contribution of mechanobiology to physiology and to disease processes.

  18. Dynamic mortar finite element method for modeling of shear rupture on frictional rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Yuval; Hager, Bradford H.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a mortar-based finite element formulation for modeling the dynamics of shear rupture on rough interfaces governed by slip-weakening and rate and state (RS) friction laws, focusing on the dynamics of earthquakes. The method utilizes the dual Lagrange multipliers and the primal-dual active set strategy concepts, together with a consistent discretization and linearization of the contact forces and constraints, and the friction laws to obtain a semi-smooth Newton method. The discretization of the RS friction law involves a procedure to condense out the state variables, thus eliminating the addition of another set of unknowns into the system. Several numerical examples of shear rupture on frictional rough interfaces demonstrate the efficiency of the method and examine the effects of the different time discretization schemes on the convergence, energy conservation, and the time evolution of shear traction and slip rate.

  19. A Study on the Surface Structures of Viscose-based Activated Carbon Fiber by FT-IR Spectroscopy and XPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄强; 黄永秋; 潘鼎

    2004-01-01

    Using viscose fiber (VF) as starting material and common steam as activating agent, formation of oxygen structures in activated carbon fiber is investigated. In the preparation of samples, VF was first heated at temperatures between 450℃ and 900℃ in N2 artmosphere. Then, in a successive activation stage, the product carbonized at 600℃ was activated in steam at 450 - 900℃ for 30 min, and at 600℃for 5- 30 min. The other carbonization products were activated at 600 and 900℃ for 30 min respectively. The products activated at 900℃ were then activated at 450℃ for 30 min again. The starting material, carbonized products and all activation products were examined by FT-IR spectroscopy and some products were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS). And the yields of the carbonized and activated products were calculated. By analysing these spectra, the amount of oxygen-containing functional groups of the activated products attained under various activation time, various activation temperature and various previous carbonization temperature was determined.

  20. Waves from an oscillating point source with a free surface in the presence of a shear current

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2016-01-01

    We investigate analytically the linearized water wave radiation problem for an oscillating submerged point source in an inviscid shear flow with a free surface. A constant depth is taken into account and the shear flow increases linearly with depth. The surface velocity relative to the source is taken to be zero, so that Doppler effects are absent. We solve the linearized Euler equations to calculate the resulting wave field as well as its far-field asymptotics. For values of the Froude number $F^2=\\omega^2 D/g$ ($\\omega$: oscillation frequency, $D$ submergence depth) below a resonant value $F^2_\\text{res}$ the wave field splits cleanly into separate contributions from regular dispersive propagating waves and non-dispersive "critical waves" resulting from a critical layer-like street of flow structures directly downstream of the source. In the sub-resonant regime the regular waves behave like sheared ring waves while the critical layer wave forms a street of a constant width of order $D\\sqrt{S/\\omega}$ ($S$ i...

  1. Absolute viscosity measured using instrumented parallel plate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broyles, H. H.

    1967-01-01

    An automatic system measures the true average shear viscosity of liquids and viscoelastic materials, using the parallel plate method and automatically displays the results on a graphic record. This eliminates apparatus setup and extensive calculations.

  2. Volumetric properties, viscosities, refractive indices and surface tensions for (dimethylpropanolamine (DMPA) + water) mixtures from 298.15 K to 343.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanaswamy, Kamal; Rayer, Aravind V.; Kadiwala, Salim [International Test Center for CO2 Capture, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 0A2 (Canada); Henni, Amr, E-mail: amr.henni@uregina.ca [International Test Center for CO2 Capture, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 0A2 (Canada)

    2012-09-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {rho}, {eta}, n{sub D}, and {gamma} of aqueous dimethylpropanolamine solutions are reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Change of H{sub 2}O structure in amines was explained using thermodynamic transfer functions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Possible complex formation at mole fraction x = 0.3. - Abstract: This paper reports the experimental data for the densities and viscosities at six temperatures (298.15-343.15) K, refractive indices at nine temperatures (293.15-333.15) K, and surface tensions at seven temperatures (298.15-333.15) K for aqueous solutions of dimethylpropanolamine (DMPA). Excess properties derived from the experimental results were discussed in terms of changes in molecular interactions in the mixtures. The derived deviations of the properties were regressed with the Redlich-Kister equation. The derived thermodynamic properties were then compared with those of other tertiary amines available in the literature.

  3. Effect of surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of auto-polymerized resin to thermoplastic denture base polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Polyamide polymers do not provide sufficient bond strength to auto-polymerized resins for repairing fractured denture or replacing dislodged denture teeth. Limited treatment methods have been developed to improve the bond strength between auto-polymerized reline resins and polyamide denture base materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface modification by acetic acid on surface characteristics and bond strength of reline resin to polyamide denture base. MATERIALS AND METHODS 84 polyamide specimens were divided into three surface treatment groups (n=28): control (N), silica-coated (S), and acid-treated (A). Two different auto-polymerized reline resins GC and Triplex resins were bonded to the samples (subgroups T and G, respectively, n=14). The specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test after they were stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermo-cycled for 5000 cycles. Data were analyzed with independent t-test, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α=.05). RESULTS The bond strength values of A and S were significantly higher than those of N (P<.001 for both). However, statistically significant difference was not observed between group A and group S. According to the independent Student's t-test, the shear bond strength values of AT were significantly higher than those of AG (P<.001). CONCLUSION The surface treatment of polyamide denture base materials with acetic acid may be an efficient and cost-effective method for increasing the shear bond strength to auto-polymerized reline resin. PMID:28018569

  4. Entropy production, viscosity bounds and bumpy black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Hartnoll, Sean; Ramirez, David; Santos, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, $\\eta/s$, is computed in various holographic geometries that break translation invariance (but are isotropic). The shear viscosity does not have a hydrodynamic interpretation in such backgrounds, but does quantify the rate of entropy production due to a strain. Fluctuations of the metric components $\\delta g_{xy}$ are massive about these backgrounds, leading to $\\eta/s < 1/(4\\pi)$ at all finite temperatures (even in Einstein gravity). As the te...

  5. Shear wave velocity estimation of the near-surface materials of Chittagong City, Bangladesh for seismic site characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Zillur; Siddiqua, Sumi; Kamal, A. S. M. Maksud

    2016-11-01

    The average shear wave velocity of the near-surface materials down to a depth of 30 m (Vs30) is essential for seismic site characterization to estimate the local amplification factor of the seismic waves during an earthquake. Chittagong City is one of the highest risk cities of Bangladesh for its seismic vulnerability. In the present study, the Vs30 is estimated for Chittagong City using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW), small scale microtremor measurement (SSMM), downhole seismic (DS), and correlation between the shear wave velocity (Vs) and standard penetration test blow count (SPT-N). The Vs30 of the near-surface materials of the city varies from 123 m/s to 420 m/s. A Vs30 map is prepared from the Vs30 of each 30 m grid using the relationship between the Holocene soil thickness and the Vs30. Based on the Vs30, the near-surface materials of Chittagong City are classified as site classes C, D, and E according to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), USA and as site classes B, C, and D according to the Eurocode 8. The Vs30 map can be used for seismic microzonation, future planning, and development of the city to improve the earthquake resiliency of the city.

  6. Comparison of shear bond strength and surface structure between conventional acid etching and air-abrasion of human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, M E; Bishara, S E; Damon, P; Jakobsen, J R

    1997-11-01

    Recently, air-abrasion technology has been examined for potential applications within dentistry, including the field of orthodontics. The purpose of this study was to compare the traditional acid-etch technique with an air-abrasion surface preparation technique, with two different sizes of abrading particles. The following parameters were evaluated: (a) shear bond strength, (b) bond failure location, and (c) enamel surface preparation, as viewed through a scanning electron microscope. Sixty extracted human third molars were pumiced and divided into three groups of 20. The first group was etched with a 37% phosphoric acid gel for 30 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds, and dried for 20 seconds. The second and third groups were air-abraded with (a) a 50 microm particle and (b) a 90 microm particle of aluminum oxide, with the Micro-etcher microabrasion machine (Danville Engineering Inc.). All three groups had molar stainless steel orthodontic brackets bonded to the buccal surface of each tooth with Transbond XT bonding system (3M Unitek). A Zwick Universal Testing Machine (Calitek Corp.) was used to determine shear bond strengths. The analysis of variance was used to compare the three groups. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was used to evaluate the residual adhesive on the enamel after bracket removal. The chi square test was used to evaluate differences in the ARI scores among the groups. The significance for all tests was predetermined at p shear bond strength among the three groups (p = 0.0001). The Duncan Multiple Range test showed a significant decrease in shear bond strength in the air-abraded groups. The chi square test revealed significant differences among the ARI scores of the acid-etched group and the air-abraded groups (chi(2) = 0.0001), indicating no adhesive remained on the enamel surface after debonding when air-abrasion was used. In conclusion, the current findings indicate that enamel surface preparation using air-abrasion results in a significant lower

  7. Evaluation of shear bond strength of composite resin to nonprecious metal alloys with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Yassini E.; Almasi S

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aim: Replacing fractured ceramometal restorations may be the best treatment option, but it is costly. Many different bonding systems are currently available to repair the fractured ceramometal restorations. This study compared the shear bond strength of composite to a base metal alloy using 4 bonding systems.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, fifty discs, casted in a Ni-Cr-Be base metal alloy (Silvercast, Fulldent),were ground with 120, 400 and 600 grit...

  8. Measurement of particle trajectories, dynamics, surface adhesion and detachment in near-wall shear flows using 3D velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Schmidt, Brian; Lawrence, Michael; Breuer, Kenneth

    2007-11-01

    Three-dimensional total internal reflection velocimetry (3D-TIRV) is used to measure the trajectories of fluorescent tracer particles within 200 nm of a wall. Diffusion and shear-induced motion can result in mean velocity measurement errors, and by taking measurements using different particle sizes and sampling times, we quantify these effects and compare with theory. We also use 3D-TIRV to observe and characterize the adhesion, surface rolling and release dynamics of particles that can adhere to the surface through the action of biological binding proteins. Particles coated with P-Selectin are allowed to adhere to and detach from a PSGL-1-coated microchannel surface, modeling the interaction between leukocytes (white blood cells) and blood vessels, respectively. Binding affinities, bond strengths and hydrodynamic interactions are inferred from the trajectory data.

  9. Apparent slip of shear thinning fluid in a microchannel with a superhydrophobic wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlazhan, Stanislav; Vagner, Sergei

    2017-07-01

    The peculiarities of simple shear flow of shear thinning fluids over a superhydrophobic wall consisting of a set of parallel gas-filled grooves and solid stripes (domains with slip and stick boundary conditions) are studied numerically. The Carreau-Yasuda model is used to provide further insight into the problem of the slip behavior of non-Newtonian fluids having a decreasing viscosity with a shear rate increase. This feature is demonstrated to cause a nonlinear velocity profile leading to the apparent slip. The corresponding transverse and longitudinal apparent slip lengths of a striped texture are found to be noticeably larger than the respective effective slip lengths of Newtonian liquids in microchannels of various thicknesses and surface fractions of the slip domains. The viscosity distribution of the shear thinning fluid over the superhydrophobic wall is carefully investigated to describe the mechanism of the apparent slip. Nonmonotonic behavior of the apparent slip length as a function of the applied shear rate is revealed. This important property of shear thinning fluids is considered to be sensitive to the steepness of the viscosity flow curve, thus providing a way to decrease considerably the flow resistance in microchannels.

  10. Shear shedding of drops and the use of superhydrophobic surfaces in microgravity: PFC and ground based results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Andrew; Amirfazli, Alidad

    In free fall, the absence of gravity poses many challenges for fluid handling systems. One such example of this is condensers. On earth, the condensed liquid is removed from the tilted condenser plate by gravity forced shedding. In microgravity, proposed solutions include the use of surfaces with gradients in wettability [1], the use of electrowetting [2], and shearing airflow [3]. In this talk, shear shedding results for a variety of surface (hydrophilic to superhydrophobic (extremely water repelling)) will be presented. Surface science and aerodynamics are used to reveal fundamental parameters controlling incipient motion for drops exposed to shearing airflow. It is found that wetting parameters such as contact angle and surface tension are very influential in determining the minimum required air velocity for drop shedding. Based on experimental results for drops of water and hexadecane (0.5-100 l) on PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic aluminum surface, an exponential function is proposed that relates the critical air velocity for shedding to the ratio of drop base length to projected area. The results for the water systems can be collapsed to a self similar curve by normalization, which also explains results from other researchers. Since shedding from superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) is seen to be easier compared to other surfaces, the behaviour of SHS is also probed in this talk. SHS have space-based applications to shedding, self cleaning, anti-icing (spacecraft launch/re-entry), anti-fouling, fluid actuation, and decreased fluid friction. The mechanism for SHS is understood to be the existence of an air layer between large portions of the drop and solid. The first concrete visual evidence of this was gained performing a parabolic flight experiment with the ESA. Results of this experi-ment will be discussed, showing the extreme water repelling potential of SHS in microgravity, and demonstrating how the wetting behaviours seen (partial penetration, transition

  11. Shear Thinning of Noncolloidal Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Tanner, Roger I.; Ellero, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Shear thinning—a reduction in suspension viscosity with increasing shear rates—is understood to arise in colloidal systems from a decrease in the relative contribution of entropic forces. The shear-thinning phenomenon has also been often reported in experiments with noncolloidal systems at high volume fractions. However its origin is an open theoretical question and the behavior is difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations where shear thickening is typically observed instead. In this letter we propose a non-Newtonian model of interparticle lubrication forces to explain shear thinning in noncolloidal suspensions. We show that hidden shear-thinning effects of the suspending medium, which occur at shear rates orders of magnitude larger than the range investigated experimentally, lead to significant shear thinning of the overall suspension at much smaller shear rates. At high particle volume fractions the local shear rates experienced by the fluid situated in the narrow gaps between particles are much larger than the averaged shear rate of the whole suspension. This allows the suspending medium to probe its high-shear non-Newtonian regime and it means that the matrix fluid rheology must be considered over a wide range of shear rates.

  12. Effect of fracture surface roughness on shear crack growth. Progress report, August 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, T.S.; Watt, D.W. [New Hampshire Univ., Durham, NH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Mendelsohn, D.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Engineering Mechanics

    1992-12-01

    A model of fracture surface interference for Mode I fatigue crack profiles was developed and evaluated. Force required to open the crack faces is estimated from point contact expressions for Mode I stress intensity factor. Force transfer across contacting asperities is estimated and used to calculate Mode II resistance stress intensity factor (applied factor is sum of effective and resistance factors). Electro-optic holographic interferometry was used to measure 3-D displacement field around a Mode I fatigue pre-crack in Al loaded in Mode II shear. Induced Mode I crack face displacements were greater than Mode II displacements. Plane stress shear lip caused displacement normal to surface as the crack faces are displaced. Algorithms are being developed to track the displacements associated with the original coordinate system in the camera. A 2-D boundary element method code for mixed mode I and II loading of a rough crack (sawtooth asperity model) has been completed. Addition of small-scale crack tip yielding and a wear model are completed and underway, respectively.

  13. Effect of LED curing on the microleakage, shear bond strength and surface hardness of a resin-based composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, Theunis G; Du Preez, Ignatius C; Kidd, M

    2005-06-01

    To determine the effect of Light emitting diode (LED) curing on dental resins, microleakage, shear bond strength and surface hardness of a dental composite cured with different LEDs were determined and compared with conventional halogen curing. For microleakage, Class V cavities were restored with Esthet-X, divided into groups, and exposed to one of the curing protocols (Elipar Freelight in soft start and standard modes; Ultra-Lume 2; Spectrum 800). Standard dye penetration tests were performed and the data summarised in a 2-way contingency table of observed frequencies. The Chi-square test was used (psurface hardness, samples of Esthet-X were exposed to the light-curing units (LCUs). Vickers hardness was determined on the upper and the bottom surfaces. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using ANOVA (phardness score for the halogen light was significantly lower than for the LED lights (p<0.01). The Spectrum 800 and the Elipar Freelight (soft start) have significantly higher shear bond strengths than the others (p<0.01). It was concluded that the LED source is more efficient for a comparable overall power output.

  14. Investigation into ferrofluid magnetoviscous effects under an oscillating shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinho, M., E-mail: marcos.pinho.etu@univ-lemans.fr [LAUM - Laboratoire d' Acoustique de l' Universite du Maine UMR CNRS 6613 (France); Brouard, B.; Genevaux, J.M. [LAUM - Laboratoire d' Acoustique de l' Universite du Maine UMR CNRS 6613 (France); Dauchez, N. [LISMMA - Institut Superieur de Mecanique de Paris (SUPMECA), 93407 Saint Ouen (France); Volkova, O. [Centre de micro et nanorheometrie, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice-cedex2 (France); Meziere, H.; Collas, P. [LAUM - Laboratoire d' Acoustique de l' Universite du Maine UMR CNRS 6613 (France)

    2011-10-15

    The use of ferrofluid seals in mechanical systems can lead to viscous damping that affects their dynamic behavior. This paper describes an investigation into local viscous properties in the case of an axial harmonic force. The influence of magnetic field level, shear stress amplitude and frequency are studied. Even for ferrofluid particles in a highly saturated magnetic field, it is shown that viscosity increases with magnetic intensity, decreases with the frequency of harmonic excitation and is not sensitive to shear rate amplitude. Viscosity is lower for oscillatory flows than for steady flows. - Highlights: > Extension of the magnetoviscous effect of ferrofluids to the oscillatory shear flow. > Influence of magnetic field level, shear stress amplitude and frequency is studied. > Ferrofluid viscosity is lower for oscillatory than for steady flow shearing. > Ferrofluid viscosity is not sensitive to shear rate amplitude. > Negative-viscosity effect occurs even for a null magnetic field.

  15. Solar-cycle variation of the rotational shear near the solar surface

    CERN Document Server

    Barekat, Atefeh; Gizon, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Helioseismology has revealed that the angular velocity of the Sun increases with depth in the outermost 35 Mm of the Sun. Recently, we have shown that the logarithmic radial gradient ($\\rm d\\ln\\Omega/\\rm d\\ln r $) in the upper 10~Mm is close to $-1$ from the equator to $60^\\circ$ latitude.We aim to measure the temporal variation of the rotational shear over solar cycle 23 and the rising phase of cycle 24 (1996-2015). We used f mode frequency splitting data spanning 1996 to 2011 from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and 2010 to 2015 from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI). In a first for such studies, the f mode frequency splitting data were obtained from 360-day time series. We used the same method as in our previous work for measuring $\\rm d\\ln\\Omega/d\\ln r $ from the equator to $80^\\circ$ latitude in the outer 13~Mm of the Sun. Then, we calculated the variation of the gradient at annual cadence relative to the average over 1996 to 2015. We found the rotational shear at low latitudes ($0^\\circ$ to $30^...

  16. Surface hydrogenation regulated wrinkling and torque capability of hydrogenated graphene annulus under circular shearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinfeng; Liu, Silin; Datta, Dibakar; Li, Zhonghua

    2015-11-01

    Wrinkles as intrinsic topological feature have been expected to affect the electrical and mechanical properties of atomically thin graphene. Molecular dynamics simulations are adopted to investigate the wrinkling characteristics in hydrogenated graphene annulus under circular shearing at the inner edge. The amplitude of wrinkles induced by in-plane rotation around the inner edge is sensitive to hydrogenation, and increases quadratically with hydrogen coverage. The effect of hydrogenation on mechanical properties is investigated by calculating the torque capability of annular graphene with varying hydrogen coverage and inner radius. Hydrogenation-enhanced wrinkles cause the aggregation of carbon atoms towards the inner edge and contribute to the critical torque strength of annulus. Based on detailed stress distribution contours, a shear-to-tension conversion mechanism is proposed for the contribution of wrinkles on torque capacity. As a result, the graphane annulus anomalously has similar torque capacity to pristine graphene annulus. The competition between hydrogenation caused bond strength deterioration and wrinkling induced local stress state conversion leads to a U-shaped evolution of torque strength relative to the increase of hydrogen coverage from 0 to 100%. Such hydrogenation tailored topological and mechanical characteristics provides an innovative mean to develop novel graphene-based devices.

  17. Onset of motion at the surface of a porous granular bed by a shearing fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Anyu; Tao, Mingjiang; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2014-03-01

    We will discuss an experimental investigation of the onset of particle motion by a fluid flow over an unconsolidated granular bed. This situation arises in a number of natural and industrial processes including wind blowing over sand, sediment transport in rivers, tidal flows interacting with beaches and flows in slurry pipelines and mixing tanks. The Shields criteria given by the ratio of the viscous shear and normal stresses is used to understand the onset of motion. However, reviews reveals considerable scatter while noting broad trends with Reynolds Number. We discuss an idealized model system where fluid flows with a prescribed flow rate through a horizontal rectangular pipe initially fully filled with granular beads. The granular bed height decreases and reaches a constant height when the shear stress at the boundary decreases below a critical value. We compare and contrast the values obtained assuming no-slip boundary conditions with those observed with PIV using florescent tracer particles to measure the actual fluid flow profile near the porous interface. We will also report the observed variation of the Shields criteria with particle Reynolds Number by varying particle size and fluid flow rates.

  18. Shear viscosities of CaO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2 and MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2 liquids: Implications for the structural role of aluminium and the degree of polymerisation of synthetic and natural aluminosilicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplis, Michael J.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2004-12-01

    The shear viscosity of 66 liquids in the systems CaO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2 (CAS) and MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2 (MAS) have been measured in the ranges 1-10 4 Pa s and 10 8-10 12 Pa s. Liquids belong to series, nominally at 50, 67, and 75 mol.% SiO 2, with atomic M 2+/(M 2++ 2Al) typically in the range 0.60 to 0.40 for each isopleth. In the system CAS at 1600°C, viscosity passes through a maximum at all silica contents. The maxima are clearly centered in the peraluminous field, but the exact composition at which viscosity is a maximum is poorly defined. Similar features are observed at 900°C. In contrast, data for the system MAS at 1600°C show that viscosity decreases with decreasing Mg/(Mg + 2Al) at all silica contents, but that a maximum in viscosity must occur in the field where Mg/2Al >1. On the other hand, the viscosity at 850°C increases with decreasing Mg/(Mg + 2Al) and shows no sign of reaching a maximum, even for the most peraluminous composition studied. The data from both systems at 1600°C have been analysed assuming that shear viscosity is proportional to average bond strength and considering the equilibrium: Al-(⇔(-NBO+Al where Al [4]-(Mg,Ca) 0.5 represents a charge-balanced tetrahedrally coordinated Al; (Mg, Ca) 0.5-NBO represents a nonbridging oxygen (NBO) associated with Ca or Mg, and Al XS represents any structural role of Al that does not require a charge-balancing cation. The viscosity data were fitted using two adjustable variables: i) the equilibrium constant of the above reaction, and ii) the relative bond strength of Al XS. The values of these parameters in the system CAS suggest that Al XS remains in tetrahedral coordination, its charge deficit being satisfied by association with a three-coordinate oxygen in a structure called a tricluster. In contrast, fits to the MAS data at 1600°C infer the presence of high-coordinate Al. These interpretations are found to be consistent with independent spectroscopic and theoretical data. Furthermore, the fitted

  19. Viscosity Index Improvers and Thickeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, R. L.; Kinker, B. G.

    The viscosity index of an oil or an oil formulation is an important physical parameter. Viscosity index improvers, VIIs, are comprised of five main classes of polymers: polymethylmethacrylates (PMAs), olefin copolymers (OCPs), hydrogenated poly(styrene-co-butadiene or isoprene) (HSD/SIP/HRIs), esterified polystyrene-co-maleic anhydride (SPEs) and a combination of PMA/OCP systems. The chemistry, manufacture, dispersancy and utility of each class are described. The comparative functions, properties, thickening ability, dispersancy and degradation of VIIs are discussed. Permanent and temporary shear thinning of VII-thickened formulations are described and compared. The end-use performance and choice of VI improvers is discussed in terms of low- and high-temperature viscosities, journal bearing oil film thickness, fuel economy, oil consumption, high-temperature pumping efficiency and deposit control. Discussion of future developments concludes that VI improvers will evolve to meet new challenges of increased thermal-oxidative degradation from increased engine operating temperatures, different base stocks of either synthetic base oils or vegetable oil-based, together with alcohol- or vegetable oil-based fuels. VI improvers must also evolve to deal with higher levels of fuel dilution and new types of sludge and also enhanced low-temperature requirements.

  20. The effects of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of composite resin to machined titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljadi, Mohammad

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between machined titanium and composite resin using different surface treatments. Materials and Methods: Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) specimens were ground with 600 grit SiC paper and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=20/group). Group #1 (Control): samples were sandblasted with 110 microm Al2 O3 for 10 sec. Group #2 (Rocatec): samples were treated with the Rocatec system following the manufacturer's directions but the silanization step was eliminated. Group #3 (Silano Pen): samples were treated with the Silano Pen system. Group #4 (H2SO4 etched): samples were sandblasted with 110 microm Al2O3 for 10 sec and etched with 48% H2SO4 for 60 minutes at 60 oC. Group#5 (acid etching + Rocatec): samples received both treatments as described in Groups 4 and 2, respectively. Group #6 (acid etching + Silano Pen): samples received both treatments as described in Groups 4 and 3, respectively. Composite was bonded to the treated titanium surface, half of the specimens from each group (n=10/group) were subjected to thermocycling, and the samples were tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Representative samples from each group were evaluated with SEM. Results: Two-way ANOVA revealed that there were significant differences (p silanization step in the Rocatec system is a critical step and eliminating it may dramatically alter its effectiveness. 3) Combining two surface treatments may not always result in an additive effect. 4) Thermocycling significantly decreased the bond strength regardless of the surface treatment used.

  1. Determination of the distance-dependent viscosity of mixtures in parallel slabs using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pařez, Stanislav; Předota, Milan

    2012-03-14

    We generalize a technique for determination of the shear viscosity of mixtures in planar slabs using non-equilibrium computer simulations by applying an external force parallel to the surface generating Poiseuille flow. The distance-dependent viscosity of the mixture, given as a function of the distance from the surface, is determined by analysis of the resulting velocity profiles of all species. We present results for a highly non-ideal water + methanol mixture in the whole concentration range between rutile (TiO(2)) walls. The bulk results are compared to the existing equilibrium molecular dynamics and experimental data while the inhomogeneous viscosity profiles at the interface are interpreted using the structural data and information on hydrogen bonding.

  2. Viscosity and electric properties of water aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavlov, A. V.; Sokolov, I. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The flow of water mist in a narrow duct has been studied experimentally. The profile of the velocity of drops has been measured, and the viscosity of the mist has been calculated using the Navier-Stokes equation. It has been found that at low gradients of the rate of shear the viscosity of the mist can exceed that of clean air by tens and even hundreds of times. The electric charge of the drops has been measured. It has been found that the viscosity of the mist differs from that of clean air at gradients of the rate of shear that are less than the frequency of the establishment of electric equilibrium between the drops. A comparative analysis of the viscosities of the mist and a drop cluster has been carried out, and the dependence of the viscosity of the water aerosol on the radius and the charge of the drops has been predicted. The possible role of aerosols that contain submicron drops in the known "clear air turbulence" problem has been shown.

  3. Influence of magnetic interactions between clusters on particle orientational characteristics and viscosity of a colloidal dispersion composed of ferromagnetic spherocylinder particles: analysis by means of mean field approximation for a simple shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Akira

    2005-09-01

    We have theoretically investigated the particle orientational distribution and viscosity of a dense colloidal dispersion composed of ferromagnetic spherocylinder particles under an applied magnetic field. The mean field approximation has been applied to take into account the magnetic interactions of the particle of interest with the other ones that belong to the neighboring clusters, besides those that belong to its own cluster. The basic equation of the orientational distribution function, which is an integrodifferential equation, has approximately been solved by Galerkin's method and the method of successive approximation. Some of the main results obtained here are summarized as follows. Even when the magnetic interaction between particles is of the order of the thermal energy, the effect of particle-particle interactions on the orientational distribution comes to appear more significant with increasing volumetric fraction of particles; the orientational distribution function exhibits a sharper peak in the direction nearer to the magnetic field one as the volumetric fraction increases. Such a significant inclination of the particle in the field direction induces the large increase in viscosity in the range of larger values of the volumetric fraction. The above-mentioned characteristics of the orientational distribution and viscosity come to appear more significantly when the influence of the applied magnetic field is not so strong compared with that of magnetic particle-particle interactions.

  4. Effect of femtosecond laser treatment on the shear bond strength of a metal bracket to prepared porcelain surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Yusuf Ziya; Irgin, Celal; Yavuz, Tevfik; Aslan, Muhammed Ali; Kilic, Hamdi Sukur; Usumez, Aslihan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of femtosecond laser treatment (Group FS) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a metal bracket to prepared porcelain surface, and to compare it with other surface treatment techniques [50 μm Al2O3 sandblasting (Group SB), 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel (Group HF), and neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG laser) (Group NY)]. Because of the increasing number of adult patients in current orthodontic practice, achieving sufficient bond strength of composite resin to porcelain restorations without bond failure during the treatment is a challenge for orthodontists. In total, 80 glazed feldspathic porcelain samples were prepared and randomly assigned to four groups of 20. Treated surfaces were treated with a silane agent. Brackets were bonded to porcelain samples. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h and then thermocycled for 500 cycles between 5° and 55°C. The SBS of the brackets was tested with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min, until bonding failure occurred. The data were analyzed statistically using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tamhane multiple comparisons tests. The results of ANOVA indicated that the SBS values varied according to the surface treatment method (ptreatment produced high SBS of the processes assessed; therefore, it appears to be an effective method for bonding orthodontic metal brackets to prepared porcelain surfaces.

  5. Effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on shear strength on single lap joint Al/CFRP using adhesive of epoxy/Al fine powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diharjo, Kuncoro; Anwar, Miftahul; Tarigan, Roy Aries P.; Rivai, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on the shear strength and failure type characteristic of single lap joint (SLJ) CFRP/Al using adhesive epoxy/Al-fine-powder. The CFRP was produced by using hand layup method for 30% of woven roving carbon fiber (w/w) and the resin used was bisphenolic. The adhesive was prepared using 12.5% of aluminum fine powder (w/w) in the epoxy adhesive. The powder was mixed by using a mixing machine at 60 rpm for 6 minutes, and then it was used to join the Al plate-2024 and CFRP. The start time to pressure for the joint process was 20 minutes after the application of adhesive on the both of adherends. The variables in this research are adhesive thickness (i.e. 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.8 mm and 1 mm) and surface treatment of adherends (i.e. acetone, chromate sulphuric acid, caustic etch and tucker's reagent). Before shear testing, all specimens were post-cured at 100 °C for 15 minutes. The result shows that the SLJ has the highest shear strength for 0.4 mm of adhesive thickness. When the adhesive thickness is more than 0.4 mm (0.6-1 mm), the shear strength decreases significantly. It might be caused by the property change of adhesive from ductile to brittle. The acetone surface treatment produces the best bonding between the adhesive and adherends (CFRP and Al-plate 2024), and the highest shear strength is 9.31 MPa. The surface treatment give the humidification effect of adherend surfaces by adhesive. The failure characteristic shows that the mixed failure of light-fiber-tear-failure and cohesive-failure are occurred on the high shear strength of SLJ, and the low shear strength commonly has the adhesive-failure type.

  6. Viscosity measurements of antibody solutions by photon correlation spectroscopy: an indirect approach - limitations and applicability for high-concentration liquid protein solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Michael; Reiche, Katharina; Blume, Alfred; Garidel, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) is compared with classic rheological measurements using the cone-and-plate technique for the determination of the viscosity of protein solutions. The potential advantages using PCS are small sample volume and fast determination of zero-shear viscosity. The present study assesses potentials and limitations of the applicability of this method for the determination of viscosity of antibody solutions in protein science development. The principle of the assay is based on the determination of the apparent hydrodynamic radius of commercial available latex beads of known size added to protein solutions. Using the Stokes-Einstein equation, the hydrodynamic radius can be converted to viscosity. Several latex particle sizes and concentrations were evaluated and the assay optimized. The PCS assay for viscosity determination was tested using water/glycerol-mixtures, where the viscosity was measured with rheometer using the cone-and-plate method and also compared with published data. Different protein solutions of bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and monoclonal antibodies were then used and the PCS results were compared with viscosity data obtained by the cone-and-plate method. It could be shown that the PCS assay has limitations for the determination of the viscosity of protein solutions, especially monoclonal antibodies. The main reason is due to protein-latex bead interactions leading to the formation of larger aggregates. The use of surface modification of the latex beads can in principle prevent this interaction.

  7. Lubrication of textured surfaces: a general theory for flow and shear stress factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaraggi, Michele

    2012-08-01

    We report on a mean field theory of textured surface lubrication. We study the fluid flow dynamics occurring at the interface as a function of the texture characteristics, e.g. texture area density, shape and distribution of microstructures, and local slip lengths. The present results may be very important for the investigation of tailored microtextured surfaces for low-friction hydrodynamic applications.

  8. Evaluation of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded on the tooth surface after internal bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia de Souza FERREIRA

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is great demand for esthetic treatment by patients who have discolored teeth, because currently aesthetic standards have become stricter and many patients have tooth bleaching procedures performed before or during orthodontic treatment. Objective: To evaluate the bonding of orthodontic brackets to human molars after internal tooth bleaching. Material and method: Forty molars were divided into four groups according to the bleaching agent used: PS sodium perborate + water; PC carbamide peroxide; PC + PS carbamide peroxide + sodium perborate; Cont water (control group. Bleaching agents placed inside the pulp chambers were replaced every 7 days for 2 weeks, and the brackets were bonded 30 days after the end of bleaching. The shear strength test was performed in a universal testing machine (Emic. Result: ANOVA with a significance level of 5% (p > 0.05, showed no statistically significant difference between groups (p = 0.1214. Conclusion: It was concluded that the different bleaching agents studied did not interfere with the bond strength of brackets to enamel and bonding the brackets 30 days after internal bleaching is a safe procedure.

  9. Origins of the Exchange-Bias Phenomenology, Coercivity Enhancement, and Asymmetric Hysteretic Shearing in Core-Surface Smart Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rıza Erdem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used a spin-1 Ising model Hamiltonian with dipolar (bilinear, J, quadrupolar (biquadratic, K, and dipolar-quadrupolar (odd, L interactions in pair approximation to investigate the exchange-bias (EB, coercive field, and asymmetric hysteretic shearing properties peculiar to core/surface (C/S composite nanoparticles (NPs. Shifted hysteresis loops with an asymmetry and coercivity enhancement are observed only in the presence of the odd interaction term in the Hamiltonian expression and their magnitudes show strong dependence on the value of L. The observed coercivity and EB in C/S NPs originated from nonzero odd coupling energies and their dependence on temperature (T and particle size (R are also discussed in relation to experimental findings.

  10. Crystallographic analysis of the implanted TiNi monocrystal containing misoriented localized shear mesobands in its near-surface layer [001]{sub B2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, L. L., E-mail: llm@ispms.tsc.ru; Meisner, S. N., E-mail: msn@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tverdokhlebova, A. V., E-mail: a@vtverd.ru; Poletika, T. M., E-mail: poletm@ispms.tsc.ru; Girsova, S. L., E-mail: girs@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The study was carried on for the implanted single TiNi crystal containing misoriented localized shear mesobands in its near-surface layer [001] B2. Due to the response of material to the Si ion implantation treatment of the single TiNi crystal, deformation mesobands would form in its near-surface layer. Specially designed software tools were employed for the treatment of experimental data obtained from X-ray and electron diffraction patterns. The 3D crystallographic orientations were calculated for the localized shear regions, which were displaced relative to one another and with respect to the original monocrystal orientation.

  11. Optical viscosity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Ling; Peyroux, Juliette; Perez, Alex; Tsui, Chi-Leung; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2009-03-01

    Viscosity measurement by bend loss of fiber is presented. The sensing principle makes use of the damping characteristic of a vibrating optical fiber probe with fix-free end configuration. By measuring the displacement of the fiber probe, the viscosity can be determined by matching the probe's displacement with the displacement built in the database obtained by either experimental method or Finite element calculation. Experimental results are presented by measuring the sucrose and glycerol solutions of different concentrations with a viscosity varying from 1 to 15 cP. Stokes' flow assumption is utilized to attenuate the mass density effect and simplify the viscosity measurement.

  12. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branch, Darren W.; Huber, Dale L.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2008-10-01

    The rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms is critical to human health and safety. To achieve a high level of sensitivity for fluidic detection applications, we have developed a 330 MHz Love wave acoustic biosensor on 36{sup o} YX Lithium Tantalate (LTO). Each die has four delay-line detection channels, permitting simultaneous measurement of multiple analytes or for parallel detection of single analyte containing samples. Crucial to our biosensor was the development of a transducer that excites the shear horizontal (SH) mode, through optimization of the transducer, minimizing propagation losses and reducing undesirable modes. Detection was achieved by comparing the reference phase of an input signal to the phase shift from the biosensor using an integrated electronic multi-readout system connected to a laptop computer or PDA. The Love wave acoustic arrays were centered at 330 MHz, shifting to 325-328 MHz after application of the silicon dioxide waveguides. The insertion loss was -6 dB with an out-of-band rejection of 35 dB. The amplitude and phase ripple were 2.5 dB p-p and 2-3{sup o} p-p, respectively. Time-domain gating confirmed propagation of the SH mode while showing suppression of the triple transit. Antigen capture and mass detection experiments demonstrate a sensitivity of 7.19 {+-} 0.74{sup o} mm{sup 2}/ng with a detection limit of 6.7 {+-} 0.40 pg/mm{sup 2} for each channel.

  13. Effect of surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of auto-polymerized resin to thermoplastic denture base polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Hafezeqoran, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Polyamide polymers do not provide sufficient bond strength to auto-polymerized resins for repairing fractured denture or replacing dislodged denture teeth. Limited treatment methods have been developed to improve the bond strength between auto-polymerized reline resins and polyamide denture base materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface modification by acetic acid on surface characteristics and bond strength of reline resin to polyamide denture base. 84 polyamide specimens were divided into three surface treatment groups (n=28): control (N), silica-coated (S), and acid-treated (A). Two different auto-polymerized reline resins GC and Triplex resins were bonded to the samples (subgroups T and G, respectively, n=14). The specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test after they were stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermo-cycled for 5000 cycles. Data were analyzed with independent t-test, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α=.05). The bond strength values of A and S were significantly higher than those of N (Pauto-polymerized reline resin.

  14. A thin rivulet or ridge subject to a uniform transverse shear stress at its free surface due to an external airflow

    KAUST Repository

    Sullivan, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    We use the lubrication approximation to analyze three closely related problems involving a thin rivulet or ridge (i.e., a two-dimensional droplet) of fluid subject to a prescribed uniform transverse shear stress at its free surface due to an external airflow, namely a rivulet draining under gravity down a vertical substrate, a rivulet driven by a longitudinal shear stress at its free surface, and a ridge on a horizontal substrate, and find qualitatively similar behaviour for all three problems. We show that, in agreement with previous numerical studies, the free surface profile of an equilibrium rivulet/ridge with pinned contact lines is skewed as the shear stress is increased from zero, and that there is a maximum value of the shear stress beyond which no solution with prescribed semi-width is possible. In practice, one or both of the contact lines will de-pin before this maximum value of the shear stress is reached, and so we consider situations in which the rivulet/ridge de-pins at one or both contact lines. In the case of de-pinning only at the advancing contact line, the rivulet/ridge is flattened and widened as the shear stress is increased from its critical value, and there is a second maximum value of the shear stress beyond which no solution with a prescribed advancing contact angle is possible. In contrast, in the case of de-pinning only at the receding contact line, the rivulet/ridge is thickened and narrowed as the shear stress is increased from its critical value, and there is a solution with a prescribed receding contact angle for all values of the shear stress. In general, in the case of de-pinning at both contact lines there is a critical "yield" value of the shear stress beyond which no equilibrium solution is possible and the rivulet/ridge will evolve unsteadily. In the Appendix, we show that an equilibrium rivulet/ridge with prescribed flux/area is quasi-statically stable to two-dimensional perturbations. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Upper-Mantle Shear Velocities beneath Southern California Determined from Long-Period Surface Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Polet, J.; Kanamori, H.

    1997-01-01

    We used long-period surface waves from teleseismic earthquakes recorded by the TERRAscope network to determine phase velocity dispersion of Rayleigh waves up to periods of about 170 sec and of Love waves up to about 150 sec. This enabled us to investigate the upper-mantle velocity structure beneath southern California to a depth of about 250 km. Ten and five earthquakes were used for Rayleigh and Love waves, respectively. The observed surface-wave dispersion shows a clear Love/Rayleigh-wave d...

  16. Interfacial shear rheology of DPPC under physiologically relevant conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Eline; Vermant, Jan

    2014-01-07

    Lipids, and phosphatidylcholines in particular, are major components in cell membranes and in human lung surfactant. Their ability to encapsulate or form stable layers suggests a significant role of the interfacial rheological properties. In the present work we focus on the surface rheological properties of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). Literature results are confusing and even contradictory; viscosity values have been reported differ by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, even both purely viscous and gel-like behaviours have been described. Assessing the literature critically, a limited experimental window has been explored correctly, which however does not yet include conditions relevant for the physiological state of DPPC in vivo. A complete temperature and surface pressure analysis of the interfacial shear rheology of DPPC is performed, showing that the monolayer behaves as a viscoelastic liquid with a domain structure. At low frequencies and for a thermally structured monolayer, the interaction of the molecules within the domains can be probed. The low frequency limit of the complex viscosity is measured over a wide range of temperatures and surface pressures. The effects of temperature and surface pressure on the low frequency viscosity can be analysed in terms of the effects of free molecular area. However, at higher frequencies or following a preshear at high shear rates, elasticity becomes important; most probably elasticity due to defects at the edge of the domains in the layer is probed. Preshearing refines the structure and induces more defects. As a result, disagreeing interfacial rheology results in various publications might be due to different pre-treatments of the interface. The obtained dataset and scaling laws enable us to describe the surface viscosity, and its dependence under physiological conditions of DPPC. The implications on functioning of lung surfactants and lung surfactant replacements will be discussed.

  17. Effects of surface treatment of provisional crowns on the shear bond strength of brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Xavier de Almeida

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the adhesive resistance of metallic brackets bonded to temporary crowns made of acrylic resin after different surface treatments. METHODS: 180 specimens were made of Duralay and randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 30 according to surface treatment and bonding material: G1 - surface roughening with Soflex and bonding with Duralay; G2 - roughening with aluminum oxide blasting and bonding with Duralay; G3 - application of monomer and bonding with Duralay; G4 - roughening with Soflex and bonding with Transbond XT; G5 - roughening with aluminum oxide blasting and bonding with Transbond XT and G6: application of monomer and bonding with Transbond. The results were statistically assessed by ANOVA/Games-Howell. RESULTS: The means (MPa were: G1= 18.04, G2= 22.64, G3= 22.4, G4= 9.71, G5= 11.23, G6= 9.67. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI ranged between 2 and 3 on G1, G2 and G3 whereas in G4, G5 and G6 it ranged from 0 to 1, showing that only the material affects the pattern of adhesive flaw. CONCLUSION: The surface treatment and the material influenced adhesive resistance of brackets bonded to temporary crowns. Roughening by aluminum blasting increased bond strength when compared to Soflex, in the group bonded with Duralay. The bond strength of Duralay acrylic resin was superior to that of Transbond XT composite resin.

  18. Comparative evaluation of the shear bond strength of metal brackets bonded to porcelain using different porcelain surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslami Amirabadi GH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare shear bond strength of metal brackets bonded to dental porcelain on the basis of presence or absence of silane, type of acid [hydrofluoric acid (HF or phosphoric acid (H3PO4] and roughness of porcelain surface (glazed or deglazed within mouth-like environment."nMaterials and Methods: Eighty glazed ceramic disks were randomly divided into 8 groups of 10 disks: group 1 [HF+silane], group 2 [deglazed+HF+silane], group 3 [HF], group 4 [deglazed+HF], group 5 [H3PO4+silane], group 6 [deglazed+H3PO4+silane], group 7 [H3PO4], group 8 [deglazed+H3PO4]. Then the brackets were bonded and thermocycled. After that, shear bond strength test was done using the Zwick device and the type of bond failure was determined under stereomicroscope at 4X magnification. 3-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis were used for statistical analyses."nResults: The shear bond strength for the test groups were as follows: group (1:13.05±7.7 MPa , group (2:25.16±10.66 MPa, group (3:6.7±5.86 MPa, group (4:15.39±8.97 MPa, group (5:12.76±7.91 MPa, group (6:13.57±7.85 MPa, group (7:0.54±0.67 MPa, group (8: 9.34±6.52 MPa. The type of bond failure in all groups was adhesive failure except for group 2. No significant difference in the interaction between (glazed or deglazed, (presence or absence of silane, and type of acid was found (P>0.05."nConclusion: Under the conditions of this study, the best clinical method was the use of 37% phosphoric acid and silane that resulted in the optimal clinical strength and adhesive bond failure.

  19. Study on adhesively-bonded surface of tapered double cantilever specimen made of aluminum foam affected with shear force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙洪鹏; CHO Jae-ung

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum foam is widely used in diverse areas to minimize the weight and maximize the absorption of shock energy in lightweight structures and various bio-materials. It presents a number of advantages, such as low density, incombustibility, non-rigidity, excellent energy absorptivity, sound absorptivity and low heat conductivity. The aluminum foam with an air cell structure was placed under the TDCB Mode II tensile load by using Landmark equipment manufactured by MTS to examine the shear failure behavior. The angle of the tapered adhesively-bonded surfaces of specimens was designated as a variable, and three models were developed with the inclined angles differing from one another at 6°, 8° and 10°. The specimens with the inclined angles of 6°, 8° and 10° have the maximum reaction forces of 168 N, 194 N when the forced displacements are 6, 5 and 4.2 mm respectively. There are three specimens with the inclined angles of 10°, 8° and 6° in the order of maximum reaction force. As the analysis result, the maximum equivalent stresses of 0.813 MPa and 0.895 MPa happened when the forced displacements of 6 mm and 5 mm proceeded at the models of 6° and 8°, respectively. A simulation was carried out on the basis of finite element method and the experimental design. The results of the experiment and the simulation analysis are shown not different from each other significantly. Thus, only a simulation could be confirmed to be performed in substitution of an experiment, which is costly and time-consuming in order to determine the shearing properties of materials made of aluminum foam with artificial data.

  20. Effect of nonthermal plasma treatment on surface chemistry of commercially-pure titanium and shear bond strength to autopolymerizing acrylic resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vechiato-Filho, Aljomar José, E-mail: aljomarvechiatoflo@gmail.com [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Aracatuba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Silva Vieira Marques, Isabella da [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Santos, Daniela Micheline dos [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Aracatuba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira Matos, Adaias [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; Cruz, Nilson Cristino da [Laboratory of Technological Plasmas (LaPTec), Engineering College, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Sorocaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-03-01

    The effect of nonthermal plasma on the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti), and on the shear bond strength between an autopolymerizing acrylic resin and cp-Ti was investigated. A total of 96 discs of cp-Ti were distributed into four groups (n = 24): Po (no surface treatment), SB (sandblasting), Po + NTP and SB + NTP (methane plasma). Surface characterization was performed through surface energy, surface roughness, scanning microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction tests. Shear bond strength test was conducted immediately and after thermocycling. Surface treatment affected the surface energy and roughness of cp-Ti discs (P < .001). SEM–EDS showed the presence of the carbide thin film. XRD spectra revealed no crystalline phase changes. The SB + NTP group showed the highest bond strength values (6.76 ± 0.70 MPa). Thermocycling reduced the bond strength of the acrylic resin/cp-Ti interface (P < .05), except for Po group. NTP is an effective treatment option for improving the shear bond strength between both materials. - Highlights: • We tested the bond strength between two widely used materials in dentistry (acrylic and titanium). • We performed an innovative surface treatment with nonthermal plasma. • Increasing adhesion will avoid complications of full-arch implant-retained prostheses.

  1. Phase-detection measurements in free-surface turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanson, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    High-velocity self-aerated flows are described as ‘white waters’ because of the entrained air bubbles. The air entrainment induces a drastic change in the multiphase flow structure of the water column and this leads to significant bubble-turbulence interactions, turbulence modulation and associated mixing processes impacting on the bulk flow properties. In these high-velocity free-surface turbulent flows, the phase-detection needle probe is a most reliable instrumentation. The signal processing of a phase-detection probe is re-visited herein. It is shown that the processing may be performed on the raw probe signal as well as the thresholded data. The latter yields the time-averaged void fraction, the bubble count rate, the particle chord time distributions and the particle clustering properties within the particulate flow regions. The raw probe signal analysis gives further the auto-correlation time scale and the power spectrum density function. Finally dimensional considerations are developed with a focus on the physical modelling of free-surface flows in hydraulic structures. It is argued that the notion of scale effects must be defined in terms of some specific set of air-water flow properties within well-defined testing conditions, while a number of free-surface flow characteristics are more prone to scale effects than others, even in large-size physical facilities.

  2. Hot pressing effect on the shear bond strength of dental porcelain to CoCrMoSi alloy substrates with different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, B; Faria, S; Soares, D; Silva, F S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hot pressing on the shear bond strength of a CoCrMoSi alloy to a low-fusing feldspathic porcelain, for two types of surface treatments: polished and grit-blasted. Moreover, the shear strength of hot pressed porcelain was also compared with that of conventional vacuum sintered porcelain. Bond strength of metal-porcelain composites were assessed by the means of a shear test performed in a universal test machine until fracture. Fracture surfaces and interfaces were investigated by optical microscope, stereomicroscope and SEM/EDS. Data was analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test to test the assumption of normality. The 2-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD multiple comparison test was used to compare shear bond strength results and the t-test was used to compare the porcelain shear strength (pporcelain. This study revealed that metal-ceramic bond strength is maximized for hot pressed porcelain onto rough metal substrates, with lower variability in results. Hot pressing technique was also shown to enhance the cohesion of porcelain.

  3. Near-Surface Shear Wave Velocity Versus Depth Profiles, VS30, and NEHRP Classifications for 27 Sites in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; Stephenson, William J.; Worley, David M.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Asencio, Eugenio; Irizarry, Harold; Cameron, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program (PRSMP) and the Geology Department at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to study near-surface shear-wave (Vs) and compressional-wave (Vp) velocities in and around major urban areas of Puerto Rico. Using noninvasive seismic refraction-reflection profiling techniques, we acquired velocities at 27 locations. Surveyed sites were predominantly selected on the premise that they were generally representative of near-surface materials associated with the primary geologic units located within the urbanized areas of Puerto Rico. Geologic units surveyed included Cretaceous intrusive and volcaniclastic bedrock, Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic units, and Quaternary unconsolidated eolian, fluvial, beach, and lagoon deposits. From the data we developed Vs and Vp depth versus velocity columns, calculated average Vs to 30-m depth (VS30), and derived NEHRP (National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program) site classifications for all sites except one where results did not reach 30-m depth. The distribution of estimated NEHRP classes is as follows: three class 'E' (VS30 below 180 m/s), nine class 'D' (VS30 between 180 and 360 m/s), ten class 'C' (VS30 between 360 and 760 m/s), and four class 'B' (VS30 greater than 760 m/s). Results are being used to calibrate site response at seismograph stations and in the development of regional and local shakemap models for Puerto Rico.

  4. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana

    2013-10-15

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  5. Measurement of human blood viscosity by an electromagnetic spinning sphere viscometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Koji; Abumiya, Takeo; Sakai, Keiji; Hirano, Miki; Osanai, Toshiya; Shichinohe, Hideo; Nakayama, Naoki; Kazumata, Ken; Aida, Toshimitsu; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2016-08-01

    We herein applied an electromagnetic spinning sphere (EMS) viscometer to the measurement of human blood viscosity for the first time. We collected blood samples from 100 healthy outpatient volunteers in order to analyse viscosity dependence on blood cell parameters and on the shear rate with a simple approximation formula [ηi (γ)\\, = Ai γ(- pi) + η0]. Viscosity dependence on blood cell parameters was relatively high at a high shear rate, but became lower as the shear rate decreased. The approximation formula with appropriate parameters of Ai and pi nearly faithfully reproduced actual blood rheological behaviour with a standard deviation of 1.5%. The distributions of Ai and pi values were broad, suggesting that the pattern of viscosity dependence on the shear rate varied with individual differences. The results obtained using the EMS viscometer suggest that blood viscosity values are individual-specific and actual individual measurements are important for understanding rheological conditions.

  6. Shear bond strength of different surface treatments in bulk fill, microhybrid, and nanoparticle repair resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Jesus Tavarez RR

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus Tavarez,1 Lauber Jose dos Santos Almeida Júnior,2 Tayanne Christine Gomes Guará,1 Izabella Santos Ribeiro,1 Etevaldo Matos Maia Filho,1 Leily Macedo Firoozmand2 1Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ceuma University (CEUMA, 2Department of Dentistry I, University Federal of Maranhão (UFMA, São Luís, Maranhão, Brazil Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of surface treatment and different types of composite resin on the microshear bond strength of repairs. Materials and methods: Seventy-two specimens (n=72 were prepared using a nanoparticle resin and stored in artificial saliva at 37 ± 1°C for 24 h. After this period, the specimens (n=24 were restored with microhybrid resin P60 (3M ESPE, nanoparticle resin Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, and Bulk Fill Surefil SDR Flow (Dentsply composite resins. Previously, the surfaces of the samples were treated, forming the following subgroups (n=12: (A conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s, and (B abrasioned with a diamond tip for 3 s and conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid. In all groups, before insertion of the composite resin, the adhesive system Adper Single Bond 2 was actively applied and photopolymerized for 20 s. Results: The microshear test was executed to assess bond strength. Kruskal–Wallis (p<0.05 and Mann–Whitney statistical tests showed significant statistical difference considering that the bulk-fill resin turned out to have a lower bond strength than the conventional nanoparticle and microhybrid composites. With regard to the technique, the roughening with diamond bur followed by the application of phosphoric acid exhibited values higher than the exclusive use of acid. Conclusion: The microshear bond strength of the composite resin repairs varies in accordance with the type of composite resin utilized, and roughening the surface increased the bond strength of these materials. Keywords: bulk-fill resins, composite resins, dental

  7. ZrO2对高硼硅玻璃高温粘度和表面张力的影响%Effect of ZrO2 on Viscosity and Surface Tension of Borosilicate Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘尧龙; 陆平; 程金树

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high melting temperature ,borosilicate glass erode refractory strongly .ZrO2 dissolved into the glass change viscosity and surface of mother glass , which also bring about many and various product defects .In this paper , a small amount of ZrO 2 were introduced into the mother glass .High temperature viscosity was tested by the rotating method and high temperature surface tension was tested by the sessile drop method .The results indicate that viscosity of the glass above 1530 ℃almost no change and viscosity of the glass below 1530 ℃ greatly increase with increasing ZrO 2 content .At same time , surface tension is increasing mono-tonically .Surface tension reduce as the temperature increases .%高硼硅玻璃由于熔化温度高,对耐火材料侵蚀严重,ZrO2溶解到玻璃中后使其高温粘度和表面张力发生变化,是产生玻璃缺陷的重要原因之一。通过在母体玻璃中引入少量ZrO2,采用旋转粘度法测试玻璃的高温粘度,采用静滴法测试玻璃的高温表面张力。结果表明,随着含量的增加,ZrO2对玻璃在1530℃以上的粘度影响不大,但可使1530℃以下的粘度有较大提高。玻璃的高温表面张力随着ZrO2含量的增加单调递增,随着温度的升高而降低。

  8. Viscosity of aluminum under shock-loading conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Xiao-Juan; Liu Fu-Sheng; Zhang Ming-Jian; Sun Yan-Yun

    2011-01-01

    A reliable data treatment method is critical for viscosity measurements using the disturbance amplitude damping method of shock waves. In this paper the finite difference method is used to obtain the numerical solutions for the disturbance amplitude damping behaviour of the sinusoidal shock front in a flyer-impact experiment. The disturbance amplitude damping curves are used to depict the numerical solutions of viscous flow. By fitting the experimental data to the numerical solutions of different viscosities, we find that the effective shear viscosity coefficients of shocked aluminum at pressures of 42, 78 and 101 GPa are (1500±100) Pa. s, (2800±100) Pa. s and (3500±100) Pa. s respectively. It is clear that the shear viscosity of aluminum increases with an increase in shock pressure, so aluminum does not melt below a shock pressure of 101 GPa. This conclusion is consistent with the sound velocity measurement.

  9. Density, viscosity, surface tension, and molar volume of propylene glycol + water mixtures from 293 to 323 K and correlations by the Jouyban–Acree model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim S. Khattab

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Density, viscosity, surface tension and molar volume of propylene glycol + water mixtures at 293, 298, 303, 308, 313, 318, and 323 K are reported, compared with the available literature data and the Jouyban–Acree model was used for mathematical correlation of the data. The mean relative deviation (MRD was used as an error criterion and the MRD values for data correlation of density, viscosity, surface tension and molar volume at different investigated temperatures are 0.1 ± 0.1%, 7.6 ± 6.4%, 3.4 ± 3.7%, and 0.4 ± 0.4%, respectively. The corresponding MRDs for the predicted properties after training the model using the experimental data at 298 K are 0.1 ± 0.2%, 12.8 ± 9.3%, 4.7 ± 4.1% and 0.6 ± 0.5%, respectively for density, viscosity, surface tension, and molar volume data.

  10. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  11. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  12. Surface-secreted von Willebrand factor mediates aggregation of ADP-activated platelets at moderate shear stress: facilitated by GPIb but controlled by GPIIb-IIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frojmovic, M M; Kasirer-Friede, A; Goldsmith, H L; Brown, E A

    1997-03-01

    We previously showed that ADP activation of washed human platelets in plasma-free suspensions supports aggregation at moderate shear stress (0.4-1.6 Nm-2) in Poiseuille flow. Although most activated platelets expressed maximal fibrinogen-occupied GPIIb-IIIa receptors, aggregation appeared to be independent of bound fibrinogen, but blocked by the hexapeptide GRGDSP. Here, we tested the hypothesis that von Willebrand factor (vWF) secreted and expressed on activated platelets mediates aggregation at moderate shear rates from 300 to 1000 s-1 corresponding to shear stresses from 0.3 to 1.1 Nm-2. Relatively unactivated platelets (Flow cytometric measurements with monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2.2.9 reporting on surface-bound vWF, and with mAb S12 reporting on alpha-granule secreted P-selectin, showed that 65% and 80%, respectively, of all platelets were maximally activated with respect to maximal secretion and surface expression of these proteins. "Resting" washed platelets exhibited both surface-bound vWF and significant P-selectin secretion. We showed that mAbs 6D1 and NMC4, respectively blocking the adhesive domains on the GPIb receptor recognizing vWF, and on the vWF molecule recognizing the GPIb receptor, partially inhibited ADP-induced aggregation under shear in Couette flow, the degree of inhibition increasing with increasing shear stress. In contrast, mAb 10E5, blocking the vWF binding domain on GPIIb-IIIa, essentially blocked all aggregation at the shear rates tested. We conclude that vWF, expressed on ADP-activated platelets, is at least the predominant cross-bridging molecule mediating aggregation at moderate shear stress. There is an absolute requirement for free activated GPIIb-IIIa receptors, postulated to interact with platelet-secreted, surface bound vWF. The GPIb-vWF cross-bridging reaction plays a facilitative role becoming increasingly important with increasing shear stress. Since aurin tricarboxylic acid, which blocks the GPIb binding domain on vWF, was

  13. Viscosity of confined inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junfang; Todd, B D; Travis, Karl P

    2004-12-01

    We use the nonlocal linear hydrodynamic constitutive model, proposed by Evans and Morriss [Statistical Mechanics of Nonequilibrium Liquids (Academic, London, 1990)], for computing an effective spatially dependent shear viscosity of inhomogeneous nonequilibrium fluids. The model is applied to a simple atomic fluid undergoing planar Poiseuille flow in a confined channel of several atomic diameters width. We compare the spatially dependent viscosity with a local generalization of Newton's law of viscosity and the Navier-Stokes viscosity, both of which are known to suffer extreme inaccuracies for highly inhomogeneous systems. The nonlocal constitutive model calculates effective position dependent viscosities that are free from the notorious singularities experienced by applying the commonly used local constitutive model. It is simple, general, and has widespread applicability in nanofluidics where experimental measurement of position dependent transport coefficients is currently inaccessible. In principle the method can be used to predict approximate flow profiles of any arbitrary inhomogeneous system. We demonstrate this by predicting the flow profile for a simple fluid undergoing planar Couette flow in a confined channel of several atomic diameters width.

  14. Intrinsic viscosity of a suspension of cubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mallavajula, Rajesh K.

    2013-11-06

    We report on the viscosity of a dilute suspension of cube-shaped particles. Irrespective of the particle size, size distribution, and surface chemistry, we find empirically that cubes manifest an intrinsic viscosity [η]=3.1±0.2, which is substantially higher than the well-known value for spheres, [η]=2.5. The orientation-dependent intrinsic viscosity of cubic particles is determined theoretically using a finite-element solution of the Stokes equations. For isotropically oriented cubes, these calculations show [η]=3.1, in excellent agreement with our experimental observations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  15. Effects of surface-conditioning methods on shear bond strength of brackets bonded to different all-ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Y Şinasi; Külünk, Tolga; Elekdağ-Türk, Selma; Saraç, Duygu; Türk, Tamer

    2011-12-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of two surface-conditioning methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal brackets bonded to three different all-ceramic materials, and to evaluate the mode of failure after debonding. Twenty feldspathic, 20 fluoro-apatite, and 20 leucite-reinforced ceramic specimens were examined following two surface-conditioning methods: air-particle abrasion (APA) with 25 μm Al(2)O(3) and silica coating with 30 μm Al(2)O(3) particles modified by silica. After silane application, metal brackets were bonded with light cure composite and then stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermocycled (×1000 at 5-55°C for 30 seconds). The SBS of the brackets was measured on a universal testing machine. The ceramic surfaces were examined with a stereomicroscope to determine the amount of composite resin remaining using the adhesive remnant index. Two-way analysis of variance, Tukey's multiple comparison test, and Weibull analysis were used for evaluation of SBS. The lowest SBS was with APA for the fluoro-apatite ceramic (11.82 MPa), which was not significantly different from APA for the feldspathic ceramic (13.58 MPa). The SBS for the fluoro-apatite ceramic was significantly lower than that of leucite-reinforced ceramic with APA (14.82 MPa). The highest SBS value was obtained with silica coating of the leucite-reinforced ceramic (24.17 MPa), but this was not significantly different from the SBS for feldspathic and fluoro-apatite ceramic (23.51 and 22.18 MPa, respectively). The SBS values with silica coating showed significant differences from those of APA. For all samples, the adhesive failures were between the ceramic and composite resin. No ceramic fractures or cracks were observed. Chairside tribochemical silica coating significantly increased the mean bond strength values.

  16. Heat treatment following surface silanization in rebonded tribochemical silica-coated ceramic brackets: shear bond strength analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    SILVA, Emilia Adriane; TRINDADE, Flávia Zardo; RESKALLA, Hélcio Nagib José Feres; de QUEIROZ, José Renato Cavalcanti

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the effects of heat treatment on the tribochemical silica coating and silane surface conditioning and the bond strength of rebonded alumina monocrystalline brackets. Material and Methods Sixty alumina monocrystalline brackets were randomly divided according to adhesive base surface treatments (n=20): Gc, no treatment (control); Gt, tribochemical silica coating + silane application; Gh, as per Gt + post-heat treatment (air flux at 100ºC for 60 s). Brackets were bonded to the enamel premolars surface with a light-polymerized resin and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 100 days. Additionally, half the specimens of each group were thermocycled (6,000 cycles between 5-55ºC) (TC). The specimens were submitted to the shear bond strength (SBS) test using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure mode was assessed using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), together with the surface roughness (Ra) of the resin cement in the bracket using interference microscopy (IM). 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey test were used to compare the data (p>0.05). Results The strategies used to treat the bracket surface had an effect on the SBS results (p=0.0), but thermocycling did not (p=0.6974). Considering the SBS results (MPa), Gh-TC and Gc showed the highest values (27.59±6.4 and 27.18±2.9) and Gt-TC showed the lowest (8.45±6.7). For the Ra parameter, ANOVA revealed that the aging method had an effect (p=0.0157) but the surface treatments did not (p=0.458). For the thermocycled and non-thermocycled groups, Ra (µm) was 0.69±0.16 and 1.12±0.52, respectively. The most frequent failure mode exhibited was mixed failure involving the enamel-resin-bracket interfaces. Conclusion Regardless of the aging method, Gh promoted similar SBS results to Gc, suggesting that rebonded ceramic brackets are a more effective strategy. PMID:24037072

  17. Heat treatment following surface silanization in rebonded tribochemical silica-coated ceramic brackets: shear bond strength analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Adriane Silva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of heat treatment on the tribochemical silica coating and silane surface conditioning and the bond strength of rebonded alumina monocrystalline brackets. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty alumina monocrystalline brackets were randomly divided according to adhesive base surface treatments (n=20: Gc, no treatment (control; Gt, tribochemical silica coating + silane application; Gh, as per Gt + post-heat treatment (air flux at 100ºC for 60 s. Brackets were bonded to the enamel premolars surface with a light-polymerized resin and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 100 days. Additionally, half the specimens of each group were thermocycled (6,000 cycles between 5-55ºC (TC. The specimens were submitted to the shear bond strength (SBS test using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min. Failure mode was assessed using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, together with the surface roughness (Ra of the resin cement in the bracket using interference microscopy (IM. 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey test were used to compare the data (p>0.05. RESULTS: The strategies used to treat the bracket surface had an effect on the SBS results (p=0.0, but thermocycling did not (p=0.6974. Considering the SBS results (MPa, Gh-TC and Gc showed the highest values (27.59±6.4 and 27.18±2.9 and Gt-TC showed the lowest (8.45±6.7. For the Ra parameter, ANOVA revealed that the aging method had an effect (p=0.0157 but the surface treatments did not (p=0.458. For the thermocycled and non-thermocycled groups, Ra (µm was 0.69±0.16 and 1.12±0.52, respectively. The most frequent failure mode exhibited was mixed failure involving the enamel-resin-bracket interfaces. CONCLUSION: Regardless of the aging method, Gh promoted similar SBS results to Gc, suggesting that rebonded ceramic brackets are a more effective strategy.

  18. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R. L.; Snieder, R. K.

    1996-07-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the tectonically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  19. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the technically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  20. Dynamic viscosity measurement in non-Newtonian graphite nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Fei; Wong, Ting Foong; Crivoi, Alexandru

    2012-07-02

    : The effective dynamic viscosity was measured in the graphite water-based nanofluids. The shear thinning non-Newtonian behavior is observed in the measurement. On the basis of the best fitting of the experimental data, the viscosity at zero shear rate or at infinite shear rate is determined for each of the fluids. It is found that increases of the particle volume concentration and the holding time period of the nanofluids result in an enhancement of the effective dynamic viscosity. The maximum enhancement of the effective dynamic viscosity at infinite rate of shear is more than 24 times in the nanofluids held for 3 days with the volume concentration of 4% in comparison with the base fluid. A transmission electron microscope is applied to reveal the morphology of aggregated nanoparticles qualitatively. The large and irregular aggregation of the particles is found in the 3-day fluids in the drying samples. The Raman spectra are extended to characterize the D and G peaks of the graphite structure in the nanofluids. The increasing intensity of the D peak indicates the nanoparticle aggregation growing with the higher concentration and the longer holding time of the nanofluids. The experimental results suggest that the increase on effective dynamic viscosity of nanofluids is related to the graphite nanoparticle aggregation in the fluids.

  1. Scaling laws for implicit viscosities in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierwisch, Claas; Polfer, Pit

    2017-06-01

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a particle-based method which solves continuum equations such as the Navier-Stokes equations. A periodic fluidic system under homogeneous shear is studied using SPH in the present work. The total pressure of the system and the shear stress contributions from the SPH interaction terms for pressure and viscosity as well as the contribution caused by velocity fluctuations are analyzed. It is found that the pressure and the shear stress contributions obey certain scaling laws depending on physical properties of the system such as compressibility, viscosity and shear rate as well as the spatial resolution. Some of the identified relations resemble scaling laws for the rheology of dense granular flows. These findings render an assessment of the convergence with respect to the spatial resolution of SPH simulations possible. Furthermore, the similarities between numerical SPH particles and physical grains in dense flow provide a deeper understanding of the nature of the SPH method.

  2. Shear Rate Dependence of the Pāhoehoe to `A`ā Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, A.; Cashman, K.

    2003-12-01

    The surface morphology transition from pāhoehoe-to-`a`ā on basaltic lava flows can be used to interpret the emplacement conditions of solidified flows and predict the behavior of active flows. Investigations of this phenomenon have emphasized either the mechanical properties of the solidified crust (e.g., Kilburn, 1981), or the rheologic properties of the liquid interior (e.g., Peterson and Tilling, 1980). In the latter, the boundary separating pāhoehoe and `a`ā is represented qualitatively by an inverse relationship between apparent viscosity and shear rate. Recent investigations of the rheology dependence of the transition have revealed a critical crystallinity range at which pāhoehoe transforms to `a`ā of φ = 0.18 to 0.35 that can vary between flows. Here, we extend this approach to investigate the shear rate dependence of the pāhoehoe-to-`a`ā transition. We use a suspension of corn syrup and rice to represent lava with crystals. Suspensions of varying particle concentration (φ = 0.15 to 0.40) are sheared in a Couette rheometer over a range of constant shear rates (0.1 to 2.0 s-1). We describe three deformation regimes, clumping, shear zone formation, and fluid failure that produce changes in the suspension microstructure and lead to shear localization. The deformation mechanisms are imaged with digital video and quantified by tracking individual particle paths. In the presence of cooling, these shear localization may be the mechanism by which `a`ā flow surfaces form. We find that the onset of each regime follows the expected inverse relationship between shear rate and suspension viscosity. We expect that the results of these experiments apply to the thermal boundary layer of a flow and thus bridge the distinct approaches taken to investigate this phenomenon. The results of these experiments can contribute to more detailed lava flow modeling and better assessment of flow dynamics from solidified lava flows.

  3. Viscosity of magnetorheological fluids using Iron-silicon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hee; Kim, CheolGi; Lee, Seung Goo; Hong, Tae Min; Choi, Joon Hong

    2013-09-01

    Fe-6.5Si fine particles were mechanically fabricated by a milling method for use in magnetorheological fluids. Oleic acid was used as a surfactant for the dispersed substance for preparing the hydrophobic fluid with silicon oil as a dispersing medium. Further, oleic acid and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate were used as surfactants, forming a bilayer structure, for preparing the hydrophilic fluid with polyethylene glycol as a dispersing medium. The adsorption of oleic acid onto the Fe-Si particles was achieved by oxidizing the particle surface with trimethylamine N-oxide dihydrate. In order to make a comparative examination of the fluid properties, ferromagnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical precipitation and the subsequent process was accompanied under the same conditions as applied for the magnetorheological fluid. The fluid particles were characterized by magnetization measurements. The viscosity of the fluids was obtained at various concentrations under an external field. The viscosity values of the magnetorheological fluid were higher than those of the ferromagnetic fluid. Moreover, they increased considerably by using silicon oil as the dispersing medium as well as under an applied magnetic field and at higher fluid concentrations. The magnetorheological fluids may be effectively resistant to a strong impact from outside when the appropriate fluid concentration is used and a magnetic field is applied for increasing the shear strength of the fluids.

  4. Odd viscosity in two-dimensional incompressible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshan, Sriram; Abanov, Alexander G.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we present observable consequences of a parity-violating odd-viscosity term in incompressible 2+1D hydrodynamics. For boundary conditions depending on the velocity field (flow) alone we show that (i) the fluid flow quantified by the velocity field is independent of odd viscosity, (ii) the force acting on a closed contour is independent of odd viscosity, and (iii) the odd-viscosity part of torque on a closed contour is proportional to the rate of change of area enclosed by the contour with the proportionality constant being twice the odd viscosity. The last statement allows us to define a measurement protocol of odd viscostance in analogy to Hall resistance measurements. We also consider no-stress boundary conditions that explicitly depend on odd viscosity. A classic hydrodynamics problem with no-stress boundary conditions is that of a bubble in a planar Stokes flow. We solve this problem exactly for shear and hyperbolic flows and show that the steady-state shape of the bubble in the shear flow depends explicitly on the value of odd viscosity.

  5. Miniature Laser Doppler Velocimeter for Measuring Wall Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Morteza; Modarress, Darius; Forouhar, Siamak; Fourguette, Dominique; Taugwalder, Federic; Wilson, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    A miniature optoelectronic instrument has been invented as a nonintrusive means of measuring a velocity gradient proportional to a shear stress in a flow near a wall. The instrument, which can be mounted flush with the wall, is a variant of a basic laser Doppler velocimeter. The laser Doppler probe volume can be located close enough to the wall (as little as 100 micron from the surface) to lie within the viscosity-dominated sublayer of a turbulent boundary layer. The instrument includes a diode laser, the output of which is shaped by a diffractive optical element (DOE) into two beams that have elliptical cross sections with very high aspect ratios.

  6. On-line blood viscosity monitoring in vivo with a central venous catheter, using electrical impedance technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, G.A.M.; Bisschops, L.L.A.; Iliev, B.; Struijk, P.C.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.

    2013-01-01

    Blood viscosity is an important determinant of microvascular hemodynamics and also reflects systemic inflammation. Viscosity of blood strongly depends on the shear rate and can be characterized by a two parameter power-law model. Other major determinants of blood viscosity are hematocrit, level of i

  7. Electrorheological Effects at High Shear Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Much attention has been given to electrorheological (ER) fluids because of the ER effect, which has been described by a large number of researchers as a notable increase in the apparent viscosity of a fluid upon the application of an electric field. The description of ER effects is, however, not accurate at high shear rates. To clarify the discrepancy, we analyze and compute the apparent viscosity as a function of shear rate for ER fluid flow between rotating coaxial cylinders in the presence of an electric field. The theoretical predictions show that the increase of electric intensity contributes little to the apparent viscosity enhancement at high shear rates, while ER effects for ER fluids with a higher polarization rate still exist and ER devices possess controllability in this regime. Description of the ER effect by the apparent viscosity leads to an unrealistic conclusion that ER effects disappear at high shear rates, because the apparent viscosity of ER fluids approaches the value for Newtonian fluids. Therefore, it is concluded that the proper description of ER effects, i.e., one that holds uniformly for any strain rate when ER effects exist, is manifested by a remarkable increase in the extra stress rather than in the apparent viscosity of ER fluids.

  8. Layering and shear properties of an ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate, confined to nano-films between mica surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkin, Susan; Albrecht, Tim; Klein, Jacob

    2010-02-14

    We report high-resolution measurements of the forces between two atomically smooth solid surfaces across a film of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ionic liquid, for film thickness down to a single ion diameter. For films thinner than approximately 2 nm oscillatory structural forces are observed as the surface separation decreases and pairs of ion layers are squeezed out of the film. Strikingly, measurements of the shear stress of the ionic liquid film reveal low friction coefficients which are 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than for analogous films of non-polar molecular liquids, including standard hydrocarbon lubricants, up to ca. 1 MPa pressure. We attribute this to the geometric and charge characteristics of the ionic liquid: the irregular shapes of the ions lead to a low shear stress, while the strong coulombic interactions between the ions and the charged confining surfaces lead to a robust film which is maintained between the shearing surfaces when pressure is applied across the film.

  9. Neoclassical Viscosities and Anomalous Flows in Stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, A. S.; Spong, D. A.; Breyfogle, M.; Marine, T.

    2009-05-01

    We present initial work to use neoclassical viscosities calculated with the PENTA code [1] in a transport model that includes Reynolds stress generation of flows [2]. The PENTA code uses a drift kinetic equation solver to calculate neoclassical viscosities and flows in general three-dimensional geometries over a range of collisionalities. The predicted neoclassical viscosities predicted by PENTA can be flux-surfaced average and applied in a 1-D transport model that includes anomalous flow generation. This combination of codes can be used to test the impact of stellarator geometry on anomalous flow generation. As a test case, we apply the code to modeling flows in the HSX stellarator. Due to variations in the neoclassical viscosities, HSX can have strong neoclassical flows in the core region. In turn, these neoclassical flows can provide a seed for anomalous flow generation. [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [2] D. E. Newman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 938 (1998).

  10. Effect of surface treatment on rheological behaviors of glass bead/hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔伟; 赵瑾朝; 王承哲; 周兴平; 解孝林

    2008-01-01

    Surface treatment of glass bead(GB) was carried out by using γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxy silane(GPTES) and γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxy silane(MPTMS) as coupling agents,respectively.The steady viscosity and yield stress of the GB/hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene(HTPB) suspensions were determined by Brookfield R/S rheometer.The effect of surface treatment on the viscosity and yield stress of GB/HTPB suspension was investigated.The results indicate that the viscosity of the pristine GB/HTPB suspension increases with increasing GB,and the relationship between its viscosity and volume fraction of GB depends on the shear rate.The modification of GB by MPTMS changes the viscosity of the MPTMS@GB/HTPB suspension,and its viscosity is the minimum at the MPTMS dosage of 0.3 g per 1 g GB.Additionally,the modification of GB by MPTMS increases the yield stress of the GB/HTPB suspension,and its yield stress is the maximum at the MPTMS dosage of 0.1 g per 1 g GB.The GPTES modified GB/HTPB suspension behaves lower viscosity and weaker shear thinning than the MPTMS modified GB/HTPB suspension within the range of experimental shear rate.

  11. Vibrational shear flow of anisotropic viscoelastic fluid with small amplitudes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩式方

    2008-01-01

    Using the constitutive equation of co-rotational derivative type for anisotropic viscoelastic fluid-liquid crystalline(LC),polymer liquids was developed.Two relaxation times are introduced in the equation:λn represents relaxation of the normal-symmetric stress components;λs represents relaxation of the shear-unsymmetric stress components.A vibrational rotating flow in gap between cylinders with small amplitudes is studied for the anisotropic viscoelastic fluid-liquid crystalline polymer.The time-dependent constitutive equation are linearized with respect to parameter of small amplitude.For the normal-symmetric part of stress tensor analytical expression of the shear stress is obtained by the constitutive equation.The complex viscosity,complex shear modulus,dynamic and imaginary viscosities,storage modulus and loss modulus are obtained for the normal-symmetric stress case which are defined by the common shear rate.For the shear-unsymmetric stress part,two shear stresses are obtained thus two complex viscosities and two complex shear modulus(i.e.first and second one) are given by the constitutive equation which are defined by rotating shear rate introduced by author.The dynamic and imaginary viscosities,storage modulus and loss modulus are given for each complex viscosities and complex shear modulus.Using the constituive equation the rotating flow with small amplitudes in gap between two coaxial cylinders is studied.

  12. Shear bond strength of veneering porcelain to zirconia: Effect of surface treatment by CNC-milling and composite layer deposition on zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, R L P; Silva, F S; Nascimento, R M; Souza, J C M; Motta, F V; Carvalho, O; Henriques, B

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of veneering feldspathic porcelain to zirconia substrates modified by CNC-milling process or by coating zirconia with a composite interlayer. Four types of zirconia-porcelain interface configurations were tested: RZ - porcelain bonded to rough zirconia substrate (n=16); PZ - porcelain bonded to zirconia substrate with surface holes (n=16); RZI - application of a composite interlayer between the veneering porcelain and the rough zirconia substrate (n=16); PZI - application of a composite interlayer between the porcelain and the zirconia substrate treated by CNC-milling (n=16). The composite interlayer was composed of zirconia particles reinforced porcelain (30%, vol%). The mechanical properties of the ceramic composite have been determined. The shear bond strength test was performed at 0.5mm/min using a universal testing machine. The interfaces of fractured and untested specimens were examined by FEG-SEM/EDS. Data was analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test to test the assumption of normality. The one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD multiple comparison test was used to compare shear bond strength results (α=0.05). The shear bond strength of PZ (100±15MPa) and RZI (96±11MPa) specimens were higher than that recorded for RZ (control group) specimens (89±15MPa), although not significantly (p>0.05). The highest shear bond strength values were recorded for PZI specimens (138±19MPa), yielding a significant improvement of 55% relative to RZ specimens (p<0.05). This study shows that it is possible to highly enhance the zirconia-porcelain bond strength - even by ~55% - by combining surface holes in zirconia frameworks and the application of a proper ceramic composite interlayer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of bulk viscosity on the decay of compressible, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Eric; Pan, Shaowu

    2016-11-01

    The practice of neglecting bulk viscosity in studies of compressible turbulence is widespread. While exact for monatomic gases and unlikely to strongly affect the dynamics of fluids whose bulk-to-shear viscosity ratio is small and/or of weakly compressible turbulence, this assumption is not justifiable for compressible, turbulent flows of gases whose bulk viscosity is orders of magnitude larger than their shear viscosities (e.g., CO2). To understand the mechanisms by which bulk viscosity and the associated phenomena affect compressible turbulence, we conduct DNS of freely decaying compressible, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence for ratios of bulk-to-shear viscosity ranging from 0-1000. Our simulations demonstrate that bulk viscosity increases the decay rate of turbulent kinetic energy; while enstrophy exhibits little sensitivity to bulk viscosity, dilatation is reduced by an order of magnitude within the two eddy turnover time. Via a Helmholtz decomposition of the flow, we determined that bulk viscosity damps the dilatational velocity and reduces dilatational-solenoidal exchanges, as well as pressure-dilatation coupling. In short, bulk viscosity renders compressible turbulence incompressible by reducing energy transfer between translational and internal modes.

  14. Shear Rheology of Suspensions of Porous Zeolite Particles in Concentrated Polymer Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanrewaju, Kayode O.; Breedveld, Victor

    2008-07-01

    We present experimental data on the shear rheology of Ultem (polyetherimide)/NMP(l-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone) solutions with and without suspended surface-modified porous/nonporous zeolite (ZSM-5) particles. We found that the porous zeolite suspensions have relative viscosities that significantly exceed the Krieger-Dougherty predictions for hard sphere suspensions. The major origin of this discrepancy is the selective absorption of NMP solvent into the zeolite pores, which raises both the polymer concentration and the particle volume fraction, thus enhancing both the viscosity of the continuous phase Ultem/NMP polymer solution and the particle contribution to the suspension viscosity. Other factors, such as zeolite non-sphericity and specific interactions with Ultem polymer, contribute to the suspension viscosity to a lesser extent. We propose a predictive model for the viscosity of porous zeolite suspensions by incorporating an absorption parameter, α, into the Krieger-Dougherty model. We also propose independent approaches to determine α. The first one is indirect and based on zeolite density/porosity data, assuming that all pores will be filled with solvent. The other method is based on our experimental data, by comparing the viscosity data of porous versus non-porous zeolite suspensions. The different approaches are compared.

  15. Viscous effects on the acoustics and stability of a shear layer over an impedance wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Doran; Brambley, Edward James

    2017-01-01

    The effect of viscosity and thermal conduction on the acoustics in a shear layer above an impedance wall is investigated numerically and asymptotically by solving the compressible linearised Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that viscothermal effects can be as important as shear, and therefore including shear while neglecting viscothermal effects by solving the linearised Euler equations is questionable. In particular, the damping rate of upstream propagating waves is found to be dramatically under-predicted by the LEE in certain instances. The effects of viscosity on stability are also found to be important. Short wavelength disturbances are stabilised by viscosity, greatly altering the characteristic wavelength and maximum growth rate of instability. For the parameters typical of aeroacoustic simulations considered here, the Reynolds number below which the flow stabilizes ranges from $10^5$ to $10^7$. By assuming a thin but nonzero-thickness boundary layer, asymptotic analysis leads to a system of boundary layer governing equations for the acoustics. This system may be solved numerically to produce an effective impedance boundary condition, applicable at the wall of a uniform inviscid flow, that accounts for both the shear and viscosity within the boundary layer. An alternative asymptotic analysis in the high frequency limit yields a different set of equations with analytic solutions. The acoustic mode shapes and axial wavenumbers from both asymptotic analyses compare well with numerical solutions of the full LNSE. A closed-form effective impedance boundary condition is derived from the high-frequency asymptotics, suitable for application in frequency-domain numerical simulations. Finally, surface waves are considered, and it is shown that a viscous flow over an impedance lining supports a greater number of surface wave modes than an inviscid flow.

  16. Influence of coupling with shear horizontal surface acoustic wave on lateral propagation of Rayleigh surface acoustic wave on 128°YX-LiNbO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Benfeng; Han, Tao; Tang, Gongbin; Zhang, Qiaozhen; Omori, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of the coupling with shear horizontal (SH) surface acoustic wave (SAW) on the propagation of Rayleigh SAW in periodic grating structures on 128°YX-LiNbO3. First, the frequency dispersion behavior with longitudinal and lateral wavenumbers of Rayleigh SAW is calculated using the finite element method (FEM) software COMSOL. It is shown that the coupling causes (1) the satellite stopband and (2) variation of the anisotropy factor. It is also shown these phenomena remain even when the electromechanical coupling factor of SH SAW is zero. Then, the extended thin plate model which can take coupling between two SAWs into account, is applied to simulate the result of FEM. Good agreement between these results indicated that the mechanical coupling is responsible for these two phenomena. Finally, including electrical excitation and detection, the model is applied to the infinitely long interdigital transducer (IDT) structure and the calculated result is compared with that obtained by the three-dimensional FEM. The excellent agreement of both results confirms the effectiveness of the extended thin plate model.

  17. Morphological instability of the solid-liquid interface under a thin shear flow with a free surface-ripples on icicles and stalactites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Kazuto

    2007-03-01

    Icicles and stalactites grow when their surfaces are covered with a thin film of flowing water through which latent heat of fusion and carbon dioxide are released to the surrounding air by diffusion and convection. Despite the complete difference in their basic growth mechanism, their surfaces often have ripples of centimeter-scale wavelengths. We consider the underlying common mechanism of ripple formation and find that the mean thickness of the water film and the capillary length associated with the surface tension of the water-air surface are common important characteristic lengths in determining the centimeter-scale wavelength of ripples. This is the first theoretical work on the morphological instability of solidification front during icicle and stalactite growth from a thin shear flow with one side being a free surface, in which we take into account the change of shape of the water-air surface when the shape of the solid-liquid interface is changed.

  18. On the viscosity of magnetic fluid with low and moderate solid fraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiqiang Ren; Yanping Han; Ruoyu Hong; Jianmin Ding; Hongzhong Li

    2008-01-01

    The design of a pressurized capillary rheometer operating at prescribed temperature is described to measure the viscosity of magnetic fluids (MFs) containing Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The equipment constant of the rheometer was obtained using liquids with predetermined viscosities. Experimentally measured viscosities were used to evaluate different equations for suspension viscosities. Deviation of measured suspension viscosities from the Einstein equation was found to be basically due to the influence of spatial distribution and aggregation of Fe3O4 MNPs. By taking account of the coating layer on MNPs and the aggregation of MNPs in MFs, a modified Einstein equation was proposed to fit the experimental data. Moreover, the influence of external magnetic field on viscosity was also taken into account. Viscosities thus predicted are in good agreement with experimental data. Temperature effect on suspension viscosity was shown experimentally to be due to the shear-thinning behavior of the MFs.

  19. Comparison of shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer to conditioned and unconditioned mineral trioxide aggregate surface: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Gulati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement to conditioned and unconditioned mineral trioxide aggregate surface. Materials and Method: White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (WMTA and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC were used for the study. 60 WMTA specimens were prepared and stored in an incubator at 37° C and 100% humidity for 72 hrs. The specimens were then divided into two groups- half of the specimens were conditioned and remaining half were left unconditioned, subsequent to which RMGIC was placed over MTA. The specimens were then stored in an incubator for 24 hrs at 37° C and 100% humidity. The shear bond strength value of RMGIC to conditioned and unconditioned WMTA was measured and compared using unpaired ′t  ′ test. Results: The mean shear bond strength of value of RMGIC to conditioned and unconditioned WMTA was 6.59 MPa and 7.587 MPa respectively. Statistical analysis using unpaired t-test revealed that the difference between values of two groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05. Conclusions: During clinical procedures like pulp capping and furcal repair, if RMGIC is placed as a base over MTA, then conditioning should be done to increase the bond strength between RMGIC and dentin and any inadvertent contact of conditioner with MTA will not significantly affect the shear bond strength value of RMGIC to MTA.

  20. Molten Composition B Viscosity at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerkle, David K.; Núñez, Marcel P.; Zucker, Jonathan M.

    2016-10-01

    A shear-thinning viscosity model is developed for molten Composition B at elevated temperature from analysis of falling ball viscometer data. Results are reported with the system held at 85, 110, and 135°C. Balls of densities of 2.7, 8.0, and 15.6 g/cm3 are dropped to generate a range of strain rates in the material. Analysis of video recordings gives the speed at which the balls fall. Computer simulation of the viscometer is used to determine parameters for a non-Newtonian model calibrated to measured speeds. For the first time, viscosity is shown to be a function of temperature and strain rate-dependent maximum RDX (cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine) particle volume fraction.

  1. Viscosity: From air to hot nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nguyen Dinh Dang

    2014-11-01

    After a brief review of the history of viscosity from classical to quantal fluids, a discussion of how the shear viscosity of a finite hot nucleus is calculated directly from the width and energy of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) of the nucleus is given in this paper. The ratio / with s being the entropy volume density, is extracted from the experimental systematic of GDR in copper, tin and lead isotopes at finite temperature . These empirical results are compared with the results predicted by several independent models, as well as with almost model-independent estimations. Based on these results, it is concluded that the ratio / in medium and heavy nuclei decreases with increasing to reach (1.3−4)$×\\hbar/(4 k_B)$ at = 5 MeV, which is almost the same as that obtained for quark-gluon plasma at > 170 MeV.

  2. Effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of resin composite bonded to CAD/CAM resin-ceramic hybrid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, Merve Bankoğlu; Bal, Bilge Turhan; Ünver, Senem; Doğan, Aylin

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of resin composite bonded to thermocycled and non-thermocycled CAD/CAM resin-ceramic hybrid materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS 120 specimens (10×10×2 mm) from each material were divided into 12 groups according to different surface treatments in combination with thermal aging procedures. Surface treatment methods were airborne-particle abrasion (abraded with 50 micron alumina particles), dry grinding (grinded with 125 µm grain size bur), and hydrofluoric acid (9%) and silane application. According to the thermocycling procedure, the groups were assigned as non-thermocycled, thermocycled after packing composites, and thermocycled before packing composites. The average surface roughness of the non-thermocycled specimens were measured after surface treatments. After packing composites and thermocycling procedures, shear bond strength (SBS) of the specimens were tested. The results of surface roughness were statistically analyzed by 2-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), and SBS results were statistically analyzed by 3-way ANOVA. RESULTS Surface roughness of GC were significantly lower than that of LU and VE (P<.05). The highest surface roughness was observed for dry grinding group, followed by airborne particle abraded group (P<.05). Comparing the materials within the same surface treatment method revealed that untreated surfaces generally showed lower SBS values. The values of untreated LU specimens showed significantly different SBS values compared to those of other surface treatment groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION SBS was affected by surface treatments. Thermocycling did not have any effect on the SBS of the materials except acid and silane applied GC specimens, which were subjected to thermocycling before packing of the composite resin. PMID:27555894

  3. Viscosity changes in hyaluronic acid: Irradiation and rheological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daar, Eman [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: e.daar@surrey.ac.uk; King, L.; Nisbet, A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Thorpe, R.B. [Fluids and Systems Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a significant component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), particular interest being shown herein in synovial fluid. The present study aims to investigate the degrading effects of X-ray radiation on HA at radiotherapy doses. Measurements of viscosity and shear stresses on HA solutions have been made at different shear rates using various types of viscometer for different concentrations in the range 0.01-1% w/v of HA. The HA has been subjected to doses of 6 MV photon radiation ranging from 0 to 20 Gy, the major emphasis being on doses below 5 Gy. It is found that there is a dose-dependent relationship between viscosity and shear rate, viscosity reducing with radiation dose, this being related to polymer scissions via the action of radiation-induced free radicals. The dependency appears to become weaker at higher concentrations, possibly due to the contribution to viscosity from polymer entanglement becoming dominant over that from mean molecular weight. Present results, for HA solutions in the concentration range 0.01% to 1% w/v, show reduced viscosity with dose over the range 0-4 Gy, the latter covering the dose regime of interest in fractionated radiotherapy. The work also shows agreement with previous Raman microspectrometry findings by others, the possible bond alterations being defined by comparison with available published data.

  4. Dynamic viscosity study of barley malt and chicory concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. Magomedov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research is to find optimal conditions for dispersing and subsequent dehydration of liquid food environments in the nozzle spray drying chamber through the study of dynamic changes in viscosity according to temperature, velocities gradients and dry residue content. The objects of study were roasted chicory and malt barley concentrates with dry residue content of 20, 40, 60 and 80%. Research of dynamic viscosity were carried out at the measuring complex based on the rotational viscometer Rheotest II, analog-to-digital converter, module Laurent and a personal computer with a unique software that allows to record in real time (not only on a tape recorder, but also in the form of graphic files the behavior of the viscosity characteristics of concentrates. Registration of changes of dynamic viscosity was carried out at a shear rate gradient from 1,0 с -1 to 27,0 с -1 and the products temperature thermostating : 35, 55, 75˚ C. The research results are presented in the form of graphic dependences of effective viscosity on shear rate and flow curves (dependencies of shear stresses on the velocity gradient, which defined flow regimes, the optimal modes of dispersion concentrates into spray dryer chambers in obtaining of powdered semi-finished products and instanting were found: dry residue content - 40 %, concentrate temperature - 75 ˚C, velocity gradient in the air channel of the nozzle at least 20 c-1

  5. A new electrical and mechanically detonatable shear wave source for near surface (0-30 m) seismic acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, J. M.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Harris, J. B.

    2013-04-01

    We present a new, impulsive, horizontal shear source capable of performing long shot profiles in a time-efficient and repeatable manner. The new shear source is ground-coupled by eight 1/2″ (1.27 cm) × 2″ (5.08 cm) steel spikes. Blank shotshells (12-gauge) used as energy sources can be either mechanically or electrically detonated. Electrical fuses have a start time repeatability of safety pin. We conducted field tests at the 17th Street Canal levee breach site in New Orleans, Louisiana (30.017° N 90.121° W) and at an instrumented test borehole at Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi (32.325° N 93.182° W) to compare our new source and a traditional hammer impact source. The new shear source produces a broader-band of frequencies (30-100 Hz cf. 30-60 Hz). Signal generated by the new shear source has signal-to-noise ratios equivalent to ~ 3 stacked hammer blows to the hammer impact source. Ideal source signals must be broadband in frequency, have a high SNR, be consistent, and have precise start times; all traits of the new shear source.

  6. Shape and shear guide sperm cells spiraling upstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jorn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2014-11-01

    A major puzzle in biology is how mammalian sperm determine and maintain the correct swimming direction during the various phases of the sexual reproduction process. Currently debated mechanisms for sperm long range travel vary from peristaltic pumping to temperature sensing (thermotaxis) and direct response to fluid flow (rheotaxis), but little is known quantitatively about their relative importance. Here, we report the first quantitative experimental study of mammalian sperm rheotaxis. Using microfluidic devices, we investigate systematically the swimming behavior of human and bull sperm over a wide range of physiologically relevant shear rates and viscosities. Our measurements show that the interplay of fluid shear, steric surface-interactions and chirality of the flagellar beat leads to a stable upstream spiraling motion of sperm cells, thus providing a generic and robust rectification mechanism to support mammalian fertilization. To rationalize these findings, we identify a minimal mathematical model that is capable of describing quantitatively the experimental observations.

  7. Intrinsic Viscosity of Flexible Polymers in Couette and Poiseuille Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Johannes; Brinke, G. ten

    1992-01-01

    The zero-shear-rate intrinsic viscosity of a flexible polymer confined in a slit in Couette and Poiseuille flow is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations of self-avoiding random walks on a simple cubic lattice and by analytical calculations in the free-draining limit. In the simulations an equilibr

  8. Dean vortex membrane microfiltration non-Newtonian viscosity effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutyser, M.A.I.; Belfort, G.

    2002-01-01

    Many industrial feeds behave as non-Newtonian fluids, and little understanding exists as to their influence on cross-flow microfiltration (CMF) performance. The viscosity effects of a model non-Newtonian shear-thickening fluid were investigated in CMF with and without suspended silica particles in t

  9. Dean vortex membrane microfiltration non-Newtonian viscosity effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutyser, M.A.I.; Belfort, G.

    2002-01-01

    Many industrial feeds behave as non-Newtonian fluids, and little understanding exists as to their influence on cross-flow microfiltration (CMF) performance. The viscosity effects of a model non-Newtonian shear-thickening fluid were investigated in CMF with and without suspended silica particles in

  10. The role of fat in flavor perception: effect of partition and viscosity in model emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayarri, Sara; Taylor, Andrew J; Hort, Joanne

    2006-11-15

    Decreasing the fat content of a food, while maintaining the same aroma content, changes both aroma release (due to partition effects) and the viscosity of the food. To understand the relative contribution of these two factors on flavor perception, a series of flavored emulsions were prepared to control aroma release and viscosity using different aroma, oil, and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) contents. Samples were formulated to deliver the same aroma-release in vitro and in vivo, and their viscosity was measured using the Kokini oral shear stress parameter. Despite the in vivo aroma release being constant, there were perceptual differences between the samples, and the flavor intensity decreased as in-mouth viscosity increased. For these iso release samples, the Kokini oral shear stress parameter correlated well with the decrease in perception, suggesting that there may be a viscosity stimulus or that the viscosity affects release of tastant and hinders aroma-taste interactions.

  11. Shear Thickening Behaviour of Composite Propellant Suspension under Oscillatory Shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Singh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Composite propellant suspensions consist of highly filled polymeric system wherein solid particles of different sizes and shapes are dispersed in a polymeric matrix. The rheological behaviour of a propellant suspension is characterised by viscoplasticity and shear rate and time dependant viscosity. The behaviour of composite propellant suspension has been studied under amplitude sweep test where tests were performed by continuously varying strain amplitude (strain in %, γ by keeping the frequency and temperature constant and results are plotted in terms of log γ (strain amplitude vs logGʹ and logGʺ (Storage modulus and loss modulus, respectively. It is clear from amplitude sweep test that dynamic moduli and complex viscosity show marked increase at critical strain amplitude after a plateau region, infering a shear thickening behaviour.

  12. Nd:YAG Laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding: Effects on shear bond strength and enamel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Xianglong [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu Xiaolin [Department of Orthodontics, Stomatology Hospital, Dalian University, Dalian 116021 (China); Bai Ding [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)], E-mail: baiding88@hotmail.com; Meng Yao; Huang Lan [Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2008-11-15

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of Nd:YAG laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding technique, both ceramic brackets and metallic brackets were bonded with orthodontic adhesive to 30 freshly extracted premolars. The specimens were divided into three groups, 10 in each, according to the brackets employed and the debonding techniques used: (1) metallic brackets with shear debonding force, (2) ceramic brackets with shear debonding force, and (3) ceramic brackets with Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The result showed that laser irradiation could diminish shear bond strength (SBS) significantly and produce the most desired ARI scores. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy investigation displayed that laser-aided technique induced little enamel scratch or loss. It was concluded that Nd:YAG laser could facilitate the debonding of ceramic brackets and diminish the amount of remnant adhesive without damaging enamel structure.

  13. Nd:YAG Laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding: Effects on shear bond strength and enamel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xianglong; Liu, Xiaolin; Bai, Ding; Meng, Yao; Huang, Lan

    2008-11-01

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of Nd:YAG laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding technique, both ceramic brackets and metallic brackets were bonded with orthodontic adhesive to 30 freshly extracted premolars. The specimens were divided into three groups, 10 in each, according to the brackets employed and the debonding techniques used: (1) metallic brackets with shear debonding force, (2) ceramic brackets with shear debonding force, and (3) ceramic brackets with Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The result showed that laser irradiation could diminish shear bond strength (SBS) significantly and produce the most desired ARI scores. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy investigation displayed that laser-aided technique induced little enamel scratch or loss. It was concluded that Nd:YAG laser could facilitate the debonding of ceramic brackets and diminish the amount of remnant adhesive without damaging enamel structure.

  14. Viscosity of Thorium Soaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAMAKANT SHARMA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The density and viscosity results of thorium soaps in benzene methanol mixture have been explained satisfactorily in terms of the equations proposed by Einstein, Vand and Jones-Dole. The values of the CMC and molar volume of thorium soaps calculated from these equations are in close agreement.

  15. Viscosity in accretion discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    Both HerX-1 and SS433 may contain accretion disks slaved to a precessing companion star. If so, it is possible to bound the effective viscosity in these disks. The results, in terms of the disk parameter alpha, are lower bounds of 0.01 for HerX-1 and of 0.1 for SS433.

  16. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, E.G.D. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States); Schepper, I.M. de [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  17. Influence of viscosity on acoustic streaming in sessile droplets: an experimental and a numerical study with a Streaming Source Spatial Filtering (SSSF) method

    CERN Document Server

    Riaud, Antoine; Matar, Oliver Bou; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Brunet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    When an acoustic wave travels in a lossy medium such as a liquid, it progressively transfers its pseudo-momentum to the fluid, which results in a steady acoustic streaming. Remarkably, the phenomenon involves a balance between sound attenuation and shear, such that viscosity vanishes in the final expression of the velocity field. For this reason, the effect of viscosity has long been ignored in acoustic streaming experiments. Here, we show experimentally that the viscosity plays a major role in cavities such as the streaming induced by surface acoustic waves in sessile droplets. We develop a numerical model based on the spatial filtering of the streaming source term to compute the induced flow motion with dramatically reduced computational requirements. We evidence that acoustic fields in droplets are a superposition of a chaotic field and a few powerful caustics. It appears that the caustics drive the flow, which allows a qualitative prediction of the flow structure. Finally, we reduce the problem to two dim...

  18. Viscosity of gruels for infants: a comparison of measurement procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouquet, C; Trèche, S

    2001-09-01

    Numerous studies have been carried out to investigate energy density and consistency of gruels for infants in developing countries. However, starch-rich gruels have a complex rheological behavior and their consistency is difficult to characterize. Many published gruel viscosity data are available, but the lack of standardized viscosity measurement procedures makes comparisons and interpretations difficult. The influences of viscometer type and viscosity measurement conditions on gruels prepared with simple or multicomponent flours were assessed in this study. The results showed a drastic decrease in apparent viscosity when the shear rate increased. Other factors like shear time and gruel temperature also had a marked influence on apparent viscosity. For two types of gruel (maize or multicomponent flour) prepared at different concentrations, correspondences between a short qualitative description of the consistency and apparent viscosity values obtained with several viscometers in different measurement conditions are given. Finally, recommendations are put forward on techniques to obtain valid data on gruel consistency, adapted to each type of study (laboratory, field or large-scale surveys).

  19. EFFECT OF ADSORPTION ON THE VISCOSITY OF DILUTE POLYMER SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-shi Cheng; Yu-fang Shao; Ming-zhu Liu; Rong-qing Lu

    1999-01-01

    Careful measurements of the dilute solution viscosities of polyethylene glycol and polyvinyl alcohol in water were carried out. The reduced viscosities of both polymer solutions plot upward curves at extremely dilute concentration levels similar to the phenomena observed for many polymer solutions in the early 1950's. Upon observation of the changes of the flow times of pure water in and the wall surface wettability of the viscometer after measuring solution viscosity, a view was formed that the observed viscosity abnormality at extremely dilute concentration regions is solely due to the effect of adsorption of polymer chains onto the wall surface of viscometer. A theory of adsorption effect based on the Langmuir isotherms was proposed and a mathematical analysis for data treatment was performed. The theory could adequately describe the existing viscosity data. It seems necessary to correct the viscosity result of dilute polymer solutions measured by glass capillary viscometer by taking into account the effect of adsorption in all cases.

  20. [The viscosity of Thiokol impression material during gelation (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Y; Kawakami, M

    1976-09-01

    Viscosity behavior of the impression materials is important property which determines the pressure and its distribution to be exerted on oral soft tissues in relation to the tray design and impression technique. The impression material, however, react to gel so fast to measure the viscosity during the reaction that it is still not completely elucidated. It would be able to seize the viscosity behavior of Thiokol impression material during the gelation unequivocally by retarding the oxidative condensation reaction using weak oxidative, lead monoxide. Based on the equal reactivity of SH groups of Thiokol liquid polymer there is no difference in statistic molecular weight distribution at any degree of the reaction between with lead monoxide and with the other oxidatives now in practical use. The viscosity measurement of the mixture of Thiokol LP-2, lead monoxide, and di-butyl phthalate was performed at the rates of shear ranged from 10(1.5) to 10(3.9) sec-1 at 20 degrees C. The viscosity of the mixture progressively increases after spatulation of the materials but yield value does not appear for the time being before setting, that is, the infinite network forming via the pendant SH groups could not take place until the most of SH groups were consumed, attributed to low concentration of poly-functional prepolymer in the liquid polymer. At early stages of the reaciton the viscosity behavior is approximately Newtonian at lower rates of shear and pseudplastic at higher rates of shear. As the reaction proceeds it becomes pseudplastic even at lower rates of shear.

  1. The uppermost mantle seismic velocity and viscosity structure of central West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, J. P.; Selway, K.; Nyblade, A. A.; Brazier, R. A.; Wiens, D. A.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Aster, R. C.; Huerta, A. D.; Wilson, T.; Winberry, J. P.

    2017-08-01

    Accurately monitoring and predicting the evolution of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet via secular changes in the Earth's gravity field requires knowledge of the underlying upper mantle viscosity structure. Published seismic models show the West Antarctic lithosphere to be ∼70-100 km thick and underlain by a low velocity zone extending to at least ∼200 km. Mantle viscosity is dependent on factors including temperature, grain size, the hydrogen content of olivine, the presence of partial melt and applied stress. As seismic wave propagation is particularly sensitive to thermal variations, seismic velocity provides a means of gauging mantle temperature. In 2012, a magnitude 5.6 intraplate earthquake in Marie Byrd Land was recorded on an array of POLENET-ANET seismometers deployed across West Antarctica. We modelled the waveforms recorded by six of the seismic stations in order to determine realistic estimates of temperature and lithology for the lithospheric mantle beneath Marie Byrd Land and the central West Antarctic Rift System. Published mantle xenolith and magnetotelluric data provided constraints on grain size and hydrogen content, respectively, for viscosity modelling. Considering tectonically-plausible stresses, we estimate that the viscosity of the lithospheric mantle beneath Marie Byrd Land and the central West Antarctic Rift System ranges from ∼1020-1022 Pa s. To extend our analysis to the sublithospheric seismic low velocity zone, we used a published shear wave model. We calculated that the velocity reduction observed between the base of the lithosphere (∼4.4-4.7 km/s) and the centre of the low velocity zone (∼4.2-4.3 km/s) beneath West Antarctica could be caused by a 0.1-0.3% melt fraction or a one order of magnitude reduction in grain size. However, the grain size reduction is inconsistent with our viscosity modelling constraints, suggesting that partial melt more feasibly explains the origin of the low velocity zone. Considering plausible

  2. Measurement and modeling of bed shear stress under solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, S.; Guard, P.A.; Baldock, T.E.

    convolution integration methods forced with the free stream velocity and incorporating a range of eddy viscosity models. Wave friction factors were estimated from skin shear stress at different instances over the wave (viz., time of maximum positive total...

  3. Mesoscopic Simulations of the Phase Behavior of Aqueous EO 19 PO 29 EO 19 Solutions Confined and Sheared by Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Hongyi

    2012-01-25

    The MesoDyn method is used to investigate associative structures in aqueous solution of a nonionic triblock copolymer consisting of poly(propylene oxide) capped on both ends with poly(ethylene oxide) chains. The effect of adsorbing (hydrophobic) and nonadsorbing (hydrophilic) solid surfaces in contact with aqueous solutions of the polymer is elucidated. The macromolecules form self-assembled structures in solution. Confinement under shear forces is investigated in terms of interfacial behavior and association. The formation of micelles under confinement between hydrophilic surfaces occurs faster than in bulk aqueous solution while layered structures assemble when the polymers are confined between hydrophobic surfaces. Micelles are deformed under shear rates of 1 μs -1 and eventually break to form persistent, adsorbed layered structures. As a result, surface damage under frictional forces is prevented. Overall, this study indicates that aqueous triblock copolymers of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) (Pluronics, EO mPO nEO m) act as a boundary lubricant for hydrophobic surfaces but not for hydrophilic ones. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  4. The effect of different surface treatments of stainless steel crown and different bonding agents on shear bond strength of direct composite resin veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajami B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Stainless steel crown (SSC is the most durable and reliable restoration for primary teeth with extensive caries but its metalic appearance has always been a matter of concern. With advances in restorative materials and metal bonding processes, composite veneer has enhanced esthetics of these crowns in clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of SSC to composite resin using different surface treatments and adhesives. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 90 stainless steel crowns were selected. They were mounted in molds and divided into 3 groups of 30 each (S, E and F. In group S (sandblast, buccal surfaces were sandblasted for 5 seconds. In group E (etch acidic gel was applied for 5 minutes and in group F (fissure bur surface roughness was created by fissure diamond bur. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (SB, AB, P based on different adhesives: Single Bond, All Bond2 and Panavia F. Composite was then bonded to specimens. Cases were incubated in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was measured by Zwick machine with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test with p0.05 so the two variables were studied separately. No significant difference was observed in mean shear bond strength of composite among the three kinds of adhesives (P>0.05. Similar results were obtained regarding surface treatments (P>0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, treating the SSC surface with bur and using single bond adhesive and composite can be used successfully to obtain esthetic results in pediatric restorative treatments.

  5. Viscosity, thermal diffusivity and Prandtl number of nanoparticle suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Buxuan; ZHOU Leping; PENG Xiaofeng

    2004-01-01

    Using our reported experimental data of effective thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity and viscosity for CuO nanoparticle suspensions, the corresponding thermal diffusivity and Prandtl number are calculated. With the hard sphere model and considering effects of particle clustering and surface adsorption, the increase of viscosity for nanoparticle suspension observed is explained. It is shown that the effective thermal conductivity will be strongly affected by the formation and correlated spatial distribution of nanoparticle clusters when compared to viscosity in hosting liquid.

  6. Influence of Additive Manufactured Scaffold Architecture on the Distribution of Surface Strains and Fluid Flow Shear Stresses and Expected Osteochondral Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikson, Wim J; Deegan, Anthony J; Yang, Ying; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Verdonschot, Nico; Moroni, Lorenzo; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Scaffolds for regenerative medicine applications should instruct cells with the appropriate signals, including biophysical stimuli such as stress and strain, to form the desired tissue. Apart from that, scaffolds, especially for load-bearing applications, should be capable of providing mechanical stability. Since both scaffold strength and stress-strain distributions throughout the scaffold depend on the scaffold's internal architecture, it is important to understand how changes in architecture influence these parameters. In this study, four scaffold designs with different architectures were produced using additive manufacturing. The designs varied in fiber orientation, while fiber diameter, spacing, and layer height remained constant. Based on micro-CT (μCT) scans, finite element models (FEMs) were derived for finite element analysis (FEA) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). FEA of scaffold compression was validated using μCT scan data of compressed scaffolds. Results of the FEA and CFD showed a significant impact of scaffold architecture on fluid shear stress and mechanical strain distribution. The average fluid shear stress ranged from 3.6 mPa for a 0/90 architecture to 6.8 mPa for a 0/90 offset architecture, and the surface shear strain from 0.0096 for a 0/90 offset architecture to 0.0214 for a 0/90 architecture. This subsequently resulted in variations of the predicted cell differentiation stimulus values on the scaffold surface. Fluid shear stress was mainly influenced by pore shape and size, while mechanical strain distribution depended mainly on the presence or absence of supportive columns in the scaffold architecture. Together, these results corroborate that scaffold architecture can be exploited to design scaffolds with regions that guide specific tissue development under compression and perfusion. In conjunction with optimization of stimulation regimes during bioreactor cultures, scaffold architecture optimization can be used to improve

  7. Influence of Additive Manufactured Scaffold Architecture on the Distribution of Surface Strains and Fluid Flow Shear Stresses and Expected Osteochondral Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikson, Wim J.; Deegan, Anthony J.; Yang, Ying; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; Verdonschot, Nico; Moroni, Lorenzo; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Scaffolds for regenerative medicine applications should instruct cells with the appropriate signals, including biophysical stimuli such as stress and strain, to form the desired tissue. Apart from that, scaffolds, especially for load-bearing applications, should be capable of providing mechanical stability. Since both scaffold strength and stress–strain distributions throughout the scaffold depend on the scaffold’s internal architecture, it is important to understand how changes in architecture influence these parameters. In this study, four scaffold designs with different architectures were produced using additive manufacturing. The designs varied in fiber orientation, while fiber diameter, spacing, and layer height remained constant. Based on micro-CT (μCT) scans, finite element models (FEMs) were derived for finite element analysis (FEA) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). FEA of scaffold compression was validated using μCT scan data of compressed scaffolds. Results of the FEA and CFD showed a significant impact of scaffold architecture on fluid shear stress and mechanical strain distribution. The average fluid shear stress ranged from 3.6 mPa for a 0/90 architecture to 6.8 mPa for a 0/90 offset architecture, and the surface shear strain from 0.0096 for a 0/90 offset architecture to 0.0214 for a 0/90 architecture. This subsequently resulted in variations of the predicted cell differentiation stimulus values on the scaffold surface. Fluid shear stress was mainly influenced by pore shape and size, while mechanical strain distribution depended mainly on the presence or absence of supportive columns in the scaffold architecture. Together, these results corroborate that scaffold architecture can be exploited to design scaffolds with regions that guide specific tissue development under compression and perfusion. In conjunction with optimization of stimulation regimes during bioreactor cultures, scaffold architecture optimization can be used to improve

  8. Elastic-viscoplastic field at mixed-mode interface crack-tip under compression and shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁文彦; 王振清; 刘方; 刘晓铎

    2014-01-01

    For a compression-shear mixed mode interface crack, it is difficult to solve the stress and strain fields considering the material viscosity, the crack-tip singularity, the frictional effect, and the mixed loading level. In this paper, a mechanical model of the dynamic propagation interface crack for the compression-shear mixed mode is proposed using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive model. The governing equations of propagation crack interface at the crack-tip are given. The numerical analysis is performed for the interface crack of the compression-shear mixed mode by introducing a displacement function and some boundary conditions. The distributed regularities of stress field of the interface crack-tip are discussed with several special parameters. The final results show that the viscosity effect and the frictional contact effect on the crack surface and the mixed-load parameter are important factors in studying the mixed mode interface crack-tip fields. These fields are controlled by the viscosity coefficient, the Mach number, and the singularity exponent.

  9. Effect of Non-Newtonian Viscosity for Surfactant Solutions on Vortex Characteristics in a Swirling Pipe Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mizue MUNEKATA; Hidefumi TAKAKI; Hideki OHBA; Kazuyoshi MATSUZAKI

    2005-01-01

    Effects of non-Newtonian viscosity for surfactant solution on the vortex characteristics and drag-reducing rate in a swirling pipe flow are investigated by pressure drop measurements, velocity profile measurements and viscosity measurements. Non-Newtonian viscosity is represented by power-law model (τ = kD n). Surfactant solution used has shear-thinning viscosity with n < 1.0. The swirling flow in this study has decay of swirl and vortex-type change from Rankin's combined vortex to forced vortex. It is shown that the effect of shear-thinning viscosity on the decay of swirl intensity is different by vortex category and the critical swirl number with the vortex-type change depends on shear-thinning viscosity.

  10. Modeling effective viscosity reduction behaviour of solid suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei En-Bo; Ji Yan-Ju; Zhang Jun

    2012-01-01

    Under a simple shearing flow,the effective viscosity of solid suspensions can be reduced by controlling the inclusion particle size or the number of inclusion particles in a unit volume.Based on the Stokes equation,the transformation field method is used to model the reduction behaviour of effective viscosity of solid suspensions theoretically by enlarging the particle size at a given high concentration of particles.With a lot of samples of random cubic particles in a unit cell,our statistical results show that at the same higher concentration,the effective viscosity of solid suspensions can be reduced by increasing the particle size or reducing the number of inclusion particles in a unit volume.This work discloses the viscosity reduction mechanism of increasing particle size,which is observed experimentally.

  11. Frictional Response of Molecularly Thin Liquid Polymer Films Subject to Constant Shear Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirhart, Charles; Troian, Sandra

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of the frictional response of nanoscale viscous films are typically obtained using the surface force apparatus in which a fluid layer is confined between smooth solid substrates approaching at constant speed or force. The squeezing pressure causes lateral flow from which the shear viscosity can be deduced. Under these conditions however, molecularly thin films tend to solidify wholly or partially and estimates of the shear viscosity can exceed those in macroscale films by many orders of magnitude. This problem can be avoided altogether by examining the response of an initially flat, supported, free surface film subject to comparable values of surface shear stress by application of an external inert gas stream. This method was first conceived by Derjaguin in 1944; more recent studies by Mate et al. at IBM Almaden on complex polymeric systems have uncovered fluid layering and other interesting behaviors. The only drawback is that this alternative technique requires an accurate model for interface distortion. We report on ellipsometric measurements of ultrathin polymeric films in efforts to determine whether the usual interface equations for free surface films based purely on continuum models can be properly extended to nanoscale films. Supported by a Fred and Jean Felberg Fellowship and G. W. Housner Student Discovery Fund.

  12. Theory of activated-rate processes under shear with application to shear-induced aggregation of colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Alessio; Wu, Hua; Gentili, Daniele; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2009-11-01

    Using an approximation scheme within the convective diffusion (two-body Smoluchowski) equation framework, we unveil the shear-driven aggregation mechanism at the origin of structure formation in sheared colloidal systems. The theory, verified against numerics and experiments, explains the induction time followed by explosive (irreversible) rise of viscosity observed in charge-stabilized colloidal and protein systems under steady shear. The Arrhenius-type equation with shear derived here, extending Kramers' theory in the presence of shear, clearly demonstrates the important role of shear drive in activated-rate processes as they are encountered in soft condensed matter.

  13. Micro-shear bond strength and surface micromorphology of a feldspathic ceramic treated with different cleaning methods after hydrofluoric acid etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Caballero STEINHAUSER

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of feldspathic ceramic surface cleaning on micro-shear bond strength and ceramic surface morphology. Material and Methods: Forty discs of feldspathic ceramic were prepared and etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 2 minutes. The discs were randomly distributed into five groups (n=8: C: no treatment, S: water spray + air drying for 1 minute, US: immersion in ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes, F: etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 1 minute, followed by 1-minute rinse, F+US: etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 1 minute, 1-minute rinse and ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes. Composite cylinders were bonded to the discs following application of silane and hydrophobic adhesive for micro-shear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until failure. Stereomicroscopy was used to classify failure type. Surface micromorphology of each treatment type was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy at 500 and 2,500 times magnification. Results: One-way ANOVA test showed no significant difference between treatments (p=0.3197 and the most common failure types were cohesive resin cohesion followed by adhesive failure. Micro-shear bond strength of the feldspathic ceramic substrate to the adhesive system was not influenced by the different surface cleaning techniques. Absence of or less residue was observed after etching with hydrofluoric acid for the groups US and F+US. Conclusions: Combining ceramic cleaning techniques with hydrofluoric acid etching did not affect ceramic bond strength, whereas, when cleaning was associated with ultrasound, less residue was observed.

  14. Viscosity effects in wind wave generation

    CERN Document Server

    Paquier, Anna; Rabaud, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the influence of the liquid viscosity on the problem of the generation of waves by a turbulent wind at the surface of a liquid, extending the results of Paquier, Moisy and Rabaud [Phys. Fluids {\\bf 27}, 122103 (2015)] over nearly three decades of viscosity. The surface deformations are measured with micrometer accuracy using the Free-Surface Synthetic Schlieren method. We recover the two regimes of surface deformations previously identified: the wrinkles regime at small wind velocity, resulting from the viscous imprint on the liquid surface of the turbulent fluctuations in the boundary layer, and the regular wave regime at large wind velocity. Below the wave threshold, we find that the characteristic amplitude of the wrinkles scales as $\

  15. A NEW TYPE LOW SHEAR RATE VISCOMETER FOR HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT POLYMER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Meiling; HAN Dong; SHI Lianghe

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of shear rate on the intrinsic viscosity measurement of partially Hydrolysed Polyacrylamide (HPAM) in salt solution were studied with homemade multibulb viscometer and low shear rate rheometer. The critical shear rate of HPAM in salt solution for high molecular weight HPAM was determined. A low shear rate capillary viscometer was designed in which the [η] approached to value at zero shear rate can be obtained for HPAM -salt system. The effect of molecular weight on shear rate dependence of viscosity was also studied.

  16. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  17. Microstructural description of shear-thickening suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Abhinendra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic particle-scale numerical simulations are used to study the variation of microstructure with shear stress during shear thickening in dense non-Brownian suspensions. The microscale information is used to characterize the differences between the shear thickened (frictional and non-thickened (lubricated, frictionless states. Here, we focus on the force and contact networks and study the evolution of associated anisotropies with increase in shear stress. The force and contact networks are both more isotropic in the shear-thickened state than in non-thickened state. We also find that both force and structural anisotropies are rate independent for both low and high stress, while they are rate (or stress dependent for the intermediate stress range where the shear thickening occurs. This behavior is similar to the evolution of viscosity with increasing stress, showing a clear correlation between the microstructure and the macroscopic rheology.

  18. Two-phase boundary layer flow and heat transfer with temperature-dependent viscosity and nonzero pressure gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randelia, R.R.; Sahai, V.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical analysis of a two-phase, laminar boundary layer is carried out using the Keller Box method. The two phases are assumed to be immiscible. The problem considered involves the boundary layer flow of a compressible gas with variable properties over a flat surface in the presence of a thin liquid film with power law temperature dependent viscosity. Both zero and nonzero pressure gradients are considered. The main purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of the presence of the liquid layer on the velocity and temperature distributions. A limited set of results are presented in terms of varying liquid Prandtl numbers, film thickness, and viscosity exponents on these distributions as well as the shear stress and heat transfer parameters at the wall and at the interface between the two fluids.

  19. Viscosity bound versus the universal relaxation bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Shahar

    2017-10-01

    For gauge theories with an Einstein gravity dual, the AdS/CFT correspondence predicts a universal value for the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density, η / s = 1 / 4 π. The holographic calculations have motivated the formulation of the celebrated KSS conjecture, according to which all fluids conform to the lower bound η / s ≥ 1 / 4 π. The bound on η / s may be regarded as a lower bound on the relaxation properties of perturbed fluids and it has been the focus of much recent attention. In particular, it was argued that for a class of field theories with Gauss-Bonnet gravity dual, the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, η / s, could violate the conjectured KSS bound. In the present paper we argue that the proposed violations of the KSS bound are strongly constrained by Bekenstein's generalized second law (GSL) of thermodynamics. In particular, it is shown that physical consistency of the Gauss-Bonnet theory with the GSL requires its coupling constant to be bounded by λGB ≲ 0 . 063. We further argue that the genuine physical bound on the relaxation properties of physically consistent fluids is ℑω(k > 2 πT) > πT, where ω and k are respectively the proper frequency and the wavenumber of a perturbation mode in the fluid.

  20. 药液表面张力和黏度对草甘膦药效的影响及其机理研究%Influences of surface tension and liquid viscosity on the efficacy of glyphosate and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张利斌; 张庆贺; 韩玉军; 陶波

    2011-01-01

    通过添加有机硅助剂和丙三醇调节草甘膦药液的表面张力和黏度,测定其对草甘膦药液液滴的物理性状及生物活性的影响.结果表明:降低药液的表面张力,雾滴的铺展直径增加,干燥时间缩短,药液的黏度以及在杂草叶片表面的最大稳定持留量没有显著性变化;草甘膦对杂草的防效表现为先升高后降低,对阔叶杂草最高目测防效和鲜重防效可提高42%和41%,对禾本科杂草防效可提高37%和37%.增加草甘膦的药液黏度,药液在杂草叶片上的最大稳定持留量增加,表面张力降低,对雾滴的干燥时间和铺展直径影响很小;草甘膦对阔叶杂草最高目测防效和鲜重防效可提高42%和41%,对禾本科杂草的防效可提高42%和42%.适当降低草甘膦药液的表面张力或增加其黏度均可提高其对杂草的防除效果.%This study was aimed to regulate the surface tension and viscosity of glyphosate by the organosilicone and glycerol, and measure the influence of physical characters of liquid droplets and biological activity. The results showed that, by reducing the surface tension of liquid, spreading diameter of the droplet was increased, and the drying time was shortened, but the viscosity of liquid and maximum retention on weed blade surface were not significantly changed. The inhibition rate to weeds firstly increased and then decreased, and the maximum control of visual and fresh weight of broadleaf weeds were increased by 37% and 37%, and those of grass weeds were increased by 42% and 41%. By increasing the viscosity, the maximum retention on weed blade surface was increased, and the surface tension was reduced, but the drying time of droplets and the spreading diameter were not significantly changed. The maximum control of visual and fresh weight of broadleaf weeds were increased by 42% and 41%, and those of grass weeds were increased by 42% and 42%. Moderate reduction of surface tension or

  1. Photoinduced aging and viscosity evolution in Se-rich Ge-Se glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueguen, Yann; Sangleboeuf, Jean-Christophe; Rouxel, Tanguy [LARMAUR ERL CNRS 6274, Université de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); King, Ellyn A.; Lucas, Pierre [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, 4715 E. Fort Lowell Road, Tucson, Arizona 85712 (United States); Keryvin, Vincent [LIMATB EA 4250, Université de Bretagne Sud, Rue de Saint Maudé, 56321 Lorient Cedex (France); Bureau, Bruno [Equipe Verres et Céramiques, UMR-CNRS 6226 Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, Université de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2013-08-21

    We propose here to investigate the non-equilibrium viscosity of Ge-Se glasses under and after light irradiation. Ge{sub 10}Se{sub 90} and Ge{sub 20}Se{sub 80} fibers have been aged in the dark and under ambient light, over months. During aging, both the relaxation of enthalpy and the viscosity have been investigated. The viscosity was measured by shear relaxation-recovery tests allowing the measurement of non-equilibrium viscosity. When Ge{sub 10}Se{sub 90} glass fibers are aged under irradiation, a relatively fast fictive temperature decrease is observed. Concomitantly, during aging under irradiation, the non-equilibrium viscosity increases and reaches an equilibrium after two months of aging. This viscosity increase is also observed in Ge{sub 20}Se{sub 80} fibers. Nevertheless, this equilibrium viscosity is far below the viscosity expected at the configurational equilibrium. As soon as the irradiation ceases, the viscosity increases almost instantaneously by about one order of magnitude. Then, if the fibers are kept in the dark, their viscosity slowly increases over months. The analysis of the shear relaxation functions shows that the aging is thermorheologically simple. On the other side, there is no simple relaxation between the shear relaxation functions measured under irradiation and those measured in the dark. These results clearly suggest that a very specific photoinduced aging process occurs under irradiation. This aging is due to photorelaxation. Nevertheless, the viscosity changes are not solely correlated to photoaging and photorelaxation. A scenario is proposed to explain all the observed viscosity evolutions under and after irradiation, on the basis of photoinduced transient defects.

  2. Bulk Viscosity and Cavitation in Boost-Invariant Hydrodynamic Expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Rajagopal, Krishna

    2009-01-01

    We solve second order relativistic hydrodynamics equations for a boost-invariant 1+1-dimensional expanding fluid with an equation of state taken from lattice calculations of the thermodynamics of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. We investigate the dependence of the energy density as a function of proper time on the values of the shear viscosity, the bulk viscosity, and second order coefficients, confirming that large changes in the values of the latter have negligible effects. Varying the shear viscosity between zero and a few times s/(4 pi), with s the entropy density, has significant effects, as expected based on other studies. Introducing a nonzero bulk viscosity also has significant effects. In fact, if the bulk viscosity peaks near the crossover temperature Tc to the degree indicated by recent lattice calculations in QCD without quarks, it can make the fluid cavitate -- falling apart into droplets. It is interesting to see a hydrodynamic calculation predicting its own breakdown, via cavitation, at th...

  3. Shear viscosity of binary mixtures: The Gay-Berne potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khordad, R., E-mail: khordad@mail.yu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most useful potential model to study the real systems is the Gay-Berne (GB) potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use GB model to examine thermodynamical properties of some anisotropic binary mixtures in two different phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The integral equation methods are applied to solve numerically the Percus-Yevick (PY) equation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtain expansion coefficients of correlation functions needed to calculate the properties of studied mixtures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results are compared with the available experimental data [e.g., HFC-125 + propane, R-125/143a, methanol + toluene, etc.] - Abstract: The Gay-Berne (GB) potential model is an interesting and useful model to study the real systems. Using the potential model, we intend to examine the thermodynamical properties of some anisotropic binary mixtures in two different phases, liquid and gas. For this purpose, we apply the integral equation method and solve numerically the Percus-Yevick (PY) integral equation. Then, we obtain the expansion coefficients of correlation functions to calculate the thermodynamical properties. Finally, we compare our results with the available experimental data [e.g., HFC-125 + propane, R-125/143a, methanol + toluene, benzene + methanol, cyclohexane + ethanol, benzene + ethanol, carbon tetrachloride + ethyl acetate, and methanol + ethanol]. The results show that the GB potential model is capable for predicting the thermodynamical properties of binary mixtures with acceptable accuracy.

  4. Shear viscosity to electric conductivity ratio of the QGP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puglisi A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport coefficients of strongly interacting matter are currently subject of intense theoretical and phenomenological studies due to their relevance for the characterization of the quark-gluon plasma produced in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions (uRHIC. We predict that (η/s/(σel/T, independently on the running coupling αs(T, should increase up to about ~ 20 for T → Tc, while it goes down to a nearly flat behavior around ≃ 4 for T ≥ 4 Tc. Therefore we find a stronger T-dependence of σel/T with respect to η/s that in a quasiparticle approach is constrained by lQCD thermodynamics. A conformal theory, instead, predicts a similar T dependence of η/s and σel/T.

  5. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10-23m3 ), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes.

  6. An eddy viscosity calculation method for a turbulent duct flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonia, R. A.; Bisset, D. K.; Kim, J.

    1991-01-01

    The mean velocity profile across a fully developed turbulent duct flow is obtained from an eddy viscosity relation combined with an empirical outer region wake function. Results are in good agreement with experiments and with direct numerical simulations in the same flow at two Reynolds numbers. In particular, the near-wall trend of the Reynolds shear stress and its variation with Reynolds number are similar to those of the simulations. The eddy viscosity method is more accurate than previous mixing length or implicit function methods.

  7. Bianchi Type Ⅲ String Cosmological Model with Bulk Viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXing-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    The Bianchi type Ⅲ cosmological model for a cloud string with bulk viscosity are presented. To obtain a determinate model, an equation of state ρ=kλ and a relation between metric potentials B = Cn are assumed. The physical and geometric aspects of the model are also discussed. The model describes a shearing non-rotating continuously expanding universe with a big-bang start, and the relation between the coefficient of bulk viscosity and the energy density is ζ∝ρ1/2.

  8. Bianchi Type Ⅲ String Cosmological Model with Bulk Viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xing-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    The Bianchi type Ⅲ cosmological model for a cloud string with bulk viscosity are presented. To obtaina determinate model, an equation of state p = κλ and a relation between metric potentials B = Cn are assumed. Thephysical and geometric aspects of the model are also discussed. The model describes a shearing non-rotating continuouslyexpanding universe with a big-bang start, and the relation between the coefficient of bulk viscosity and the energy densityis ζ∝1 p1/2.

  9. A memory-based model for blood viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Clara M.

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a comparison between existing models for non-Newtonian fluid viscosity as a function of shear rate variations. A novel model is introduced whose parameters are linked to physiological phenomena in the blood. The end use of such models is to predict changes in viscosity to adapt the speed of a nanorobot device for targeted drug delivery purposes. Simulation results show the agreement between the proposed model and available models from literature. A laboratory scale validation of the proposed model for a fluid mimicking non-Newtonian properties has been performed. Conceptual perspectives are also given in this work.

  10. Quantitative calculation of local shear deformation in adiabatic shear band for Ti-6Al-4V

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    JOHNSON-COOK(J-C) model was used to calculate flow shear stress-shear strain curve for Ti-6Al-4V in dynamic torsion test. The predicted curve was compared with experimental result. Gradient-dependent plasticity(GDP) was introduced into J-C model and GDP was involved in the measured flow shear stress-shear strain curve, respectively, to calculate the distribution of local total shear deformation(LTSD) in adiabatic shear band(ASB). The predicted LTSDs at different flow shear stresses were compared with experimental measurements. J-C model can well predict the flow shear stress-shear strain curve in strain-hardening stage and in strain-softening stage where flow shear stress slowly decreases. Beyond the occurrence of ASB, with a decrease of flow shear stress, the increase of local plastic shear deformation in ASB is faster than the decrease of elastic shear deformation, leading to more and more apparent shear localization. According to the measured flow shear stress-shear strain curve and GDP, the calculated LTSDs in ASB are lower than experimental results. At earlier stage of ASB, though J-C model overestimates the flow shear stress at the same shear strain, the model can reasonably assess the LTSDs in ASB. According to the measured flow shear stress-shear strain curve and GDP, the calculated local plastic shear strains in ASB agree with experimental results except for the vicinity of shear fracture surface. In the strain-softening stage where flow shear stress sharply decreases, J-C model cannot be used. When flow shear stress decreases to a certain value, shear fracture takes place so that GDP cannot be used.

  11. Hall Viscosity I: Linear Response Theory for Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradlyn, Barry; Goldstein, Moshe; Read, Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    In two dimensional systems with broken time-reversal symmetry, there can exist a non-dissipative viscosity coefficient [1,2,3]. This Hall viscosity is similar in nature to the non-dissipative Hall conductivity. In order to investigate this phenomenon further, we develop a linear response formalism for viscosity. We derive a Kubo formula for the frequency dependent viscosity tensor in the long wavelength limit. We compute the viscosity tensor for the free electron gas, integer quantum Hall systems, and two-dimensional paired superfluids. In the zero frequency limit, we show how the known results [3,4] for the Hall viscosity are recovered.[4pt] [1] J. Avron, R. Seiler, and P. Zograf, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 697 (1995).[0pt] [2] P. Levay, J. Math. Phys. 36, 2792 (1995).[0pt] [3] N. Read, Phys. Rev. B 79, 045308 (2009).[0pt] [4] N. Read and E. Rezayi, Phys. Rev. B 84, 085316 (2011).

  12. Experimental study on the special shear thinning process of a kind of non-Newtonian fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN HaoSheng; CHEN DaRong; WANG JiaDao; LI YongJian

    2007-01-01

    To study the effect of long chain molecule and surface active agent on non-Newtonian fluid properties, rheological experiments on two different fluids have been done. The first group of the fluid is the hydroxyethyl cellulose water solution, and the second is the water solution containing the mixture of dodecyltriethyl ammonium bromide and lauryl sodium sulfate. With the increasing shear rate, shear thinning phenomenon appears in the first group of solution, and a special shear thickening-shear thinning phenomenon appears in the second group. It is considered that the special rheological phenomenon is caused by the difference between the aggregating and the departing speed of the colloidal particles formed in the fluid. The difference between the two speeds relates with the shear rate. The experiment results indicate that the rheological properties can be designed by choosing proper additives at a certain shear rate, and such a fluid with special viscosity variation should be included in the classification of the non-Newtonian fluid.

  13. Electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mampallil, Dileep; Ende, van den Dirk

    2013-01-01

    We generate and study electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels. By chemically or electrically modifying the surface potential of the channel walls a shear flow component with controllable velocity gradient can be added to the electroosmotic flow caused by double layer effects at the channel walls.

  14. Influence of surface tension on the instabilities and bifurcations of a particle in a drop under shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaire, Francois; Zhu, Lailai

    2016-11-01

    While the deformation regimes under flow of anuclear cells, like red blood cells, have been widely analyzed, the dynamics of nuclear cells are less explored. The objective of this work is to investigate the interplay between the stiff nucleus, modeled here as a rigid spherical particle and the surrounding deformable cell membrane, modeled for simplicity as an immiscible droplet, subjected to an external unbounded plane shear flow. A three-dimensional boundary integral implementation is developed to describe the interface-structure interaction characterized by two dimensionless numbers: the capillary number Ca , defined as the ratio of shear to capillary forces and and the particle-droplet size ratio. For large Ca , i.e. very deformable droplets, the particle has a stable equilibrium position at the center of the droplet. However, for smaller Ca , both the plane symmetry and the time invariance are broken and the particle migrates to a closed orbit located off the symmetry plane, reaching a limit cycle. For even smaller capillary numbers, the time invariance is restored and the particle reaches a steady equilibrium position off the symmetry plane. This series of bifurcations is analyzed and possible physical mechanisms from which they originate are discussed. Financial support by ERC Grant SimCoMiCs 280117 is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Impact of gas injection on the apparent viscosity and viscoelastic property of waste activated sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobade, Veena; Baudez, Jean Christophe; Evans, Geoffery; Eshtiaghi, Nicky

    2017-05-01

    Gas injection is known to play a major role on the particle size of the sludge, the oxygen transfer rate, as well as the mixing efficiency of membrane bioreactors and aeration basins in the waste water treatment plants. The rheological characteristics of sludge are closely related to the particle size of the sludge floc. However, particle size of sludge floc depends partly on the shear induced in the sludge and partly on physico-chemical nature of the sludge. The objective of this work is to determine the impact of gas injection on both the apparent viscosity and viscoelastic property of sludge. The apparent viscosity of sludge was investigated by two methods: in-situ and after sparging. Viscosity curves obtained by in-situ measurement showed that the apparent viscosity decreases significantly from 4000 Pa s to 10 Pa s at low shear rate range (below 10 s(-1)) with an increase in gas flow rate (0.5LPM to 3LPM); however the after sparging flow curve analysis showed that the reduction in apparent viscosity throughout the shear rate range is negligible to be displayed. Torque and displacement data at low shear rate range revealed that the obtained lower apparent viscosity in the in-situ method is not the material characteristics, but the slippage effect due to a preferred location of the bubbles close to the bob, causing an inconsistent decrease of torque and increase of displacement at low shear rate range. In linear viscoelastic regime, the elastic and viscous modulus of sludge was reduced by 33% & 25%, respectively, due to gas injection because of induced shear. The amount of induced shear measured through two different tests (creep and time sweep) were the same. The impact of this induced shear on sludge structure was also verified by microscopic images.

  16. Undulatory swimming in shear-thinning fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Gagnon, David A; Arratia, Paulo E

    2014-01-01

    The swimming behaviour of microorganisms can be strongly influenced by the rheology of their fluid environment. In this manuscript, we experimentally investigate the effects of shear-thinning viscosity on the swimming behaviour of an undulatory swimmer, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Tracking methods are used to measure the swimmer's kinematic data (including propulsion speed) and velocity fields. We find that shear-thinning viscosity modifies the velocity fields produced by the swimming nematode but does not modify the nematode's speed and beating kinematics. Velocimetry data show significant enhancement in local vorticity and circulation, and an increase in fluid velocity near the nematode's tail, compared to Newtonian fluids of similar effective viscosity. These findings are in good agreement with recent theoretical and numerical results.

  17. Origin of shear thickening in semidilute wormlike micellar solutions and evidence of elastic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marín-Santibáñez, Benjamín M. [Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Química e Industrias Extractivas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, U.P.A.L.M. C.P. 07738, Col. S. P. Zacatenco, Del. Gustavo A. Madero, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Pérez-González, José, E-mail: jpg@esfm.ipn.mx [Laboratorio de Reología y Física de la Matería Blanda, Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, U.P.A.L.M. C.P. 07730, Col. S. P. Zacatenco, Del. Gustavo A. Madero, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rodríguez-González, Francisco [Departamento de Biotecnología, Centro de Desarrollo de Productos Bióticos, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, C.P. 62731, Col. San Isidro, Yautepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-11-01

    The origin of shear thickening in an equimolar semidilute wormlike micellar solution of cetylpyridinium chloride and sodium salicylate was investigated in this work by using Couette rheometry, flow visualization, and capillary Rheo-particle image velocimetry. The use of the combined methods allowed the discovery of gradient shear banding flow occurring from a critical shear stress and consisting of two main bands, one isotropic (transparent) of high viscosity and one structured (turbid) of low viscosity. Mechanical rheometry indicated macroscopic shear thinning behavior in the shear banding regime. However, local velocimetry showed that the turbid band increased its viscosity along with the shear stress, even though barely reached the value of the viscosity of the isotropic phase. This shear band is the precursor of shear induced structures that subsequently give rise to the average increase in viscosity or apparent shear thickening of the solution. Further increase in the shear stress promoted the growing of the turbid band across the flow region and led to destabilization of the shear banding flow independently of the type of rheometer used, as well as to vorticity banding in Couette flow. At last, vorticity banding disappeared and the flow developed elastic turbulence with chaotic dynamics.

  18. Effect of particle size and distribution of the sizing agent on the carbon fibers surface and interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of its composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R.L. [Open Project of State Key Laboratory Breeding Base for Mining Disaster Prevention and Control, Shandong University of Science and Technology (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, 266590 Qingdao (China); Liu, Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, 266590 Qingdao (China); Huang, Y.D., E-mail: rlzhit@126.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, State Key laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 Harbin (China); Liu, L. [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, State Key laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 Harbin (China)

    2013-12-15

    Effect of particle size and distribution of the sizing agent on the performance of carbon fiber and carbon fiber composites has been investigated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize carbon fiber surface topographies. At the same time, the single fiber strength and Weibull distribution were also studied in order to investigate the effect of coatings on the fibers. The interfacial shear strength and hygrothermal aging of the carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites were also measured. The results indicated that the particle size and distribution is important for improving the surface of carbon fibers and its composites performance. Different particle size and distribution of sizing agent has different contribution to the wetting performance of carbon fibers. The fibers sized with P-2 had higher value of IFSS and better hygrothermal aging resistant properties.

  19. Three dimensional shear wave velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in South China Sea and its adjacent regions by surface waveform inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We assembled approximately 328 seismic records. The data set wasfrom 4 digitally recording long-period and broadband stations of CDSN. We carried out the inversion based on the partitioned waveform inversion (PWI). It partitions the large-scale optimization problem into a number of independent small-scale problems. We adopted surface waveform inversion with an equal block (2°′2°) discretization in order to acquire the images of shear velocity structure at different depths (from surface to 430 km) in the crust and upper-mantle. The resolution of all these anomalies has been established with 2check-board2 resolution tests. These results show significant difference in velocity, lithosphere and asthenosphere structure between South China Sea and its adjacent regions.

  20. ESTIMATION OF VISCOSITY ENGINE OILS USING ROTATIONAL RHEOMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. RYNIEWICZ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The operating criteria, the assurance of energy-efficiency and environmental protection impose very diversified rheological requirements on the parameters of work of car engine oils. The aim of the work was the estimation of rheological parameters of selected car engine oils at controlled shear stress in a wide range of temperatures, using a rotational rheometer. Investigated mineral engine oils, semi-synthetic and synthetic ones that belong to different viscosity classes. The characteristics of viscosity in relation to temperature in the testing node were determined. The results of tests at sub-zero and low temperatures indicate significant differentiation of rheological properties of engine oils. It can be claimed that in the exploited friction nodes, especially in the conditions of fluid and mixed friction, the smallest viscosity is characteristic to the fully synthetic oils from the tested group 5W and the semi-synthetic oil Orlen Gas Semisynthetic 10W-40. Semi-synthetic oil Platinum Rally Sport 10W-60 stands out as its viscosity values at sub-zero and low temperatures are greater than the ones of mineral oils from the tested group 15W-40. At high temperatures one can distinguish the oil called Elf Sporti SRI 15W-40 whose viscosity very slightly decreases. The conducted oil tests confirmed their catalog parameters and affiliation to viscosity classes.