WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface shear modulus

  1. Monte Carlo study of the shear modulus at the surface of a Lennard-Jones crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eerden, J. P. v. d.; Knops, H. J. F.; Roos, A.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we give a microscopic definition of local elastic constants. We apply this to the numerical evaluation of the shear modulus of an interface which is sharp as compared with the interaction range. The algorithm is applied to a study of the (001) face of a face-centered-cubic (fcc) Lennard-Jones crystal. The vanishing of the shear modulus gives an estimate of the melting temperature of the first layer which is well below the bulk triple point. Some theoretical aspects of surface melting are briefly discussed.

  2. Structural relaxation monitored by instantaneous shear modulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe; Christensen, Tage Emil

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports on aging of the silicone oil MS704 for sudden changes of temperature from 210.5 to 209.0 K and from 207.5 to 209.0 K studied by continuously monitoring the instantaneous shear modulus G [infinity]. The results are interpreted within the Tool-Narayanaswamy formalism with a reduc...

  3. Quantitative imaging of nonlinear shear modulus by combining static elastography and shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Ossa, Heldmuth; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; De Brosses, Emilie; Tanter, Mickaël

    2012-04-01

    The study of new tissue mechanical properties such as shear nonlinearity could lead to better tissue characterization and clinical diagnosis. This work proposes a method combining static elastography and shear wave elastography to derive the nonlinear shear modulus by applying the acoustoelasticity theory in quasi-incompressible soft solids. Results demonstrate that by applying a moderate static stress at the surface of the investigated medium, and by following the quantitative evolution of its shear modulus, it is possible to accurately and quantitatively recover the local Landau (A) coefficient characterizing the shear nonlinearity of soft tissues.

  4. Shear modulus of neutron star crust

    CERN Document Server

    Baiko, D A

    2011-01-01

    Shear modulus of solid neutron star crust is calculated by thermodynamic perturbation theory taking into account ion motion. At given density the crust is modelled as a body-centered cubic Coulomb crystal of fully ionized atomic nuclei of one type with the uniform charge-compensating electron background. Classic and quantum regimes of ion motion are considered. The calculations in the classic temperature range agree well with previous Monte Carlo simulations. At these temperatures the shear modulus is given by the sum of a positive contribution due to the static lattice and a negative $\\propto T$ contribution due to the ion motion. The quantum calculations are performed for the first time. The main result is that at low temperatures the contribution to the shear modulus due to the ion motion saturates at a constant value, associated with zero-point ion vibrations. Such behavior is qualitatively similar to the zero-point ion motion contribution to the crystal energy. The quantum effects may be important for li...

  5. The instantaneous shear modulus in the shoving model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, J. C.; Wang, W. H.

    2012-01-01

    We point out that the instantaneous shear modulus G∞ of the shoving model for the non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of viscous liquids’ relaxation time is the experimentally accessible highfrequency plateau modulus, not the idealized instantaneous affine shear modulus that cannot be measured...

  6. Determination of Modulus of Elasticity and Shear Modulus by the Measurement of Relative Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labašová, Eva

    2016-12-01

    This contribution is focused on determining the material properties (Young modulus and shear modulus) of the testing samples. The theoretical basis for determining material properties are the knowledge of linear elasticity and strength. The starting points are dependencies among the modulus of elasticity, shear modulus, normal stress and relative strain. The relative strains of the testing samples were obtained by measuring predefined load conditions using a strain-gauge bridge and the universal measurement system Quantum X MX 840. The integration of these tasks into the teaching process enhances practical and intellectual skills of students at secondary level technical universities.

  7. 3D mapping of elastic modulus using shear wave optical micro-elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Qi, Li; Miao, Yusi; Ma, Teng; Dai, Cuixia; Qu, Yueqiao; He, Youmin; Gao, Yiwei; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-10-01

    Elastography provides a powerful tool for histopathological identification and clinical diagnosis based on information from tissue stiffness. Benefiting from high resolution, three-dimensional (3D), and noninvasive optical coherence tomography (OCT), optical micro-elastography has the ability to determine elastic properties with a resolution of ~10 μm in a 3D specimen. The shear wave velocity measurement can be used to quantify the elastic modulus. However, in current methods, shear waves are measured near the surface with an interference of surface waves. In this study, we developed acoustic radiation force (ARF) orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) to visualize shear waves in 3D. This method uses acoustic force perpendicular to the OCT beam to excite shear waves in internal specimens and uses Doppler variance method to visualize shear wave propagation in 3D. The measured propagation of shear waves agrees well with the simulation results obtained from finite element analysis (FEA). Orthogonal acoustic excitation allows this method to measure the shear modulus in a deeper specimen which extends the elasticity measurement range beyond the OCT imaging depth. The results show that the ARFOE-OCE system has the ability to noninvasively determine the 3D elastic map.

  8. Shear modulus of the hadron-quark mixed phase

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K

    2012-01-01

    Robust arguments predict that a hadron-quark mixed phase may exist in the cores of some "neutron" stars. Such a phase forms a crystalline lattice with a shear modulus higher than that of the crust due to the high density and charge separation, even allowing for the effects of charge screening. This may lead to strong continuous gravitational-wave emission from rapidly rotating neutron stars and gravitational-wave bursts associated with magnetar flares and pulsar glitches. We present the first detailed calculation of the shear modulus of the mixed phase. We describe the quark phase using the bag model plus first-order quantum chromodynamics corrections and the hadronic phase using relativistic mean-field models with parameters allowed by the most massive pulsar. Most of the calculation involves treating the "pasta phases" of the lattice via dimensional continuation, and we give a general method for computing dimensionally continued lattice sums including the Debye model of charge screening. We compute all the ...

  9. The effect of treatments on the shear modulus of human hair measured by the single fiber torsion pendulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, D L; Kamath, Y K

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies with the single fiber torsion pendulum have alluded to the ability of this device to selectively measure different regions of a fiber, namely, the core and the sheath. This selective ability of the torsion pendulum was explored further as a means of better understanding treatments effects. First, a substantial reduction in shear modulus was caused by simply abrading the hair fiber surface to remove the cuticle layer. In another experiment, bleaching was found to have a softening effect on the cuticle layer since the shear modulus was reduced significantly. Next, the fibers were subsequently treated with either Polyquaternium-10 or cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CETAB) and measured again. The CETAB treatment resulted in an increase in the shear modulus indicating fortification of the cuticle layer. Polyquaternium-10 treatment increased the shear modulus slightly. These different effects are explained by the molecular sizes of these compounds-CETAB is a small molecule which can penetrate into the cuticle layer while Polyquaternium-10 is too large to do so. Lastly, the effect of moisture was evaluated by varying the humidity inside a chamber surrounding the sample mounted in the torsion pendulum. This showed a substantial inverse relationship between humidity level and shear modulus that was much more pronounced for bleached hair fibers than for untreated.

  10. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein-Didier, C.; Andrade, R. J.; Brum, J.; Hug, F.; Tanter, M.; Nordez, A.; Gennisson, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear.

  11. Imaging and characterizing shear wave and shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force excitation using OCT Doppler variance method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Qu, Yueqiao; Ma, Teng; Li, Rui; Du, Yongzhao; Huang, Shenghai; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    We report on a novel acoustic radiation force orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) technique for imaging shear wave and quantifying shear modulus under orthogonal acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) Doppler variance method. The ARF perpendicular to the OCT beam is produced by a remote ultrasonic transducer. A shear wave induced by ARF excitation propagates parallel to the OCT beam. The OCT Doppler variance method, which is sensitive to the transverse vibration, is used to measure the ARF-induced vibration. For analysis of the shear modulus, the Doppler variance method is utilized to visualize shear wave propagation instead of Doppler OCT method, and the propagation velocity of the shear wave is measured at different depths of one location with the M scan. In order to quantify shear modulus beyond the OCT imaging depth, we move ARF to a deeper layer at a known step and measure the time delay of the shear wave propagating to the same OCT imaging depth. We also quantitatively map the shear modulus of a cross-section in a tissue-equivalent phantom after employing the B scan.

  12. The measurement of the shear modulus for polymer porous layer with two microphones

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    International audience; An experimental method is described for measuring the shear modulus of thin porous layer. An acoustical excitation with a loudspeaker and a simulation performed with the Biot theory allow measurement without any mechanical excitation.

  13. A Modified approach for calculating dynamic shear modulus of stiff specimens by resonant column tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Xiaoming; Sun Jing; Sun Rui

    2006-01-01

    An error analysis of the dynamic shear modulus of stiff specimens from tests performed by a new resonant column device developed by the Institute of Engineering Mechanics, China was conducted. A modified approach for calculating the dynamic shear modulus of the stiff specimens is presented. The error formula of the tests was deduced and parameters that impact the accuracy of the test were identified. Using six steel specimens with known standard stiffness as a base, a revised dynamic shear modulus calculation for stiff specimens was formulated by comparing three of the models.The maximum error between the test results and the calculated results shown by curves from both the free-vibration and the resonant-vibration tests is less than 6%. The free-vibration and resonant-vibration tests for three types of stiff samples with a known modulus indicate that the maximum deviation between the actual and the tested value using the modified approach were less than 10%. As a result, the modified approach presented here is shown to be reliable and the new device can be used for testing dynamic shear modulus of any stiff materials at low shear strain levels

  14. On a thickness free expression for the shear modulus of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadyani, Ghasem; Soufeiani, Leila; Öchsner, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    The thickness of carbon nanotubes is an important issue for the characterization and design of these structures. In this article, thickness free expressions for the shear modulus of single-walled carbon nanotubes have been developed by finite element simulations on the minimum potential energy circle. As a part of this work, some equations have been obtained to define the relation between the thickness and the shear modulus, which are in good agreement with previous studies. Moreover, these expressions are in good agreement with both continuum and quantum mechanics and capable to support "Yakobson's paradox," that the scattering data for the elastic properties of carbon nanotubes are due to the not-well-defined thickness for these structures. Furthermore, these expressions can provide a tool for the prediction of the shear modulus of single-walled carbon nanotubes in regards to any thickness assumption when the experimental investigations are too difficult to realize.

  15. Axial shear modulus of a fiber-reinforced composite with random fiber cross-sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Bose

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available A study is made of the effective axial shear modulus of a fiber reinforced material with random fiber cross-sections so that the micromechanics is governed by stochastic differential equations. A coarse-graining procedure is adopted to investigate the macroscopic behavior of the material. This analysis leads to the formula for the effective axial shear modulus μ∗=μ1/{1−2c(μ2−μ1/(μ2+μ1},where μ1 and μ2 are the shear modulus of the matrix and fibers respectively and c is the concentration of the fibers less that 0.5. For c>0.5, the fiber and matrix moduli are to be interchanged and c is to be replaced by 1−c. The results of this study are compared with those of the theory of fibre reinforced materials. Finally, a numerical example is presented with graphical representation.

  16. Shear Modulus of the Partially Obstructed Rat Small Intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Daming; Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua;

    2016-01-01

    A number of factors influence gastrointestinal tissue structure and mechanical properties such as the physical environment and diseases like partial obstruction. Hence multi-axial biomechanical properties are important for understanding the pathophysiology of the obstructed intestine. The aim......-cm intestinal segments were used for histological and mechanical analysis. The segments were obtained distal (S1), proximal (S2) and further proximal (S3) to the site of obstruction or suturing site. The tri-axial testing included simultaneous torsion, inflation and longitudinal stretching. The lumen...... and longitudinal direction where as it was softer in shear direction, especially in S2 (p intestinal obstruction site....

  17. Determination of the shear modulus in self-assembled monolayers using quartz resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, T.W.; Martin, S.J.; Frye, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    This work examined self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of n-alkane thiols using quartz resonators to determine the shear storage and loss moduli. Network analyzer measurements of electrical admittance at fundamental and corresponding harmonic values are fit to an equivalent circuit model. Shear modulus depends on frequency; the modulus values are three orders of magnitude lower than expected for a liquid or elastomeric polymer, more like those of a dense gas or supercritical fluid. A density of around 0.45 g/cm{sup 3} is calculated for a dodecane thiol SAM; this is roughly half of the bulk density. In conclusion, quartz resonators can be used to inertially deform SAMs.

  18. Analytical Solution for Wave-Induced Response of Seabed with Variable Shear Modulus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A plane strain analysis based on the generalized Biot's equation is utilized to investigate the wave-induced response of a poro-elastic seabed with variable shear modulus. By employing integral transform and Frobenius methods, the transient and steady solutions for the wave-induced pore water pressure, effective stresses and displacements are analytically derived in detail. Verification is available through the reduction to the simple case of homogeneous seabed. The numerical results indicate that the inclusion of variable shear modulus significantly affects the wave-induced seabed response.

  19. Bending stiffness and interlayer shear modulus of few-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Yi, Chenglin; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)

    2015-03-09

    Interlayer shear deformation occurs in the bending of multilayer graphene with unconstrained ends, thus influencing its bending rigidity. Here, we investigate the bending stiffness and interlayer shear modulus of few-layer graphene through examining its self-folding conformation on a flat substrate using atomic force microscopy in conjunction with nonlinear mechanics modeling. The results reveal that the bending stiffness of 2–6 layers graphene follows a square-power relationship with its thickness. The interlayer shear modulus is found to be in the range of 0.36–0.49 GPa. The research findings show that the weak interlayer shear interaction has a substantial stiffening effect for multilayer graphene.

  20. Effect of single-particle magnetostriction on the shear modulus of compliant magnetoactive elastomers

    OpenAIRE

    Kalita, Viktor; Snarskii, Andrew; Shamonin, Mikhail; Zorinets, Denys

    2017-01-01

    The influence of an external magnetic field on the static shear strain and the effective shear modulus of a magnetoactive elastomer (MAE) is studied theoretically in the framework of a recently introduced approach to the single-particle magnetostriction mechanism [V. M. Kalita et al, Phys. Rev. E 93, 062503 (2016)]. The planar problem of magnetostriction in an MAE with soft magnetic inclusions in the form of a thin disk (platelet) having the magnetic anisotropy in the plane of this disk is so...

  1. Dynamic transverse shear modulus for a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.; Duan, Yunda

    2016-09-01

    An exact analytical solution is presented for the effective dynamic transverse shear modulus in a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions. The complex and frequency-dependent properties of the dynamic shear modulus are caused by the physical mechanism of mesoscopic-scale wave-induced fluid flow whose scale is smaller than wavelength but larger than the size of pores. Our model consists of three phases: a long cylindrical inclusion, a cylindrical shell of poroelastic matrix material with different mechanical and/or hydraulic properties than the inclusion and an outer region of effective homogeneous medium of laterally infinite extent. The behavior of both the inclusion and the matrix is described by Biot's consolidation equations, whereas the surrounding effective medium which is used to describe the effective transverse shear properties of the inner poroelastic composite is assumed to be a viscoelastic solid whose complex transverse shear modulus needs to be determined. The determined effective transverse shear modulus is used to quantify the S-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in heterogeneous fluid-filled poroelastic rocks. The calculation shows the relaxation frequency and relative position of various fluid saturation dispersion curves predicted by this study exhibit very good agreement with those of a previous 2-D finite-element simulation. For the double-porosity model (inclusions having a different solid frame than the matrix but the same pore fluid as the matrix) the effective shear modulus also exhibits a size-dependent characteristic that the relaxation frequency moves to lower frequencies by two orders of magnitude if the radius of the cylindrical poroelastic composite increases by one order of magnitude. For the patchy-saturation model (inclusions having the same solid frame as the matrix but with a different pore fluid from the matrix), the heterogeneity in pore fluid cannot cause any attenuation in the

  2. Ultrasonic measurement of viscoelastic shear modulus development in hydrating cement paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Subramaniam, Kolluru V; Lin, Fengbao

    2010-06-01

    A test procedure for measuring changes in amplitude and phase of SH ultrasonic waves from the interface between fused-quartz and cement paste samples is presented. The phase change is determined from the temporal shift in the reflected signal relative to the incident signal. The sensitivity of the measured parameters to changes in acoustic impedance of the materials in contact with fused-quartz is evaluated for different angles of incidence. It is shown that a reflection measurement at normal incidence at nano-second temporal resolution does not provide sufficient sensitivity to measure the viscous component of shear modulus of low viscosity fluids and cannot be applied to cement paste while it is in a fluid state. Monitoring the measured amplitude and phase at oblique angle of incidence allows for measuring fluids with acoustic impedance comparable to cement paste. The reflection measurements are used to determine the evolution of elastic and viscous components of shear modulus cement paste with time. Influence of sampling rate and temperature effects on the phase measurements are evaluated and shown to be significant. It is shown that the initial loss of workability of cement paste through setting process is associated with a larger relative increase in the viscous component of shear modulus. Following the initial rapid rise of the viscous component of shear modulus, there is a larger relative increase in the elastic component, which can be related to the emergence of a solid structure capable of retaining an imprint.

  3. NEW TEST TECHNIQUE FOR SHEAR MODULUS AND OTHER ELASTIC CONSTANTS OF FILAMENTARY COMPOSITES,

    Science.gov (United States)

    corresponding to one tensile test . Otherwise, two tests are required to obtain those properties. The shear modulus, which is independent of the Poisson’s...ratio, can be obtained from tensile test data on a specimen having filaments oriented at any angle 0 < alpha < 90 degrees. The validity and

  4. Probabilistic characterization of cyclic shear modulus reduction for normally to moderately over-consolidated clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Iok-Tong; Yuen, Ka-Veng; Lao, Ngai-Kuan

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of the cyclic shear modulus of soils is a crucial but challenging task for many geotechnical earthquake engineering and soil dynamic issues. Improper determination of this property unnecessarily drives up design and maintenance costs or even leads to the construction of unsafe structures. Due to the complexities involved in the direct measurement, empirical curves for estimating the cyclic shear modulus have been commonly adopted in practice for simplicity and economical considerations. However, a systematic and robust approach for formulating a reliable model and empirical curve for cyclic shear modulus prediction for clayey soils is still lacking. In this study, the Bayesian model class selection approach is utilized to identify the most significant soil parameters affecting the normalized cyclic shear modulus and a reliable predictive model for normally to moderately over-consolidated clays is proposed. Results show that the predictability and reliability of the proposed model out performs the well-known empirical models. Finally, a new design chart is established for practical usage.

  5. Shear Modulus of Sintered 'House of Cards'-Like Assemblies of Crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaink, H.M.; Malssen, van K.

    2007-01-01

    A cell model of a 'house of cards'-like assembly of crystals is used for the study of the evolution of the shear modulus during sintering. The crystals are assumed to have a lozenge shape. The cell model takes different crystal-crystal contacts into account. The force needed to separate two sintered

  6. Quantitative estimation of muscle shear elastic modulus of the upper trapezius with supersonic shear imaging during arm positioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hio-Teng Leong

    Full Text Available Pain and tenderness of the upper trapezius are the major complaints among people with chronic neck and shoulder disorders. Hyper-activation and increased muscle tension of the upper trapezius during arm elevation will cause imbalance of the scapular muscle force and contribute to neck and shoulder disorders. Assessing the elasticity of the upper trapezius in different arm positions is therefore important for identifying people at risk so as to give preventive programmes or for monitoring the effectiveness of the intervention programmes for these disorders. This study aimed to establish the reliability of supersonic shear imaging (SSI in quantifying upper trapezius elasticity/shear elastic modulus and its ability to measure the modulation of muscle elasticity during arm elevation. Twenty-eight healthy adults (15 males, 13 females; mean age = 29.6 years were recruited to participate in the study. In each participant, the shear elastic modulus of the upper trapezius while the arm was at rest and at 30° abduction was measured by two operators and twice by operator 1 with a time interval between the measurements. The results showed excellent within- and between-session intra-operator (ICC = 0.87-0.97 and inter-observer (ICC = 0.78-0.83 reliability for the upper trapezius elasticity with the arm at rest and at 30° abduction. An increase of 55.23% of shear elastic modulus from resting to 30° abduction was observed. Our findings demonstrate the possibilities for using SSI to quantify muscle elasticity and its potential role in delineating the modulation of upper trapezius elasticity, which is essential for future studies to compare the differences in shear elastic modulus between normal elasticity and that of individuals with neck and shoulder disorders.

  7. A Six-Week Resistance Training Program Does Not Change Shear Modulus of the Triceps Brachii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Ryota; Shikiba, Tomofumi; Tanaka, Jun; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effect of a 6-week resistance training program on the shear modulus of the triceps brachii (TB). Twenty-three young men were randomly assigned to either the training (n = 13) or control group (n = 10). Before and after conducting the resistance training program, the shear modulus of the long head of the TB was measured at the point 70% along the length of the upper arm from the acromial process of the scapula to the lateral epicondyle of the humerus using shear wave ultrasound elastography. Muscle thickness of the long head of the TB was also determined at the same site by ultrasonography used during both tests. A resistance exercise was performed 3 days a week for 6 weeks using a dumbbell mass-adjusted to 80% of the 1-repetition maximum (1RM). The training effect on the muscle thickness and 1RM was significant. Nevertheless, the muscle shear modulus was not significantly changed after the training program. From the perspective of muscle mechanical properties, the present results indicate that significant adaptation must occur to make the TB more resistant to subsequent damaging bouts during the 6-week training program to target the TB.

  8. Fibre-reinforced plastic composites - Determination of the in-plane shear stress/shear strain response, including the in-plane shear modulus and strength, by the plus or minus 45 degree tension test method

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    1997-01-01

    Fibre-reinforced plastic composites - Determination of the in-plane shear stress/shear strain response, including the in-plane shear modulus and strength, by the plus or minus 45 degree tension test method

  9. Shear modulus of glasses: results from the full replica-symmetry-breaking solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Hajime; Zamponi, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    We compute the shear modulus of amorphous hard and soft spheres, using the exact solution in infinite spatial dimensions that has been developed recently. We characterize the behavior of this observable in the whole phase diagram, and in particular around the glass and jamming transitions. Our results are consistent with other theoretical approaches, which are unified within this general picture, and they are also consistent with numerical and experimental results. Furthermore, we discuss some properties of the out-of-equilibrium dynamics after a deep quench close to the jamming transition, and we show that a combined measure of the shear modulus and of the mean square displacement allows one to probe experimentally the complex structure of phase space predicted by the full replica-symmetry-breaking solution.

  10. The effects of interstitial tissue pressure on the measured shear modulus in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, John B.; Perrinez, P. R.; Bergeron, J. A.; Kennedy, F. E.; Wang, H.; Lollis, S. Scott; Doyley, M. M.; Hoopes, P. J.; Paulsen, K. D.

    2007-03-01

    It is well known that many pathologic processes, like cancer, result in increased tissue stiffness but the biologic mechanisms which cause pathologies to be stiffer than normal tissues are largely unknown. Increased collagen density has been presumed to be largely responsible because it has been shown to cause variations in normal tissue stiffness. However, other effects such as increased tissue pressure are also thought to be significant. We examined the effects of tissue pressure on shear modulus measured using MR elastography (MRE) by comparing the shear modulus in the pre-mortem, edematous and post-mortem porcine brain and found that the measured shear modulus increases with tissue pressure as expected. The slope of a linear fit to this preliminary data varied from 0.3 kPa/mmHg to 0.1 kPa/mmHg. These results represent the first in vivo demonstration of tissue pressure affecting intrinsic mechanical properties and have several implications. First, if the linear relationship described is correct, tissue pressure could contribute significantly (~20%) to the increase in stiffness observed in cancer. Second, tissue pressure effects must be considered when in vitro mechanical properties are extrapolated to in vivo settings. Moreover, MRE might provide a means to characterize pathologic conditions associated with increased or decreased tissue pressure, such as edema and ischemia, in a diverse set of diseases including cancer, diabetes, stroke, and transplant rejection.

  11. Shear modulus of shock-compressed LY12 aluminium up to melting point

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yu-Ying; Tan Hua; Hu Jian-Bo; Dai Cheng-Da

    2008-01-01

    Asymmetric plate impact experiments are conducted on LY12 aluminium alloy in a pressure range of 85-131 GPa.The longitudinal sound speeds are obtained from the time-resolved particle speed profiles of the specimen measured with Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) technique,and they are shown to be good agreement with our previously reported data of this alloy in a pressure range of 20-70 CPa,and also with those of 2024 aluminium reported by McQueen.Using all of the longitudinal speeds and the corresponding bulk speeds calculated from the Gruneisen equation of state (EOS),shear moduli of LY12 aluminium alloy are obtained.A comparison of the shear moduli in the solid phase region with those estimated from the Steinberg model demonstrate that the latter are systematically lower than the measurements.By re-analysing the pressure effect on the shear modulus,a modified equation is proposed,in which the pressure term of P/η1/3 in the Steinberg model is replaced by a linear term.Good agreement between experiments and the modified equation is obtained,which implies that the shear modulus of LY12 aluminium varies linearly both with pressure and with temperature throughout the whole solid phase region.On the other hand,shear modulus of aluminium in a solid-liquid mixed phrase region decreases gradually and smoothly,a feature that is very different from the drastic dropping at the melting point under static conditions.

  12. Young's modulus measurement based on surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfalian, Ali; Jandaghian, Ali; Saghafifar, Hossein; Mohajerani, Ezzedin

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, Young's modulus of polymers is experimentally measured using pressure sensors based on surface plasmon polariton. Theoretical relationships of changes in polymer reflective index due to applying pressure are investigated as well as the dependence of surface plasmon to the polymer reflective index. For the purpose of investigating the effects of the layers thicknesses, numerical simulation is performed using transfer matrix. Changes in resonance angle of surface plasmon due to applying pressure are experimentally studied as well. Practically, a sample of silicon rubber, as one of the most widely-used polymers, is checked and its Young's modulus is measured as 8.1 MPa.

  13. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: II. Shear wave imaging of thermal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-08-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is currently hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to a precise mapping of the lesion. HIFU treatment and monitoring were respectively performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single element transducer focused at 34 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Ultrasound-based strain imaging was combined with shear wave imaging on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created with pushing beams of 100 μs at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Thus, elasticity and strain mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to real-time monitoring of the treatment. When thermal damage occurs, tissue stiffness was found to increase up to 4-fold and strain imaging showed strong shrinkages that blur the temperature information. We show that strain imaging elastograms are not easy to interpret for accurate lesion characterization, but SWI provides a quantitative mapping of the thermal lesion. Moreover, the concept of shear wave thermometry (SWT) developed in the companion paper allows mapping temperature with the same method. Combined SWT and shear wave imaging can map the lesion stiffening and temperature outside the lesion, which could be used to predict the eventual lesion growth by thermal dose calculation. Finally, SWI is shown to be robust to motion and reliable in vivo on sheep muscle.

  14. Examination of Existing Shear Wave Velocity and Shear Modulus Correlations in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    in Terms of Characteristic Indices of Soil," Butsuri- Tanko (Geophysical Exploration) (in Japanese), Vol 29, No. 4, pp 34-41. . 1978a. "Empirical Shear...34Physical Background of the Statistically Obtained S-Wave Velocity Equation in Terms of Soil Indexes," Butsuri- Tanko (Geophysical Explo- ration) (in Japanese

  15. Pore Fluid Effects on Shear Modulus in a Model of Heterogeneous Rocks, Reservoirs, and Granular Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J G

    2005-03-23

    To provide quantitative measures of the importance of fluid effects on shear waves in heterogeneous reservoirs, a model material called a ''random polycrystal of porous laminates'' is introduced. This model poroelastic material has constituent grains that are layered (or laminated), and each layer is an isotropic, microhomogeneous porous medium. All grains are composed of exactly the same porous constituents, and have the same relative volume fractions. The order of lamination is not important because the up-scaling method used to determine the transversely isotropic (hexagonal) properties of the grains is Backus averaging, which--for quasi-static or long-wavelength behavior--depends only on the volume fractions and layer properties. Grains are then jumbled together totally at random, filling all space, and producing an overall isotropic poroelastic medium. The poroelastic behavior of this medium is then analyzed using the Peselnick-Meister-Watt bounds (of Hashin-Shtrikman type). We study the dependence of the shear modulus on pore fluid properties and determine the range of behavior to be expected. In particular we compare and contrast these results to those anticipated from Gassmann's fluid substitution formulas, and to the predictions of Mavko and Jizba for very low porosity rocks with flat cracks. This approach also permits the study of arbitrary numbers of constituents, but for simplicity the numerical examples are restricted here to just two constituents. This restriction also permits the use of some special exact results available for computing the overall effective stress coefficient in any two-component porous medium. The bounds making use of polycrystalline microstructure are very tight. Results for the shear modulus demonstrate that the ratio of compliance differences R (i.e., shear compliance changes over bulk compliance changes when going from drained to undrained behavior, or vice versa) is usually nonzero and can take a wide

  16. Shoulder horizontal abduction stretching effectively increases shear elastic modulus of pectoralis minor muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Jun; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Fujita, Kosuke; Kusano, Ken; Nishishita, Satoru; Araki, Kojiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Yanase, Ko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2017-07-01

    Stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle, which involve shoulder horizontal abduction or scapular retraction, are performed in clinical and sports settings because the tightness of this muscle may contribute to scapular dyskinesis. The effectiveness of stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle is unclear in vivo. The purpose of this study was to verify the effectiveness of stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle in vivo using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Eighteen healthy men participated in this study. Elongation of the pectoralis minor muscle was measured for 3 stretching maneuvers (shoulder flexion, shoulder horizontal abduction, and scapular retraction) at 3 shoulder elevation angles (30°, 90°, and 150°). The shear elastic modulus, used as the index of muscle elongation, was computed using ultrasonic shear wave elastography for the 9 aforementioned stretching maneuver-angle combinations. The shear elastic modulus was highest in horizontal abduction at 150°, followed by horizontal abduction at 90°, horizontal abduction at 30°, scapular retraction at 30°, scapular retraction at 90°, scapular retraction at 150°, flexion at 150°, flexion at 90°, and flexion at 30°. The shear elastic moduli of horizontal abduction at 90° and horizontal abduction at 150° were significantly higher than those of other stretching maneuvers. There was no significant difference between horizontal abduction at 90° and horizontal abduction at 150°. This study determined that shoulder horizontal abduction at an elevation of 90° and horizontal abduction at an elevation of 150° were the most effective stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Elastic metamaterials with simultaneously negative effective shear modulus and mass density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Lai, Yun; Zhang, Zhao-Qing

    2011-09-02

    We propose a type of elastic metamaterial comprising fluid-solid composite inclusions which can possess a negative shear modulus and negative mass density over a large frequency region. Such a material has the unique property that only transverse waves can propagate with a negative dispersion while longitudinal waves are forbidden. This leads to many interesting phenomena such as negative refraction, which is demonstrated by using a wedge sample and a significant amount of mode conversion from transverse waves to longitudinal waves that cannot occur on the interface of two natural solids.

  18. Elastic superlattices with simultaneously negative effective mass density and shear modulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Mora, I. S.; Palomino-Ovando, M. A.; Pérez-Rodríguez, F.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the vibrational properties of superlattices with layers of rubber and polyurethane foam, which can be either conventional or auxetic. Phononic dispersion calculations show a second pass band for transverse modes inside the lowest band gap of the longitudinal modes. In such a band, the superlattices behave as a double-negative elastic metamaterial since the effective dynamic mass density and shear modulus are both negative. The pass band is associated to a Fabry-Perot resonance band which turns out to be very narrow as a consequence of the high contrast between the acoustic impedances of the superlattice components.

  19. Elastic Metamaterials with Simultaneously Negative Effective Shear Modulus and Mass Density

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying

    2011-09-02

    We propose a type of elastic metamaterial comprising fluid-solid composite inclusions which can possess a negative shear modulus and negative mass density over a large frequency region. Such a material has the unique property that only transverse waves can propagate with a negative dispersion while longitudinal waves are forbidden. This leads to many interesting phenomena such as negative refraction, which is demonstrated by using a wedge sample and a significant amount of mode conversion from transverse waves to longitudinal waves that cannot occur on the interface of two natural solids.

  20. Lateral Earth Pressure at Rest and Shear Modulus Measurements on Hanford Sludge Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Beric E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Bauman, Nathan N.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Arduino, P.; Keller, P. J.

    2010-09-30

    This report describes the equipment, techniques, and results of lateral earth pressure at rest and shear modulus measurements on kaolin clay as well as two chemical sludge simulants. The testing was performed in support of the problem of hydrogen gas retention and release encountered in the double- shell tanks (DSTs) at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Wastes from single-shell tanks (SSTs) are being transferred to double-shell tanks (DSTs) for safety reasons (some SSTs are leaking or are in danger of leaking), but the available DST space is limited.

  1. The Evaluation of the Initial Shear Modulus of Selected Cohesive Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabryś Katarzyna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns the evaluation of the initial stiffness of selected cohesive soils based on laboratory tests. The research materials used in this study were clayey soils taken from the area of the road embankment No. WD-18, on the 464th km of the S2 express-way, Konotopa-Airport route, Warsaw. The initial stiffness is represented here by the shear modulus (Gmax determined during resonant column tests. In the article, a number of literature empirical formulas for defining initial value of the shear modulus of soils being examined were adopted from the literature in order to analyze the data set. However, a large discrepancy between laboratory test results and the values of Gmax calculated from empirical relationships resulted in the rejection of these proposals. They are inaccurate and do not allow for an exact evaluation of soil stiffness for selected cohesive soils. Hence, the authors proposed their own empirical formula that enables the evaluation of the test soils’ Gmax in an easy and uncomplicated way. This unique formula describes mathematically the effect of certain soil parameters, namely mean effective stress ( p′ and void ratio (e, on the initial soil stiffness.

  2. Experimental study of seismic cyclic loading effects on small strain shear modulus of saturated sands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yan-guo; CHEN Yun-min; HUANG Bo

    2005-01-01

    The seismic loading on saturated soil deposits induces a decrease in effective stress and a rearrangement of the soil-particle structure, which may both lead to a degradation in undrained stiffness and strength of soils. Only the effective stress influence on small strain shear modulus Gmax is considered in seismic response analysis nowadays, and the cyclic shearing induced fabric changes of the soil-particle structure are neglected. In this paper, undrained cyclic triaxial tests were conducted on saturated sands with the shear wave velocity measured by bender element, to study the influences of seismic loading on Gmax. And Gmax of samples without cyclic loading effects was also investigated for comparison. The test results indicated that Gmax under cyclic loading effects is lower than that without such effects at the same effective stress, and also well correlated with the effective stress variation. Hence it is necessary to reinvestigate the determination of Gmax in seismic response analysis carefully to predict the ground responses during earthquake more reasonably.

  3. Effect of consolidation ratios on maximum dynamic shear modulus of sands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Xiaoming; Sun Jing; Sun Rui

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic shear modulus (DSM) is the most basic soil parameter in earthquake or other dynamic loading conditions and can be obtained through testing in the field or in the laboratory. The effect of consolidation ratios on the maximum DSM for two types of sand is investigated by using resonant column tests. And, an increment formula to obtain the maximum DSM for cases of consolidation ratio kc>1 is presented. The results indicate that the maximum DSM rises rapidly when kc is near 1 and then slows down, which means that the power function of the consolidation ratio increment kc-1 can be used to describe the variation of the maximum DSM due to kc>1. The results also indicate that the increase in the maximum DSM due to kc>1 is significantly larger than that predicted by Hardin and Black's formula.

  4. The effect of three-dimensional postural change on shear elastic modulus of the iliotibial band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Shiratori, Sakiko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-06-01

    To understand and treat iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome, caused by excessive compression between the ITB and lateral femoral condyle, it is important to identify factors contributing to an increase in ITB stiffness. The purpose of this study was to clarify the factors that contribute to an increase in ITB stiffness by examining the relationship between three-dimensional postural changes and ITB stiffness. Fourteen healthy individuals performed one-leg standing under 7 conditions (including normal one-leg standing as a control condition) in which the pelvic position was changed in three planes. The shear elastic modulus in the ITB was measured using shear-wave elastography, as a measure of ITB stiffness. The three-dimensional joint angles and external joint moments in the hip and knee joints were also measured to confirm the changes in joint angles and external load. Compared to the normal one-leg standing condition, ITB stiffness was significantly increased in the pelvic posterior tilted position (i.e. hip extension), contralateral pelvic dropped position (i.e. hip adduction), and contralateral pelvic posterior rotated position (i.e. hip external rotation). The findings suggest that interventions to reduce hip extension, adduction, and external rotation might be useful if these excessive positional changes are detected in patients with ITB syndrome.

  5. Perbaikan Sifat Reologi Visco-Elastic Aspal dengan Penambahan Asbuton Murni Menggunakan Parameter Complex Shear Modulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Wahyu Indriyati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand of crude oil will increase the price of petroleum asphalt. Indonesia has imported asphalt to meet the need for the annually road construction and maintenance. One solution to improving the rheological properties of bitumen is by adding the harder bitumen or other chemical compound to reduce dependence to petroleum asphalt. In Indonesia there is a source of natural asphalt in Buton Island, Sulawesi with huge amount of deposit that potentially could improve the rheological properties of Pen 60/70 Petroleum Asphalt. In order to obtain a better understanding on the contribution of Asbuton to the improvement of performance on rheological properties, this research used 19 variations of Asbuton and pen 60/70 petroleum bitumen. This variation is then subjected to the basic rheology test and the mechanistic test using Dynamic Shear Rheometer. The conclusion of basic rheological performance is obtained that mixture (Asbuton and 60/70 petroleum bitumen will increase hardness of bitumen. Conclusion on mechanistic rheological performance is that mixture (Asbuton and 60/70 petrol bitumen will increase Performance Grade (PG and Complex Shear Modulus (G*. The results from the analysis of Master Curve and Black Diagram, it is shown that the increasing proportion of bitumen Asbuton will decrease the phase angle (δ but its temperature susceptibility is worse.

  6. Small shear modulus of cubic CaSiO3 perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kenji; Tsuchiya, Taku

    2015-04-01

    Ca-perovskite (CaPv) is considered to be one of the most abundant minerals in the Earth's lower mantle (LM). Furthermore, previous static calculations and mean-field theory suggest that it has a much larger shear modulus than bridgmanite (MgPv). In this study, the elasticity of cubic CaPv was reinvestigated using the density functional constant-temperature first principles molecular dynamics method under the correct conditions to simulate its elasticity. Our new results clearly demonstrate that cubic CaPv has comparable bulk and slightly smaller shear moduli than Fe-bearing MgPv. This is because the boundary condition for the supercell used in this study allows for the rotational phonon motion of SiO6 octahedra under strain, which predominantly affects the decrease in C11 and C44. Acoustic wave velocities determined from the elastic moduli indicate that cubic CaPv has slower velocities and larger densities than Fe-bearing MgPv and preliminary reference Earth model in the LM. This suggests that if CaPv-rich material exists, it can accumulate in the lowermost LM and produce a seismically low-velocity anomaly.

  7. Consideration of shear modulus in biomechanical analysis of peri-implant jaw bone: accuracy verification using image-based multi-scale simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Satoru; Naito, Hiroyoshi; Tamatsu, Yuichi; Takano, Naoki; Abe, Shinichi; Ide, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of shear modulus on the analytical accuracy in peri-implant jaw bone simulation. A 3D finite element (FE) model was prepared based on micro-CT data obtained from images of a jawbone containing implants. A precise model that closely reproduced the trabecular architecture, and equivalent models that gave shear modulus values taking the trabecular architecture into account, were prepared. Displacement norms during loading were calculated, and the displacement error was evaluated. The model that gave shear modulus values taking the trabecular architecture into account showed an analytical error of around 10-20% in the cancellous bone region, while in the model that used incorrect shear modulus, the analytical error exceeded 40% in certain regions. The shear modulus should be evaluated precisely in addition to the Young modulus when considering the mechanics of peri-implant trabecular bone structure.

  8. The effect of hip rotation on shear elastic modulus of the medial and lateral hamstrings during stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umegaki, Hiroki; Ikezoe, Tome; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Nishishita, Satoru; Kobayashi, Takuya; Fujita, Kosuke; Tanaka, Hiroki; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2015-02-01

    Regarding hamstring stretching methods, many studies have investigated the effect of stretching duration or frequency on muscle stiffness. However, the most effective stretching positions for hamstrings are unclear because it is impossible to quantify muscle elongation directly and noninvasively in vivo. Recently, a new ultrasound technology, ultrasonic shear wave elastography, has permitted noninvasive and reliable measurement of muscle shear elastic modulus, which has a strong linear relationship to the amount of muscle elongation. This study aimed to investigate the effect of hip internal and external rotation on shear elastic modulus of the lateral and medial hamstrings, respectively, during stretching in vivo using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Twenty-three healthy men (age, 23.0 ± 2.1 years) were recruited for this study. To investigate the effect of hip rotation on the elongation of the medial and lateral hamstrings, shear elastic modulus of the biceps femoris (BF) and semitendinosus (ST) was measured at rest (a supine position with 90° knee flexion, 90° hip flexion, and hip neutral rotation) and in seven stretching positions (with 45° knee flexion and hip internal, external, and neutral rotation) using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. In both BF and ST, the shear elastic modulus in the rest position was significantly lower than that in all stretching positions. However, no significant differences were seen among stretching positions. Our results suggest that adding hip rotation at a stretching position for the hamstrings may not have a significant effect on muscle elongation of the medial and lateral hamstrings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Linear and nonlinear modulus surfaces in stress space, from stress-strain measurements on Berea sandstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boudjema

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The elastic response of many rocks to quasistatic stress changes is highly nonlinear and hysteretic, displaying discrete memory. Rocks also display unusual nonlinear response to dynamic stress changes. A model to describe the elastic behavior of rocks and other consolidated materials is called the Preisach-Mayergoyz (PM space model. In contrast to the traditional analytic approach to stress-strain, the PM space picture establishes a relationship between the quasistatic data and a number density of hysteretic mesoscopic elastic elements in the rock. The number density allows us to make quantitative predictions of dynamic elastic properties. Using the PM space model, we analyze a complex suite of quasistatic stress-strain data taken on Berea sandstone. We predict a dynamic bulk modulus and a dynamic shear modulus surface as a function of mean stress and shear stress. Our predictions for the dynamic moduli compare favorably to moduli derived from time of flight measurements. We derive a set of nonlinear elastic constants and a set of constants that describe the hysteretic behavior of the sandstone.

  10. Characterizing the variation of small strain shear modulus for silt and sand during hydraulic hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosravi Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies have indicated that the small strain shear modulus, Gmax, of unsaturated silt and clay has a greater amount during imbibition than during drainage, when presented as a function of matric suction. However, due to material properties and inter-particle forces, different behavior is expected in the case of sand. Although considerable research has been devoted in recent years to characterize the behaviour of Gmax of sand during drainage, rather less attention has been paid to the effect of hydraulic hysteresis on Gmax and its variations during imbibition. In the study presented herein, an effort has been made to compare the Gmax behavior of specimens of silt and sand during hydraulic hysteresis. In this regard, a series of bender element tests were carried out in a modified triaxial test device with suction-saturation control to evaluate the impact of hydraulic hysteresis on Gmax for specimens of silt and sand. Trends between the Gmax and matric suction for unsaturated sand were found to be different from those for silty specimens. The variations in Gmax showed an up and down trend in both drainage and imbibition paths for sandy specimens, where plotted as a function of matric suction. Results also indicated smaller magnitudes of Gmax upon imbibition than those during drainage; a behavior which is believed to be attributed to variations in suction stress with matric suction. In silty specimens, a stiffer response was measured during imbibition which was hypothesized to be due to drainage-induced hardening experienced by the specimens that was not fully recovered during imbibition.

  11. Determination of the shear modulus of gelatine hydrogels by magnetization measurements using dispersed nickel nanorods as mechanical probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, P., E-mail: nano@p-bender.de; Tschöpe, A., E-mail: antsch@mx.uni-saarland.de; Birringer, R., E-mail: r.birringer@nano.uni-saarland.de

    2013-11-15

    Ni nanorods are dispersed into gelatine gels and used as nanoprobes to estimate the shear modulus of the surrounding gel matrix by magnetization measurements. The nanorods are synthesized via pulsed electrodeposition of Ni into porous alumina, released from the templates by dissolution of the oxide layer and after several processing steps dispersed into gelatine gels with an isotropic orientation-distribution. Magnetization measurements of the resulting gels show a significant influence of the gelatine concentration on their magnetic behavior. In particular, with decreasing gelatine concentration the measured coercivity is reduced indicating a mechanical rotation of the nanorods in the field direction. A theoretical model which relates the measured coercivity to the shear modulus of the surrounding gel matrix is introduced and applied to investigate the ageing process of gelatine gels with different gelatine concentrations at room temperature. - Highlights: • AAO-template synthesis of uniaxial ferromagnetic single domain Ni nanorods. • Embedding nanorods as magnetic probes in soft elastic gelatine hydrogels. • Coercivity of isotropic samples increases with gelation time and gelatine concentration. • Quantitative relationship between coercivity and matrix shear modulus is obtained from an extended Stoner–Wohlfarth-model. • Semi-quantitative method for magnetic rheometry of soft elastic materials.

  12. An effective ultrasonic strain measurement-based shear modulus reconstruction technique for superficial tissues - demonstration on in vitro pork ribs and in vivo human breast tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Chikayoshi; Nakayama, Kiyoshi; Kubota, Mitsuhiro

    2000-06-01

    An effective shear modulus reconstruction technique is described which uses ultrasonic strain measurements for diagnosis of superficial tissues, i.e. our previously developed ultrasonic strain measurement and shear modulus reconstruction methods are combined and enhanced. The technique realizes very low computational load, yet yields fairly high quantitativeness, high stability and spatial resolution, and large dynamic range. The suitability of the method is demonstrated on in vitro pork ribs and in vivo human breast tissues (fibroadenoma and scirrhous carcinoma).

  13. Shear modulus of simulated glass-forming model systems: Effects of boundary condition, temperature, and sampling time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Xu, H.; Polińska, P.; Weysser, F.; Baschnagel, J.

    2013-03-01

    The shear modulus G of two glass-forming colloidal model systems in d = 3 and d = 2 dimensions is investigated by means of, respectively, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Comparing ensembles where either the shear strain γ or the conjugated (mean) shear stress τ are imposed, we compute G from the respective stress and strain fluctuations as a function of temperature T while keeping a constant normal pressure P. The choice of the ensemble is seen to be highly relevant for the shear stress fluctuations μF(T) which at constant τ decay monotonously with T following the affine shear elasticity μA(T), i.e., a simple two-point correlation function. At variance, non-monotonous behavior with a maximum at the glass transition temperature Tg is demonstrated for μF(T) at constant γ. The increase of G below Tg is reasonably fitted for both models by a continuous cusp singularity, G(T)∝(1 - T/Tg)1/2, in qualitative agreement with recent theoretical predictions. It is argued, however, that longer sampling times may lead to a sharper transition.

  14. Shear-Modulus Investigations of Monohydroxy Alcohols: Evidence for a Short-Chain-Polymer Rheological Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecksher, Tina; Jakobsen, Bo; Dyre, J. C.;

    2014-01-01

    Liquids composed of small-molecule monohydroxy alcohols are demonstrated to display rheological behavior typical for oligomeric chains. This observation was made possible by rheological experiments in which more than seven decades in frequency and more than five decades on the mechanical modulus ...

  15. Acoustomicrofluidic application of quasi-shear surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darinskii, A N; Weihnacht, M; Schmidt, H

    2017-02-20

    The paper analyzes the possibility of using predominantly boundary polarized surface acoustic waves for actuating fluidic effects in microchannels fabricated inside containers made of PDMS. The aim is to remove a shortcoming peculiar to conventionally utilized predominantly vertically polarized waves. Such waves strongly attenuate while they propagate under container side walls because of the leakage into them. Due to a specific feature of PDMS - extremely small shear elastic modulus - losses of boundary polarized modes should be far smaller. The amplitude of vertical mechanical displacements can be increased right inside the channel owing to the scattering of acoustic fields. As an example, the predominantly vertically polarized surface wave on 128YX LiNbO3 is compared with the quasi-shear leaky wave on 64YX LiNbO3. Our computations predict that, given the electric power supplied to the launching transducer, the quasi-shear wave will drive the fluid more efficiently than the surface wave on 128YX LiNbO3 when the container wall thickness is larger than 25-30 wavelengths, if there are no additional scatterers inside the channel. In the presence of a scatterer, such as a thin gold strip, the quasi-shear wave can be more efficient when the wall thickness exceeds 10-15 wavelengths.

  16. Estimates and Rigorous Bounds on Pore-Fluid Enhanced Shear Modulus in Poroelastic Media with Hard and Soft Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J G

    2005-01-24

    A general analysis of poroelasticity for hexagonal, tetragonal, and cubic symmetry shows that four eigenvectors are pure shear modes with no coupling to the pore-fluid mechanics. The remaining two eigenvectors are linear combinations of pure compression and uniaxial shear, both of which are coupled to the fluid mechanics. The analysis proceeds by first reducing the problem to a 2 x 2 system. The poroelastic system including both anisotropy in the solid elastic frame (i.e., with ''hard anisotropy''), and also anisotropy of the poroelastic coefficients (''soft anisotropy'') is then studied in some detail. In the presence of anisotropy and spatial heterogeneity, mechanics of the pore fluid produces shear dependence on fluid bulk modulus in the overall poroelastic system. This effect is always present (though sometimes small in magnitude) in the systems studied, and can be comparatively large (up to a maximum increase of about 20 per cent) in some porous media--including porous glass and Schuler-Cotton Valley sandstone. General conclusions about poroelastic shear behavior are also related to some recently derived product formulas that determine overall shear response of these systems. Another method is also introduced based on rigorous Hashin-Shtrikman-style bounds for nonporous random polycrystals, followed by related self-consistent estimates of mineral constants for polycrystals. Then, another self-consistent estimation method is formulated for the porous case, and used to estimate drained and undrained effective constants. These estimates are compared and contrasted with the results of the first method and a consistent picture of the overall behavior is found in three computed examples for polycrystals of grains having tetragonal symmetry.

  17. Bioresponse to polymeric substrates: Effect of surface energy, modulus, topography, and surface graft copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Leslie Hoipkemeier

    Biofouling is the accumulation of biological matter on a substrate. It is essential to elucidate and model the major factors that affect both biological settlement and adhesion to substrates in order to develop coatings that minimize initial fouling or ease the removal of this fouling. To date, models that have estimated adhesion strength to coatings primarily included bulk elastic modulus and surface energy. Topography, however, has been found to dominate both these terms in the reduction of settlement and has been found to affect the adhesion strength as well. Silicone foul release coatings have demonstrated moderate success in the prevention of marine biofouling because of their low modulus and low surface energy. Problems exist with durability and eventual fouling of the coating due to the overgrowth of foulants that prefer hydrophobic substrates. This research details the characterization and the surface and bulk modification of a commercially available silicone elastomer. The modifications include bulk additives, surface topography, and surface graft copolymers. The effect of these modifications on biological response was then assayed using the alga Ulva as a model for marine biofouling. The unmodified silicone elastomer has a bulk modulus of approximately 1 MPa. The addition of vinyl functional polydimethylsiloxane oils allowed for a greater than 200% increase or a 90% decrease in the bulk modulus of the material. The addition of non-reactive polydimethylsiloxane oils allowed for a change in the surface lubricity of the elastomer without a significant change in the mechanical properties. Topographical modifications of the surface show a profound effect on the bioresponse. Appropriately scaled engineered microtopographies replicated in the silicone elastomer can produce a 250% increase in algal zoospore fouling or an 85% reduction in settlement relative to a smooth silicone elastomer. Finally, the modification of the surface energy of this material was

  18. The external and internal measurement impact on shear modulus distribution within cyclic small strains in triaxal studies into cohesive soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jastrzebska M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with comparison of tangent shear moduli Gs of kaolin from Tułowice obtained from cyclic triaxial tests on the basis of external and internal reading in the small strains range (10-5÷10-3. The tests were carried out on a modernised test bed, enabling full saturation of specimens using the back pressure method as well as a precise internal measurement of strains by means of contactless microdisplacements sensors. The value of linearity factor L is one of adopted quality criteria for two measuring methods. Maintaining a constant deformation rate the influence of various cyclic process parameters (deviator stress amplitude – constant or variable; high or low; initial level of stress and strain, at which the unloading and reloading cycles were started; overconsolidation ratio OCR as well as cycles’ number and arrangement on the "shear modulus – axial strain" characteristic was studied. The obtained values of Gint and Gext (or Lint and Lext clearly show an underestimation (even 5 times of Gs value within the range 10-5÷10-3 when using an external measurement. In addition, the differences between Gint and Gext, which develop differently depending on specified cyclic process parameters, gradually decrease with increasing axial strains.

  19. The diagnostic performance of shear wave speed (SWS) imaging for thyroid nodules with elasticity modulus and SWS measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; He, Ya-Ping; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Liu, Bo-Ji; Zhao, Chong-Ke; Fu, Hui-Jun; Wei, Qing; Xu, Hui-Xiong

    2017-01-06

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of a new technique of shear wave speed (SWS) imaging for the diagnosis of thyroid nodule with elasticity modulus and SWS measurement. 322 thyroid nodules in 322 patients (216 benign nodules, 106 malignant nodules) were included in this study. All the nodules received conventional ultrasound (US) and SWS imaging (Aplio500, Toshiba Medical Systems, Japan) before fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and/or surgery. The values of E-max and E-mean with elastic modulus (61.27 ± 36.31 kPa and 31.89 ± 19.11 kPa) or SWS (4.45 ± 1.49 m/s and 3.26 ± 2.71 m/s) in malignant nodules were significantly higher than those in benign lesions (29.18 ± 18.62 kPa and 15.85 ± 6.96 kPa, or 2.98 ± 0.85 m/s and 2.19 ± 0.42 m/s, all P 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, E-max (m/s) with SWS was identified to be the strongest independent predictor for malignant nodules (odds ratio [OR] = 16.760), followed by poorly-defined margin (OR = 7.792), taller-than-wide shape (OR = 3.160), micro-calcification (OR = 2.422), and E-max (kPa) with elastic modulus (OR = 0.914). The AUC was 0.813 for E-max with SWS (m/s) and 0.796 for E-max with elastic modulus (kPa). With cut-off SWS value of 3.52 m/s in E-max, sensitivity of 69.8%, specificity of 81.5%, and accuracy of 77.6% were achieved. SWS imaging is a valuable tool in predicting thyroid malignancy. E-max with SWS measurement is the strongest independent predictor for thyroid malignancy.

  20. Modulus Proposal for a Multi Axes Grinding of Sculptured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandečka, Karel

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents the use of the CAD/CAM system Cimatron for free programming of NC grinding machines. NC technology use, first of all in milling, turning and drilling operations, is widely dispersed at present. Development of these technologies depends to some extent on the cutting tools which are to be produced and sharpened to a high quality. Usable properties of the cutting tools, e.g. the shape accuracy, the quality of function surfaces, etc., are inspired by the production technology used. This technology plays a main role in production and sharpening of powerful and complex shaped cutting tools.

  1. Sand production prediction using ratio of shear modulus to bulk compressibility (case study)

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsan Khamehchi; Ebrahim Reisi

    2015-01-01

    Sand production is a serious problem widely existing in oil/gas production. The problems resulting from sand influx include abrasion of downhole tubular/casing, subsurface safety valve and surface equipment; casing/tubing buckling, failure of casing or liners from removal of surrounding formation, compaction and erosion; and loss of production caused by sand bridging in tubing and/or flow lines. There are several methods for predicting sand production. The methods include use of production da...

  2. Shear Modulus Estimation on Vastus Intermedius of Elderly and Young Females over the Entire Range of Isometric Contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong-Zhi; Li, Tian-Jie; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Elderly people often suffer from sarcopenia in their lower extremities, which gives rise to the increased susceptibility of fall. Comparing the mechanical properties of the knee extensor/flexors on elderly and young subjects is helpful in understanding the underlying mechanisms of the muscle aging process. However, although the stiffness of skeletal muscle has been proved to be positively correlated to its non-fatiguing contraction intensity by some existing methods, this conclusion has not been verified above 50% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) due to the limitation of their measurement range. In this study, a vibro-ultrasound system was set up to achieve a considerably larger measurement range on muscle stiffness estimation. Its feasibility was verified on self-made silicone phantoms by comparing with the mechanical indentation method. The system was then used to assess the stiffness of vastus intermedius (VI), one of the knee extensors, on 10 healthy elderly female subjects (56.7±4.9 yr) and 10 healthy young female subjects (27.6±5.0 yr). The VI stiffness in its action direction was confirmed to be positively correlated to the % MVC level (R2 = 0.999) over the entire range of isometric contraction, i.e. from 0% MVC (relaxed state) to 100% MVC. Furthermore, it was shown that there was no significant difference between the mean VI shear modulus of the elderly and young subjects in a relaxed state (p>0.1). However, when performing step isometric contraction, the VI stiffness of young female subjects was found to be larger than that of elderly participants (pmuscle and its relationship with intensity of active contraction. Furthermore, the vibro-ultrasound system has a potential to become a powerful tool for investigating the elderly’s muscle diseases. PMID:24991890

  3. Shear modulus estimation on vastus intermedius of elderly and young females over the entire range of isometric contraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong-Zhi Wang

    Full Text Available Elderly people often suffer from sarcopenia in their lower extremities, which gives rise to the increased susceptibility of fall. Comparing the mechanical properties of the knee extensor/flexors on elderly and young subjects is helpful in understanding the underlying mechanisms of the muscle aging process. However, although the stiffness of skeletal muscle has been proved to be positively correlated to its non-fatiguing contraction intensity by some existing methods, this conclusion has not been verified above 50% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC due to the limitation of their measurement range. In this study, a vibro-ultrasound system was set up to achieve a considerably larger measurement range on muscle stiffness estimation. Its feasibility was verified on self-made silicone phantoms by comparing with the mechanical indentation method. The system was then used to assess the stiffness of vastus intermedius (VI, one of the knee extensors, on 10 healthy elderly female subjects (56.7 ± 4.9 yr and 10 healthy young female subjects (27.6 ± 5.0 yr. The VI stiffness in its action direction was confirmed to be positively correlated to the % MVC level (R2 = 0.999 over the entire range of isometric contraction, i.e. from 0% MVC (relaxed state to 100% MVC. Furthermore, it was shown that there was no significant difference between the mean VI shear modulus of the elderly and young subjects in a relaxed state (p > 0.1. However, when performing step isometric contraction, the VI stiffness of young female subjects was found to be larger than that of elderly participants (p < 0.001, especially at the relatively higher contraction levels. The results expanded our knowledge on the mechanical property of the elderly's skeletal muscle and its relationship with intensity of active contraction. Furthermore, the vibro-ultrasound system has a potential to become a powerful tool for investigating the elderly's muscle diseases.

  4. Fractal Description of the Shearing-Surface of Tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bing-cheng; JING Chang; REN Zhao-hui; REN Li-yi

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the basic methods are introduced to calculate the fractal dimensions of the shearing surface of some tools. The fractal dimension of the shearing surface of experimental sampling is obtained and the fractal characteristics are also discussed. We can apply the fractal method to identify types of tools used by burglars and to do the job of individual recognition. New theories and methods are provided to measure and process the shearing surface profile of tools.

  5. Fractal analysis of polyethylene catalysts surface morphologies based on wavelet transform modulus maxima method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CEN Wei; YANG ShiFeng; XUE Rong; XU RiWei; YU DingSheng

    2007-01-01

    Surface morphologies of supported polyethylene (PE) catalysts are investigated by an approach combining fractal with wavelet. The multiscale edge (detail) pictures of catalyst surface are extracted by wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method. And, the distribution of edge points on the edge image at every scale is studied with fractal and multifractal method. Furthermore, the singularity intensity distribution of edge points in the PE catalyst is analyzed by multifractal spectrum based on WTMM. The results reveal that the fractal dimension values and multifractal spectrums of edge images at small scales have a good relation with the activity and surface morphology of PE catalyst. Meanwhile the catalyst exhibiting the higher activity shows the wider singular strength span of multifractal spectrum based on WTMM, as well as the more edge points with the higher singular intensity. The research on catalyst surface morphology with hybrid fractal and wavelet method exerts the superiorities of wavelet and fractal theories and offers a thought for studying solid surfaces morphologies.

  6. A sensitive dynamic viscometer for measuring the complex shear modulus in a steady shear flow using the method of orthogonal superposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, Jos; Ende, van den Dirk; Blom, Cor; Altena, Egbert G.; Beukema, Gerrit J.; Mellema, Jorrit

    1995-01-01

    A new instrument to carry out complex viscosity measurements in equilibrium and in a steady shear flow has been developed. A small amplitude harmonic excitation is superimposed orthogonally to the steady shear rate component. It is realized by a thin-walled cylinder, which oscillates in the axial di

  7. CAS-1模拟月壤动剪切模量与阻尼比的试验研究%Experimental study of dynamic shear modulus and damping ratio of CAS-1 lunar soil simulant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宇; 余飞; 陈善雄; 李剑

    2014-01-01

    Through the dynamic tests on the CAS-1 lunar soil simulant (national standard sample) which is developed by the Institute of Geochemistry and the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences with the GDS resonant column test instrument, the effect of the different void ratios and the different confining pressures on the dynamic shear modulus G and the damping ratiois analyzed. The test results show that, the dynamic shear modulus G is smaller as well as the damping ratiois larger, and dynamic shear modulus decreases rapidly as well as damping ratio increases sharply with the increase of shear strain in the real lunar surface environmental conditions with low stress level and large void ratio. By using the Hardin-Drnevich model, the average fitting curve of G/Gmax and/max with the change of the dynamic shear strainunder different void ratios and different confining pressures are obtained;and the correlation formulas between dynamic parameters of the maximum dynamic shear modulus Gmax, the maximum damping ratiomax, the reference shear strainr and the stress levelare discussed. Accordingly, the range intervals of Gmax, max, r within the drill sampling depth (0-3 m) of the lunar soil as well as the recommended values of G/Gmax and corresponding to each of the shear strain are presented.%针对中国科学院地球化学研究所与国家天文台合作研制成功的CAS-1模拟月壤(国家标准试样),利用GDS共振柱试验仪对模拟月壤开展动力学参数的试验研究,分析了不同孔隙比、不同围压对动剪切模量 G 及剪应变的影响规律。试验结果表明,在应力水平很低、孔隙比较大的真实月面环境条件下,动剪切模量 G 较小,阻尼比较大,且随着动剪应变的增大,动剪切模量快速减小,阻尼比急剧增大。采用 Hardin-Drnevich 模型,得到了不同孔隙比、不同围压下归一化动剪模量G/Gmax与归一

  8. Estimation of liquid properties by inverse problem analysis based on shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kento; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    A shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor can detect liquid properties, such as viscosity, density, permittivity, and conductivity. The advantage of using the SH-SAW sensors is the simultaneous detection of the mechanical and electrical properties of liquids. In this paper, we proposed a method of estimating the density and viscosity of liquids based on the inverse problem analysis. Glycerol or ethanol aqueous solutions were measured. The estimated and literature values were compared. For glycerol aqueous solutions, when the concentration is low, those values agree well. However, when the concentration is high, those values did not agree because the bulk modulus of glycerin solutions cannot be assumed as constant. On the other hand, as the bulk modulus of ethanol aqueous solutions can be assumed to be the same as that of water, the deviations between those values were small. Therefore, the proposed method is effective when the bulk modulus is assumed as constant.

  9. Application of an elastic 2D tube-waveform tomography to estimate the shear modulus in the vicinity of the FINO3 offshore platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhn, D.; Wilken, D.; Rabbel, W.

    2012-04-01

    The FINO3 project is aimed at the construction of an offshore research platform in the north-sea, hosting research projects dealing with offshore wind energy topics. As part of FINO3 our sub-project deals with the development of new seismic acquisition and inversion concepts for offshore-building foundation soil analysis. We are focussed on the determination of seismic parameters and structural information of the building plot of the platform. Possible changes of the shear modulus of the sediments in the vicinity of the FINO3 monopile due to mechanic loads on the platform are estimated by a tube-waveform tomography. The tube-waves are excited by a hammer blow at the internal wall of the FINO3 monopile above the water line. The tube-waves are propagating through the water column and the sediments and are measured in situ by hydrophones at the external wall of the monopile. Homogenous long wavelength starting models for the waveform tomography are estimated using simple 2D finite difference models. Possible shear-wave velocity starting models range from 150-300 m/s. The resolution of the tube-waveform tomography is estimated by simple chequerboard and random media models. Additionally first results of the data application in the vicinity of the monopile are presented.

  10. Surface Forces on a Deforming Ellipsoid in Shear Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kightley, E P; Evans, J A; Bortz, D M

    2016-01-01

    We present a model for computing the surface force density on a fluid ellipsoid in simple shear flow, which we derive by coupling existing models for the shape of a fluid droplet and the surface force density on a solid ellipsoid. The primary contribution of this coupling is to develop a method to compute the force acting against a plane intersecting the ellipsoid, which we call the fragmentation force. The model can be used to simulate the motion, shape, surface force density, and breakage of fluid droplets and colloidal aggregates in shear flow.

  11. Automated system for measuring the surface dilational modulus of liquid-air interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Dominik; Hofmann, Matthias J.; Motschmann, Hubert; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2016-06-01

    The surface dilational modulus is a crucial parameter for describing the rheological properties of aqueous surfactant solutions. These properties are important for many technological processes. The present paper describes a fully automated instrument based on the oscillating bubble technique. It works in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 500 Hz, where surfactant exchange dynamics governs the relaxation process. The originality of instrument design is the consistent combination of modern measurement technologies with advanced imaging and signal processing algorithms. Key steps on the way to reliable and precise measurements are the excitation of harmonic oscillation of the bubble, phase sensitive evaluation of the pressure response, adjustment and maintenance of the bubble shape to half sphere geometry for compensation of thermal drifts, contour tracing of the bubbles video images, removal of noise and artefacts within the image for improving the reliability of the measurement, and, in particular, a complex trigger scheme for the measurement of the oscillation amplitude, which may vary with frequency as a result of resonances. The corresponding automation and programming tasks are described in detail. Various programming strategies, such as the use of MATLAB® software and native C++ code are discussed. An advance in the measurement technique is demonstrated by a fully automated measurement. The instrument has the potential to mature into a standard technique in the fields of colloid and interface chemistry and provides a significant extension of the frequency range to established competing techniques and state-of-the-art devices based on the same measurement principle.

  12. Influence of shear velocity on frictional characteristics of rock surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T N Singh; A K Verma; Tanmay Kumar; Avi Dutt

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the fundamental issues related with the effect of shear velocity on frictional characteristics at the interface of rock surfaces is an important issue. In this paper, strain-rate dependence on friction is investigated in relation to sliding behaviour under normal load. The phenomenon of stick-slip of granite and shaly sandstone with a tribometer at constant rate of strain under normal loads was observed. Friction at the interface of the rock samples was developed by increasing shear strain at a constant rate by applying constant velocity using the tribometer. For shaly sandstone, state parameters ( and ) played a major role in determining the friction values and roughness of the contact surfaces as well. Higher values of for shaly sandstone may be attributed to the fact that its surface had a greater number of pronounced asperities. Rubbing between the surfaces does not mean that surface becomes smoother. This is because of variation of friction between surfaces.

  13. Surface micromachined differential piezoelectric shear-stress sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Randall P.; Kim, Donghwan; Gawalt, David P.; Hall, Neal A.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to measure viscous wall shear stress in high-speed flows is important for verifying simulated results typically obtained from direct numerical simulation in the aerodynamics research community, and robust sensors are required to measure wall shear reliably under such high-speed conditions. This letter summarizes the design, fabrication, and testing of a surface micromachined piezoelectric shear-stress sensor which uses a thin piezoelectric film to generate a voltage proportional to an applied shear stress without additional moving parts. A differential-cell architecture is used to enhance selectivity to shear stress while canceling normal-stress sensitivity. The conceptual design, fabrication details, and experimental measurements of device sensitivity are presented. A finite element model is used to validate the device performance against measurements, and to provide insight into the potential and electric fields underlying the device concept. The potential for understanding device behavior and optimization through modeling is illustrated using finite element analysis results. The minimum detectable shear stress for the sensor is estimated to be 52.9 mPa  √Hz-1 at 1.5 kHz.

  14. Anisotropic surface strain in single crystalline cobalt nanowires and its impact on the diameter-dependent Young's modulus

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Xiaohu

    2013-01-01

    Understanding and measuring the size-dependent surface strain of nanowires are essential to their applications in various emerging devices. Here, we report on the diameter-dependent surface strain and Young\\'s modulus of single-crystalline Co nanowires investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. Diameter-dependent initial longitudinal elongation of the nanowires is observed and ascribed to the anisotropic surface stress due to the Poisson effect, which serves as the basis for mechanical measurements. As the nanowire diameter decreases, a transition from the "smaller is softer" regime to the "smaller is tougher" regime is observed in the Young\\'s modulus of the nanowires, which is attributed to the competition between the elongation softening and the surface stiffening effects. Our work demonstrates a new nondestructive method capable of measuring the initial surface strain and estimating the Young\\'s modulus of single crystalline nanowires, and provides new insights on the size effect. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Importance of physical vs. chemical interactions in surface shear rheology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, P.A.; Kosters, H.; Egmond, M.R.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2006-01-01

    The stability of adsorbed protein layers against deformation has in literature been attributed to the formation of a continuous gel-like network. This hypothesis is mostly based on measurements of the increase of the surface shear elasticity with time. For several proteins this increase has been att

  16. Surface Shear, Persistent Wave Groups and Rogue Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chafin, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of waves with surface flows by considering the full set of conserved quantities, subtle but important surface elevations induced by wave packets and by directly considering the necessary forces to prevent packet spreading in the deep water limit. Narrow surface shear flows are shown to exert strong localizing and stabilizing forces on wavepackets to maintain their strength and amplify their intensity even in the linear regime. Necessary criticisms of some earlier notions of stress and angular momentum of waves are included and we argue that nonlinearity enters the system in a way that makes the formation of rogue waves nonperturbative. Quantitative bounds on the surface shear flow necessary to stabilize packets of any wave amplitude are given.

  17. Influence of heat treatment and veneering on the storage modulus and surface of zirconia ceramic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Siavikis; M. Behr; J.M. van der Zel; A.J. Feilzer; M. Rosentritt

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Glass-ceramic veneered zirconia is used for the application as fixed partial dentures. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate whether the heat treatment during veneering, the application of glass-ceramic for veneering or long term storage has an influence on the storage modulus of

  18. Experimental research on factors influencing dynamic shear modulus of dispersive clay%分散性土动剪切模量影响因素的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙仲林; 党进谦; 樊恒辉; 王飞

    2012-01-01

    The dispersive clay is a special soil which has low erosion resistance ability, impermeability, and high dispersion in pure water; it would cause serious harm to water conservancy construction. There have been many results on identification and modification of dispersive clay; but study of dynamic characteristics of dispersive clay is seldom reported in the newspapers. By using the DTC-199 dynamic torsional shear instrument to study the dynamic shear modulus of a kind of dispersive clay coming from a rolling soil dam in Ningxia. By changing the initial conditions such as moisture content, dry density and confining pressure and so on, to study its dynamic characteristics and its variation rules of dynamic shear modulus in different experimental conditions, then to compare and analyze the results. We can get that: dispersive ciay's dynamic shear stress-strain relations conform Hardin-Dmevich hyperbolic model; controlling the initial conditions, as other condition is the same, the lower moisture content, the greater dynamic shear modulus; the greater dry density is, the greater dynamic shear modulus is; the higher confining pressure is, the greater dynamic shear modulus is. Initial shear modulus and the maximum dynamic shear stress change as the same way. Dynamic shear modulus become smaller as dynamic shear strain increases. Compared with ordinary clay, the moisture content has greater impact on its strength and deformation.%分散性土耐冲蚀性低、抗渗性能差,在纯水中具有很高的分散性,严重威胁水利工程的安全.在分散性土的鉴别和改性方面已有很多成果,但分散性土动力特性的研究见诸报端的还很少.利用日本诚研社生产的DTC-199型电液伺服加荷往复扭剪三轴仪,对取自宁夏某碾压均质土坝的分散性土的动剪切模量进行了探索.通过改变试样的含水率、干密度和围压等初始条件,研究分散性土在不同试验条件下的动力特性及剪切模量的变化

  19. Stability of shear shallow water flows with free surface

    CERN Document Server

    Chesnokov, Alexander; Gavrilyuk, Sergey; Pavlov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Stability of inviscid shear shallow water flows with free surface is studied in the framework of the Benney equations. This is done by investigating the generalized hyperbolicity of the integrodifferential Benney system of equations. It is shown that all shear flows having monotonic convex velocity profiles are stable. The hydrodynamic approximations of the model corresponding to the classes of flows with piecewise linear continuous and discontinuous velocity profiles are derived and studied. It is shown that these approximations possess Hamiltonian structure and a complete system of Riemann invariants, which are found in an explicit form. Sufficient conditions for hyperbolicity of the governing equations for such multilayer flows are formulated. The generalization of the above results to the case of stratified fluid is less obvious, however, it is established that vorticity has a stabilizing effect.

  20. Relationship between small-strain shear modulus and growth of strength for stabilized silt%固化粉土小应变剪切模量与强度增长相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张涛; 刘松玉; 蔡国军

    2015-01-01

    小应变剪切模量和无侧限抗压强度是表征固化土刚度和强度特性的两个重要参数.简要介绍了弯曲元测试技术的原理及其在试验中存在的问题,采用压电陶瓷弯曲元测试技术对水泥和木质素固化剂固化粉土试样在不同养护龄期下的小应变剪切模量进行了测试,同时对相应龄期下试样进行了常规无侧限抗压强度试验,通过引入归一化参数G28和 UCS28对不同固化土的小应变剪切模量和无侧限抗压强度之间的相关关系进行分析,提出了固化土刚度与强度的相关性模型,可为地基处理中固化土的无损测试与加固效果评价提供新的方法.结果表明,水泥、木质素固化粉土的小应变剪切模量随养护龄期增加而增加,养护龄期28 d内增长显著,28 d后增长趋于平稳;相同类型固化土不论固化剂掺量多少,其小应变剪切模量随养护时间的发展在本质上是相同的;固化土归一化无侧限抗压强度表现出与小应变剪切模量相似的发展趋势;提出的固化土归一化模型可作为一种土体强度无损检测的新方法.%The small-strain shear modulus and unconfined compressive strength are two important parameters to characterize the stiffness and strength of stabilized soils. The fundamental and the main problems existing in the experiment of bender element technique are briefly reviewed. The small-strain shear modulus of cement and lignin stabilized silt are tested under different curing time by piezoelectric bender element technique. The conventional unconfined compressive strength test is also carried out on stabilized samples under different curing time. The relationships between the small-strain shear modulus and unconfined compressive strength of different stabilized soils are analyzed by introducing the normalized parametersG28 and UCS28. A stabilization model for the stiffness and strength of stabilized soils is proposed to provide a new method for

  1. Effect of fracture surface roughness on shear crack growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, T.S.; Watt, D.W. (New Hampshire Univ., Durham, NH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Mendelsohn, D.A. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Engineering Mechanics)

    1992-12-01

    A model of fracture surface interference for Mode I fatigue crack profiles was developed and evaluated. Force required to open the crack faces is estimated from point contact expressions for Mode I stress intensity factor. Force transfer across contacting asperities is estimated and used to calculate Mode II resistance stress intensity factor (applied factor is sum of effective and resistance factors). Electro-optic holographic interferometry was used to measure 3-D displacement field around a Mode I fatigue pre-crack in Al loaded in Mode II shear. Induced Mode I crack face displacements were greater than Mode II displacements. Plane stress shear lip caused displacement normal to surface as the crack faces are displaced. Algorithms are being developed to track the displacements associated with the original coordinate system in the camera. A 2-D boundary element method code for mixed mode I and II loading of a rough crack (sawtooth asperity model) has been completed. Addition of small-scale crack tip yielding and a wear model are completed and underway, respectively.

  2. Thermo-Oxidative Stability of Graphite/PMR-15 Composites: Effect of Fiber Surface Modification on Composite Shear Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhukar, Madhu S.; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Papadopolous, Demetrios S.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to establish a correlation between the weight loss of a polyimide (PMR- 15) matrix and graphite fibers and the in-plane shear properties of their unidirectional composites subjected to different isothermal aging times up to 1000 hr at 316 C. The role of fiber surface treatment on the composite degradation during the thermo-oxidative aging was investigated by using A4 graphite fibers with three surface modifications: untreated (AU-4), surface treated (AS-4), and surface treated and sized with an epoxy-compatible sizing (AS-4G). The weight loss of the matrix fibers, and composites was determined during the aging. The effect of thermal aging was seen in all the fiber samples in terms of weight loss and reduction in fiber diameter. Calculated values of weight loss fluxes for different surfaces of rectangular unidirectional composite plates showed that the largest weight loss occurred at those cut surfaces where fibers were perpendicular to the surface. Consequently, the largest amount of damage was also noted on these cut surfaces. Optical observation of the neat matrix and composite plates subjected to different aging times revealed that the degradation (such as matrix microcracking and void growth) occurred in a thin surface layer near the specimen edges. The in-plane shear modulus of the composites was unaffected by the fiber surface treatment and the thermal aging. The shear strength of the composites with the untreated fibers was the lowest and it decreased with aging. A fracture surface examination of the composites with untreated fibers suggested that the weak interface allowed the oxidation reaction to proceed along the interface and thus expose the inner material to further oxidation. The results indicated that the fiber-matrix interface affected the composite degradation process during its thermal aging and that the the weak interface accelerated the composite degradation.

  3. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  4. Near surface shear wave velocity in Bucharest, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. von Steht

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bucharest, the capital of Romania with nearly 2 1/2 million inhabitants, is endangered by the strong earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone. To obtain information on the near surface shear-wave velocity Vs structure and to improve the available microzonations we conducted seismic refraction measurements in two parks of the city. There the shallow Vs structure is determined along five profiles, and the compressional-wave velocity (Vp structure is obtained along one profile. Although the amount of data collected is limited, they offer a reasonable idea about the seismic velocity distribution in these two locations. This knowledge is useful for a city like Bucharest where seismic velocity information so far is sparse and poorly documented. Using sledge-hammer blows on a steel plate and a 24-channel recording unit, we observe clear shear-wave arrivals in a very noisy environment up to a distance of 300 m from the source. The Vp model along profile 1 can be correlated with the known near surface sedimentary layers. Vp increases from 320 m/s near the surface to 1280 m/s above 55–65 m depth. The Vs models along all five profiles are characterized by low Vs (<350 m/s in the upper 60 m depth and a maximum Vs of about 1000 m/s below this depth. In the upper 30 m the average Vs30 varies from 210 m/s to 290 m/s. The Vp-Vs relations lead to a high Poisson's ratio of 0.45–0.49 in the upper ~60 m depth, which is an indication for water-saturated clayey sediments. Such ground conditions may severely influence the ground motion during strong Vrancea earthquakes.

  5. Effects of loading history on small-strain shear modulus of saturated clays%循环应力历史对饱和软黏土小应变剪切模量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷川; 蔡袁强; 王军; 杨芳; 胡秀青

    2012-01-01

    饱和软黏土的小应变剪切模量Gmax是其基本力学参数。在进行饱和软黏土的有效应力动力分析时,往往认为小应变剪切模量Gmax只随着有效应力的降低而衰减,而不受动荷载应力历史的影响,因此基本采用静力状态下得到的小应变剪切模量代替相同有效应力时动力状态下的小应变剪切模量。但是,对于饱和软黏土,目前并没有足够多的试验数据证明这一假设。基于这一考虑,通过GDS动三轴及弯曲元测试系统,研究了循环应力历史对饱和软黏土小应变剪切模量的影响,试验结果表明循环应力历史对Gmax的影响较大,采用静力状态下得到的Gmax代替动力状态下的Gmax并不可取。同时,发现可以使用小应变剪切模量的突变来表征饱和软黏土的结构破坏。%The small-strain shear modulus is the main physical index of saturated clays. In the methods for the effective stress analysis, the mall-strain shear modulus obtained from static tests is often used in the dynamic analysis without regard to the influence of loading history. However, for saturated clays, this assumption has not been proved by enough test data. Based on this consideration, a few cyclic triaxial and bender element tests were conducted to study the influence of loading history on the small-strain shear modulus of saturated clays. The test results indicate that the influence is great and the above assumption is not correct. Meanwhile, it is also found that the small-strain shear modulus can be used to determine the failure criterion of saturated clays under cyclic loading.

  6. Surface waves on arbitrary vertically-sheared currents

    CERN Document Server

    Smeltzer, Benjamin K

    2016-01-01

    We study dispersion properties of linear surface gravity waves propagating in an arbitrary direction atop a current profile of arbitrary depth-varying magnitude using a piecewise linear approximation, and develop a robust numerical framework for practical calculation. The method has been much used in the past in 2D, and we herein extend and apply it to 3D problems. Being valid for all wavelengths without loss of accuracy, the scheme is particularly well suited to solve problems involving Fourier transformations in the horizontal plane. We examine the group and phase velocities over different wavelength regimes and current profiles, highlighting characteristics due to the depth-variable vorticity. We show an example application to ship waves on an arbitrary current profile, and demonstrate qualitative differences in the wake patterns between a concave down profile when compared to a constant shear profile with equal depth-averaged vorticity. New insight is given concerning the nature of extra spurious solution...

  7. Bacterial deposition to fluoridated and non-fluoridated polyurethane coatings with different elastic modulus and surface tension in a parallel plate and a stagnation point flow chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, D.P.; Huijs, F.M.; Vries, J. de; Klijnstra, J.W.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, H.C. van der

    2003-01-01

    Deposition of three marine bacterial strains with different cell surface hydrophobicities from artificial seawater to polyurethane coatings on glass with different surface tensions and elastic modulus was studied in situ in a parallel plate (PP) and stagnation point (SP) flow chamber. Different surf

  8. Oscillating sources in a shear flow with a free surface

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2016-01-01

    We report on progress on the free surface flow in the presence of submerged oscillating line sources (2D) or point sources (3D) when a simple shear flow is present varying linearly with depth. Such sources are in routine use as Green functions in the realm of potential theory for calculating wave-body interactions, but no such theory exists in for rotational flow. We solve the linearized problem in 2D and 3D from first principles, based on the Euler equations, when the sources are at rest relative to the undisturbed surface. Both in 2D and 3D a new type of solution appears compared to irrotational case, a critical layer-like flow whose surface manifestation ("wave") drifts downstream from the source at the velocity of the flow at the source depth. We analyse the additional vorticity in light of the vorticity equation and provide a simple physical argument why a critical layer is a necessary consequence of Kelvin's circulation theorem. In 3D a related critical layer phenomenon occurs at every depth, whereby a ...

  9. Dynamic Shear Modulus Prediction of Wood Plastic Composite Materials Based on Gray Neural Network%基于灰色神经网络木塑复合材料动态剪切模量预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦楠; 马莉英; 王琳

    2015-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of wood-plastic composite materials processing technology, this paper designed the wood-plastic composite materials processing experiment under different process conditions, and obtained the mechanical properties under different conditions. Based on gray neural network forecasting model, this paper established the prediction model of wood-plastic composite materials dynamic shear modulus. The results show that this model can predict the wood-plastic composite materials dynamic shear modulus well, and the prediction maximum error is 0.69%, which achieves practical engineering requirements.%基于木塑复合材料加工工艺的特点,设计了不用工艺条件下的木塑复合材料工艺实验,并得到了不同条件下的力学性能。本文在灰色神经网络组合预测模型的基础上,建立了木塑复合材料动态剪切模量的预测模型。结果表明:该模型能够较好地预测出木塑复合材料动态剪切模量,预测最大误差为0.69%,能够达到工程实际要求。

  10. Succeed escape: Flow shear promotes tumbling of Escherichia colinear a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Understanding how bacteria move close to a surface under various stimuli is crucial for a broad range of microbial processes including biofilm formation, bacterial transport and migration. While prior studies focus on interactions between single stimulus and bacterial suspension, we emphasize on compounding effects of flow shear and solid surfaces on bacterial motility, especially reorientation and tumble. We have applied microfluidics and digital holographic microscopy to capture a large number (>105) of 3D Escherichia coli trajectories near a surface under various flow shear. We find that near-surface flow shear promotes cell reorientation and mitigates the tumble suppression and re-orientation confinement found in a quiescent flow, and consequently enhances surface normal bacterial dispersion. Conditional sampling suggests that two complimentary hydrodynamic mechanisms, Jeffrey Orbit and shear-induced flagella unbundling, are responsible for the enhancement in bacterial tumble motility. These findings imply that flow shear may mitigate cell trapping and prevent biofilm initiation.

  11. Surface waves on currents with arbitrary vertical shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Benjamin K.; Ellingsen, Simen Å.

    2017-04-01

    We study dispersion properties of linear surface gravity waves propagating in an arbitrary direction atop a current profile of depth-varying magnitude using a piecewise linear approximation and develop a robust numerical framework for practical calculation. The method has been much used in the past for the case of waves propagating along the same axis as the background current, and we herein extend and apply it to problems with an arbitrary angle between the wave propagation and current directions. Being valid for all wavelengths without loss of accuracy, the scheme is particularly well suited to solve problems involving a broad range of wave vectors, such as ship waves and Cauchy-Poisson initial value problems. We examine the group and phase velocities over different wavelength regimes and current profiles, highlighting characteristics due to the depth-variable vorticity. We show an example application to ship waves on an arbitrary current profile and demonstrate qualitative differences in the wake patterns between concave down and concave up profiles when compared to a constant shear profile with equal depth-averaged vorticity. We also discuss the nature of additional solutions to the dispersion relation when using the piecewise-linear model. These are vorticity waves, drifting vortical structures which are artifacts of the piecewise model. They are absent for a smooth profile and are spurious in the present context.

  12. EFFECT OF FABRIC ANISOTROPY ON DYNAMIC SHEAR MODULUS IN K0 CONDITION%K0条件下砂土原生各向异性的动剪切模量试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李博; 余闯; 曾向武

    2013-01-01

    工程实践中动剪切模量是砂土关键的动力学参数之一。结合压电陶瓷弯曲元波速测试技术开展K0条件下砂土的原生各向异性对动剪切模量的影响试验研究。通过自行研制的试验装置,对沉积角度分别为0°,±45°和90°的丰浦砂在加卸荷条件下剪切模量的变化进行研究。结果表明:90°的砂样在单向荷载作用下,水平方向和垂直方向的剪切模量最大,并且还发现在卸载条件下,不同沉积角度的砂样对应力历史反应不一,沉积角度为90°的砂样应力历史的影响最明显,验证不同的沉积方向对砂土小应变剪切刚度的影响十分显著。基于试验结果,对现有的微观本构模型进行验证,发现该本构模型能较好地反映原生各向异性、应力状态和颗粒接触特征对土的动剪切模量的影响。%Dynamic shear modulus is a critical factor for sand in engineering practice. In order to evaluate the effects of fabric anisotropy on dynamic shear modulus,the measurement of wave velocity by bender element technique is conducted. The special container is manufactured to prepare the model with deposition angles of 0°, ±45°and 90°. The Toyoura sand specimens with specified deposition angles are tested in loading and unloading conditions. The results show that the sand sample prepare in the deposition angle of 90°has the largest shear modulus in horizontal and vertical directions. It is found that in unloading condition,specimens with different deposition angles show different responses for stress history,and response of sand sample with deposition angle of 90°is most obvious,which verify that influence of deposition angle on small strain shear stiffness of sand is very significant. Based on the results,a micromechanical stress-strain model is validated,which could show the influences of fabric anisotropy,stress condition and particle contact characteristics on dynamic shear modulus

  13. The wall shear force on a liquid droplet adhering to a solid surface under an imposed shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabtay, Royi; Frankel, Itzchak

    2011-11-01

    We focus on large droplet viscosities typical of those appearing in the upper respiratory tract of CF or chronically ventilated patients. To further simplify the problem we assume vanishingly small capillary numbers and consider (non-deformable) hemispherical droplets. Under these assumptions the problem decouples into (i) the external problem of imposed shear flow over a planar solid wall with a hemispherical protuberance which is simulated by means of a commercially available finite - volume code and (ii) the inner Stokes flow animated by the now prescribed shear stress distribution over the liquid surface. The latter problem is addressed through use of series expansions in spherical harmonics. The interaction between the caterpillar inner - fluid motion and the solid substrate results in a shear force adding to the external - flow drag force acting in the downstream direction. Throughout the range of outer - flow Reynolds numbers considered (0.05-50) this interaction contributes over 35% of the total hydrodynamic force acting to dislodge the droplet.

  14. Turbulent mass transfer through a flat shear-free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnaudet, Jacques; Calmet, Isabelle

    2006-04-01

    Mass transfer through the flat shear-free surface of a turbulent open-channel flow is investigated over a wide range of Schmidt number (1 ≤ Sc ≤ 200) by means of large-eddy simulations using a dynamic subgrid-scale model. In contrast with situations previously analysed using direct numerical simulation, the turbulent Reynolds number Re is high enough for the near-surface turbulence to be fairly close to isotropy and almost independent of the structure of the flow in the bottom region (the statistics of the velocity field are identical to those described by I. Calmet & J. Magnaudet J. Fluid Mech. vol. 474, 2003, p. 355). The main statistical features of the concentration field are analysed in connection with the structure of the turbulent motion below the free surface, characterized by a velocity macroscale u and an integral length scale L. All near-surface statistical profiles are found to be Sc-independent when plotted vs. the dimensionless coordinate Sc({1) / 2}yu/nu (y is the distance to the surface and nu is the kinematic viscosity). Mean concentration profiles are observed to be linear throughout an inner diffusive sublayer whose thickness is about one Batchelor microscale, i.e. LSc({) - 1 / 2 }Re({) - 3 / 4}. In contrast, the concentration fluctuations are found to reach their maximum near the edge of the outer diffusive layer which scales as LSc({) - 1 / 2}Re({) - 1 / 2}. Instantaneous views of the near-surface isovalues of the concentration and vertical velocity are used to reveal the influence of the Schmidt number. In particular, it is observed that at high Schmidt number, the tiny concentration fluctuations that subsist in the diffusive sublayer just mirror the divergence of the two-component surface velocity field. Co-spectra of concentration and vertical velocity fluctuations indicate that the main contribution to the turbulent mass flux is provided by eddies whose horizontal size is close to L, which strongly supports the view that the mass

  15. Broad belts of shear zones: The common form of surface rupture produced by the 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.M.; Cruikshank, K.M. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Richard H. Jahns Engineering Geology Lab.; Fleming, R.W. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Surface rupturing during the 28 June 1992, Landers, California earthquake, east of Los Angeles, accommodated right-lateral offsets up to about 6 m along segments of distinct, en echelon fault zones with a total length of about 80 km. The offsets were accommodated generally not by faults -- distinct slip surfaces -- but rather by shear zones, tabular bands of localized shearing. In long, straight stretches of fault zones at Landers the rupture is characterized by telescoping of shear zones and intensification of shearing: broad shear zones of mild shearing, containing narrow shear zones of more intense shearing, containing even-narrower shear zones of very intense shearing, which may contain a fault. Thus the ground ruptured across broad belts of shearing with subparallel walls, oriented NW. Each broad belt consists of a broad zone of mild shearing, extending across its entire width (50 to 200 m), and much narrower (a few m wide) shear zones that accommodate most of the offset of the belt and are portrayed by en echelon tension cracks. In response to right-lateral shearing, the slices of ground bounded by the tension cracks rotated in a clockwise sense, producing left lateral shearing, and the slices were forced against the walls of the shear zone, producing thrusting. Even narrower shear zones formed within the narrow shear zones, and some of these were faults. Although the narrower shear zones probably are indicators to right-lateral fault segments at depth, the surface rupturing during the earthquake is characterized not by faulting, but by zones of shearing at various scales. Furthermore, understanding of the formation of the shear zones may be critical to understanding of earthquake faulting because, where faulting is associated with the formation of a shear zone, the faulting occurs late in the development of the shear zone. The faulting occurs after a shear zone or a belt of shear zones forms.

  16. Monitoring polymer properties using shear horizontal surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Dana Y; Millard, Paul J; Pereira da Cunha, Mauricio

    2009-10-01

    Real-time, nondestructive methods for monitoring polymer film properties are increasingly important in the development and fabrication of modern polymer-containing products. Online testing of industrial polymer films during preparation and conditioning is required to minimize material and energy consumption, improve the product quality, increase the production rate, and reduce the number of product rejects. It is well-known that shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) propagation is sensitive to mass changes as well as to the mechanical properties of attached materials. In this work, the SH-SAW was used to monitor polymer property changes primarily dictated by variations in the viscoelasticity. The viscoelastic properties of a negative photoresist film were monitored throughout the ultraviolet (UV) light-induced polymer cross-linking process using SH-SAW delay line devices. Changes in the polymer film mass and viscoelasticity caused by UV exposure produced variations in the phase velocity and attenuation of the SH-SAW propagating in the structure. Based on measured polymer-coated delay line scattering transmission responses (S(21)) and the measured polymer layer thickness and density, the viscoelastic constants c(44) and eta(44) were extracted. The polymer thickness was found to decrease 0.6% during UV curing, while variations in the polymer density were determined to be insignificant. Changes of 6% in c(44) and 22% in eta(44) during the cross-linking process were observed, showing the sensitivity of the SH-SAW phase velocity and attenuation to changes in the polymer film viscoelasticity. These results indicate the potential for SH-SAW devices as online monitoring sensors for polymer film processing.

  17. Shear driven droplet shedding and coalescence on a superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtadernejad, S.; Tembely, M.; Jadidi, M.; Esmail, N.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2015-03-01

    The interest on shedding and coalescence of sessile droplets arises from the importance of these phenomena in various scientific problems and industrial applications such as ice formation on wind turbine blades, power lines, nacelles, and aircraft wings. It is shown recently that one of the ways to reduce the probability of ice accretion on industrial components is using superhydrophobic coatings due to their low adhesion to water droplets. In this study, a combined experimental and numerical approach is used to investigate droplet shedding and coalescence phenomena under the influence of air shear flow on a superhydrophobic surface. Droplets with a size of 2 mm are subjected to various air speeds ranging from 5 to 90 m/s. A numerical simulation based on the Volume of Fluid method coupled with the Large Eddy Simulation turbulent model is carried out in conjunction with the validating experiments to shed more light on the coalescence of droplets and detachment phenomena through a detailed analysis of the aerodynamics forces and velocity vectors on the droplet and the streamlines around it. The results indicate a contrast in the mechanism of two-droplet coalescence and subsequent detachment with those related to the case of a single droplet shedding. At lower speeds, the two droplets coalesce by attracting each other with successive rebounds of the merged droplet on the substrate, while at higher speeds, the detachment occurs almost instantly after coalescence, with a detachment time decreasing exponentially with the air speed. It is shown that coalescence phenomenon assists droplet detachment from the superhydrophobic substrate at lower air speeds.

  18. Surface mixed layer deepening through wind shear alignment in a seasonally stratified shallow sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, B. J.; Rippeth, T. P.; Simpson, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    Inertial oscillations are a ubiquitous feature of the surface ocean. Here we combine new observations with a numerical model to investigate the role of inertial oscillations in driving deepening of the surface mixed layer in a seasonally stratified sea. Observations of temperature and current structure, from a mooring in the Western Irish Sea, reveal episodes of strong currents (>0.3 m s-1) lasting several days, resulting in enhanced shear across the thermocline. While the episodes of strong currents are coincident with windy periods, the variance in the shear is not directly related to the wind stress. The shear varies on a subinertial time scale with the formation of shear maxima lasting several hours occurring at the local inertial period of 14.85 h. These shear maxima coincide with the orientation of the surface current being at an angle of approximately 90° to the right of the wind direction. Observations of the water column structure during windy periods reveal deepening of the surface mixed layer in a series of steps which coincide with a period of enhanced shear. During the periods of enhanced shear gradient, Richardson number estimates indicate Ri-1 ≥ 4 at the base of the surface mixed layer, implying the deepening as a result of shear instability. A one-dimensional vertical exchange model successfully reproduces the magnitude and phase of the shear spikes as well as the step-like deepening. The observations and model results therefore identify the role of wind shear alignment as a key entrainment mechanism driving surface mixed layer deepening in a shallow, seasonally stratified sea.

  19. COMPARISON OF THE SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF BRACKETS USING TWO SURFACE CONDITIONING METHODS FOR PORCELAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Ballesteros-Pinzón, Claudia; Bermúdez-Lozano, Jesús A.; Coronel-Corzo, Nelly; de-León-Goenaga, Edwin; Delgado, Linda P.; Báez-Quintero, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: During 2010 the degree research “Comparison of the shear bond strength of brackets using two surface conditioning methods for porcelain” was carried out at Universidad Cooperativa de Colombia in Bogota. Objective: To determine the shear bond strength of metal brackets cemented on porcelain using two surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: Forty human premolars were used and prepared for further cementing porcelain-metal crowns. There were two groups of 20 teeth each...

  20. Surface and downhole shear wave seismic methods for thick soil site investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, J.A.; Benjumea, B.; Harris, J.B.; Miller, R.D.; Pullan, S.E.; Burns, R.A.; Good, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Shear wave velocity-depth information is required for predicting the ground motion response to earthquakes in areas where significant soil cover exists over firm bedrock. Rather than estimating this critical parameter, it can be reliably measured using a suite of surface (non-invasive) and downhole (invasive) seismic methods. Shear wave velocities from surface measurements can be obtained using SH refraction techniques. Array lengths as large as 1000 m and depth of penetration to 250 m have been achieved in some areas. High resolution shear wave reflection techniques utilizing the common midpoint method can delineate the overburden-bedrock surface as well as reflecting boundaries within the overburden. Reflection data can also be used to obtain direct estimates of fundamental site periods from shear wave reflections without the requirement of measuring average shear wave velocity and total thickness of unconsolidated overburden above the bedrock surface. Accurate measurements of vertical shear wave velocities can be obtained using a seismic cone penetrometer in soft sediments, or with a well-locked geophone array in a borehole. Examples from thick soil sites in Canada demonstrate the type of shear wave velocity information that can be obtained with these geophysical techniques, and show how these data can be used to provide a first look at predicted ground motion response for thick soil sites. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  1. Behavior of Fiber Glass Bolts, Rock Bolts and Cable Bolts in Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuwei; Aziz, Naj; Mirzaghorbanali, Ali; Nemcik, Jan

    2016-07-01

    This paper experimentally compares the shear behavior of fiber glass (FG) bolt, rock bolt (steel rebar bolt) and cable bolt for the bolt contribution to bolted concrete surface shear strength, and bolt failure mode. Two double shear apparatuses of different size were used for the study. The tensile strength, the shear strength and the deformation modulus of bolt control the shear behavior of a sheared bolted joint. Since the strength and deformation modulus of FG bolt, rock bolt and cable bolt obtained from uniaxial tensile tests are different, their shear behavior in reinforcing joints is accordingly different. Test results showed that the shear stiffness of FG bolted joints decreased gradually from the beginning to end, while the shear stiffness of joints reinforced by rock bolt and cable bolt decreased bi-linearly, which is clearly consistent with their tensile deformation modulus. The bolted joint shear stiffness was highly influenced by bolt pretension in the high stiffness stage for both rock bolt and cable bolt, but not in the low stiffness stage. The rock bolt contribution to joint shear strength standardised by the bolt tensile strength was the largest, followed by cable bolts, then FG bolts. Both the rock bolts and cable bolts tended to fail in tension, while FG bolts in shear due to their low shear strength and constant deformation modulus.

  2. Estimation of the shear stress on the surface of an aortic valve leaflet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, M W; LaBorde, D V; Yoganathan, A P

    1999-01-01

    The limited durability of xenograft heart valves and the limited supply of allografts have sparked interest in tissue engineered replacement valves. A bioreactor for tissue engineered valves must operate at conditions that optimize the biosynthetic abilities of seeded cells while promoting their adherence to the leaflet matrix. An important parameter is shear stress, which is known to influence cellular behavior and may thus be crucial in bioreactor optimization. Therefore, an accurate estimate of the shear stress on the leaflet surface would not only improve our understanding of the mechanical environment of aortic valve leaflets, but it would also aid in bioreactor design. To estimate the shear stress on the leaflet surface, two-component laser-Doppler velocimetry measurements have been conducted inside a transparent polyurethane valve with a trileaflet structure similar to the native aortic valve. Steady flow rates of 7.5, 15.0, and 22.5 L/min were examined to cover the complete range possible during the cardiac cycle. The laminar shear stresses were calculated by linear regression of four axial velocity measurements near the surface of the leaflet. The maximum shear stress recorded was 79 dyne/cm2, in agreement with boundary layer theory and previous experimental and computational studies. This study has provided a range of shear stresses to be explored in bioreactor design and has defined a maximum shear stress at which cells must remain adherent upon a tissue engineered construct.

  3. Stress-strain curves of adsorbed protein layers at the air/water interface measured with surface shear rheology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, A.; Bos, M.; Stuart, M.C.; Vliet, T. van

    2002-01-01

    Interfacial shear properties of adsorbed protein layers at the air/water interface were determined using a Couette-type surface shear rheometer. Such experiments are often used to determine a steady-state ratio between stress and rate of strain, which is then denoted as "surface shear viscosity". Ho

  4. Inverting Comet Acoustic Surface Sounding Experiment (CASSE) touchdown signals to measure the elastic modulus of comet material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W.; Faber, C.; Knapmeyer, M.; Witte, L.; Schröder, S.; Tune, J.; Möhlmann, D.; Roll, R.; Chares, B.; Fischer, H.; Seidensticker, K.

    2014-07-01

    The landing of Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is scheduled for November 11, 2014. Each of the three landing feet of Philae house a triaxial acceleration sensor of CASSE, which will thus be the first sensors to be in mechanical contact with the cometary surface. CASSE will be in listening mode to record the deceleration of the lander, when it impacts with the comet at a velocity of approx. 0.5 m/s. The analysis of this data yields information on the reduced elastic modulus and the yield stress of the comet's surface material. We describe a series of controlled landings of a lander model. The tests were conducted in the Landing & Mobility Test Facility (LAMA) of the DLR Institute of Space Systems in Bremen, Germany, where an industrial robot can be programmed to move landers or rovers along predefined paths, allowing to adapt landing procedures with predefined velocities. The qualification model of the Philae landing gear was used in the tests. It consists of three legs manufactured of carbon fiber and metal joints. A dead mass of the size and mass of the lander housing is attached via a damper above the landing gear to represent the lander structure as a whole. Attached to each leg is a foot with two soles and a mechanically driven fixation screw (''ice screw'') to secure the lander on the comet. The right soles, if viewed from the outside towards the lander body, house a Brüel & Kjaer DeltaTron 4506 triaxial piezoelectric accelerometer as used on the spacecraft. Orientation of the three axes was such that one of the axes, here the X-axis of the accelerometer, points downwards, while the Y- and Z-axes are horizontal. Data were recorded at a sampling rate of 8.2 kHz within a time gate of 2 s. In parallel, a video sequence was taken, in order to monitor the touchdown on the sand and the movement of the ice screws. Touchdown measurements were conducted on three types of ground with landing velocities between 0.1 to 1.1 m/s. Landings with low velocities were

  5. Area Expansivity Moduli of Regenerating Plant Protoplast Cell Walls Exposed to Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Yuu; Iino, Masaaki; Watanabe, Ugai

    2005-05-01

    To control the elasticity of the plant cell wall, protoplasts isolated from cultured Catharanthus roseus cells were regenerated in shear flows of 115 s-1 (high shear) and 19.2 s-1 (low shear, as a control). The surface area expansivity modulus and the surface breaking strength of these regenerating protoplasts were measured by a micropipette aspiration technique. Cell wall synthesis was also measured using a cell wall-specific fluorescent dye. High shear exposure for 3 h doubled both the surface area modulus and breaking strength observed under low shear, significantly decreased cell wall synthesis, and roughly quadrupled the moduli of the cell wall. Based on the cell wall synthesis data, we estimated the three-dimensional modulus of the cell wall to be 4.1± 1.2 GPa for the high shear, and 0.35± 0.2 GPa for the low shear condition, using the surface area expansivity modulus divided by the cell wall thickness, which is identical with the Young’s modulus divided by 2(1-σ), where σ is Poisson's ratio. We concluded that high shear exposure considerably strengthens the newly synthesized cell wall.

  6. An Integrated Laser-Induced Piezoelectric/Differential Confocal Surface Acoustic Wave System for Measurement of Thin Film Young’s Modulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotang Hu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper presents the design and development results of a system setup for measuring Young’s modulus of thin films by laser-induced surface acoustic waves based on the integration of two detection methods, namely, piezoelectric transducer detection and differential confocal detection, which may be used for conducting consecutive or simultaneous measurements. After demonstrating the capabilities of each detection approach, it is shown how, depending on a wider range of applications, sample materials and measurement environments, the developed integrated system inherits and harnesses the main characteristics of its detection channels, resulting in an more practical and flexible equipment for determining Young’s modulus than traditional nanoindentation equipment, and also suitable for cross-validation purposes.

  7. Quality factor due to roughness scattering of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves in nanoresonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we study the quality factor associated with dissipation due to scattering of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves by random self-affine roughness. It is shown that the quality factor is strongly influenced by both the surface roughness exponent H and the roughness amplitude w to late

  8. Shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to coping materials with different pre-surface treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar, Norsamihah; Ahmad, Marlynda

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Pre-surface treatments of coping materials have been recommended to enhance the bonding to the veneering ceramic. Little is known on the effect on shear bond strength, particularly with new coping material. The aim of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to three coping materials: i) metal alloy (MA), ii) zirconia oxide (ZO), and iii) lithium disilicate (LD) after various pre-surface treatments. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-two (n = 32) discs were prepared for each coping material. Four pre-surface treatments were prepared for each sub-group (n = 8); a) no treatment or control (C), b) sandblast (SB), c) acid etch (AE), and d) sandblast and acid etch (SBAE). Veneering ceramics were applied to all discs. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons tests. RESULTS Mean shear bond strengths were obtained for MA (19.00 ± 6.39 MPa), ZO (24.45 ± 5.14 MPa) and LD (13.62 ± 5.12 MPa). There were statistically significant differences in types of coping material and various pre-surface treatments (P<.05). There was a significant correlation between coping materials and pre-surface treatment to the shear bond strength (P<.05). CONCLUSION Shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to zirconia oxide was higher than metal alloy and lithium disilicate. The highest shear bond strengths were obtained in sandblast and acid etch treatment for zirconia oxide and lithium disilicate groups, and in acid etch treatment for metal alloy group. PMID:27826383

  9. Surface modes in sheared boundary layers over impedance linings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambley, E. J.

    2013-08-01

    Surface modes, being duct modes localized close to the duct wall, are analysed within a lined cylindrical duct with uniform flow apart from a thin boundary layer. As well as full numerical solutions of the Pridmore-Brown equation, simplified mathematical models are given where the duct lining and boundary layer are lumped together and modelled using a single boundary condition (a modification of the Myers boundary condition previously proposed by the author), from which a surface mode dispersion relation is derived. For a given frequency, up to six surface modes are shown to exist, rather than the maximum of four for uniform slipping flow. Not only is the different number and behaviour of surface modes important for frequency-domain mode-matching techniques, which depend on having found all relevant modes during matching, but the thin boundary layer is also shown to lead to different convective and absolute stability than for uniform slipping flow. Numerical examples are given comparing the predictions of the surface mode dispersion relation to full solutions of the Pridmore-Brown equation, and the accuracy with which surface modes are predicted is shown to be significantly increased compared with the uniform slipping flow assumption. The importance of not only the boundary layer thickness but also its profile (tanh or linear) is demonstrated. A Briggs-Bers stability analysis is also performed under the assumption of a mass-spring-damper or Helmholtz resonator impedance model.

  10. Surface-mounted bender elements for measuring horizontal shear wave velocity of soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-guo ZHOU; Yun-min CHEN; Yoshiharu ASAKA; Tohru ABE

    2008-01-01

    The bender element testing features its in-plane directivity,which allows using bender elements to measure the shear wave velocities in a wider range of in-plane configurations besides the standard tip-to-tip alignment.This paper proposed a novel bender element testing technique for measuring the horizontal shear wave velocity of soils,where the bender elements are surface-mounted and the axes of the source and receiver elements are parallel to each other.The preliminary tests performed on model ground of silica sand showed that,by properly determining the travel distance and time of the shear waves,the surface-mounted bender elements can perform as accurately as the conventional "tip-to-tip" configuration.Potentially,the present system provides a promising nondestructive tool for characterizing geomaterials and site conditions both in laboratory and in the fields.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Shear Moduli for Coulomb Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, C J

    2008-01-01

    Torsional (shear) oscillations of neutron stars may have been observed in quasiperiodic oscillations of Magnetar Giant Flares. The frequencies of these modes depend on the shear modulus of neutron star crust. We calculate the shear modulus of Coulomb crystals from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that electron screening reduces the shear modulus by about 10% compared to previous Ogata et al. results. Our MD simulations can be extended to calculate the effects of impurities and or polycrystalline structures on the shear modulus.

  12. Influence of surface treatment on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ione Helena Vieira Portella Brunharo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to micro-hybrid and micro-particulate resins under different surface treatment methods was assessed. METHODS: Two hundred and eighty test samples were divided into 28 groups (n = 10, where 140 specimens were filled with Durafill micro-particulate resin and 140 with Charisma composite. In 140 samples, a coupling agent (silane was applied. The surface treatment methods were: Phosphoric and hydrofluoric acid etching, sodium bicarbonate and aluminum oxide blasting, stone and burs. A Universal Instron Machine was used to apply an occlusal shear force directly to the resin composite bracket surface at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The means were compared using analysis of variance and multivariate regression to assess the interaction between composites and surface treatment methods. RESULTS: Means and standard deviations for the groups were: Sodium bicarbonate jet 11.27±2.78; burs 9.26±3.01; stone 7.95±3.67; aluminum oxide blasting 7.04±3.21; phosphoric acid 5.82±1.90; hydrofluoric acid 4.54±2.87, and without treatment 2.75±1.49. An increase of 1.94 MPa in shear bond strength was seen in Charisma groups. Silane agent application reduced the Charisma shear bond strength by 0.68 Mpa, but increased Durafill means for bicarbonate blasting (0.83, burs (0.98 and stone drilling (0.46. CONCLUSION: The sodium bicarbonate blasting, burs and stone drilling methods produced adequate shear bond strength and may be suitable for clinical use. The Charisma micro hybrid resin composite showed higher shear bond means than Durafill micro particle composite.

  13. Chemical, modulus and cell attachment studies of reactive calcium phosphate filler-containing fast photo-curing, surface-degrading, polymeric bone adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, E A; Palmer, G; Knowles, J C; Salih, V; Young, A M

    2010-07-01

    The initial structure, setting and degradation processes of a poly(lactide-co-propylene glycol-co-lactide) dimethacrylate adhesive filled with 50, 60 or 70 wt.% reactive calcium phosphates (monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM)/beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP)) have been assessed using nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman, X-ray powder diffraction and gravimetric studies. Filler incorporation reduced the rapid light-activated monomer polymerization rates slightly, but not the final levels. Upon immersion in water for 24h, the set composite mass and volume increased due to water sorption. This promoted initial soluble MCPM loss from the composite surfaces, but also its reaction and monetite precipitation within the specimen bulk. After 48 h, composite gravimetric and chemical studies were consistent with surface erosion of polymer with reacted/remaining filler. The filled formulations exhibited more rapid early water sorption and subsequent surface erosion than the unfilled polymer. Calcium and phosphate release profiles and solution pH measurements confirmed early loss of surface MCPM with protons from polymer degradation products. At later times, the slower release of monetite/beta-TCP buffered composite storage solutions at approximately 5 instead of 3.2 for the unfilled polymer. Incorporation of filler increased both the early and later time material modulus. At intermediate times this effect was lost, presumably as a result of enhanced water sorption. The early modulus values obtained fell within the range reported for cancellous bone. Despite surface degradation, initial human mesenchymal cell attachment to both composites and polymer could be comparable with a non-degrading positive Thermanox control. These studies indicate that the filled formulations may be good candidates for bone repair. Release of calcium and phosphate ions provides components essential for such repair.

  14. Biomechanics of cell rolling: shear flow, cell-surface adhesion, and cell deformability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C; Lei, X X

    2000-01-01

    The mechanics of leukocyte (white blood cell; WBC) deformation and adhesion to endothelial cells (EC) has been investigated using a novel in vitro side-view flow assay. HL-60 cell rolling adhesion to surface-immobilized P-selectin was used to model the WBC-EC adhesion process. Changes in flow shear stress, cell deformability, or substrate ligand strength resulted in significant changes in the characteristic adhesion binding time, cell-surface contact and cell rolling velocity. A 2-D model indicated that cell-substrate contact area under a high wall shear stress (20 dyn/cm2) could be nearly twice of that under a low stress (0.5 dyn/cm2) due to shear flow-induced cell deformation. An increase in contact area resulted in more energy dissipation to both adhesion bonds and viscous cytoplasm, whereas the fluid energy that inputs to a cell decreased due to a flattened cell shape. The model also predicted a plateau of WBC rolling velocity as flow shear stresses further increased. Both experimental and computational studies have described how WBC deformation influences the WBC-EC adhesion process in shear flow.

  15. Effect of Different Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Veneering Composite to Polyetherketone Core Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Pourkhalili

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective:The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of different surface treatment methods on shear bond strength of the veneering composite to polyetheretherketone (PEEK core material. Materials and Methods::In this in vitro, experimental study, 60 PEEK discs were fabricated, polished with silicon carbide abrasive paper and divided into five surface treatment groups (n=12 namely air abrasion with 110µm alumina particles at 0.2MPa pressure for 10 seconds, 98% sulfuric acid etching for one minute, air abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching, application of cyanoacrylate resin and a no surface treatment control group. Visio.link adhesive and GC Gradia veneering composite were applied on PEEK surfaces and light-cured. Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine and the data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results:The mean ± standard deviation (SD values of shear bond strength of the veneering composite to PEEK surfaces were 8.85±3.03, 15.6±5.02, 30.42±5.43, 26.14±4.33 and 5.94±4.49MPa in the control, air-abrasion, sulfuric acid etching, air-abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching and cyanoacrylate resin groups, respectively. The control and cyanoacrylate groups had significant differences with air abrasion, sulfuric acid etching and air abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching groups in terms of shear bond strength (P<0.0001. Higher bond strength values were noted in sulfuric acid etching, air-abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching and air abrasion groups compared to the control and cyanoacrylate groups (P<0.0001. Conclusion:Sulfuric acid etching, air abrasion and a combination of both are recommended as efficient surface treatments to increase the shear bond strength of the veneering composite to PEEK core material.

  16. A NEW APPROACH TO CALCULATION OF THE ELLIPTICAL BEARING OF MULTI-SHEARING-SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin GÜLLÜ

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new approach is proposed in the calculation of performance characteristics of elliptic bearings of Multi-Shearing-Surface (MSS type which has widely been used yet. The number of researches available in this area are far below the needs. This paper presents the proposed approach and the performance of bearings without use of superposition.

  17. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danov, K.D.; Kralchevsky, P.A.; Radulova, G.M.; Basheva, E.S.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Pelan, E.G.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, Esh and ¿sh,

  18. Notes on the Surface Velocity Profile and Horizontal Shear across the Width of the Gulf Stream

    OpenAIRE

    Arx, William S. Von

    2011-01-01

    During a cruise across the Gulf Stream in October 1950 measurements of surface velocity were made both with the Loran-space-dead method and the electromagnetic method. A short account of the results is given with special reference to the velocity profile and the horizontal shear across the Gulf Stream.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1952.tb01006.x

  19. Helioseismic Imaging of Supergranulation throughout the Sun’s Near-Surface Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Benjamin J.; Hindman, Bradley W.; Toomre, Juri

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of the Sun’s sub-surface convective flows and provide evidence that the pattern of supergranulation is driven at the surface. The pattern subsequently descends slowly throughout the near-surface shear layer in a manner that is inconsistent with a 3D cellular structure. The flow measurements are obtained through the application of a new helioseismic technique based on traditional ring analysis. We measure the flow field over the course of eleven days and perform a correlation analysis between all possible pairs of depths and temporal separations. In congruence with previous studies, we find that the supergranulation pattern remains coherent at the surface for slightly less than two days and the instantaneous surface pattern is imprinted to a depth of 7 Mm. However, these correlation times and depths are deceptive. When we admit a potential time lag in the correlation, we find that peak correlation in the convective flows descends at a rate of 10-40 m s-1 (or equivalently 1-3 Mm per day). Furthermore, the correlation extends throughout all depths of the near-surface shear layer. This pattern-propagation rate is well matched by estimates of the speed of downflows obtained through the anelastic approximation. Direct integration of the measured speed indicates that the supergranulation pattern that first appears at the surface eventually reaches the bottom of the near-surface shear layer a month later. Thus, the downflows have a Rossby radius of deformation equal to the depth of the shear layer and we suggest that this equality may not be coincidental.

  20. Influence of Hot-Etching Surface Treatment on Zirconia/Resin Shear Bond Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Lv

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effect of hot-etching surface treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia ceramics and two commercial resin cements. Ceramic cylinders (120 units; length: 2.5 mm; diameter: 4.7 mm were randomly divided into 12 groups (n = 10 according to different surface treatments (blank control; airborne-particle-abrasion; hot-etching and different resin cements (Panavia F2.0; Superbond C and B and whether or not a thermal cycling fatigue test (5°–55° for 5000 cycles was performed. Flat enamel surfaces, mounted in acrylic resin, were bonded to the zirconia discs (diameter: 4.7 mm. All specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. All data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and multiple-comparison least significant difference tests (α = 0.05. Hot-etching treatment produced higher bond strengths than the other treatment with both resin cements. The shear bond strength of all groups significantly decreased after the thermal cycling test; except for the hot-etching group that was cemented with Panavia F2.0 (p < 0.05. Surface treatment of zirconia with hot-etching solution enhanced the surface roughness and bond strength between the zirconia and the resin cement.

  1. Bonding to a porcelain surface: Factors affecting the shear bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishir Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bonding to porcelain veneers, crowns or restorations is a major challenge for an orthodontist. A study was undertaken wherein, the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets on porcelain were compared and the effects of debonding on the debonded surfaces were evaluated. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 acrylic duplicate samples were fabricated from a therapeutically extracted maxillary first premolar, duly prepared for metal crown with porcelain facing. The samples were divided into two equal groups for bonding of metal and ceramic brackets. The shear bond strength of the samples was measured with a universal testing machine. Results: The metal brackets showed shear bond strengths with a mean of 12.21 ± 1.4 MPa, whereas the ceramic brackets displayed shear bond strengths with a mean of 17.45 ± 2.36 MPa. Visual and scanning electron microscope examination revealed multiple failure patterns with more of porcelain fractures in the ceramic brackets group. Conclusion: Bonding of metal and ceramic brackets to porcelain can be achieved with bond strengths comparable to that when bonded to enamel surface. Porcelain fractures are more commonly associated with debonding of ceramic brackets.

  2. Turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with shear-dependent slip length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosh Aghdam, Sohrab; Seddighi, Mehdi; Ricco, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by recent experimental evidence, shear-dependent slip length superhydrophobic surfaces are studied. Lyapunov stability analysis is applied in a 3D turbulent channel flow and extended to the shear-dependent slip-length case. The feedback law extracted is recognized for the first time to coincide with the constant-slip-length model widely used in simulations of hydrophobic surfaces. The condition for the slip parameters is found to be consistent with the experimental data and with values from DNS. The theoretical approach by Fukagata (PoF 18.5: 051703) is employed to model the drag-reduction effect engendered by the shear-dependent slip-length surfaces. The estimated drag-reduction values are in very good agreement with our DNS data. For slip parameters and flow conditions which are potentially realizable in the lab, the maximum computed drag reduction reaches 50%. The power spent by the turbulent flow on the walls is computed, thereby recognizing the hydrophobic surfaces as a passive-absorbing drag-reduction method, as opposed to geometrically-modifying techniques that do not consume energy, e.g. riblets, hence named passive-neutral. The flow is investigated by visualizations, statistical analysis of vorticity and strain rates, and quadrants of the Reynolds stresses. Part of this work was funded by Airbus Group. Simulations were performed on the ARCHER Supercomputer (UKTC Grant).

  3. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR BENDING BEAM SUBJECT TO LATERAL FORCE WITH DIFFERENT MODULUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚文娟; 叶志明

    2004-01-01

    A bending beam,subjected to state of plane stress,was chosen to investigate.The determination of the neutral surface of the structure was made,and the calculating formulas of neutral axis,normal stress,shear stress and displacement were derived.It is concluded that, for the elastic bending beam with different tension-compression modulus in the condition of complex stress, the position of the neutral axis is not related with the shear stress, and the analytical solution can be derived by normal stress used as a criterion, improving the multiple cyclic method which determines the position of neutral point by the principal stress. Meanwhile, a comparison is made between the results of the analytical solution and those calculated from the classic mechanics theory, assuming the tension modulus is equal to the compression modulus, and those from the finite element method (FEM) numerical solution. The comparison shows that the analytical solution considers well the effects caused by the condition of different tension and compression modulus. Finally, a calculation correction of the structure with different modulus is proposed to optimize the structure.

  4. 干砂最大剪切模量的共振柱与弯曲元试验%Resonant column and bender element tests on maximum shear modulus of dry sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柏立懂; 项伟; SAVIDIS A Stavros; RACKWITZ Frank

    2012-01-01

    对德国4种干砂试样进行了共振柱与弯曲元对比试验,旨在分析弯曲元法测定砂土最大剪切模量时存在问题和解决方法。研究表明:时域初达法判定的剪切波传播时间较其他方法具有更好的稳定性;弯曲元试验测定最大剪切模量输入电压脉冲频率的减小而减小,衰减程度因砂土类型而异,该影响随围压的增大而减弱;对比分析表明,弯曲元与共振柱试验测定的最大剪切模量具有良好的线性关系,对柏林砂和不伦瑞克砂,存在一个临界最大剪切模量,小于该临界值时,弯曲元测值大于共振柱测值,而大于该临界值时,前者小于后者,两者差值随土样刚度增大而增大。对比研究指出,弯曲元试验尽可能采用合适高频脉冲电压作为激发电压,实践中应事先与共振柱试验进行对比。%The problems and solutions of applying the bender element method to determine the maximum shear modulus (Gmax) of sand are investigated by conducting resonant column (RC) and bender element (BE) tests on four dry sands obtained from Germany. The study indicates that the start-to-start method is more reliable to identify the time of shear wave propagation in specimens compared to other methods. In BE tests, the excitation frequency of input waves has influence on the tested Gmax, and this influence is dependent on soil types and reduced by increasing confining pressure. A comparison between RC and BE tests shows that Gmax by both methods may be well expressed as a linear equation; for the Berlin sand and Braunschweig coarse sand, there exists a threshold Gmax below which Gmax by BE tests (Gmax (BE)) is greater than that by RC tests (Gmax (RC)), however beyond which the Gmax (BE) is smaller than Gmax (RC) and the distance between both increases with increasing stiffness soil. In practice, it is suggested that the input voltage with proper high

  5. Mass sensitivity of layered shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave devices for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Trinchi, Adrian; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Holland, Anthony; Galatsis, Kosmas

    2001-11-01

    Layered Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices that allow the propagation of Love mode acoustic waves will be studied in this paper. In these devices, the substrate allows the propagation of Surface Skimming Bulks Waves (SSBWs). By depositing layers, that the speed of Shear Horizontal (SH) acoustic wave propagation is less than that of the substrate, the propagation mode transforms to Love mode. Love mode devices which will be studied in this paper, have SiO2 and ZnO acoustic guiding layers. As Love mode of propagation has no movement of particles component normal to the active sensor surface, they can be employed for the sensing applications in the liquid media.

  6. Helioseismic Imaging of Supergranulation throughout the Sun's Near-Surface Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Bradley; Greer, Benjamin; Toomre, Juri

    2016-05-01

    We present measurements of the Sun's sub-surface convective flows and provide evidence that the pattern of supergranulation is driven at the surface. The pattern subsequently descends slowly throughout the near-surface shear layer in a manner that is inconsistent with a 3-D cellular structure. The flow measurements are obtained through the application of a new helioseismic technique based on traditional ring analysis. We measure the flow field over the course of eleven days and perform a correlation analysis between all possible pairs of depths and temporal separations. In congruence with previous studies, we find that the supergranulation pattern remains coherent at the surface for slightly less than two days and the instantaneous surface pattern is imprinted to a depth of 7 Mm. However, these correlation times and depths are deceptive. When we admit a potential time lag in the correlation, we find that peak correlation in the convective flows descends at a rate of 10 - 30 m s-1 (or equivalently 1 - 3 Mm per day). Furthermore, the correlation extends throughout all depths of the near-surface shear layer. This pattern-propagation rate is well matched by estimates of the speed of down flows obtained through the anelastic approximation. Direct integration of the measured speed indicates that the supergranulation pattern that first appears at the surface eventually reaches the bottom of the near-surface shear layer a month later. Thus, the transit time is roughly equal to a solar rotation period and we suggest this equality may not be coincidental.

  7. Direct ambient noise tomography for 3-D near surface shear velocity structure: methodology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has provided essential constraints on crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure in global seismology. Recent studies demonstrate that high frequency (e.g., ~ 1 Hz) surface waves between receivers at short distances can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation and then be used for imaging near surface or shallow crustal shear velocity structures. This approach provides important information for strong ground motion prediction in seismically active area and overburden structure characterization in oil and gas fields. Here we propose a new tomographic method to invert all surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wavespeed without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency-dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. The wavelet coefficients of the velocity model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, and upon iterations the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated from the newly obtained velocity model. We apply this new method to determine the 3-D near surface wavespeed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan, Hefei urban area and a shale and gas production field in China using the high-frequency interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion data extracted from ambient noisecross-correlation. The results reveal strong effects of off-great-circle propagation of high-frequency surface waves in these regions with above 30% shear wavespeed variations. The proposed approach is more efficient and robust than the traditional two-step surface wave tomography for imaging complex

  8. Quantification of muscle co-contraction using supersonic shear wave imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiteri, Brent J; Hug, François; Cresswell, Andrew G; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-02-01

    Muscle stiffness estimated using shear wave elastography can provide an index of individual muscle force during isometric contraction and may therefore be a promising method for quantifying co-contraction. We estimated the shear modulus of the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle using supersonic shear wave imaging and measured its myoelectrical activity using surface electromyography (sEMG) during graded isometric contractions of plantar flexion and dorsiflexion (n=7). During dorsiflexion, the average shear modulus was 26 ± 6 kPa at peak sEMG amplitude, which was significantly less (P=0.02) than that measured at the same sEMG level during plantar flexion (42 ± 10 kPa). The passive tension during contraction was estimated using the passive LG muscle shear modulus during a passive ankle rotation measured at an equivalent ankle angle to that measured during contraction. The passive shear modulus increased significantly (Pmuscle shear modulus due to active contraction was significantly greater (Pmuscle, despite measured sEMG activity of 19% of maximal voluntary plantar flexion contraction. This strongly suggests that the sEMG activity recorded from the LG muscle during isometric dorsiflexion was primarily due to cross-talk. However, it is clear that passive muscle tension changes can contribute to joint torque during isometric dorsiflexion.

  9. Effect of dentin surface roughness on the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Poursoltan, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to investigate whether dentin surface preparation with diamond rotary instruments of different grit sizes affects the shear bond strength of resin-bonded restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS The buccal enamel of 60 maxillary central incisors was removed with a low speed diamond saw and wet ground with silicon carbide papers. The polished surfaces of the teeth were prepared with four groups of rotary diamond burs with super-coarse (SC), coarse (C), medium (M), and fine (F) grit sizes. Following surface preparation, 60 restorations were casted with nickel-chromium alloy and bonded with Panavia cement. To assess the shear bond strength, the samples were mounted on a universal testing machine and an axial load was applied along the cement-restoration interface at the crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The acquired data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS The mean ± SD shear bond strengths (in MPa) of the study groups were 17.75 ± 1.41 for SC, 13.82 ± 1.13 for C, 10.40 ± 1.45 for M, and 7.13 ± 1.18 for F. Statistical analysis revealed the significant difference among the study groups such that the value for group SC was significantly higher than that for group F (P<.001). CONCLUSION Dentin surface roughness created by diamond burs of different grit sizes considerably influences the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations. PMID:27350858

  10. Surface morphology of platelet adhesion influenced by activators, inhibitors and shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Melanie Groan

    Platelet activation involves multiple events, one of which is the generation and release of nitric oxide (NO), a platelet aggregation inhibitor. Platelets simultaneously send and receive various agents that promote a positive and negative feedback control system during hemostasis. Although the purpose of platelet-derived NO is not fully understood, NO is known to inhibit platelet recruitment. NO's relatively large diffusion coefficient allows it to diffuse more rapidly than platelet agonists. It may thus be able to inhibit recruitment of platelets near the periphery of a growing thrombus before agonists have substantially accumulated in those regions. Results from two studies in our laboratory differed in the extent to which platelet-derived NO decreased platelet adhesion. Frilot studied the effect of L-arginine (L-A) and NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA) on platelet adhesion to collagen under static conditions in a Petri dish. Eshaq examined the percent coverage on collagen-coated and fibrinogen-coated microchannels under shear conditions with different levels of L-A and Adenosine Diphosphate (ADP). Frilot's results showed no effect of either L-A or L-NMMA on surface coverage, thrombus size or serotonin release, while Eshaq's results showed a decrease in surface coverage with increased levels of L-A. A possible explanation for these contrasting results is that platelet-derived NO may be more important under flow conditions than under static conditions. For this project, the effects of L-A. ADP and L-NMMA on platelet adhesion were studied at varying shear stresses on protein-coated glass slides. The surface exposed to platelet-rich-plasma in combination with each chemical solution was observed under AFM, FE-SEM and fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons of images obtained with these techniques confirmed the presence of platelets on the protein coatings. AFM images of fibrinogen and collagen-coated slides presented characteristic

  11. Study on the use of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and 3-chloropropyltriethoxysilane to surface biochemical modification of a novel low elastic modulus Ti-Nb-Hf alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, V; Salvagni, E; Rodríguez-Castellon, E; Gil, F J; Manero, J M

    2015-04-01

    A biocompatible new titanium alloy Ti-16Hf-25Nb with low elastic modulus (45 GPa) and the use of short bioadhesive peptides derived from the extracellular matrix have been studied. In terms of cell adhesion, a comparative study with mixtures of short peptides as RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp)/PHSRN (Pro-His-Ser-Arg-Asn) and RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp)/FHRRIKA (Phe-His-Arg-Arg-Ile-Lys-Ala) have been carried out with rat mesenchymal cells. The effect of these mixtures of short peptides have already been studied but there are no comparative studies between them. Despite the wide variety of silane precursors available for surface modification in pure titanium, the majority of studies have used aminosilanes, in particular 3-minopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Nevertheless, the 3-chloropropyltriethoxysilane (CPTES) is, recently, proposed by other authors. Unlike APTES, CPTES does not require an activation step and offers the potential to directly bind the nucleophilic groups present on the biomolecule (e.g., amines or thiols). Since the chemical surface composition of this new alloy could be different to that pure titanium, both organosilanes have been compared and characterized by means of a complete surface characterization using contact angle goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  12. Oscillating line source in a shear flow with a free surface: critical layer-like contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2016-01-01

    The linearized water-wave radiation problem for an oscillating submerged line source in an inviscid shear flow with a free surface is investigated analytically at finite, constant depth in the presence of a shear flow varying linearly with depth. The surface velocity is taken to be zero relative to the oscillating source, so that Doppler effects are absent. The radiated wave out from the source is calculated based on Euler's equation of motion with the appropriate boundary and radiation conditions, and differs substantially from the solution obtained by assuming potential flow. To wit, an additional wave is found in the downstream direction in addition to the previously known dispersive wave solutions; this wave is non-dispersive and we show how it is the surface manifestation of a critical layer-like flow generated by the combination of shear and mass flux at the source, passively advected with the flow. As seen from a system moving at the fluid velocity at the source's depth, streamlines form closed curves ...

  13. Effect of LASER Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramic Surface to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Shahabi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Reliable bonding between tooth substrate and zirconia-based ceramic restorations is always of great importance. The laser might be useful for treatment of ceramic surfaces. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic surface to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 40 Cercon zirconia ceramic blocks were fabricated. The surface treatment was performed using sandblasting with 50-micrometer Al2O3, CO2 laser, or Nd:YAG laser in each test groups. After that, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement. The shear bond strength of ceramics to dentin was determined and failure mode of each specimen was analyzed by stereo-microscope and SEM investigations. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparisons. The surface morphology of one specimen from each group was investigated under SEM. Results: The mean shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to dentin was 7.79±3.03, 9.85±4.69, 14.92±4.48 MPa for CO2 irradiated, Nd:YAG irradiated, and sandblasted specimens, respectively. Significant differences were noted between CO2 (P=0.001 and Nd:YAG laser (P=0.017 irradiated specimens with sandblasted specimens. No significant differences were observed between two laser methods (P=0.47. The mode of bond failure was predominantly adhesive in test groups (CO2 irradiated specimens: 75%, Nd:YAG irradiated: 66.7%, and sandblasting: 41.7%. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the present study, surface treatment of zirconia ceramics using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers was not able to produce adequate bond strength with dentin surfaces in comparison to sandblasting technique. Therefore, the use of lasers with the mentioned parameters may not be recommended for the surface treatment of Cercon ceramics.

  14. Fast relaxation of a hexagonal Poiseuille shear-induced near-surface phase in a threadlike micellar solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W A; Butler, P D; Magid, L J; Han, Z; Slawecki, T M

    1999-08-01

    The dynamics of near-surface conformations in complex fluids under flow should dramatically affect their rheological properties. We have made the first measurements resolving the decay kinetics of a hexagonal phase induced in a threadlike polyionic micellar system under Poiseuille shear near a quartz surface. Upon cessation of shearing flow, this minimum interference crystalline phase formed within approximately 20 microm of the surface "melts" to a metastable two-dimensional liquid of aligned micelles in approximately 0.7 s. This is some three orders of magnitude shorter than the time required for bulk (Couette) shear-aligned micelles in this system to reach a fully entangled state.

  15. Influence of Pre-Sintered Zirconia Surface Conditioning on Shear Bond Strength to Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomofumi Sawada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite on zirconia surface to which a specific conditioner was applied before sintering. After sintering of either conditioner-coated or uncoated specimens, both groups were divided into three subgroups by their respective surface modifications (n = 10 per group: no further treatment; etched with hydrofluoric acid; and sandblasted with 50 µm Al2O3 particles. Surfaces were characterized by measuring different surface roughness parameters (e.g., Ra and Rmax and water contact angles. Half of the specimens underwent thermocycling (10,000 cycles, 5–55 °C after self-adhesive resin cement build-up. The SBSs were measured using a universal testing machine, and the failure modes were analyzed by microscopy. Data were analyzed by nonparametric and parametric tests followed by post-hoc comparisons (α = 0.05. Conditioner-coated specimens increased both surface roughness and hydrophilicity (p < 0.01. In the non-thermocycled condition, sandblasted surfaces showed higher SBSs than other modifications, irrespective of conditioner application (p < 0.05. Adhesive fractures were commonly observed in the specimens. Thermocycling favored debonding and decreased SBSs. However, conditioner-coated specimens upon sandblasting showed the highest SBS (p < 0.05 and mixed fractures were partially observed. The combination of conditioner application before sintering and sandblasting after sintering showed the highest shear bond strength and indicated improvements concerning the failure mode.

  16. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadizenouz, Ghazaleh; Esmaeili, Behnaz; Taghvaei, Arnica; Jamali, Zahra; Jafari, Toloo; Amiri Daneshvar, Farshid; Khafri, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1); air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2); irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3); roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4); and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5). Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm) was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6). A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05). Results. One-way ANOVA indicated significant differences between the groups (P < 0.05). SBS of controls was significantly lower than the other groups; differences between groups 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were not significant. Surface treatment with diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid resulted in the highest bond strength. Conclusion. All the surface treatments used in this study improved the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite resin used. PMID:27092209

  17. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Ahmadizenouz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1; air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2; irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3; roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4; and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5. Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6. A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05. Results. One-way ANOVA indicated significant differences between the groups (P < 0.05. SBS of controls was significantly lower than the other groups; differences between groups 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were not significant. Surface treatment with diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid resulted in the highest bond strength. Conclusion. All the surface treatments used in this study improved the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite resin used.

  18. Effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of denture teeth to denture base resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Bahrani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Debonding of denture teeth from denture bases is the most common failure in removable dentures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of denture teeth to heat-polymerized and autopolymerized denture base resins. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 60 maxillary central incisor acrylic teeth were divided into two groups. Group M was polymerized with heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Meliodent by compression molding technique and group F was processed by autopolymerized acrylic resin (Futura Gen by injection molding technique. Within each group, specimens were divided into three subgroups according to the teeth surface treatments (n = 10: (1 ground surface as the control group (M 1 and F 1 , (2 ground surface combined with monomer application (M 2 and F 2 , and (3 airborne particle abrasion by 50 μm Al 2 O 3 (M 3 and F 3 . The shear bond strengths of the specimens were tested by universal testing machine with crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey′s honestly significant difference (HSD tests (P < 0.05. Results: The mean shear bond strengths of the studied groups were 96.40 ± 14.01, 124.70 ± 15.64, and 118 ± 16.38 N for M 1 , M 2 , and M 3 and 87.90 ± 13.48, 117 ± 13.88, and 109.70 ± 13.78 N for F 1 , F 2 , and F 3 , respectively. The surface treatment of the denture teeth significantly affected their shear bond strengths to the both the denture base resins (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences between the groups treated by monomer or airborne particle abrasion (P = 0.29. The highest percentage of failure mode was mixed in Meliodent and adhesive in Futura Gen. Conclusion: Monomer application and airborne particle abrasion of the ridge lap area of the denture teeth improved their shear bond strengths to the denture base resins regardless of the type of polymerization.

  19. Enhancing the formation and shear resistance of nitrifying biofilms on membranes by surface modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lackner, Susanne; Holmberg, Maria; Terada, Akihiko;

    2009-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) membranes and polyethylene (PE) surfaces were modified to enhance formation and shear resistance of nitrifying biofilms for wastewater treatment applications. A combination of plasma polymerization and wet chemistry was employed to ultimately introduce poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG...... similar trends: biofilms on -PEG-NH2 modified surfaces were much stronger compared to the other modifications and the unmodified reference surfaces. Electrostatic interactions between the protonated amino group and negatively charged bacteria as well as PEG chain density which can affect the surface...... structure might be possible explanations of the superiority of the -PEG-NH2 modification. The success of the-PEG-NH2 modification was independent of the original surface and might, therefore, be used in wastewater treatment bioreactors to improve reactor performance by making biofilm formation more stable...

  20. Platelets interact with tissue factor immobilized on surfaces: effects of shear rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonda, R; Lopez-Vilchez, I; Navalon, F; Pino, M; Hernandez, M R; Escolar, G; Galan, A M

    2008-01-01

    While procoagulant activities of Tissue Factor (TF) have been widely investigated, its possible pro-adhesive properties towards platelets have not been studied in detail. We explored the interaction of platelets with human Tissue Factor (hTF) firmly adsorbed on a synthetic surface of polyvinilidene difluoride (PVDF) using different shear rates. For studies at 250 and 600 s(-1), TF firmly adsorbed was exposed to flowing anticoagulated blood in flat perfusion devices. Deposition of platelets and fibrin were evaluated by morphometric, immunocytochemical and ultrastructural methods. Prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2) levels were also measured. Experiments at 5000 s(-1), were performed on the Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA-100) with experimental cartridges with collagen (COL) or collagen-hTF (COL + TF). Haemostatic effect of recombinant activated FVIIa (rFVIIa) was assessed in the same experimental settings. Platelet deposition on hTF reached 19.8 +/- 1.3% and 26.1 +/- 3.4% of the total surface, at 250 and 600 s(-1), respectively. Fibrin formation was significantly higher at 250 s(-1) than at 600 s(-1) (P hTF (154.09 +/- 14.69 s vs. 191.45 +/- 16.09 s COL alone; P hTF is an adhesive substrate for platelets and suggest that the von Willebrand factor could mediate these interactions. At low and intermediate shear rates, rFVIIa enhanced the procoagulant action of hTF, but this effect was not observed at very high shear rates.

  1. Shear velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of Madagascar derived from surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Martin J.; Wysession, Michael E.; Aleqabi, Ghassan; Wiens, Douglas A.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Shore, Patrick; Rambolamanana, Gérard; Andriampenomanana, Fenitra; Rakotondraibe, Tsiriandrimanana; Tucker, Robert D.; Barruol, Guilhem; Rindraharisaona, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    The crust and upper mantle of the Madagascar continental fragment remained largely unexplored until a series of recent broadband seismic experiments. An island-wide deployment of broadband seismic instruments has allowed the first study of phase velocity variations, derived from surface waves, across the entire island. Late Cenozoic alkaline intraplate volcanism has occurred in three separate regions of Madagascar (north, central and southwest), with the north and central volcanism active until Madagascar velocity structure. Shallow (upper 10 km) low-shear-velocity regions correlate well with sedimentary basins along the west coast. Upper mantle low-shear-velocity zones that extend to at least 150 km deep underlie the north and central regions of recent alkali magmatism. These anomalies appear distinct at depths <100 km, suggesting that any connection between the zones lies at depths greater than the resolution of surface-wave tomography. An additional low-shear velocity anomaly is also identified at depths 50-150 km beneath the southwest region of intraplate volcanism. We interpret these three low-velocity regions as upwelling asthenosphere beneath the island, producing high-elevation topography and relatively low-volume magmatism.

  2. Effects of bulk and free surface shear flows on amyloid fibril formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada, David; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2008-11-01

    Amyloid diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's, among others, are characterized by the conversion of monomers to oligomers (precursors) and then to amyloid fibrils. Besides factors such as concentration, pH, and ionic strength, evidence exists that shearing flow strongly influences amyloid formation in vitro. Also, during fibrillation in the presence of either gas or solid surfaces, both the polarity and roughness of the surfaces play a significant role in the kinetics of the fibrillation process. By studying the nucleation and growth of a model system (insulin fibrils) in a well-defined flow field, we can identify the flow and interfacial conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics. The present flow system consists of an annular region, bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders and driven by rotation of the floor, with either a hydrophobic (air) or hydrophilic (solid) interface. We show both the combined and separated effects of shear and interfacial hydrophobicity on the fibrillation process, and the use of interfacial shear viscosity as a parameter for quantifying the oligomerization process.

  3. Multiple resonances of a moving, oscillating surface disturbance on a shear current

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We consider waves radiated by a disturbance of oscillating strength moving at constant velocity along the free surface of a shear flow which, when undisturbed, has uniform horizontal vorticity of magnitude $S$. When no current is present the problem is a classical one and much studied, and in deep water a resonance is known to occur when $\\tau=|\\boldsymbol{V}|\\omega_0/g$ equals the critical value $1/4$ ($\\boldsymbol{V}$: velocity of disturbance, $\\omega_0$: oscillation frequency, $g$: gravitational acceleration). We show that the presence of the sub-surface shear current can change this picture radically. Not only does the resonant value of $\\tau$ depend strongly on the angle between $\\boldsymbol{V}$ and the current's direction and the "shear-Froude number" $\\mathrm{Frs}=|\\boldsymbol{V}|S/g$; when $\\mathrm{Frs}>1/3$, multiple resonant values --- as many as $4$ --- can occur for some directions of motion. At sufficiently large values of $\\mathrm{Frs}$, the smallest resonance frequency tends to zero, representi...

  4. AFM quantitative analysis and determination of shear angle of {259}f martensitic surface relief

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An attentive observation and quantitative analysis of {259}f martensitic surface relief in an Fe-23Ni-0.55C alloy are made by means of an atomic force microscope (AFM), and different martensitic variants' shear angles are determined in this paper. The experiments show that {259}f martensitic surface relief exhibits regular shape in many cases, which is in agreement with the prediction of invariant plane strain (IPS). Generally, {259}f martensitic surface relief appears to be "N"-shaped, but it is tent-shaped in the case of zigzag-shaped martensite. The compressed deformation of parent phase diminishes the surface relief in size but with little change of its relief angle. {259}f martensitic surface relief, large or small, has approximately the same relief angles, exhibiting a good "self-similar fractal". The determined values of different {259}f martensitic variants' shear angles are in fine agreement with the prediction of Wechsler-Liberman-Read (W-L-R) theory, with only a slight difference of less than 3.65°.

  5. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadizenouz, Ghazaleh; Esmaeili, Behnaz; Taghvaei, Arnica; Jamali, Zahra; Jafari, Toloo; Amiri Daneshvar, Farshid; Khafri, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1); air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2); irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3); roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4); and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5). Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm) was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6). A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P composite resin used.

  6. Shear-bond-strength of orthodontic brackets to aged nano-hybrid composite-resin surfaces using different surface preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtas, Hatice Kubra; Akin, Mehmet; Ileri, Zehra; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different surface preparation methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic metal brackets to aged nano-hybrid resin composite surfaces in vitro. A total of 100 restorative composite resin discs, 6 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were obtained and treated with an ageing procedure. After ageing, the samples were randomly divided as follows according to surface preparation methods: (1)Control, (2)37% phosphoric acid gel, (3)Sandblasting, (4)Diamond bur, (5)Air-flow and 20 central incisor teeth were used for the control etched group. SBS test were applied on bonded metal brackets to all samples. SBS values and residual adhesives were evaluated. Analysis of variance showed a significant difference (phybrid composite resin surfaces.

  7. Shear horizontal surface acoustic waves in a magneto-electro-elastic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Shahin; Shodja, Hossein M.

    2016-04-01

    Propagation of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves (SHSAWs) within a functionally graded magneto-electro-elastic (FGMEE) half-space was previously presented (Shodja HM, Eskandari S, Eskandari M. J. Eng. Math. 2015, 1-18) In contrast, the current paper considers propagation of SHSAWs in a medium consisting of an FGMEE layer perfectly bonded to a homogeneous MEE substrate. When the FGMEE layer is described by some special inhomogeneity functions - all the MEE properties have the same variation in depth which may or may not be identical to that of the density - we obtain the exact closed-form solution for the MEE fields. Additionally, certain special inhomogeneity functions with monotonically decreasing bulk shear wave velocity in depth are considered, and the associated boundary value problem is solved using power series solution. This problem in the limit as the layer thickness goes to infinity collapses to an FGMEE half-space with decreasing bulk shear wave velocity in depth. It is shown that in such a medium SHSAW does not propagate. Using power series solution we can afford to consider some FGMEE layers of practical importance, where the composition of the MEE obeys a prescribed volume fraction variation. The dispersive behavior of SHSAWs in the presence of such layers is also examined.

  8. Deformation mechanism of leukocyte adhering to vascular surface under steady shear flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Xiaoheng; WANG; Xiong; YIN; Hongmei; CHEN; Huaiqing

    2004-01-01

    The adhesion of leukocytes to vascular surface is an important biomedical problem and has drawn extensive attention. In this study, we propose a compound drop model to simulate a leukocyte with a nucleus adhering to the surface of blood vessel under steady shear flow. A two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is conducted to determine the local distribution of pressure on the surface of the adherent model cell. By introducing the parameter of deformation index (DI), we investigate the deformation of the leukocyte and its nucleus under controlled conditions. Our numerical results show that: (i) the leukocyte is capable of deformation under external exposed flow field. The deformation index increases with initial contact angle and Reynolds number of external exposed flow. (ii) The nucleus deforms with the cell, and the deformation index of the leukocyte is greater than that of the nucleus. The leukocyte is more deformable while the nucleus is more capable of resisting external shear flow. (iii) The leukocyte and the nucleus are not able to deform infinitely with the increase of Reynolds number because the deformation index reaches a maximum. (iv) Pressure distribution confirms that there exists a region downstream of the cell, which produces high pressure to retard continuous deformation and provide a positive lift force on the cell. Meanwhile, we have measured the deformation of human leukocytes exposed to shear flow by using a flow chamber system. We found that the numerical results are well consistent with those of experiment. We conclude that the nucleus with high viscosity plays a particular role in leukocyte deformation.

  9. 砂土剪切模量测定的弯曲元、共振柱和循环扭剪试验%Combining bender element, resonant column and cyclic torsional shear tests to determine small strain shear modulus of sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾晓强; 杨峻; 黄茂松; 高广运

    2016-01-01

    利用弯曲元、共振柱和循环扭剪试验联合测定了不同围压和密实度条件下干砂的小应变剪切模量,研究了弯曲元试验中输出信号的特性和各种信号分析方法确定剪切波传播时间的可靠性,并对比了不同试验的结果。研究结果表明,在共振柱试验时,需要考虑系统刚度对试验结果的影响,特别当试样刚度较大时。弯曲元输出信号中最先到达的是近场效应,其初始极化方向跟剪切波相反。近场效应随着输入频率的增加有一定程度的减小,但不会消失。实际试验中建议输入频率不断增加,直至输出信号比较稳定。值得注意的是,剪切初达波的振幅可能远小于后续振动,因此容易造成初达波的误判。时域初达波法能比较可靠准确地确定剪切波的传播时间,波峰法、交互相关法和交互功率法结果均随输入频率有较大波动,不能可靠地确定剪切波的传播时间。对比试验表明,弯曲元、共振柱和循环扭剪试验确定小应变剪切模量对细砂和粗砂均吻合良好,初步表明砂土粒径对不同试验方法结果的一致性没有影响。%Bender element (BE), resonant column (RC) and cyclic torsional shear (TS) tests are performed to measure the small strain shear modulus of dry sands. Thecharacteristics of the received signals in BE tests are investigated, and different interpretation methods are used to determine the travel time of shear waves.The results indicate that it is important to account for the compliance of the testing system in RC tests, especially when the specimen is stiff. In BE tests, the near fieldcomponent arrives first and its initial polarization is opposite to that of the input signal. The near flied decreases as the input frequency increases, but it always exists. Inpractice, it isrecommended that the input frequency should increase continuously until the output signal becomes stable. Note that

  10. Effect of ending surface on energy and Young's modulus of single-walled carbon nanotubes studied using linear scaling quantum mechanical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, J., E-mail: caijun@ncepu.edu.c [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Wang, Y.D. [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Wang, C.Y. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-11-15

    By using a linear scaling self-consistent charge, density functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method and an ab intio Dmol3 calculation, the energy and Young's modulus as a function of tube length for (10, 0) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated. It was found that with increasing the length of SWCNTs the Young's modulus increases rapidly, then, there is a slow increase, which ultimately approaches a constant value after the length is increased to approx20 nm, whereas a reversed variation tendency was found for the average energy of atoms in SWCNTs with a change of the tube length. We found that the characters of the length-dependent energy and Young's modulus stem from the changed P{sub y}-DOS of atoms in the ending region of the tube. Here one simple formula is proposed for quantitatively explaining the length-dependent energy and modulus.

  11. What Supergranule Flow Models Tell Us About the Sun's Surface Shear Layer and Magnetic Flux Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David

    2011-01-01

    Models of the photospheric flows due to supergranulation are generated using an evolving spectrum of vector spherical harmonics up to spherical harmonic wavenumber l1500. Doppler velocity data generated from these models are compared to direct Doppler observations from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. The models are adjusted to match the observed spatial power spectrum as well as the wavenumber dependence of the cell lifetimes, differential rotation velocities, meridional flow velocities, and relative strength of radial vs. horizontal flows. The equatorial rotation rate as a function of wavelength matches the rotation rate as a function of depth as determined by global helioseismology. This leads to the conclusions that the cellular structures are anchored at depths equal to their widths, that the surface shear layer extends to at least 70 degrees latitude, and that the poleward meridional flow decreases in amplitude and reverses direction at the base of the surface shear layer (approx.35 Mm below the surface). Using the modeled flows to passively transport magnetic flux indicates that the observed differential rotation and meridional flow of the magnetic elements are directly related to the differential rotation and meridional flow of the convective pattern itself. The magnetic elements are transported by the evolving boundaries of the supergranule pattern (where the convective flows converge) and are unaffected by the weaker flows associated with the differential rotation or meridional flow of the photospheric plasma.

  12. Measurement of Plasma Clotting Using Shear Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Tatsuya; Kondoh, Jun; Oonishi, Tomoko; Hosokawa, Kazuya

    2013-07-01

    The monitoring of blood coagulation is important during operation. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied to monitor plasma clotting. An SH-SAW sensor with a metallized surface for mechanical perturbation detection can detect plasma clotting. As plasma clotting is a gel formation reaction, the SH-SAW sensor detects viscoelastic property changes. On the other hand, an SH-SAW sensor with a free surface for electrical perturbation detection detects only the liquid mixing effect. No electrical property changes due to plasma clotting are obtained using this sensor. A planar electrochemical sensor is also used to monitor plasma clotting. In impedance spectral analysis, plasma clotting is measured. However, in the measurement of time responses, no differences between clotting and nonclotting are obtained. Therefore, the SH-SAW sensor is useful for monitoring plasma clotting.

  13. Excitation and propagation of shear-horizontal-type surface and bulk acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, K Y; Yamaguchi, M

    2001-09-01

    This paper reviews the basic properties of shear-horizontal (SH)-type surface acoustic waves (SAWs) and bulk acoustic waves (BAWs). As one of the simplest cases, the structure supporting Bleustein-Gulyaev-Shimizu waves is considered, and their excitation and propagation are discussed from various view points. First, the formalism based on the complex integral theory is presented, where the surface is assumed to be covered with an infinitesimally thin metallic film, and it is shown how the excitation and propagation of SH-type waves are affected by the surface perturbation. Then, the analysis is extended to a periodic grating structure, and the behavior of SH-type SAWs under the grating structure is discussed. Finally, the origin of the leaky nature is explained.

  14. Shear rheology of lipid monolayers and insights on membrane fluidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Gabriel; López-Montero, Iván; Monroy, Francisco; Langevin, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    The concept of membrane fluidity usually refers to a high molecular mobility inside the lipid bilayer which enables lateral diffusion of embedded proteins. Fluids have the ability to flow under an applied shear stress whereas solids resist shear deformations. Biological membranes require both properties for their function: high lateral fluidity and structural rigidity. Consequently, an adequate account must include, in addition to viscosity, the possibility for a nonzero shear modulus. This knowledge is still lacking as measurements of membrane shear properties have remained incomplete so far. In the present contribution we report a surface shear rheology study of different lipid monolayers that model distinct biologically relevant situations. The results evidence a large variety of mechanical behavior under lateral shear flow. PMID:21444777

  15. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumerlato, Marina; de Lima, Eduardo Martinelli; Osorio, Leandro Berni; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; de Menezes, Luciane Macedo; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Methods: One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48): Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3, two drillings were done with a spherical diamond bur; Group 4, sandblasting was performed with 50-µm aluminum oxide. Before the experiment, half of the samples stayed immersed in distilled water at 37oC for 90 days. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT and shear strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine. SBS were compared by surface treatment and by ageing with two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey’s test. ARI scores were compared between surface treatments with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn’s test. Results: Surface treatments on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets (p< 0.01), result not observed with ageing (p= 0.45). Groups II, III, and IV showed higher SBS and greater ARI than the Group 1 (p< 0.05). SBS was greater in the groups 3 and 4 (drilling, sandblasting) than in the Group 2 (grinding) (p< 0.05). SBS and ARI showed a positive correlation (Spearman’s R2= 0.57; p< 0.05). Conclusion: Surface treatment on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets, however ageing did not show any relevance. Sandblasting and drilling showed greater SBS than grinding. There was a positive correlation between SBS and ARI.

  16. A microstructure- and surface energy-dependent third-order shear deformation beam model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.-L.; Zhang, G. Y.

    2015-08-01

    A new non-classical third-order shear deformation model is developed for Reddy-Levinson beams using a variational formulation based on Hamilton's principle. A modified couple stress theory and a surface elasticity theory are employed. The equations of motion and complete boundary conditions for the beam are obtained simultaneously. The new model contains a material length scale parameter to account for the microstructure effect and three surface elastic constants to describe the surface energy effect. Also, Poisson's effect is incorporated in the new beam model. The current non-classical model recovers the classical elasticity-based third-order shear deformation beam model as a special case when the microstructure, surface energy and Poisson's effects are all suppressed. In addition, the newly developed beam model includes the models considering the microstructure dependence or the surface energy effect alone as limiting cases and reduces to two existing models for Bernoulli-Euler and Timoshenko beams incorporating the microstructure and surface energy effects. To illustrate the new model, the static bending and free vibration problems of a simply supported beam loaded by a concentrated force are analytically solved by directly applying the general formulas derived. For the static bending problem, the numerical results reveal that both the deflection and rotation of the simply supported beam predicted by the current model are smaller than those predicted by the classical model. Also, it is observed that the differences in the deflection and rotation predicted by the two beam models are very large when the beam thickness is sufficiently small, but they are diminishing with the increase in the beam thickness. For the free vibration problem, it is found that the natural frequency predicted by the new model is higher than that predicted by the classical beam model, and the difference is significant for very thin beams. These predicted trends of the size effect at the

  17. Influence of ceramic surface treatment on shear bond strength of ceramic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Fernandes Ramos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare four different surface treatment methods and determine which produces adequate bond strength between ceramic brackets and facets of porcelain (feldspathic, and evaluate the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scores. Materials and Methods: Ten facets of porcelain specimens with glazed surfaces were used for each group. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following treatment conditions of the porcelain surface: (1 no surface treatment (control group, (2 fine diamond bur + orthophosphoric acid gel 37%, (3 hydrofluoric acid (HFL 10%, and (4 HFL 10% + silane. Ceramic brackets were bonded with the adhesive cement Transbond XT. The shear bond strength values were measured on a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: There was a significant difference (P<0.05 between the control group and all other groups. There was no significant difference (P<0.05 between treated porcelain surface with diamond bur + orthophosphoric acid gel 37% (4.8 MPa and HFL 10% (6.1 MPa, but the group treated with HFL 10% had clinically acceptable bond strength values. The group treated with HFL 10% + silane (17.5 MPa resulted in a statistically significant higher tensile bond strength (P<0.05. In group 4, 20% of the porcelain facets displayed damage. Conclusion: Etching of the surface with HFL increased the bond strength values. Silane application was recommended to bond a ceramic bracket to the porcelain surface in order to achieve bond strengths that are clinically acceptable.

  18. Evaluation of shear bond strength of composite resin to nonprecious metal alloys with different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassini E.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Replacing fractured ceramometal restorations may be the best treatment option, but it is costly. Many different bonding systems are currently available to repair the fractured ceramometal restorations. This study compared the shear bond strength of composite to a base metal alloy using 4 bonding systems.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, fifty discs, casted in a Ni-Cr-Be base metal alloy (Silvercast, Fulldent,were ground with 120, 400 and 600 grit sandpaper and divided equally into 5 groups receiving 5 treatments for veneering. Conventional feldspathic porcelain (Ceramco2, Dentsply Ceramco was applied on control group (PFM or group1 and the remaining metal discs were air- abraded for 15 seconds with 50 mm aluminum oxide at 45 psi and washed for 5 seconds under tap water.Then the specimens were dried by compressed air and the  groups were treated with one of the bonding systems as follows: All-Bond 2 (AB, Ceramic Primer (CP, Metal Primer II (MP and Panavia F2 (PF. An opaque composite (Foundation opaque followed by a hybrid composite (Gradia Direct was placed on the treated metal surface and light cured separately. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 370C and thermocycled prior to shear strength testing. Fractured specimens were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis was performed with one way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance.Results: Mean shear bond strengths of the groups in MPa were as follows: PFM group 38.6±2, All-Bond 2 17.06±2.85, Ceramic Primer 14.72±1.2, Metal Primer II 19.04±2.2 and Panavia F2 21.37±2.1. PFM group exhibited the highest mean shear bond strength and Ceramic Primer showed the lowest. Tukey's HSD test revealed the mean bond strength of the PFM group to be significantly higher than the other groups (P<0.001. The data for the PF group was significantly higher than AB and CP groups (P<0.05 and the shear

  19. A Comparative Study of Solutions Concerning Thick Elastic Plates on Bi-modulus Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Vlad

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The classical bending theory of elastic plates is based upon the assumption that the internal moments are proportional to the curvatures of the median deformed surface. This theory does not include the effects of shear and normal pressure in the plate. The model of a bi-modulus foundation is a realistic generalization of the Winkler’s classical one and is widely used to represent the subgrade of railroad systems, airport lanes [1], [2]. The derived equation of elastic thick plates on bi-modulus foundation considers shear and normal stress as linear variable across the plate thickness. This paper presents numerical solutions for thick plate resting on bi-modulus subgrade. These solutions take into account the shear distortion, and they are compared to the solution obtained by Finite Element Analysis and with the Winkler’s model. Particular solutions for the rectangular plate of clamped boundary, for the hinged rectangular plate and for a semi-elliptical plate, are discussed. The numerical solutions consist of double power series and they were obtained based on the minimum of the total strain energy [1]. Parametric studies have been performed in order to emphasize the effects of the chosen foundation and that of the geometry.

  20. Estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity by inversion of Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The shear-wave (S-wave) velocity of near-surface materials (soil, rocks, pavement) and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many groundwater, engineering, and environmental studies. Rayleigh-wave phase velocity of a layered-earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth properties: P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and thickness of layers. Analysis of the Jacobian matrix provides a measure of dispersion-curve sensitivity to earth properties. S-wave velocities are the dominant influence on a dispersion curve in a high-frequency range (>5 Hz) followed by layer thickness. An iterative solution technique to the weighted equation proved very effective in the high-frequency range when using the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques. Convergence of the weighted solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Synthetic examples demonstrated calculation efficiency and stability of inverse procedures. We verify our method using borehole S-wave velocity measurements.Iterative solutions to the weighted equation by the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques are derived to estimate near-surface shear-wave velocity. Synthetic and real examples demonstrate the calculation efficiency and stability of the inverse procedure. The inverse results of the real example are verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements.

  1. A shear wave ground surface vibration technique for the detection of buried pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Papandreou, B.

    2014-07-01

    A major UK initiative, entitled 'Mapping the Underworld' aims to develop and prove the efficacy of a multi-sensor device for accurate remote buried utility service detection, location and, where possible, identification. One of the technologies to be incorporated in the device is low-frequency vibro-acoustics; the application of this technology for detecting buried infrastructure, in particular pipes, is currently being investigated. Here, a shear wave ground vibration technique for detecting buried pipes is described. For this technique, shear waves are generated at the ground surface, and the resulting ground surface vibrations measured. Time-extended signals are employed to generate the illuminating wave. Generalized cross-correlation functions between the measured ground velocities and a reference measurement adjacent to the excitation are calculated and summed using a stacking method to generate a cross-sectional image of the ground. To mitigate the effects of other potential sources of vibration in the vicinity, the excitation signal can be used as an additional reference when calculating the cross-correlation functions. Measurements have been made at two live test sites to detect a range of buried pipes. Successful detection of the pipes was achieved, with the use of the additional reference signal proving beneficial in the noisier of the two environments.

  2. A global shear velocity model of the mantle from normal modes and surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    durand, S.; Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.; Lambotte, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new global shear wave velocity model of the mantle based on the inversion of all published normal mode splitting functions and the large surface wave dataset measured by Debayle & Ricard (2012). Normal mode splitting functions and surface wave phase velocity maps are sensitive to lateral heterogeneities of elastic parameters (Vs, Vp, xi, phi, eta) and density. We first only consider spheroidal modes and Rayleigh waves and restrict the inversion to Vs, Vp and the density. Although it is well known that Vs is the best resolved parameter, we also investigate whether our dataset allows to extract additional information on density and/or Vp. We check whether the determination of the shear wave velocity is affected by the a priori choice of the crustal model (CRUST2.0 or 3SMAC) or by neglecting/coupling poorly resolved parameters. We include the major discontinuities, at 400 and 670 km. Vertical smoothing is imposed through an a priori gaussian covariance matrix on the model and we discuss the effect of coupling/decoupling the inverted structure above and below the discontinuities. We finally discuss the large scale structure of our model and its geodynamical implications regarding the amount of mass exchange between the upper and lower mantle.

  3. Detection of cells captured with antigens on shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Hsu-Chao; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-02-01

    Techniques to separate cells are widely applied in immunology. The technique to separate a specific antigen on a microfluidic platform involves the use of a shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave (SH-SAW) sensor. With specific antibodies conjugated onto the surface of the SH-SAW sensors, this technique can serve to identify specific cells in bodily fluids. Jurkat cells, used as a target in this work, provide a model of cells in small abundance (1:1000) for isolation and purification with the ultimate goal of targeting even more dilute cells. T cells were separated from a mixed-cell medium on a chip (Jurkat cells/K562 cells, 1/1000). A novel microchamber was developed to capture cells during the purification, which required a large biosample. Cell detection was demonstrated through the performance of genetic identification on the chip.

  4. Deep soil compaction as a method of ground improvement and to stabilization of wastes and slopes with danger of liquefaction, determining the modulus of deformation and shear strength parameters of loose rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lersow, M

    2001-01-01

    For the stabilization of dumps with the construction of hidden dams and for building ground improvement, for instance for traffic lines over dumps, nearly all applied compaction methods have the aim to reduce the pore volume in the loose rock. With these methods, a homogenization of the compacted loose rock will be obtained too. The compaction methods of weight compaction by falling weight, compaction by vibration and compaction by blasting have been introduced, and their applications and efficiencies have been shown. For the estimation of the effective depth of the compaction and for a safe planning of the bearing layer, respectively, the necessary material parameters have to be determined for each deep compaction method. Proposals for the determination of these parameters have been made within this paper. In connection with the stabilization of flow-slide-prone dump slopes, as well as for the improvement of dump areas for the use as building ground, it is necessary to assess the deformation behavior and the bearing capacity. To assess the resulting building ground improvement, deformation indexes (assessment of the flow-prone layer) and strength indexes (assessment of the bearing capacity) have to be determined with soil mechanical tests. Förster and Lersow, [Patentschrift DE 197 17 988. Verfahren, auf der Grundlage last- und/oder weggesteuerter Plattendruckversuche auf der Bohrlochsohle, zur Ermittlung des Spannungs-Verformungs-Verhaltens und/oder von Deformationsmoduln und/oder von Festigkeitseigenschaften in verschiedenen Tiefen insbesondere von Lockergesteinen und von Deponiekörpern in situ; Förster W, Lersow M. Plattendruckversuch auf der Bohrlochsohle, Ermittlung des Spannungs-Verformungs-Verhaltens von Lockergestein und Deponiematerial Braunkohle--Surface Mining, 1998;50(4): 369-77; Lersow M. Verfahren zur Ermittlung von Scherfestigkeitsparametern von Lockergestein und Deponiematerial aus Plattendruckversuchen auf der Bohrlochsohle. Braunkohle--Surface

  5. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets. Copyright © 2014

  6. Analysis shear wave velocity structure obtained from surface wave methods in Bornova, Izmir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamuk, Eren, E-mail: eren.pamuk@deu.edu.tr; Akgün, Mustafa, E-mail: mustafa.akgun@deu.edu.tr [Department of Geophysical Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey); Özdağ, Özkan Cevdet, E-mail: cevdet.ozdag@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylul University Rectorate, Izmir (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Properties of the soil from the bedrock is necessary to describe accurately and reliably for the reduction of earthquake damage. Because seismic waves change their amplitude and frequency content owing to acoustic impedance difference between soil and bedrock. Firstly, shear wave velocity and depth information of layers on bedrock is needed to detect this changing. Shear wave velocity can be obtained using inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods (MASW- the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves, ReMi-Refraction Microtremor, SPAC-Spatial Autocorrelation). While research depth is limeted in active source study, a passive source methods are utilized for deep depth which is not reached using active source methods. ReMi method is used to determine layer thickness and velocity up to 100 m using seismic refraction measurement systems.The research carried out up to desired depth depending on radius using SPAC which is utilized easily in conditions that district using of seismic studies in the city. Vs profiles which are required to calculate deformations in under static and dynamic loads can be obtained with high resolution using combining rayleigh wave dispersion curve obtained from active and passive source methods. In the this study, Surface waves data were collected using the measurements of MASW, ReMi and SPAC at the İzmir Bornova region. Dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods were combined in wide frequency band and Vs-depth profiles were obtained using inversion. Reliability of the resulting soil profiles were provided by comparison with theoretical transfer function obtained from soil paremeters and observed soil transfer function from Nakamura technique and by examination of fitting between these functions. Vs values are changed between 200-830 m/s and engineering bedrock (Vs>760 m/s) depth is approximately 150 m.

  7. Effect of sandblasting on surface roughness of zirconia-based ceramics and shear bond strength of veneering porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Zhang, Zutai; Zheng, Dongxiang; Ding, Ning; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of sandblasting on the surface roughness of zirconia and the shear bond strength of the veneering porcelain. Pre-sintered zirconia plates were prepared and divided into four groups. Group A were not treated at all; group B were first sandblasted under 0.2 MPa pressure and then densely sintered; group C and D were sintered first, and then sandblasted under 0.2 MPa and 0.4 MPa pressures respectively. Surface roughness was measured and 3D roughness was reconstructed for the specimens, which were also analyzed with X-ray diffractometry. Finally after veneering porcelain sintering, shear bond tests were conducted. Sandblasting zirconia before sintering significantly increased surface roughness and the shear bond strength between zirconia and veneering porcelain (pzirconia before sintering is a useful method to increase surface roughness and could successfully improve the bonding strength of veneering porcelain.

  8. Shear elasticity of fluids at low-frequent shear influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badmaev, Badma B; Budaev, Ochir R; Dembelova, Tuyana S; Damdinov, Bair B

    2006-12-22

    The visco-elastic properties of liquids have been investigated using acoustical resonance method. Piezoquatrz performed tangential oscillations on the main resonance frequency of 74 kHz contacts by the one end of horizontal surface with the studied liquid layer covered by quartz cover-plate. So the stagnant shear waves are installed in layer. The solution of interaction of piezoquartz-liquid layer-cover-plate gives three methods of determination of the real shear modulus (G) and the tangent of mechanical loss angle (tan theta) of liquid. The first method is realized at smaller thickness of liquid layer then the length of shear wave. Liquids of different classes have been studied using this method: polymer liquids, oils, glycols and alcohols. The second method is connected with the propagation of shear wave in liquid layer, parameters of which are determined the G and tan theta. And the third method is based on the determination of limit shift of resonance frequencies at completes damping of shear wave in thick layer of liquid. All these three methods give satisfactory agreement of results.

  9. Shear bond strength of veneering ceramic to zirconia core after different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmali, Omer; Akin, Hakan; Ozdemir, Ali Kemal

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments: sandblasting, liners, and different laser irradiations on shear bond strength (SBS) of pre-sintered zirconia to veneer ceramic. The SBS between veneering porcelain and zirconium oxide (ZrO2) substructure was weak. Various surface treatment methods have been suggested for zirconia to obtain high bond strength to veneering porcelain. There is no study that evaluated the bond strength between veneering porcelain and the different surface treatments on pre-sintered ZrO2 substructure. Two hundred specimens with 7 mm diameter and 3 mm height pre-sintered zirconia blocks were fabricated. Specimens were randomly divided into 10 groups (n=20) according to surface treatments applied. Group C, untreated (Control); Group E, erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiated; Group N, neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiated; Group SB, sandblasted; Group L, liner applied; Group NL, Nd:YAG laser irradiated+liner applied; Group EL, Er:YAG laser irradiated+liner applied; Group SN, sandblasted+Nd:YAG laser irradiated; Group SE, sandblasted+Er:YAG laser irradiated; and Group SL, sandblasted+liner applied. The disks were then veneered with veneering porcelain. Before the experiment, specimens were steeped in 37°C distilled water for 24 h. All specimens were thermocycled for 5000 cycles between 5°C and 55°C with a 30 sec dwell time. Shear bond strength test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The fractured specimens were examined under a stereomicroscope to evaluate the fracture pattern. Surface treatments significantly changing the topography of the yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramic according to scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images. The highest mean bond strength value was obtained in Group SE, and the lowest bond strength value was observed in NL group. Bond strength values of the other groups were similar to each other. This

  10. Rivulet flow round a horizontal cylinder subject to a uniform surface shear stress

    KAUST Repository

    Paterson, C.

    2014-09-14

    © 2014 © The Author, 2014. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. The steady flow of a slowly varying rivulet with prescribed flux in the azimuthal direction round a large stationary horizontal cylinder subject to a prescribed uniform azimuthal surface shear stress is investigated. In particular, we focus on the case where the volume flux is downwards but the shear stress is upwards, for which there is always a solution corresponding to a rivulet flowing down at least part of one side of the cylinder. We consider both a rivulet with constant non-zero contact angle but slowly varying width (that is, de-pinned contact lines) and a rivulet with constant width but slowly varying contact angle (that is, pinned contact lines), and show that they have qualitatively different behaviour. When shear is present, a rivulet with constant non-zero contact angle can never run all the way from the top to the bottom of the cylinder, and so we consider the scenario in which an infinitely wide two-dimensional film of uniform thickness covers part of the upper half of the cylinder and \\'breaks\\' into a single rivulet with constant non-zero contact angle. In contrast, a sufficiently narrow rivulet with constant width can run all the way from the top to the bottom of the cylinder, whereas a wide rivulet can do so only if its contact lines de-pin, and so we consider the scenario in which the contact lines of a wide rivulet de-pin on the lower half of the cylinder.

  11. Enhancing the formation and shear resistance of nitrifying biofilms on membranes by surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Susanne; Holmberg, Maria; Terada, Akihiko; Kingshott, Peter; Smets, Barth F

    2009-08-01

    Polypropylene (PP) membranes and polyethylene (PE) surfaces were modified to enhance formation and shear resistance of nitrifying biofilms for wastewater treatment applications. A combination of plasma polymerization and wet chemistry was employed to ultimately introduce poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) chains with two different functional groups (-PEG-NH(2) and -PEG-CH(3)). Biofilm growth experiments using a mixed nitrifying bacterial culture revealed that the specific combination of PEG chains with amino groups resulted in most biofilm formation on both PP and PE samples. Detachment experiments showed similar trends: biofilms on -PEG-NH(2) modified surfaces were much stronger compared to the other modifications and the unmodified reference surfaces. Electrostatic interactions between the protonated amino group and negatively charged bacteria as well as PEG chain density which can affect the surface structure might be possible explanations of the superiority of the -PEG-NH(2) modification. The success of the-PEG-NH(2) modification was independent of the original surface and might, therefore, be used in wastewater treatment bioreactors to improve reactor performance by making biofilm formation more stable and predictable.

  12. Effect of Four Methods of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaei, Soghra; Aghili, Hossein Agha; Davari, Abdolrahim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Providing reliable attachment between bracket base and zirconia surface is a prerequisite for exertion of orthodontic force. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of four zirconium surface treatment methods on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: One block of zirconium was trimmed into four zirconium surfaces, which served as our four study groups and each had 18 metal brackets bonded to them. Once the glazed layer was removed, the first group was etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (HF), and the remaining three groups were prepared by means of sandblasting and 1W, and 2W Er: YAG laser, respectively. After application of silane, central incisor brackets were bonded to the zirconium surfaces. The SBS values were measured by a Dartec testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD for multiple comparisons. Results: The highest SBS was achieved in the sandblasted group (7.81±1.02 MPa) followed in a descending order by 2W laser group (6.95±0.87 MPa), 1W laser group (6.87±0.92 MPa) and HF acid etched group (5.84±0.78 MPa). The differences between the study groups were statistically significant except between the laser groups (Pacid etching for zirconium surface treatment prior to bracket bonding. PMID:26622283

  13. Comparing shear-wave velocity profiles inverted from multichannel surface wave with borehole measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Hunter, J.A.; Harris, J.B.; Ivanov, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent field tests illustrate the accuracy and consistency of calculating near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). S-wave velocity profiles (S-wave velocity vs. depth) derived from MASW compared favorably to direct borehole measurements at sites in Kansas, British Columbia, and Wyoming. Effects of changing the total number of recording channels, sampling interval, source offset, and receiver spacing on the inverted S-wave velocity were studied at a test site in Lawrence, Kansas. On the average, the difference between MASW calculated Vs and borehole measured Vs in eight wells along the Fraser River in Vancouver, Canada was less than 15%. One of the eight wells was a blind test well with the calculated overall difference between MASW and borehole measurements less than 9%. No systematic differences were observed in derived Vs values from any of the eight test sites. Surface wave analysis performed on surface data from Wyoming provided S-wave velocities in near-surface materials. Velocity profiles from MASW were confirmed by measurements based on suspension log analysis. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Motion of cells sedimenting on a solid surface in a laminar shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, O; Pierres, A; Foa, C; Delaage, M; Bongrand, P

    1992-01-01

    Cell adhesion often occurs under dynamic conditions, as in flowing blood. A quantitative understanding of this process requires accurate knowledge of the topographical relationships between the cell membrane and potentially adhesive surfaces. This report describes an experimental study made on both the translational and rotational velocities of leukocytes sedimenting of a flat surface under laminar shear flow. The main conclusions are as follows: (a) Cells move close to the wall with constant velocity for several tens of seconds. (b) The numerical values of translational and rotational velocities are inconsistent with Goldman's model of a neutrally buoyant sphere in a laminar shear flow, unless a drag force corresponding to contact friction between cells and the chamber floor is added. The phenomenological friction coefficient was 7.4 millinewton.s/m. (c) Using a modified Goldman's theory, the width of the gap separating cells (6 microns radius) from the chamber floor was estimated at 1.4 micron. (d) It is shown that a high value of the cell-to-substrate gap may be accounted for by the presence of cell surface protrusions of a few micrometer length, in accordance with electron microscope observations performed on the same cell population. (e) In association with previously reported data (Tissot, O., C. Foa, C. Capo, H. Brailly, M. Delaage, and P. Bongrand. 1991. Biocolloids and Biosurfaces. In press), these results are consistent with the possibility that cell-substrate attachment be initiated by the formation of a single molecular bond, which might be considered as the rate limiting step.

  15. Guided shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors for chemical and biochemical detection in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josse, F; Bender, F; Cernose, R W

    2001-12-15

    The design and performance of guided shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (guided SH-SAW) devices on LiTaO3 substrates are investigated for high-sensitivity chemical and biochemical sensors in liquids. Despite their structural similarity to Rayleigh SAW, SH-SAWs often propagate slightly deeper within the substrate, hence preventing the implementation of high-sensitivity detectors. The device sensitivity to mass and viscoelastic loading is increased using a thin guiding layer on the device surface. Because of their relatively low shear wave velocity, various polymers including poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and cyanoethyl cellulose (cured or cross-linked) are investigated as the guiding layers to trap the acoustic energy near the sensing surface. The devices have been tested in biosensing and chemical sensing experiments. Suitable design principles for these applications are discussed with regard to wave guidance, electrical passivation of the interdigital transducers from the liquid environments, acoustic loss, and sensor signal distortion. In biosensing experiments, using near-optimal PMMA thickness of approximately 2 microm, mass sensitivity greater than 1500 Hz/(ng/mm2) is demonstrated, resulting in a minimum detection limit less than 20 pg/mm2. For chemical sensor experiments, it is found that optimal waveguide thickness must be modified to account for the chemically sensitive layer which also acts to guide the SH-SAW. A detection limit of 780 (3 x peak-to-peak noise) or 180 ppb (3 x rms noise) is estimated from the present measurements for some organic compounds in water.

  16. Surface acoustic load sensing using a face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2012-11-01

    Pb(In(0.5)Nb(0.5))O(3)-Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-PbTiO(3) (PIN-PMN-PT) resonators for surface acoustic load sensing are presented in this paper. Different acoustic loads are applied to thickness mode, thickness-shear mode, and face-shear mode resonators, and the electrical impedances at resonance and anti-resonance frequencies are recorded. More than one order of magnitude higher sensitivity (ratio of electrical impedance change to surface acoustic impedance change) at the resonance is achieved for the face-shear-mode resonator compared with other resonators with the same dimensions. The Krimholtz, Leedom, and Matthaei (KLM) model is used to verify the surface acoustic loading effect on the electrical impedance spectrum of face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonators. The demonstrated high sensitivity of face-shear mode resonators to surface loads is promising for a broad range of applications, including artificial skin, biological and chemical sensors, touch screens, and other touch-based sensors.

  17. Fast relaxation of a hexagonal Poiseuille shear-induced near-surface phase in a threadlike micellar solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, W.A. [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6393 (United States); Butler, P.D.; Slawecki, T.M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Magid, L.J.; Han, Z. [Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    1999-08-01

    The dynamics of near-surface conformations in complex fluids under flow should dramatically affect their rheological properties. We have made the first measurements resolving the decay kinetics of a hexagonal phase induced in a threadlike polyionic micellar system under Poiseuille shear near a quartz surface. Upon cessation of shearing flow, this minimum interference crystalline phase formed within {approximately}20 {mu}m of the surface {open_quotes}melts{close_quotes} to a metastable two-dimensional liquid of aligned micelles in {approximately}0.7 s. This is some three orders of magnitude shorter than the time required for bulk (Couette) shear-aligned micelles in this system to reach a fully entangled state. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Raman study of lysozyme amyloid fibrils suspended on super-hydrophobic surfaces by shear flow

    KAUST Repository

    Moretti, Manola

    2017-05-19

    The shear flow generated at the rim of a drop evaporating on a micro-fabricated super-hydrophobic surface has been used to suspend and orient single/few lysozyme amyloid fibrils between two pillars for substrate-free characterization. Micro Raman spectroscopy performed on extended fibers evidenced a shift of the Amide I band main peak to the value attributed to β-sheet secondary structure, characteristic of the amyloid fibers. In addition, given the orientation sensitivity of the anisotropic molecule, the Raman signal of the main secondary structure was nicely enhanced for a fiber alignment parallel to the polarization direction of the laser. The substrate-free sample generated by this suspending technique is suitable for other structural analysis methods, where fiber crystals are investigated. It could be further employed for generation of arrays and patterns in a controllable fashion, where bio-compatible material is needed.

  19. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to enamel under different surface treatment conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Melo Pithon

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to enamel and the adhesive remnant index (ARI of both metallic and polycarbonate brackets bonded under different conditions. Ninety bovine permanent mandibular incisors were embedded in acrylic resin using PVC rings as molds and assigned to 6 groups (n=15. In Groups 1 (control and 3, metallic and polycarbonate orthodontic brackets were, respectively, bonded to the enamel surfaces using Transbond XT composite according to the manufacturer's recommendations. In Groups 2 and 4, both types of brackets were bonded to enamel with Transbond XT composite, but XT primer was replaced by the OrthoPrimer agent. In Groups 5 and 6, the polycarbonate bracket bases were sandblasted with 50-mm aluminum-oxide particle stream and bonded to the enamel surfaces prepared under the same conditions described in Groups 3 and 4, respectively. After bonding, the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 hours and then submitted to shear bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results (MPa showed no statistically significant difference between Groups 4 and 6 (p>0.05. Likewise, no statistically significant differences (p>0.05 were found among Groups 1, 2, and 5, although their results were significantly lower than those of Groups 4 and 6 (p<0.05. Group 3 had statistically significant lower bond strength than Groups 2, 4, and 6, but no statistically significant differences were found on comparison to Groups 1 and 5. A larger number of fractures at the bracket/composite interface were evidenced by the ARI scores. OrthoPrimer bonding agent yielded higher bond strength in the groups using either conventional or sandblasted polycarbonate brackets, which was not observed in the groups using metallic brackets.

  20. SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF BRACKETS BONDED TO PORCELAIN SURFACE: IN VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidan Alakuş Sabuncuoğlu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the effects of different porcelain surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength (SBS and fracture mode of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: Seventy feldspathic porcelain disk samples mounted in acrylic resin blocks were divided into seven groups (n=10 according to type of surface treatment: I, Diamond bur; II, Orthosphoric acid (OPA; III, hydrofluoric acid (HFA; IV, sandblasted with aluminum oxide (SB; V, SB+HFA; VI, Neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG laser; VII, Erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG laser. Brackets were affixed to treated all-porcelain surfaces with a silane bonding agent and adhesive resin and subjected to SBS testing. Specimens were evaluated according to the adhesive remnant index (ARI, and failure modes were assessed quantitatively under a stereomicroscope and morphologically under a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance and the post-hoc Tukey test, with the significance level set at 0.05. Results: The highest SBS values were observed for Group V, with no significant difference between Groups V and III. SBS values for Group I were significantly lower than those of all other groups tested. The porcelain/resin interface was the most common site of failure in Group V (40% and Group III (30%, whereas other groups showed various types of bond failure, with no specific location pre-dominating, but with some of the adhesive left on the porcelain surfaces (ARI scores 2 or 3 in most cases. Conclusion: The current findings indicate that a diamond bur alone is unable to sufficiently etch porcelain surfaces for bracket bonding. Moreover, SB and HFA etching used in combination results in a significantly higher shear-bond strength than HFA or SB alone. Finally, laser etching with either an Nd:YAG or Er:YAG laser was found to be more effective and less time-consuming than both HFA acid and SB for the treatment of deglazed

  1. Surface chemistry regulates the sensitivity and tolerability of osteoblasts to various magnitudes of fluid shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Jinfeng; Xing, Juan; Wang, Yuanliang; Luo, Yanfeng

    2016-12-01

    Scaffolds provide a physical support for osteoblasts and act as the medium to transfer mechanical stimuli to cells. To verify our hypothesis that the surface chemistry of scaffolds regulates the perception of cells to mechanical stimuli, the sensitivity and tolerability of osteoblasts to fluid shear stress (FSS) of various magnitudes (5, 12, 20 dynes/cm(2) ) were investigated on various surface chemistries (-OH, -CH3 , -NH2 ), and their follow-up effects on cell proliferation and differentiation were examined as well. The sensitivity was characterized by the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) while the tolerability was by cellular membrane integrity. The cell proliferation was characterized by S-phase cell fraction and the differentiation by ALP activity and ECM expression (fibronectin and type I collagen). As revealed, osteoblasts demonstrated higher sensitivity and lower tolerability on OH and CH3 surfaces, yet lower sensitivity and higher tolerability on NH2 surfaces. Observations on the focal adhesion formation, F-actin organization and cellular orientation before and after FSS exposure suggest that the potential mechanism lies in the differential control of F-actin organization and focal adhesion formation by surface chemistry, which further divergently mediates the sensitivity and tolerability of ROBs to FSS and the follow-up cell proliferation and differentiation. These findings are essentially valuable for design/selection of desirable surface chemistry to orchestrate with FSS stimuli, inducing appropriate cell responses and promoting bone formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2978-2991, 2016.

  2. Single-monolayer in situ modulus measurements using a SAW device: Photocrosslinking of a diacetylenic thiol-based monolayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricco, A.J.; Staton, A.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Crooks, R.M. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Kim, Taisun [Hallym Univ., Kang-Won Do (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-10-01

    We report direct measurement of the modulus change that accompanies the crosslinking of a single molecular monolayer. We measured a change in elastic modulus of 5 x 10{sup 10} dyn/cm{sup 2} as a result of ultraviolet-induced photocrosslinking of a single surface-confined monolayer of the conjugated diacetylenic thiol HS(CH{sub 2}){sub 10}C{triple_bond}CC{triple_bond}C(CH{sub 2}){sub 10}COOH, designated {open_quotes}DAT{close_quotes} hereafter. The modulus measurement was made on a monolayer of DAT chemisorbed upon a gold film on the surface of a 97-MHz ST-quartz surface acoustic wave delay line. The ratio of the changes recorded in SAW velocity and attenuation, approximately 4:1, suggests that the measured effect is mainly a change in the elastic (real) component of the complex shear modulus, viscous changes playing a lesser role. In relation to typical polymer modulus values, the change of 5 x 10{sup 10} dyn/cm{sup 2} is consistent with a change from a rubbery material (G{prime} {approximately} 10{sup 7} - 10{sup 8} dyn/cm{sup 2}) to a fairly rigid, glassy material (G{prime} {approximately} 10{sup 10} dyn/cm{sup 2}), reasonable for comparison of the monolayer in its as-adsorbed and crosslinked forms. This report of the direct SAW-based measurement of the modulus change associated with the crosslinking of a single molecular monolayer is complementary to and consistent with previous in-situ measurements of this process using thickness-shear mode resonators.

  3. Low-frequency shear elasticity of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badmaev, B. B.; Bal'Zhinov, S. A.; Damdinov, B. B.; Dembelova, T. S.

    2010-09-01

    The shear modulus and mechanical loss tangent are measured for several liquids in the frequency region between 104 and 105 Hz. It is found that an increase in frequency is accompanied by a decrease in the shear modulus and an increase in the mechanical loss tangent.

  4. Capture and On-chip analysis of Melanoma Cells Using Tunable Surface Shear forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Simon Chang-Hao; Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Dey, Shuvashis; Carrascosa, Laura G.; Christophi, Christopher; Cebon, Jonathan; Shiddiky, Muhammad J. A.; Behren, Andreas; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    With new systemic therapies becoming available for metastatic melanoma such as BRAF and PD-1 inhibitors, there is an increasing demand for methods to assist with treatment selection and response monitoring. Quantification and characterisation of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) has been regarded as an excellent non-invasive candidate but a sensitive and efficient tool to do these is lacking. Herein we demonstrate a microfluidic approach for melanoma cell capture and subsequent on-chip evaluation of BRAF mutation status. Our approach utilizes a recently discovered alternating current electrohydrodynamic (AC-EHD)-induced surface shear forces, referred to as nanoshearing. A key feature of nanoshearing is the ability to agitate fluid to encourage contact with surface-bound antibody for the cell capture whilst removing nonspecific cells from the surface. By adjusting the AC-EHD force to match the binding affinity of antibodies against the melanoma-associated chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (MCSP), a commonly expressed melanoma antigen, this platform achieved an average recovery of 84.7% from biological samples. Subsequent staining with anti-BRAFV600E specific antibody enabled on-chip evaluation of BRAFV600E mutation status in melanoma cells. We believe that the ability of nanoshearing-based capture to enumerate melanoma cells and subsequent on-chip characterisation has the potential as a rapid screening tool while making treatment decisions.

  5. Displacement of liquid droplets on a surface by a shearing air flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J; Wilson, M C T; Kapur, N

    2011-04-01

    The motion of droplets on surfaces is crucial to the performance of a wide range of processes; this study examines the initiation of droplet motion through a shearing mechanism generated here by a controlled air flow. Systematic experiments are carried out for a range of fluids and well defined surfaces. A model is postulated that balances surface tension forces at the contact line and the drag force due to the air motion. Experiments reveal that the critical velocity at which droplet motion is initiated depends on the contact angle and the droplet size. Visualizations highlight three modes of motion: (I) the droplet retains a footprint similar to that at the point of motion; (II) a tail exists at the rear of the droplet; (III) a trail remains behind the droplet (that can shed smaller droplets). The predictions of droplet initiation velocity are good for type I motion, in accordance with the assumptions inherent within the model. This model confirms the dominant physics associated with the initiation of droplet motion and provides a useful predictive expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fractal properties of isovelocity surfaces in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.; Foss, John F.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Karyakin, Mikhail Yu.

    1993-08-01

    The fractal properties of isovelocity surfaces are studied in three high Reynolds number (Rλ≊2.0×102-3.2×103) laboratory shear flows using the standard box-counting method. The fractal dimension D=-d(log Nr)/d(log r) was estimated within the range of box sizes r from several Kolmogorov scales up to several integral scales (Nr is the number of boxes with size r required to cover the line intersection of an isovelocity surface). The inertial subrange was of particular interest in this investigation. Measurements were carried out for external intermittency factors γ≊0.6-1.0. The data were processed using threshold levels U±2.5u' (U and u' denote mean and rms values of longitudinal velocity). Over the parameters studied, no wide range of constant fractal dimension was found. On the other hand, the accuracy of constant fractal dimension approximation with D≊0.4 over the inertial subranges was shown to be similar to that of the Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 30, 301 (1941)] ``two-thirds law.''

  7. Effect of Four Methods of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Zirconium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soghra Yassaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Providing reliable attachment between bracket base and zirconia surface is a prerequisite for exertion of orthodontic force. The purpose of the present study was to eval- uate the effect of four zirconium surface treatment methods on shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: One block of zirconium was trimmed into four zirconium sur- faces, which served as our four study groups and each had 18 metal brackets bonded to them. Once the glazed layer was removed, the first group was etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (HF, and the other three groups were prepared by means of sandblasting and 1 W, and 2 W Er: YAG laser, respectively. After application of silane, central incisor brackets were bonded to the zirconium surfaces. The SBS values were measured by a Dartec testing ma- chine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min.Results: The highest SBS was achieved in the sandblasted group (7.81±1.02 MPa followed in a descending order by 2 W laser group (6.95±0.87 MPa, 1 W laser group (6.87±0.92MPa and HF acid etched group (5.84±0.78 MPa. The differences between the study groups, were statistically significant except between the laser groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: In terms of higher bond strength and safety, sandblasting and Er: YAG laser irradiation with power output of 1 W and 2 W can be considered more appropriate alterna- tives to HF acid etching for zirconium surface treatment prior to bracket bonding.

  8. 实时定量超声弹性成像技术检测肱二头肌横切面与纵切面弹性差异%Quantitative measurement for the elastic modulus of the cross section and longitudinal section of biceps brachii by shear-wave elasto-sonography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范春芝; 安力春; 徐建红; 王真; 孙静; 唐杰; 温朝阳

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究声束平行于肌纤维(纵切面)和声束垂直于肌纤维(横切面)时肱二头肌的杨氏模量值差异.方法 141例男性志愿者,年龄16~34岁,平均22岁,均无上肢外伤史、重症肌无力、进行性肌营养不良、周期性瘫痪、代谢性肌病等病史.使用法国Supersonic Imagine公司的AixPlore型实时定量剪切波超声弹性成像超声诊断仪,L4-15线阵探头.探头平行于肱二头肌肌纤维(纵切面)和垂直于肱二头肌肌纤维(横切面)时分别测量肱二头肌杨氏模量值并进行比较.结果 松弛状态下,肱二头肌纵切面杨氏模量值为(45.658±13.479)kPa,横切面杨氏模量值为(7.334±1.612) kPa,差异有统计学意义(P=0.0000);收缩状态下,肱二头肌纵切面杨氏模量值为(123.658±31.392) kPa,横切面杨氏模量值为(13.261±4.045)kPa,差异有统计学意义(P=0.0000).结论 肱二头肌纵切面杨氏模量值明显大于横切面杨氏模量值;肱二头肌弹性模量的各向异性,提示在检查心肌、肾脏等组织结构具有各向异性的脏器时,应注意到超声检查切面角度可能会影响其杨氏模量测量值大小;横切面检查和纵切面检查相结合也许能为疾病的诊断提供更多的信息和依据.%Objective To assess the elastic modulus difference of the ultrasonic beam parallel to the biceps brachii fiber( longitudinal section )and the ultrasonic beam perpendicular to the biceps brachii fibers( cross section ). Methods A total of 141 male volunteers aged 16 to 34 years ( mean 22 years old ), who had no history of upper extremity trauma, myasthenia gravis, progressive muscular dystrophy, periodic paralysis and metabolic myopathy were included in the study. A shear-wave elasto-sonography ( AixPlorer model, Supersonic Imagine, Aix en Provence, France ) coupled with a linear array transducer array ( 4-15 MHz ) was employed. The ultrasound transducer was parallel to the biceps brachii muscle fiber and then it was

  9. Shear bond strength of a self-etched resin cement to an indirect composite: effect of different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harorli, O T; Barutcugil, C; Kirmali, O; Kapdan, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of resin cement (Rely X-U200) bonded to differently conditioned indirect composite samples. Sixty-six composite resin specimens (5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were prepared with an indirect composite resin (Grandia) and randomly divided into six groups. Surfaces of the samples were treated with one of the following treatments; %37 phosphoric acid etching, sandblasting, 1,5 W, 2 W and 3 W erbium, chromium: Yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser application. An untreated group was used as a control. In each group surface of the sample was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. The remaining samples (n = 60) were built up with a self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X-U200) 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm height. After 24 h water storage at 37°C, the prepared specimens were submitted to shear bond strength test. One-way analysis of variance was used to analyze the bond strength values of different groups. Highest shear bond strength values were observed in sandblasting group however there were not statistical difference among the tested surface treatment methods. In Shear bond strength of resin, cement was independent of the surface conditioning methods applied on tested indirect resin composite.

  10. Variation in wind speed and surface shear stress from open floor to porous parallel windbreaks: A wind tunnel study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, De-Xin; Zhong, Ye; Jin, Chang-Jie; Wang, An-Zhi; Wu, Jia-Bing; Shi, Ting-Ting; Zhu, Ting-Yao

    2009-08-01

    As vegetative windbreaks become established on a large scale in agricultural ecosystems, understanding the influence of windbreak networks on the momentum budget of the atmospheric boundary layer becomes important. The authors conducted a wind tunnel experiment to study the variation of wind speed profile and surface shear stress of wind flow passing from an open surface to another with parallel windbreaks. Five spacing (L = 5, 10, 15, 20, 30 h, wherein h is the windbreak height) windbreak arrays with moderate porosity (aerodynamic porosity α = 0.501) were used in the experiments. Both near-floor and over-array wind speed measurements showed that airflow will approach equilibrium state behind a special windbreak of the array, varying from 4th to 9th windbreak when the spacing change from 30 to 5 h. Within the range of L/h values investigated, arrays with narrower spacing cause higher friction velocity and roughness length, which were up to 2.26 and nearly 100 times those observed over open floor, respectively. A semiempirical momentum budget model is developed on the arrayed surface to estimate windbreak drag and shear stress on the protected floor. Windbreak drag accounts for more than 80% of shear stress on the arrayed surface, and the shear stress on protected floor is less than 20% when L/h < 40 based on the model estimation. The sum of the two estimated components agrees well with the estimates obtained from over-array wind profiles.

  11. Late-Time Mixing Sensitivity to Initial Broadband Surface Roughness in High-Energy-Density Shear Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flippo, K. A.; Doss, F. W.; Kline, J. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Capelli, D.; Cardenas, T.; DeVolder, B.; Fierro, F.; Huntington, C. M.; Kot, L.; Loomis, E. N.; MacLaren, S. A.; Murphy, T. J.; Nagel, S. R.; Perry, T. S.; Randolph, R. B.; Rivera, G.; Schmidt, D. W.

    2016-11-23

    Using a large volume high-energy-density fluid shear experiment (8.5 cm3) at the National Ignition Facility, we have demonstrated for the first time the ability to significantly alter the evolution of a supersonic sheared mixing layer by controlling the initial conditions of that layer. By altering the initial surface roughness of the tracer foil, we demonstrate the ability to transition the shear mixing layer from a highly ordered system of coherent structures to a randomly ordered system with a faster growing mix layer, indicative of strong mixing in the layer at a temperature of several tens of electron volts and at near solid density. Simulations using a turbulent-mix model show good agreement with the experimental results and poor agreement without turbulent mix.

  12. Evaluation of shear bond strength of porcelain bonded to laser welded titanium surface and determination of mode of bond failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Narendra P; Dandekar, Minal; Nadiger, Ramesh K; Guttal, Satyabodh S

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of porcelain to laser welded titanium surface and to determine the mode of bond failure through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrophotometry (EDS). Forty five cast rectangular titanium specimens with the dimension of 10 mm x 8 mm x 1 mm were tested. Thirty specimens had a perforation of 2 mm diameter in the centre. These were randomly divided into Group A and B. The perforations in the Group B specimens were repaired by laser welding using Cp Grade II titanium wire. The remaining 15 specimens were taken as control group. All the test specimens were layered with low fusing porcelain and tested for shear bond strength. The debonded specimens were subjected to SEM and EDS. Data were analysed with 1-way analysis of variance and Student's t-test for comparison among the different groups. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed no statistically significant difference in shear bond strength values at a 5% level of confidence. The mean shear bond strength values for control group, Group A and B was 8.4 +/- 0.5 Mpa, 8.1 +/- 0.4 Mpa and 8.3 +/- 0.3 Mpa respectively. SEM/EDS analysis of the specimens showed mixed and cohesive type of bond failure. Within the limitations of the study laser welding did not have any effect on the shear bond strength of porcelain bonded to titanium.

  13. Multiphase composites with extremal bulk modulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibiansky, L. V.; Sigmund, Ole

    2000-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the analytical and numerical study of isotropic elastic composites made of three or more isotropic phases. The ranges of their effective bulk and shear moduli are restricted by the Hashin-Shtrikman-Walpole (HSW) bounds. For two-phase composites, these bounds are attainable......, that is, there exist composites with extreme bulk and shear moduli. For multiphase composites, they may or may not be attainable depending on phase moduli and volume fractions. Sufficient conditions of attainability of the bounds and various previously known and new types of optimal composites...... are described. Most of our new results are related to the two-dimensional problem. A numerical topology optimization procedure that solves the inverse homogenization problem is adopted and used to look for two-dimensional three-phase composites with a maximal effective bulk modulus. For the combination...

  14. Inertial effects on thin-film wave structures with imposed surface shear on an inclined plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapuratharasu, M.; Hibberd, S.; Hubbard, M. E.; Power, H.

    2016-06-01

    This study provides an extended approach to the mathematical simulation of thin-film flow on a flat inclined plane relevant to flows subject to high surface shear. Motivated by modelling thin-film structures within an industrial context, wave structures are investigated for flows with moderate inertial effects and small film depth aspect ratio ε. Approximations are made assuming a Reynolds number, Re ∼ O(ε-1) and depth-averaging used to simplify the governing Navier-Stokes equations. A parallel Stokes flow is expected in the absence of any wave disturbance and a generalisation for the flow is based on a local quadratic profile. This approach provides a more general system which includes inertial effects and is solved numerically. Flow structures are compared with studies for Stokes flow in the limit of negligible inertial effects. Both two-tier and three-tier wave disturbances are used to study film profile evolution. A parametric study is provided for wave disturbances with increasing film Reynolds number. An evaluation of standing wave and transient film profiles is undertaken and identifies new profiles not previously predicted when inertial effects are neglected.

  15. Temperature dependence of immunoreactions using shear horizontal surface acoustic wave immunosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogai, Takashi; Yatsuda, Hiromi; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the temperature dependence of immunoreactions, which are antibody-antigen reactions, on a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) immunosensor is described. The immunosensor is based on a reflection-type delay line on a 36° Y-cut 90° X-propagation quartz substrate, where the delay line is composed of a floating electrode unidirectional transducer (FEUDT), a grating reflector, and a sensing area between them. In order to evaluate the temperature dependence of immunoreactions, human serum albumin (HSA) antigen-antibody reactions are investigated. The SH-SAW immunosensor chip is placed in a thermostatic chamber and the changes in the SH-SAW velocity resulting from the immunoreactions are measured at different temperatures. As a result, it is observed that the HSA immunoreactions are influenced by the ambient temperature and that higher temperatures provide more active reactions. In order to analyze the immunoreactions, an analytical approach using an exponential fitting method for changes in SH-SAW velocity is employed.

  16. Drag reduction by the introduction of shear-free surfaces in a turbulent channel flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AJAY KUMAR SOOD; MURALI R CHOLEMARI; BALAJI SRINIVASAN

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a novel technique for drag reduction in turbulent flows is presented. The technique involves the modification of the large scales of turbulent flows and is a passive approach. The lateral transport of momentum, which is a dominant mechanism in turbulence, is attenuated by the introduction of moving shearfree surfaces (SFSes). This brings about a reduction in the drag. 2D simulations have been carried out for aturbulent channel flow using shear stress transport (SST) Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) model and validated with the available experimental results. The interaction between the plates and the fluid is two way,and is enforced either by the use of a rigid body solver with moving mesh, or by considering the SFSes to befixed at particular locations and then updating the velocities of the plates at those locations. The latter is equivalent to solving a fully developed flow in the moving mesh case. The number, shape, size and placement of the SFSes strongly influence the amount of drag reduction. The phenomenon is confirmed to be governed by a ‘slow’ turbulent time scale. Further, the efficacy of the method is seen to depend on the ratio of two time scales – an advection time scale indicating the ‘resident time’ near an SFS, and the turbulent time scale. In addition, the effectiveness of the approach is improved by judicious placement of multiple SFSes in the flow.

  17. 腰背部肌筋膜疼痛综合征激痛点的剪切波弹性模量研究%Study on the elastic modulus of shear wave for myofascial trigger points of lumber and back myofascial pain syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李真; 吕恒勇; 任泽阳; 梁晓宁; 贾晓霞; 李硕; 牛雅莉; 李迎新; 郭瑞君

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical diagnostic value of elastography in myofascial pain syndrome by measuring the elastic properties of myofascial trigger points.Methods The elastic modulus of 30 myofascial trigger points from 15 female patients with myofascial pain syndrome and 8 normal points from 8 female healthy volunteers were measured by shear wave elastography.The mean,min,max,and standard deviation (SD) of elastic modulus in lesions,surrounding tissue of myofascial trigger point and normal points were recorded and compared,and the correlation between elasticity of myofascial trigger points and age,location were analyzed.Results The mean,min,max,and standard deviation of elastic modulus in lesion area of myofascial trigger point were significantly higher than that in surrounding tissue and normal points (P<0.05).There were no significant differences between lesion area of myofascial trigger point and normal points (P>0.05),and elastic modulus of myofascial trigger points bore no relation to age and location (P>0.05).Conclusions Shear wave elastic modulus can be used to differentiate lesion area and its adjacent area of trigger points and normal points,which will provide a new way to identify myofascial trigger point and new basis for palpation,thus has higher application value in clinical and research prospect.%目的 通过剪切波弹性成像(SWE)技术研究肌筋膜疼痛综合征激痛点的弹性特征,探索弹性超声技术在肌筋膜疼痛综合征临床诊断中的应用价值.方法 对8例女性健康志愿者的8个正常点和15例女性肌筋膜疼痛综合征患者腰背部30个激痛点行弹性超声检查,分别获得正常点、激痛点病灶区及邻近区定量分析取样框(Q-box)内弹性模量的均值(Mean)、最小值(Min)、最大值(Max)及标准差(SD);比较正常点、激痛点病灶区及临近区的弹性模量差异,探索激痛点弹性模量与患者年龄、所在部位的关系.结果 激痛点病灶区弹

  18. 不同病因肝硬化患者肝实时剪切波弹性成像测值范围比较%Comparison of the liver Young's modulus value range of cirrhotic patients with different etiologies by real-time ;shear wave elastography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪惠鹏; 韩秀梅; 王学梅

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析不同病因的肝硬化患者肝杨氏模量值是否有差异。方法收集经临床确诊的肝硬化失代偿期患者199例,其中乙型肝炎后肝硬化患者139例,丙型肝炎后肝硬化患者26例,酒精性肝硬化患者34例。选择同期50名健康志愿者作为健康对照组。所有受试者均进行肝实时剪切波弹性成像检查,测量并记录肝组织的杨氏模量值,分析比较各组受试者肝组织的杨氏模量值差异。结果健康对照组的肝组织杨氏模量值最低,为(4.81±0.9)kPa。乙肝后肝硬化组、丙肝后肝硬化组、酒精性肝硬化组的肝组织杨氏模量值依次增高,分别为(16.3±8.9)kPa、(17.8±4.8)kPa、(30.6±12.3)kPa,组间差异有统计学意义(F =27.95,P <0.01)。结论实时剪切波弹性成像技术测量的不同病因肝硬化患者的肝组织杨氏模量值有一定的差异。%Objective To analyze the difference of Young's modulus between cirrhotic patients with different etiologies.Methods There were 1 99 patients with decompensated cirrhosis enrolled in this study, all of them had been diagnosed clinically.There were 139 cases of hepatitis B patients with cirrhosis,26 cases of hepatitis C patients with liver cirrhosis,34 cases of patients with alcoholic cirrhosis,and selected 50 healthy volunteers as control group in the same period.All subj ects underwent liver shear wave elastography examination,measured and recorded the Young's modulus,and compared the difference between each groups.Results The Young's modulus of liver in the healthy control group was (4.81±0.9)kPa,which was lowest in all groups.The Young's modulus of hepatitis B cirrhosis,hepatitis C cirrhosis,alcoholic cirrhosis increased successively,which was (16.3±8.9)kPa,(17.8±4.8)kPa,(30.6±12.3)kPa,respectively,and the difference between the groups was statistically significant(F =27.95,P <0.01).Conclusions There were some differences of the Young's modulus of cirrhotic patients with

  19. Comparative Study of Surface Chemical Composition and Oxide Layer Modification upon Oxygen Plasma Cleaning and Piranha Etching on a Novel Low Elastic Modulus Ti25Nb21Hf Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Virginia; Salvagni, Emiliano; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Manero, José María

    2017-08-01

    Metals are widely employed for many biological artificial replacements, and it is known that the quality and the physical/chemical properties of the surface are crucial for the success of the implant. Therefore, control over surface implant materials and their elastic moduli may be crucial to avoid undesired effects. In this study, surface modification upon cleaning and activation of a low elastic modulus Ti alloy (Ti25Hf21Nb) was investigated. Two different methods, oxygen plasma (OP) cleaning and piranha (PI) solution, were studied and compared. Both surface treatments were effective for organic contaminant removal and to increase the Ti-oxide layer thickness rather than other metal-oxides present at the surface, which is beneficial for biocompatibility of the material. Furthermore, both techniques drastically increased hydrophilicity and introduced oxidation and hydroxylation (OH)-functional groups at the surface that may be beneficial for further chemical modifications. However, these treatments did not alter the surface roughness and bulk material properties. The surfaces were fully characterized in terms of surface roughness, wettability, oxide layer composition, and hydroxyl surface density through analytical techniques (interferometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle, and zinc complexation). These findings provide essential information when planning surface modifications for cleanliness, oxide layer thickness, and surface hydroxyl density, as control over these factors is essential for many applications, especially in biomaterials.

  20. Shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite on dentin surface as a result of scrubbing pressure and duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferry Jaya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-adhering flowable composite is a combination of composite resin and adhesive material. Its application needs scrubbing process on the dentin surface, but sometimes it is difficult to determine the pressure and duration of scrubbing. Purpose: This study was aimed to analyze the effect of scrubbing pressure and duration on shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite to dentin surface Methods: Fifty four mandibulary third molar were cut to get the dentin surface and divided into nine groups (n = 6. Dentin surface was scrubbed with 1, 2, and 3 grams of scrubbing pressure, each for 15, 20, and 25 seconds respectively. surface was scrubbed with 1, 2, and 3 grams of scrubbing pressure, each for 15, 20, and 25 seconds respectively. Composite resin was applied incrementally and polymerized for 20 seconds. All specimens were immersed in saline solution at 37º C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was tested for all specimens by using Universal Testing Machine (Shimadzu AG-5000E, Japan at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute and analyzed by ANOVA and Post Hoc Test Bonferonni. The interface between self-adhering flowable interface between self-adhering flowable composite and dentin was observed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (JEOL JSM 6510LA. Results: The highest shear bond strength was obtained by 3 grams scrubbing pressure for 25 seconds or equal to applying the brush applicator in 0º relative to dentin surface. Conclusion: Increasing the scrubbing pressure and duration will increase the shear bond strength of self adhering flowable composite resin to dentinal surface. The highest shear bond strength was obtained when the applicator in 0º relative to dentin surface. Latar belakang: Self-adhering flowable composite merupakan gabungan resin komposit dengan material adhesif yang dalam penggunaannya memerlukan teknik scrubbing pada permukaan dentin, namun sulit untuk menentukan besar tekanan yang tepat saat scrubbing. Tujuan

  1. OCT-based quantification of flow velocity, shear force, and power generated by a biological ciliated surface (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Loewenberg, Michael; Choma, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    In cilia-driven fluid flow physiology, quantification of flow velocity, shearing force, and power dissipation is important in defining abnormal ciliary function. The capacity to generate flow can be robustly described in terms of shearing force. Dissipated power can be related to net ATP consumption by ciliary molecular motors. To date, however, only flow velocity can be routinely quantified in a non-invasive, non-contact manner. Additionally, traditional power-based metrics rely on metabolic consumption that reflects energy consumption not just from cilia but also from all active cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the estimation of all three of these quantities (flow velocity, shear force, and power dissipation) using only optical coherence tomography (OCT). Specifically, we develop a framework that can extract force and power information from vectorial flow velocity fields obtained using OCT-based methods. We do so by (a) estimating the viscous stress tensor from flow velocity fields to estimate shearing force and (b) using the viscous stress tensor to estimate the power dissipation function to infer total mechanical power. These estimates have the advantage of (a) requiring only a single modality, (b) being non-invasive in nature, and (c) being reflective of only the net power work generated by a ciliated surface. We demonstrate our all-optical approach to the estimation of these parameters in the Xenopus animal model system under normal and increased viscous loading. Our preliminary data support the hypothesis that the Xenopus ciliated surface can increase force output under loading conditions.

  2. Correlation of shear wave elastography Young's modulus with different clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's thyroiditis%剪切波弹性成像模量值与桥本甲状腺炎临床表现的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    强也; 胡建群; 殷立平; 王剑翔; 宋旭光; 吴意贇

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨剪切波弹性成像杨氏模量值与桥本甲状腺炎(H T )不同临床表现的相关性。方法将收集的86例临床确诊为HT的患者按照甲状腺功能分成甲亢组、甲功正常组、亚临床甲减组和临床甲减组,应用超声剪切波弹性成像技术,对各组进行超声剪切波弹性量化检测,用方差分析比较各组 HT 患者甲状腺组织剪切波模量值之间的关系。结果甲亢组、甲功正常组、亚临床甲减组和临床甲减组的 HT 患者甲状腺组织剪切波弹性模量值依次增大,分别为(15.543±4.319)kPa、(20.083±5.444)kPa、(26.682±5.676)kPa、(29.210±8.848)kPa ,组间差异有统计学意义( F =14.925,P <0.01)。HT甲亢组剪切波弹性模量值低于 HT甲功正常组、HT亚临床甲减组、HT临床甲减组,差异均有统计学意义( P均<0.05)。HT甲功正常组剪切波弹性模量值低于 HT亚临床甲减组、HT 临床甲减组,差异有统计学意义( P均<0.05)。结论剪切波弹性成像杨氏模量值与桥本甲状腺炎不同时期的临床表现有一定相关性,可为 HT的治疗提供一定的参考信息。%Objective To investigate shear wave elastography Young's modulus and correlation Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) with different clinical manifestations .Methods We divided the 86 cases ,which were clinically diagnosed with HT according to the thyroid function ,into the hyperthyroidism group ,the normal thyroid function group ,the subclinical hy‐pothyroidism group ,and the clinical hypothyroidism group .Using ultrasonic shear wave elastography ,we tested each group to get a elastic modulus .Using analysis of variance ,we compared the relationship of each group’s elastic modulus result .Results The elastic modulus of each group increased successively in hyperthyroidism group ,the normal thyroid function group ,subclinical hypothyroidism group and the clinical

  3. Shear bond, wettability and AFM evaluations on CO2 laser-irradiated CAD/CAM ceramic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gamal, Ahmed; Medioni, Etienne; Rocca, Jean Paul; Fornaini, Carlo; Muhammad, Omid H; Brulat-Bouchard, Nathalie

    2017-03-09

    The purpose of this study is to determine the CO2 laser irradiation in comparison with sandblasting (Sb), hydrofluoric acid (Hf) and silane coupling agent (Si) on shear bond strength (SBS), roughness (Rg) and wettability (Wt) of resin cement to CAD/CAM ceramics. Sixty (CAD/CAM) ceramic discs were prepared and distributed into six different groups: group A, control lithium disilicate (Li); group B, control zirconia (Zr); group C, Li: CO2/HF/Si; group D, Li: HF/Si; group E, Zr: CO2/Sb/Si; group F, Zr: Sb/Si. Result showed significant difference between irradiated and non-irradiated in terms of shear bond strength for zirconia ceramics (p value = 0.014). Moreover, partial surface wettability for irradiated and non-irradiated ceramics. Irradiated surface demonstrated more rough surface in lithium disilicate than zirconia ceramics. CO2 irradiation could increase shear bond strength, surface roughness and wettability for both CAD/CAM ceramics.

  4. A Study on Effect of Surface Treatments on the Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Acrylic Resin Denture Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Gupta, Tapas K; Banerjee, Ardhendu

    2011-03-01

    Visible light-cured composite resins have become popular in prosthetic dentistry for the replacement of fractured/debonded denture teeth, making composite denture teeth on partial denture metal frameworks, esthetic modification of denture teeth to harmonize with the characteristics of adjacent natural teeth, remodelling of worn occlusal surfaces of posterior denture teeth etc. However, the researches published on the bond strength between VLC composite resins and acrylic resin denture teeth is very limited. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of five different methods of surface treatments on acrylic resin teeth on the shear bond strength between light activated composite resin and acrylic resin denture teeth. Ninety cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were done upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into six groups, containing 15 samples each. Over all the treated and untreated surfaces of all groups, light-cured composite resin was applied. The shear strengths were measured in a Universal Testing Machine using a knife-edge shear test. Data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and mean values were compared by the F test. Application of bonding agent with prior treatment of methyl methacrylate on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin.

  5. Shear-stress relaxation and ensemble transformation of shear-stress autocorrelation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Xu, H.; Baschnagel, J.

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the relation between the shear-stress relaxation modulus G (t ) , computed at finite shear strain 0 0 with Geq being the static equilibrium shear modulus. G (t ) and C(t ) | γ thus must become different for solids and it is impossible to obtain Geq alone from C(t ) | γ as often assumed. We comment briefly on self-assembled transient networks where Geq(f ) must vanish for a finite scission-recombination frequency f . We argue that G(t ) =C (t ) | τ=C(t ) | γ should reveal an intermediate plateau set by the shear modulus Geq(f =0 ) of the quenched network.

  6. Near Surface Shear Wave Velocity Model of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, S.; Craig, M. S.; Hayashi, K.; Galvin, J. L.; Deqiang, C.; Jones, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface wave measurements (MASW) and microtremor array measurements (MAM) were performed at twelve sites across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to obtain high resolution shear wave velocity (VS) models. Deeper surveys were performed at four of the sites using the two station spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method. For the MASW and MAM surveys, a 48-channel seismic system with 4.5 Hz geophones was used with a 10-lb sledgehammer and a metal plate as a source. Surveys were conducted at various locations on the crest of levees, the toe of the levees, and off of the levees. For MASW surveys, we used a record length of 2.048 s, a sample interval of 1 ms, and 1 m geophone spacing. For MAM, ambient noise was recorded for 65.536 s with a sampling interval of 4 ms and 1 m geophone spacing. VS was determined to depths of ~ 20 m using the MASW method and ~ 40 m using the MAM method. Maximum separation between stations in the two-station SPAC surveys was typically 1600 m to 1800 m, providing coherent signal with wavelengths in excess of 5 km and depth penetration of as much as 2000 m. Measured values of VS30 in the study area ranged from 97 m/s to 257 m/s, corresponding to NEHRP site classifications D and E. Comparison of our measured velocity profiles with available geotechnical logs, including soil type, SPT, and CPT, reveals the existence of a small number of characteristic horizons within the upper 40m in the Delta: levee fill material, peat, transitional silty sand, and eolian sand at depth. Sites with a peat layer at the surface exhibited extremely low values of VS. Based on soil borings, the thickness of peat layers were approximately 0 m to 8 m. The VS for the peat layers ranged from 42 m/s to 150 m/s while the eolian sand layer exhibited VS ranging from of 220 m/s to 370 m/s. Soft near surface soils present in the region pose an increased earthquake hazard risk due to the potential for high ground accelerations.

  7. Shear Bond Strength of a Resin Cement to Different Alloys Subjected to Various Surface Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Ezoji

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Micromechanical retention of resin cements to alloys is an important factor affecting the longevity of metal base restorations. This study aimed to compare the bond strength and etching pattern of a newly introduced experimental etchant gel namely Nano Met Etch with those of conventional surface treatment techniques for nickel-chrome (Ni-Cr and high noble alloys. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 discs (8×10×15 mm were cast with Ni-Cr (n=20, high noble BegoStar (n=50 and gold coin alloys (n=50. Their Surfaces were ground with abrasive papers. Ni-Cr specimens received sandblasting and etching. High noble alloy specimens (begoStar and gold coin received sandblasting, sandblasting-alloy primer, etching, etch-alloy primer and alloy primer alone. Cylindrical specimens of Panavia were bonded to surfaces using Tygon tubes. Specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength testing after storing at 37°C for 24 hours.Results: In gold coin group, the highest bond strength was achieved after sandblasting (25.82±1.37MPa, P<0.001 and etching+alloy primer (26.60 ± 5.47 MPa, P<0.01. The lowest bond strength belonged to sandblasting+alloy primer (17.79±2.96MPa, P<0.01. In BegoStar group, the highest bond strength was obtained in the sandblasted group (38.40±3.29MPa, P<0.001 while the lowest bond strength was detected in the sandblast+ alloy primer group (15.38±2.92MPa, P<0.001. For the Ni-Cr alloy, bond strength in the etched group (20.79±2.01MPa was higher than that in the sandblasted group (18.25±1.82MPa (P<0.01.Conclusions: For the Ni-Cr alloy, etching was more efficient than sandblasting but for the high noble alloys, higher Au content increased the efficacy of etching.

  8. Water Waves from General, Time-Dependent Surface Pressure Distribution in the Presence of a Shear Current

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We obtain a general solution for the water waves resulting from a general, time-dependent surface pressure distribution, in the presence of a shear current of uniform vorticity beneath the surface, in three dimensions. Linearized governing equations and boundary conditions including the effects of gravity, a distributed external pressure disturbance, and constant finite depth, are solved analytically, and particular attention is paid to classic initial value problems: an initial pressure impulse and a steady pressure distribution which appears suddenly. In the present paper, good agreement with previous results is demonstrated. We subsequently show both analytically and numerically how transient waves from a suddenly appearing steady pressure distribution vanis for large times, and steady ship waves remain. The transient contribution to wave resistance was derived. The results show that a shear current has significant impact on the transient wave motions, resulting in asymmetry between upstream and downstream...

  9. Critical shear stress on the surface of a cuttings bed; Tensao critica de cisalhamento na superficie de um leito de cascalhos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Luciana Mancor [Universidade Estadual Norte Fluminense (UENF), Macae, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Engenharia de Petroleo]. E-mail: luciana@lenep.uenf.br; Campos, Wellington [PETROBRAS, S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas]. E-mail: campos@cenpes.petrobras.com.br; Braga, Luiz Carvalho [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica (CEFET), Macae, RJ (Brazil). Unidade de Ensino Descentralizada]. E-mail: luiz@lenep.uenf.br

    2000-07-01

    The cuttings transport during the drilling of highly inclined and horizontal wells is hindered by the creation of a cuttings bed in the annulus. In this work, it is shown that the equilibrium height of this bed can be determined from the shear stress on its surface. This fact enables the formulation of a methodology for evaluating the equilibrium height of the cuttings bed through the introduction of a new concept, that of critical shear stress. This is the shear stress that acts on the bed surface at the imminence of movement of the particles on the bed surface. The use of the methodology requires the determination of the acting shear stress and of the required critical shear stress. The acting shear stress is calculated by means of a computer program that solve the motion differential equations in the annular space; covering the cases of the laminar and turbulent flow regimes. The actuating shear stress is a function of flow rate and of the annular geometry in the presence of a cuttings bed; it is also a function of the physical properties of the fluid. On the other hand, the required critical shear stress is a function of the particles diameters and physical properties of the fluid and particles. A mechanistic model for the critical shear stress is also presented. (author)

  10. Effect of four different surface treatments on shear bond strength of three porcelain repair systems: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Gourav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ceramic fracture in metal ceramic restorations are serious and pose an aesthetic and functional dilemma both for the patients and the dentist. This has created a demand for the development of practical repair options which do not necessitate the removal and remake of entire restorations. Aim: To evaluate and compare the effect of four different surface treatments on shear bond strength of metal ceramic specimens with three commercially available porcelain repair systems. Materials and Methods: Specimens were fabricated with a base-metal ceramic alloy and divided into three groups, to evaluate three porcelain repair systems. Each group was divided into four subgroups based on surface treatment (A sandblasting, (B sandblasting followed by etching with 9% HF (Hydrofluoric acid on surrounding ceramic, (C Use of a diamond bur on exposed metal followed by etching with 37% H 3 PO 4 and (D Control groups (D 1 , D 2 , D 3 for three groups of porcelain repair system which was not subjected to further treatment after finishing with 240 grit silicon carbide paper grinding. Shear bond strength of each group of specimens based on surface treatment were evaluated with a universal testing machine after storing in distilled water for 7 days. One way ANOVA and Tukey-HSD procedure were used to compare the mean values between and among the groups. Results: The mean shear bond strength of group III (10.402 ± 1.055 were significantly higher than group I (8.647 ± 0.990 and group II (8.099 ± 0.600 for all surface treatments. However the mean values of shear bond strength of sub-group A were significantly higher than sub-group C and D but were not significantly higher than sub-group B. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that in fractured metal ceramic restorations the exposed metal surface treated with sandblasting or sandblasting and etching the surrounding ceramic surface with HF can increase the shear bond strength of the repaired metal

  11. Hydrodynamic Study of a Hollow Fiber Membrane System Using Experimental and Numerical Derived Surface Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Hunze, M.; Nopens, I.

    2012-01-01

    : 0.25 – 0.49 Pa) with an error of less than 5 %; (ii) high shear stresses (i.e. 90th percentile) predictions were much less accurate (model: 0.60 – 1.23 Pa; experimental: 1.04 – 1.90 Pa) with an error up to 38 %. This was attributed to the fact that the CFD model only considers the two-phase flow (50......Computational Fluids Dynamics (CFD) models can be used to gain insight into the shear stresses induced by air sparging on submerged hollow fiber Membrane BioReactor (MBR) systems. It was found that the average range of shear stresses obtained by the CFD model (0.30 – 0.60 Pa) and experimentally (0.......39 – 0.69 Pa) were in good agreement, with an error less that 15 %. Based on comparison of the cumulative frequency distribution of shear stresses from experiments and simulation: (i) moderate shear stresses (i.e. 50th percentile) were found to be accurately predicted (model: 0.24 – 0.45 Pa; experimental...

  12. Hydrodynamic Study of a Hollow Fiber Membrane System Using Experimental and Numerical Derived Surface Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Hunze, M.; Nopens, I.

    2012-01-01

    Computational Fluids Dynamics (CFD) models can be used to gain insight into the shear stresses induced by air sparging on submerged hollow fiber Membrane BioReactor (MBR) systems. It was found that the average range of shear stresses obtained by the CFD model (0.30 – 0.60 Pa) and experimentally (0.......39 – 0.69 Pa) were in good agreement, with an error less that 15 %. Based on comparison of the cumulative frequency distribution of shear stresses from experiments and simulation: (i) moderate shear stresses (i.e. 50th percentile) were found to be accurately predicted (model: 0.24 – 0.45 Pa; experimental......: 0.25 – 0.49 Pa) with an error of less than 5 %; (ii) high shear stresses (i.e. 90th percentile) predictions were much less accurate (model: 0.60 – 1.23 Pa; experimental: 1.04 – 1.90 Pa) with an error up to 38 %. This was attributed to the fact that the CFD model only considers the two-phase flow (50...

  13. The Contribution of Cell Surface Components to the Neutrophil Mechanosensitivity to Shear Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Akenhead

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses the regulation of neutrophils by fluid shear stress in the context of factors that may govern cell mechanosensitivity and its influence on cell functions. There is substantial evidence that mechanoreceptors located on the peripheral membrane contribute to the ability of shear stress to regulate cell activity. In the case of neutrophils, the formyl peptide receptor (FPR and the CD18 integrins on the cell membrane have been shown to provide neutrophils with the ability to sense shear stresses in their local environment and alter their physiological state, accordingly. This configuration is also found for other types of cells, although they involve different cell-specific mechanoreceptors. Moreover, from an examination of the neutrophil mechanotransducing capacity, it is apparent that cellular mechanosensitivity depends on a number of factors that, if altered, contribute to dysregulation and ultimately pathophysiology. To exemplify this, we first describe the neutrophil responses to shear exposure. We then review two neutrophil mechanoreceptors, specifically FPR and CD18 integrins, which participate in controlling cell activity levels under physiological conditions. Next, we discuss the various factors that may alter neutrophil mechanosensitivity to shear stress and how these may underlie the circulatory pathobiology of two cardiovascular disease states: hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. Based on the material presented, it is conceivable that cell mechanosensitivity is a powerful global metric that permits a more efficient approach to understanding the contribution of mechanobiology to physiology and to disease processes.

  14. Effects of SBS Configuration on Performance of High Modulus Bitumen Based on Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Liang; Yong Hu; Xiangjun Kong; Weiyu Fan; Xue Xin; Hui Luo

    2016-01-01

    High modulus bitumens modified by polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS) with different molecular structure were investigated on dynamic shear rheometer and fluorescence microscopy to evaluate viscoelastic properties and morphology of binders. The results shows that storage modulus (G’) is obviously less than loss modulus (G”), which means viscous behaviour of bitumen is dominant, and anti-rutting factor (G* ⁄ sin δ) is markedly enhanced by star SBS than by linear SBS. The mo...

  15. Dynamic mortar finite element method for modeling of shear rupture on frictional rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Yuval; Hager, Bradford H.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a mortar-based finite element formulation for modeling the dynamics of shear rupture on rough interfaces governed by slip-weakening and rate and state (RS) friction laws, focusing on the dynamics of earthquakes. The method utilizes the dual Lagrange multipliers and the primal-dual active set strategy concepts, together with a consistent discretization and linearization of the contact forces and constraints, and the friction laws to obtain a semi-smooth Newton method. The discretization of the RS friction law involves a procedure to condense out the state variables, thus eliminating the addition of another set of unknowns into the system. Several numerical examples of shear rupture on frictional rough interfaces demonstrate the efficiency of the method and examine the effects of the different time discretization schemes on the convergence, energy conservation, and the time evolution of shear traction and slip rate.

  16. VELOCITY IN A LIQUID SUBJECTED TO A SHEAR FORCE AT THE LIQUID SURFACE WITH A RECEDING VELOCITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴子牛

    2003-01-01

    The development of the Stokes layer in a liquid subjected to a constant shear force at the liquid surface with mass erosion is studied in this paper.It is shown that the velocity in the Stokes layer is weakened by surface receding and the relative decrease of the maximal liquid velocity due to surface recession is a unique function of the time normalized by the recession/diffusion balance time scale,defined as the ratio between the kinematic viscosity and the square of the receding velocity.At a time much larger than the diffusion/recession balance time scale,the role of the surface receding is rather important:instead of being pushed into the liquid at the receding velocity,the development of the Stokes layer is effectively prohibited by surface receding.

  17. VELOCITY IN A LIQUID SUBJECTED TO A SHEAR FORCE AT THE LIQUID SURFACE WITH A RECEDING VELOCITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴子牛

    2003-01-01

    The development of the Stokes layer in a liquid subjected to a constant shear force at the liquid surface with mass erosion is studied in this paper. It is shown that the velocity in the Stokes layer is weakened by surface receding and the relative decrease of the maximal liquid velocity due to surface recession is a unique function of the time normalized by the recession/ditftmion balance time scale, defined as the ratio between the kinematic viscosity and the square of the receding velocity. At a time much larger than the diffusion/recession balance time scale, the role of the surface receding is rather important: instead of being pushed into the liquid at the receding velocity, the development of the Stokes layer is effectively prohibited by surface receding.

  18. Waves from an oscillating point source with a free surface in the presence of a shear current

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2016-01-01

    We investigate analytically the linearized water wave radiation problem for an oscillating submerged point source in an inviscid shear flow with a free surface. A constant depth is taken into account and the shear flow increases linearly with depth. The surface velocity relative to the source is taken to be zero, so that Doppler effects are absent. We solve the linearized Euler equations to calculate the resulting wave field as well as its far-field asymptotics. For values of the Froude number $F^2=\\omega^2 D/g$ ($\\omega$: oscillation frequency, $D$ submergence depth) below a resonant value $F^2_\\text{res}$ the wave field splits cleanly into separate contributions from regular dispersive propagating waves and non-dispersive "critical waves" resulting from a critical layer-like street of flow structures directly downstream of the source. In the sub-resonant regime the regular waves behave like sheared ring waves while the critical layer wave forms a street of a constant width of order $D\\sqrt{S/\\omega}$ ($S$ i...

  19. Effect of surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of auto-polymerized resin to thermoplastic denture base polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Polyamide polymers do not provide sufficient bond strength to auto-polymerized resins for repairing fractured denture or replacing dislodged denture teeth. Limited treatment methods have been developed to improve the bond strength between auto-polymerized reline resins and polyamide denture base materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface modification by acetic acid on surface characteristics and bond strength of reline resin to polyamide denture base. MATERIALS AND METHODS 84 polyamide specimens were divided into three surface treatment groups (n=28): control (N), silica-coated (S), and acid-treated (A). Two different auto-polymerized reline resins GC and Triplex resins were bonded to the samples (subgroups T and G, respectively, n=14). The specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test after they were stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermo-cycled for 5000 cycles. Data were analyzed with independent t-test, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α=.05). RESULTS The bond strength values of A and S were significantly higher than those of N (P<.001 for both). However, statistically significant difference was not observed between group A and group S. According to the independent Student's t-test, the shear bond strength values of AT were significantly higher than those of AG (P<.001). CONCLUSION The surface treatment of polyamide denture base materials with acetic acid may be an efficient and cost-effective method for increasing the shear bond strength to auto-polymerized reline resin. PMID:28018569

  20. Shear wave velocity estimation of the near-surface materials of Chittagong City, Bangladesh for seismic site characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Zillur; Siddiqua, Sumi; Kamal, A. S. M. Maksud

    2016-11-01

    The average shear wave velocity of the near-surface materials down to a depth of 30 m (Vs30) is essential for seismic site characterization to estimate the local amplification factor of the seismic waves during an earthquake. Chittagong City is one of the highest risk cities of Bangladesh for its seismic vulnerability. In the present study, the Vs30 is estimated for Chittagong City using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW), small scale microtremor measurement (SSMM), downhole seismic (DS), and correlation between the shear wave velocity (Vs) and standard penetration test blow count (SPT-N). The Vs30 of the near-surface materials of the city varies from 123 m/s to 420 m/s. A Vs30 map is prepared from the Vs30 of each 30 m grid using the relationship between the Holocene soil thickness and the Vs30. Based on the Vs30, the near-surface materials of Chittagong City are classified as site classes C, D, and E according to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), USA and as site classes B, C, and D according to the Eurocode 8. The Vs30 map can be used for seismic microzonation, future planning, and development of the city to improve the earthquake resiliency of the city.

  1. Low elastic modulus Ti–Ta alloys for load-bearing permanent implants: Enhancing the biodegradation resistance by electrochemical surface engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesteven, Jazmin [Biomaterials and Engineering Materials (BEM) Laboratory, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia); Kannan, M. Bobby, E-mail: bobby.mathan@jcu.edu.au [Biomaterials and Engineering Materials (BEM) Laboratory, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia); Walter, Rhys; Khakbaz, Hadis [Biomaterials and Engineering Materials (BEM) Laboratory, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia); Choe, Han-Choel [Department of Dental Materials, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the in vitro degradation behaviour of titanium–tantalum (Ti–Ta) alloys (10–30 wt.% Ta) was investigated and compared with conventional implant materials, i.e., commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) and titanium–aluminium–vanadium (Ti6Al4V) alloy. Among the three Ti–Ta alloys studied, the Ti20Ta (6.3 × 10{sup −4} mm/y) exhibited the lowest degradation rate, followed by Ti30Ta (1.2 × 10{sup −3} mm/y) and Ti10Ta (1.4 × 10{sup −3} mm/y). All the Ti–Ta alloys exhibited lower degradation rate than that of Cp-Ti (1.8 × 10{sup −3} mm/y), which suggests that Ta addition to Ti is beneficial. As compared to Ti6Al4V alloy (8.1 × 10{sup −4} mm/y), the degradation rate of Ti20Ta alloy was lower by ∼ 22%. However, the Ti30Ta alloy, which has closer elastic modulus to that of natural bone, showed ∼ 48% higher degradation rate than that of Ti6Al4V alloy. Hence, to improve the degradation performance of Ti30Ta alloy, an intermediate thin porous layer was formed electrochemically on the alloy followed by calcium phosphate (CaP) electrodeposition. The coated Ti30Ta alloy (3.8 × 10{sup −3} mm/y) showed ∼ 53% lower degradation rate than that of Ti6Al4V alloy. Thus, the study suggests that CaP coated Ti30Ta alloy can be a viable material for load-bearing permanent implants. - Highlights: • In vitro degradation of titanium–tantalum (Ti–Ta) alloys was studied. • Ta addition to Ti is beneficial for better degradation resistance. • Ti–Ta alloys perform better than commercially pure Ti. • Calcium phosphate coated Ti–Ta alloy is superior to Ti6Al4V alloy.

  2. Comparison of shear bond strength and surface structure between conventional acid etching and air-abrasion of human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, M E; Bishara, S E; Damon, P; Jakobsen, J R

    1997-11-01

    Recently, air-abrasion technology has been examined for potential applications within dentistry, including the field of orthodontics. The purpose of this study was to compare the traditional acid-etch technique with an air-abrasion surface preparation technique, with two different sizes of abrading particles. The following parameters were evaluated: (a) shear bond strength, (b) bond failure location, and (c) enamel surface preparation, as viewed through a scanning electron microscope. Sixty extracted human third molars were pumiced and divided into three groups of 20. The first group was etched with a 37% phosphoric acid gel for 30 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds, and dried for 20 seconds. The second and third groups were air-abraded with (a) a 50 microm particle and (b) a 90 microm particle of aluminum oxide, with the Micro-etcher microabrasion machine (Danville Engineering Inc.). All three groups had molar stainless steel orthodontic brackets bonded to the buccal surface of each tooth with Transbond XT bonding system (3M Unitek). A Zwick Universal Testing Machine (Calitek Corp.) was used to determine shear bond strengths. The analysis of variance was used to compare the three groups. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was used to evaluate the residual adhesive on the enamel after bracket removal. The chi square test was used to evaluate differences in the ARI scores among the groups. The significance for all tests was predetermined at p shear bond strength among the three groups (p = 0.0001). The Duncan Multiple Range test showed a significant decrease in shear bond strength in the air-abraded groups. The chi square test revealed significant differences among the ARI scores of the acid-etched group and the air-abraded groups (chi(2) = 0.0001), indicating no adhesive remained on the enamel surface after debonding when air-abrasion was used. In conclusion, the current findings indicate that enamel surface preparation using air-abrasion results in a significant lower

  3. Residual stress in high modulus carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K. J.; Diefendorf, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The modulus and residual strain in carbon fibers are measured by successively electrochemically milling away the fiber surface. Electrochemical etching is found to remove the carbon fiber surface very uniformly, in contrast to air and wet oxidation. The precision of fiber diameter measurements is improved by using a laser diffraction technique instead of optical methods. More precise diameter measurements reveal that past correlations of diameter and fiber modulus are largely measurement artifact. The moduli of most carbon fibers decrease after the outer layers of the fibers are removed. Owing to experimental difficulties, the moduli and strengths of the fibers at their centers are not determined, and moduli are estimated on the basis of microstructure. The calculated residual stresses are found to be insensitive to these moduli estimates as well as the exact form of regression equation used to describe the moduli and residual strain distributions. Axial compressive residual stresses are found to be very high for some higher modulus carbon fibers. It is pointed out that the compressive stress makes the fibers insensitive to surface flaws when loaded in tension but it may initiate failure by buckling when loaded in compression.

  4. Evaluation of shear bond strength of composite resin to nonprecious metal alloys with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Yassini E.; Almasi S

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aim: Replacing fractured ceramometal restorations may be the best treatment option, but it is costly. Many different bonding systems are currently available to repair the fractured ceramometal restorations. This study compared the shear bond strength of composite to a base metal alloy using 4 bonding systems.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, fifty discs, casted in a Ni-Cr-Be base metal alloy (Silvercast, Fulldent),were ground with 120, 400 and 600 grit...

  5. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  6. Modulus enhancement of natural rubber through the dispersion size reduction of protein/fiber aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improved mechanical properties of natural rubber are required for various rubber applications. Aggregates of protein and fiber that constitute soy protein concentrate were shear-reduced and used to enhance the tensile modulus of natural rubber. The aqueous dispersion of the shear-reduced aggregates ...

  7. Measurement of particle trajectories, dynamics, surface adhesion and detachment in near-wall shear flows using 3D velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Schmidt, Brian; Lawrence, Michael; Breuer, Kenneth

    2007-11-01

    Three-dimensional total internal reflection velocimetry (3D-TIRV) is used to measure the trajectories of fluorescent tracer particles within 200 nm of a wall. Diffusion and shear-induced motion can result in mean velocity measurement errors, and by taking measurements using different particle sizes and sampling times, we quantify these effects and compare with theory. We also use 3D-TIRV to observe and characterize the adhesion, surface rolling and release dynamics of particles that can adhere to the surface through the action of biological binding proteins. Particles coated with P-Selectin are allowed to adhere to and detach from a PSGL-1-coated microchannel surface, modeling the interaction between leukocytes (white blood cells) and blood vessels, respectively. Binding affinities, bond strengths and hydrodynamic interactions are inferred from the trajectory data.

  8. Shear shedding of drops and the use of superhydrophobic surfaces in microgravity: PFC and ground based results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Andrew; Amirfazli, Alidad

    In free fall, the absence of gravity poses many challenges for fluid handling systems. One such example of this is condensers. On earth, the condensed liquid is removed from the tilted condenser plate by gravity forced shedding. In microgravity, proposed solutions include the use of surfaces with gradients in wettability [1], the use of electrowetting [2], and shearing airflow [3]. In this talk, shear shedding results for a variety of surface (hydrophilic to superhydrophobic (extremely water repelling)) will be presented. Surface science and aerodynamics are used to reveal fundamental parameters controlling incipient motion for drops exposed to shearing airflow. It is found that wetting parameters such as contact angle and surface tension are very influential in determining the minimum required air velocity for drop shedding. Based on experimental results for drops of water and hexadecane (0.5-100 l) on PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic aluminum surface, an exponential function is proposed that relates the critical air velocity for shedding to the ratio of drop base length to projected area. The results for the water systems can be collapsed to a self similar curve by normalization, which also explains results from other researchers. Since shedding from superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) is seen to be easier compared to other surfaces, the behaviour of SHS is also probed in this talk. SHS have space-based applications to shedding, self cleaning, anti-icing (spacecraft launch/re-entry), anti-fouling, fluid actuation, and decreased fluid friction. The mechanism for SHS is understood to be the existence of an air layer between large portions of the drop and solid. The first concrete visual evidence of this was gained performing a parabolic flight experiment with the ESA. Results of this experi-ment will be discussed, showing the extreme water repelling potential of SHS in microgravity, and demonstrating how the wetting behaviours seen (partial penetration, transition

  9. Vibrational shear flow of anisotropic viscoelastic fluid with small amplitudes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩式方

    2008-01-01

    Using the constitutive equation of co-rotational derivative type for anisotropic viscoelastic fluid-liquid crystalline(LC),polymer liquids was developed.Two relaxation times are introduced in the equation:λn represents relaxation of the normal-symmetric stress components;λs represents relaxation of the shear-unsymmetric stress components.A vibrational rotating flow in gap between cylinders with small amplitudes is studied for the anisotropic viscoelastic fluid-liquid crystalline polymer.The time-dependent constitutive equation are linearized with respect to parameter of small amplitude.For the normal-symmetric part of stress tensor analytical expression of the shear stress is obtained by the constitutive equation.The complex viscosity,complex shear modulus,dynamic and imaginary viscosities,storage modulus and loss modulus are obtained for the normal-symmetric stress case which are defined by the common shear rate.For the shear-unsymmetric stress part,two shear stresses are obtained thus two complex viscosities and two complex shear modulus(i.e.first and second one) are given by the constitutive equation which are defined by rotating shear rate introduced by author.The dynamic and imaginary viscosities,storage modulus and loss modulus are given for each complex viscosities and complex shear modulus.Using the constituive equation the rotating flow with small amplitudes in gap between two coaxial cylinders is studied.

  10. Effect of fracture surface roughness on shear crack growth. Progress report, August 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, T.S.; Watt, D.W. [New Hampshire Univ., Durham, NH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Mendelsohn, D.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Engineering Mechanics

    1992-12-01

    A model of fracture surface interference for Mode I fatigue crack profiles was developed and evaluated. Force required to open the crack faces is estimated from point contact expressions for Mode I stress intensity factor. Force transfer across contacting asperities is estimated and used to calculate Mode II resistance stress intensity factor (applied factor is sum of effective and resistance factors). Electro-optic holographic interferometry was used to measure 3-D displacement field around a Mode I fatigue pre-crack in Al loaded in Mode II shear. Induced Mode I crack face displacements were greater than Mode II displacements. Plane stress shear lip caused displacement normal to surface as the crack faces are displaced. Algorithms are being developed to track the displacements associated with the original coordinate system in the camera. A 2-D boundary element method code for mixed mode I and II loading of a rough crack (sawtooth asperity model) has been completed. Addition of small-scale crack tip yielding and a wear model are completed and underway, respectively.

  11. Effect of LED curing on the microleakage, shear bond strength and surface hardness of a resin-based composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, Theunis G; Du Preez, Ignatius C; Kidd, M

    2005-06-01

    To determine the effect of Light emitting diode (LED) curing on dental resins, microleakage, shear bond strength and surface hardness of a dental composite cured with different LEDs were determined and compared with conventional halogen curing. For microleakage, Class V cavities were restored with Esthet-X, divided into groups, and exposed to one of the curing protocols (Elipar Freelight in soft start and standard modes; Ultra-Lume 2; Spectrum 800). Standard dye penetration tests were performed and the data summarised in a 2-way contingency table of observed frequencies. The Chi-square test was used (psurface hardness, samples of Esthet-X were exposed to the light-curing units (LCUs). Vickers hardness was determined on the upper and the bottom surfaces. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using ANOVA (phardness score for the halogen light was significantly lower than for the LED lights (p<0.01). The Spectrum 800 and the Elipar Freelight (soft start) have significantly higher shear bond strengths than the others (p<0.01). It was concluded that the LED source is more efficient for a comparable overall power output.

  12. Solar-cycle variation of the rotational shear near the solar surface

    CERN Document Server

    Barekat, Atefeh; Gizon, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Helioseismology has revealed that the angular velocity of the Sun increases with depth in the outermost 35 Mm of the Sun. Recently, we have shown that the logarithmic radial gradient ($\\rm d\\ln\\Omega/\\rm d\\ln r $) in the upper 10~Mm is close to $-1$ from the equator to $60^\\circ$ latitude.We aim to measure the temporal variation of the rotational shear over solar cycle 23 and the rising phase of cycle 24 (1996-2015). We used f mode frequency splitting data spanning 1996 to 2011 from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and 2010 to 2015 from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI). In a first for such studies, the f mode frequency splitting data were obtained from 360-day time series. We used the same method as in our previous work for measuring $\\rm d\\ln\\Omega/d\\ln r $ from the equator to $80^\\circ$ latitude in the outer 13~Mm of the Sun. Then, we calculated the variation of the gradient at annual cadence relative to the average over 1996 to 2015. We found the rotational shear at low latitudes ($0^\\circ$ to $30^...

  13. Surface hydrogenation regulated wrinkling and torque capability of hydrogenated graphene annulus under circular shearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinfeng; Liu, Silin; Datta, Dibakar; Li, Zhonghua

    2015-11-01

    Wrinkles as intrinsic topological feature have been expected to affect the electrical and mechanical properties of atomically thin graphene. Molecular dynamics simulations are adopted to investigate the wrinkling characteristics in hydrogenated graphene annulus under circular shearing at the inner edge. The amplitude of wrinkles induced by in-plane rotation around the inner edge is sensitive to hydrogenation, and increases quadratically with hydrogen coverage. The effect of hydrogenation on mechanical properties is investigated by calculating the torque capability of annular graphene with varying hydrogen coverage and inner radius. Hydrogenation-enhanced wrinkles cause the aggregation of carbon atoms towards the inner edge and contribute to the critical torque strength of annulus. Based on detailed stress distribution contours, a shear-to-tension conversion mechanism is proposed for the contribution of wrinkles on torque capacity. As a result, the graphane annulus anomalously has similar torque capacity to pristine graphene annulus. The competition between hydrogenation caused bond strength deterioration and wrinkling induced local stress state conversion leads to a U-shaped evolution of torque strength relative to the increase of hydrogen coverage from 0 to 100%. Such hydrogenation tailored topological and mechanical characteristics provides an innovative mean to develop novel graphene-based devices.

  14. Onset of motion at the surface of a porous granular bed by a shearing fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Anyu; Tao, Mingjiang; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2014-03-01

    We will discuss an experimental investigation of the onset of particle motion by a fluid flow over an unconsolidated granular bed. This situation arises in a number of natural and industrial processes including wind blowing over sand, sediment transport in rivers, tidal flows interacting with beaches and flows in slurry pipelines and mixing tanks. The Shields criteria given by the ratio of the viscous shear and normal stresses is used to understand the onset of motion. However, reviews reveals considerable scatter while noting broad trends with Reynolds Number. We discuss an idealized model system where fluid flows with a prescribed flow rate through a horizontal rectangular pipe initially fully filled with granular beads. The granular bed height decreases and reaches a constant height when the shear stress at the boundary decreases below a critical value. We compare and contrast the values obtained assuming no-slip boundary conditions with those observed with PIV using florescent tracer particles to measure the actual fluid flow profile near the porous interface. We will also report the observed variation of the Shields criteria with particle Reynolds Number by varying particle size and fluid flow rates.

  15. Quantitative measurement of the elastic modulus of the biceps brachii during muscle relaxation and tension by shear-wave elasto-sonography%实时定量超声弹性成像技术检测肱二头肌松弛和紧张状态下弹性模量值差异

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温朝阳; 范春芝; 安力春; 徐建红; 陈浩; 王月香; 唐杰

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the difference of Young' s modulus in the biceps brachii during muscle relaxation and tension. Methods A total of 141 healthy male volunteers with age range from 16 to 34 years ( mean 22 years old ) were included in the study. A shear-wave elasto-sonography ( AixPlorer model, Supersonic Imagine,Aix en Provence, France ) coupled with a linear array transducer array ( 4-15 MHz )was used. The scanner was set at the SWE mode and then at Q-BOX mode and the ultrasound transducer was placed directly above the biceps brachii belly and carefully aligned with the muscle bundle. The elastic moduli of the biceps brachii were measured during muscle relaxation and tension in all 141 volunteers. Results The Young ' s modulus of biceps brachii was 123. 658 ± 31. 392 kPa during muscle tension and 45. 658 ± 13. 479 kPa during muscle relaxation, respectively with statistical significance ( P =0. 0000 ), Conclusion The Young' s modulus of the biceps brachii was higher during muscle tension than those during muscle relaxation.%目的 研究松弛和紧张状态下肱二头肌肌腹的杨氏模量值差异.方法 141例男性健康志愿者,年龄16~34岁, 中位年龄22岁.使用法国Supersonic 公司的AixPlore型实时定量剪切波弹性成像超声诊断仪,L4-15线阵探头沿肱二头肌肌腹肌束方向检查,启动超声仪器弹性成像模式(SWE)模式,然后使用其定量分析系统Q-BOX分别测量二头肌处于松弛与紧张状态下的杨氏模量值.结果 紧张状态下肱二头肌肌腹杨氏模量值为(123.658±31.392) kPa,松弛状态下杨氏模量值为(45.658±13.479) kPa,两者比较差异具有统计学意义(P=0.0000).结论 剪切波弹性成像技术可检测肱二头肌肌腹在松弛和紧张状态下杨氏模量值差异,紧张状态下较松弛状态下模量值大;定量超声弹性成像技术用于肌肉组织疾病检查,使提供常规超声之外的诊断信息成为可能.

  16. The effects of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of composite resin to machined titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljadi, Mohammad

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between machined titanium and composite resin using different surface treatments. Materials and Methods: Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) specimens were ground with 600 grit SiC paper and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=20/group). Group #1 (Control): samples were sandblasted with 110 microm Al2 O3 for 10 sec. Group #2 (Rocatec): samples were treated with the Rocatec system following the manufacturer's directions but the silanization step was eliminated. Group #3 (Silano Pen): samples were treated with the Silano Pen system. Group #4 (H2SO4 etched): samples were sandblasted with 110 microm Al2O3 for 10 sec and etched with 48% H2SO4 for 60 minutes at 60 oC. Group#5 (acid etching + Rocatec): samples received both treatments as described in Groups 4 and 2, respectively. Group #6 (acid etching + Silano Pen): samples received both treatments as described in Groups 4 and 3, respectively. Composite was bonded to the treated titanium surface, half of the specimens from each group (n=10/group) were subjected to thermocycling, and the samples were tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Representative samples from each group were evaluated with SEM. Results: Two-way ANOVA revealed that there were significant differences (p silanization step in the Rocatec system is a critical step and eliminating it may dramatically alter its effectiveness. 3) Combining two surface treatments may not always result in an additive effect. 4) Thermocycling significantly decreased the bond strength regardless of the surface treatment used.

  17. Surface Shear Viscosity and Phase Transitions of Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relini, A.; Ciuchi, F.; Rolandi, R.

    1995-08-01

    The canal method has been employed to measure the in-plane steady shear viscosity of monolayers of bolaform lipids extracted from the membrane of the thermophilic microorganism Sulfolobus solfataricus. Monolayers were formed with the polar lipid extract (PLE), which is a mixture of several bolaform lipids, each one endowed with two nonequivalent polar headgroups. Viscosities were obtained from the measured flows by using the equation introduced by Joly; this equation contains a semiempirical parameter A, which takes into account the monolayer-subphase mechanical coupling. Measuring the flows for two different substances (PLE and oleic acid) and channel widths, the monolayer viscosities and the parameter A were determined at the same time. The analysis of the viscosity data according to the free area model shows evidences of the molecular conformational changes matching monolayer phase transitions.

  18. Effect of femtosecond laser treatment on the shear bond strength of a metal bracket to prepared porcelain surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Yusuf Ziya; Irgin, Celal; Yavuz, Tevfik; Aslan, Muhammed Ali; Kilic, Hamdi Sukur; Usumez, Aslihan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of femtosecond laser treatment (Group FS) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a metal bracket to prepared porcelain surface, and to compare it with other surface treatment techniques [50 μm Al2O3 sandblasting (Group SB), 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel (Group HF), and neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG laser) (Group NY)]. Because of the increasing number of adult patients in current orthodontic practice, achieving sufficient bond strength of composite resin to porcelain restorations without bond failure during the treatment is a challenge for orthodontists. In total, 80 glazed feldspathic porcelain samples were prepared and randomly assigned to four groups of 20. Treated surfaces were treated with a silane agent. Brackets were bonded to porcelain samples. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h and then thermocycled for 500 cycles between 5° and 55°C. The SBS of the brackets was tested with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min, until bonding failure occurred. The data were analyzed statistically using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tamhane multiple comparisons tests. The results of ANOVA indicated that the SBS values varied according to the surface treatment method (ptreatment produced high SBS of the processes assessed; therefore, it appears to be an effective method for bonding orthodontic metal brackets to prepared porcelain surfaces.

  19. Effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on shear strength on single lap joint Al/CFRP using adhesive of epoxy/Al fine powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diharjo, Kuncoro; Anwar, Miftahul; Tarigan, Roy Aries P.; Rivai, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on the shear strength and failure type characteristic of single lap joint (SLJ) CFRP/Al using adhesive epoxy/Al-fine-powder. The CFRP was produced by using hand layup method for 30% of woven roving carbon fiber (w/w) and the resin used was bisphenolic. The adhesive was prepared using 12.5% of aluminum fine powder (w/w) in the epoxy adhesive. The powder was mixed by using a mixing machine at 60 rpm for 6 minutes, and then it was used to join the Al plate-2024 and CFRP. The start time to pressure for the joint process was 20 minutes after the application of adhesive on the both of adherends. The variables in this research are adhesive thickness (i.e. 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.8 mm and 1 mm) and surface treatment of adherends (i.e. acetone, chromate sulphuric acid, caustic etch and tucker's reagent). Before shear testing, all specimens were post-cured at 100 °C for 15 minutes. The result shows that the SLJ has the highest shear strength for 0.4 mm of adhesive thickness. When the adhesive thickness is more than 0.4 mm (0.6-1 mm), the shear strength decreases significantly. It might be caused by the property change of adhesive from ductile to brittle. The acetone surface treatment produces the best bonding between the adhesive and adherends (CFRP and Al-plate 2024), and the highest shear strength is 9.31 MPa. The surface treatment give the humidification effect of adherend surfaces by adhesive. The failure characteristic shows that the mixed failure of light-fiber-tear-failure and cohesive-failure are occurred on the high shear strength of SLJ, and the low shear strength commonly has the adhesive-failure type.

  20. Lubrication of textured surfaces: a general theory for flow and shear stress factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaraggi, Michele

    2012-08-01

    We report on a mean field theory of textured surface lubrication. We study the fluid flow dynamics occurring at the interface as a function of the texture characteristics, e.g. texture area density, shape and distribution of microstructures, and local slip lengths. The present results may be very important for the investigation of tailored microtextured surfaces for low-friction hydrodynamic applications.

  1. Evaluation of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded on the tooth surface after internal bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia de Souza FERREIRA

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is great demand for esthetic treatment by patients who have discolored teeth, because currently aesthetic standards have become stricter and many patients have tooth bleaching procedures performed before or during orthodontic treatment. Objective: To evaluate the bonding of orthodontic brackets to human molars after internal tooth bleaching. Material and method: Forty molars were divided into four groups according to the bleaching agent used: PS sodium perborate + water; PC carbamide peroxide; PC + PS carbamide peroxide + sodium perborate; Cont water (control group. Bleaching agents placed inside the pulp chambers were replaced every 7 days for 2 weeks, and the brackets were bonded 30 days after the end of bleaching. The shear strength test was performed in a universal testing machine (Emic. Result: ANOVA with a significance level of 5% (p > 0.05, showed no statistically significant difference between groups (p = 0.1214. Conclusion: It was concluded that the different bleaching agents studied did not interfere with the bond strength of brackets to enamel and bonding the brackets 30 days after internal bleaching is a safe procedure.

  2. Origins of the Exchange-Bias Phenomenology, Coercivity Enhancement, and Asymmetric Hysteretic Shearing in Core-Surface Smart Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rıza Erdem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used a spin-1 Ising model Hamiltonian with dipolar (bilinear, J, quadrupolar (biquadratic, K, and dipolar-quadrupolar (odd, L interactions in pair approximation to investigate the exchange-bias (EB, coercive field, and asymmetric hysteretic shearing properties peculiar to core/surface (C/S composite nanoparticles (NPs. Shifted hysteresis loops with an asymmetry and coercivity enhancement are observed only in the presence of the odd interaction term in the Hamiltonian expression and their magnitudes show strong dependence on the value of L. The observed coercivity and EB in C/S NPs originated from nonzero odd coupling energies and their dependence on temperature (T and particle size (R are also discussed in relation to experimental findings.

  3. Crystallographic analysis of the implanted TiNi monocrystal containing misoriented localized shear mesobands in its near-surface layer [001]{sub B2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, L. L., E-mail: llm@ispms.tsc.ru; Meisner, S. N., E-mail: msn@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tverdokhlebova, A. V., E-mail: a@vtverd.ru; Poletika, T. M., E-mail: poletm@ispms.tsc.ru; Girsova, S. L., E-mail: girs@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The study was carried on for the implanted single TiNi crystal containing misoriented localized shear mesobands in its near-surface layer [001] B2. Due to the response of material to the Si ion implantation treatment of the single TiNi crystal, deformation mesobands would form in its near-surface layer. Specially designed software tools were employed for the treatment of experimental data obtained from X-ray and electron diffraction patterns. The 3D crystallographic orientations were calculated for the localized shear regions, which were displaced relative to one another and with respect to the original monocrystal orientation.

  4. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branch, Darren W.; Huber, Dale L.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2008-10-01

    The rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms is critical to human health and safety. To achieve a high level of sensitivity for fluidic detection applications, we have developed a 330 MHz Love wave acoustic biosensor on 36{sup o} YX Lithium Tantalate (LTO). Each die has four delay-line detection channels, permitting simultaneous measurement of multiple analytes or for parallel detection of single analyte containing samples. Crucial to our biosensor was the development of a transducer that excites the shear horizontal (SH) mode, through optimization of the transducer, minimizing propagation losses and reducing undesirable modes. Detection was achieved by comparing the reference phase of an input signal to the phase shift from the biosensor using an integrated electronic multi-readout system connected to a laptop computer or PDA. The Love wave acoustic arrays were centered at 330 MHz, shifting to 325-328 MHz after application of the silicon dioxide waveguides. The insertion loss was -6 dB with an out-of-band rejection of 35 dB. The amplitude and phase ripple were 2.5 dB p-p and 2-3{sup o} p-p, respectively. Time-domain gating confirmed propagation of the SH mode while showing suppression of the triple transit. Antigen capture and mass detection experiments demonstrate a sensitivity of 7.19 {+-} 0.74{sup o} mm{sup 2}/ng with a detection limit of 6.7 {+-} 0.40 pg/mm{sup 2} for each channel.

  5. Elastic modulus of viral nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Ge, Zhibin; Fang, Jiyu

    2008-09-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the radial elasticity of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) nanotubes. An atomic force microscope tip is used to apply small radial indentations to deform TMV nanotubes. The initial elastic response of TMV nanotubes can be described by finite-element analysis in 5nm indentation depths and Hertz theory in 1.5nm indentation depths. The derived radial Young’s modulus of TMV nanotubes is 0.92±0.15GPa from finite-element analysis and 1.0±0.2GPa from the Hertz model, which are comparable with the reported axial Young’s modulus of 1.1GPa [Falvo , Biophys. J. 72, 1396 (1997)].

  6. Effect of surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of auto-polymerized resin to thermoplastic denture base polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Hafezeqoran, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Polyamide polymers do not provide sufficient bond strength to auto-polymerized resins for repairing fractured denture or replacing dislodged denture teeth. Limited treatment methods have been developed to improve the bond strength between auto-polymerized reline resins and polyamide denture base materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface modification by acetic acid on surface characteristics and bond strength of reline resin to polyamide denture base. 84 polyamide specimens were divided into three surface treatment groups (n=28): control (N), silica-coated (S), and acid-treated (A). Two different auto-polymerized reline resins GC and Triplex resins were bonded to the samples (subgroups T and G, respectively, n=14). The specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test after they were stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermo-cycled for 5000 cycles. Data were analyzed with independent t-test, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α=.05). The bond strength values of A and S were significantly higher than those of N (Pauto-polymerized reline resin.

  7. A thin rivulet or ridge subject to a uniform transverse shear stress at its free surface due to an external airflow

    KAUST Repository

    Sullivan, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    We use the lubrication approximation to analyze three closely related problems involving a thin rivulet or ridge (i.e., a two-dimensional droplet) of fluid subject to a prescribed uniform transverse shear stress at its free surface due to an external airflow, namely a rivulet draining under gravity down a vertical substrate, a rivulet driven by a longitudinal shear stress at its free surface, and a ridge on a horizontal substrate, and find qualitatively similar behaviour for all three problems. We show that, in agreement with previous numerical studies, the free surface profile of an equilibrium rivulet/ridge with pinned contact lines is skewed as the shear stress is increased from zero, and that there is a maximum value of the shear stress beyond which no solution with prescribed semi-width is possible. In practice, one or both of the contact lines will de-pin before this maximum value of the shear stress is reached, and so we consider situations in which the rivulet/ridge de-pins at one or both contact lines. In the case of de-pinning only at the advancing contact line, the rivulet/ridge is flattened and widened as the shear stress is increased from its critical value, and there is a second maximum value of the shear stress beyond which no solution with a prescribed advancing contact angle is possible. In contrast, in the case of de-pinning only at the receding contact line, the rivulet/ridge is thickened and narrowed as the shear stress is increased from its critical value, and there is a solution with a prescribed receding contact angle for all values of the shear stress. In general, in the case of de-pinning at both contact lines there is a critical "yield" value of the shear stress beyond which no equilibrium solution is possible and the rivulet/ridge will evolve unsteadily. In the Appendix, we show that an equilibrium rivulet/ridge with prescribed flux/area is quasi-statically stable to two-dimensional perturbations. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Upper-Mantle Shear Velocities beneath Southern California Determined from Long-Period Surface Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Polet, J.; Kanamori, H.

    1997-01-01

    We used long-period surface waves from teleseismic earthquakes recorded by the TERRAscope network to determine phase velocity dispersion of Rayleigh waves up to periods of about 170 sec and of Love waves up to about 150 sec. This enabled us to investigate the upper-mantle velocity structure beneath southern California to a depth of about 250 km. Ten and five earthquakes were used for Rayleigh and Love waves, respectively. The observed surface-wave dispersion shows a clear Love/Rayleigh-wave d...

  9. Influence of the Testing Gage Length on the Strength, Young's Modulus and Weibull Modulus of Carbon Fibres and Glass Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Claudio Pardini

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibres and glass fibres are reinforcements for advanced composites and the fiber strength is the most influential factor on the strength of the composites. They are essentially brittle and fail with very little reduction in cross section. Composites made with these fibres are characterized by a high strength/density ratio and their properties are intrisically related to their microstructure, i.e., amount and orientation of the fibres, surface treatment, among other factors. Processing parameters have an important role in the fibre mechanical behaviour (strength and modulus. Cracks, voids and impurities in the case of glass fibres and fibrillar misalignments in the case of carbon fibres are created during processing. Such inhomogeneities give rise to an appreciable scatter in properties. The most used statistical tool that deals with this characteristic variability in properties is the Weibull distribution. The present work investigates the influence of the testing gage length on the strength, Young's modulus and Weibull modulus of carbon fibres and glass fibres. The Young's modulus is calculated by two methods: (i ASTM D 3379M, and (ii interaction between testing equipment/specimen The first method resulted in a Young modulus of 183 GPa for carbon fibre, and 76 GPa for glass fibre. The second method gave a Young modulus of 250 GPa for carbon fibre and 50 GPa for glass fibre. These differences revelead differences on how the interaction specimen/testing machine can interfere in the Young modulus calculations. Weibull modulus can be a tool to evaluate the fibre's homogeneity in terms of properties and it is a good quality control parameter during processing. In the range of specimen gage length tested the Weibull modulus for carbon fibre is ~ 3.30 and for glass fibres is ~ 5.65, which indicates that for the batch of fibres tested, the glass fibre is more uniform in properties.

  10. Effects of surface treatment of provisional crowns on the shear bond strength of brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Xavier de Almeida

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the adhesive resistance of metallic brackets bonded to temporary crowns made of acrylic resin after different surface treatments. METHODS: 180 specimens were made of Duralay and randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 30 according to surface treatment and bonding material: G1 - surface roughening with Soflex and bonding with Duralay; G2 - roughening with aluminum oxide blasting and bonding with Duralay; G3 - application of monomer and bonding with Duralay; G4 - roughening with Soflex and bonding with Transbond XT; G5 - roughening with aluminum oxide blasting and bonding with Transbond XT and G6: application of monomer and bonding with Transbond. The results were statistically assessed by ANOVA/Games-Howell. RESULTS: The means (MPa were: G1= 18.04, G2= 22.64, G3= 22.4, G4= 9.71, G5= 11.23, G6= 9.67. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI ranged between 2 and 3 on G1, G2 and G3 whereas in G4, G5 and G6 it ranged from 0 to 1, showing that only the material affects the pattern of adhesive flaw. CONCLUSION: The surface treatment and the material influenced adhesive resistance of brackets bonded to temporary crowns. Roughening by aluminum blasting increased bond strength when compared to Soflex, in the group bonded with Duralay. The bond strength of Duralay acrylic resin was superior to that of Transbond XT composite resin.

  11. Image reconstruction with acoustic radiation force induced shear waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleavey, Stephen A.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Stutz, Deborah L.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2003-05-01

    Acoustic radiation force may be used to induce localized displacements within tissue. This phenomenon is used in Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI), where short bursts of ultrasound deliver an impulsive force to a small region. The application of this transient force launches shear waves which propagate normally to the ultrasound beam axis. Measurements of the displacements induced by the propagating shear wave allow reconstruction of the local shear modulus, by wave tracking and inversion techniques. Here we present in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo measurements and images of shear modulus. Data were obtained with a single transducer, a conventional ultrasound scanner and specialized pulse sequences. Young's modulus values of 4 kPa, 13 kPa and 14 kPa were observed for fat, breast fibroadenoma, and skin. Shear modulus anisotropy in beef muscle was observed.

  12. Ultra-high modulus organic fiber hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental organic fiber, designated Fiber D, was characterized, and its performance as a reinforcement for composites was investigated. The fiber has a modulus of 172 GPa, tensile strength of 3.14 GPa, and density of 1.46 gm/cu cm. Unidirectional Fiber D/epoxy laminates containing 60 percent fiber by volume were evaluated in flexure, shear, and compression, at room temperature and 121 C in both the as fabricated condition and after humidity aging for 14 days at 95 percent RH and 82 C. A modulus of 94.1 GPa, flexure strength of 700 MPa, shear strength of 54 MPa, and compressive strength of 232 MPa were observed at room temperature. The as-fabricated composites at elevated temperature and humidity aged material at room temperature had properties 1 to 20 percent below these values. Combined humidity aging plus evaluated temperature testing resulted in even lower mechanical properties. Hybrid composite laminates of Fiber D with Fiber FP alumina or Thornel 300 graphite fiber were also evaluated and significant increases in modulus, flexure, and compressive strengths were observed.

  13. Comparative evaluation of the shear bond strength of metal brackets bonded to porcelain using different porcelain surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslami Amirabadi GH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare shear bond strength of metal brackets bonded to dental porcelain on the basis of presence or absence of silane, type of acid [hydrofluoric acid (HF or phosphoric acid (H3PO4] and roughness of porcelain surface (glazed or deglazed within mouth-like environment."nMaterials and Methods: Eighty glazed ceramic disks were randomly divided into 8 groups of 10 disks: group 1 [HF+silane], group 2 [deglazed+HF+silane], group 3 [HF], group 4 [deglazed+HF], group 5 [H3PO4+silane], group 6 [deglazed+H3PO4+silane], group 7 [H3PO4], group 8 [deglazed+H3PO4]. Then the brackets were bonded and thermocycled. After that, shear bond strength test was done using the Zwick device and the type of bond failure was determined under stereomicroscope at 4X magnification. 3-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis were used for statistical analyses."nResults: The shear bond strength for the test groups were as follows: group (1:13.05±7.7 MPa , group (2:25.16±10.66 MPa, group (3:6.7±5.86 MPa, group (4:15.39±8.97 MPa, group (5:12.76±7.91 MPa, group (6:13.57±7.85 MPa, group (7:0.54±0.67 MPa, group (8: 9.34±6.52 MPa. The type of bond failure in all groups was adhesive failure except for group 2. No significant difference in the interaction between (glazed or deglazed, (presence or absence of silane, and type of acid was found (P>0.05."nConclusion: Under the conditions of this study, the best clinical method was the use of 37% phosphoric acid and silane that resulted in the optimal clinical strength and adhesive bond failure.

  14. Study on adhesively-bonded surface of tapered double cantilever specimen made of aluminum foam affected with shear force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙洪鹏; CHO Jae-ung

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum foam is widely used in diverse areas to minimize the weight and maximize the absorption of shock energy in lightweight structures and various bio-materials. It presents a number of advantages, such as low density, incombustibility, non-rigidity, excellent energy absorptivity, sound absorptivity and low heat conductivity. The aluminum foam with an air cell structure was placed under the TDCB Mode II tensile load by using Landmark equipment manufactured by MTS to examine the shear failure behavior. The angle of the tapered adhesively-bonded surfaces of specimens was designated as a variable, and three models were developed with the inclined angles differing from one another at 6°, 8° and 10°. The specimens with the inclined angles of 6°, 8° and 10° have the maximum reaction forces of 168 N, 194 N when the forced displacements are 6, 5 and 4.2 mm respectively. There are three specimens with the inclined angles of 10°, 8° and 6° in the order of maximum reaction force. As the analysis result, the maximum equivalent stresses of 0.813 MPa and 0.895 MPa happened when the forced displacements of 6 mm and 5 mm proceeded at the models of 6° and 8°, respectively. A simulation was carried out on the basis of finite element method and the experimental design. The results of the experiment and the simulation analysis are shown not different from each other significantly. Thus, only a simulation could be confirmed to be performed in substitution of an experiment, which is costly and time-consuming in order to determine the shearing properties of materials made of aluminum foam with artificial data.

  15. Effect of nonthermal plasma treatment on surface chemistry of commercially-pure titanium and shear bond strength to autopolymerizing acrylic resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vechiato-Filho, Aljomar José, E-mail: aljomarvechiatoflo@gmail.com [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Aracatuba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Silva Vieira Marques, Isabella da [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Santos, Daniela Micheline dos [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Aracatuba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira Matos, Adaias [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; Cruz, Nilson Cristino da [Laboratory of Technological Plasmas (LaPTec), Engineering College, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Sorocaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-03-01

    The effect of nonthermal plasma on the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti), and on the shear bond strength between an autopolymerizing acrylic resin and cp-Ti was investigated. A total of 96 discs of cp-Ti were distributed into four groups (n = 24): Po (no surface treatment), SB (sandblasting), Po + NTP and SB + NTP (methane plasma). Surface characterization was performed through surface energy, surface roughness, scanning microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction tests. Shear bond strength test was conducted immediately and after thermocycling. Surface treatment affected the surface energy and roughness of cp-Ti discs (P < .001). SEM–EDS showed the presence of the carbide thin film. XRD spectra revealed no crystalline phase changes. The SB + NTP group showed the highest bond strength values (6.76 ± 0.70 MPa). Thermocycling reduced the bond strength of the acrylic resin/cp-Ti interface (P < .05), except for Po group. NTP is an effective treatment option for improving the shear bond strength between both materials. - Highlights: • We tested the bond strength between two widely used materials in dentistry (acrylic and titanium). • We performed an innovative surface treatment with nonthermal plasma. • Increasing adhesion will avoid complications of full-arch implant-retained prostheses.

  16. Phase-detection measurements in free-surface turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanson, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    High-velocity self-aerated flows are described as ‘white waters’ because of the entrained air bubbles. The air entrainment induces a drastic change in the multiphase flow structure of the water column and this leads to significant bubble-turbulence interactions, turbulence modulation and associated mixing processes impacting on the bulk flow properties. In these high-velocity free-surface turbulent flows, the phase-detection needle probe is a most reliable instrumentation. The signal processing of a phase-detection probe is re-visited herein. It is shown that the processing may be performed on the raw probe signal as well as the thresholded data. The latter yields the time-averaged void fraction, the bubble count rate, the particle chord time distributions and the particle clustering properties within the particulate flow regions. The raw probe signal analysis gives further the auto-correlation time scale and the power spectrum density function. Finally dimensional considerations are developed with a focus on the physical modelling of free-surface flows in hydraulic structures. It is argued that the notion of scale effects must be defined in terms of some specific set of air-water flow properties within well-defined testing conditions, while a number of free-surface flow characteristics are more prone to scale effects than others, even in large-size physical facilities.

  17. Hot pressing effect on the shear bond strength of dental porcelain to CoCrMoSi alloy substrates with different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, B; Faria, S; Soares, D; Silva, F S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hot pressing on the shear bond strength of a CoCrMoSi alloy to a low-fusing feldspathic porcelain, for two types of surface treatments: polished and grit-blasted. Moreover, the shear strength of hot pressed porcelain was also compared with that of conventional vacuum sintered porcelain. Bond strength of metal-porcelain composites were assessed by the means of a shear test performed in a universal test machine until fracture. Fracture surfaces and interfaces were investigated by optical microscope, stereomicroscope and SEM/EDS. Data was analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test to test the assumption of normality. The 2-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD multiple comparison test was used to compare shear bond strength results and the t-test was used to compare the porcelain shear strength (pporcelain. This study revealed that metal-ceramic bond strength is maximized for hot pressed porcelain onto rough metal substrates, with lower variability in results. Hot pressing technique was also shown to enhance the cohesion of porcelain.

  18. Laboratory Performance Evaluation of High Modulus Asphalt Concrete Modified with Different Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to evaluate comprehensive performance of high modulus asphalt concrete (HMAC and propose common values for establishing evaluation system. Three gradations with different modifiers were conducted to study the high and low temperature performance, shearing behavior, and water stability. The laboratory tests for HMAC included static and dynamic modulus tests, rutting test, uniaxial penetration test, bending test, and immersion Marshall test. Dynamic modulus test results showed that modifier can improve the static modulus and the improvements were remarkable at higher temperature. Moreover, modulus of HMAC-20 was better than those of HMAC-16 and HMAC-25. The results of performance test indicated that HMAC has good performance to resist high temperature rutting, and the resistances of the HMAC-20 and HMAC-25 against rutting were better than that of HMAC-16. Then, the common values of dynamic stability were recommended. Furthermore, common values of HMAC performance were established based on pavement performance tests.

  19. Shear and compression rheology of Langmuir monolayers of natural ceramides: solid character and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Montero, Iván; Catapano, Elisa R; Espinosa, Gabriel; Arriaga, Laura R; Langevin, Dominique; Monroy, Francisco

    2013-06-04

    The present work addresses the fundamental question of membrane elasticity of ceramide layers with a special focus on the plastic regime. The compression and shear viscoelasticity of egg-ceramide Langmuir monolayers were investigated using oscillatory surface rheology in the linear regime and beyond. High compression and shear moduli were measured at room temperature-a clear signature for a solid behavior. At deformations larger than one per mill, egg-ceramide monolayers display plastic features characterized by a decrease of the storage modulus followed by a viscous regime typical of fluid lipids. This behavior is accompanied by a marked decrease of the loss modulus with increasing stress above a yield point. The results permit to univocally classify ceramide monolayers as 2D solids able to undergo plastic deformations, at the difference of typical fluid lipid monolayers. These unusual features are likely to have consequences in the mechanical behavior of ceramide-rich emplacements in biological membranes.

  20. Near-Surface Shear Wave Velocity Versus Depth Profiles, VS30, and NEHRP Classifications for 27 Sites in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; Stephenson, William J.; Worley, David M.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Asencio, Eugenio; Irizarry, Harold; Cameron, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program (PRSMP) and the Geology Department at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to study near-surface shear-wave (Vs) and compressional-wave (Vp) velocities in and around major urban areas of Puerto Rico. Using noninvasive seismic refraction-reflection profiling techniques, we acquired velocities at 27 locations. Surveyed sites were predominantly selected on the premise that they were generally representative of near-surface materials associated with the primary geologic units located within the urbanized areas of Puerto Rico. Geologic units surveyed included Cretaceous intrusive and volcaniclastic bedrock, Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic units, and Quaternary unconsolidated eolian, fluvial, beach, and lagoon deposits. From the data we developed Vs and Vp depth versus velocity columns, calculated average Vs to 30-m depth (VS30), and derived NEHRP (National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program) site classifications for all sites except one where results did not reach 30-m depth. The distribution of estimated NEHRP classes is as follows: three class 'E' (VS30 below 180 m/s), nine class 'D' (VS30 between 180 and 360 m/s), ten class 'C' (VS30 between 360 and 760 m/s), and four class 'B' (VS30 greater than 760 m/s). Results are being used to calibrate site response at seismograph stations and in the development of regional and local shakemap models for Puerto Rico.

  1. Shear bond strength of different surface treatments in bulk fill, microhybrid, and nanoparticle repair resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Jesus Tavarez RR

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus Tavarez,1 Lauber Jose dos Santos Almeida Júnior,2 Tayanne Christine Gomes Guará,1 Izabella Santos Ribeiro,1 Etevaldo Matos Maia Filho,1 Leily Macedo Firoozmand2 1Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ceuma University (CEUMA, 2Department of Dentistry I, University Federal of Maranhão (UFMA, São Luís, Maranhão, Brazil Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of surface treatment and different types of composite resin on the microshear bond strength of repairs. Materials and methods: Seventy-two specimens (n=72 were prepared using a nanoparticle resin and stored in artificial saliva at 37 ± 1°C for 24 h. After this period, the specimens (n=24 were restored with microhybrid resin P60 (3M ESPE, nanoparticle resin Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, and Bulk Fill Surefil SDR Flow (Dentsply composite resins. Previously, the surfaces of the samples were treated, forming the following subgroups (n=12: (A conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s, and (B abrasioned with a diamond tip for 3 s and conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid. In all groups, before insertion of the composite resin, the adhesive system Adper Single Bond 2 was actively applied and photopolymerized for 20 s. Results: The microshear test was executed to assess bond strength. Kruskal–Wallis (p<0.05 and Mann–Whitney statistical tests showed significant statistical difference considering that the bulk-fill resin turned out to have a lower bond strength than the conventional nanoparticle and microhybrid composites. With regard to the technique, the roughening with diamond bur followed by the application of phosphoric acid exhibited values higher than the exclusive use of acid. Conclusion: The microshear bond strength of the composite resin repairs varies in accordance with the type of composite resin utilized, and roughening the surface increased the bond strength of these materials. Keywords: bulk-fill resins, composite resins, dental

  2. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  3. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  4. Surface-secreted von Willebrand factor mediates aggregation of ADP-activated platelets at moderate shear stress: facilitated by GPIb but controlled by GPIIb-IIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frojmovic, M M; Kasirer-Friede, A; Goldsmith, H L; Brown, E A

    1997-03-01

    We previously showed that ADP activation of washed human platelets in plasma-free suspensions supports aggregation at moderate shear stress (0.4-1.6 Nm-2) in Poiseuille flow. Although most activated platelets expressed maximal fibrinogen-occupied GPIIb-IIIa receptors, aggregation appeared to be independent of bound fibrinogen, but blocked by the hexapeptide GRGDSP. Here, we tested the hypothesis that von Willebrand factor (vWF) secreted and expressed on activated platelets mediates aggregation at moderate shear rates from 300 to 1000 s-1 corresponding to shear stresses from 0.3 to 1.1 Nm-2. Relatively unactivated platelets (Flow cytometric measurements with monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2.2.9 reporting on surface-bound vWF, and with mAb S12 reporting on alpha-granule secreted P-selectin, showed that 65% and 80%, respectively, of all platelets were maximally activated with respect to maximal secretion and surface expression of these proteins. "Resting" washed platelets exhibited both surface-bound vWF and significant P-selectin secretion. We showed that mAbs 6D1 and NMC4, respectively blocking the adhesive domains on the GPIb receptor recognizing vWF, and on the vWF molecule recognizing the GPIb receptor, partially inhibited ADP-induced aggregation under shear in Couette flow, the degree of inhibition increasing with increasing shear stress. In contrast, mAb 10E5, blocking the vWF binding domain on GPIIb-IIIa, essentially blocked all aggregation at the shear rates tested. We conclude that vWF, expressed on ADP-activated platelets, is at least the predominant cross-bridging molecule mediating aggregation at moderate shear stress. There is an absolute requirement for free activated GPIIb-IIIa receptors, postulated to interact with platelet-secreted, surface bound vWF. The GPIb-vWF cross-bridging reaction plays a facilitative role becoming increasingly important with increasing shear stress. Since aurin tricarboxylic acid, which blocks the GPIb binding domain on vWF, was

  5. Effects of surface-conditioning methods on shear bond strength of brackets bonded to different all-ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Y Şinasi; Külünk, Tolga; Elekdağ-Türk, Selma; Saraç, Duygu; Türk, Tamer

    2011-12-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of two surface-conditioning methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal brackets bonded to three different all-ceramic materials, and to evaluate the mode of failure after debonding. Twenty feldspathic, 20 fluoro-apatite, and 20 leucite-reinforced ceramic specimens were examined following two surface-conditioning methods: air-particle abrasion (APA) with 25 μm Al(2)O(3) and silica coating with 30 μm Al(2)O(3) particles modified by silica. After silane application, metal brackets were bonded with light cure composite and then stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermocycled (×1000 at 5-55°C for 30 seconds). The SBS of the brackets was measured on a universal testing machine. The ceramic surfaces were examined with a stereomicroscope to determine the amount of composite resin remaining using the adhesive remnant index. Two-way analysis of variance, Tukey's multiple comparison test, and Weibull analysis were used for evaluation of SBS. The lowest SBS was with APA for the fluoro-apatite ceramic (11.82 MPa), which was not significantly different from APA for the feldspathic ceramic (13.58 MPa). The SBS for the fluoro-apatite ceramic was significantly lower than that of leucite-reinforced ceramic with APA (14.82 MPa). The highest SBS value was obtained with silica coating of the leucite-reinforced ceramic (24.17 MPa), but this was not significantly different from the SBS for feldspathic and fluoro-apatite ceramic (23.51 and 22.18 MPa, respectively). The SBS values with silica coating showed significant differences from those of APA. For all samples, the adhesive failures were between the ceramic and composite resin. No ceramic fractures or cracks were observed. Chairside tribochemical silica coating significantly increased the mean bond strength values.

  6. Heat treatment following surface silanization in rebonded tribochemical silica-coated ceramic brackets: shear bond strength analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    SILVA, Emilia Adriane; TRINDADE, Flávia Zardo; RESKALLA, Hélcio Nagib José Feres; de QUEIROZ, José Renato Cavalcanti

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the effects of heat treatment on the tribochemical silica coating and silane surface conditioning and the bond strength of rebonded alumina monocrystalline brackets. Material and Methods Sixty alumina monocrystalline brackets were randomly divided according to adhesive base surface treatments (n=20): Gc, no treatment (control); Gt, tribochemical silica coating + silane application; Gh, as per Gt + post-heat treatment (air flux at 100ºC for 60 s). Brackets were bonded to the enamel premolars surface with a light-polymerized resin and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 100 days. Additionally, half the specimens of each group were thermocycled (6,000 cycles between 5-55ºC) (TC). The specimens were submitted to the shear bond strength (SBS) test using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure mode was assessed using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), together with the surface roughness (Ra) of the resin cement in the bracket using interference microscopy (IM). 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey test were used to compare the data (p>0.05). Results The strategies used to treat the bracket surface had an effect on the SBS results (p=0.0), but thermocycling did not (p=0.6974). Considering the SBS results (MPa), Gh-TC and Gc showed the highest values (27.59±6.4 and 27.18±2.9) and Gt-TC showed the lowest (8.45±6.7). For the Ra parameter, ANOVA revealed that the aging method had an effect (p=0.0157) but the surface treatments did not (p=0.458). For the thermocycled and non-thermocycled groups, Ra (µm) was 0.69±0.16 and 1.12±0.52, respectively. The most frequent failure mode exhibited was mixed failure involving the enamel-resin-bracket interfaces. Conclusion Regardless of the aging method, Gh promoted similar SBS results to Gc, suggesting that rebonded ceramic brackets are a more effective strategy. PMID:24037072

  7. Heat treatment following surface silanization in rebonded tribochemical silica-coated ceramic brackets: shear bond strength analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Adriane Silva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of heat treatment on the tribochemical silica coating and silane surface conditioning and the bond strength of rebonded alumina monocrystalline brackets. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty alumina monocrystalline brackets were randomly divided according to adhesive base surface treatments (n=20: Gc, no treatment (control; Gt, tribochemical silica coating + silane application; Gh, as per Gt + post-heat treatment (air flux at 100ºC for 60 s. Brackets were bonded to the enamel premolars surface with a light-polymerized resin and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 100 days. Additionally, half the specimens of each group were thermocycled (6,000 cycles between 5-55ºC (TC. The specimens were submitted to the shear bond strength (SBS test using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min. Failure mode was assessed using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, together with the surface roughness (Ra of the resin cement in the bracket using interference microscopy (IM. 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey test were used to compare the data (p>0.05. RESULTS: The strategies used to treat the bracket surface had an effect on the SBS results (p=0.0, but thermocycling did not (p=0.6974. Considering the SBS results (MPa, Gh-TC and Gc showed the highest values (27.59±6.4 and 27.18±2.9 and Gt-TC showed the lowest (8.45±6.7. For the Ra parameter, ANOVA revealed that the aging method had an effect (p=0.0157 but the surface treatments did not (p=0.458. For the thermocycled and non-thermocycled groups, Ra (µm was 0.69±0.16 and 1.12±0.52, respectively. The most frequent failure mode exhibited was mixed failure involving the enamel-resin-bracket interfaces. CONCLUSION: Regardless of the aging method, Gh promoted similar SBS results to Gc, suggesting that rebonded ceramic brackets are a more effective strategy.

  8. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R. L.; Snieder, R. K.

    1996-07-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the tectonically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  9. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the technically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  10. Analysis of damage localization for ductile metal in process of shear band propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Distribution of localized damage in shear band can' t be predicted theoretically based on classical elastoplastic theory. The average damage variable in shear band was considered to be a non-local variable. Based on non-local theory, an analytical expression for the localized damage in strain-softening region of shear band in the process of shear band propagation was presented using boundary condition and symmetry of local damage variable, etc. The results show that dynamic shear softening modulus, dynamic shear strength and shear elastic modulus influence the distribution of the localized damage in shear band. Internal length of ductile metal only governs the thickness of shear band. In the strain-softening region of shear band, the local damage variable along shear band's tangential and normal directions is non-linear and highly non-uniform. The non-uniformities in the normal and tangential directions of shear band stem from the interactions and interplaying among microstructures and the non-uniform distribution of shear stress, respectively. At the tail of the strain-softening region, the maximum value of local damage variable reaches 1. This means that material at this position fractures completely. At the tip of shear band and upper as well as lower boundaries, no damage occurs. Local damage variable increases as dynamic shear softening modulus decreases or shear elastic modulus increases, leading to difficulty in identification or detection of damage for less ductile metal material at higher strain rates.

  11. Shear Thickening Behaviour of Composite Propellant Suspension under Oscillatory Shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Singh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Composite propellant suspensions consist of highly filled polymeric system wherein solid particles of different sizes and shapes are dispersed in a polymeric matrix. The rheological behaviour of a propellant suspension is characterised by viscoplasticity and shear rate and time dependant viscosity. The behaviour of composite propellant suspension has been studied under amplitude sweep test where tests were performed by continuously varying strain amplitude (strain in %, γ by keeping the frequency and temperature constant and results are plotted in terms of log γ (strain amplitude vs logGʹ and logGʺ (Storage modulus and loss modulus, respectively. It is clear from amplitude sweep test that dynamic moduli and complex viscosity show marked increase at critical strain amplitude after a plateau region, infering a shear thickening behaviour.

  12. Sheared solid materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akira Onuki; Akira Furukawa; Akihiko Minami

    2005-05-01

    We present a time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau model of nonlinear elasticity in solid materials. We assume that the elastic energy density is a periodic function of the shear and tetragonal strains owing to the underlying lattice structure. With this new ingredient, solving the equations yields formation of dislocation dipoles or slips. In plastic flow high-density dislocations emerge at large strains to accumulate and grow into shear bands where the strains are localized. In addition to the elastic displacement, we also introduce the local free volume . For very small the defect structures are metastable and long-lived where the dislocations are pinned by the Peierls potential barrier. However, if the shear modulus decreases with increasing , accumulation of around dislocation cores eventually breaks the Peierls potential leading to slow relaxations in the stress and the free energy (aging). As another application of our scheme, we also study dislocation formation in two-phase alloys (coherency loss) under shear strains, where dislocations glide preferentially in the softer regions and are trapped at the interfaces.

  13. Layering and shear properties of an ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate, confined to nano-films between mica surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkin, Susan; Albrecht, Tim; Klein, Jacob

    2010-02-14

    We report high-resolution measurements of the forces between two atomically smooth solid surfaces across a film of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ionic liquid, for film thickness down to a single ion diameter. For films thinner than approximately 2 nm oscillatory structural forces are observed as the surface separation decreases and pairs of ion layers are squeezed out of the film. Strikingly, measurements of the shear stress of the ionic liquid film reveal low friction coefficients which are 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than for analogous films of non-polar molecular liquids, including standard hydrocarbon lubricants, up to ca. 1 MPa pressure. We attribute this to the geometric and charge characteristics of the ionic liquid: the irregular shapes of the ions lead to a low shear stress, while the strong coulombic interactions between the ions and the charged confining surfaces lead to a robust film which is maintained between the shearing surfaces when pressure is applied across the film.

  14. Shear loading of costal cartilage

    CERN Document Server

    Subit, Damien

    2014-01-01

    A series of tests were performed on a single post-mortem human subject at various length scales. First, tabletop tests were performed. Next, the ribs and intercostal muscles were tested with the view to characterize the load transfer between the ribs. Finally, the costal cartilage was tested under shear loading, as it plays an important in the transfer of the load between the ribs and the sternum. This paper reports the results of dynamic shear loading tests performed on three samples of costal cartilage harvested from a single post-mortem human subject, as well as the quantification of the effective Young's modulus estimated from the amount of cartilage calcification.

  15. Computation of Modulus of Elasticity of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onwuka, D.O

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available - In this presentation, a computer based method which uses a set of algebraic equations and statistical data, were used to compute concrete mixes for prescribeable elastic concrete modulus, and vice versa. The computer programs based on Simplex and Regression theories can be used to predict several mix proportions for obtaining a desired modulus of elasticity of concrete made from crushed granite rock and other materials. The modulus of elasticity of concrete predicted by these programs agreed with experimentally obtained values. The programs are easy and inexpensive to use, and give instant and accurate results. For example, if the modulus of elasticity is specified as input, the computer instantly prints out all possible concrete mix ratios that can yield concrete having the specified elastic modulus. When the concrete mix ratio is specified as input, the computer quickly prints out the elastic modulus of the concrete obtainable from a given concrete mix ratio.

  16. Shear bond strength of veneering porcelain to zirconia: Effect of surface treatment by CNC-milling and composite layer deposition on zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, R L P; Silva, F S; Nascimento, R M; Souza, J C M; Motta, F V; Carvalho, O; Henriques, B

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of veneering feldspathic porcelain to zirconia substrates modified by CNC-milling process or by coating zirconia with a composite interlayer. Four types of zirconia-porcelain interface configurations were tested: RZ - porcelain bonded to rough zirconia substrate (n=16); PZ - porcelain bonded to zirconia substrate with surface holes (n=16); RZI - application of a composite interlayer between the veneering porcelain and the rough zirconia substrate (n=16); PZI - application of a composite interlayer between the porcelain and the zirconia substrate treated by CNC-milling (n=16). The composite interlayer was composed of zirconia particles reinforced porcelain (30%, vol%). The mechanical properties of the ceramic composite have been determined. The shear bond strength test was performed at 0.5mm/min using a universal testing machine. The interfaces of fractured and untested specimens were examined by FEG-SEM/EDS. Data was analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test to test the assumption of normality. The one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD multiple comparison test was used to compare shear bond strength results (α=0.05). The shear bond strength of PZ (100±15MPa) and RZI (96±11MPa) specimens were higher than that recorded for RZ (control group) specimens (89±15MPa), although not significantly (p>0.05). The highest shear bond strength values were recorded for PZI specimens (138±19MPa), yielding a significant improvement of 55% relative to RZ specimens (p<0.05). This study shows that it is possible to highly enhance the zirconia-porcelain bond strength - even by ~55% - by combining surface holes in zirconia frameworks and the application of a proper ceramic composite interlayer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Study on elastic modulus of individual ferritin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JinHai; CUI ChengYi; ZHOU XingFei

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical property of individual ferriUn was measured with force-volume mapping (FV) under contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in this work. The elastic modulus of individual ferritin was estimated by the Hertz mode. The estimated value of the elastic modulus of individual ferritin was about 250-800 MPs under a small deformation. In addition, the elastic modulus of individual ferritin was compared with that of the colloid gold nanoparticle.

  18. Nonlinear surface waves in soft, weakly compressible elastic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A; Ilinskii, Yurii A; Hamilton, Mark F

    2007-04-01

    Nonlinear surface waves in soft, weakly compressible elastic media are investigated theoretically, with a focus on propagation in tissue-like media. The model is obtained as a limiting case of the theory developed by Zabolotskaya [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 91, 2569-2575 (1992)] for nonlinear surface waves in arbitrary isotropic elastic media, and it is consistent with the results obtained by Fu and Devenish [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 49, 65-80 (1996)] for incompressible isotropic elastic media. In particular, the quadratic nonlinearity is found to be independent of the third-order elastic constants of the medium, and it is inversely proportional to the shear modulus. The Gol'dberg number characterizing the degree of waveform distortion due to quadratic nonlinearity is proportional to the square root of the shear modulus and inversely proportional to the shear viscosity. Simulations are presented for propagation in tissue-like media.

  19. Various Expressions for Modulus of Random Convexity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Lin ZENG

    2013-01-01

    We first prove various kinds of expressions for modulus of random convexity by using an Lo(F,R)-valued function's intermediate value theorem and the well known Hahn-Banach theorem for almost surely bounded random linear functionals,then establish some basic properties including continuity for modulus of random convexity.In particular,we express the modulus of random convexity of a special random normed module Lo(F,X) derived from a normed space X by the classical modulus of convexity of X.

  20. Influence of coupling with shear horizontal surface acoustic wave on lateral propagation of Rayleigh surface acoustic wave on 128°YX-LiNbO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Benfeng; Han, Tao; Tang, Gongbin; Zhang, Qiaozhen; Omori, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of the coupling with shear horizontal (SH) surface acoustic wave (SAW) on the propagation of Rayleigh SAW in periodic grating structures on 128°YX-LiNbO3. First, the frequency dispersion behavior with longitudinal and lateral wavenumbers of Rayleigh SAW is calculated using the finite element method (FEM) software COMSOL. It is shown that the coupling causes (1) the satellite stopband and (2) variation of the anisotropy factor. It is also shown these phenomena remain even when the electromechanical coupling factor of SH SAW is zero. Then, the extended thin plate model which can take coupling between two SAWs into account, is applied to simulate the result of FEM. Good agreement between these results indicated that the mechanical coupling is responsible for these two phenomena. Finally, including electrical excitation and detection, the model is applied to the infinitely long interdigital transducer (IDT) structure and the calculated result is compared with that obtained by the three-dimensional FEM. The excellent agreement of both results confirms the effectiveness of the extended thin plate model.

  1. Morphological instability of the solid-liquid interface under a thin shear flow with a free surface-ripples on icicles and stalactites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Kazuto

    2007-03-01

    Icicles and stalactites grow when their surfaces are covered with a thin film of flowing water through which latent heat of fusion and carbon dioxide are released to the surrounding air by diffusion and convection. Despite the complete difference in their basic growth mechanism, their surfaces often have ripples of centimeter-scale wavelengths. We consider the underlying common mechanism of ripple formation and find that the mean thickness of the water film and the capillary length associated with the surface tension of the water-air surface are common important characteristic lengths in determining the centimeter-scale wavelength of ripples. This is the first theoretical work on the morphological instability of solidification front during icicle and stalactite growth from a thin shear flow with one side being a free surface, in which we take into account the change of shape of the water-air surface when the shape of the solid-liquid interface is changed.

  2. Comparison of shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer to conditioned and unconditioned mineral trioxide aggregate surface: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Gulati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement to conditioned and unconditioned mineral trioxide aggregate surface. Materials and Method: White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (WMTA and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC were used for the study. 60 WMTA specimens were prepared and stored in an incubator at 37° C and 100% humidity for 72 hrs. The specimens were then divided into two groups- half of the specimens were conditioned and remaining half were left unconditioned, subsequent to which RMGIC was placed over MTA. The specimens were then stored in an incubator for 24 hrs at 37° C and 100% humidity. The shear bond strength value of RMGIC to conditioned and unconditioned WMTA was measured and compared using unpaired ′t  ′ test. Results: The mean shear bond strength of value of RMGIC to conditioned and unconditioned WMTA was 6.59 MPa and 7.587 MPa respectively. Statistical analysis using unpaired t-test revealed that the difference between values of two groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05. Conclusions: During clinical procedures like pulp capping and furcal repair, if RMGIC is placed as a base over MTA, then conditioning should be done to increase the bond strength between RMGIC and dentin and any inadvertent contact of conditioner with MTA will not significantly affect the shear bond strength value of RMGIC to MTA.

  3. Modeling, design, packing and experimental analysis of liquid-phase shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Thomas B

    using uniform-electrode and shear-horizontal mode configurations on potassium-niobate, langasite, and quartz substrates. Optimum configurations are determined yielding maximum sensitivity. Results show mode propagation-loss and sensitivity to viscosity are correlated by a factor independent of substrate material. The analysis is useful for designing devices meeting sensitivity and signal level requirements. A novel, rapid and precise microfluidic chamber alignment/bonding method was developed for SAW platforms. The package is shown to have little effect on device performance and permits simple macrofluidic interfacing. Lastly, prototypes were designed, fabricated, and tested for viscosity and biosensor applications; results show ability to detect as low as 1% glycerol in water and surface-bound DNA crosslinking.

  4. Research on elastic modulus backcalculation of asphalt course using BP artificial neural network based on surface deflection basin of pavement%基于路表弯沉盆的BP人工神经网络反演沥青面层弹性模量研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国良; 钟雯; 黄晓韵; 梁思敏; 何慧慧; 陈家驹

    2015-01-01

    Based on layered elastic theory,the elastic modulus of asphalt course in asphalt pavement was predicted using BP artificial neural network.According to the types of pavement structure in common use,the database of surface deflections with their corresponding structural parameters of asphalt course based on layered elastic theory was established.The elastic modulus backcalculation model of asphalt course in asphalt pavement was developed using BP artificial neural network to predict.The predictive results of asphalt course elastic modulus backcalculation using theoretical deflection basin and measured deflection basin indicate that the elastic modulus backcalculation model of asphalt course in asphalt pavement is of good predictive accuracy and reliability.It would provide the references with the elastic modulus backcalculation model of asphalt course to accurately and quickly estimate the conditions of asphalt course in asphalt pavement.%基于层状弹性体系理论,建立BP人工神经网络反演沥青路面沥青面层弹性模量预测模型,利用BP人工神经网络预测沥青路面沥青面层弹性模量.理论弯沉盆和实测弯沉盆反演沥青面层弹性模量的结果表明,建立的BP人工神经网络反演沥青路面沥青面层弹性模量模型具有良好的预测精度和可靠性,为评价沥青路面的沥青面层性能状况提供了参考.

  5. Effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of resin composite bonded to CAD/CAM resin-ceramic hybrid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, Merve Bankoğlu; Bal, Bilge Turhan; Ünver, Senem; Doğan, Aylin

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of resin composite bonded to thermocycled and non-thermocycled CAD/CAM resin-ceramic hybrid materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS 120 specimens (10×10×2 mm) from each material were divided into 12 groups according to different surface treatments in combination with thermal aging procedures. Surface treatment methods were airborne-particle abrasion (abraded with 50 micron alumina particles), dry grinding (grinded with 125 µm grain size bur), and hydrofluoric acid (9%) and silane application. According to the thermocycling procedure, the groups were assigned as non-thermocycled, thermocycled after packing composites, and thermocycled before packing composites. The average surface roughness of the non-thermocycled specimens were measured after surface treatments. After packing composites and thermocycling procedures, shear bond strength (SBS) of the specimens were tested. The results of surface roughness were statistically analyzed by 2-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), and SBS results were statistically analyzed by 3-way ANOVA. RESULTS Surface roughness of GC were significantly lower than that of LU and VE (P<.05). The highest surface roughness was observed for dry grinding group, followed by airborne particle abraded group (P<.05). Comparing the materials within the same surface treatment method revealed that untreated surfaces generally showed lower SBS values. The values of untreated LU specimens showed significantly different SBS values compared to those of other surface treatment groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION SBS was affected by surface treatments. Thermocycling did not have any effect on the SBS of the materials except acid and silane applied GC specimens, which were subjected to thermocycling before packing of the composite resin. PMID:27555894

  6. A new electrical and mechanically detonatable shear wave source for near surface (0-30 m) seismic acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, J. M.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Harris, J. B.

    2013-04-01

    We present a new, impulsive, horizontal shear source capable of performing long shot profiles in a time-efficient and repeatable manner. The new shear source is ground-coupled by eight 1/2″ (1.27 cm) × 2″ (5.08 cm) steel spikes. Blank shotshells (12-gauge) used as energy sources can be either mechanically or electrically detonated. Electrical fuses have a start time repeatability of safety pin. We conducted field tests at the 17th Street Canal levee breach site in New Orleans, Louisiana (30.017° N 90.121° W) and at an instrumented test borehole at Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi (32.325° N 93.182° W) to compare our new source and a traditional hammer impact source. The new shear source produces a broader-band of frequencies (30-100 Hz cf. 30-60 Hz). Signal generated by the new shear source has signal-to-noise ratios equivalent to ~ 3 stacked hammer blows to the hammer impact source. Ideal source signals must be broadband in frequency, have a high SNR, be consistent, and have precise start times; all traits of the new shear source.

  7. Nd:YAG Laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding: Effects on shear bond strength and enamel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Xianglong [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu Xiaolin [Department of Orthodontics, Stomatology Hospital, Dalian University, Dalian 116021 (China); Bai Ding [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)], E-mail: baiding88@hotmail.com; Meng Yao; Huang Lan [Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2008-11-15

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of Nd:YAG laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding technique, both ceramic brackets and metallic brackets were bonded with orthodontic adhesive to 30 freshly extracted premolars. The specimens were divided into three groups, 10 in each, according to the brackets employed and the debonding techniques used: (1) metallic brackets with shear debonding force, (2) ceramic brackets with shear debonding force, and (3) ceramic brackets with Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The result showed that laser irradiation could diminish shear bond strength (SBS) significantly and produce the most desired ARI scores. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy investigation displayed that laser-aided technique induced little enamel scratch or loss. It was concluded that Nd:YAG laser could facilitate the debonding of ceramic brackets and diminish the amount of remnant adhesive without damaging enamel structure.

  8. Nd:YAG Laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding: Effects on shear bond strength and enamel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xianglong; Liu, Xiaolin; Bai, Ding; Meng, Yao; Huang, Lan

    2008-11-01

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of Nd:YAG laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding technique, both ceramic brackets and metallic brackets were bonded with orthodontic adhesive to 30 freshly extracted premolars. The specimens were divided into three groups, 10 in each, according to the brackets employed and the debonding techniques used: (1) metallic brackets with shear debonding force, (2) ceramic brackets with shear debonding force, and (3) ceramic brackets with Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The result showed that laser irradiation could diminish shear bond strength (SBS) significantly and produce the most desired ARI scores. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy investigation displayed that laser-aided technique induced little enamel scratch or loss. It was concluded that Nd:YAG laser could facilitate the debonding of ceramic brackets and diminish the amount of remnant adhesive without damaging enamel structure.

  9. Dual SAW sensor technique for determining mass and modulus changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietala, S L; Hietala, V M; Brinker, C J

    2001-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors, which are sensitive to a variety of surface changes, have been widely used for chemical and physical sensing. The ability to control or compensate for the many surface forces has been instrumental in collecting valid data. In cases in which it is not possible to neglect certain effects, such as frequency drift with temperature, methods such as the "dual sensor" technique have been utilized. This paper describes a novel use of a dual sensor technique, using two sensor materials (quartz and GaAs) to separate out the contributions of mass and modulus of the frequency change during gas adsorption experiments. The large modulus change in the film calculated using this technique and predicted by the Gassmann equation provide a greater understanding of the challenges of SAW sensing.

  10. Mesoscopic Simulations of the Phase Behavior of Aqueous EO 19 PO 29 EO 19 Solutions Confined and Sheared by Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Hongyi

    2012-01-25

    The MesoDyn method is used to investigate associative structures in aqueous solution of a nonionic triblock copolymer consisting of poly(propylene oxide) capped on both ends with poly(ethylene oxide) chains. The effect of adsorbing (hydrophobic) and nonadsorbing (hydrophilic) solid surfaces in contact with aqueous solutions of the polymer is elucidated. The macromolecules form self-assembled structures in solution. Confinement under shear forces is investigated in terms of interfacial behavior and association. The formation of micelles under confinement between hydrophilic surfaces occurs faster than in bulk aqueous solution while layered structures assemble when the polymers are confined between hydrophobic surfaces. Micelles are deformed under shear rates of 1 μs -1 and eventually break to form persistent, adsorbed layered structures. As a result, surface damage under frictional forces is prevented. Overall, this study indicates that aqueous triblock copolymers of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) (Pluronics, EO mPO nEO m) act as a boundary lubricant for hydrophobic surfaces but not for hydrophilic ones. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. The effect of different surface treatments of stainless steel crown and different bonding agents on shear bond strength of direct composite resin veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajami B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Stainless steel crown (SSC is the most durable and reliable restoration for primary teeth with extensive caries but its metalic appearance has always been a matter of concern. With advances in restorative materials and metal bonding processes, composite veneer has enhanced esthetics of these crowns in clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of SSC to composite resin using different surface treatments and adhesives. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 90 stainless steel crowns were selected. They were mounted in molds and divided into 3 groups of 30 each (S, E and F. In group S (sandblast, buccal surfaces were sandblasted for 5 seconds. In group E (etch acidic gel was applied for 5 minutes and in group F (fissure bur surface roughness was created by fissure diamond bur. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (SB, AB, P based on different adhesives: Single Bond, All Bond2 and Panavia F. Composite was then bonded to specimens. Cases were incubated in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was measured by Zwick machine with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test with p0.05 so the two variables were studied separately. No significant difference was observed in mean shear bond strength of composite among the three kinds of adhesives (P>0.05. Similar results were obtained regarding surface treatments (P>0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, treating the SSC surface with bur and using single bond adhesive and composite can be used successfully to obtain esthetic results in pediatric restorative treatments.

  12. Influence of Additive Manufactured Scaffold Architecture on the Distribution of Surface Strains and Fluid Flow Shear Stresses and Expected Osteochondral Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikson, Wim J; Deegan, Anthony J; Yang, Ying; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Verdonschot, Nico; Moroni, Lorenzo; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Scaffolds for regenerative medicine applications should instruct cells with the appropriate signals, including biophysical stimuli such as stress and strain, to form the desired tissue. Apart from that, scaffolds, especially for load-bearing applications, should be capable of providing mechanical stability. Since both scaffold strength and stress-strain distributions throughout the scaffold depend on the scaffold's internal architecture, it is important to understand how changes in architecture influence these parameters. In this study, four scaffold designs with different architectures were produced using additive manufacturing. The designs varied in fiber orientation, while fiber diameter, spacing, and layer height remained constant. Based on micro-CT (μCT) scans, finite element models (FEMs) were derived for finite element analysis (FEA) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). FEA of scaffold compression was validated using μCT scan data of compressed scaffolds. Results of the FEA and CFD showed a significant impact of scaffold architecture on fluid shear stress and mechanical strain distribution. The average fluid shear stress ranged from 3.6 mPa for a 0/90 architecture to 6.8 mPa for a 0/90 offset architecture, and the surface shear strain from 0.0096 for a 0/90 offset architecture to 0.0214 for a 0/90 architecture. This subsequently resulted in variations of the predicted cell differentiation stimulus values on the scaffold surface. Fluid shear stress was mainly influenced by pore shape and size, while mechanical strain distribution depended mainly on the presence or absence of supportive columns in the scaffold architecture. Together, these results corroborate that scaffold architecture can be exploited to design scaffolds with regions that guide specific tissue development under compression and perfusion. In conjunction with optimization of stimulation regimes during bioreactor cultures, scaffold architecture optimization can be used to improve

  13. Influence of Additive Manufactured Scaffold Architecture on the Distribution of Surface Strains and Fluid Flow Shear Stresses and Expected Osteochondral Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikson, Wim J.; Deegan, Anthony J.; Yang, Ying; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; Verdonschot, Nico; Moroni, Lorenzo; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Scaffolds for regenerative medicine applications should instruct cells with the appropriate signals, including biophysical stimuli such as stress and strain, to form the desired tissue. Apart from that, scaffolds, especially for load-bearing applications, should be capable of providing mechanical stability. Since both scaffold strength and stress–strain distributions throughout the scaffold depend on the scaffold’s internal architecture, it is important to understand how changes in architecture influence these parameters. In this study, four scaffold designs with different architectures were produced using additive manufacturing. The designs varied in fiber orientation, while fiber diameter, spacing, and layer height remained constant. Based on micro-CT (μCT) scans, finite element models (FEMs) were derived for finite element analysis (FEA) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). FEA of scaffold compression was validated using μCT scan data of compressed scaffolds. Results of the FEA and CFD showed a significant impact of scaffold architecture on fluid shear stress and mechanical strain distribution. The average fluid shear stress ranged from 3.6 mPa for a 0/90 architecture to 6.8 mPa for a 0/90 offset architecture, and the surface shear strain from 0.0096 for a 0/90 offset architecture to 0.0214 for a 0/90 architecture. This subsequently resulted in variations of the predicted cell differentiation stimulus values on the scaffold surface. Fluid shear stress was mainly influenced by pore shape and size, while mechanical strain distribution depended mainly on the presence or absence of supportive columns in the scaffold architecture. Together, these results corroborate that scaffold architecture can be exploited to design scaffolds with regions that guide specific tissue development under compression and perfusion. In conjunction with optimization of stimulation regimes during bioreactor cultures, scaffold architecture optimization can be used to improve

  14. Diameter-dependent bending modulus of individual multiwall boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanur, Adrienne E; Wang, Jiesheng; Reddy, Arava L M; Lamont, Daniel N; Yap, Yoke Khin; Walker, Gilbert C

    2013-04-25

    The mechanical properties of individual multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (MWBNNTs) synthesized by a growth-vapor-trapping chemical vapor deposition method are investigated by a three-point bending technique via atomic force microscopy. Multiple locations on suspended tubes are probed in order to determine the boundary conditions of the supported tube ends. The bending moduli (EB) calculated for 20 tubes with diameters ranging from 18 to 58 nm confirm the exceptional mechanical properties of MWBNNTs, with an average EB of 760 ± 30 GPa. For the first time, the bending moduli of MWBNNTs are observed to increase with decreasing diameter, ranging from 100 ± 20 GPa to as high as 1800 ± 300 GPa. This diameter dependence is evaluated by Timoshenko beam theory. The Young's modulus and shear modulus were determined to be 1800 ± 300 and 7 ± 1 GPa, respectively, for a trimmed data set of 16 tubes. The low shear modulus of MWBNNTs is the reason for the detected diameter-dependent bending modulus and is likely due to the presence of interwall shearing between the crystalline and faceted helical nanotube structures of MWBNNTs.

  15. Micro-shear bond strength and surface micromorphology of a feldspathic ceramic treated with different cleaning methods after hydrofluoric acid etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Caballero STEINHAUSER

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of feldspathic ceramic surface cleaning on micro-shear bond strength and ceramic surface morphology. Material and Methods: Forty discs of feldspathic ceramic were prepared and etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 2 minutes. The discs were randomly distributed into five groups (n=8: C: no treatment, S: water spray + air drying for 1 minute, US: immersion in ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes, F: etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 1 minute, followed by 1-minute rinse, F+US: etching with 37% phosphoric acid for 1 minute, 1-minute rinse and ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes. Composite cylinders were bonded to the discs following application of silane and hydrophobic adhesive for micro-shear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until failure. Stereomicroscopy was used to classify failure type. Surface micromorphology of each treatment type was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy at 500 and 2,500 times magnification. Results: One-way ANOVA test showed no significant difference between treatments (p=0.3197 and the most common failure types were cohesive resin cohesion followed by adhesive failure. Micro-shear bond strength of the feldspathic ceramic substrate to the adhesive system was not influenced by the different surface cleaning techniques. Absence of or less residue was observed after etching with hydrofluoric acid for the groups US and F+US. Conclusions: Combining ceramic cleaning techniques with hydrofluoric acid etching did not affect ceramic bond strength, whereas, when cleaning was associated with ultrasound, less residue was observed.

  16. Modulus-Pressure Equation for Confined Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Gor, Gennady Y; Shen, Vincent K; Bernstein, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic experiments allow one to measure the elastic modulus of bulk solid or fluid samples. Recently such experiments have been carried out on fluid-saturated nanoporous glass to probe the modulus of a confined fluid. In our previous work [J. Chem. Phys., (2015) 143, 194506], using Monte Carlo simulations we showed that the elastic modulus $K$ of a fluid confined in a mesopore is a function of the pore size. Here we focus on modulus-pressure dependence $K(P)$, which is linear for bulk materials, a relation known as the Tait-Murnaghan equation. Using transition-matrix Monte Carlo simulations we calculated the elastic modulus of bulk argon as a function of pressure and argon confined in silica mesopores as a function of Laplace pressure. Our calculations show that while the elastic modulus is strongly affected by confinement and temperature, the slope of the modulus versus pressure is not. Moreover, the calculated slope is in a good agreement with the reference data for bulk argon and experimental data for ...

  17. Shear Behavior of 3D Woven Hollow Integrated Sandwich Composites: Experimental, Theoretical and Numerical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangming; Liu, Chang; Cai, Deng'an; Li, Wenlong; Wang, Xiaopei

    2016-11-01

    An experimental, theoretical and numerical investigation on the shear behavior of 3D woven hollow integrated sandwich composites was presented in this paper. The microstructure of the composites was studied, then the shear modulus and load-deflection curves were obtained by double lap shear tests on the specimens in two principal directions of the sandwich panels, called warp and weft. The experimental results showed that the shear modulus of the warp was higher than that of the weft and the failure occurred in the roots of piles. A finite element model was established to predict the shear behavior of the composites. The simulated results agreed well with the experimental data. Simultaneously, a theoretical method was developed to predict the shear modulus. By comparing with the experimental data, the accuracy of the theoretical method was verified. The influence of structural parameters on shear modulus was also discussed. The higher yarn number, yarn density and dip angle of the piles could all improve the shear modulus of 3D woven hollow integrated sandwich composites at different levels, while the increasing height would decrease the shear modulus.

  18. Shear waves in vegetal tissues at ultrasonic frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariñas, M. D.; Sancho-Knapik, D.; Peguero-Pina, J. J.; Gil-Pelegrín, E.; Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, T. E.

    2013-03-01

    Shear waves are investigated in leaves of two plant species using air-coupled ultrasound. Magnitude and phase spectra of the transmission coefficient around the first two orders of the thickness resonances (normal and oblique incidence) have been measured. A bilayer acoustic model for plant leaves (comprising the palisade parenchyma and the spongy mesophyll) is proposed to extract, from measured spectra, properties of these tissues like: velocity and attenuation of longitudinal and shear waves and hence Young modulus, rigidity modulus, and Poisson's ratio. Elastic moduli values are typical of cellular solids and both, shear and longitudinal waves exhibit classical viscoelastic losses. Influence of leaf water content is also analyzed.

  19. Flexural modulus identification of thin polymer sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluhihs, S.; Kovalovs, A.; Tishkunovs, A.; Chate, A.

    2011-06-01

    The method of determination of the flexural Young's modulus is based on a solution to the problem of compression of a thin-walled cylindrical specimen by two parallel planes (TWCS method). This method was employed to calculate the flexural modulus for PET polymer compositions. The flexural modules received by TWCS method were verified by comparing the experimentally measured eigenfrequencies by Polytec vibrometer with numerical results from ANSYS program.

  20. Flexural modulus identification of thin polymer sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluhihs, S; Kovalovs, A; Tishkunovs, A; Chate, A, E-mail: s_gluhih@inbox.lv [Riga Technical University, Institute of Materials and Structures, Azenes 16/22, LV-1048, Riga (Latvia)

    2011-06-23

    The method of determination of the flexural Young's modulus is based on a solution to the problem of compression of a thin-walled cylindrical specimen by two parallel planes (TWCS method). This method was employed to calculate the flexural modulus for PET polymer compositions. The flexural modules received by TWCS method were verified by comparing the experimentally measured eigenfrequencies by Polytec vibrometer with numerical results from ANSYS program.

  1. Modulus and yield stress of drawn LDPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarungkul, Nandh

    Modulus and yield stress were investigated in drawn low density polyethylene (LDPE) film. Uniaxially drawn polymeric films usually show high values of modulus and yield stress, however, studies have normally only been conducted to identify the structural features that determine modulus. In this study small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), thermal shrinkage, birefringence, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) were used to examine, directly and indirectly, the structural features that determine both modulus and yield stress, which are often closely related in undrawn materials. Shish-kebab structures are proposed to account for the mechanical properties in drawn LDPE. The validity of this molecular/morphological model was tested using relationships between static mechanical data and structural and physical parameters. In addition, dynamic mechanical results are also in line with static data in supporting the model. In the machine direction (MD), "shish" and taut tie molecules (TTM) anchored in the crystalline phase account for E; whereas crystal lamellae with contributions from "shish" and TTM determine yield stress. In the transverse direction (TD), the crystalline phase plays an important roll in both modulus and yield stress. Modulus is determined by crystal lamellae functioning as platelet reinforcing elements in the amorphous matrix with an additional contributions from TTM and yield stress is determined by the crystal lamellae's resistance to deformation.

  2. Size dependent elastic modulus and mechanical resilience of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Simona; Shaw, Jeremy; Zhao, Xiaoli; Abbott, Paul V; Munroe, Paul; Xu, Jiang; Habibi, Daryoush; Xie, Zonghan

    2014-03-21

    Human tooth enamel exhibits a unique microstructure able to sustain repeated mechanical loading during dental function. Although notable advances have been made towards understanding the mechanical characteristics of enamel, challenges remain in the testing and interpretation of its mechanical properties. For example, enamel was often tested under dry conditions, significantly different from its native environment. In addition, constant load, rather than indentation depth, has been used when mapping the mechanical properties of enamel. In this work, tooth specimens are prepared under hydrated conditions and their stiffnesses are measured by depth control across the thickness of enamel. Crystal arrangement is postulated, among other factors, to be responsible for the size dependent indentation modulus of enamel. Supported by a simple structure model, effective crystal orientation angle is calculated and found to facilitate shear sliding in enamel under mechanical contact. In doing so, the stress build-up is eased and structural integrity is maintained.

  3. Quantitative calculation of local shear deformation in adiabatic shear band for Ti-6Al-4V

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    JOHNSON-COOK(J-C) model was used to calculate flow shear stress-shear strain curve for Ti-6Al-4V in dynamic torsion test. The predicted curve was compared with experimental result. Gradient-dependent plasticity(GDP) was introduced into J-C model and GDP was involved in the measured flow shear stress-shear strain curve, respectively, to calculate the distribution of local total shear deformation(LTSD) in adiabatic shear band(ASB). The predicted LTSDs at different flow shear stresses were compared with experimental measurements. J-C model can well predict the flow shear stress-shear strain curve in strain-hardening stage and in strain-softening stage where flow shear stress slowly decreases. Beyond the occurrence of ASB, with a decrease of flow shear stress, the increase of local plastic shear deformation in ASB is faster than the decrease of elastic shear deformation, leading to more and more apparent shear localization. According to the measured flow shear stress-shear strain curve and GDP, the calculated LTSDs in ASB are lower than experimental results. At earlier stage of ASB, though J-C model overestimates the flow shear stress at the same shear strain, the model can reasonably assess the LTSDs in ASB. According to the measured flow shear stress-shear strain curve and GDP, the calculated local plastic shear strains in ASB agree with experimental results except for the vicinity of shear fracture surface. In the strain-softening stage where flow shear stress sharply decreases, J-C model cannot be used. When flow shear stress decreases to a certain value, shear fracture takes place so that GDP cannot be used.

  4. Electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mampallil, Dileep; Ende, van den Dirk

    2013-01-01

    We generate and study electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels. By chemically or electrically modifying the surface potential of the channel walls a shear flow component with controllable velocity gradient can be added to the electroosmotic flow caused by double layer effects at the channel walls.

  5. Influence of surface tension on the instabilities and bifurcations of a particle in a drop under shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaire, Francois; Zhu, Lailai

    2016-11-01

    While the deformation regimes under flow of anuclear cells, like red blood cells, have been widely analyzed, the dynamics of nuclear cells are less explored. The objective of this work is to investigate the interplay between the stiff nucleus, modeled here as a rigid spherical particle and the surrounding deformable cell membrane, modeled for simplicity as an immiscible droplet, subjected to an external unbounded plane shear flow. A three-dimensional boundary integral implementation is developed to describe the interface-structure interaction characterized by two dimensionless numbers: the capillary number Ca , defined as the ratio of shear to capillary forces and and the particle-droplet size ratio. For large Ca , i.e. very deformable droplets, the particle has a stable equilibrium position at the center of the droplet. However, for smaller Ca , both the plane symmetry and the time invariance are broken and the particle migrates to a closed orbit located off the symmetry plane, reaching a limit cycle. For even smaller capillary numbers, the time invariance is restored and the particle reaches a steady equilibrium position off the symmetry plane. This series of bifurcations is analyzed and possible physical mechanisms from which they originate are discussed. Financial support by ERC Grant SimCoMiCs 280117 is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Elastic modulus of SiCw/6061Al alloy composites as-squeeze-cast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜传海; 吴建生; 王德尊

    2001-01-01

    By using the system of image analyzer connected with scanning electron microscope, the whisker orientation in the SiCw/6061Al alloy composite as-squeeze-cast was measured. According to the shear lag model and the actual distribution function of whisker in composite, the inhomogeneity of elastic modulus in composite was analyzed. With the method of ultrasonic velocity, the elastic modulus of composite was measured. The results showed that, the whiskers of composite are preferred in an orientation normal to the direction of squeeze cast. The higher the volume fraction of whisker, the more extent of preferred orientation of it, and the inhomogeneity of elastic modulus is mainly due to the differences of whisker distribution in composite.

  7. Effects of SBS Configuration on Performance of High Modulus Bitumen Based on Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available High modulus bitumens modified by polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS with different molecular structure were investigated on dynamic shear rheometer and fluorescence microscopy to evaluate viscoelastic properties and morphology of binders. The results shows that storage modulus (G’ is obviously less than loss modulus (G”, which means viscous behaviour of bitumen is dominant, and anti-rutting factor (G* ⁄ sin δ is markedly enhanced by star SBS than by linear SBS. The morphology indicated that star SBS improved the softening point more obviously, tending to form a cross-linked network in bitumen. As for linear SBS, it is dispersed in bitumen in the form of globules and enhances the ductility of binder.

  8. A spherical cavity expansion model for penetration of ogival-nosed projectiles into concrete targets with shear-dilatancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao He; He-Ming Wen; Xiao-Jun Guo

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic spherical cavity-expansion penetration model is suggested herein to predict the penetration and perforation of concrete targets struck normally by ogivalnosed projectiles.Shear dilatancy as well as compressibility of the material in comminuted region are considered in the paper by introducing a dilatant-kinematic relation.A procedure is first presented to compute the radial stress at the cavity surface and then a numerical method is used to calculate the results of penetration and perforation with friction being taken into account.The influences of various target parameters such as shear strength,bulk modulus,density,Poisson's ratio and tensile strength on the depth of penetration are delineated.It is shown that the model predictions are in good agreement with available experimental data.It is also shown that the shear strength plays a dominant role in the target resistance to penetration.

  9. Shear Wave Measurements for Evaluation of Tendon Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chia-Lun; Kuo, Po-Ling; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Brum, Javier; Tanter, Mickael; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigated the feasibility of using supersonic shear wave measurements to quantitatively differentiate normal and damaged tendons based on their mechanical properties. Five freshly harvested porcine tendons excised from pig legs were used. Tendon damage was induced by incubating the tendons with a 1% w/v collagenase solution. Values of shear modulus were derived both by a time-of-flight (TOF) approach and a transverse isotropic plate model (TI-model). The results show that as the preload applied to the tendon increased from 0 to 3 N, the mean shear modulus derived based on the TOF approach, the TI-model, and Young's modulus estimated from mechanical testing increased from 14.6 to 89.9 kPa, 53.9 to 348 kPa, and from 1.45 to 10.36 MPa, respectively, in untreated tendons, and from 8.4 to 67 kPa, 28 to 258 kPa, and from 0.93 to 7.2 MPa in collagenase-treated tendons. Both the TOF approach and the TI-model correlated well with the changes in Young's modulus. Although there is bias on the estimation of shear modulus using the TOF approach, it still provides statistical significance to differentiate normal and damaged tendons. Our data indicate that supersonic shear wave imaging is a valuable imaging technique to assess tendon stiffness dynamics and characterize normal and collagenase-damaged tendons.

  10. CALCULATION OF THE YOUNG'S MODULUS OF AN ADSORBED POLYMER LAYER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rüdiger Stark; Michael Kappl; Hans-Jürgen Butt

    2007-01-01

    Polymer layers adsorbed to a surface or in a confined environment often change their mechanical properties. There is even the possibility of solidification of the confined layer. To judge the stiffness of such a layer, we used the Hertz model to calculate the Young's modulus of the polymer layer in the confinement of AFM experiments with silicon nitride tip with a radius of curvature of R ≈ 50 nm and a glass sphere attached to the cantilever R = 5 μm. Since there is no visible indentation of the layer in the AFM experiments, the layer is either penetrated very easily, or the indentation is too small to be seen in a force curve. The latter would be the case for a polymer layer with a Young's modulus above 4×108 Pa in case of an experiment with a silicon nitride tip and 4×105 Pa in case of a glass sphere.

  11. Effect of particle size and distribution of the sizing agent on the carbon fibers surface and interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of its composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R.L. [Open Project of State Key Laboratory Breeding Base for Mining Disaster Prevention and Control, Shandong University of Science and Technology (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, 266590 Qingdao (China); Liu, Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, 266590 Qingdao (China); Huang, Y.D., E-mail: rlzhit@126.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, State Key laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 Harbin (China); Liu, L. [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, State Key laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 Harbin (China)

    2013-12-15

    Effect of particle size and distribution of the sizing agent on the performance of carbon fiber and carbon fiber composites has been investigated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize carbon fiber surface topographies. At the same time, the single fiber strength and Weibull distribution were also studied in order to investigate the effect of coatings on the fibers. The interfacial shear strength and hygrothermal aging of the carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites were also measured. The results indicated that the particle size and distribution is important for improving the surface of carbon fibers and its composites performance. Different particle size and distribution of sizing agent has different contribution to the wetting performance of carbon fibers. The fibers sized with P-2 had higher value of IFSS and better hygrothermal aging resistant properties.

  12. Three dimensional shear wave velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in South China Sea and its adjacent regions by surface waveform inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We assembled approximately 328 seismic records. The data set wasfrom 4 digitally recording long-period and broadband stations of CDSN. We carried out the inversion based on the partitioned waveform inversion (PWI). It partitions the large-scale optimization problem into a number of independent small-scale problems. We adopted surface waveform inversion with an equal block (2°′2°) discretization in order to acquire the images of shear velocity structure at different depths (from surface to 430 km) in the crust and upper-mantle. The resolution of all these anomalies has been established with 2check-board2 resolution tests. These results show significant difference in velocity, lithosphere and asthenosphere structure between South China Sea and its adjacent regions.

  13. Probing the adhesion of particles to responsive polymer coatings with hydrodynamic shear stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Ryan; Efe, Gulnur

    2015-03-01

    Lower critical solution temperature (LCST) polymers in confined geometries have found success in applications that benefit from reversible modulation of surface properties, including drug delivery, separations, tissue cultures, and chromatography. In this talk, we present the adhesion of polystyrene microspheres to cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), or poly(NIPAAm) coatings, as studied with a spinning disk method. This method applies a linear range of hydrodynamic shear forces to physically adsorbed microspheres along the radius of a coated disk. Quantification of detachment is accomplished by optical microscopy to evaluate the minimum shear stress to remove adherent particles. Experiments were performed to assess the relationship between the surface chemistry of the microsphere, the thickness and cross-link density of the poly(NIPAAm) coating, the adsorption (or incubation) time, and the temperature on the detachment profiles of the microspheres. Results show that both the shear modulus and slow dynamic processes in the poly(NIPAAm) films strongly influence the detachment shear stresses. Moreover, whether an adsorbed microsphere can be released (through a modulation in the swelling of the poly(NIPAAm) coating by temperature) depends on both the surface chemistry of the microsphere and the extent of the adsorption time. Finally, the results show that the structure of the poly(NIPAAm) coating can significantly affect performance, which may explain several of the conflicting findings that have been reported in the literature.

  14. Ultra-high Modulus Nano-Fluoroelastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, David H.

    2004-03-01

    The cross-linking densities, glass transition temperatures, and physical properties of fluoroelastomers filled with a nanometer-size particle have been determined as a function of filler concentration and co-solvent using both dry and wet filler incorporation methodologies. Addition of alcohol to the casting solvent such as methyl isobutyl ketone results in about a factor of 1.5-3 increase in elastic modulus for elastomer of the same filler concentration. It is discovered that a properly prepared nano-fluoroelastomer can exhibit as much as a two-order-of-magnitude increase in elastic modulus as the filler concentration increases from zero to 35 parts per hundred of rubber (phr) by weight while the glass transition temperature does not change substantially with filler concentration. The effect of cross-linking density on the elastic modulus for these materials will be discussed in this paper.

  15. Revisiting Fermat's Factorization for the RSA Modulus

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Sounak

    2009-01-01

    We revisit Fermat's factorization method for a positive integer $n$ that is a product of two primes $p$ and $q$. Such an integer is used as the modulus for both encryption and decryption operations of an RSA cryptosystem. The security of RSA relies on the hardness of factoring this modulus. As a consequence of our analysis, two variants of Fermat's approach emerge. We also present a comparison between the two methods' effective regions. Though our study does not yield a new state-of-the-art algorithm for integer factorization, we believe that it reveals some interesting observations that are open for further analysis.

  16. High-resolution shear-wave seismic reflection as a tool to image near-surface subrosion structures - a case study in Bad Frankenhausen, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja H.; Polom, Ulrich; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2016-10-01

    Subrosion is the subsurface leaching of soluble rocks that results in the formation of depression and collapse structures. This global phenomenon is a geohazard in urban areas. To study near-surface subrosion structures, four shear-wave seismic reflection profiles, with a total length of ca. 332 m, were carried out around the famous leaning church tower of Bad Frankenhausen in northern Thuringia, Germany, which shows an inclination of 4.93° from the vertical. Most of the geological underground of Thuringia is characterized by soluble Permian deposits, and the Kyffhäuser Southern Margin Fault is assumed to be a main pathway for water to leach the evaporite. The seismic profiles were acquired with the horizontal micro-vibrator ELVIS, developed at Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics (LIAG), and a 72 m long landstreamer equipped with 72 horizontal geophones. The high-resolution seismic sections show subrosion-induced structures to a depth of ca. 100 m and reveal five features associated with the leaching of Permian deposits: (1) lateral and vertical varying reflection patterns caused by strongly heterogeneous strata, (2) discontinuous reflectors, small offsets, and faults, which show the underground is heavily fractured, (3) formation of depression structures in the near-surface, (4) diffractions in the unmigrated seismic sections that indicate increased scattering of the seismic waves, and (5) varying seismic velocities and low-velocity zones that are presumably caused by fractures and upward-migrating cavities. A previously undiscovered southward-dipping listric normal fault was also found, to the north of the church. It probably serves as a pathway for water to leach the Permian formations below the church and causes the tilting of the church tower. This case study shows the potential of horizontal shear-wave seismic reflection to image near-surface subrosion structures in an urban environment with a horizontal resolution of less than 1 m in the uppermost 10

  17. Investigation to determine the vulnerability of reclaimed land to building collapse using near surface geophysical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewoyin, O. O.; Joshua, E. O.; Akinyemi, M. L.; Omeje, M.; Joel, E. S.

    2017-05-01

    Adequate knowledge of the geology and the structures of the subsurface would assist engineers in the best way to carry out constructions to avoid building collapse. In this study, near surface seismic refraction method was used to determine the geotechnical parameters of the subsurface, the results obtained were correlated with the result of borehole data drilled in the study area. The results of seismic refraction method delineated mostly two distinct layers with the first layer having the lower geotechnical parameters. It was observed that in the first layer, the Young’s modulus ranged from 0.168 to 0.458 GPa, shear modulus ranged between 0.068 and 0.185 GPa, the bulk modulus ranged between 0.106 and 0.287 GPa while the bearing capacity ranged from 0.083 to 0.139 MPa. On the other hand, in the second layer, the Young’s modulus ranged between 3.717 and 7.018 GPa, shear modulus ranged from 1.500 to 2.830 GPa while the bulk modulus ranged from 2.383 to 4.449 GPa. Significantly, the formation of the second layer appeared to be more competent than the first layer, therefore engineering construction in this geological setting is recommended to be founded on the second layer at depth ranging between 7 and 16 m.

  18. The Influence of Abutment Surface Treatment and the Type of Luting Cement on Shear Bond Strength between Titanium/Cement/Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Śmielak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the shear bond strength of zirconia cylinders on a modified titanium surface using different luting cement types. Material and Methods. Eighty titanium disks were divided into two groups (n=40, which were treated with either grinding or a combination of sandblasting and grinding. Then, each group was subdivided into 4 groups (n=10 and the disks were bonded to disks of sintered zirconia using one of four cement types (permanent: composite cement; temporary: polycarboxylate cement, zinc-oxide-eugenol cement, and resin cement. Shear bond strength (SBS was measured in a universal testing machine. Fracture pattern and site characteristic were recorded. A fractographic analysis was performed with SEM. The chemical analysis of the composition of the fractures was performed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The results of the experiment were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test. Results. The highest mean values of SBS were achieved when grinding was combined with sandblasting and when composite cement was used (18.18 MPa. In the temporary cement group, the highest mean values of SBS were for polycarboxylate cement after grinding (3.57 MPa. Conclusion. The choice of cement has a crucial influence on the titanium-cement-zirconia interface quality.

  19. Fluid Effects on Shear for Seismic Waves in Finely Layered Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J G

    2004-07-22

    Although there are five effective shear moduli for any layered VTI medium, one and only one effective shear modulus of the layered system (namely the uniaxial shear) contains all the dependence of pore fluids on the elastic or poroelastic constants that can be observed in vertically polarized shear waves. Pore fluids can increase the magnitude the shear energy stored in this modulus by an amount that ranges from the smallest to the largest effective shear moduli of the VTI system. But, since there are five shear moduli in play, the overall increase in shear energy due to fluids is reduced by a factor of about 5 in general. We can therefore give definite bounds on the maximum increase of overall shear modulus, being about 20% of the allowed range as liquid is fully substituted for gas. An attendant increase of density (depending on porosity and fluid density) by approximately 5 to 10% decreases the shear wave speed and, thereby, partially offsets the effect of this shear modulus increase. The final result is an increase of shear wave speed on the order of 5 to 10%. This increase is shown to be possible under most favorable circumstances - i.e. when the shear modulus fluctuations are large (resulting in strong anisotropy) and the medium behaves in an undrained fashion due to fluid trapping. At frequencies higher than seismic (such as sonic and ultrasonic waves for well-logging or laboratory experiments), resulting short response times also produce the requisite undrained behavior and, therefore, fluids also affect shear waves at high frequencies by increasing rigidity.

  20. Review of the Shearing Process for Sheet Steels and Its Effect on Sheared-Edge Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, B. S.; Van Tyne, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    Failure in sheared-edge stretching often limits the use of advanced high-strength steel sheets in automotive applications. The present study analyzes data in the literature from laboratory experiments on both the shearing process and the characteristics of sheared edges. Shearing produces a surface with regions of rollover, burnish, fracture, and burr. The effect of clearance and tensile strength on the shear face characteristics is quantified. Higher strength, lower ductility steels exhibit an increase in percent fracture region. The shearing process also creates a zone of deformation adjacent to the shear face called the shear-affected zone (SAZ). From an analysis of data in the literature, it is concluded that deformation in the SAZ is the dominant factor in controlling failure during sheared-edge stretching. The characteristics of the shear face are generally important for failures during sheared-edge stretching only as there is a correlation between the characteristics of the shear face and the characteristics of the SAZ. The effect of the shear burr on shear-edge stretching is also related to a correlation with the characteristics of the SAZ. In reviewing the literature, many shearing variables that could affect sheared-edge stretching limits are not identified or if identified, not quantified. It is likely that some of these variables could affect subsequent sheared-edge stretching limits.

  1. Active Control of Shear Thickening in Suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Neil Y C; Cates, Michael E; Sun, Jin; Cohen, Itai

    2016-01-01

    Shear thickening, an increase of viscosity with shear rate, is a ubiquitous phenomena in suspended materials that has implications for broad technological applications. Controlling this thickening behavior remains a major challenge and has led to empirical strategies ranging from altering the particle surfaces and shape to modifying the solvent properties. However, none of these methods allow for active control of flow properties during shear itself. Here, we demonstrate that by strategic imposition of a high-frequency and low-amplitude shear perturbation orthogonal to the primary shearing flow, we can largely eradicate shear thickening. The orthogonal shear effectively becomes a regulator for controlling thickening in the suspension, allowing the viscosity to be reduced by up to two decades on demand. In a separate setup, we show that such effects can be induced by simply agitating the sample transversely to the primary shear direction. Overall, the ability of in situ manipulation of shear thickening paves a...

  2. Loading Rate for Modulus of Rupture Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QUMing; ZHANGYong-fang

    1996-01-01

    Relationship among load rate,strain rate and stress rate for modulus of ruptue test,the way of applying load with stress rate using both hydraulic compression testing machine and nechanical compression testing machine have been described.The test results are identical with selected strain rate loading and stress rate loading.

  3. Elastic modulus of cetacean auditory ossicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubelli, Andrew A; Zosuls, Aleks; Ketten, Darlene R; Mountain, David C

    2014-05-01

    In order to model the hearing capabilities of marine mammals (cetaceans), it is necessary to understand the mechanical properties, such as elastic modulus, of the middle ear bones in these species. Biologically realistic models can be used to investigate the biomechanics of hearing in cetaceans, much of which is currently unknown. In the present study, the elastic moduli of the auditory ossicles (malleus, incus, and stapes) of eight species of cetacean, two baleen whales (mysticete) and six toothed whales (odontocete), were measured using nanoindentation. The two groups of mysticete ossicles overall had lower average elastic moduli (35.2 ± 13.3 GPa and 31.6 ± 6.5 GPa) than the groups of odontocete ossicles (53.3 ± 7.2 GPa to 62.3 ± 4.7 GPa). Interior bone generally had a higher modulus than cortical bone by up to 36%. The effects of freezing and formalin-fixation on elastic modulus were also investigated, although samples were few and no clear trend could be discerned. The high elastic modulus of the ossicles and the differences in the elastic moduli between mysticetes and odontocetes are likely specializations in the bone for underwater hearing.

  4. Determination of Young's modulus by nanoindentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Dejun; Chung Wo Ong; LIU Jianmin; HE Jiawen

    2004-01-01

    A methodology for determining Young's modulus of materials by non-ideally sharp indentation has been developed. According to the principle of the same area-to-depth ratio, a non-ideally pyramidal indenter like a Berkovich one can be approximated by a non-ideally conical indenter with a spherical cap at the tip. By applying dimensional and finite element analysis to the non-ideally conical indentation, a set of approximate one-to-one relationships between the ratio of nominal hardness/reduced Young's modulus and the ratio of elastic work/total work, which correspond to different tip bluntness, have been revealed. The nominal hardness is defined as the maximum indentation load divided by the cross-section area of the conical indenter specified at the maximum indentation depth. As a consequence, Young's modulus can be determined from a nanoindentation test only using the maximum indentation load and depth, and the work done during loading and unloading processes. The new method for determining Young's modulus is referred to as "pure energy method". The validity of the method was examined by performing indentation tests on five materials. The experimental results and the standard reference values are in good agreement, indicating that the proposed pure energy method is a promising substitution for the most widely used analysis models at present.

  5. Lateral shear interferometry with holo shear lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joenathan, C.; Mohanty, R. K.; Sirohi, R. S.

    1984-12-01

    A simple method for obtaining lateral shear using holo shear lenses (HSL) has been discussed. This simple device which produces lateral shears in the orthogonal directions has been used for lens testing. The holo shear lens is placed at or near the focus of the lens to be tested. It has also been shown that HSL can be used in speckle shear interferometry as it performs both the functions of shearing and imaging.

  6. Viscosity of dilute suspensions of rigid bead arrays at low shear: accounting for the variation in hydrodynamic stress over the bead surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Stuart A; Pei, Hongxia

    2009-06-11

    In this work, we examine the viscosity of a dilute suspension of irregularly shaped particles at low shear. A particle is modeled as a rigid array of nonoverlapping beads of variable size and geometry. Starting from a boundary element formalism, approximate account is taken of the variation in hydrodynamic stress over the surface of the individual beads. For a touching dimer of two identical beads, the predicted viscosity is lower than the exact value by 5.2%. The methodology is then applied to several other model systems including tetramers of variable conformation and linear strings of touching beads. An analysis is also carried out of the viscosity and translational diffusion of several dilute amino acids and diglycine in water. It is concluded that continuum hydrodynamic modeling with stick boundary conditions is unable to account for the experimental viscosity and diffusion data simultaneously. A model intermediate between "stick" and "slip" could possibly reconcile theory and experiment.

  7. Shear viscoelastic properties of liquids and their boundary layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badmaev, Badma B; Dembelova, Tuyana S; Damdinov, Bair B

    2003-07-01

    An acoustical resonance method with piezoquartz vibrator was used in the experimental determination of shear elasticity modulus and a tangent of mechanical loss angle of studied liquids and their boundary layers. It has been shown that liquid has an earlier unknown low frequency (approx. 100 kHz) viscoelastic relaxation process. The experimental results of investigation of low frequency shear elasticity of different class of liquids and their solutions have been presented. An experimental research of shear properties in dependence on shear deformation rate has been carried out. The possibility of the discovery of anomalous high viscosity of liquids has also been considered.

  8. Some Modulus and Normal Structure in Banach Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanfei Zuo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present some sufficient conditions for which a Banach space X has normal structure in terms of the modulus of U-convexity, modulus of W∗-convexity, and the coefficient R(1,X, which generalized some well-known results. Furthermore the relationship between modulus of convexity, modulus of smoothness, and Gao's constant is considered, meanwhile the exact value of Milman modulus has been obtained for some Banach space.

  9. Geometrical modulus of a casting and its influence on solidification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Havlicek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Object: The work analyses the importance of the known criterion for evaluating the controlled solidification of castings, so called geometrical modulus defined by N. Chvorinov as the first one. Geometrical modulus influences the solidification process. The modulus has such specificity that during the process of casting formation it is not a constant but its initial value decreases with the solidification progress because the remaining melt volume can decrease faster than its cooling surface.Methodology: The modulus is determined by a simple calculation from the ratio of the casting volume after pouring the metal in the mould to the cooled mould surface. The solidified metal volume and the cooled surface too are changed during solidification. That calculation is much more complicated. Results were checked up experimentally by measuring the temperatures in the cross-section of heavy steel castings during cooling them.Results: The given experimental results have completed the original theoretical calculations by Chvorinov and recent researches done with use of numerical calculations. The contribution explains how the geometrical modulus together with the thermal process in the casting causes the higher solidification rate in the axial part of the casting cross-section and shortening of solidification time. Practical implications: Change of the geometrical modulus negatively affects the casting internal quality. Melt feeding by capillary filtration in the dendritic network in the casting central part decreases and in such a way the shrinkage porosity volume increases. State of stress character in the casting is changed too and it increases.

  10. Analysis of localized shear deformation of ductile metal based on gradient-dependent plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学滨; 代树红; 海龙; 潘一山

    2003-01-01

    Shear localization in linear strain softening heterogeneous material under simple shear was investigated analytically.The closed-form solutions obtained based on gradient plasticity theory considering interactions and interplaying among microstructures due to heterogeneity of metal material show that in the normal direction of shear band,elastic shear displacement is linear; while plastic and total shear displacement are non-linear.Elastic shear strain in the band is uniform and the non-uniformity of total shear displacement stems from localized plastic shear displacement.In the center of the band,plastic and total shear displacement all reach their maximum values.In strain-softening process,elastic displacement decreases as flow shear stress decreases.Contrarily,plastic and total shear displacement increase and manifest shear localization occurs progressively.Under the same shear stress level,plastic and total shear displacement increase as strain softening modulus and elastic shear modulus decrease.The present analytical solutions were compared with many experimental results and the agreement is good.

  11. Modulus reconstruction from prostate ultrasound images using finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhennan; Zhang, Shaoting; Alam, S. Kaisar; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; Garra, Brian S.; Feleppa, Ernest J.

    2012-03-01

    In medical diagnosis, use of elastography is becoming increasingly more useful. However, treatments usually assume a planar compression applied to tissue surfaces and measure the deformation. The stress distribution is relatively uniform close to the surface when using a large, flat compressor but it diverges gradually along tissue depth. Generally in prostate elastography, the transrectal probes used for scanning and compression are cylindrical side-fire or rounded end-fire probes, and the force is applied through the rectal wall. These make it very difficult to detect cancer in prostate, since the rounded contact surfaces exaggerate the non-uniformity of the applied stress, especially for the distal, anterior prostate. We have developed a preliminary 2D Finite Element Model (FEM) to simulate prostate deformation in elastography. The model includes a homogeneous prostate with a stiffer tumor in the proximal, posterior region of the gland. A force is applied to the rectal wall to deform the prostate, strain and stress distributions can be computed from the resultant displacements. Then, we assume the displacements as boundary condition and reconstruct the modulus distribution (inverse problem) using linear perturbation method. FEM simulation shows that strain and strain contrast (of the lesion) decrease very rapidly with increasing depth and lateral distance. Therefore, lesions would not be clearly visible if located far away from the probe. However, the reconstructed modulus image can better depict relatively stiff lesion wherever the lesion is located.

  12. Shear Wave Velocity Profiles Determined from Surface Wave Measurements at Sites Affected by the August 15th, 2007 Earthquake in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblad, B. L.; Bay, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    The shear wave velocity (Vs) profile of near-surface soils is a critical parameter for understanding recorded ground motions and predicting local site effects in an earthquake. In structural design, the Vs profile in the top 30 m is used to modify design response spectra to account for local soil effects. In addition, knowledge of the near- surface Vs profile at strong motion stations can be used to account for changes in frequency content and amplification caused by the local site conditions. Following the August 15th, 2007 earthquake in Peru, a field testing program was performed to measure Vs profiles in the top 20 to 30 m at twenty-two locations in the affected region. The measurements were performed primarily at the sites of damaged school buildings but were also performed at several strong motion station sites as well as a few locations where evidence of soil liquefaction was observed. Nineteen of the sites were located in the severely affected cities of Chincha, Ica, Pisco and Tambo de Mora, with the remaining three sites located in, Lima, Palpa and Paracus. The Vs profiles were determined from surface wave velocity measurements performed with an impact source. The objective of this paper is to present and discuss the range of Vs profile conditions encountered in the regions affected by the Pisco-Peru earthquake. In the city of Ica, the profiles generally exhibited gradually increasing velocities with depth, with velocities which rarely exceeded 400 m/s in the top 30 m. In contrast, the profiles measured in Pisco, often exhibited strong, shallow velocity contrasts with Vs increasing from less than 200 m/s at the surface to over 600 m/s at some sites. The profiles measured in Chincha generally fell in between the ranges measured in Ica and Pisco. Lastly, soil liquefaction was evident throughout Tambo de Mora on the coast of Peru. Measurements indicated very low shear wave velocities of 75 to 125 m/s in the top 4 m, which is consistent with the observed

  13. The amphoteric effect on friction between the bovine cartilage/cartilage surfaces under slightly sheared hydration lubrication mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Zenon; Gadomski, Adam; Sojka, Michal; Urbaniak, Wieslaw; Bełdowski, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    The amphoteric effect on the friction between the bovine cartilage/cartilage contacts has been found to be highly sensitive to the pH of an aqueous solution. The cartilage surface was characterized using a combination of the pH, wettability, as well as the interfacial energy and friction coefficient testing methods to support lamellar-repulsive mechanism of hydration lubrication. It has been confirmed experimentally that phospholipidic multi-bilayers are essentially described as lamellar frictionless lubricants protecting the surface of the joints against wear. At the hydrophilicity limit, the low friction would then be due to (a) lamellar slippage of bilayers and (b) a short-range (nanometer-scale) repulsion between the interfaces of negatively charged (PO4(-)) cartilage surfaces, and in addition, contribution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) collagen fibers, hyaluronate, proteoglycans aggregates (PGs), glycoprotein termed lubricin and finally, lamellar PLs phases. In this paper we demonstrate experimentally that the pH sensitivity of cartilage to friction provides a novel concept in joint lubrication on charged surfaces.

  14. Surface Structure of Hydrogenated Diamond-like Carbon: Origin of Run-In Behavior Prior to Superlubricious Interfacial Shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Azizi, Ala A; Eryilmaz, Osman; Erdemir, Ali; Kim, Seong H.

    2015-01-01

    The oxidized layers at the surface of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (H-DLC) were studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure, and Raman spectroscopy. The structure of these layers was correlated with the friction and wear behavior observed on H-DLC. H-DLC is well-known for its ultralow friction in inert environments, but the steady superlubricious state is always preceded by a run-in period with a high friction. It was hypothesized that the run-in period is related to the surface oxide layer formed naturally upon exposure of the sample to air. To test this hypothesis, thermal oxide layers were grown, and their structures were analyzed and compared with the native oxide layer on a pristine sample. It was found that the Raman spectra of the surface oxide layers of H-DLC have higher D/G band ratio than the bulk, indicating a larger amount of aromatic clusters compared to the bulk film. Thick oxide layers grown at 300 °C showed a run-in friction behavior that resembled the friction of graphite. The run-in periods were found to become longer when the thickness of the oxide layers increased, indicating that the run-in behavior of H-DLC is attributed to the removal of the surface oxide layers.

  15. Elastic bending modulus of monolayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Qiang; Huang Rui [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Arroyo, Marino [Department of Applied Mathematics 3, LaCaN, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Barcelona 08034 (Spain)

    2009-05-21

    An analytic formula is derived for the elastic bending modulus of monolayer graphene based on an empirical potential for solid-state carbon atoms. Two physical origins are identified for the non-vanishing bending stiffness of the atomically thin graphene sheet, one due to the bond-angle effect and the other resulting from the bond-order term associated with the dihedral angles. The analytical prediction compares closely with ab initio energy calculations. Pure bending of graphene monolayers into cylindrical tubes is simulated by a molecular mechanics approach, showing slight nonlinearity and anisotropy in the tangent bending modulus as the bending curvature increases. An intrinsic coupling between bending and in-plane strain is noted for graphene monolayers rolled into carbon nanotubes. (fast track communication)

  16. Microscopic origin of volume modulus inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicoli, Michele [ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna, via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Muia, Francesco [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna, via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Pedro, Francisco Gil [Departamento de Fisica Teórica UAM and Instituto de Fisica Teórica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-21

    High-scale string inflationary models are in well-known tension with low-energy supersymmetry. A promising solution involves models where the inflaton is the volume of the extra dimensions so that the gravitino mass relaxes from large values during inflation to smaller values today. We describe a possible microscopic origin of the scalar potential of volume modulus inflation by exploiting non-perturbative effects, string loop and higher derivative perturbative corrections to the supergravity effective action together with contributions from anti-branes and charged hidden matter fields. We also analyse the relation between the size of the flux superpotential and the position of the late-time minimum and the inflection point around which inflation takes place. We perform a detailed study of the inflationary dynamics for a single modulus and a two moduli case where we also analyse the sensitivity of the cosmological observables on the choice of initial conditions.

  17. Microscopic Origin of Volume Modulus Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Cicoli, Michele; Pedro, Francisco Gil

    2015-01-01

    High-scale string inflationary models are in well-known tension with low-energy supersymmetry. A promising solution involves models where the inflaton is the volume of the extra dimensions so that the gravitino mass relaxes from large values during inflation to smaller values today. We describe a possible microscopic origin of the scalar potential of volume modulus inflation by exploiting non-perturbative effects, string loop and higher derivative perturbative corrections to the supergravity effective action together with contributions from anti-branes and charged hidden matter fields. We also analyse the relation between the size of the flux superpotential and the position of the late-time minimum and the inflection point around which inflation takes place. We perform a detailed study of the inflationary dynamics for a single modulus and a two moduli case where we also analyse the sensitivity of the cosmological observables on the choice of initial conditions.

  18. Fibonacci difference sequence spaces for modulus functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldip Raj

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we introduce Fibonacci difference sequence spaces l(F, Ƒ, p, u and  l_∞(F, Ƒ, p, u by using a sequence of modulus functions and a new band matrix F. We also make an effort to study some inclusion relations, topological and geometric properties of these spaces. Furthermore, the alpha, beta, gamma duals and matrix transformation of the space l(F, Ƒ, p, u are determined.

  19. Effects of constitutive parameters on adiabatic shear localization for ductile metal based on JOHNSON-COOK and gradient plasticity models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue-bin

    2006-01-01

    By using the widely used JOHNSON-COOK model and the gradient-dependent plasticity to consider microstmctural effect beyond the occurrence of shear strain localization, the distributions of local plastic shear strain and deformation in adiabatic shear band(ASB) were analyzed. The peak local plastic shear strain is proportional to the average plastic shear strain, while it is inversely proportional to the critical plastic shear strain corresponding to the peak flow shear stress. The relative plastic shear deformation between the top and base of ASB depends on the thickness of ASB and the average plastic shear strain. A parametric study was carried out to study the influence of constitutive parameters on shear strain localization. Higher values of static shear strength and work to heat conversion factor lead to lower critical plastic shear strain so that the shear localization is more apparent at the same average plastic shear strain. Higher values of strain-hardening exponent, strain rate sensitive coefficient, melting point,thermal capacity and mass density result in higher critical plastic shear strain, leading to less apparent shear localization at the same average plastic shear strain. The strain rate sensitive coefficient has a minor influence on the critical plastic shear strain, the distributions of local plastic shear strain and deformation in ASB. The effect of strain-hardening modulus on the critical plastic shear strain is not monotonous. When the maximum critical plastic shear strain is reached, the least apparent shear localization occurs.

  20. Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps and three-dimensional shear velocity structure of the western US from local non-plane surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.F.; Snoke, J. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    We utilize two-and-three-quarter years of vertical-component recordings made by the Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope to constrain three-dimensional (3-D) seismic shear wave velocity structure in the upper 200 km of the western United States. Single-taper spectral estimation is used to compile measurements of complex spectral amplitudes from 44 317 seismograms generated by 123 teleseismic events. In the first step employed to determine the Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity structure, we implement a new tomographic method, which is simpler and more robust than scattering-based methods (e.g. multi-plane surface wave tomography). The TA is effectively implemented as a large number of local arrays by defining a horizontal Gaussian smoothing distance that weights observations near a given target point. The complex spectral-amplitude measurements are interpreted with the spherical Helmholtz equation using local observations about a succession of target points, resulting in Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods over the range of 18–125 s. The derived maps depend on the form of local fits to the Helmholtz equation, which generally involve the nonplane-wave solutions of Friederich et al. In a second step, the phase-velocity maps are used to derive 3-D shear velocity structure. The 3-D velocity images confirm details witnessed in prior body-wave and surface-wave studies and reveal new structures, including a deep (>100 km deep) high-velocity lineament, of width ∼200 km, stretching from the southern Great Valley to northern Utah that may be a relic of plate subduction or, alternatively, either a remnant of the Mojave Precambrian Province or a mantle downwelling. Mantle seismic velocity is highly correlated with heat flow, Holocene volcanism, elastic plate thickness and seismicity. This suggests that shallow mantle structure provides the heat source for associated magmatism, as well as thinning of the thermal lithosphere, leading to relatively high

  1. Buckling Analysis of Functionally Graded Material Plates Using Higher Order Shear Deformation Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sidda Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prime aim of the present study is to present analytical formulations and solutions for the buckling analysis of simply supported functionally graded plates (FGPs using higher order shear deformation theory (HSDT without enforcing zero transverse shear stresses on the top and bottom surfaces of the plate. It does not require shear correction factors and transverse shear stresses vary parabolically across the thickness. Material properties of the plate are assumed to vary in the thickness direction according to a power law distribution in terms of the volume fractions of the constituents. The equations of motion and boundary conditions are derived using the principle of virtual work. Solutions are obtained for FGPs in closed-form using Navier’s technique. Comparison studies are performed to verify the validity of the present results from which it can be concluded that the proposed theory is accurate and efficient in predicting the buckling behavior of functionally graded plates. The effect of side-to-thickness ratio, aspect ratio, modulus ratio, the volume fraction exponent, and the loading conditions on the critical buckling load of FGPs is also investigated and discussed.

  2. Actuating properties of soft gels with ordered iron particles: basis for a shear actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yuxian; Shaw, Montgomery T.

    2003-04-01

    Soft electrorheological (ER) gels were prepared by arranging iron particles in silicone prepolymers within magnetic fields and crosslinking the obtained structure. The gap between the particles, and consequently the conductivity, was controlled by swelling the crosslinked material with additional silicone prepolymer. Iron-particle chains were made with as little as 0.5% particles and at angles from 0° to 60° to the normal of the sample surface. The ER, transducing and actuating properties of these materials were explored using rheometry and dielectrometry. In general, the dynamic shear moduli of the aligned ER gels increased quadratically with the electric field intensity. With only 1 vol% particles, the modulus doubled to an electrical field of around 2 kV mm-1. Transducer and actuator properties were noted. With particle chain alignment of 30°, shear stresses of around 150 Pa were measured with a special sandwich-type shear fixture. The influence of tilt angle on the shear stress was found to be qualitatively consistent with the calculation based on the point-dipole approximation.

  3. Shear jamming in highly strained granular system without shear banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yiqiu; Barés, Jonathan; Zheng, Hu; Behringer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Bi et al. have shown that, if sheared, a granular material can jam even if its packing fraction (ϕ) is lower than the critical isotropic jamming point ϕJ. They have introduced a new critical packing fraction value ϕS such that for ϕSjams if sheared. Nevertheless, the value of ϕS as a function of the shear profile or the strain necessary to observe jamming remain poorly understood because of the experimental complexity to access high strain without shear band. We present a novel 2D periodic shear apparatus made of 21 independent, aligned and mirrored glass rings. Each ring can be moved independently which permits us to impose any desired shear profile. The circular geometry allows access to any strain value. The forces between grains are measured using reflective photoelasticity. By performing different shear profiles for different packing fractions we explored the details of jamming diagram including the location of the yield surface. This work is supported by NSF No.DMR1206351, NASA No.NNX15AD38G and W. M. Keck Foundation.

  4. Emergent SO(3) Symmetry of the Frictionless Shear Jamming Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baity-Jesi, Marco; Goodrich, Carl P.; Liu, Andrea J.; Nagel, Sidney R.; Sethna, James P.

    2017-01-01

    We study the shear jamming of athermal frictionless soft spheres, and find that in the thermodynamic limit, a shear-jammed state exists with different elastic properties from the isotropically-jammed state. For example, shear-jammed states can have a non-zero residual shear stress in the thermodynamic limit that arises from long-range stress-stress correlations. As a result, the ratio of the shear and bulk moduli, which in isotropically-jammed systems vanishes as the jamming transition is approached from above, instead approaches a constant. Despite these striking differences, we argue that in a deeper sense, the shear jamming and isotropic jamming transitions actually have the same symmetry, and that the differences can be fully understood by rotating the six-dimensional basis of the elastic modulus tensor.

  5. The effect of various sandblasting conditions on surface changes of dental zirconia and shear bond strength between zirconia core and indirect composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Naichuan; Yue, Li; Liao, Yunmao; Liu, Wenjia; Zhang, Hai; Li, Xin; Wang, Hang; Shen, Jiefei

    2015-06-01

    To measure the surface loss of dental restorative zirconia and the short-term bond strength between an indirect composite resin (ICR) and zirconia ceramic after various sandblasting processes. Three hundred zirconia bars were randomly divided into 25 groups according to the type of sandblasting performed with pressures of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 MPa, sandblasting times of 7, 14 and 21 seconds, and alumina powder sizes of 50 and 110 µm. The control group did not receive sandblasting. The volume loss and height loss on zirconia surface after sandblasting and the shear bond strength (SBS) between the sandblasted zirconia and ICR after 24-h immersion were measured for each group using multivariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Least Significance Difference (LSD) test (α=.05). After sandblasting, the failure modes of the ICR/zirconia surfaces were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The volume loss and height loss were increased with higher sandblasting pressure and longer sandblasting treatment, but they decreased with larger powder size. SBS was significantly increased by increasing the sandblasting time from 7 seconds to 14 seconds and from 14 seconds to 21 seconds, as well as increasing the size of alumina powder from 50 µm to 110 µm. SBS was significantly increased from 0.1 MPa to 0.2 MPa according to the size of alumina powder. However, the SBSs were not significantly different with the sandblasting pressure of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 MPa. The possibilities of the combination of both adhesive failure and cohesive failure within the ICR were higher with the increases in bonding strength. Based on the findings of this study, sandblasting with alumina particles at 0.2 MPa, 21 seconds and the powder size of 110 µm is recommended for dental applications to improve the bonding between zirconia core and ICR.

  6. The effect of various sandblasting conditions on surface changes of dental zirconia and shear bond strength between zirconia core and indirect composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Naichuan; Yue, Li; Liao, Yunmao; Liu, Wenjia; Zhang, Hai; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To measure the surface loss of dental restorative zirconia and the short-term bond strength between an indirect composite resin (ICR) and zirconia ceramic after various sandblasting processes. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three hundred zirconia bars were randomly divided into 25 groups according to the type of sandblasting performed with pressures of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 MPa, sandblasting times of 7, 14 and 21 seconds, and alumina powder sizes of 50 and 110 µm. The control group did not receive sandblasting. The volume loss and height loss on zirconia surface after sandblasting and the shear bond strength (SBS) between the sandblasted zirconia and ICR after 24-h immersion were measured for each group using multivariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Least Significance Difference (LSD) test (α=.05). After sandblasting, the failure modes of the ICR/zirconia surfaces were observed using scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS The volume loss and height loss were increased with higher sandblasting pressure and longer sandblasting treatment, but they decreased with larger powder size. SBS was significantly increased by increasing the sandblasting time from 7 seconds to 14 seconds and from 14 seconds to 21 seconds, as well as increasing the size of alumina powder from 50 µm to 110 µm. SBS was significantly increased from 0.1 MPa to 0.2 MPa according to the size of alumina powder. However, the SBSs were not significantly different with the sandblasting pressure of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 MPa. The possibilities of the combination of both adhesive failure and cohesive failure within the ICR were higher with the increases in bonding strength. CONCLUSION Based on the findings of this study, sandblasting with alumina particles at 0.2 MPa, 21 seconds and the powder size of 110 µm is recommended for dental applications to improve the bonding between zirconia core and ICR. PMID:26140173

  7. New multitarget constant modulus array for CDMA systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jidong; Zheng Baoyu

    2006-01-01

    A new multitarget constant modulus array is proposed for CDMA systems based on least squares constant modulus algorithm. The new algorithm is called pre-despreading decision directed least squares constant modulus algorithm (DDDLSCMA). In the new algorithm, the pre-despreading is first applied for multitarget arrays to remove some multiple access signals, then the despreaded signal is processed by the algorithm which united the constant modulus algorithm and decision directed method. Simulation results illustrate the good performance for the proposed algorithm.

  8. An analysis of the contact phase of blood coagulation: effects of shear rate and surface are intertwined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, K; Basmadjian, D

    1994-01-01

    This work analyzes, for the first time, the combined role of blood flow, protein transport and the reaction network of the contact phase up to the "common pathway" of the blood coagulation cascade. The model is comprised of a set of 20 dominant reactions with 11 components. Systems of ODEs reducible to 4 coupled equations describe rigorously the dynamic behavior, while systems of algebraic equations, reducible to a single polynomial equation, model the steady state concentrations of the coagulants. The analysis showed that there is never more than one stable steady state. This is in contrast to the analysis of common pathway that gives rise to multiple concentration states. It also revealed a general robustness of the system to changes in procoagulant concentrations, inhibition rates and most activation rate constants. The system is largely impervious to the level of activated Factor XII, given that a trace (non-zero) level is present. In contrast, the system displays a dual response to flow and surface activity: A change in either of these factors alone can promote, have no effect on, or (in the case of flow) impede the progress of coagulation, depending on the value of the other factor. Their effects must therefore be examined in unison. These results may help resolve contradictory findings attributed to one or the other factor alone.

  9. Quantification of dry needling and posture effects on myofascial trigger points using ultrasound shear-wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Ruth M; Hayes, Dawn M; Shinohara, Minoru

    2013-11-01

    To determine (1) whether the shear modulus in upper trapezius muscle myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) reduces acutely after dry needling (DN), and (2) whether a change in posture from sitting to prone affects the shear modulus. Ultrasound images were acquired in B mode with a linear transducer oriented in the transverse plane, followed by performance of shear-wave elastography (SWE) before and after DN and while sitting and prone. University. Women (N=7; mean age ± SD, 46±17y) with palpable MTrPs were recruited. All participants were dry needled in the prone position using solid filament needles that were inserted and manipulated inside the MTrPs. SWE was performed before and after DN in the sitting and prone positions. MTrPs were evaluated by shear modulus using SWE. Palpable reductions in stiffness were noted after DN and in the prone position. These changes were apparent in the shear modulus map obtained with ultrasound SWE. With significant main effects, the shear modulus reduced from before to after DN (P<.01) and from the sitting to the prone position (P<.05). No significant interaction effect between time and posture was observed. The shear modulus measured with ultrasound SWE reduced after DN and in the prone position compared with sitting, in agreement with reductions in palpable stiffness. These findings suggest that DN and posture have significant effects on the shear modulus of MTrPs, and that shear modulus measurement with ultrasound SWE may be sensitive enough to detect these effects. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Real-time monitoring of methanol concentration using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor for direct methanol fuel cell without reference liquid measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Kyosuke; Nozawa, Takuya; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing demand for sensors that continuously measure liquid concentrations and detect abnormalities in liquid environments. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied for the continuous monitoring of liquid concentrations. As the SH-SAW sensor functions using the relative measurement method, it normally needs a reference at each measurement. However, if the sensor is installed in a liquid flow cell, it is difficult to measure a reference liquid. Therefore, it is important to establish an estimation method for liquid concentrations using the SH-SAW sensor without requiring a reference measurement. In this study, the SH-SAW sensor is installed in a direct methanol fuel cell to monitor the methanol concentration. The estimated concentration is compared with a conventional density meter. Moreover, the effect of formic acid is examined. When the fuel temperature is higher than 70 °C, it is necessary to consider the influence of liquid conductivity. Here, an estimation method for these cases is also proposed.

  11. High-resolution calculation of the solar global convection with the reduced speed of sound technique: II. Near surface shear layer with the rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Hotta, H; Yokoyama, T

    2014-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique we can extend our global convection simulation to $0.99\\,R_{\\odot}$ and include near the top of our domain small-scale convection with short time scales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of a NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range $r=0.95-0.975R_\\odot$. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward directed meridional flow and a NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the $\\langle v'_r v'_\\theta\\rangle$ correlation of turbulent velocities. The orig...

  12. High-resolution Calculation of the Solar Global Convection with the Reduced Speed of Sound Technique. II. Near Surface Shear Layer with the Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R ⊙ and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R ⊙. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation results from rotationally aligned convection cells ("banana cells"). The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  13. Vitamin A deficiency alters the pulmonary parenchymal elastic modulus and elastic fiber concentration in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes Amey J

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchial hyperreactivity is influenced by properties of the conducting airways and the surrounding pulmonary parenchyma, which is tethered to the conducting airways. Vitamin A deficiency (VAD is associated with an increase in airway hyperreactivity in rats and a decrease in the volume density of alveoli and alveolar ducts. To better define the effects of VAD on the mechanical properties of the pulmonary parenchyma, we have studied the elastic modulus, elastic fibers and elastin gene-expression in rats with VAD, which were supplemented with retinoic acid (RA or remained unsupplemented. Methods Parenchymal mechanics were assessed before and after the administration of carbamylcholine (CCh by determining the bulk and shear moduli of lungs that that had been removed from rats which were vitamin A deficient or received a control diet. Elastin mRNA and insoluble elastin were quantified and elastic fibers were enumerated using morphometric methods. Additional morphometric studies were performed to assess airway contraction and alveolar distortion. Results VAD produced an approximately 2-fold augmentation in the CCh-mediated increase of the bulk modulus and a significant dampening of the increase in shear modulus after CCh, compared to vitamin A sufficient (VAS rats. RA-supplementation for up to 21 days did not reverse the effects of VAD on the elastic modulus. VAD was also associated with a decrease in the concentration of parenchymal elastic fibers, which was restored and was accompanied by an increase in tropoelastin mRNA after 12 days of RA-treatment. Lung elastin, which was resistant to 0.1 N NaOH at 98°, decreased in VAD and was not restored after 21 days of RA-treatment. Conclusion Alterations in parenchymal mechanics and structure contribute to bronchial hyperreactivity in VAD but they are not reversed by RA-treatment, in contrast to the VAD-related alterations in the airways.

  14. Regulation of the elastic modulus of polyurethane microarrays and its influence on gecko-inspired dry adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Zhao, Aiwu; Jiang, Rui; Wang, Dapeng; Li, Da; Guo, Hongyan; Tao, Wenyu; Gan, Zibao; Zhang, Maofeng

    2011-02-01

    We studied the influence of the elastic modulus on the gecko-inspired dry adhesion by regulating the elastic modulus of bulk polyurethane combined with changing the size of microarrays. Segmented polyurethane (PU) was utilized to fabricate micro arrays by the porous polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) membrane molding method. The properties of the micro arrays, such as the elastic modulus and adhesion, were investigated by Triboindenter. The study demonstrates that bulk surfaces show the highest elastic modulus, with similar values at around 175 MPa and decreasing the arrays radius causes a significant decrease in E, down to 0.62 MPa. The corresponding adhesion experiments show that decrease of the elastic modulus can enhance the adhesion which is consistent with the recent theoretical models.

  15. Characterizing bulk modulus of fine-grained subgrade soils under large capacity construction equipment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available 1 Corresponding Author. Senior Researcher, CSIR Built Environment, Transport Infrastructure Engineering, Bldg 2C, P O Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa; E-mail: JAnochieboateng@csir.co.za the optimum. The bulk modulus together with shear..., unloaded to zero, and then, reloaded to the next stress state until the maximum hydrostatic stress of 276 kPa was reached (i.e., 0 ? 20.7 kPa ? 0 ? 41.4 kPa ? 0 ? 69 kPa ? 0 ?138 kPa ? 0). A pulsed wave shape with 60-second loading and 60-second...

  16. Shear resistance properties of TPS modified bitumen binders and asphalt mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹庭维; 吴少鹏; 刘聪慧; 张涛

    2008-01-01

    Shear resistance properties of the virgin bitumen and modified bitumen binders with Tafpack Super(TPS) modifier and SBS modified bitumen were discussed.Dynamic shear rheometer(DSR) was used to measure the laboratory creep data for these binders over a wide range of constant shear stresses at 20 ℃ to characterize the shear creep behaviors of all kinds of asphalt binders,and the rutting test system was used to investigate the permanent deformation of porous asphalt mixtures using the above bitumen binders for a fixed compressive stress.The shear strain rate and shear creep modulus were used to characterize the shear creep behavior of the TPS modified bitumen,and the rutting test results were used to show the consistency of porous asphalt mixtures with the bitumen binders.Results indicate that a distinction of shear creep strain can be made among different contents of TPS modified bitumen at the same stress level,where the shear creep strain-time response curve of the SBS modified bitumen binder is between the curves of the 8% TPS and 12% TPS modified bitumen binders.The shear strain rate and the shear creep modulus of the TPS modified bitumen binders are obtained to compare with those of the SBS modified bitumen binder which results in the same trend as the shear creep strain-time response curve.Permanent deformation results of all the porous asphalt mixtures from the rutting test show reasonable agreement with the findings of the shear strain rates and shear creep modulus over the range of shear stress levels.

  17. Shear Flows in Resonant Surfaces During Nonlinear Evolution of Double Tearing Modes%双撕裂模非线性演化过程中有理面上的剪切流

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新霞; 路兴强; 龚学余

    2011-01-01

    在二维平板几何模型下,利用磁流体力学方程组数值模拟托卡马克装置中双撕裂模非线性演化过程中有理面上剪切流的时间和空间分布.结果表明,双撕裂模非线性演化的早期阶段,有理面上没有形成明显的剪切流.剪切流主要存在于快速磁重联阶段,随着磁重联的结束而逐渐消失,剪切流的强度和空间分布随磁岛的演化而改变.另外,较大的等离子体电阻加速磁重联,但是对剪切流的强度和变化趋势没有直接的影响.%Shear flows in resonant surfaces of Tokamka devices induced by nonlinear evolution of double tearing modes ( DTM ) are studied numerically in the framework of resistive magnetohydronamic model with slab geometry. It is found that in early phases of nonlinear evolution of DTM, no remarkable shear flows is generated in resonant surfaces. Effective shear flows emerge during the phase of fast magnetic reconnection and disappear finally. Both amplitude and distribution of shear flows are found vary with nonlinear evolution of magnetic islands. Moreover, by taking into account plasma resistivity, it is shown that greater plasmas resistivity results in faster magnetic reconection, but it hardly affects shear flows of resonant surfaces in Tokamka devices.

  18. Shear Wave Imaging of Breast Tissue by Color Doppler Shear Wave Elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Nakajima, Takahito; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Koda, Ren; Sunaguchi, Naoki

    2017-02-01

    Shear wave elastography is a distinctive method to access the viscoelastic characteristic of the soft tissue that is difficult to obtain by other imaging modalities. This paper proposes a novel shear wave elastography [color Doppler shear wave imaging (CD SWI)] for breast tissue. Continuous shear wave is produced by a small lightweight actuator, which is attached to the tissue surface. Shear wave wavefront that propagates in tissue is reconstructed as a binary pattern that consists of zero and the maximum flow velocities on color flow image (CFI). Neither any modifications of the ultrasound color flow imaging instrument nor a high frame rate ultrasound imaging instrument is required to obtain the shear wave wavefront map. However, two conditions of shear wave displacement amplitude and shear wave frequency are needed to obtain the map. However, these conditions are not severe restrictions in breast imaging. This is because the minimum displacement amplitude is [Formula: see text] for an ultrasonic wave frequency of 12 MHz and the shear wave frequency is available from several frequencies suited for breast imaging. Fourier analysis along time axis suppresses clutter noise in CFI. A directional filter extracts shear wave, which propagates in the forward direction. Several maps, such as shear wave phase, velocity, and propagation maps, are reconstructed by CD SWI. The accuracy of shear wave velocity measurement is evaluated for homogeneous agar gel phantom by comparing with the acoustic radiation force impulse method. The experimental results for breast tissue are shown for a shear wave frequency of 296.6 Hz.

  19. Cold Resistant Properties of High Modulus Polyurethane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Minghua; XIA Ru; ZHANG Yuchuan; HUANG Zhifang; YAO Heping; HUANG Wanli; WANG Yifeng; HUI Jianqiang; WU Chunyu

    2009-01-01

    Six kinds of polyurethane(PU)elastomers were prepared based on different poly-esters,polyethers and chain extenders.The structure,mechanical properties and cold resistant proper-ties of PU were systematically investigated by FTIR,XRD,DMTA,universal testing machine and flex ductility machine.The results show that T_g of soft segment is the main factor of the cold resistant properties of polyurethane elastomer.Compared with the same relative molecular mass of the polyester and the polyether,the polyether flexibility is better,the glass transition temperature(T_g)is lower and the cold resistant properties is remarkable,for example the cold resistant properties of PU based on poly(tetramethylene glycol),1,4-BG and MDI achieves the fifth level.The physics performances of polyurethane elastomers,such as breakdown strength,Young's modulus and the cold resistant prop-erties,are all superior.

  20. Traction-separation laws and stick-slip shear phenomenon of interfaces between cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinko, Robert; Keten, Sinan

    2015-05-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are one of nature's most abundant structural material building blocks and possess outstanding mechanical properties including a tensile modulus comparable to Kevlar. It remains challenging to upscale these properties in CNC neat films and nanocomposites due to the difficulty of characterizing interfacial bonding between CNCs that governs stress transfer under deformation. Here we present new analyses based on atomistic simulations of shear and tensile failure of the interfaces between Iβ CNCs, providing new insight into factors governing the mechanical behavior of hierarchical nanocellulose materials. We compare the two most relevant crystal interfaces and find that hydrogen bonded surfaces have greater tensile strength compared to the surfaces governed by weaker interactions. On the contrary, shearing simulations reveal that friction between the atomic interfaces depends not only on surface energy but also the energy landscape along the shear direction. While being a weaker interface, the intersheet plane exhibits greater energy barriers to shear. The molecular roughness of this interface, characterized by a greater energy barrier, exhibits stick-slip deformation behavior as opposed to a more continuous sliding and rebonding mechanism observed for the interfaces with hydrogen bonds. Analytical models to describe the energy landscapes are developed using energy scaling relations for van der Waals surfaces in combination with a modification of the Prandtl-Tomlinson model for atomic friction. Our simulations pave the way for tailoring hierarchical CNC materials by taking a similar approach to techniques employed for describing metals, where mechanical properties can be tuned through a deeper understanding of grain boundary physics and nanoscale interfaces.

  1. Cell disaggregation behavior in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snabre, P; Bitbol, M; Mills, P

    1987-05-01

    The disaggregation behavior of erythrocytes in dextran saline solution was investigated by a light reflectometry technique in a Couette flow and in a plane Poiseuille flow. Dextran concentration and mass average molecular weight of the polymer fraction strongly influence the shear stress dependence of the erythrocyte suspension reflectivity in shear flow and the critical hydrodynamic conditions (shear rate or shear stress) for near-complete cell dispersion. We investigated the influence of cell volume fraction and membrane deformability (heat treatment of the erythrocytes) on the reflectivity of the flowing suspension. This study indicates that the intercell adhesiveness and the shear stress are the only parameters that influence rouleau break-up in steady uniform shear flow, thus eliminating cell volume fraction and membrane deformability as possible factors. However, the critical cross-sectional average shear stress for near-complete cell dispersion through the flow cross-section is shown to depend on the flow pattern. The rotation of cells in a shear flow or the nonuniform shear field in Poiseuille flow indeed increases the flow resistance of cell aggregates. We give a theoretical description of the shear-induced cell disaggregation process in Couette flow and in plane Poiseuille flow. The quantitation of shear forces for cell dispersion provides a way for estimating the surface adhesive energy of the bridging membranes by fluid mechanical technique.

  2. Young’s modulus of [111] germanium nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maksud

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a diameter-independent Young’s modulus of 91.9 ± 8.2 GPa for [111] Germanium nanowires (Ge NWs. When the surface oxide layer is accounted for using a core-shell NW approximation, the YM of the Ge core approaches a near theoretical value of 147.6 ± 23.4 GPa. The ultimate strength of a NW device was measured at 10.9 GPa, which represents a very high experimental-to-theoretical strength ratio of ∼75%. With increasing interest in this material system as a high-capacity lithium-ion battery anode, the presented data provide inputs that are essential in predicting its lithiation-induced stress fields and fracture behavior.

  3. Young’s modulus of [111] germanium nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksud, M.; Palapati, N. K. R.; Subramanian, A., E-mail: asubramanian@vcu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Yoo, J. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Harris, C. T. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports a diameter-independent Young’s modulus of 91.9 ± 8.2 GPa for [111] Germanium nanowires (Ge NWs). When the surface oxide layer is accounted for using a core-shell NW approximation, the YM of the Ge core approaches a near theoretical value of 147.6 ± 23.4 GPa. The ultimate strength of a NW device was measured at 10.9 GPa, which represents a very high experimental-to-theoretical strength ratio of ∼75%. With increasing interest in this material system as a high-capacity lithium-ion battery anode, the presented data provide inputs that are essential in predicting its lithiation-induced stress fields and fracture behavior.

  4. A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus for potential application in seismology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Miao, E-mail: yumiao@cqu.edu.cn; Qi, Song; Fu, Jie; Zhu, Mi [Key Lab for Optoelectronic Technology and Systems, Ministry of Education, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-09-14

    A high-damping magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) with bi-directional magnetic-control modulus is developed. This MRE was synthesized by filling NdFeB particles into polyurethane (PU)/ epoxy (EP) interpenetrating network (IPN) structure. The anisotropic samples were prepared in a permanent magnetic field and magnetized in an electromagnetic field of 1 T. Dynamic mechanical responses of the MRE to applied magnetic fields are investigated through magneto-rheometer, and morphology of MREs is observed via scanning electron microscope (SEM). Test result indicates that when the test field orientation is parallel to that of the sample's magnetization, the shear modulus of sample increases. On the other hand, when the orientation is opposite to that of the sample's magnetization, shear modulus decreases. In addition, this PU/EP IPN matrix based MRE has a high-damping property, with high loss factor and can be controlled by applying magnetic field. It is expected that the high damping property and the ability of bi-directional magnetic-control modulus of this MRE offer promising advantages in seismologic application.

  5. Foam rheology: A model of viscous effects in shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraynik, Andrew M.; Reinelt, Douglas A.

    Foams consisting of gas bubbles dispersed in a continuous network of thin liquid films display a remarkable range of rheological characteristics that include a finite shear modulus, yield stress, non-Newtonian viscosity, and slip at the wall. Progress in developing micromechanical theories to describe foam rheology has depended upon two-dimensional models, which in most cases are assumed to have perfectly ordered structure. Princen accounted for surface tension and geometrical effects, and analyzed the nonlinear elastic response of a spatially periodic foam in simple shear. His analysis has been extended to account for more general deformations. Khan and Armstrong and Kraynik and Hansen have proposed ad hoc models for viscous effects in foam rheology. Their models capture numerous qualitative phenomena but incorporate relaxation mechanisms based upon overly simplified assumptions of liquid flow in the thin films. Mysels, Shinoda, and Frankel considered soap films with interfaces that are inextensible due to the presence of surfactants. They analyzed the primary flow that occurs when such films are slowly withdrawn from or recede into essentially static junction regions such as the Plateau borders in a foam. Adopting this mechanism, Schwartz and Princen considered small periodic deformations of a foam and calculated the energy dissipation due to viscous flow in the thin films. In the following, we also adopt the basic interfacial and viscous mechanisms introduced by Mysels et al. and analyze simple shearing deformations of finite amplitude. The configuration and effective stress of the foam are determined. Under these deformation conditions, the foam is a nonlinear viscoelastic material. Results for the uniform expansion of a foam are also presented.

  6. Detection of cellular damage by hydrogen peroxide using SV40-T2 cells on shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiyama, Takumi; Katsuyama, Akihiro; Otori, Hideki; Kamimura, Toru; Uehara, Atsushi; Kainuma, Miho; Takumi, Ryo; Kudo, Yukako; Ebina, Masayuki; Mochitate, Katsumi; Kon, Tasuku; Furuya, Yasubumi; Kikuchi, Hideaki

    2014-08-01

    The rat lung epithelial cell line SV40-T2 was used to develop a cellular biosensing system to assay for environmental toxicants. The novel approach on which this system is based involves direct attachment of cultured rat or human cells onto a cell-adhesive matrix on the device through which shear horizontal surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) are transmitted using 50 MHz SAW resonator. This novel design enables sensitive monitoring of changes of the electrophysical characteristics of cells, such as their conductivity and relative permittivity. A time-dependent change of phase of SAW and change of insertion loss (change of amplitude) were observed when the cells were treated with 0.5 or 1.0 mM H2O2. The change of insertion loss was biphasic, with an early phase (1-3 h) and a late phase (3-6 h). The late phase coincided with the destruction of cell-cell tight junctions detected by measurement of the transepithelial electrical resistance and paracellular permeability; in contrast, the early phase coincided with the destruction of intracellular actin filaments by H2O2. The early-phase effect of H2O2 on phase shift may be attributable to the change of intracellular permittivity by a change of cellular polarity. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed the disappearance of zonula occludens protein 1 from the region of cell-cell contact. These results suggest the correlation between the change of insertion loss as an SAW parameter and the destruction of tight junctions of the cells on the SH-SAW device in the late phase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of binary mixtures of aqueous aromatic hydrocarbons with low-phase-noise shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors using multielectrode transducer designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Florian; Mohler, Rachel E; Ricco, Antonio J; Josse, Fabien

    2014-11-18

    The present work investigates a compact sensor system that provides rapid, real-time, in situ measurements of the identities and concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons at parts-per-billion concentrations in water through the combined use of kinetic and thermodynamic response parameters. The system uses shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensors operating directly in the liquid phase. The 103 MHz SAW sensors are coated with thin sorbent polymer films to provide the appropriate limits of detection as well as partial selectivity for the analytes of interest, the BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), which are common indicators of fuel and oil accidental releases in groundwater. Particular emphasis is placed on benzene, a known carcinogen and the most challenging BTEX analyte with regard to both regulated levels and its solubility properties. To demonstrate the identification and quantification of individual compounds in multicomponent aqueous samples, responses to binary mixtures of benzene with toluene as well as ethylbenzene were characterized at concentrations below 1 ppm (1 mg/L). The use of both thermodynamic and kinetic (i.e., steady-state and transient) responses from a single polymer-coated SH-SAW sensor enabled identification and quantification of the two BTEX compounds in binary mixtures in aqueous solution. The signal-to-noise ratio was improved, resulting in lower limits of detection and improved identification at low concentrations, by designing and implementing a type of multielectrode transducer pattern, not previously reported for chemical sensor applications. The design significantly reduces signal distortion and root-mean-square (RMS) phase noise by minimizing acoustic wave reflections from electrode edges, thus enabling limits of detection for BTEX analytes of 9-83 ppb (calculated from RMS noise); concentrations of benzene in water as low as ~100 ppb were measured directly. Reliable quantification of BTEX

  8. HIGH-RESOLUTION CALCULATION OF THE SOLAR GLOBAL CONVECTION WITH THE REDUCED SPEED OF SOUND TECHNIQUE. II. NEAR SURFACE SHEAR LAYER WITH THE ROTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Yokoyama, T., E-mail: hotta@ucar.edu [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R {sub ☉} and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R {sub ☉}. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 results from rotationally aligned convection cells ({sup b}anana cells{sup )}. The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  9. Effects of the ratio of hardness to Young's modulus on the friction and wear behavior of bilayer coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wangyang; Cheng, Yang-Tse; Lukitsch, Michael J.; Weiner, Anita M.; Lev, Lenoid C.; Grummon, David S.

    2004-11-01

    We present a study of the effects of the ratio of hardness to Young's modulus on the friction and wear behavior of layered composite coatings. Layered coating structures with the same surface coating but different interlayers were prepared by physical vapor deposition. We found that the ratio of hardness to Young's modulus plays an important role in determining the friction coefficient and wear resistance of layered composite coatings. A low friction coefficient and high wear resistance can be achieved in structures with high ratio of hardness to Young's modulus and moderately high hardness.

  10. Wind shear test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techniques for forecasting and detecting a type of wind shear called microbursts are being tested this month in an operational program at Denver's Stapleton International Airport as part of an effort to reduce hazards to airplanes and passengers.Wind shear, which can be spawned by convective storms, can occur as a microburst. These downbursts of cool air are usually recognizable as a visible rain shaft beneath a thundercloud. Sometimes, however, the rain shaft evaporates before reaching the ground, leaving the downdraft invisible. Although thunderstorms are traditionally avoided by airplane pilots, these invisible downdrafts also harbor hazards in what usually appear to be safe skies. When the downdraft reaches the earth's surface, the downdraft spreads out horizontally, much like a stream of water gushing from a garden hose on a concrete surface, explained John McCarthy, director of the operational program. Airplanes can encounter trouble when the downdraft from the microburst causes sudden shifts in wind direction, which may reduce lift on the wing, an especially dangerous situation during takeoff.

  11. Interfacial Modulus Mapping during Structural Transformation in Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jianfeng; Cui, Shushan; Zhang, Jihua; Rong, Yonghua

    2017-10-01

    Through the modified phase-field model the local soft mode mechanism of nucleation during martensitic transformation was confirmed in shape memory alloys. It was discovered that the modulus loss (8 pct) depended on the martensitic nucleation exceeding the loss (1 pct) during the martensitic growth. The elastic modulus and the stress across the martensite/parent interface differed from those across the martensitic twin boundary. The modulus losses in systems with three variants, two variants, and one variant were compared.

  12. The relationship between the adiabatic bulk modulus and enthalpy for mantle-related minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Orson L.

    1989-07-01

    It is found that the adiabatic bulk modulus, KS, is linear with enthalpy over a wide temperature range: up to at least 1825 K, the present limit of the measurement of the bulk modulus. This correlation is shown to hold for Al2O3, MgO, and Mg2SiO4. Since the enthalpy is listed in thermodynamic tables up to 3000 K, one can reasonably safely extrapolate KS up to lower mantle temperatures using this correlation. This correlation was anticipated in a theoretical 1966 paper, where the definition of the anharmonic parameter δ S was made in terms of properties which vary with temperature, δ _s = - left( {1/{α K_S }} right)left( {{δ K}/{δ T}} right)_{P'} where α is the volume coefficient of thermal expansion. The correlation was first confirmed for polycrystalline oxides in an experimental 1966 paper. Since the isotropic shear modulus, G, is linear with T, it is possible to estimate the sound velocities in the temperature regime just below the melting point.

  13. Development of polydimethylsiloxane substrates with tunable elastic modulus to study cell mechanobiology in muscle and nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchesko, Rachelle N; Zhang, Ling; Sun, Yan; Feinberg, Adam W

    2012-01-01

    Mechanics is an important component in the regulation of cell shape, proliferation, migration and differentiation during normal homeostasis and disease states. Biomaterials that match the elastic modulus of soft tissues have been effective for studying this cell mechanobiology, but improvements are needed in order to investigate a wider range of physicochemical properties in a controlled manner. We hypothesized that polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) blends could be used as the basis of a tunable system where the elastic modulus could be adjusted to match most types of soft tissue. To test this we formulated blends of two commercially available PDMS types, Sylgard 527 and Sylgard 184, which enabled us to fabricate substrates with an elastic modulus anywhere from 5 kPa up to 1.72 MPa. This is a three order-of-magnitude range of tunability, exceeding what is possible with other hydrogel and PDMS systems. Uniquely, the elastic modulus can be controlled independently of other materials properties including surface roughness, surface energy and the ability to functionalize the surface by protein adsorption and microcontact printing. For biological validation, PC12 (neuronal inducible-pheochromocytoma cell line) and C2C12 (muscle cell line) were used to demonstrate that these PDMS formulations support cell attachment and growth and that these substrates can be used to probe the mechanosensitivity of various cellular processes including neurite extension and muscle differentiation.

  14. Development of polydimethylsiloxane substrates with tunable elastic modulus to study cell mechanobiology in muscle and nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachelle N Palchesko

    Full Text Available Mechanics is an important component in the regulation of cell shape, proliferation, migration and differentiation during normal homeostasis and disease states. Biomaterials that match the elastic modulus of soft tissues have been effective for studying this cell mechanobiology, but improvements are needed in order to investigate a wider range of physicochemical properties in a controlled manner. We hypothesized that polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS blends could be used as the basis of a tunable system where the elastic modulus could be adjusted to match most types of soft tissue. To test this we formulated blends of two commercially available PDMS types, Sylgard 527 and Sylgard 184, which enabled us to fabricate substrates with an elastic modulus anywhere from 5 kPa up to 1.72 MPa. This is a three order-of-magnitude range of tunability, exceeding what is possible with other hydrogel and PDMS systems. Uniquely, the elastic modulus can be controlled independently of other materials properties including surface roughness, surface energy and the ability to functionalize the surface by protein adsorption and microcontact printing. For biological validation, PC12 (neuronal inducible-pheochromocytoma cell line and C2C12 (muscle cell line were used to demonstrate that these PDMS formulations support cell attachment and growth and that these substrates can be used to probe the mechanosensitivity of various cellular processes including neurite extension and muscle differentiation.

  15. Minimal subfamilies and the probabilistic interpretation for modulus on graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Albin, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The notion of $p$-modulus of a family of objects on a graph is a measure of the richness of such families. We develop the notion of minimal subfamilies using the method of Lagrangian duality for $p$-modulus. We show that minimal subfamilies have at most $|E|$ elements and that these elements carry a weight related to their "importance" in relation to the corresponding $p$-modulus problem. When $p=2$, this measure of importance is in fact a probability measure and modulus can be thought as trying to minimize the expected overlap in the family.

  16. Advanced testing and characterization of shear modulus and deformation characteristics of oil sand materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oil sands are natural deposits of sand materials that are rich in bitumen. Limited studies have been conducted to determine the dynamic behavior of oil sand materials. Recent difficulties encountered in oil sand mine fields in Canada substantiated...

  17. Experimental study on the determination of small strain-shear modulus of loess soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona El Mosallamy

    2016-08-01

    Test results also show that (Gmax increases with the increase of confining pressure and relative density. The change in damping properties is not significant under the effect of silt content and water content, and it reduces slightly with the increase of confining pressure and relative density. Empirical equations based on the results of the experimental work were proposed to predict (Gmax with respect to (Cp, voids ratio and applied pressure.

  18. Shear System Debugging and Shear Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Dong-xue; JIAO; Hai-yang

    2015-01-01

    Shear system is the essential equipment of head-end processing in the spent fuel reprocessing process,with the aim of cutting spent fuels into appropriate lengths for dissolve,separatingspent fuel core from jacket.Shear system of CRARL is mainly set in 01Bhot cell,element rods will be cut into short lengths of 10-30mm

  19. Shear Model Development of Limestone Joints with Incorporating Variations of Basic Friction Coefficient and Roughness Components During Shearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrishal, Seyedahmad; Sharifzadeh, Mostafa; Shahriar, Korosh; Song, Jae-Jon

    2017-04-01

    In relation to the shearing of rock joints, the precise and continuous evaluation of asperity interlocking, dilation, and basic friction properties has been the most important task in the modeling of shear strength. In this paper, in order to investigate these controlling factors, two types of limestone joint samples were prepared and CNL direct shear tests were performed on these joints under various shear conditions. One set of samples were travertine and another were onyx marble with slickensided surfaces, surfaces ground to #80, and rough surfaces were tested. Direct shear experiments conducted on slickensided and ground surfaces of limestone indicated that by increasing the applied normal stress, under different shearing rates, the basic friction coefficient decreased. Moreover, in the shear tests under constant normal stress and shearing rate, the basic friction coefficient remained constant for the different contact sizes. The second series of direct shear experiments in this research was conducted on tension joint samples to evaluate the effect of surface roughness on the shear behavior of the rough joints. This paper deals with the dilation and roughness interlocking using a method that characterizes the surface roughness of the joint based on a fundamental combined surface roughness concept. The application of stress-dependent basic friction and quantitative roughness parameters in the continuous modeling of the shear behavior of rock joints is an important aspect of this research.

  20. ON A GENERALIZED MODULUS OF CONVEXITY AND UNIFORM NORMAL STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Changsen; Wang Fenghui

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors study a generalized modulus of convexity, δ(α)(∈).Certain related geometrical properties of this modulus are analyzed. Their main result is that Banach space X has uniform normal structure if there exists ∈, 0 ≤∈≤1, such that δ(α)(1 + ∈) > (1 - α)∈.

  1. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behlow, H.; Saini, D.; Durham, L.; Simpson, J.; Skove, M. J.; Rao, A. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Clemson Nanomaterials Center, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Oliveira, L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Serkiz, S. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Clemson Nanomaterials Center, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar{sup ®} 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively.

  2. Dielectric and shear mechanical relaxations in glass-forming liquids: A test of the Gemant-DiMarzio-Bishop model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, K.; Jakobsen, B.; Olsen, N.B.

    2005-01-01

    The Gemant-DiMarzio-Bishop model, which connects the frequency-dependent shear modulus to the frequency-dependent dielectric constant, is reviewed and a new consistent macroscopic formulation is derived. It is moreover shown that this version of the model can be tested without fitting parameters...... that the Gemant-DiMarzio-Bishop model is correct on a qualitative level. The quantitative agreement between the model and the data is on the other hand moderate to poor. It is discussed if a model-free comparison between the dielectric and shear mechanical relaxations is relevant, and it is concluded...... that the shear modulus should be compared with the rotational dielectric modulus, 1/(epsilon(omega)–n^2), which is extracted from the Gemant-DiMarzio-Bishop model, rather than to the dielectric susceptibility or the conventional dielectric modulus M=1/epsilon(omega)...

  3. Dentinogenesis imperfecta - hardness and Young's modulus of teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Aneta; Loster, Jolanta; Ryniewicz, Wojciech; Ryniewicz, Anna M

    2013-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DI-II) is the most common dental genetic disease with reported incidence 1 in 8000. Elasticity and hardness of the enamel of teeth are important values which are connected with their resistance to attrition. It is hypothesized that values of physical properties for healthy teeth and teeth with DI-II are different. The aim of the study was to investigate some physical properties of teeth extracted from patients with DI-II in comparison with normal teeth. The material of the study was six teeth: three lower molars, with clinical signs of DI-II, which were extracted due to complications of pulp inflammation and three other lower molars which were extracted for orthodontic reasons - well formed, without any signs of pathology. The surfaces of DI-II and normal teeth were tested on the CSM Instruments Scratch Tester machine (producer CSEM Switzerland) by Oliver and Pharr method. The indenter used was Vicker's VG-73 diamond indenter. Additionally, the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis of the surface of the teeth with DI-II was made. Vickers hardness of the teeth with dental pathology (DI-II) was seven times smaller, and Young's modulus six times smaller than those of healthy teeth. The parameters of hardness and elasticity of enamel of teeth with clinical diagnosis of DI-II were very much smaller than in normal teeth and because of that can be responsible for attrition.

  4. Determination of Lubricant Bulk Modulus in Metal Forming by Means of a Simple Laboratory Test and Inverse FEM Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hafis, S. M.; Christiansen, P.; Martins, P. A. F.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of workpiece surface topography on friction, lubrication and final surface equality in metal forming operations is well known and has been pointed out by many researchers.This is especially the case when liquid lubricants are applied in situations, where increased surface roughness...... a simple, practical test to determine the bulk modulus. Combination of the experimental upsetting of an axisymmetric metal workpiece containing a truncated conical surface pocket with an inverse finite element analysis of the test allows determining the lubricant bulk modulus. The finite element analysis...... couples lubricant flow with plastic deformation of the metal directly. Results show that the proposed procedure allows determining an approximate bulk modulus for the lubricant....

  5. Shear strain determination of the polymer polydimethysiloxane (PMDS) using digital image correlation in different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Oliveira, G N [Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica, TEM/PGMEC, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua Passo da Patria, 156, Niteroi, R.J., Brazil, Cep.: 24.210-240 (Brazil); Nunes, L C S [Laboratorio de Mecanica Teorica e Aplicada, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua Passo da Patria, 156, Niteroi, R.J., Brazil, Cep.: 24.210-240 (Brazil); Dos Santos, P A M, E-mail: pams@if.uff.br [Instituto de Fisica, Laboratorio de Optica Nao-linear e Aplicada, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Nilton Tavares de Souza, s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, R.J., Brazil, Cep.:24.210-346 (Brazil)

    2011-01-01

    In the present work a digital image correlation (DIC) method is used in order to analyze the adhesive shear modulus of poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) submitted to different loads and temperatures. This is an optical-numerical full-field surface displacement measurement method. It is based on a comparison between two images of a specimen coated by a random speckled pattern in the undeformed and in the deformed states. A single lap joint testing is performed. This is a standard test specimen for characterizing adhesive properties and it is considered the simplest form of adhesive joints. For the single lap joint specimen, steel adherends are bonded using a flexible rubber elastic polymer (PDMS), which is a commercially available silicone elastic rubber.

  6. Reduced shear power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Northwestern U.; Shapiro, Charles; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  7. Reduced shear power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Northwestern U.; Shapiro, Charles; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  8. Phase-shifted reflective coherent gradient sensor for measuring Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of polished alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kang; Xie, Huimin; Fan, Bozhao

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of Ni-Cr Alloy are measured using phase-shifted reflective coherent gradient sensing (CGS) method. Three-point bending experiment is applied to obtain the Young's modulus by measuring the specimen out-of-plane displacement slopes. Bending experiment of a circular plate with fixed edges loaded by a centric concentrated force is applied to obtain the specimen bending stiffness. The Poisson's ratio is then solved by substituting the bending stiffness into Young's modulus. The results show that the phase-shifted reflective CGS method is valid for measuring Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of metals and alloys. In addition, the reflective specimen surfaces are obtained with precision finishing operations and the polishing parameters are optimized for CGS measurement. This method is more effective than the reflecting film transfer method, which is widely used in previous studies.

  9. Shear alters motility of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Jalali, Maryam; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of locomotion of microorganisms in shear flows drew a wide range of interests in microbial related topics such as biological process including pathogenic infection and biophysical interactions like biofilm formation on engineering surfaces. We employed microfluidics and digital holography microscopy to study motility of E. coli in shear flows. We controlled the shear flow in three different shear rates: 0.28 s-1, 2.8 s-1, and 28 s-1 in a straight channel with the depth of 200 μm. Magnified holograms, recorded at 15 fps with a CCD camera over more than 20 minutes, are analyzed to obtain 3D swimming trajectories and subsequently used to extract shear responses of E.coli. Thousands of 3-D bacterial trajectories are tracked. The change of bacteria swimming characteristics including swimming velocity, reorientation, and dispersion coefficient are computed directly for individual trajectory and ensemble averaged over thousands of realizations. The results show that shear suppresses the bacterial dispersions in bulk but promote dispersions near the surface contrary to those in quiescent flow condition. Ongoing analyses are focusing to quantify effect of shear rates on tumbling frequency and reorientation of cell body, and its implication in locating the hydrodynamic mechanisms for shear enhanced angular scattering. NIH, NSF, GoMRI.

  10. An experimental and analytical investigation of the rail shear-test method as applied to composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R.; Mcwithey, R. R.; Weisshaar, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    This report presents the results from an experimental and analytical investigation of the stress distributions occurring in a rail shear test. The effects of non-uniform stresses induced by differential thermal expansion, rail flexibility and specimen aspect ratio on measured shear modulus and ultimate strength of composite laminates are shown. A two-dimensional linearly elastic finite element model was used to analytically determine how various geometric parameters influenced the magnitude and distribution of inplane normal and shear stresses in a tensile rail shear specimen. Rail shear tests were conducted at room temperature and 589 K (600 F) on selected graphite-polyimide composite laminates using two titanium rail configurations. The analysis and test methods are discussed, and the results of the effects of the various parameters on shear modulus and ultimate strength are presented.

  11. Experimental Validation of the Transverse Shear Behavior of a Nomex Core for Sandwich Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, M. I.; Nasir, M. A.; Ali, H. M.; Ali, Y.

    2017-05-01

    This work deals with determination of the transverse shear moduli of a Nomex® honeycomb core of sandwich panels. Their out-of-plane shear characteristics depend on the transverse shear moduli of the honeycomb core. These moduli were determined experimentally, numerically, and analytically. Numerical simulations were performed by using a unit cell model and three analytical approaches. Analytical calculations showed that two of the approaches provided reasonable predictions for the transverse shear modulus as compared with experimental results. However, the approach based upon the classical lamination theory showed large deviations from experimental data. Numerical simulations also showed a trend similar to that resulting from the analytical models.

  12. Probe Oscillation Shear Elastography (PROSE): A High Frame-Rate Method for Two-Dimensional Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellema, Daniel C; Song, Pengfei; Kinnick, Randall R; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F; Manduca, Armando; Chen, Shigao

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) utilizes the propagation of induced shear waves to characterize the shear modulus of soft tissue. Many methods rely on an acoustic radiation force (ARF) "push beam" to generate shear waves. However, specialized hardware is required to generate the push beams, and the thermal stress that is placed upon the ultrasound system, transducer, and tissue by the push beams currently limits the frame-rate to about 1 Hz. These constraints have limited the implementation of ARF to high-end clinical systems. This paper presents Probe Oscillation Shear Elastography (PROSE) as an alternative method to measure tissue elasticity. PROSE generates shear waves using a harmonic mechanical vibration of an ultrasound transducer, while simultaneously detecting motion with the same transducer under pulse-echo mode. Motion of the transducer during detection produces a "strain-like" compression artifact that is coupled with the observed shear waves. A novel symmetric sampling scheme is proposed such that pulse-echo detection events are acquired when the ultrasound transducer returns to the same physical position, allowing the shear waves to be decoupled from the compression artifact. Full field-of-view (FOV) two-dimensional (2D) shear wave speed images were obtained by applying a local frequency estimation (LFE) technique, capable of generating a 2D map from a single frame of shear wave motion. The shear wave imaging frame rate of PROSE is comparable to the vibration frequency, which can be an order of magnitude higher than ARF based techniques. PROSE was able to produce smooth and accurate shear wave images from three homogeneous phantoms with different moduli, with an effective frame rate of 300 Hz. An inclusion phantom study showed that increased vibration frequencies improved the accuracy of inclusion imaging, and allowed targets as small as 6.5 mm to be resolved with good contrast (contrast-to-noise ratio ≥ 19 dB) between the target and

  13. Numerical study of shear rate effect on unsteady flow separation from the surface of the square cylinder using structural bifurcation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Rajendra K.; Kumar, Atendra

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, an incompressible two-dimensional shear flow past a square cylinder problem is investigated numerically using a higher order compact finite difference scheme. Simulations are presented for three sets of Reynolds numbers, 100, 200, and 500, with various shear parameter (K) values ranging from 0.0 to 0.4. The purpose of the present study is to elaborate the influence of shear rate on the vortex shedding phenomenon behind the square cylinder. The results presented here show that the vortex shedding phenomenon strongly depends on Re as well as K. The strength and size of vortices shed behind the cylinder vary as a function of Re and K. When K is larger than a critical value, the vortex shedding phenomenon has completely disappeared depending on the Reynolds number. Apart from the numerical study, a thorough theoretical investigation has been done by using a topology based structural bifurcation analysis for unsteady flow separations from the walls of the cylinder. Through this analysis, we study the exact locations of the bifurcation points associated with secondary and tertiary vortices with appropriate non-dimensional time of occurrence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time, a topological aspect based structural bifurcation analysis has been done to understand the vortex shedding phenomenon and flow separation for this problem.

  14. Temperature effect on elastic modulus of thin films and nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lihong; Li, Meizhi; Qin, Fuqi; Wei, Yueguang

    2013-02-01

    The stability of nanoscale devices is directly related to elasticity and the effect of temperature on the elasticity of thin films and nanocrystals. The elastic instability induced by rising temperature will cause the failure of integrated circuits and other microelectronic devices in service. The temperature effect on the elastic modulus of thin films and nanocrystals is unclear although the temperature dependence of the modulus of bulk materials has been studied for over half a century. In this paper, a theoretical model of the temperature-dependent elastic modulus of thin films and nanocrystals is developed based on the physical definition of the modulus by considering the size effect of the related cohesive energy and the thermal expansion coefficient. Moreover, the temperature effect on the modulus of Cu thin films is simulated by the molecular dynamics method. The results indicate that the elastic modulus decreases with increasing temperature and the rate of the modulus decrease increases with reducing thickness of thin films. The theoretical predictions based on the model are consistent with the results of computational simulations, semi-continuum calculations and the experimental measurements for Cu, Si thin films and Pd nanocrystals.

  15. Elastic modulus of phases in Ti–Mo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei-dong [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Liu, Yong, E-mail: yonliu11@aliyun.com [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Wu, Hong; Song, Min [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Zhang, Tuo-yang [Metallurgical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Lan, Xiao-dong; Yao, Tian-hang [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2015-08-15

    In this work, a series of binary Ti–Mo alloys with the Mo contents ranging from 3.2 to 12 at.% were prepared using non-consumable arc melting. The microstructures were investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, and the elastic modulus was evaluated by nanoindentation testing technique. The evolution of the volume fractions of ω phase was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the phase constitution and elastic modulus of the Ti–Mo alloys are sensitive to the Mo content. Ti–3.2Mo and Ti–8Mo alloys containing only α and β phases, respectively, have a low elastic modulus. In contrast, Ti–4.5Mo, Ti–6Mo, Ti–7Mo alloys, with different contents of ω phase, have a high elastic modulus. A simple micromechanical model was used to calculate the elastic modulus of ω phase (E{sub ω}), which was determined to be 174.354 GPa. - Highlights: • Ti–Mo alloys with the Mo contents ranging from 3.2 to 12 at.% were investigated. • XPS was used to investigate the volume fractions of ω phase. • The elastic modulus of Ti–Mo alloys is sensitive to the Mo content. • The elastic modulus of ω phase was determined to be 174.354 GPa.

  16. Transiently Jammed State in Shear Thickening Suspensions under Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Allen, Benjamin; Brown, Eric

    2014-03-01

    We examine the response of a suspension of cornstarch and water under normal impact at controlled velocities. This is a model system to understand why a person can run on the surface of a discontinuous shear thickening fluid. Using simultaneous high-speed imaging of the top and bottom surfaces along with normal force measurements allows us to investigate whether the force response is a result of system spanning structures. We observe a shear thickening transition where above a critical velocity the normal force increases by orders of magnitude. In the high force regime the force response is displacement dependent like a solid rather than velocity dependent like a liquid. The stresses are on the order of 106 Pa which is enough to hold up a person's weight. In this regime imaging shows the existence of a solid like structure that extends to the bottom interface.

  17. Shear Horizontal Wave Propagation Speed in Mylar Sheet and Coated Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, M.; Karppinen, T.; Hæggström, E.; Stor-Pellinen, J.

    2006-03-01

    Soft plate-like membranes find application e.g. as pill or paper coatings, bio-filter membranes, and gas seals in food products. For these applications the integrity and the mechanical properties of the membrane are important. Mechanical properties of these products can be determined by stretching or bending tests, but such methods can damage these fragile products. We propose a rapid nondestructive acoustic method to estimate mechanical film characteristics with shear horizontal (in-plane shear) waves. A 23 kHz, 1-cycle square signal was excited into a thin foil with a piezoceramic pickup and received with an inductive pickup. The SNR (power) was 20 dB in 1 kHz -50 kHz bandwidth. This actuation-detection scheme can be used to excite in-plane longitudinal, shear and even elliptic waves in a thin foil. The method was validated by measuring in-plane shear wave and longitudinal wave time-of-flight TOF at different actuator-receiver separations and calculating the corresponding longitudinal and shear modulus. The samples were Mylar® sheet and coated paper. The anisotropy of MOE for Mylar sheet was close to the manufacturer specifications. For coated paper a maximum shear modulus anisotropy of 5% and a shear modulus dependence on temperature of 0.7 MPa/°C were found. Laser doppler vibrometry showed that the excited waves were confined in-plane.

  18. Rheological responses of fumed silica suspensions under steady and oscillatory shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Rheological experiments under steady and oscillatory shear were conducted for fumed silica suspen- sions in polyethylene glycol. Under steady shear the shear-thinning and thickening response were exhibited and the flow exponent N was determined. With the increase of concentration the flow exponent N showed a rapid increase, and it increased dramatically when the discontinuous shear-thickening took place. Oscillatory shear experiments were conducted at constant frequency and constant amplitude strain, respectively. The shear-thinning and the discontinuous shear-thickening behavior were observed under different constant frequencies from 10 to 80 rad/s. The correlation between complex modulus (G*) and sweep frequency (ω) was illuminated at γ =750%. It was found that the correlation between G* and ω could be fitted by equation: G*∝ωn. The indexes in shear-thinning region and shear-thickening were determined. The indexes were similar to some extent at shear-thinning region and increased dramati- cally to a much higher value when the shear-thickening occurred,especially at higher weight fractions. The behaviors can be qualitatively explained as follows: the shear-thinning owes to decrease of viscos- ity, which results from disruption of the aggregates; the cluster theory attributes the shear-thickening to the formation of metastable, flow induced clusters, which block the system.

  19. Rheological responses of fumed silica suspensions under steady and oscillatory shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG HaiLin; RUAN JianMing; ZOU JianPeng; WU QiuMei; ZHOU ZhongCheng; ZHOU ZhiHua

    2009-01-01

    Rheological experiments under steady and oscillatory shear were conducted for fumed silica suspensions in polyethylene glycol. Under steady shear the shear-thinning and thickening response were exhibited and the flow exponent Nwas determined. With the increase of concentration the flow exponent N showed a rapid increase, and it increased dramatically when the discontinuous shear-thickening took place. Oscillatory shear experiments were conducted at constant frequency and constant amplitude strain, respectively. The shear-thinning and the discontinuous shear-thickening behavior were observed under different constant frequencies from 10 to 80 rad/s. The correlation between complex modulus (G*)and sweep frequency (ω) was illuminated atγ=750%. It was found that the correlation between G* and ω could be fitted by equation: G*∝ωn. The indexes in shear-thinning region and shear-thickening were determined. The indexes were similar to some extent at shear-thinning region end increased dramatically to a much higher value when the shear-thickening occurred, especially at higher weight fractions. The behaviors can be qualitatively explained as follows: the shear-thinning owes to decrease of viscosity, which results from disruption of the aggregates; the cluster theory attributes the shear-thickening to the formation of metastable, flow induced clusters, which block the system.

  20. Measurement of Young's modulus of vocal folds by indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, Dinesh K; Zhang, Zhaoyan; Neubauer, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    To assess the accuracy of the indentation method for stiffness measurements and to estimate the Young's modulus of the vocal fold using this technique. Basic science. Indentation tests were performed using a range of indenter diameters and indentation depths on single- and double-layer silicone rubber models with various cover-layer thicknesses with known geometry and Young's moduli. Measurements were repeated on intact vocal folds and isolated muscle and cover-layer samples from three cadaveric human larynges. Indentation on single-layer rubber models yielded Young's moduli with acceptable accuracy when the indentation depth was equal to or smaller than the indenter diameter, and both were smaller than the physical dimensions of the material sample. On two-layer models, the stiffness estimation was similarly influenced by indenter diameter and indentation depth, and acceptable accuracy was reached when indentation depth was much smaller than the height of the top cover layer. Measurements on midmembranous vocal fold tissue revealed location-dependent Young's moduli (in kPa) as follows: intact hemilarynx, 8.6 (range=5.3-13.1); isolated inferior medial surface cover, 7.5 (range=7-7.9); isolated medial surface cover, 4.8 (range=3.9-5.7); isolated superior surface cover, 2.9 (range=2.7-3.2); and isolated thyroarytenoid muscle, 2.0 (range=1.3-2.7). Indenter diameter, indentation depth, and material thickness are important parameters in the measurement of vocal fold stiffness using the indentation technique. Measurements on human larynges showed location-dependent differences in stiffness. The stiffness of the vocal folds was also found to be higher when the vocal fold structure was still attached to the laryngeal framework compared with that when the vocal fold was separated from the framework. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modulus of Elasticity and Thermal Expansion Coefficient of ITO Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Austin D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Elhadj, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-24

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine the modulus of elasticity (E) and thermal expansion coefficient (α) of RF sputtered Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) as a function of temperature (T), and to collect ITO film stress data. In order to accomplish that goal, the Toho FLX-2320-S thin film stress measurement machine was used to collect both single stress and stress-temperature data for ITO coated fused silica and sapphire substrates. The stress measurement function of the FLX-2320-S cannot be used to calculate the elastic modulus of the film because the Stoney formula incorporates the elastic modulus of the substrate, rather than of the film itself.

  2. SPLITTING MODULUS FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR ORTHOGONAL ANISOTROPIC PLATE BENGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党发宁; 荣廷玉; 孙训方

    2001-01-01

    Splitting modulus variational principle in linear theory of solid mechanics was introduced, the principle for thin plate was derived, and splitting modulus finite element method of thin plate was established too. The distinctive feature of the splitting model is that its functional contains one or more arbitrary additional parameters, called splitting factors,so stiffness of the model can be adjusted by properly selecting the splitting factors. Examples show that splitting modulus method has high precision and the ability to conquer some illconditioned problems in usual finite elements. The cause why the new method could transform the ill-conditioned problems into well-conditioned problem, is analyzed finally.

  3. Determining the modulus of intact bovine vertebral cancellous bone tissue: Development and validation of a protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbretson, Andrew Craig

    Cancellous, or spongy, bone accounts for nearly 80% of the human skeleton's internal surface area, despite comprising only 20% of its mass. It is made up of a network of struts and plates that provide lightweight internal support to mammalian bones. In addition, it often serves as the main interface between the skeletal system and implanted devices such as artificial hips, knees, and fracture fixation devices. However, hip arthroplasties can succumb to loosening of the implant due to bone resorption, which is thought to be caused by a mismatch in both apparent and real stiffness between the device and the surrounding bone. Many studies have attempted to determine the Young's modulus of cancellous bone tissue, but the results are far from being in agreement. Reported values range from less than 1 to nearly 20 GPa. In addition, the small size of trabeculae has made dissection and testing a challenge. In this thesis, whole individual trabeculae from a bovine lumbar spine were tested in three-point bending to determine their Young's modulus using custom-made equipment to fit a miniature single-axis testing device. The device itself was validated by testing materials with moduli ranging from 1 to 200 GPa. The structure of the cancellous bone and the morphology of the individual struts were determined using micro x-ray computed tomography (muXCT). Individual struts were manually isolated from slices made using a low-speed saw under constant lubrication and measured under a stereomicroscope. Samples exhibiting no machined surfaces (and thus deemed to be whole, or "uncut" were compared to struts that had been cut by the saw during sectioning. Validation showed that the system was capable of determining the modulus of materials that were approximately five times stiffer than the expected cancellous modulus (copper, at 115 GPa) to within 10% of published values. This gave confidence in the results for bone. The modulus of the "uncut" specimens was found to be 15.28 2.26 GPa

  4. The effect of physiological conditions on the surface structure of proteins: Setting the scene for human digestion of emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Valderrama, J.; Gunning, A. P.; Ridout, M. J.; Wilde, P. J.; Morris, V. J.

    2009-10-01

    Understanding and manipulating the interfacial mechanisms that control human digestion of food emulsions is a crucial step towards improved control of dietary intake. This article reports initial studies on the effects of the physiological conditions within the stomach on the properties of the film formed by the milk protein ( β -lactoglobulin) at the air-water interface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface tension and surface rheology techniques were used to visualize and examine the effect of gastric conditions on the network structure. The effects of changes in temperature, pH and ionic strength on a pre-formed interfacial structure were characterized in order to simulate the actual digestion process. Changes in ionic strength had little effect on the surface properties. In isolation, acidification reduced both the dilatational and the surface shear modulus, mainly due to strong repulsive electrostatic interactions within the surface layer and raising the temperature to body temperature accelerated the rearrangements within the surface layer, resulting in a decrease of the dilatational response and an increase of surface pressure. Together pH and temperature display an unexpected synergism, independent of the ionic strength. Thus, exposure of a pre-formed interfacial β -lactoglobulin film to simulated gastric conditions reduced the surface dilatational modulus and surface shear moduli. This is attributed to a weakening of the surface network in which the surface rearrangements of the protein prior to exposure to gastric conditions might play a crucial role.

  5. Low elastic modulus titanium–nickel scaffolds for bone implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing; Yang, Hailin; Wang, Huifeng; Ruan, Jianming, E-mail: jianming@csu.edu.cn

    2014-01-01

    The superelastic nature of repeating the human bones is crucial to the ideal artificial biomedical implants to ensure smooth load transfer and foster the ingrowth of new bone tissues. Three dimensional interconnected porous TiNi scaffolds, which have the tailorable porous structures with micro-hole, were fabricated by slurry immersing with polymer sponge and sintering method. The crystallinity and phase composition of scaffolds were studied by X-ray diffraction. The pore morphology, size and distribution in the scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The porosity ranged from 65 to 72%, pore size was 250–500 μm. Compressive strength and elastic modulus of the scaffolds were ∼ 73 MPa and ∼ 3GPa respectively. The above pore structural and mechanical properties are similar to those of cancellous bone. In the initial cell culture test, osteoblasts adhered well to the scaffold surface during a short time, and then grew smoothly into the interconnected pore channels. These results indicate that the porous TiNi scaffolds fabricated by this method could be bone substitute materials. - Highlights: • A novel approach for the fabrication of porous TiNi scaffolds • Macroporous structures are replicated from the polymer sponge template. • The pore characteristics and mechanical properties of TiNi scaffolds agree well with the requirement of trabecular bone. • Cytocompatibility of TiNi scaffolds is assessed, and it closely associated with pore property.

  6. Expression, crosslinking, and developing modulus master curves of recombinant resilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Md Shahriar K; Dudek, Daniel M; Beers, Eric P; Dillard, David A

    2017-05-01

    Resilin is a disordered elastomeric protein found in specialized regions of insect cuticles, where low stiffness and high resilience are required. Having a wide range of functions that vary among insect species, resilin operates across a wide frequency range, from 5Hz for locomotion to 13kHz for sound production. We synthesize and crosslink a recombinant resilin from clone-1 (exon-1+exon-2) of the gene, and determine the water content (approximately 80wt%) and dynamic mechanical properties, along with estimating surface energies relevant for adhesion. Dynamic moduli master curves have been developed, by applying the time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP) and time-temperature concentration superposition principle (TTCSP), and compared with reported master curves for natural resilin from locusts, dragonflies, and cockroaches. To our knowledge, this is the first time dynamic moduli master curves have been developed to explore the dynamic mechanical properties of recombinant resilin and compare with resilin behavior. The resulting master curves show that the synthetic resilin undergoes a pronounced transition with increasing ethanol concentrations, with the storage modulus increasing by approximately three orders of magnitude. Although possibly a glass transition, alternate explanations include the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds or that the chitin binding domain (ChBD) in exon-2 might change the secondary structure of the normally disordered exon-1 into more ordered conformations that limit deformation.

  7. Squirming through shear-thinning fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Datt, Charu; Elfring, Gwynn J; Pak, On Shun

    2015-01-01

    Many microorganisms find themselves immersed in fluids displaying non-Newtonian rheological properties such as viscoelasticity and shear-thinning viscosity. The effects of viscoelasticity on swimming at low Reynolds numbers have already received considerable attention, but much less is known about swimming in shear-thinning fluids. A general understanding of the fundamental question of how shear-thinning rheology influences swimming still remains elusive. To probe this question further, we study a spherical squirmer in a shear-thinning fluid using a combination of asymptotic analysis and numerical simulations. Shear-thinning rheology is found to affect a squirming swimmer in nontrivial and surprising ways; we predict and show instances of both faster and slower swimming depending on the surface actuation of the squirmer. We also illustrate that while a drag and thrust decomposition can provide insights into swimming in Newtonian fluids, extending this intuition to problems in complex media can prove problemat...

  8. Low Shear Strength and Shear-Induced Failure in Ti3SiC2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Shear strength and shear-induced Hertzian contact damage in Ti3SiC2 were investigated using double-notched-beamspecimen and steel spherical indenter, respectively. The shear strength of 40 MPa that was only about 10% of bendingstrength was obtained for this novel ceramic. The SEM fractograph of specimens failed in shear test indicated acombination of intergranular and transgranular fracture. Under a contact load, plastic indent without cone crackcould be formed on the surface of Ti3SiC2 sample. Optical observation on side view showed half-circle cracks aroundthe damage zone below the indent, and the crack shape was consistent with the contrail of the principal shearingstress. The low shear strength and the shearing-activated intergranular sliding were confirmed being the key factorsfor failure in Ti3SiC2.

  9. A comparative study of shear bond strength of orthodontic bracket after acid-etched and Er:YAG treatment on enamel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Juliana C.; Mota, Cláudia C. B. O.; Cassimiro-silva, Patricia F.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of teeth prepared for orthodontic bracket bonding with 37% phosphoric acid and Er:YAG laser. Forty bovine incisors were divided into two groups. In Group I, the teeth were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid and brackets were bonded with Transbond XT; in Group II, the teeth were irradiated with Er:YAG and bonding with Transbond XT. After SBS test, the adhesive remnant index was determined. Adhesion to dental hard tissues after Er:YAG laser etching was inferior to that obtained after acid etching but exceeded what is believed to be clinically sufficient strength, and therefore can be used in patients.

  10. Reduction in the modulus of elasticity in orthodontic wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, A J; Vanderby, R; Burstone, C J

    1977-10-01

    The modulus of elasticity of stainless steel orthodontic wires was found to be 20% below the normally assumed range of 19.3 to 20.0 x 10(4) MPa (28.0 to 29.0 x 10(6) psi). Use of the latter value can result in significant computational errors in orthodontic applicance mechanics. The lower modulus was attributed to severe cold drawing.

  11. Elastic modulus of posts and the risk of root fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meira, Josete B C; Espósito, Camila O M; Quitero, Mayra F Z; Poiate, Isis A V P; Pfeifer, Carmem Silvia C; Tanaka, Carina B; Ballester, Rafael Y

    2009-08-01

    The definition of an optimal elastic modulus for a post is controversial. This work hypothesized that the influence of the posts' elastic modulus on dentin stress concentration is dependent on the load direction. The objective was to evaluate, using finite element analysis, the maximum principal stress (sigma(max)) on the root, using posts with different elastic modulus submitted to different loading directions. Nine 3D models were built, representing the dentin root, gutta-percha, a conical post and the cortical bone. The softwares used were: MSC.PATRAN2005r2 (preprocessing) and MSC.Marc2005r2 (processing). Load of 100 N was applied, varying the directions (0 degrees, 45 degrees and 90 degrees) in relation to the post's long axis. The magnitude and direction of the sigma(max) were recorded. At the 45 degrees and 90 degrees loading, the highest values of sigma(max) were recorded for the lowest modulus posts, on the cervical region, with a direction that suggests debonding of the post. For the 0 degrees loading, the highest values of sigma(max) were recorded for higher modulus posts, on the apical region, and the circumferential direction suggests vertical root fracture. The hypothesis was accepted: the effect of the elastic modulus on the magnitude and direction of the sigma(max) generated on the root was dependent on the loading direction.

  12. Non-toxic invert analog glass compositions of high modulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi are described. They and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consist essentially of, in mols, 15 to 40% SiO2, 6 to 15% Li2O, 24 to 45% of at least two bivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Ca, NzO, MgO and CuO; 13 to 39% of at least two trivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, La2O3, and Y2O3 and up to 15% of one or more tetravelent oxides selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2. The high modulus, low density glass compositions contain no toxic elements. The composition, glass density, Young's modulus, and specific modulus for 28 representative glasses are presented. The fiber modulus of five glasses are given.

  13. Effects of Bone Young’s Modulus on Finite Element Analysis in the Lateral Ankle Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. X. Niu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element analysis (FEA is a powerful tool in biomechanics. The mechanical properties of biological tissue used in FEA modeling are mainly from experimental data, which vary greatly and are sometimes uncertain. The purpose of this study was to research how Young’s modulus affects the computations of a foot-ankle FEA model. A computer simulation and an in-vitro experiment were carried out to investigate the effects of incremental Young’s modulus of bone on the stress and strain outcomes in the computational simulation. A precise 3-dimensional finite element model was constructed based on an in-vitro specimen of human foot and ankle. Young’s moduli were assigned as four levels of 7.3, 14.6, 21.9 and 29.2 GPa respectively. The proximal tibia and fibula were completely limited to six degrees of freedom, and the ankle was loaded to inversion 10° and 20° through the calcaneus. Six cadaveric foot-ankle specimens were loaded as same as the finite element model, and strain was measured at two positions of the distal fibula. The bone stress was less affected by assignment of Young’s modulus. With increasing of Young’s modulus, the bone strain decreased linearly. Young’s modulus of 29.2 GPa was advisable to get the satisfactory surface strain results. In the future study, more ideal model should be constructed to represent the nonlinearity, anisotropy and inhomogeneity, as the same time to provide reasonable outputs of the interested parameters.

  14. IMAGE ANALYSIS FOR MODELLING SHEAR BEHAVIOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lopez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Through laboratory research performed over the past ten years, many of the critical links between fracture characteristics and hydromechanical and mechanical behaviour have been made for individual fractures. One of the remaining challenges at the laboratory scale is to directly link fracture morphology of shear behaviour with changes in stress and shear direction. A series of laboratory experiments were performed on cement mortar replicas of a granite sample with a natural fracture perpendicular to the axis of the core. Results show that there is a strong relationship between the fracture's geometry and its mechanical behaviour under shear stress and the resulting damage. Image analysis, geostatistical, stereological and directional data techniques are applied in combination to experimental data. The results highlight the role of geometric characteristics of the fracture surfaces (surface roughness, size, shape, locations and orientations of asperities to be damaged in shear behaviour. A notable improvement in shear understanding is that shear behaviour is controlled by the apparent dip in the shear direction of elementary facets forming the fracture.

  15. Shearing stability of lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  16. Shearing stability of lubricants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-03-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  17. Texture Dependent Young's Modulus in Austenitic Cladding

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    In Austenitic claddings of pressure vessel steel columnar grains with a 〈100〉-fiber axis oriented perpendicular to the surface have been previously observed. The fiber axis is parallel to the steepest temperature gradient. Since high temperature gradients also exist in the plane of cladding, preferred orientation should be found there.This was proved with {111}- and {220}-pole figures taken of the cladding in addition to {200}-pole figures. From these pole figures it could be concluded that t...

  18. Assessment of dynamic modulus of high density polypropylene waste fiber reinforcement in asphalt concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan S. OTUOZE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional asphalt tests like Hveem and Marshall tests are at best mere characterization than effective test of pavement field performance because of complex viscoelastic behavior of asphalt. Mechanical properties otherwise called simple performance tests (SPT are performance criteria of asphalt. Dynamic modulus among other SPT’s like permanent deformation, fatigue cracking, thermal cracking, moisture susceptibility, shear and friction properties; determines stress-strain to time-temperature relationships that imparts on strength, service life and durability. The test followed the recommendations of NCHRP 1-37a (2004 and mixes were prepared using 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% HDPP contents. The parameters tested for dynamic modulus, /E*/, are stiffness, recoverable strain (ε, and phase angle (ξ. Time – temperature superposition (TTS called master curve was fitted using sigmoidal curve to interpolate the parameters beyond measured data set so as to observe the viscoelastic behavior outside the physical properties. The performance of 0.5% HDPP asphalt is better enhanced than the conventional asphalt to improve upon strength, service and durability.

  19. Pressure induced stiffening, thermal softening of bulk modulus and brittle nature of mercury chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Dinesh; Shriya, Swarna; Sapkale, Raju; Varshney, Meenu; Ameri, M.

    2015-07-01

    The pressure and temperature dependent elastic properties of mercury chalcogenides (HgX; X = S, Se and Te) with pressure induced structural transition from ZnS-type (B3) to NaCl-type (B1) structure have been analyzed within the framework of a model interionic interaction potential with long-range Coulomb and charge transfer interactions, short-range overlap repulsion and van der Waals (vdW) interactions as well as zero point energy effects. Emphasis is on the evaluation of the Bulk modulus with pressure and temperature dependency to yield the Poisson's ratio ν, the Pugh ratio ϕ, anisotropy parameter, Shear and Young's modulus, Lamé's constant, Klein man parameter, elastic wave velocity and Debye temperature. The Poisson's ratio behavior infers that HgX are brittle in nature. To our knowledge this is the first quantitative theoretical prediction of the pressure dependence of elastic and thermodynamical properties explicitly the ductile (brittle) nature of HgX and still awaits experimental confirmations.

  20. Tilting Shear Layers in Coastal Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    2181 email: khelfrich@whoi.edu Brian L. White Department of Marine Sciences University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 3117c Venable Hall ...and rotation. Figure 1. a) Sketch of tilting, horizontal shear layer near Stuart Island from Farmer et al (2002). b) Photograph of the...surface expression of intense vortices near Stuart Island (from Farmer et al, 2002). c) Infra-red image of a tilting shear layer in the Snohomish River

  1. Resistive interchange instability in reversed shear tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Masaru; Nakamura, Yuji; Wakatani, Masahiro [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    Resistive interchange modes become unstable due to the magnetic shear reversal in tokamaks. In the present paper, the parameter dependences, such as q (safety factor) profile and the magnetic surface shape are clarified for improving the stability, using the local stability criterion. It is shown that a significant reduction of the beta limit is obtained for the JT-60U reversed shear configuration with internal transport barrier, since the local pressure gradient increases. (author)

  2. Variable modulus cellular structures using pneumatic artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontecorvo, Michael E.; Niemiec, Robert J.; Gandhi, Farhan S.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a novel variable modulus cellular structure based on a hexagonal unit cell with pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) inclusions. The cell considered is pin-jointed, loaded in the horizontal direction, with three PAMs (one vertical PAM and two horizontal PAMs) oriented in an "H" configuration between the vertices of the cell. A method for calculation of the hexagonal cell modulus is introduced, as is an expression for the balance of tensile forces between the horizontal and vertical PAMs. An aluminum hexagonal unit cell is fabricated and simulation of the hexagonal cell with PAM inclusions is then compared to experimental measurement of the unit cell modulus in the horizontal direction with all three muscles pressurized to the same value over a pressure range up to 758 kPa. A change in cell modulus by a factor of 1.33 and a corresponding change in cell angle of 0.41° are demonstrated experimentally. A design study via simulation predicts that differential pressurization of the PAMs up to 2068 kPa can change the cell modulus in the horizontal direction by a factor of 6.83 with a change in cell angle of only 2.75°. Both experiment and simulation show that this concept provides a way to decouple the length change of a PAM from the change in modulus to create a structural unit cell whose in-plane modulus in a given direction can be tuned based on the orientation of PAMs within the cell and the pressure supplied to the individual muscles.

  3. STM verification of the reduction of the Young's modulus of CdS nanoparticles at smaller sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, A.; Peretz, E.; Dikovsky, V.; Santra, P. K.; Shneck, R. Z.; Sarma, D. D.; Manassen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate the first STM evaluation of the Young's modulus (E) of nanoparticles (NPs) of different sizes. The sample deformation induced by tip-sample interaction has been determined using current-distance (I-Z) spectroscopy. As a result of tip-sample interaction, and the induced surface deformations, the I-z curves deviates from pure exponential dependence. Normally, in order to analyze the deformation quantitatively, the tip radius must be known. We show, that this necessity is eliminated by measuring the deformation on a substrate with a known Young's modulus (Au(111)) and estimating the tip radius, and afterwards, using the same tip (with a known radius) to measure the (unknown) Young's modulus of another sample (nanoparticles of CdS). The Young's modulus values found for 3 NP's samples of average diameters of 3.7, 6 and 7.5 nm, were E ~ 73%, 78% and 88% of the bulk value, respectively. These results are in a good agreement with the theoretically predicted reduction of the Young's modulus due to the changes in hydrostatic stresses which resulted from surface tension in nanoparticles with different sizes. Our calculation using third order elastic constants gives a reduction of E which scales linearly with 1/r (r is the NP's radius). This demonstrates the applicability of scanning tunneling spectroscopy for local mechanical characterization of nanoobjects. The method does not include a direct measurement of the tip-sample force but is rather based on the study of the relative elastic response.

  4. Uniaxial tensile and shear deformation tests of gold–tin eutectic solder film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Namazu, Hideki Takemoto, Hiroshi Fujita and Shozo Inoue

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel experimental technique for measuring mechanical properties of gold-tin (Au–Sn eutectic solder film used for soldering package in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS. Dual-source DC magnetron sputtering was employed to deposit Au-20 weight % (wt% Sn film. The tensile test with in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD measurement evaluates the Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio at intermediate temperatures. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio at room temperature were found to be 51.3 GPa and 0.288, lower than bulk values. The Young's modulus decreased with increasing temperature, whereas the Poisson's ratio did not depend on temperature. The XRD tensile test also showed creep deformation behavior of Au–Sn film. We have developed a shear deformation test technique, which is performed by using Au–Sn film sandwiched by two single crystal silicon (Si cantilever structures, to characterize the shear properties of the film. The shear moduli obtained from the shear deformation tests ranged from 11.5 to 13.3 GPa, about 38% lower than those from the XRD tensile tests. The measured shear strength from 12 to 17 MPa exhibited a temperature dependency. Information about the tensile and shear characteristics would likely to be of great use in designing Au–Sn soldering packages for MEMS.

  5. Determination of elasticity modulus and Poisson ratio of two onion varieties under different loading conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Jafari Malekabadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Poisson ratio and modulus of elasticity are two fundamental properties of elastic and viscoelastic solids that use in solving all contact problems, including the calculation of stress, the contact surfaces and elastic deformation (Mohsenin, 1986; Gentle and Halsall, 1982. There are many published literature on Poisson ratio and elasticity modulus of fruit and vegetables. Shitanda et al. (2002 calculated Poisson ratio of rice by considering Boussinesq’s theory. They showed that the Poisson ratio is greater for shorter varieties. In another study, researchers used the instrumented bending beam to measure the lateral expansion of red beans. They were considered Poisson ratio as the ratio of transverse strain to the longitudinal strain (regardless of the geometry of the sample and were calculated modulus of elasticity with Hertz theory for convex bodies (Kiani Deh Kiani et al., 2009. Cakir et al. (2002 was determined the Poisson ratio and elastic modulus of some onion varieties. They used a simple formula to determine the transverse strain that developed by Sitkei (1986 for prism-shaped rod, regardless of the geometry of the product. Reviewed scientific literature shows that these parameters have not been studied according to the geometric shape of onions and was not used by a more accurate method, such as image processing to determine these parameters. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of two varieties of onions. Poisson ratio was determined with image processing. Considering shape of the onions and deformation value, and using Hertz’s theory with Poisson ratio, modulus of elasticity was calculated. The effects of loading directions (polar or equatorial, deformation value (5, 10 and 15 mm, loading speed (15 or 25 mm min-1 and onion varieties (Red and Yellow on the modulus of elasticity and apparent Poisson’s ratio were examined. Materials and Methods: The onions harvested in autumn, 20 days

  6. Measurement of Young’s Modulus and Internal Damping of Pork Muscle in Dynamic Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakroun, Moez; Ghozlen, Med Hédi Ben

    2016-09-01

    Automotive shocks involve various tiers’ speed for different human body tissues. Knowing the behavior of these tissues, including muscles, in different vibration frequency is therefore necessary. The muscle has viscoelatic properties. Dynamically, this material has variable mechanical properties depending on the vibration frequency. A novel technique is being employed to examine the variation of the mechanical impedance of pork muscle as a function of frequency. A force is imposed on the lower surface of the sample and acceleration is measured on its upper surface. These two parameters are measured using sensors. The sample is modeled by Kelvin-Voigt model. These measures allow deducing the change in the mechanical impedance modulus (/Zexp/ = /Force: Acceleration/) of pork muscle as a function of vibration frequency. The measured impedance has a resonance of approximately 60Hz. Best-fit parameters of theoretical impedance can be deduced by superposition with the experiment result. The variation of Young’s modulus and internal damping of pig’s muscle as a function of frequency are determined. The results obtained between 5Hz and 30Hz are the same as determined by Aimedieu and al in 2003, therefore validating our technique. The Young’s modulus of muscle increases with the frequency, on the other hand, we note a rating decrease of internal damping.

  7. Shear Induced Morphology Evolution and Dynamic Viscoelastic Behavior of Binary and Ternary Elastomer Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xia; Liu, Xianggui; Liu, Wei; Han, Charles C.; Wang, Dujin

    2015-03-01

    The morphology evolution and rheological response of a near-critical composition polybutadiene /polyisoprene blend and solution-polymerized styrene-butadiene rubber/polyisoprene/silica ternary composites after various shear flow were in situ studied with the rheological and rheo-optical techniques. The relationship between the morphology of the blend during the relaxation after the cessation of steady shear with different shear rates and their corresponding rheological properties was successfully established. It was found that the different shear-induced morphologies under steady shear would relax to the equilibrium states via varied mechanisms after the shear cessation. The storage modulus G' increased significantly in the breakup process of the string-like phase. In long time scale, silica slowed down the succeeding breakup of the string-phase domains and simultaneous coalescence of broken droplets, and then effectively reduced the droplets size and stabilized the morphology. The authors thank the financial support from National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51173195).

  8. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves and Down-Hole Tests in the Archeological "Palatine Hill" Area (Rome, Italy): Evaluation and Influence of 2D Effects on the Shear Wave Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiore, V.; Cavuoto, G.; Tarallo, D.; Punzo, M.; Evangelista, L.

    2016-05-01

    A joint analysis of down-hole (DH) and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) measurements offers a complete evaluation of shear wave velocity profiles, especially for sites where a strong lateral variability is expected, such as archeological sites. In this complex stratigraphic setting, the high "subsoil anisotropy" (i.e., sharp lithological changes due to the presence of anthropogenic backfill deposits and/or buried man-made structures) implies a different role for DH and MASW tests. This paper discusses some results of a broad experimental program conducted on the Palatine Hill, one of the most ancient areas of the city of Rome (Italy). The experiments were part of a project on seismic microzoning and consisted of 20 MASW and 11 DH tests. The main objective of this study was to examine the difficulties related to the interpretation of the DH and MASW tests and the reliability limits inherent in the application of the noninvasive method in complex stratigraphic settings. As is well known, DH tests provide good determinations of shear wave velocities (Vs) for different lithologies and man-made materials, whereas MASW tests provide average values for the subsoil volume investigated. The data obtained from each method with blind tests were compared and were correlated to site-specific subsurface conditions, including lateral variability. Differences between punctual (DH) and global (MASW) Vs measurements are discussed, quantifying the errors by synthetic comparison and by site response analyses. This study demonstrates that, for archeological sites, VS profiles obtained from the DH and MASW methods differ by more than 15 %. However, the local site effect showed comparable results in terms of natural frequencies, whereas the resolution of the inverted shear wave velocity was influenced by the fundamental mode of propagation.

  9. Introducing Biomimetic Shear and Ion Gradients to Microfluidic Spinning Improves Silk Fiber Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, David; Jacobsen, Matthew M.; Rim, Nae Gyune; Backman, Daniel; Kaplan, David L.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2017-01-01

    Silkworm silk is an attractive biopolymer for biomedical applications due to its high mechanical strength and biocompatibility; as a result, there is increasing interest in scalable devices to spin silk and recombinant silk so as to improve and customize their properties for diverse biomedical purposes.[1] While artificial spinning of regenerated silk fibroins adds tunability to properties such as degradation rate and surface functionalization, the resulting fibers do not yet approach the mechanical strength of native silkworm silk. These drawbacks reduce the applicability and attractiveness of artificial silk.[2] Here, we used computational fluid dynamic simulations to incorporate shear in tandem with biomimetic ion gradients by coupling a modular novel glass microfluidic device to our previous co-axial flow device. Fibers spun with this combined apparatus demonstrated a significant increase in mechanical strength compared to fibers spun with the basic apparatus alone, with a three-fold increase in Young’s modulus and extensibility and a twelve-fold increase in toughness. These results thus demonstrate the critical importance of ionic milieu and shear stress in spinning strong fibers from solubilized silk fibroin. PMID:28471354

  10. Shear adhesion strength of thermoplastic gecko-inspired synthetic adhesive exceeds material limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Andrew G; Fearing, Ronald S

    2011-09-20

    Natural gecko array wearless dynamic friction has recently been reported for 30,000 cycles on a smooth substrate. Following these findings, stiff polymer gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives have been proposed for high-cycle applications such as robot feet. Here we examine the behavior of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polypropylene (PP) microfiber arrays during repeated cycles of engagement on a glass surface, with a normal preload of less than 40 kPa. We find that fiber arrays maintained 54% of the original shear stress of 300 kPa after 10,000 cycles, despite showing a marked plastic deformation of fiber tips. This deformation could be due to shear-induced plastic creep of the fiber tips from high adhesion forces, adhesive wear, or thermal effects. We hypothesize that a fundamental material limit has been reached for these fiber arrays and that future gecko synthetic adhesive designs must take into account the high adhesive forces generated to avoid damage. Although the synthetic material and natural gecko arrays have a similar elastic modulus, the synthetic material does not show the same wear-free dynamic friction as the gecko.

  11. Three-dimensional shear wave imaging based on full-field laser speckle contrast imaging with one-dimensional mechanical scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Pei-Yu; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-08-22

    The high imaging resolution and motion sensitivity of optical-based shear wave detection has made it an attractive technique in biomechanics studies with potential for improving the capabilities of shear wave elasticity imaging. In this study we implemented laser speckle contrast imaging for two-dimensional (X-Z) tracking of transient shear wave propagation in agarose phantoms. The mechanical disturbances induced by the propagation of the shear wave caused temporal and spatial fluctuations in the local speckle pattern, which manifested as local blurring. By mechanically moving the sample in the third dimension (Y), and performing two-dimensional shear wave imaging at every scan position, the three-dimensional shear wave velocity distribution of the phantom could be reconstructed. Based on comparisons with the reference shear wave velocity measurements obtained using a commercial ultrasound shear wave imaging system, the developed system can estimate the shear wave velocity with an error of less than 6% for homogeneous phantoms with shear moduli ranging from 1.52 kPa to 7.99 kPa. The imaging sensitivity of our system makes it capable of measuring small variations in shear modulus; the estimated standard deviation of the shear modulus was found to be less than 0.07 kPa. A submillimeter spatial resolution for three-dimensional shear wave imaging has been achieved, as demonstrated by the ability to detect a 1-mm-thick stiff plate embedded inside heterogeneous agarose phantoms.

  12. 不同处理方法对树脂面与托槽粘接强度的影响%Effects of different surface treatments on shear bonding strength between brackets and resin veneers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈湘涛; 朱红; 梁凤林; 陈琳

    2009-01-01

    背景:树脂表面不同处理方法对金属托槽和树脂面的粘接强度可能有直接影响.目的:观察不同表面处理方法对金属托槽与光固化复合树脂修复体粘接抗剪切强度的影响.设计、时间及地点:对比观察实验,于2006-05/2007-04佳木斯大学口腔生物材料实验室完成.材料:制作20个双面充光固化复合树脂的长方块,共计40个树脂面,随机分为乙醇组、打磨组、酸蚀组、酸蚀+硅烷组,每组10个树脂面.方法:乙醇组:用蘸有体积分数为75%乙醇溶液的棉球擦拭树脂面,自然晾干.打磨组:使用钨钢麻花钻打磨树脂面中央使粘接面粗糙,打磨面积稍大于托槽底面积,用无油水气枪冲洗15 s,吹干.酸蚀组:9.6%氢氟酸酸蚀树脂面2 min,酸蚀面积稍大于托槽底面积,蒸馏水冲洗20 s,吹干.酸蚀+硅烷组:9.6%氢氟酸酸蚀处理同上,再在酸蚀的树脂面上均匀涂布一层硅烷偶联剂.在处理过的树脂面上均匀涂布一薄层光固化复合树脂底胶光固化灯照射20 s,将适量复合树脂置于托槽底部,以均匀适当的压力将托槽就位去除托槽周围多余的树脂,用光固化灯从托槽的近远中方向分别照射40 s使其固化粘接.主要观察指标:所有样品储存在37℃水中24 h后,5~55℃冷热循500次.将样品置于电子万能试验机下进行抗剪切强度的测试.并在10倍放大镜下观察树脂面破坏情况.结果:打磨组、酸蚀+硅烷组的抗剪切强度明显高于乙醇组和酸蚀组(P0.05).结论:氢氟酸酸蚀+硅烷偶联剂联合使用可提高金属托槽与光固化复合树脂修复体粘接的抗剪切强度,硅烷偶联剂的使用增加了托槽与树脂面的粘接强度.%BACKGROUND: Surface preparation of resin can directly influence the shear strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to resin surface.OBJECJIME: To compare the effects of various surface treatments on the shear bonding strength between metal brackets and resin

  13. Avaliação da resistência ao cisalhamento de braquetes da técnica lingual colados sobre superfície cerâmica Evaluation of shear strength of lingual brackets bonded to ceramic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Balestrin Imakami

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a resistência ao cisalhamento de braquetes metálicos (American Orthodontics utilizados na técnica lingual, colados em facetas de cerâmica. MÉTODOS: foram utilizados 40 corpos de prova divididos em quatro grupos de 10, de acordo com o material de colagem e do preparo da porcelana: Grupo I -resina Sondhi Rapid-Set e ácido fluorídrico; Grupo II -resina Sondhi Rapid-Set e óxido de alumínio; Grupo III -resina Transbond XT e ácido fluorídrico; e Grupo IV -resina Transbond XT e óxido de alumínio. Previamente à colagem, os braquetes foram preparados com base de resina de carga pesada (Z-250 e as facetas de cerâmica receberam aplicação de silano. O teste de cisalhamento foi realizado por uma máquina de ensaios Kratos à uma velocidade de 0,5mm/min. RESULTADOS: os resultados obtidos foram analisados estatisticamente através do teste de Tukey (pOBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear strength of lingual metal brackets (American Orthodontics bonded to ceramic veneers. METHODS: A total of 40 specimens were divided into four groups of 10, according to bonding material and ceramics preparation: Group I -Sondhi Rapid-Set resin and Hydrofluoric acid, Group II -Sondhi Rapid-Set resin and aluminum oxide, Group III -Transbond XT resin and Hydrofluoric acid, and Group IV -Transbond XT resin and aluminum oxide. Prior to bonding, the brackets were prepared with heavy-duty resin base (Z-250 and the ceramic veneers were treated with silane. The shear test was conducted with a Kratos testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS: The results were statistically analyzed by the Tukey test (p<0.05 and showed a statistically significant difference between groups I (2.77 MPa and IV (6.00 MPa, and between groups III (3.33 MPa and IV. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the bonding of lingual brackets to ceramic surfaces exhibited greater shear strength when aluminum oxide was used in association with the two resins utilized in

  14. Size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient of thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Ye; Huang, Bao-Ling; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-08-21

    Nanomaterials possess a high surface/volume ratio and surfaces play an essential role in size-dependent material properties. In the present study, nanometer-thick thin films were taken as an ideal system to investigate the surface-induced size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient. The surface eigenstress model was further developed with the consideration of thermal expansion, leading to analytic formulas of size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus, and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient of thin films. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on face-centered cubic (fcc) Ag, Cu, and Ni(001) thin films were conducted at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 600 K. The MD simulation results are perfectly consistent with the theoretical predictions, thereby verifying the theoretical approach. The newly developed surface eigenstress model will be able to attack similar problems in other types of nanomaterials.

  15. Determination of the elastic modulus of snow via acoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerling, Bastian; van Herwijnen, Alec; Löwe, Henning

    2016-04-01

    The elastic modulus of snow is a key quantity from the viewpoint of avalanche research and forecasting, snow engineering or materials science in general. Since it is a fundamental property, many measurements have been reported in the literature. Due to differences in measurement methods, there is a lot of variation in the reported values. Especially values derived via computer tomography (CT) based numerical calculations using finite element methods are not corresponding to the results of other methods. The central issue is that CT based moduli are purely elastic whereas other methods may include viscoelastic deformation. In order to avoid this discrepancy we derived the elastic modulus of snow via wave propagation measurements and compared our results with CT based calculations. We measured the arrival times of acoustic pulses propagating through the snow samples to determine the P-wave velocity and in turn derive the elastic modulus along the direction of wave propagation. We performed a series of laboratory experiments to derive the P-wave modulus of snow in relation to density. The P-wave modulus ranged from 10 to 280 MPa for a snow density between 150 and 370 kg/m^3;. The moduli derived from the acoustic measurements correlated well with the CT-based values and both exhibited a power law trend over the entire density range. Encouraged by these results we used the acoustic method to investigate the temporal evolution of the elastic modulus. The rate of increase was very close to values mentioned in literature on the sintering rate of snow. Overall, our results are a first but important step towards a new measurement method to attain the elastic properties of snow.

  16. Fracture Toughness and Elastic Modulus of Epoxy-Based Nanocomposites with Dopamine-Modified Nano-Fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Kwang Liang Koh; Xianbai Ji; Aravind Dasari; Xuehong Lu; Soo Khim Lau; Zhong Chen

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of surface treatment and filler shape factor on the fracture toughness and elastic modulus of epoxy-based nanocomposite. Two forms of nanofillers, polydopamine-coated montmorillonite clay (D-clay) and polydopamine-coated carbon nanofibres (D-CNF) were investigated. It was found that Young’s modulus increases with increasing D-clay and D-CNF loading. However, the fracture toughness decreases with increased D-clay loading but increases with increased D-CNF loading...

  17. Modulus of families of loops with applications in network analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Shakeri, Heman; Albin, Nathan; Scoglio, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    We study the structure of loops in networks using the notion of modulus of loop families. We introduce a new measure of network clustering by quantifying the richness of families of simple loops. Modulus tries to minimize the expected overlap among loops by spreading the expected link-usage optimally. We propose weighting networks using these expected link-usages to improve classical community detection algorithms. We show that the proposed method enhances the performance of certain algorithms, such as spectral partitioning and modularity maximization, on standard benchmarks.

  18. Temperature, Frequency and Young’s Modulus of a Wineglass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitta Miller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A crystal soda-lime wineglass, heated to temperatures ranging from 25 °C to 150 °C, was tapped and the frequency recorded. It was shown that the relative change in the frequency at different temperatures can be used to determine the effect of temperature on Young’s Modulus of the glass. This simple method of tapping a wineglass is proposed as an effective way of determining the relative effect of temperature on Young’ Modulus of glass.

  19. Mesoscale Elucidation of Biofilm Shear Behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Barai, Pallab; Mukherjee, Partha P

    2015-01-01

    Formation of bacterial colonies as biofilm on the surface/interface of various objects has the potential to impact not only human health and disease but also energy and environmental considerations. Biofilms can be regarded as soft materials, and comprehension of their shear response to external forces is a key element to the fundamental understanding. A mesoscale model has been presented in this article based on digitization of a biofilm microstructure. Its response under externally applied shear load is analyzed. Strain stiffening type behavior is readily observed under high strain loads due to the unfolding of chains within soft polymeric substrate. Sustained shear loading of the biofilm network results in strain localization along the diagonal direction. Rupture of the soft polymeric matrix can potentially reduce the intercellular interaction between the bacterial cells. Evolution of stiffness within the biofilm network under shear reveals two regions: a) initial increase in stiffness due to strain stiffe...

  20. Influence of different silane coupling agents on shear bond strength of metal brackets to porcelain surface%不同偶联剂对烤瓷瓷面与金属托槽抗剪切力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁宏

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of different silane coupling agents to the shear bond strength of metal brackets bonded to porcelain surface. Methods 30 porcelain specimens were deglazed by water sandpaper and etched,rinsed with distilled water and dried before applying the silane primer.All specimens were divided randomly into 3 groups according to different silane coupling agents application,every group had 10 porcelain facets.30 metal brackets were bonded to ceramic specimens.All specimens were stored in artificial saliva bath at 37℃ for 24 hours.after brackets bonded for 60min,then the specimens were underwent shear testing with Instron universal testing machine. Results The shear bond strength of the groups treated with silane primer were higher than that without silane primer(P0.05).The groups treated without silane coupling agent showed lower porcelain fracture than the groups treated with silane coupling agent. Conclusions Silane coupling agent can improve the shear bond strength between metal brackets and porcelain surface.There was not any statistically significant in the shear bond strength between the group of one-mix silane coupling agent and the group of two-mix silane coupling agent.%目的:研究不同类型硅烷偶联剂对烤瓷瓷面与金属托槽之间抗剪切力的影响。方法:将30个烤瓷瓷面行水砂纸打磨去釉,HF酸蚀处理,根据硅烷偶联剂的不同随机分3组,将30个金属托槽粘结于烤瓷瓷面,托槽粘结60min后经37℃恒温人工唾液水浴孵化24h,使用Instron万能材料力学试验机测定样本抗剪切力。结果:使用硅烷偶联剂组抗剪切力比未使用硅烷偶联剂组大,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);单组份和双组份硅烷偶联剂组之间抗剪切力比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);未使用硅烷偶联剂组瓷面破损指数明显小于使用硅烷偶联剂组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:硅烷偶联剂能有

  1. Impact of twin boundaries on bulk elastic constants: Density-functional theory data for Young׳s modulus of Ag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöffel, Tobias; Bitzek, Erik; Meyer, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies on nanowires have reported a size-dependence of the Young׳s modulus in the axial direction, which has been attributed to the increasing influence of surface stresses with decreasing wire diameter. Internal interfaces and their associated interface stresses could lead to similar changes in the elastic properties. In Kobler et al. [1], however, we reported results from atomistic calculations which showed for Ag that twin boundaries have a negligible effect on the Young׳s modulus. Here, we present data of density-functional theory calculations of elastic constants and Young׳s modulus for defect-free bulk Ag as well as for bulk Ag containing dense arrays of twin boundaries. It is shown that rigorous convergence tests are required in order to be able to deduce changes in the elastic properties due to bulk defects in a reliable way.

  2. Young's modulus measurements of SiC coatings on spherical particles by using nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, J.; Meadows, P.J. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester, M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Zhang, D. [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Chen Xi [Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Columbia University, New York (United States); Lopez-Honorato, E.; Zhao, X.; Yang, F. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester, M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Abram, T. [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Xiao, P., E-mail: ping.xiao@manchester.ac.u [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester, M1 7HS (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Spherical silicon carbide coatings are deposited by fluidised bed chemical vapour deposition for the application to Tristructural Isotropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles. The silicon carbide exhibits columnar structure and grows along the radial direction during deposition. In this work, two measurements are made with nanoindentation, one is measured vertically to the grain growth direction, which gives a Young's modulus of 391.1 +- 12.9 GPa, and the other is measured along the grain growth direction which gives a Young's modulus of 442.5 +- 13.3 GPa. Finite element analysis and a theoretical effort are introduced to estimate the bending contribution when the indentation is carried out on the external surface of SiC. The relationship between grain orientation of SiC and its Young's modulus has been examined.

  3. Estimation of viscoelastic parameters in Prony series from shear wave propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jae-Wook; Hong, Jung-Wuk, E-mail: j.hong@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: jwhong@alum.mit.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, KAIST, 291 Deahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyoung-Ki; Choi, Kiwan [Health and Medical Equipment, Samsung Electronics, 1003 Daechi-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-280 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-21

    When acquiring accurate ultrasonic images, we must precisely estimate the mechanical properties of the soft tissue. This study investigates and estimates the viscoelastic properties of the tissue by analyzing shear waves generated through an acoustic radiation force. The shear waves are sourced from a localized pushing force acting for a certain duration, and the generated waves travel horizontally. The wave velocities depend on the mechanical properties of the tissue such as the shear modulus and viscoelastic properties; therefore, we can inversely calculate the properties of the tissue through parametric studies.

  4. Cross Shear Roll Bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Bjerregaard, Henrik; Petersen, Søren. B;

    1994-01-01

    The present paper describes an investigation of roll bonding an AlZn alloy to mild steel. Application of cross shear roll bonding, where the two equal sized rolls run with different peripheral speed, is shown to give better bond strength than conventional roll bonding. Improvements of up to 20......-23% in bond strength are found and full bond strength is obtained at a reduction of 50% whereas 65% is required in case of conventional roll bonding. Pseudo cross shear roll bonding, where the cross shear effect is obtained by running two equal sized rolls with different speed, gives the same results....

  5. Angular shear plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruda, Mitchell C [Tucson, AZ; Greynolds, Alan W [Tucson, AZ; Stuhlinger, Tilman W [Tucson, AZ

    2009-07-14

    One or more disc-shaped angular shear plates each include a region thereon having a thickness that varies with a nonlinear function. For the case of two such shear plates, they are positioned in a facing relationship and rotated relative to each other. Light passing through the variable thickness regions in the angular plates is refracted. By properly timing the relative rotation of the plates and by the use of an appropriate polynomial function for the thickness of the shear plate, light passing therethrough can be focused at variable positions.

  6. Study of the Effect of Temperature Changes on the Elastic Modulus of Flexible Pavement Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Raihan Taha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In general, the stiffness of flexible pavement is influenced by environmental changes, whereby temperature and rainfall affect the asphalt layer and non-asphalt layer, such as the subgrade, respectively. Normally, the effect of temperature on flexible pavement can be measured using two methods. The first is a destructive test whereby core samples are tested in a laboratory using a Universal Testing Machine (UTM. The second is a non-destructive in situ test using equipment such as a Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD and Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of temperature at different tensile levels on the Soekarno-Hatta and Purwakarta Cikampek roads in Bandung, West Java, Indonesia. It is observed that different tensile levels and testing methods result in various elastic modulus values of flexible pavement. The higher the temperature applied to the flexible pavement layer, the more the elastic modulus values decrease. In contrast, the lower the temperature imposed on the flexible pavement layer, the more the elastic modulus values increase. Different testing methods (FWD, UTM and SASW on the flexible pavement layer are also affected by temperature changes.

  7. Indentation modulus and hardness of viscoelastic thin films by atomic force microscopy: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passeri, D., E-mail: daniele.passeri@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Bettucci, A.; Biagioni, A.; Rossi, M.; Alippi, A. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Tamburri, E. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma (Italy); Lucci, M.; Davoli, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma (Italy); Berezina, S. [Department of Physics, University of Zilina, 01026, Univerzitna 1 Zilina (Slovakia)

    2009-11-15

    We propose a nanoindentation technique based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) that allows one to deduce both indentation modulus and hardness of viscoelastic materials from the force versus penetration depth dependence, obtained by recording the AFM cantilever deflection as a function of the sample vertical displacement when the tip is pressed against (loading phase) and then removed from (unloading phase) the surface of the sample. Reliable quantitative measurements of both indentation modulus and hardness of the investigated sample are obtained by calibrating the technique through a set of different polymeric samples, used as reference materials, whose mechanical properties have been previously determined by standard indentation tests. By analyzing the dependence of the cantilever deflection versus time, the proposed technique allows one to evaluate and correct the effect of viscoelastic properties of the investigated materials, by adapting a post-experiment data processing procedure well-established for standard depth sensing indentation tests. The technique is described in the case of the measurement of indentation modulus and hardness of a thin film of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(4-styrenesulfonate), deposited by chronoamperometry on an indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate.

  8. Haptic Edge Detection Through Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Lipson, Hod; Hayward, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Most tactile sensors are based on the assumption that touch depends on measuring pressure. However, the pressure distribution at the surface of a tactile sensor cannot be acquired directly and must be inferred from the deformation field induced by the touched object in the sensor medium. Currently, there is no consensus as to which components of strain are most informative for tactile sensing. Here, we propose that shape-related tactile information is more suitably recovered from shear strain than normal strain. Based on a contact mechanics analysis, we demonstrate that the elastic behavior of a haptic probe provides a robust edge detection mechanism when shear strain is sensed. We used a jamming-based robot gripper as a tactile sensor to empirically validate that shear strain processing gives accurate edge information that is invariant to changes in pressure, as predicted by the contact mechanics study. This result has implications for the design of effective tactile sensors as well as for the understanding of the early somatosensory processing in mammals. PMID:27009331

  9. Adjustable rheology of fumed silica dispersion in urethane prepolymers: Composition-dependent sol and gel behaviors and energy-mediated shear responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zhong, E-mail: 11329038@zju.edu.cn; Song, Yihu, E-mail: s-yh0411@zju.edu.cn; Wang, Xiang, E-mail: 11229036@zju.edu.cn; Zheng, Qiang, E-mail: zhengqiang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Variation of colloidal and interfacial interactions leads to a microstructural diversity in fumed silica dispersions exhibiting absolutely different sol- or gel-like rheological responses. In this study, fumed silicas with different surface areas (200–400 m{sup 2}/g) and surface characteristics (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) are dispersed into moisture-cured polyurethane. The microstructures investigated using transmission electron microscope are associated perfectly with three different rheological behaviors: (i) Sols with well-dispersed silica aggregates, (ii) weak gels with agglomerate-linked networks, and (iii) strong gels with concentrated networks of large agglomerates. Though sols and gels are well distinguished by shear thickening or sustained thinning response through steady shear flow test, it is interesting that the sols and weak gels exhibit a uniform modulus plateau-softening-hardening-softening response with increasing dynamic strain at frequency 10 rad s{sup −1} while the strong gels show a sustained softening beyond the linear regime. Furthermore, the onset of softening and hardening can be normalized: The two softening are isoenergetic at mechanical energies of 0.3 J m{sup −3} and 10 kJ m{sup −3}. On the other hand, the hardening is initiated by a critical strain of 60%. The mechanisms involved in the generation of the sol- and the gel-like dispersions and their structural evolutions during shear are thoroughly clarified in relation to the polyols, the characteristic and content of silica and the curing catalysts.

  10. Mechanical spectra of glass-forming liquids. I. Low-frequency bulk and shear moduli of DC704 and 5-PPE measured by piezoceramic transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecksher, Tina; Olsen, Niels Boye; Nelson, Keith Adam

    2013-01-01

    We present dynamic shear and bulk modulus measurements of supercooled tetraphenyl-tetramethyl-trisiloxane (DC704) and 5-phenyl-4-ether over a range of temperatures close to their glass transition. The data are analyzed and compared in terms of time-temperature superposition (TTS), the relaxation...... time, and the spectral shape parameters. We conclude that TTS is obeyed to a good approximation for both the bulk and shear moduli. The loss-peak shapes are nearly identical, while the shear modulus relaxes faster than the bulk modulus. The temperature dependence of this decoupling of time scales...... is constant over the temperature range explored here. In addition, we demonstrate how one can measure reliably the DC shear viscosity over ten orders of magnitude by using the two measuring techniques in combination....

  11. In vivo areal modulus of elasticity estimation of the human tympanic membrane system: modelling of middle ear mechanical function in normal young and aged ears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaihede, Michael [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark); Liao Donghua [Centre of Excellence in Visceral Biomechanics and Pain, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark); Gregersen, Hans [Centre of Excellence in Visceral Biomechanics and Pain, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark)

    2007-02-07

    The quasi-static elastic properties of the tympanic membrane system can be described by the areal modulus of elasticity determined by a middle ear model. The response of the tympanic membrane to quasi-static pressure changes is determined by its elastic properties. Several clinical problems are related to these, but studies are few and mostly not comparable. The elastic properties of membranes can be described by the areal modulus, and these may also be susceptible to age-related changes reflected by changes in the areal modulus. The areal modulus is determined by the relationship between membrane tension and change of the surface area relative to the undeformed surface area. A middle ear model determined the tension-strain relationship in vivo based on data from experimental pressure-volume deformations of the human tympanic membrane system. The areal modulus was determined in both a younger (n = 10) and an older (n = 10) group of normal subjects. The areal modulus for lateral and medial displacement of the tympanic membrane system was smaller in the older group (mean = 0.686 and 0.828 kN m{sup -1}, respectively) compared to the younger group (mean = 1.066 and 1.206 kN m{sup -1}, respectively), though not significantly (2p = 0.10 and 0.11, respectively). Based on the model the areal modulus was established describing the summated elastic properties of the tympanic membrane system. Future model improvements include exact determination of the tympanic membrane area accounting for its shape via 3D finite element analyses. In vivo estimates of Young's modulus in this study were a factor 2-3 smaller than previously found in vitro. No significant age-related differences were found in the elastic properties as expressed by the areal modulus.

  12. Quantitative photoacoustic elastography of Young's modulus in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Gong, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-03-01

    Elastography can noninvasively map the elasticity distribution of biological tissue, which is often altered in pathological states. In this work, we report quantitative photoacoustic elastography (QPAE), capable of measuring Young's modulus of human tissue in vivo. By combining photoacoustic elastography with a stress sensor having known stress-strain behavior, QPAE can simultaneously measure strain and stress, from which Young's modulus is calculated. We first applied QPAE to quantify the Young's modulus of tissue-mimicking agar phantoms with different concentrations. The measured values fitted well with both the empirical expectations based on the agar concentrations and those measured in independent standard compression tests. We then demonstrated the feasibility of QPAE by measuring the Young's modulus of human skeletal muscle in vivo. The data showed a linear relationship between muscle stiffness and loading. The results proved that QPAE can noninvasively quantify the absolute elasticity of biological tissue, thus enabling longitudinal imaging of tissue elasticity. QPAE can be exploited for both preclinical biomechanics studies and clinical applications.

  13. Device to measure elastic modulus of superconducting windings

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    This device was made to measure elastic modulus of the Po dipole superconducting coils. More elaborated devices, but based on the same concept, were later used to measure the apparent elastic moduli of the LHC superconducting magnet coils. See also 7903547X, 7901386.

  14. Modulus of smoothness and theorems concerning approximation on compact groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vaezi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the generalized shift operator defined by (Shuf(g=∫Gf(tut−1gdt on a compact group G, and by using this operator, we define “spherical” modulus of smoothness. So, we prove Stechkin and Jackson-type theorems.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Shearing Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, B M

    2006-01-01

    I consider the nonaxisymmetric linear theory of an isothermal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shear flow. The analysis is performed in the shearing box, a local model appropriate for a thin disk geometry. Linear perturbations in this model can be decomposed in terms of shearing waves (shwaves), which appear spatially as plane waves in a frame comoving with the shear. The time dependence of these waves cannot in general be expressed in terms of a frequency eigenvalue as in a normal mode decomposition, and numerical integration of a set of first-order amplitude equations is required for a complete characterization of their behavior. Their generic time dependence, however, is oscillatory with slowly-varying frequency and amplitude, and one can construct accurate analytic solutions by applying the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method to the full set of amplitude equations. For the bulk of wavenumber space, therefore, the shwaves are well-approximated as modes with time-dependent frequencies and amplitudes. The incompressiv...

  16. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with effective coupling agents and higher filler loading, viscous flow can be greatly decreased due to the

  17. Analysis of Shear Stress and Energy Consumption in a Tubular Airlift Membrane System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Chan, C.C.V.; Berube, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    of fouling by imposing high shear stress near the surface of the membrane. Previously, shear stress histograms (SSH) have been introduced to summarize results from an experimental setup developed to investigate the shear stress imposed on the surface of a membrane under different two-phase flow conditions...

  18. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1985-11-01

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Shear-resistant behavior of light composite shear wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李升才; 董毓利

    2015-01-01

    Shear test results for a composite wall panel in a light composite structure system are compared with test results for shear walls in Japan. The analysis results show that this kind of composite wall panel works very well, and can be regarded as a solid panel. The composite wall panel with a hidden frame is essential for bringing its effect on shear resistance into full play. Comprehensive analysis of the shear-resistant behavior of the composite wall panel suggests that the shear of the composite shear wall panel can be controlled by the cracking strength of the web shearing diagonal crack.

  20. Shear-Resistant Behavior Analysis of Light Composite Shear Walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李升才; 江见鲸; 于庆荣

    2002-01-01

    Shear test results for a composite wall panel in a light composite structure system are compared with test results for shear walls in Japan in this paper. The analysis results show that this kind of composite wall panel works very well, and can be regarded as a solid panel. The composite wall panel with a hidden frame is essential for bringing its effect on shear resistance into full play. Comprehensive analysis of the shear-resistant behavior of the composite wall panel suggests that the shear of the composite shear wall panel can be controlled by the cracking strength of the web shearing diagonal crack.

  1. Direct Shear Tests with Evaluation of Variable Shearing Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarūnas Skuodis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of soil shear strength properties for Baltic Sea shore sand along Klaipėda city are presented. Investigated sand angle of internal friction (φ and cohesion (c is determined via two different direct shear tests procedures. First procedure is standard and ordinary in geotechnical practice, when direct shear test is provided using constant shearing area A0. Second test procedure is different because shearing area according to horizontal displacement each test second is recalculated. This recalculated shearing area author’s call corrected shearing area A. Obtained normal and tangential stresses’ difference via two different testing procedures was 10%.

  2. Analytical Solution for Predicting In-plane Elastic Shear Properties of 2D Orthogonal PWF Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xu; XIONG Junjiang; BAI Jiangbo

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new analytical solution to predict the shear modulus of a two-dimensional (2D) plain weave fabric (PWF) composite accounting for the interaction of orthogonal interlacing strands with coupled shear deformation modes including not only relative bending but also torsion,etc.The two orthogonal yams in a micromechanical unit cell are idealized as curved beams with a path depicted by using sinusoidal shape functions.The intemal forces and macroscopic deformations carried by the yarn families,together with macroscopic shear modulus of PWFs are derived by means of a strain energy approach founded on micromechanics.Three sets of experimental data pertinent to three kinds of 2D orthogonal PWF composites have been implemented to validate the new model.The calculations from the new model are also compared with those by using two models in the earlier literature.It is shown that the experimental results correlate well with predictions from the new model.

  3. Dynamical properties of the brain tissue under oscillatory shear stresses at large strain range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjema, F.; Khelidj, B.; Lounis, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this experimental work, we study the viscoelastic behaviour of in vitro brain tissue, particularly the white matter, under oscillatory shear strain. The selective vulnerability of this tissue is the anisotropic mechanical properties of theirs different regions lead to a sensitivity to the angular shear rate and magnitude of strain. For this aim, shear storage modulus (G‧) and loss modulus (G″) were measured over a range of frequencies (1 to 100 Hz), for different levels of strain (1 %, to 50 %). The mechanical responses of the brain matter samples showed a viscoelastic behaviour that depend on the correlated strain level and frequency range and old age sample. The samples have been showed evolution behaviour by increasing then decreasing the strain level. Also, the stiffness anisotropy of brain matter was showed between regions and species.

  4. Bacterial transport suppressed by fluid shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Stocker, Roman

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria often live in dynamic fluid environments and flow can affect fundamental microbial processes such as nutrient uptake and infection. However, little is known about the consequences of the forces and torques associated with fluid flow on bacteria. Through microfluidic experiments, we show that fluid shear produces strong spatial heterogeneity in suspensions of motile bacteria, characterized by up to 70% cell depletion from low-shear regions due to `trapping’ in high-shear regions. Two mathematical models and a scaling analysis accurately capture these observations, including the maximal depletion at mean shear rates of 2.5-10 s-1, and reveal that trapping by shear originates from the competition between the cell alignment with the flow and the stochasticity in the swimming orientation. We show that this shear-induced trapping directly impacts widespread bacterial behaviours, by hampering chemotaxis and promoting surface attachment. These results suggest that the hydrodynamic environment may directly affect bacterial fitness and should be carefully considered in the study of microbial processes.

  5. Vesicle dynamics in shear and capillary flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2005-11-01

    The deformation of vesicles in flow is studied by a mesoscopic simulation technique, which combines multi-particle collision dynamics for the solvent with a dynamically triangulated surface model for the membrane. Shape transitions are investigated both in simple shear flows and in cylindrical capillary flows. We focus on reduced volumes, where the discocyte shape of fluid vesicles is stable, and the prolate shape is metastable. In simple shear flow at low membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from discocyte to prolate with increasing shear rate, while at high membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from prolate to discocyte, or tumbling motion accompanied by oscillations between these two morphologies. In capillary flow, at small flow velocities the symmetry axis of the discocyte is found not to be oriented perpendicular to the cylinder axis. With increasing flow velocity, a transition to a prolate shape occurs for fluid vesicles, while vesicles with shear-elastic membranes (like red blood cells) transform into a coaxial parachute-like shape.

  6. Dynamically triggered slip leading to sustained fault gouge weakening under laboratory shear conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. A.; Carmeliet, J.; Savage, H. M.; Scuderi, M.; Carpenter, B. M.; Guyer, R. A.; Daub, E. G.; Marone, C.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate dynamic wave-triggered slip under laboratory shear conditions. The experiment is composed of a three-block system containing two gouge layers composed of glass beads and held in place by a fixed load in a biaxial configuration. When the system is sheared under steady state conditions at a normal load of 4 MPa, we find that shear failure may be instantaneously triggered by a dynamic wave, corresponding to material weakening and softening if the system is in a critical shear stress state (near failure). Following triggering, the gouge material remains in a perturbed state over multiple slip cycles as evidenced by the recovery of the material strength, shear modulus, and slip recurrence time. This work suggests that faults must be critically stressed to trigger under dynamic conditions and that the recovery process following a dynamically triggered event differs from the recovery following a spontaneous event.

  7. Geometric aspects of shear jamming induced by deformation of frictionless sphere packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinutha, H. A.; Sastry, Srikanth

    2016-09-01

    normal mode analysis and computing shear modulus.

  8. Lubricin deficiency in the murine lumbar intervertebral disc results in elevated torsional apparent modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeple, Erin; Aslani, Koosha; Shalvoy, Matthew R; Medrano, Jade E; Zhang, Ling; Machan, Jason T; Fleming, Braden C; Jay, Gregory D

    2015-07-16

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanical consequences of proteoglycan 4 (Prg4) deficiency on intervertebral disc mechanics using a Prg4 knockout mouse model. Prg4, also called lubricin, was first identified as the boundary lubricant in synovial fluid but has subsequently been localized within a number of musculoskeletal tissues in areas subjected to shear and tensile stresses, including the intervertebral disc. The function of lubricin in the intervertebral disc has not been determined. Lumbar level 1-2 vertebral body-disc-vertebral body motion segments were isolated from Prg4 null mice and wild type (WT) litter mate controls. Disc dimensions were measured and motion segments were tested in axial loading and torsion. Torque measurements and disc dimensions were used to calculate the torsional apparent modulus for discs from Prg4 null and WT discs. Discs from Prg4 null mice had a significantly smaller mean transverse disc area (p=0.0057), with a significantly larger proportion of this area occupied by the nucleus pulposus (p<0.0001), compared to WT specimens. Apparent torsional moduli were found to be elevated in Prg4 null lumbar discs compared to WT controls at 10-10° (p=0.0048) and 10-30° (p=0.0127) rotation. This study suggests a functional role for Prg4 in the murine intervertebral disc. The absence of Prg4 was associated with an increased apparent torsional modulus and the structural consequences of Prg4 deficiency in the intervertebral disc, with expansion of the area of the nucleus pulposus relative to the transverse disc area in Prg4 null specimens.

  9. Protocol for determining Apparent Young's Modulus of human teeth using laser speckle interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Palmer, Rosario; González-Peña, Rolando J.; Martínez-Celorio, René A.; López, Francisco J.; Paredes, Vanessa; Cibrián, Rosa

    2012-10-01

    Digital Speckle Shearing Pattern Interferometry (DSSPI) allows to directly quantify deformations in teeth that are subjected to stress. Eighteen second premolars (2PM) were studied both before and after endodontic treatment made with the ProTaper method in order to evaluate the variation of dental elasticity. We present a protocol for determination tooth Apparent Young's Modulus (AYM). Each tooth underwent different flexion loads from 50 to 300 g. DSSPI technique, makes it possible to show the deformation at each point of a line, selected by the researcher, that goes from the attachment point (Point 0) to the root area where the load is applied (Point 300-350, depending on the tooth size). The deformation of each tooth was characterized by the deformation value of point 150, located around the mid-area of tooth. This value was obtained from a linear regression applied on the deformation values of all the points in the fitted line. The correlation coefficients of these fitted regression lines were always higher than 0.972. The elasticity constant of each tooth was obtained as the slope of a new regression line, corresponding to the different loads applied on the tooth versus the corresponding deformation at point 150. This value, divided by the length of the tooth, is the apparent Young's modulus (AYM), which is expressed in arbitrary units (a.u.). Values of the AYM before (4.16 104 a.u) and after endodontic treatment using the ProTaper method (4.30 104 a.u.) showed no statistically significant difference in the elasticity of teeth (p>0.7).

  10. Ambient Noise Surface Wave Tomography for Geotechnical Monitoring Using "Large N" Distributed Acoustic Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Lindsey, N.; Martin, E. R.; Wagner, A. M.; Robertson, M.; Bjella, K.; Gelvin, A.; Ulrich, C.; Wu, Y.; Freifeld, B. M.; Daley, T. M.; Dou, S.

    2015-12-01

    Surface wave tomography using ambient noise sources has found broad application at the regional scale but has not been adopted fully for geotechnical applications despite the abundance of noise sources in this context. The recent development of Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) provides a clear path for inexpensively recording high spatial resolution (survey as well as direct-push data on ice content. We also compare vintages of ambient noise DAS data to evaluate the short-term repeatability of the technique in the face of changing noise environments. The resulting dataset demonstrates the utility of using DAS for real-time shear-modulus monitoring in support of critical infrastructure.

  11. Dynamics of Discontinuous Shear Thickening suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Concentrated suspensions of hard particles such as cornstarch in water exhibit Discontinuous Shear Thickening, in which an increasing shear rate drives a transition from liquid- to solid-like mechanical behavior. In steady-state shear this phenomena is a result of a dynamic version of jamming in which forces are transmitted along particle contact networks that span to system boundaries and repeatedly form and break up. Several dynamic phenomena observed in such suspensions have long been assumed to be a consequence of this shear thickening, but cannot be explained as a direct result of shear thickening; for example a uniquely strong impact response which allows a person to run on the fluid surface. We perform experiments in which a concentrated suspension is subjected to transient impact. We find that the strong impact response is due a short-lived jammed contact network spanning to the boundaries and a delay time required for this dynamically jammed region to propagate to the boundary. The resulting ability of this system-spanning solid-like region to support loads can explain the ability of a person to run on the surface of these fluids. This delay before a solid-like response may also explain several other dynamic phenomena observed in these fluids.

  12. Water Uptake Behavior and Young Modulus Prediction of Composites Based on Treated Sisal Fibers and Poly(Lactic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ander Orue

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this work was to study the effect of sisal fiber surface treatments on water uptake behavior of composites based on untreated and treated fibers. For this purpose, sisal fibers were treated with different chemical treatments. All surface treatments delayed the water absorption of fibers only for a short time of period. No significant differences were observed in water uptake profiles of composites based on fibers with different surface treatments. After water uptake period, tensile strength and Young modulus values of sisal fiber/poly(lactic acid (PLA composites were decreased. On the other hand, composites based on NaOH + silane treated fibers showed the lowest diffusion coefficient values, suggesting that this treatment seemed to be the most effective treatment to reduce water diffusion rate into the composites. Finally, Young modulus values of composites, before water uptake period, were predicted using different micromechanical models and were compared with experimental data.

  13. Shear elastic constants of thin films of the misfit layered compound [(SnSe)1.05]n[MoSe2]n

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongyao; Mitchson, Gavin; Johnson, David; Schleife, Andre; Cahill, David

    Crystalline materials with interlayer van der Waals bonding typically have low stiffness for shear deformation that reduces the through-plane thermal conductivity and facilitates the use of layered materials as solid-state lubricants. In graphite and MoS2, c44 = 5GPa and 18GPa respectively. The shear modulus of incommensurate layered materials is expected to be strongly reduced relative to ordered crystals but the magnitude of the suppression is currently unknown. We have recently developed an approach for measuring the shear modulus of thin layers using GHz surface acoustic waves (SAW). [(SnSe)1.05]n[MoSe2]n with n =1-4 were prepared as thin films (60 nm) on Si substrates using the modulated elemental reactants technique. The SAW velocity vSAWof Al/[(SnSe)(MoSe2) ]/Si structures was measured using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phase-shift optical mask in a pump-probe system. c44 was determined by fitting the measured vSAW to the calculated SAW velocity using multi-layer SAW model. c33was measured by picosecond acoustics. c11, c12 and c13 were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with van der Waals correction. The measured c33 and c44 are compared with the DFT prediction. Experimentally we obtain c44 = 1.9GPa, 1.2GPa, and smaller than 0.05GPa for n =1, 2 and 4. The author acknowledge the support of International Institute for Carbon Neutral Energy Research.

  14. Size-Dependent Elastic Modulus and Vibration Frequency of Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The elastic properties and the vibration characterization are important for the stability of materials and devices, especially for nanomaterials with potential and broad application. Nanomaterials show different properties from the corresponding bulk materials; the valid theoretical model about the size effect of the elastic modulus and the vibration frequency is significant to guide the application of nanomaterials. In this paper, a unified analytical model about the size-dependent elastic modulus and vibration frequency of nanocrystalline metals, ceramics and semiconductors is established based on the inherent lattice strain and the binding energy change of nanocrystals compared with the bulk crystals, and the intrinsic correlation between the elasticity and the vibration properties is discussed. The theoretical predictions for Cu, Ag, Si thin films, nanoparticles, and TiO2 nanoparticles agree with the experimental results, the computational simulations, and the other theoretical models.

  15. Ultrasonic Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Kelvin Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Sukwon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastic modulus of 3D-printed Kelvin foam plate is investigated by measuring the acoustic wave velocity of 1 MHz ultrasound. An isotropic tetrakaidecahedron foam of 3 mm unit cell is designed and printed layer upon layer to fablicate a Kelvin foam plate of 14mm thickness by 3D CAD/printer using ABS plastic. The Kelvin foam plate is filled completely with paraffin wax for impedance matching, so that acoustic wave may propagate through the porous foam plate. The acoustic wave velocity of the foam plate is measured using the time-of-flight (TOF method to calculate the elastic modulus of the Kelvin foam plate based on acousto-elasticity.

  16. Evaluation of Bulk Modulus of Oil System with Hydraulic Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bureček A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to experimentally measure and ealuate bulk modulus of oil/steel pipe system and oil/hose system. The measurement was performed using experimental device on the basis of a measured pressure difference depending on time. Bulk modulus is evaluated from pressure change with known flow and volume of line. Pressure rise is caused by valve closure at the line end. Furthermore, a mathematical model of the experimental device is created using Matlab SimHydraulics software. Time dependencies of pressure for the oil/steel pipe system and the oil/hose system are simulated on this mathematical model. The simulations are verified by experiment.

  17. Modulus stabilization in a non-flat warped braneworld scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Indrani [S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Department of Astrophysics and Cosmology, Kolkata (India); SenGupta, Soumitra [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Department of Theoretical Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2017-05-15

    The stability of the modular field in a warped brane world scenario has been a subject of interest for a long time. Goldberger and Wise (GW) proposed a mechanism to achieve this by invoking a massive scalar field in the bulk space-time neglecting the back-reaction. In this work, we examine the possibility of stabilizing the modulus without bringing about any external scalar field. We show that instead of flat 3-branes as considered in Randall-Sundrum (RS) warped braneworld model, if one considers a more generalized version of warped geometry with de Sitter 3-brane, then the brane vacuum energy automatically leads to a modulus potential with a metastable minimum. Our result further reveals that in this scenario the gauge hierarchy problem can also be resolved for an appropriate choice of the brane's cosmological constant. (orig.)

  18. Steganography based on wavelet transform and modulus function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In order to provide larger capacity of the hidden secret data while maintaining a good visual quality of stego-image,in accordance with the visual property that human eyes are less sensitive to strong texture,a novel steganographic method based on wavelet and modulus function is presented.First,an image is divided into blocks of prescribed size,and every block is decomposed into one-level wavelet.Then,the capacity of the hidden secret data is decided with the number of wavelet coefficients of larger magnitude.Finall,secret information is embedded by steganography based on modulus function. From the experimental results,the proposed method hides much more information and maintains a good visual quality of stego-image.Besides,the embedded data can be extracted from the stego-image without referencing the original image.

  19. High modulus invert analog glass compositions containing beryllia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of, in mols, 10-45% SiO2, 2-15% Li2O, 3-34% BeO, 12-36% of at least one bivalent oxide selected from the group consisting of CaO, ZnO, MgO and CuO, 10-39% of at least one trivalent oxide selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, B2O3, La2O3, Y2O3 and the mixed rare earth oxides, the total number of said bivalent and trivalent oxides being at least three, and up to 10% of a tetravalent oxide selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2.

  20. Multigene Genetic Programming for Estimation of Elastic Modulus of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mohammadi Bayazidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new multigene genetic programming (MGGP approach for estimation of elastic modulus of concrete. The MGGP technique models the elastic modulus behavior by integrating the capabilities of standard genetic programming and classical regression. The main aim is to derive precise relationships between the tangent elastic moduli of normal and high strength concrete and the corresponding compressive strength values. Another important contribution of this study is to develop a generalized prediction model for the elastic moduli of both normal and high strength concrete. Numerous concrete compressive strength test results are obtained from the literature to develop the models. A comprehensive comparative study is conducted to verify the performance of the models. The proposed models perform superior to the existing traditional models, as well as those derived using other powerful soft computing tools.

  1. A Methodology for Determination of Resilient Modulus of Asphaltic Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resilient modulus, , is an important parameter for designing pavements. However, its determination by resorting to cyclic triaxial tests is tedious and time consuming. Moreover, empirical relationships, correlating to various other material properties (namely, California Bearing Ratio, CBR; Limerock Bearing Ratio, LBR; R-value and the Soil Support Value, SSV, give vast variation in the estimated results. With this in view, an electronic circuitry, which employs bender and extender elements (i.e., piezo-ceramic elements, was developed. Details of the circuitry and the testing methodology adopted for this purpose are presented in this paper. This methodology helps in determining the resilient modulus of the material quite precisely. Further, it is believed that this methodology would be quite useful to engineers and technologists for conducting quality check of the pavements, quite rapidly and easily.

  2. Poroelastic fluid effects on shear for rocks with soft anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, James G.

    2005-06-01

    A general analysis of poroelasticity for vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) shows that four eigenvectors are pure shear modes with no coupling to the pore-fluid mechanics. The remaining two eigenvectors are linear combinations of pure compression and uniaxial shear, both of which are coupled to the fluid mechanics. After reducing the problem to a 2 × 2 system, the analysis shows in a relatively elementary fashion how a poroelastic system with isotropic solid elastic frame, but with anisotropy introduced only through the poroelastic coefficients (and, therefore, termed soft anisotropy), interacts with the mechanics of the pore fluid and produces shear dependence on fluid properties in the overall poroelastic system. The analysis shows, for example, that this effect is always present (though sometimes small in magnitude) in the systems studied and can be comparatively large (on the order of 10 to 20 per cent) for wave propagation studies in some rocks, including Sierra White granite and Spirit River sandstone. Some of the results quoted here are obtained by using a new product formula relating local bulk and uniaxial shear energy to the product of the two eigenvalues that are coupled to the fluid mechanics. This product formula was first derived in prior work. The results obtained here are observed to be useful both for explaining difficult to reconcile laboratory wave propagation (especially ultrasonic) data showing that the shear modulus exhibits clear dependence on fluid content and also for benchmarking of poroelastic codes.

  3. Functions of Bounded kth p-Variation and Continuity Modulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odalis Mejía

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A scale of spaces exists connecting the class of functions of bounded kth p-variation in the sense of Riesz-Merentes with the Sobolev space of functions with p-integrable kth derivative. This scale is generated by the generalized functionals of Merentes type. We prove some limiting relations for these functionals as well as sharp estimates in terms of the fractional modulus of smoothness of order k-1/p.

  4. Charged string solutions with dilaton and modulus fields

    CERN Document Server

    Cvetic, M

    1994-01-01

    We find charged, abelian, spherically symmetric solutions (in flat space-time) corresponding to the effective action of $D=4$ heterotic string theory with scale-dependent dilaton $\\p$ and modulus $\\vp$ fields. We take into account perturbative (genus-one), moduli-dependent `threshold' corrections to the coupling function $f(\\p,\\vp)$ in the gauge field kinetic term $f(\\p,\\vp) F^2_{\\m\

  5. Measuring Propellant Stress Relaxation Modulus Using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-29

    P. N., Singh, P. P., and Bhattacharya, B., “Determination of Activation Energy of Relaxation Events in Composite Solid Propellants by Dynamic...Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 04 August 2016 – 29 March 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Measuring Propellant Stress Relaxation Modulus Using Dynamic...ERC 14. ABSTRACT A method for determining the stress relaxation master curve of solid rocket propellants was developed. The propellant was tested in

  6. Free volume under shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H. A.; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-01

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems — particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior.

  7. Pengukuran Modulus Elastisitas Dinamis Batuan dengan Metode Seismik Refraksi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashadi Salim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The seismic wave velocity in rock formation depends on the elastic modulus and mass density of rock where the wave travels. The velocity measurement of P and S waves on rock formation and the mass density in the laboratory can be used for calculating the elastic modulus of rock formation. The elastic modulus is part of rock mechanical parameter needed in geological engineering researches. The velocity measurement of P and S waves by the seismic refraction method was done on a tunnel with 11 spreads of measurement. From the resultsof the measurement, three groups of rock formation could be identified. The first is rock formation with Ed=8.890-12.68 MPa and G=3.306-4.830MPa; the second group is rock formation with Ed=8.890-12.68 MPa and G=3.306-4.830MPa; and the third group is with Ed=18.520-21.120MPa and G=6.724-7.744MP. The first group is clay formation while the second and third groups are andesitic stone formation. 

  8. Young's modulus and hardness of shark tooth biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitenack, Lisa B; Simkins, Daniel C; Motta, Philip J; Hirai, Makoto; Kumar, Ashok

    2010-03-01

    To date, the majority of studies on feeding mechanics in sharks have focused on the movement of cranial components and muscle function, with little attention to tooth properties or function. Attributes related to mechanical properties, such as structural strength, may also be subjected to natural selection. Additionally it is necessary to characterize these properties in order to construct biomechanical models of tooth function. The goal of this study was to determine hardness and elastic modulus for the shark tooth materials enameloid, osteodentine, and orthodentine. Five teeth each from one carcharhiniform species, the bonnethead Sphyrna tiburo, and one lamniform, the sand tiger shark Carcharias taurus, were utilized for nanoindentation testing. Each tooth was sectioned transversely, air-dried, and polished. Both enameloid and dentine were tested on each tooth via a Berkovich diamond tip, with nine 2 microm deep indentations per material. t-Tests were used to determine if there were differences in hardness and Young's modulus between the tooth materials of the two species. There was no significant difference between the two species for the material properties of enameloid, however both hardness and Young's modulus were higher for osteodentine than for orthodentine. This may be due to differences in microanatomy and chemical composition, however this needs to be studied in greater detail. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Space charge relaxation in polyetherimides by the electric modulus formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudarra, M.; Belana, J.; Cañadas, J. C.; Diego, J. A.; Sellarès, J.; Díaz-Calleja, R.; Sanchís, M. J.

    2000-10-01

    Dynamic electrical analysis shows that at high temperatures (above the glass transition temperature), the electrical properties of polyetherimide are strongly influenced by space charge. In this article we have studied the relaxation of space charge in two commercial varieties of polyetherimide: Ultem 1000 and Ultem 5000. Their conductive properties were determined by dynamic electrical analysis, using the electric modulus formalism. The complex part of the electric modulus was fitted to Coelho's model which considers ohmic conductivity and diffusion as the prevailing charge transport mechanisms. The complex part of the electric modulus exhibits a peak in the low frequency range that can be associated with space charge. A good agreement between experimental and calculated data is observed after the fitting process to Coelho's model. Differences in the electrode behavior were required: blocking electrode conditions in the case of Ultem 5000 and partially blocking electrode for Ultem 1000. In both cases the conductivity determined is thermally activated and it increases with the temperature due to an increasing mobility, as their carrier densities do not vary significantly in the temperature range studied.

  10. Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Collagen Type I Single Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutov, Pavel; Antipova, Olga; Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    Collagen fibers are the main components of the extra cellular matrix and the primary contributors to the mechanical properties of tissues. Here we report a novel approach to measure the longitudinal component of the elastic moduli of biological fibers under conditions close to those found in vivo and apply it to type I collagen from rat tail tendon. This approach combines optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and exploits Euler-Bernoulli elasticity theory for data analysis. This approach also avoids drying for measurements or visualization, since samples are freshly extracted. Importantly, strains are kept below 0.5%, which appear consistent with the linear elastic regime. We find, surprisingly, that the longitudinal elastic modulus of type I collagen cannot be represented by a single quantity but rather is a distribution that is broader than the uncertainty of our experimental technique. The longitudinal component of the single-fiber elastic modulus is between 100 MPa and 360 MPa for samples extracted from different rats and/or different parts of a single tail. Variations are also observed in the fibril-bundle/fibril diameter with an average of 325±40 nm. Since bending forces depend on the diameter to the fourth power, this variation in diameter is important for estimating the range of elastic moduli. The remaining variations in the modulus may be due to differences in composition of the fibril-bundles, or the extent of the proteoglycans constituting fibril-bundles, or that some single fibrils may be of fibril-bundle size.

  11. Evaluation of annealing and double ion beam irradiation by a laser-induced and laser-detected surface acoustic wave diagnostic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Sin-iti; Wakai, Eiichi; Aoto, Kazumi

    2016-10-01

    The effects of annealing and double ion irradiation on nuclear structural materials were investigated using a novel, non-destructive, non-contact diagnostic method. A laser-induced and laser-detected surface acoustic wave (SAW) was adopted as a diagnostic system. The SAWs propagation velocity and the SAWs vibration velocity along the normal direction of the surface were measured to investigate mechanical properties of the substrates. Change of the shear modulus was detected in the annealed substrates. Non-linear effect on amplitude of the excited SAW was observed on the double ion irradiated materials. The potential of the SAW diagnostic system for assessing nuclear structural materials was demonstrated.

  12. Mixing through shear instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Brüggen, M

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of numerical simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a stratified shear layer. This shear instability is believed to be responsible for extra mixing in differentially rotating stellar interiors and is the prime candidate to explain the abundance anomalies observed in many rotating stars. All mixing prescriptions currently in use are based on phenomenological and heuristic estimates whose validity is often unclear. Using three-dimensional numerical simulations, we study the mixing efficiency as a function of the Richardson number and compare our results with some semi-analytical formalisms of mixing.

  13. Soil Shear Properties Assessment, Resistance, Thermal, and Triboelectric Analysis (SPARTTA) Tool: A New Multitool Instrument for Identifying the Physical Properties of In-situ Soils on Planetary Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. C.; Peters, G. H.; Beegle, L. W.; Zhou, Y. M.; Van Stryk, N.; Carey, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    SPARTTA is a low cost, low mass (robotic