WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface sensitive analysis

  1. Determination of temperature of moving surface by sensitivity analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Farhanieh, B

    2002-01-01

    In this paper sensitivity analysis in inverse problem solutions is employed to estimate the temperature of a moving surface. Moving finite element method is used for spatial discretization. Time derivatives are approximated using Crank-Nicklson method. The accuracy of the solution is assessed by simulation method. The convergence domain is investigated for the determination of the temperature of a solid fuel.

  2. Sensitivity Analysis and Optimization of Aerodynamic Configurations with Blend Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A. M.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    A novel (geometrical) parametrization procedure using solutions to a suitably chosen fourth order partial differential equation is used to define a class of airplane configurations. Inclusive in this definition are surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, vertical tail and horizontal tail. The design variables are incorporated into the boundary conditions, and the solution is expressed as a Fourier series. The fuselage has circular cross section, and the radius is an algebraic function of four design parameters and an independent computational variable. Volume grids are obtained through an application of the Control Point Form method. A graphic interface software is developed which dynamically changes the surface of the airplane configuration with the change in input design variable. The software is made user friendly and is targeted towards the initial conceptual development of any aerodynamic configurations. Grid sensitivity with respect to surface design parameters and aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients based on potential flow is obtained using an Automatic Differentiation precompiler software tool ADIFOR. Aerodynamic shape optimization of the complete aircraft with twenty four design variables is performed. Unstructured and structured volume grids and Euler solutions are obtained with standard software to demonstrate the feasibility of the new surface definition.

  3. Sensitivity analysis of surface runoff generation in urban flood forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, N E; Leitão, J P; Maksimović, C; Sá Marques, A; Pina, R

    2010-01-01

    Reliable flood forecasting requires hydraulic models capable to estimate pluvial flooding fast enough in order to enable successful operational responses. Increased computational speed can be achieved by using a 1D/1D model, since 2D models are too computationally demanding. Further changes can be made by simplifying 1D network models, removing and by changing some secondary elements. The Urban Water Research Group (UWRG) of Imperial College London developed a tool that automatically analyses, quantifies and generates 1D overland flow network. The overland flow network features (ponds and flow pathways) generated by this methodology are dependent on the number of sewer network manholes and sewer inlets, as some of the overland flow pathways start at manholes (or sewer inlets) locations. Thus, if a simplified version of the sewer network has less manholes (or sewer inlets) than the original one, the overland flow network will be consequently different. This paper compares different overland flow networks generated with different levels of sewer network skeletonisation. Sensitivity analysis is carried out in one catchment area in Coimbra, Portugal, in order to evaluate overland flow network characteristics.

  4. Sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003741.htm Sensitivity analysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sensitivity analysis determines the effectiveness of antibiotics against microorganisms (germs) ...

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of the Land Surface Model NOAH-MP for Different Model Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Juliane; Thober, Stephan; Samaniego, Luis; Branch, Oliver; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Clark, Martyn; Attinger, Sabine; Kumar, Rohini; Cuntz, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Land Surface Models (LSMs) use a plenitude of process descriptions to represent the carbon, energy and water cycles. They are highly complex and computationally expensive. Practitioners, however, are often only interested in specific outputs of the model such as latent heat or surface runoff. In model applications like parameter estimation, the most important parameters are then chosen by experience or expert knowledge. Hydrologists interested in surface runoff therefore chose mostly soil parameters while biogeochemists interested in carbon fluxes focus on vegetation parameters. However, this might lead to the omission of parameters that are important, for example, through strong interactions with the parameters chosen. It also happens during model development that some process descriptions contain fixed values, which are supposedly unimportant parameters. However, these hidden parameters remain normally undetected although they might be highly relevant during model calibration. Sensitivity analyses are used to identify informative model parameters for a specific model output. Standard methods for sensitivity analysis such as Sobol indexes require large amounts of model evaluations, specifically in case of many model parameters. We hence propose to first use a recently developed inexpensive sequential screening method based on Elementary Effects that has proven to identify the relevant informative parameters. This reduces the number parameters and therefore model evaluations for subsequent analyses such as sensitivity analysis or model calibration. In this study, we quantify parametric sensitivities of the land surface model NOAH-MP that is a state-of-the-art LSM and used at regional scale as the land surface scheme of the atmospheric Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF). NOAH-MP contains multiple process parameterizations yielding a considerable amount of parameters (˜ 100). Sensitivities for the three model outputs (a) surface runoff, (b) soil drainage

  6. Sensitivity analysis and numerical experiments on transient test of compact heat exchanger surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hesheng REN; Lingjun LAI; Yongzheng CUI

    2008-01-01

    A single-blow transient testing technique con-sidering the effect of longitudinal heat conduction is sug-gested for determining the average convection heat transfer coefficient of compact heat exchanger surface. By matching the measured outlet fluid temperature vari-ation with similar theoretical curves, the dimensionless longitudinal conduction parameter λ1, the time constant of the inlet fluid temperature τ+, and the number of heat transfer units Ntu can be determined simultaneously using the Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear parameter estima-tion method. Both sensitivity analysis and numerical experiments with simulated measurements containing random errors show that the method in the present invest-igation provides satisfactory accuracy of the estimated parameter Ntu, which characterizes the heat transfer per-formance of compact heat exchanger surfaces.

  7. Mitigating the surface urban heat island: Mechanism study and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chunlei

    2017-08-01

    In a surface urban heat island (SUHI), the urban land surface temperature (LST) is usually higher than the temperature of the surrounding rural areas due to human activities and surface characteristics. Because a SUHI has many adverse impacts on urban environment and human health, SUHI mitigation strategies are very important. This paper investigates the mechanism of a SUHI based on the basic physical laws that control the formation of a SUHI; five mitigation strategies are proposed, namely: sprinkling and watering; paving a pervious surface; reducing the anthropogenic heat (AH) release; using a "white roof"; increasing the fractional vegetation cover or leaf area index (LAI). To quantify the effect of these mitigation strategies, 26 sets of experiments are designed and implemented by running the integrated urban land model (IUM). The results of the sensitivity analysis indicate that sprinkling and watering is an effective measure for mitigating a SUHI for an entire day. Decreasing the AH release is also useful for both night- and daytime SUHI mitigation; however, the cooling extent is proportional to the diurnal cycle of AH. Increasing the albedo can reduce the LST in the daytime, especially when the solar radiation is significant; the cooling extent is approximately proportional to the diurnal cycle of the net radiation. Increasing the pervious surface percentage can mitigate the SUHI especially in the daytime. Increasing the fractional vegetation cover can mitigate the SUHI in the daytime but may aggravate the SUHI at night.

  8. 3-D description of fracture surfaces and stress-sensitivity analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.Q.; Jioa, D.; Meng, Y.F.; Fan, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Three kinds of reservoir cores (limestone, sandstone, and shale with natural fractures) were used to study the effect of morphology of fracture surfaces on stress sensitivity. The cores, obtained from the reservoirs with depths of 2170 to 2300 m, have fractures which are mated on a large scale, but unmated on a fine scale. A specially designed photoelectric scanner with a computer was used to describe the topography of the fracture surfaces. Then, theoretical analysis of the fracture closure was carried out based on the fracture topography generated. The scanning results show that the asperity has almost normal distributions for all three types of samples. For the tested samples, the fracture closure predicted by the elastic-contact theory is different from the laboratory measurements because plastic deformation of the aspirates plays an important role under the testing range of normal stresses. In this work, the traditionally used elastic-contact theory has been modified to better predict the stress sensitivity of reservoir fractures. Analysis shows that the standard deviation of the probability density function of asperity distribution has a great effect on the fracture closure rate.

  9. A Monte Carlo/response surface strategy for sensitivity analysis: application to a dynamic model of vegetative plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J. T.; Gold, H. J.; Wilkerson, G. G.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    We describe the application of a strategy for conducting a sensitivity analysis for a complex dynamic model. The procedure involves preliminary screening of parameter sensitivities by numerical estimation of linear sensitivity coefficients, followed by generation of a response surface based on Monte Carlo simulation. Application is to a physiological model of the vegetative growth of soybean plants. The analysis provides insights as to the relative importance of certain physiological processes in controlling plant growth. Advantages and disadvantages of the strategy are discussed.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of Entropy Generation in Nanofluid Flow inside a Channel by Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Darbari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids can afford excellent thermal performance and have a major role in energy conservation aspect. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis has been performed by using response surface methodology to calculate the effects of nanoparticles on the entropy generation. For this purpose, the laminar forced convection of Al2O3-water nanofluid flow inside a channel is considered. The total entropy generation rates consist of the entropy generation rates due to heat transfer and friction loss are calculated by using velocity and temperature gradients. The continuity, momentum and energy equations have been solved numerically using a finite volume method. The sensitivity of the entropy generation rate to different parameters such as the solid volume fraction, the particle diameter, and the Reynolds number is studied in detail. Series of simulations were performed for a range of solid volume fraction 0 ≤ ϕ ≤ 0.05 , particle diameter 30  nm ≤ d p ≤ 90 ​ nm , and the Reynolds number 200 ≤ Re ≤ 800. The results showed that the total entropy generation is more sensitive to the Reynolds number rather than the nanoparticles diameter or solid volume fraction. Also, the magnitude of total entropy generation, which increases with increase in the Reynolds number, is much higher for the pure fluid rather than the nanofluid.

  11. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity as an ultra sensitive tool for ligand binding analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim

    2007-01-01

    The Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) and Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity (SERROA) spectra of myoglobin and the myoglobin-azide complex were measured on very dilute samples (100 nM protein) in order to analyze the sensitivity of SERROA spectroscopy when inducing...

  12. On understanding the relationship between structure in the potential surface and observables in classical dynamics: A functional sensitivity analysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Richard S.; Rabitz, Herschel

    1987-04-01

    The relationship between structure in the potential surface and classical mechanical observables is examined by means of functional sensitivity analysis. Functional sensitivities provide maps of the potential surface, highlighting those regions that play the greatest role in determining the behavior of observables. A set of differential equations for the sensitivities of the trajectory components are derived. These are then solved using a Green's function method. It is found that the sensitivities become singular at the trajectory turning points with the singularities going as η-3/2, with η being the distance from the nearest turning point. The sensitivities are zero outside of the energetically and dynamically allowed region of phase space. A second set of equations is derived from which the sensitivities of observables can be directly calculated. An adjoint Green's function technique is employed, providing an efficient method for numerically calculating these quantities. Sensitivity maps are presented for a simple collinear atom-diatom inelastic scattering problem and for two Henon-Heiles type Hamiltonians modeling intramolecular processes. It is found that the positions of the trajectory caustics in the bound state problem determine regions of the highest potential surface sensitivities. In the scattering problem (which is impulsive, so that ``sticky'' collisions did not occur), the positions of the turning points of the individual trajectory components determine the regions of high sensitivity. In both cases, these lines of singularities are superimposed on a rich background structure. Most interesting is the appearance of classical interference effects. The interference features in the sensitivity maps occur most noticeably where two or more lines of turning points cross. The important practical motivation for calculating the sensitivities derives from the fact that the potential is a function, implying that any direct attempt to understand how local

  13. Mass sensitivity analysis and designing of surface acoustic wave resonators for chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshetrimayum, Roshan; Yadava, R. D. S.; Tandon, R. P.

    2009-05-01

    The sensitivity of surface acoustic wave (SAW) chemical sensors depends on several factors such as the frequency and phase point of SAW device operation, sensitivity of the SAW velocity to surface mass loading, sensitivity of the SAW oscillator resonance to the loop phase shift, film thickness and oscillator electronics. This paper analyzes the influence of the phase point of operation in SAW oscillator sensors based on two-port resonator devices. It is found that the mass sensitivity will be enhanced if the SAW device has a nonlinear dependence on the frequency (delay ~ frequency-1). This requires the device to generate and operate in a ωτg(ω) = const region in the device passband, where ω denotes the angular frequency of oscillation and τg(ω) denotes the phase slope of the SAW resonator device. A SAW coupled resonator filter (CRF) that take advantage of mode coupling is considered in realizing such a device to help in shaping the phase transfer characteristics of a high mass sensitivity sensor. The device design and simulation results are presented within the coupling-of-modes formalism.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of radiative transfer for atmospheric remote sensing in thermal IR: atmospheric weighting functions and surface partials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, E. A.

    2003-01-01

    In this presentation, we apply the adjoint sensitivity analysis of radiative transfer in thermal IR to the general case of the analytic evaluation of the weighting functions of atmospheric parameters together with the partial derivatives for the surface parameters. Applications to remote sensing of atmospheres of Mars and Venus are discussed.

  15. Advanced multiple response surface method of sensitivity analysis for turbine blisk reliability with multi-physics coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chunyi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To reasonably implement the reliability analysis and describe the significance of influencing parameters for the multi-failure modes of turbine blisk, advanced multiple response surface method (AMRSM was proposed for multi-failure mode sensitivity analysis for reliability. The mathematical model of AMRSM was established and the basic principle of multi-failure mode sensitivity analysis for reliability with AMRSM was given. The important parameters of turbine blisk failures are obtained by the multi-failure mode sensitivity analysis of turbine blisk. Through the reliability sensitivity analyses of multiple failure modes (deformation, stress and strain with the proposed method considering fluid–thermal–solid interaction, it is shown that the comprehensive reliability of turbine blisk is 0.9931 when the allowable deformation, stress and strain are 3.7 × 10−3 m, 1.0023 × 109 Pa and 1.05 × 10−2 m/m, respectively; the main impact factors of turbine blisk failure are gas velocity, gas temperature and rotational speed. As demonstrated in the comparison of methods (Monte Carlo (MC method, traditional response surface method (RSM, multiple response surface method (MRSM and AMRSM, the proposed AMRSM improves computational efficiency with acceptable computational accuracy. The efforts of this study provide the AMRSM with high precision and efficiency for multi-failure mode reliability analysis, and offer a useful insight for the reliability optimization design of multi-failure mode structure.

  16. Advanced multiple response surface method of sensitivity analysis for turbine blisk reliability with multi-physics coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Chunyi; Song Lukai; Fei Chengwei; Lu Cheng; Xie Yongmei

    2016-01-01

    To reasonably implement the reliability analysis and describe the significance of influenc-ing parameters for the multi-failure modes of turbine blisk, advanced multiple response surface method (AMRSM) was proposed for multi-failure mode sensitivity analysis for reliability. The mathematical model of AMRSM was established and the basic principle of multi-failure mode sen-sitivity analysis for reliability with AMRSM was given. The important parameters of turbine blisk failures are obtained by the multi-failure mode sensitivity analysis of turbine blisk. Through the reli-ability sensitivity analyses of multiple failure modes (deformation, stress and strain) with the pro-posed method considering fluid–thermal–solid interaction, it is shown that the comprehensive reliability of turbine blisk is 0.9931 when the allowable deformation, stress and strain are 3.7 × 10-3 m, 1.0023 × 109 Pa and 1.05 × 10-2 m/m, respectively; the main impact factors of tur-bine blisk failure are gas velocity, gas temperature and rotational speed. As demonstrated in the comparison of methods (Monte Carlo (MC) method, traditional response surface method (RSM), multiple response surface method (MRSM) and AMRSM), the proposed AMRSM improves computational efficiency with acceptable computational accuracy. The efforts of this study provide the AMRSM with high precision and efficiency for multi-failure mode reliability analysis, and offer a useful insight for the reliability optimization design of multi-failure mode structure.

  17. Chapter 5: Modulation Excitation Spectroscopy with Phase-Sensitive Detection for Surface Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulda, Sarah; Richards, Ryan M.

    2016-02-19

    Advancements in in situ spectroscopic techniques have led to significant progress being made in elucidating heterogeneous reaction mechanisms. The potential of these progressive methods is often limited only by the complexity of the system and noise in the data. Short-lived intermediates can be challenging, if not impossible, to identify with conventional spectra analysis means. Often equally difficult is separating signals that arise from active and inactive species. Modulation excitation spectroscopy combined with phase-sensitive detection analysis is a powerful tool for removing noise from the data while simultaneously revealing the underlying kinetics of the reaction. A stimulus is applied at a constant frequency to the reaction system, for example, a reactant cycled with an inert phase. Through mathematical manipulation of the data, any signal contributing to the overall spectra but not oscillating with the same frequency as the stimulus will be dampened or removed. With phase-sensitive detection, signals oscillating with the stimulus frequency but with various lag times are amplified providing valuable kinetic information. In this chapter, some examples are provided from the literature that have successfully used modulation excitation spectroscopy with phase-sensitive detection to uncover previously unobserved reaction intermediates and kinetics. Examples from a broad range of spectroscopic methods are included to provide perspective to the reader.

  18. Sensitivity Analysis of Grain Surface Chemistry to Binding Energies of Ice Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, E. M.; Walsh, C.; Cuppen, H. M.

    2017-07-01

    Advanced telescopes, such as ALMA and the James Webb Space Telescope, are likely to show that the chemical universe may be even more complex than currently observed, requiring astrochemical modelers to improve their models to account for the impact of new data. However, essential input information for gas-grain models, such as binding energies of molecules to the surface, have been derived experimentally only for a handful of species, leaving hundreds of species with highly uncertain estimates. We present in this paper a systematic study of the effect of uncertainties in the binding energies on an astrochemical two-phase model of a dark molecular cloud, using the rate equations approach. A list of recommended binding energy values based on a literature search of published data is presented. Thousands of simulations of dark cloud models were run, and in each simulation a value for the binding energy of hundreds of species was randomly chosen from a normal distribution. Our results show that the binding energy of H2 is critical for the surface chemistry. For high binding energies, H2 freezes out on the grain forming an H2 ice. This is not physically realistic, and we suggest a change in the rate equations. The abundance ranges found are in reasonable agreement with astronomical ice observations. Pearson correlation coefficients revealed that the binding energy of HCO, HNO, CH2, and C correlate most strongly with the abundance of dominant ice species. Finally, the formation route of complex organic molecules was found to be sensitive to the branching ratios of H2CO hydrogenation.

  19. Parameter Estimation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Urban Surface Energy Balance Parameterization at a Tropical Suburban Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshan, S.; Roth, M.; Velasco, E.

    2014-12-01

    Forecasting of the urban weather and climate is of great importance as our cities become more populated and considering the combined effects of global warming and local land use changes which make urban inhabitants more vulnerable to e.g. heat waves and flash floods. In meso/global scale models, urban parameterization schemes are used to represent the urban effects. However, these schemes require a large set of input parameters related to urban morphological and thermal properties. Obtaining all these parameters through direct measurements are usually not feasible. A number of studies have reported on parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis to adjust and determine the most influential parameters for land surface schemes in non-urban areas. Similar work for urban areas is scarce, in particular studies on urban parameterization schemes in tropical cities have so far not been reported. In order to address above issues, the town energy balance (TEB) urban parameterization scheme (part of the SURFEX land surface modeling system) was subjected to a sensitivity and optimization/parameter estimation experiment at a suburban site in, tropical Singapore. The sensitivity analysis was carried out as a screening test to identify the most sensitive or influential parameters. Thereafter, an optimization/parameter estimation experiment was performed to calibrate the input parameter. The sensitivity experiment was based on the "improved Sobol's global variance decomposition method" . The analysis showed that parameters related to road, roof and soil moisture have significant influence on the performance of the model. The optimization/parameter estimation experiment was performed using the AMALGM (a multi-algorithm genetically adaptive multi-objective method) evolutionary algorithm. The experiment showed a remarkable improvement compared to the simulations using the default parameter set. The calibrated parameters from this optimization experiment can be used for further model

  20. Surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, T

    2006-10-01

    Surface analysis techniques are important tools to use in the verification of surface cleanliness and medical device functionality. How these techniques can be employed and some example applications are described.

  1. Variogram Analysis of Response surfaces (VARS): A New Framework for Global Sensitivity Analysis of Earth and Environmental Systems Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, S.; Gupta, H. V.

    2015-12-01

    Earth and environmental systems models (EESMs) are continually growing in complexity and dimensionality with continuous advances in understanding and computing power. Complexity and dimensionality are manifested by introducing many different factors in EESMs (i.e., model parameters, forcings, boundary conditions, etc.) to be identified. Sensitivity Analysis (SA) provides an essential means for characterizing the role and importance of such factors in producing the model responses. However, conventional approaches to SA suffer from (1) an ambiguous characterization of sensitivity, and (2) poor computational efficiency, particularly as the problem dimension grows. Here, we present a new and general sensitivity analysis framework (called VARS), based on an analogy to 'variogram analysis', that provides an intuitive and comprehensive characterization of sensitivity across the full spectrum of scales in the factor space. We prove, theoretically, that Morris (derivative-based) and Sobol (variance-based) methods and their extensions are limiting cases of VARS, and that their SA indices can be computed as by-products of the VARS framework. We also present a practical strategy for the application of VARS to real-world problems, called STAR-VARS, including a new sampling strategy, called "star-based sampling". Our results across several case studies show the STAR-VARS approach to provide reliable and stable assessments of "global" sensitivity across the full range of scales in the factor space, while being at least 1-2 orders of magnitude more efficient than the benchmark Morris and Sobol approaches.

  2. Surface Sensitive Microfluidic Optomechanical Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyu Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The microfluidic optomechanical resonator (uFOMR) based on a thin-walled glass capillary supports high Q-factor (>1000) mechanical modes in the presence of liquids. In this Letter, the sensitivity of the uFOMR to the surface change is studied by layer-by-layer removal of SiO2 molecules from the uFOMR inner surface using various concentrations of hydrofluoric acid solutions. A frequency downshift is observed with a sensitivity of 1.2 Hz/(pg/mm2), which translates to a surface density detection limit of 83 pg/mm2. This work opens a door to using the optomechanical mode for detection and characterization of molecules present near the resonator surface.

  3. Monitoring temperature and pressure over surfaces using sensitive paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Viramontes, J. Ascención; Moreno Hernández, David; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Morán Loza, José Miguel; García Arreola, Alicia

    2007-03-01

    Two techniques for monitoring temperature and pressure variations over surfaces using sensitive paints are presented. The analysis is done by the acquisition of a set of images of the surface under analysis. The surface is painted by a paint called Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) for pressure measurements and Temperature Sensitive Paints (TSP) for temperature measurements. These kinds of paints are deposited over the surface under analysis. The recent experimental advances in calibration process are presented in this paper.

  4. Sensitivity Analysis and Parameter Identifiability of the Land Surface Model JULES at the point scale in permeable catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakopoulou, C.; Bulygina, N.; Butler, A. P.; McIntyre, N. R.

    2012-04-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are recognised as important components of Global Circulation Models (GCMs). Simulating exchanges of the moisture, carbon and energy between land surface and atmosphere in a consistent manner requires physics-based LSMs of high complexity, fine vertical resolution and a large number of parameters that need to be estimated. The "physics" that is incorporated in such models is generally based on our knowledge of point (or very small) scale hydrological processes. Therefore, while larger GCM grid-scale performance may be the ultimate goal, the ability of the model to simulate the point-scale processes is, intuitively, a pre-requisite for its reliable use at larger scales. Critical evaluation of model performance and parameter uncertainty at point scales is therefore a rational starting point for critical evaluation of LSMs; and identification of optimal parameter sets at the point scale is a significant stage of the model evaluation at larger scales. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is a complex LSM, which is used to represent surface exchanges in the UK Met Office's forecast and climate change models. This complexity necessitates a large number of model parameters (in total 108) some of which are incapable of being measured directly at large (i.e. kilometer) scales. For this reason, a parameter sensitivity analysis is a vital confidence building process within the framework of every LSM, and as a part of the calibration strategy. The problem of JULES parameter estimation and uncertainty at the point scale with a view to assessing the accuracy and the uncertainty in the default parameter values is addressed. The sensitivity of the JULES output of soil moisture is examined using parameter response surface analysis. The implemented technique is based on the Regional Sensitivity Analysis method (RSA), which evaluates the model response surface over a region of parameter space using Monte Carlo sampling. The modified version of RSA

  5. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cacuci, Dan G; Navon, Ionel Michael

    2005-01-01

    As computer-assisted modeling and analysis of physical processes have continued to grow and diversify, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses have become indispensable scientific tools. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis. Volume I: Theory focused on the mathematical underpinnings of two important methods for such analyses: the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure and the Global Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure. This volume concentrates on the practical aspects of performing these analyses for large-scale systems. The applications addressed include two-phase flow problems, a radiative c

  6. Sensitivity analysis of surface ozone to emission controls in Beijing and its neighboring area during the 2008 Olympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Zhang, Meigen

    2012-01-01

    The regional air quality modeling system RAMS (regional atmospheric modeling system)-CMAQ (community multi-scale air quality modeling system) is applied to analyze temporal and spatial variations in surface ozone concentration over Beijing and its surrounding region from July to October 2008. Comparison of simulated and observed meteorological elements and concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone at one urban site and three rural sites during Olympic Games show that model can generally reproduce the main observed feature of wind, temperature and ozone, but NOx concentration is overestimated. Although ozone concentration decreased during Olympics, high ozone episodes occurred on 24 July and 24 August with concentration of 360 and 245 microg/m3 at Aoyuncun site, respectively. The analysis of sensitive test, with and without emission controls, shows that emission controls could reduce ozone concentration in the afternoon when ozone concentration was highest but increase it at night and in the morning. The evolution of the weather system during the ozone episodes (24 July and 24 August) indicates that hot and dry air and a stable weak pressure field intensified the production of ozone and allowed it to accumulate. Process analysis at the urban site and rural site shows that under favorable weather condition on 24 August, horizontal transport was the main contributor of the rural place and the pollution from the higher layer would be transported to the surface layer. On 24 July, as the wind velocity was smaller, the impact of transport on the rural place was not obvious.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of surface ozone to emission controls in Beijing and its neighboring area during the 2008 Olympic Games

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Gao; Meigen Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The regional air quality modeling system RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System)-CMAQ (Community Multi-scale Air Quality modeling system) is applied to analyze temporal and spatial variations in surface ozone concentration over Beijing and its surrounding region from July to October 2008.Comparison of simulated and observed meteorological elements and concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone at one urban site and three rural sites during Olympic Games show that model can generally reproduce the main observed feature of wind,temperature and ozone,but NOx concentration is overestimated.Although ozone concentration decreased during Olympics,high ozone episodes occurred on 24 July and 24 August with concentration of 360 and 245 μg/m3 at Aoyuncun site,respectively.The analysis of sensitive test,with and without emission controls,shows that emission controls could reduce ozone concentration in the afternoon when ozone concentration was highest but increase it at night and in the morning.The evolution of the weather system during the ozone episodes (24 July and 24 August) indicates that hot and dry air and a stable weak pressure field intensified the production of ozone and allowed it to accumulate.Process analysis at the urban site and rural site shows that under favorable weather condition on 24 August,horizontal transport was the main contributor of the rural place and the pollution from the higher layer would be transported to the surface layer.On 24 July,as the wind velocity was smaller,the impact of transport on the rural place was not obvious.

  8. Integrated Sensitivity Analysis Workflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman-Hill, Ernest J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoffman, Edward L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gibson, Marcus J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clay, Robert L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a crucial element of rigorous engineering analysis, but performing such an analysis on a complex model is difficult and time consuming. The mission of the DART Workbench team at Sandia National Laboratories is to lower the barriers to adoption of advanced analysis tools through software integration. The integrated environment guides the engineer in the use of these integrated tools and greatly reduces the cycle time for engineering analysis.

  9. Probability strength design of steam turbine blade and sensitivity analysis with respect to random parameters based on response surface method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei DUAN

    2008-01-01

    Many stochastic parameters have an effect on the reliability of a steam turbine blade during practical operation. To improve the reliability of blade design, it is necessary to take these stochastic parameters into account. An equal cross-section blade is investigated and a finite element model is built parametrically. Geometrical parameters, material parameters and load parameters of the blade are considered as input random variables while the maximum deflection and maximum equivalent stress are output random variables. Analysis file of the blade is compiled by deterministic finite element method and applied to be loop file to create sample points. A quadratic polynomial with cross terms is chosen to regress these samples by step-forward regression method and employed as a surrogate of numerical solver to drastically reduce the number of solvers call. Then, Monte Carlo method is used to obtain the statistical characteristics and cumulative distribution function of the maximum deflection and maximum equivalent stress of the blade. Probability sensitivity analysis, which combines the slope of the gradient and the width of the scatter range of the random input variables, is applied to evaluate how much the output parameters are influenced by the random input para-meters. The scatter plots of structural responses with respect to the random input variables are illustrated to analyze how to change the input random variables to improve the reliability of the blade. The results show that combination of the finite element method, the response surface method and Monte Carlo method is an ideal way for the reliability analysis and probability strength design of the blade.

  10. Sensitivity analysis of SPURR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witholder, R.E.

    1980-04-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute has conducted a limited sensitivity analysis on a System for Projecting the Utilization of Renewable Resources (SPURR). The study utilized the Domestic Policy Review scenario for SPURR agricultural and industrial process heat and utility market sectors. This sensitivity analysis determines whether variations in solar system capital cost, operation and maintenance cost, and fuel cost (biomass only) correlate with intuitive expectations. The results of this effort contribute to a much larger issue: validation of SPURR. Such a study has practical applications for engineering improvements in solar technologies and is useful as a planning tool in the R and D allocation process.

  11. Sensitive and selective analysis of a wide concentration range of IGFBP7 using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dae-Ho; Choi, Youngbo; Choi, Yong-Soo; Kim, Sun-Mi; Kwak, Hojung; Shin, Se-Hyun; Hong, Surin

    2014-11-01

    A sensitive method for selectively detecting insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) over a wide range of concentrations based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing techniques is described. IGFBP7 has been shown to regulate cell proliferation, cell adhesion, cellular senescence, apoptosis, and angiogenesis in several different cancer cell lines. Since the concentration of IGFBP7 can vary widely in the body, determining the precise concentration of IGFBP7 over a wide range of concentrations is important, since it serves as an inducible biomarker for both disease diagnosis and subsequent therapy. The SPR sensing method is based on the selective interaction of IGFBP7 with specific anti-IGFBP7 proteins on a gold thin film, which was covalently bound to the Fc-binding domain of protein G on a mixed self-assembled monolayer composed of DSNHS (S2(CH2)11COO(CH2)2COO-(N-hydroxysuccinimide)) and mercaptoundecanol, and effect of this on changes in the SPR profiles. The limit of detection (LOD) of the SPR biosensor was determined to be 10 ng/ml, which is a reasonable LOD value for biomedical applications. The response is essentially linear in the concentration range of 10-300 ng/ml. The SPR biosensor also shows specificity for IGFBP7 compared to that for biologically relevant interleukin (IL) derivatives including IL4, IL23, IL29, and IFG1. These molecules are also present along with IGFBP7 in the cell culture medium and have the potential to interfere with the analysis. Finally, the level secretion of IGFBP7 from cancer cells detected by the SPR biosensor showed a good correlation with a commercial kit using an IGFBP7 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The findings reported herein indicate that the SPR biosensor for IGFBP7 would be applicable in a wide variety of biomedical fields.

  12. Skin Sensitive Difference of Human Body Sections under Clothing--Multiple Analysis of Skin Surface Temperature Changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊; 吴海燕; 张渭源

    2003-01-01

    A new researching method on clothing comfort perception is developed.By it the skin surface temperature changes and subjective psychological perception of human body sections stimulated by the same cold stimulation are studied.With the multiple comparison analysis method the changing laws of skin temperature of main human body sections is obtained.

  13. Sensitivity Analysis and Investigation of the Behaviour of the UTOPIA Land-Surface Process Model: A Case Study for Vineyards in Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francone, C.; Cassardo, C.; Richiardone, R.; Confalonieri, R.

    2012-09-01

    We used sensitivity-analysis techniques to investigate the behaviour of the land-surface model UTOPIA while simulating the micrometeorology of a typical northern Italy vineyard ( Vitis vinifera L.) under average climatic conditions. Sensitivity-analysis experiments were performed by sampling the vegetation parameter hyperspace using the Morris method and quantifying the parameter relevance across a wide range of soil conditions. This method was used since it proved its suitability for models with high computational time or with a large number of parameters, in a variety of studies performed on different types of biophysical models. The impact of input variability was estimated on reference model variables selected among energy (e.g. net radiation, sensible and latent heat fluxes) and hydrological (e.g. soil moisture, surface runoff, drainage) budget components. Maximum vegetation cover and maximum leaf area index were ranked as the most relevant parameters, with sensitivity indices exceeding the remaining parameters by about one order of magnitude. Soil variability had a high impact on the relevance of most of the vegetation parameters: coefficients of variation calculated on the sensitivity indices estimated for the different soils often exceeded 100 %. The only exceptions were represented by maximum vegetation cover and maximum leaf area index, which showed a low variability in sensitivity indices while changing soil type, and confirmed their key role in affecting model results.

  14. Sensitivity analysis and implications for surface processes from a hydrological modelling approach in the Gunt catchment, high Pamir Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, E.; Knoche, M.; Gloaguen, R.; Andermann, C.; Krause, P.

    2015-07-01

    the effect of interannual climatic variability on river flow to be inferred. We infer the existence of two subsurface reservoirs. The groundwater reservoir (providing 40 % of annual discharge) recharges in spring and summer and releases slowly during autumn and winter, when it provides the only source for river discharge. A not fully constrained shallow reservoir with very rapid retention times buffers meltwaters during spring and summer. The negative glacier mass balance (-0.6 m w.e. yrsurface processes, which are essentially confined to glaciated catchments in late summer, when glacier runoff is the only source of surface runoff. Only this precise constraint of the hydrologic cycle in this complex region allows for unravelling of the surface processes and natural hazards such as floods and landslides as well as water availability in the downstream areas. The proposed conceptual model has a tremendous importance for the understanding of the denudation processes in the region. In the Pamirs, large releases of running water that control erosion intensity are primarily controlled by temperature and the availability of snow and glaciers, thus making the region particularly sensitive to climatic variations.

  15. Chemically stable Au nanorods as probes for sensitive surface enhanced scattering (SERS) analysis of blue BIC ballpoint pens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyami, Abeer; Saviello, Daniela; McAuliffe, Micheal A. P.; Cucciniello, Raffaele; Mirabile, Antonio; Proto, Antonio; Lewis, Liam; Iacopino, Daniela

    2017-08-01

    Au nanorods were used as an alternative to commonly used Ag nanoparticles as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) probes for identification of dye composition of blue BIC ballpoint pens. When used in combination with Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC), Au nanorod colloids allowed identification of the major dye components of the BIC pen ink, otherwise not identifiable by normal Raman spectroscopy. Thanks to their enhanced chemical stability compared to Ag colloids, Au nanorods provided stable and reproducible SERS signals and allowed easy identification of phthalocyanine and triarylene dyes in the pen ink mixture. These findings were supported by FTIR and MALDI analyses, also performed on the pen ink. Furthermore, the self-assembly of Au nanorods into large area ordered superstructures allowed identification of BIC pen traces. SERS spectra of good intensity and high reproducibility were obtained using Au nanorod vertical arrays, due to the high density of hot spots and morphological reproducibility of these superstructures. These results open the way to the employment of SERS for fast screening analysis and for quantitative analysis of pens and faded pens which are relevant for the fields of forensic and art conservation sciences.

  16. Metallic superhydrophobic surfaces via thermal sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, Hamed; Wang, Wei; Popat, Ketul C.; Kwon, Gibum; Holland, Troy B.; Kota, Arun K.

    2017-06-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces (i.e., surfaces extremely repellent to water) allow water droplets to bead up and easily roll off from the surface. While a few methods have been developed to fabricate metallic superhydrophobic surfaces, these methods typically involve expensive equipment, environmental hazards, or multi-step processes. In this work, we developed a universal, scalable, solvent-free, one-step methodology based on thermal sensitization to create appropriate surface texture and fabricate metallic superhydrophobic surfaces. To demonstrate the feasibility of our methodology and elucidate the underlying mechanism, we fabricated superhydrophobic surfaces using ferritic (430) and austenitic (316) stainless steels (representative alloys) with roll off angles as low as 4° and 7°, respectively. We envision that our approach will enable the fabrication of superhydrophobic metal alloys for a wide range of civilian and military applications.

  17. Uncertainty and Sensitivity in Surface Dynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettner, Albert J.; Syvitski, James P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Papers for this special issue on 'Uncertainty and Sensitivity in Surface Dynamics Modeling' heralds from papers submitted after the 2014 annual meeting of the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System or CSDMS. CSDMS facilitates a diverse community of experts (now in 68 countries) that collectively investigate the Earth's surface-the dynamic interface between lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere, by promoting, developing, supporting and disseminating integrated open source software modules. By organizing more than 1500 researchers, CSDMS has the privilege of identifying community strengths and weaknesses in the practice of software development. We recognize, for example, that progress has been slow on identifying and quantifying uncertainty and sensitivity in numerical modeling of earth's surface dynamics. This special issue is meant to raise awareness for these important subjects and highlight state-of-the-art progress.

  18. Assessment of the contamination of drinking water supply wells by pesticides from surface water resources using a finite element reactive transport model and global sensitivity analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Binning, Philip John

    2013-01-01

    SummaryA reactive transport model is employed to evaluate the potential for contamination of drinking water wells by surface water pollution. The model considers various geologic settings, includes sorption and degradation processes and is tested by comparison with data from a tracer experiment where fluorescein dye injected in a river is monitored at nearby drinking water wells. Three compounds were considered: an older pesticide MCPP (Mecoprop) which is mobile and relatively persistent, glyphosate (Roundup), a newer biodegradable and strongly sorbing pesticide, and its degradation product AMPA. Global sensitivity analysis using the Morris method is employed to identify the dominant model parameters. Results show that the characteristics of clay aquitards (degree of fracturing and thickness), pollutant properties and well depths are crucial factors when evaluating the risk of drinking water well contamination from surface water. This study suggests that it is unlikely that glyphosate in streams can pose a threat to drinking water wells, while MCPP in surface water can represent a risk: MCPP concentration at the drinking water well can be up to 7% of surface water concentration in confined aquifers and up to 10% in unconfined aquifers. Thus, the presence of confining clay aquitards may not prevent contamination of drinking water wells by persistent compounds in surface water. Results are consistent with data on pesticide occurrence in Denmark where pesticides are found at higher concentrations at shallow depths and close to streams.

  19. Proportional counter for X-ray analysis of lunar and planetary surfaces. [a position sensitive scintillating imaging proportional counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    A position sensitive proportional scintillation detector was developed and evaluated for use in applications involving X-ray imaging as well as spectroscopy. Topics covered include limitations of the proportional scintillation counter for use in space; purification of the xenon gas in the detector, and the operation of the detector system. Results show that the light signal in a proportional scintillation detector remains well localized. With modest electric fields in xenon, the primary electrons from a photoelectric absorption of an X-ray can be brought a distance of a few millimeters to a higher field region without spreading more than a millimeter or so. Therefore, it is possible to make a proportional scintillation detector with good position sensitivity that could be used to calibrate out the difference in light collection over its sensitive volume.

  20. Parameterization, sensitivity analysis, and inversion: an investigation using groundwater modeling of the surface-mined Tivoli-Guidonia basin (Metropolitan City of Rome, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vigna, Francesco; Hill, Mary C.; Rossetto, Rudy; Mazza, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    With respect to model parameterization and sensitivity analysis, this work uses a practical example to suggest that methods that start with simple models and use computationally frugal model analysis methods remain valuable in any toolbox of model development methods. In this work, groundwater model calibration starts with a simple parameterization that evolves into a moderately complex model. The model is developed for a water management study of the Tivoli-Guidonia basin (Rome, Italy) where surface mining has been conducted in conjunction with substantial dewatering. The approach to model development used in this work employs repeated analysis using sensitivity and inverse methods, including use of a new observation-stacked parameter importance graph. The methods are highly parallelizable and require few model runs, which make the repeated analyses and attendant insights possible. The success of a model development design can be measured by insights attained and demonstrated model accuracy relevant to predictions. Example insights were obtained: (1) A long-held belief that, except for a few distinct fractures, the travertine is homogeneous was found to be inadequate, and (2) The dewatering pumping rate is more critical to model accuracy than expected. The latter insight motivated additional data collection and improved pumpage estimates. Validation tests using three other recharge and pumpage conditions suggest good accuracy for the predictions considered. The model was used to evaluate management scenarios and showed that similar dewatering results could be achieved using 20 % less pumped water, but would require installing newly positioned wells and cooperation between mine owners.

  1. Sensitivity of aerosol retrieval over snow surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, F. C.; Painter, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Significant amounts of black carbon and dust aerosols are transported to and accumulated in snowpacks of mountain ranges around the globe. The direct climate forcing of these particles is increasingly understood, whereas its indirect radiative forcing due to snow albedo and snow cover changes is still under investigation. In-situ and new remote sensing techniques are used to estimate snowpack properties from local to regional scales. Nevertheless, orbital and suborbital Earth observation data are difficult to analyze due to high spatial variability of the snowpack in rugged terrain. In addition, changes in atmospheric turbidity significantly complicate the estimation of snow cover characteristics and requires prior retrieval of optical and microphysical aerosol properties. Unfortunately, most aerosol retrieval techniques work only over dark surfaces. We therefore present a study on the sensitivity of aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval over snow surfaces. Radiative transfer calculations show that the sensitivity to surface spectral albedo depends strongly on the aerosol single scattering albedo (ratio of scattering efficiency to total extinction efficiency). Absorbing aerosol types (e.g. soot) provide a relatively good AOD retrieval sensitivity for very bright surfaces. The findings provide a basis for the development of future techniques and algorithms, which are able to concurrently retrieve snow and aerosol properties using remote sensing data. We explore these sensitivities with synthetic data and a time series of imaging spectrometer data, in situ spectral irradiance measurements, and sunphotometer measurements of AOD in the mountains of the Upper Colorado River Basin, USA. Ultimately, this research is important to map and better understand regional influences of aerosol and climate forcings on the cryosphere and water cycle in mountainous and other cold regions.

  2. The Electric Mechanism of Surface Pretreatments for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on Internal Equivalent Resistance Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    xu Wei-Wei; HU Lin-Hua; LUO Xiang-Dong; LIU Pei-Sheng; DAI Song-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Based on the optimization of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) photoelectrodes pretreated with different methods such as electrodeposition,spin-coating and TiCl4 pretreatment,theoretical calculations are carried out to interpret the internal electric mechanism.The numerical values,including the series resistance Rs and the shunt resistance Rsh corresponding to the equivalent circuit model,are well evaluated and confirm that the DSC has good performance with a high Rsh and a low Rs due to good electrical contact and a low charge recombination after the different modifications.The Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves are fifted in the case without series resistance,and account for the role of Rs in the output characteristics.It is found that when Rs tends to the infinitesimal,the short-circuit current Isc,the open-circuit voltage Voc and the fill factor can be improved by almost 0.8-1.4,2.9 and 2.1-6.8%,respectively.%Based on the optimization of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) photoelectrodes pretreated with different methods such as electrodeposition, spin-coating and TiCCl pretreatment, theoretical calculations are carried out to interpret the internal electric mechanism. The numerical values, including the series resistance Re and the shunt resistance Rsh corresponding to the equivalent circuit model, are well evaluated and confirm that the DSC has good performance with a high Rgh and a low Re due to good electrical contact and a low charge recombination after the different modifications. The I-V curves are fitted in the case without series resistance, and account for the role of Rs in the output characteristics. It is found that when Re tends to te infinitesimal, the short-circuit current Isc, the open-circuit voltage Voc and the fill factor can be improved by almost 0.8-1.4, 2.9 and 2.1-6.8%, respectively.

  3. Vibration Sensitive Keystroke Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopatka, M.; Peetz, M.-H.; van Erp, M.; Stehouwer, H.; van Zaanen, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel method for performing non-invasive biometric analysis on habitual keystroke patterns using a vibration-based feature space. With the increasing availability of 3-D accelerometer chips in laptop computers, conventional methods using time vectors may be augmented using a distinct fe

  4. Phantom pain : A sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsje, Susanne; Bosmans, JC; Van der Schans, CP; Geertzen, JHB; Dijkstra, PU

    2004-01-01

    Purpose : To analyse how decisions to dichotomise the frequency and impediment of phantom pain into absent and present influence the outcome of studies by performing a sensitivity analysis on an existing database. Method : Five hundred and thirty-six subjects were recruited from the database of an o

  5. An analysis of sensitivity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neyer, B.T.

    1992-03-06

    A new method of analyzing sensitivity tests is proposed. It uses the Likelihood Ratio Test to compute regions of arbitrary confidence. It can calculate confidence regions for the parameters of the distribution (e.g., the mean, {mu}, and the standard deviation, {sigma}) as well as various percentiles. Unlike presently used methods, such as those based on asymptotic analysis, it can analyze the results of all sensitivity tests, and it does not significantly underestimate the size of the confidence regions. The main disadvantage of this method is that it requires much more computation to calculate the confidence regions. However, these calculations can be easily and quickly performed on most computers.

  6. Sensitivity analysis in remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Ustinov, Eugene A

    2015-01-01

    This book contains a detailed presentation of general principles of sensitivity analysis as well as their applications to sample cases of remote sensing experiments. An emphasis is made on applications of adjoint problems, because they are more efficient in many practical cases, although their formulation may seem counterintuitive to a beginner. Special attention is paid to forward problems based on higher-order partial differential equations, where a novel matrix operator approach to formulation of corresponding adjoint problems is presented. Sensitivity analysis (SA) serves for quantitative models of physical objects the same purpose, as differential calculus does for functions. SA provides derivatives of model output parameters (observables) with respect to input parameters. In remote sensing SA provides computer-efficient means to compute the jacobians, matrices of partial derivatives of observables with respect to the geophysical parameters of interest. The jacobians are used to solve corresponding inver...

  7. Sensitivity of surface meteorological analyses to observation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Daniel Paul

    A computationally efficient variational analysis system for two-dimensional meteorological fields is developed and described. This analysis approach is most efficient when the number of analysis grid points is much larger than the number of available observations, such as for large domain mesoscale analyses. The analysis system is developed using MATLAB software and can take advantage of multiple processors or processor cores. A version of the analysis system has been exported as a platform independent application (i.e., can be run on Windows, Linux, or Macintosh OS X desktop computers without a MATLAB license) with input/output operations handled by commonly available internet software combined with data archives at the University of Utah. The impact of observation networks on the meteorological analyses is assessed by utilizing a percentile ranking of individual observation sensitivity and impact, which is computed by using the adjoint of the variational surface assimilation system. This methodology is demonstrated using a case study of the analysis from 1400 UTC 27 October 2010 over the entire contiguous United States domain. The sensitivity of this approach to the dependence of the background error covariance on observation density is examined. Observation sensitivity and impact provide insight on the influence of observations from heterogeneous observing networks as well as serve as objective metrics for quality control procedures that may help to identify stations with significant siting, reporting, or representativeness issues.

  8. Economic modeling and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, J W

    1998-09-01

    The field of pharmacoeconomics (PE) faces serious concerns of research credibility and bias. The failure of researchers to reproduce similar results in similar settings, the inappropriate use of clinical data in economic models, the lack of transparency, and the inability of readers to make meaningful comparisons across published studies have greatly contributed to skepticism about the validity, reliability, and relevance of these studies to healthcare decision-makers. Using a case study in the field of lipid PE, two suggestions are presented for generally applicable reporting standards that will improve the credibility of PE. Health economists and researchers should be expected to provide either the software used to create their PE model or a multivariate sensitivity analysis of their PE model. Software distribution would allow other users to validate the assumptions and calculations of a particular model and apply it to their own circumstances. Multivariate sensitivity analysis can also be used to present results in a consistent and meaningful way that will facilitate comparisons across the PE literature. Using these methods, broader acceptance and application of PE results by policy-makers would become possible. To reduce the uncertainty about what is being accomplished with PE studies, it is recommended that these guidelines become requirements of both scientific journals and healthcare plan decision-makers. The standardization of economic modeling in this manner will increase the acceptability of pharmacoeconomics as a practical, real-world science.

  9. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  10. Sensitivity of surface acoustic wave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Zubko, Konrad

    2001-08-01

    The SAW devices are widely used as filters, delay lines, resonators and gas sensors. It is possible to use it as mechanical force. The paper describes sensitivity of acceleration sensor based on SAW using the Rayleigh wave propagation. Since characteristic of acceleration SAW sensors are largely determined by piezoelectric materials, it is very important to select substrate with required characteristics. Researches and numerical modeling based on simply sensor model include piezoelectric beam with unilateral free end. An aggregated mass is connected to the one. The dimension and aggregated mass are various. In this case a buckling stress and sensitivity are changed. Sensitivity in main and perpendicular axis are compare for three sensor based on SiO2, LiNbO3, Li2B4O7. Influences of phase velocity, electro-mechanical coupling constant and density on sensitivity are investigated. Some mechanical parameters of the substrates in dynamic work mode are researched using sensor model and Rayleigh model of vibrations without vibration damping. The model is useful because it simply determines dependencies between sensor parameters and substrate parameters. Differences between measured and evaluated quantities are less than 5 percent. Researches based on sensor modes, which fulfilled mechanical specifications similarly to aircraft navigation.

  11. Surface sensitivity of the spin Seebeck effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aqeel, Aisha; Vera Marun, Ivan; van Wees, Bart; Palstra, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of the interface quality on the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) of the bilayer system yttrium iron garnet (YIG)-platinum (Pt). The magnitude and shape of the SSE is strongly influenced by mechanical treatment of the YIG single crystal surface. We observe that the saturat

  12. Surface Aesthetics and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, Barış; Öreroğlu, Ali Rıza; Daniel, Rollin K

    2016-01-01

    Surface aesthetics of an attractive nose result from certain lines, shadows, and highlights with specific proportions and breakpoints. Analysis emphasizes geometric polygons as aesthetic subunits. Evaluation of the complete nasal surface aesthetics is achieved using geometric polygons to define the existing deformity and aesthetic goals. The relationship between the dome triangles, interdomal triangle, facet polygons, and infralobular polygon are integrated to form the "diamond shape" light reflection on the nasal tip. The principles of geometric polygons allow the surgeon to analyze the deformities of the nose, define an operative plan to achieve specific goals, and select the appropriate operative technique.

  13. Surface sensitivity of the spin Seebeck effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aqeel, A.; Vera-Marun, I. J.; Wees, B. J. van; Palstra, T. T. M., E-mail: t.t.m.palstra@rug.nl [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-10-21

    We have investigated the influence of the interface quality on the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) of the bilayer system yttrium iron garnet (YIG)–platinum (Pt). The magnitude and shape of the SSE is strongly influenced by mechanical treatment of the YIG single crystal surface. We observe that the saturation magnetic field (H{sub sat}{sup SSE}) for the SSE signal increases from 55.3 mT to 72.8 mT with mechanical treatment. The change in the magnitude of H{sub sat}{sup SSE} can be attributed to the presence of a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy due to the treatment induced surface strain or shape anisotropy in the Pt/YIG system. Our results show that the SSE is a powerful tool to investigate magnetic anisotropy at the interface.

  14. [Sensitivity of surface microorganisms to disinfectants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzywicka, H; Janowska, J; Tadeusiak, B

    1991-01-01

    The influence of humidity and temperature on survival of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa on the surfaces of titles, glass and blanket carriers has been estimated. The number of CFU was examined after exposure time 6 and 24 hours in temperatures of 21 degrees C, 37 degrees C and RH 35%, 95%. It was observed: 1. The important reduction of numbers of both microorganisms at temperature 37 degrees C and RH 95%, 2. The relatively high number of survival cells of P. aeruginosa on the surface of blankets at temp. 21 degrees C and RH 95%. The microorganisms on the carriers were previously kept for 24 h at temp. 21 degrees C, RH 35% and 95% and then exposed to solutions of chloramine, formalin, lysol and Sterinol (QAC). It was observed that there was a great dependence of the disinfecting effect on the degree of dessication of the surfaces. In all cases the resistance of contaminated carriers stored 24 h was higher at 95% RH than at 35% RH.

  15. Surface analysis in microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignataro, S

    1995-10-01

    The contribution given by surface analysis to solve some problems encountered in the production of electronic power devices have been discussed. Mainly two types of problems have been faced. One of these deal with interfacial chemistry. Three examples have been investigated. The first applies to the improvement of the quality and the reliability of plastic packages through the optimization of the resin/metal and resin/die adhesion. The second relies to the adhesion between polyimide and silicon nitride used in the multilevel technology. The third example refers to the so called die-attach process and related problems. Another area of interest in microelectronics is that of the erosion of various types of surfaces and the possibility of wrong etching. A few examples of the application of surface analytical techniques for these problems will be presented. XPS and SIMS working in imaging and multipoint analysis mode, scanning acoustic microscopy, contact angle measurements as well as peeling and tensile strength measurements are the main tools used to obtain useful data.

  16. Towards More Efficient and Effective Global Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Saman; Gupta, Hoshin

    2014-05-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) is an important paradigm in the context of model development and application. There are a variety of approaches towards sensitivity analysis that formally describe different "intuitive" understandings of the sensitivity of a single or multiple model responses to different factors such as model parameters or forcings. These approaches are based on different philosophies and theoretical definitions of sensitivity and range from simple local derivatives to rigorous Sobol-type analysis-of-variance approaches. In general, different SA methods focus and identify different properties of the model response and may lead to different, sometimes even conflicting conclusions about the underlying sensitivities. This presentation revisits the theoretical basis for sensitivity analysis, critically evaluates the existing approaches in the literature, and demonstrates their shortcomings through simple examples. Important properties of response surfaces that are associated with the understanding and interpretation of sensitivities are outlined. A new approach towards global sensitivity analysis is developed that attempts to encompass the important, sensitivity-related properties of response surfaces. Preliminary results show that the new approach is superior to the standard approaches in the literature in terms of effectiveness and efficiency.

  17. Sensitivity Analysis of Multidisciplinary Rotorcraft Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Diskin, Boris; Biedron, Robert T.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Bauchau, Olivier A.

    2017-01-01

    A multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis of rotorcraft simulations involving tightly coupled high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics and comprehensive analysis solvers is presented and evaluated. An unstructured sensitivity-enabled Navier-Stokes solver, FUN3D, and a nonlinear flexible multibody dynamics solver, DYMORE, are coupled to predict the aerodynamic loads and structural responses of helicopter rotor blades. A discretely-consistent adjoint-based sensitivity analysis available in FUN3D provides sensitivities arising from unsteady turbulent flows and unstructured dynamic overset meshes, while a complex-variable approach is used to compute DYMORE structural sensitivities with respect to aerodynamic loads. The multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis is conducted through integrating the sensitivity components from each discipline of the coupled system. Numerical results verify accuracy of the FUN3D/DYMORE system by conducting simulations for a benchmark rotorcraft test model and comparing solutions with established analyses and experimental data. Complex-variable implementation of sensitivity analysis of DYMORE and the coupled FUN3D/DYMORE system is verified by comparing with real-valued analysis and sensitivities. Correctness of adjoint formulations for FUN3D/DYMORE interfaces is verified by comparing adjoint-based and complex-variable sensitivities. Finally, sensitivities of the lift and drag functions obtained by complex-variable FUN3D/DYMORE simulations are compared with sensitivities computed by the multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis, which couples adjoint-based flow and grid sensitivities of FUN3D and FUN3D/DYMORE interfaces with complex-variable sensitivities of DYMORE structural responses.

  18. Sensitivity Analysis of Component Reliability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhenhuaGe

    2004-01-01

    In a system, Every component has its unique position within system and its unique failure characteristics. When a component's reliability is changed, its effect on system reliability is not equal. Component reliability sensitivity is a measure of effect on system reliability while a component's reliability is changed. In this paper, the definition and relative matrix of component reliability sensitivity is proposed, and some of their characteristics are analyzed. All these will help us to analyse or improve the system reliability.

  19. Sensitive carbohydrate detection using surface enhanced Raman tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangala, Karthikeshwar; Yanney, Michael; Hsiao, Cheng-Te; Wu, Wells W; Shen, Rong-Fong; Zou, Sige; Sygula, Andrzej; Zhang, Dongmao

    2010-12-15

    Glycomic analysis is an increasingly important field in biological and biomedical research as glycosylation is one of the most important protein post-translational modifications. We have developed a new technique to detect carbohydrates using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) by designing and applying a Rhodamine B derivative as the SERS tag. Using a reductive amination reaction, the Rhodamine-based tag (RT) was successfully conjugated to three model carbohydrates (glucose, lactose, and glucuronic acid). SERS detection limits obtained with a 633 nm HeNe laser were ∼1 nM in concentration for all the RT-carbohydrate conjugates and ∼10 fmol in total sample consumption. The dynamic range of the SERS method is about 4 orders of magnitude, spanning from 1 nM to 5 μM. Ratiometric SERS quantification using isotope-substituted SERS internal references allows comparative quantifications of carbohydrates labeled with RT and deuterium/hydrogen substituted RT tags, respectively. In addition to enhancing the SERS detection of the tagged carbohydrates, the Rhodamine tagging facilitates fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection of carbohydrates. Current fluorescence sensitivity of RT-carbohydrates is ∼3 nM in concentration while the mass spectrometry (MS) sensitivity is about 1 fmol, achieved with a linear ion trap electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS instrument. Potential applications that take advantage of the high SERS, fluorescence, and MS sensitivity of this SERS tagging strategy are discussed for practical glycomic analysis where carbohydrates may be quantified with a fluorescence and SERS technique and then identified with ESI-MS techniques.

  20. Shape design sensitivity analysis using domain information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Hwal-Gyeong; Choi, Kyung K.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical method for obtaining accurate shape design sensitivity information for built-up structures is developed and demonstrated through analysis of examples. The basic character of the finite element method, which gives more accurate domain information than boundary information, is utilized for shape design sensitivity improvement. A domain approach for shape design sensitivity analysis of built-up structures is derived using the material derivative idea of structural mechanics and the adjoint variable method of design sensitivity analysis. Velocity elements and B-spline curves are introduced to alleviate difficulties in generating domain velocity fields. The regularity requirements of the design velocity field are studied.

  1. Sensitivity analysis of distributed volcanic source inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavo', Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G.; González, Pablo J.; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2016-04-01

    A recently proposed algorithm (Camacho et al., 2011) claims to rapidly estimate magmatic sources from surface geodetic data without any a priori assumption about source geometry. The algorithm takes the advantages of fast calculation from the analytical models and adds the capability to model free-shape distributed sources. Assuming homogenous elastic conditions, the approach can determine general geometrical configurations of pressured and/or density source and/or sliding structures corresponding to prescribed values of anomalous density, pressure and slip. These source bodies are described as aggregation of elemental point sources for pressure, density and slip, and they fit the whole data (keeping some 3D regularity conditions). Although some examples and applications have been already presented to demonstrate the ability of the algorithm in reconstructing a magma pressure source (e.g. Camacho et al., 2011,Cannavò et al., 2015), a systematic analysis of sensitivity and reliability of the algorithm is still lacking. In this explorative work we present results from a large statistical test designed to evaluate the advantages and limitations of the methodology by assessing its sensitivity to the free and constrained parameters involved in inversions. In particular, besides the source parameters, we focused on the ground deformation network topology, and noise in measurements. The proposed analysis can be used for a better interpretation of the algorithm results in real-case applications. Camacho, A. G., González, P. J., Fernández, J. & Berrino, G. (2011) Simultaneous inversion of surface deformation and gravity changes by means of extended bodies with a free geometry: Application to deforming calderas. J. Geophys. Res. 116. Cannavò F., Camacho A.G., González P.J., Mattia M., Puglisi G., Fernández J. (2015) Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises, Scientific Reports, 5 (10970) doi:10.1038/srep

  2. Sensitivity Analysis for Multidisciplinary Systems (SAMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AFRL-RQ-WP-TM-2017-0017 SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR MULTIDISCIPLINARY SYSTEMS (SAMS) Richard D. Snyder Design & Analysis Branch Aerospace Vehicles...for public release. Distribution is unlimited. 1 AFRL-NASA Collaboration Provide economical, accurate sensitivities for multidisciplinary design and... Concept Refinement Technology Development System Development & Demonstration Production & Deployment Operation & Support • Knowledge is most limited

  3. Object-sensitive Type Analysis of PHP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Hoek, Henk Erik; Hage, J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we develop an object-sensitive type analysis for PHP, based on an extension of the notion of monotone frameworks to deal with the dynamic aspects of PHP, and following the framework of Smaragdakis et al. for object-sensitive analysis. We consider a number of instantiations of the frame

  4. Extended Forward Sensitivity Analysis for Uncertainty Quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2008-09-01

    This report presents the forward sensitivity analysis method as a means for quantification of uncertainty in system analysis. The traditional approach to uncertainty quantification is based on a “black box” approach. The simulation tool is treated as an unknown signal generator, a distribution of inputs according to assumed probability density functions is sent in and the distribution of the outputs is measured and correlated back to the original input distribution. This approach requires large number of simulation runs and therefore has high computational cost. Contrary to the “black box” method, a more efficient sensitivity approach can take advantage of intimate knowledge of the simulation code. In this approach equations for the propagation of uncertainty are constructed and the sensitivity is solved for as variables in the same simulation. This “glass box” method can generate similar sensitivity information as the above “black box” approach with couples of runs to cover a large uncertainty region. Because only small numbers of runs are required, those runs can be done with a high accuracy in space and time ensuring that the uncertainty of the physical model is being measured and not simply the numerical error caused by the coarse discretization. In the forward sensitivity method, the model is differentiated with respect to each parameter to yield an additional system of the same size as the original one, the result of which is the solution sensitivity. The sensitivity of any output variable can then be directly obtained from these sensitivities by applying the chain rule of differentiation. We extend the forward sensitivity method to include time and spatial steps as special parameters so that the numerical errors can be quantified against other physical parameters. This extension makes the forward sensitivity method a much more powerful tool to help uncertainty analysis. By knowing the relative sensitivity of time and space steps with other

  5. Assessment of the contamination of drinking water supply wells by pesticides from surface water resources using a finite element reactive transport model and global sensitivity analysis techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Binning, Philip John

    2013-01-01

    fluorescein dye injected in a river is monitored at nearby drinking water wells. Three compounds were considered: an older pesticide MCPP (Mecoprop) which is mobile and relatively persistent, glyphosate (Roundup), a newer biodegradable and strongly sorbing pesticide, and its degradation product AMPA. Global...... contamination from surface water. This study suggests that it is unlikely that glyphosate in streams can pose a threat to drinking water wells, while MCPP in surface water can represent a risk: MCPP concentration at the drinking water well can be up to 7% of surface water concentration in confined aquifers...... and up to 10% in unconfined aquifers. Thus, the presence of confining clay aquitards may not prevent contamination of drinking water wells by persistent compounds in surface water. Results are consistent with data on pesticide occurrence in Denmark where pesticides are found at higher concentrations...

  6. Sensitivity analysis for large-scale problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Whitworth, Sandra L.

    1987-01-01

    The development of efficient techniques for calculating sensitivity derivatives is studied. The objective is to present a computational procedure for calculating sensitivity derivatives as part of performing structural reanalysis for large-scale problems. The scope is limited to framed type structures. Both linear static analysis and free-vibration eigenvalue problems are considered.

  7. An ESDIRK Method with Sensitivity Analysis Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Rode; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2004-01-01

    A new algorithm for numerical sensitivity analysis of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is presented. The underlying ODE solver belongs to the Runge-Kutta family. The algorithm calculates sensitivities with respect to problem parameters and initial conditions, exploiting the special structure...

  8. Extended Forward Sensitivity Analysis for Uncertainty Quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2011-09-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are playing more important roles to quantify uncertainties and realize high fidelity simulations in engineering system analyses, such as transients happened in a complex nuclear reactor system. Traditional V&V in the reactor system analysis focused more on the validation part or did not differentiate verification and validation. The traditional approach to uncertainty quantification is based on a 'black box' approach. The simulation tool is treated as an unknown signal generator, a distribution of inputs according to assumed probability density functions is sent in and the distribution of the outputs is measured and correlated back to the original input distribution. The 'black box' method mixes numerical errors with all other uncertainties. It is also not efficient to perform sensitivity analysis. Contrary to the 'black box' method, a more efficient sensitivity approach can take advantage of intimate knowledge of the simulation code. In these types of approaches equations for the propagation of uncertainty are constructed and the sensitivities are directly solved for as variables in the simulation. This paper presents the forward sensitivity analysis as a method to help uncertainty qualification. By including time step and potentially spatial step as special sensitivity parameters, the forward sensitivity method is extended as one method to quantify numerical errors. Note that by integrating local truncation errors over the whole system through the forward sensitivity analysis process, the generated time step and spatial step sensitivity information reflect global numerical errors. The discretization errors can be systematically compared against uncertainties due to other physical parameters. This extension makes the forward sensitivity method a much more powerful tool to help uncertainty qualification. By knowing the relative sensitivity of time and space steps with other interested physical

  9. Analysis of MEMS Accelerometer for Optimized Sensitivity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khairun Nisa Khamil; Kok Swee Leong; Norizan Bin Mohamad; Norhayati Soin; Norshahida Saba

    2014-01-01

    .... The geometrical of the accelerometer, mass width, beam (length and width) of the device and its sensitivity are analyzed theoretically and also using finite element analysis software, COMSOL Multiphysics...

  10. Sensitivity Analysis Using Simple Additive Weighting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne S. Goodridge

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The output of a multiple criteria decision method often has to be analyzed using some sensitivity analysis technique. The SAW MCDM method is commonly used in management sciences and there is a critical need for a robust approach to sensitivity analysis in the context that uncertain data is often present in decision models. Most of the sensitivity analysis techniques for the SAW method involve Monte Carlo simulation methods on the initial data. These methods are computationally intensive and often require complex software. In this paper, the SAW method is extended to include an objective function which makes it easy to analyze the influence of specific changes in certain criteria values thus making easy to perform sensitivity analysis.

  11. Acoustic design sensitivity analysis of structural sound radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许智生

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an acoustic design sensitivity(ADS)analysis on sound radiation of structures by using the boundary element method(BEM).We calculated the velocity distribution of the thin plate by analytical method and the surface sound pressure by Rayleigh integral,and expressed the sound radiation power of the structure in a positive definite quadratic form of the Hermitian with an impedance matrix.The ADS analysis of the plate was thus translated into the analysis of structure dynamic sensitivity and ...

  12. Multiple predictor smoothing methods for sensitivity analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helton, Jon Craig; Storlie, Curtis B.

    2006-08-01

    The use of multiple predictor smoothing methods in sampling-based sensitivity analyses of complex models is investigated. Specifically, sensitivity analysis procedures based on smoothing methods employing the stepwise application of the following nonparametric regression techniques are described: (1) locally weighted regression (LOESS), (2) additive models, (3) projection pursuit regression, and (4) recursive partitioning regression. The indicated procedures are illustrated with both simple test problems and results from a performance assessment for a radioactive waste disposal facility (i.e., the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant). As shown by the example illustrations, the use of smoothing procedures based on nonparametric regression techniques can yield more informative sensitivity analysis results than can be obtained with more traditional sensitivity analysis procedures based on linear regression, rank regression or quadratic regression when nonlinear relationships between model inputs and model predictions are present.

  13. Sensitivity Analysis of Criticality for Different Nuclear Fuel Shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Sik; Jang, Misuk; Kim, Seoung Rae [NESS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Rod-type nuclear fuel was mainly developed in the past, but recent study has been extended to plate-type nuclear fuel. Therefore, this paper reviews the sensitivity of criticality according to different shapes of nuclear fuel types. Criticality analysis was performed using MCNP5. MCNP5 is well-known Monte Carlo codes for criticality analysis and a general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle code that can be used for neutron, photon, electron or coupled neutron / photon / electron transport, including the capability to calculate eigenvalues for critical systems. We performed the sensitivity analysis of criticality for different fuel shapes. In sensitivity analysis for simple fuel shapes, the criticality is proportional to the surface area. But for fuel Assembly types, it is not proportional to the surface area. In sensitivity analysis for intervals between plates, the criticality is greater as the interval increases, but if the interval is greater than 8mm, it showed an opposite trend that the criticality decrease by a larger interval. As a result, it has failed to obtain the logical content to be described in common for all cases. The sensitivity analysis of Criticality would be always required whenever subject to be analyzed is changed.

  14. Photoactive Fluoropolymer Surfaces that Release Sensitizer Drug Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Goutam; Minnis, Mihaela; Ghogare, Ashwini A.; Abramova, Inna; Cengel, Keith; Busch, Theresa M.; Greer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We describe a physical-organic study of two fluoropolymers bearing a photoreleasable PEGylated photosensitizer which generates 1O2(1Δg) [chlorin e6 methoxy tri(ethylene glycol) triester]. The surfaces are Teflon/polyvinylalcohol (PVA) nanocomposite and fluorinated silica. The relative efficiency of these surfaces to photorelease the PEGylated sensitizer [shown previously to be phototoxic to ovarian cancer cells (Kimani, S. et al J. Org. Chem 2012, 77, 10638)] was slightly higher for the nanocomposite. In the presence of red light and O2, 1O2 is formed, which cleaves an ethene linkage to liberate the sensitizer in 68–92% yields. The fluoropolymers were designed to deal with multiple problems. Namely, their success relied not only high O2 solubility and drug repellency, but that the C−F bonds physically quench little 1O2 for its productive use away from the surface. The results obtained here indicate that Teflon-like surfaces have potential uses of delivering sensitizer and singlet oxygen for applications in tissue repair and photodynamic therapy (PDT). PMID:25686407

  15. Photoactive fluoropolymer surfaces that release sensitizer drug molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Goutam; Minnis, Mihaela; Ghogare, Ashwini A; Abramova, Inna; Cengel, Keith A; Busch, Theresa M; Greer, Alexander

    2015-03-12

    We describe a physical-organic study of two fluoropolymers bearing a photoreleasable PEGylated photosensitizer that generates (1)O2((1)Δg) [chlorin e6 methoxy tri(ethylene glycol) triester]. The surfaces are Teflon/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanocomposite and fluorinated silica. The relative efficiency of these surfaces to photorelease the PEGylated sensitizer [shown previously to be phototoxic to ovarian cancer cells (Kimani, S. et al. J. Org. Chem 2012, 77, 10638)] was slightly higher for the nanocomposite. In the presence of red light and O2, (1)O2 is formed, which cleaves an ethene linkage to liberate the sensitizer in 68-92% yield. The fluoropolymers were designed to deal with multiple problems. Namely, their success relied not only on high O2 solubility and drug repellency but also on the C-F bonds, which physically quench little (1)O2, for singlet oxygen's productive use away from the surface. The results obtained here indicate that Teflon-like surfaces have potential uses in delivering sensitizer and singlet oxygen for applications in tissue repair and photodynamic therapy (PDT).

  16. Optical cavity coupled surface plasmon resonance sensing for enhanced sensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zheng; Xin Zhao; Jinsong Zhu; Jim Diamond

    2008-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing system based on the optical cavity enhanced detection tech-nique is experimentally demonstrated. A fiber-optic laser cavity is built with a SPR sensor inside. By measuring the laser output power when the cavity is biased near the threshold point, the sensitivity, defined as the dependence of the output optical intensity on the sample variations, can be increased by about one order of magnitude compared to that of the SPR sensor alone under the intensity interrogation scheme. This could facilitate ultra-high sensitivity SPR biosensing applications. Further system miniaturization is possible by using integrated optical components and waveguide SPR sensors.

  17. Surface Binding and Organization of Sensitizing Dyes on Metal Oxide Single Crystal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkinson, Bruce

    2010-06-04

    Even though investigations of dye-sensitized nanocrystalline semiconductors in solar cells has dominated research on dye-sensitized semiconductors over the past two decades. Single crystal electrodes represent far simpler model systems for studying the sensitization process with a continuing train of studies dating back more than forty years. Even today single crystal surfaces prove to be more controlled experimental models for the study of dye-sensitized semiconductors than the nanocrystalline substrates. We analyzed the scientific advances in the model sensitized single crystal systems that preceded the introduction of nanocrystalline semiconductor electrodes. It then follows the single crystal research to the present, illustrating both their striking simplicity of use and clarity of interpretation relative to nanocrystalline electrodes. Researchers have employed many electrochemical, photochemical and scanning probe techniques for studying monolayer quantities of sensitizing dyes at specific crystallographic faces of different semiconductors. These methods include photochronocoulometry, electronic spectroscopy and flash photolysis of dyes at potential-controlled semiconductor electrodes and the use of total internal reflection methods. In addition, we describe the preparation of surfaces of single crystal SnS2 and TiO2 electrodes to serve as reproducible model systems for charge separation at dye sensitized solar cells. This process involves cleaving the SnS2 electrodes and a photoelectrochemical surface treatment for TiO2 that produces clean surfaces for sensitization (as verified by AFM) resulting in near unity yields for electron transfer from the molecular excited dyes into the conduction band.

  18. Surface Sensitive Techniques for Advanced Characterization of Luminescent Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Hendrik C

    2017-08-04

    The important role of surface sensitive characterization techniques such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight scanning ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) for the characterization of different phosphor materials is discussed in this short review by giving selective examples from previous obtained results. AES is used to monitor surface reactions during electron bombardment and also to determine the elemental composition of the surfaces of the materials, while XPS and TOF-SIMS are used for determining the surface chemical composition and valence state of the dopants. The role of XPS to determine the presence of defects in the phosphor matrix is also stated with the different examples. The role of HRTEM in combination with Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) for nanoparticle characterization is also pointed out.

  19. Surface analysis the principal techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Vickerman, John C

    2009-01-01

    This completely updated and revised second edition of Surface Analysis: The Principal Techniques, deals with the characterisation and understanding of the outer layers of substrates, how they react, look and function which are all of interest to surface scientists. Within this comprehensive text, experts in each analysis area introduce the theory and practice of the principal techniques that have shown themselves to be effective in both basic research and in applied surface analysis. Examples of analysis are provided to facilitate the understanding of this topic and to show readers how they c

  20. Eigenfrequency sensitivity analysis of flexible rotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šašek J.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with sensitivity analysis of eigenfrequencies from the viewpoint of design parameters. The sensitivity analysis is applied to a rotor which consists of a shaft and a disk. The design parameters of sensitivity analysis are the disk radius and the disk width. The shaft is modeled as a 1D continuum using shaft finite elements. The disks of rotating systems are commonly modeled as rigid bodies. The presented approach to the disk modeling is based on a 3D flexible continuum discretized using hexahedral finite elements. The both components of the rotor are connected together by special proposed couplings. The whole rotor is modeled in rotating coordinate system with considering rotation influences (gyroscopic and dynamics stiffness matrices.

  1. THE EFFECT OF BONDING AND SURFACE SEALANT APPLICATION ON POSTOPERATIVE SENSITIVITY FROM POSTERIOR COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan TEKÇE

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the postoperative sensitivity of posterior Class I composite restoration at short-term, restorated with two different all-in-one self-etch adhesives with or without surface sealant application. Materials and Methods: 44 restorations were inserted in 11 patients who required Class I restorations in their molars. Each patient received 4 restorations, thus four groups were formed; (1 G-Aenial Bond (GC, Japan; (2 Clearfil S3 Bond (Kuraray, Japan; (3 G-Aenial Bond+Fortify Plus (Bisco, USA, (4 Clearfil S3 Bond+Fortify Plus. Sensitivity was evaluated at 24h, 7, 15, and 30 days using cold air, ice, and pressure stimuli using a visual analog scale. Comparisons of continuous variables between the sensitivity evaluations were performed using the Friedman’s One-Way Analysis of Variance with repeated measures test (p0.05. The use of Clearfil S3 Bond resulted in almost the same level of postoperative sensitivity as did the use of G-Aenial Bond. The highest sensitivity scores were observed for the surface sealant applied teeth without any statistical significance (p>0.05. Conclusions: Self etch adhesives displayed postoperative sensitivity. The sensitivity scores slightly decreased at the end of 30 days (p>0.05. Surface sealant application did not result in a decrease in sensitivity scores for either dentin adhesives.

  2. Sensitivity analysis and application in exploration geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, R.

    2013-12-01

    In exploration geophysics, the usual way of dealing with geophysical data is to form an Earth model describing underground structure in the area of investigation. The resolved model, however, is based on the inversion of survey data which is unavoidable contaminated by various noises and is sampled in a limited number of observation sites. Furthermore, due to the inherent non-unique weakness of inverse geophysical problem, the result is ambiguous. And it is not clear that which part of model features is well-resolved by the data. Therefore the interpretation of the result is intractable. We applied a sensitivity analysis to address this problem in magnetotelluric(MT). The sensitivity, also named Jacobian matrix or the sensitivity matrix, is comprised of the partial derivatives of the data with respect to the model parameters. In practical inversion, the matrix can be calculated by direct modeling of the theoretical response for the given model perturbation, or by the application of perturbation approach and reciprocity theory. We now acquired visualized sensitivity plot by calculating the sensitivity matrix and the solution is therefore under investigation that the less-resolved part is indicated and should not be considered in interpretation, while the well-resolved parameters can relatively be convincing. The sensitivity analysis is hereby a necessary and helpful tool for increasing the reliability of inverse models. Another main problem of exploration geophysics is about the design strategies of joint geophysical survey, i.e. gravity, magnetic & electromagnetic method. Since geophysical methods are based on the linear or nonlinear relationship between observed data and subsurface parameters, an appropriate design scheme which provides maximum information content within a restricted budget is quite difficult. Here we firstly studied sensitivity of different geophysical methods by mapping the spatial distribution of different survey sensitivity with respect to the

  3. From analysis to surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bemman, Brian; Meredith, David

    2014-01-01

    of Sheer Pluck (1984), a twelve-tone composition for guitar by Milton Babbitt (1916–2011). This analysis focuses on the all-partition array structure on which the piece is based. Having pre- sented this analysis, we formalize some constraints on the structure of the piece and explore some computational...

  4. ANALYSIS OF SENSITIVITY AND CHARACTERISTICS OF MULTI-MODE DISPERSION CURVES OF SURFACE WAVE%面波多模频散曲线的敏感性及特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨奎

    2012-01-01

    At present, surface wave exploration has been widely applied to the selection of site, the seismic safety evaluation, etc. More attention is paid to for the Raylcigh wave applications, but less attention is paid to the Love wave. The research in paper shows the analysis of sensitivity and characteristics of multi-mode dispersion wave of surface wave for the rate model and the low-velocity model, and achieved the media response of multi-mode wave in half-space models. The characteristics of base mode and higher mode in high frequency and low frequency were analyzed, and that refined the high frequency of multi-mode wave theory the lowest speed. Some general conclusions of surface wave supporting the surface wave are achieved.%面波勘探现在已经被广泛应用于工程选址及地震安全评价等方面,但其大多是针对Rayleigh波的应用,对Love波的关注较少.针对面波信息中的两种主要成份Rayleigh波和Love波对速度递增模型和存在低速层模型进行多模频散曲线的敏感性和特征分析,得到了多模式波对半空间介质模型和多层介质的响应特征,而且还对其基模式波和高模式波在高频和低频上的速度趋势进行了分析,细化了高频时的多模式波的理论最低速,得出了一些具有普遍性的结论,并为面波信息的综合利用提供了有力支持.

  5. A numerical comparison of sensitivity analysis techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamby, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    Engineering and scientific phenomena are often studied with the aid of mathematical models designed to simulate complex physical processes. In the nuclear industry, modeling the movement and consequence of radioactive pollutants is extremely important for environmental protection and facility control. One of the steps in model development is the determination of the parameters most influential on model results. A {open_quotes}sensitivity analysis{close_quotes} of these parameters is not only critical to model validation but also serves to guide future research. A previous manuscript (Hamby) detailed many of the available methods for conducting sensitivity analyses. The current paper is a comparative assessment of several methods for estimating relative parameter sensitivity. Method practicality is based on calculational ease and usefulness of the results. It is the intent of this report to demonstrate calculational rigor and to compare parameter sensitivity rankings resulting from various sensitivity analysis techniques. An atmospheric tritium dosimetry model (Hamby) is used here as an example, but the techniques described can be applied to many different modeling problems. Other investigators (Rose; Dalrymple and Broyd) present comparisons of sensitivity analyses methodologies, but none as comprehensive as the current work.

  6. What Constitutes a "Good" Sensitivity Analysis? Elements and Tools for a Robust Sensitivity Analysis with Reduced Computational Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Saman; Gupta, Hoshin; Haghnegahdar, Amin

    2016-04-01

    Global sensitivity analysis (GSA) is a systems theoretic approach to characterizing the overall (average) sensitivity of one or more model responses across the factor space, by attributing the variability of those responses to different controlling (but uncertain) factors (e.g., model parameters, forcings, and boundary and initial conditions). GSA can be very helpful to improve the credibility and utility of Earth and Environmental System Models (EESMs), as these models are continually growing in complexity and dimensionality with continuous advances in understanding and computing power. However, conventional approaches to GSA suffer from (1) an ambiguous characterization of sensitivity, and (2) poor computational efficiency, particularly as the problem dimension grows. Here, we identify several important sensitivity-related characteristics of response surfaces that must be considered when investigating and interpreting the ''global sensitivity'' of a model response (e.g., a metric of model performance) to its parameters/factors. Accordingly, we present a new and general sensitivity and uncertainty analysis framework, Variogram Analysis of Response Surfaces (VARS), based on an analogy to 'variogram analysis', that characterizes a comprehensive spectrum of information on sensitivity. We prove, theoretically, that Morris (derivative-based) and Sobol (variance-based) methods and their extensions are special cases of VARS, and that their SA indices are contained within the VARS framework. We also present a practical strategy for the application of VARS to real-world problems, called STAR-VARS, including a new sampling strategy, called "star-based sampling". Our results across several case studies show the STAR-VARS approach to provide reliable and stable assessments of "global" sensitivity, while being at least 1-2 orders of magnitude more efficient than the benchmark Morris and Sobol approaches.

  7. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR PARAMETERIZED VARIATIONAL INEQUALITY PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fei

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents sensitivity analysis for parameterized variational inequality problems (VIP). Under appropriate assumption, it is shown that the perturbed solution to parameterized VIP is existent, unique, continuous and differentiable with respect to perturbation parameter. In the case of differentiability, we derive the equations forcalculating the derivative of solution variables with respect to the perturbation parameters.

  8. Surface Temperature Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Ruedy, Reto

    2012-01-01

    Small global mean temperature changes may have significant to disastrous consequences for the Earth's climate if they persist for an extended period. Obtaining global means from local weather reports is hampered by the uneven spatial distribution of the reliably reporting weather stations. Methods had to be developed that minimize as far as possible the impact of that situation. This software is a method of combining temperature data of individual stations to obtain a global mean trend, overcoming/estimating the uncertainty introduced by the spatial and temporal gaps in the available data. Useful estimates were obtained by the introduction of a special grid, subdividing the Earth's surface into 8,000 equal-area boxes, using the existing data to create virtual stations at the center of each of these boxes, and combining temperature anomalies (after assessing the radius of high correlation) rather than temperatures.

  9. Design optimization of highly sensitive LSPR enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensors with nanoholes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Wu; Qingkang Wang

    2008-01-01

    For breaking through the sensitivity limitation of conventional surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors, novel highly sensitive SPR biosensors with Au nanoparticles and nanogratings enhancement have been proposed recently.But in practice, these structures have obvious disadvantages.In this study, a nanohole based sensitivity enhancement SPR biosensor is proposed and the influence of different structural parameters on the performance is investigated by using rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA).Electromagnetic field distributions around the nanohole are also given out to directly explain the performance difference for various structural parameters.The results indicate that significant sensitivity increase is associated with localized surface plasmons (LSPs) excitation mediated by nanoholes.Except to outcome the weakness of other LSP based biosensors, larger resonance angle shift, reflectance amplitude, and sharper SPR curves' width are obtained simultaneously under optimized structural parameters.

  10. Highly sensitive BTX detection using surface functionalized QCM sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozkurt, Asuman Aşıkoğlu; Özdemir, Okan; Altındal, Ahmet, E-mail: altindal@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Yildiz Technical University, Davutpasa, 34210 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    A novel organic compound was designed and successfully synthesized for the fabrication of QCM based sensors to detect the low concentrations of BTX gases in indoor air. The effect of the long-range electron orbital delocalization on the BTX vapour sensing properties of azo-bridged Pcs based chemiresistor-type sensors have also been investigated in this work. The sensing behaviour of the film for the online detection of volatile organic solvent vapors was investigated by utilizing an AT-cut quartz crystal resonator. It was observed that the adsorption of the target molecules on the coating surface cause a reversible negative frequency shift of the resonator. Thus, a variety of solvent vapors can be detected by using the phthalocyanine film as sensitive coating, with sensitivity in the ppm range and response times in the order of several seconds depending on the molecular structure of the organic solvent.

  11. Surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensor based on metallic grating with high sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kaiqun; Lu, Yonghua; Chen, Junxue; Zheng, Rongsheng; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai

    2008-11-10

    High sensitivity is obtained at larger resonant incident angle if negative diffraction order of metallic grating is used to excite the surface plasmon. A highly sensitive grating-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is designed for the hydrogen detection. A thin palladium (Pd) film deposited on the grating surface is used as transducer. The influences of grating period and the thickness of Pd on the performance of sensor are investigated using rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) method. The sensitivity as well as the width of the SPR curves and reflective amplitude is considered simultaneously for designing the grating-based SPR hydrogen sensor, and a set of optimized structural parameters is presented. The performance of grating-based SPR sensor is also compared with that of conventional prism-based SPR sensor.

  12. Thin film surface reconstruction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imperatori, P. [CNR, Monterotondo Stazione, Rome (Italy). Istituto di Chimica dei materiali

    1996-09-01

    The study of the atomic structure of surfaces and interfaces is a fundamental step in the knowledge and the development of new materials. Among the several surface-sensitive techniques employed to characterise the atomic arrangements, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD) is one of the most powerful. With a simple data treatment, based on the kinematical theory, and using the classical methods of x-ray bulk structure determination, it gives the atomic positions of atoms at a surface or an interface and the atomic displacements of subsurface layers for a complete determination of the structure. In this paper the main features of the technique will be briefly reviewed and selected of application to semiconductor and metal surfaces will be discussed.

  13. 随机平衡设计傅里叶振幅敏感性分析方法和拓展傅里叶振幅敏感性分析方法在陆面过程模式敏感性分析中的应用探索∗%Applications of random balance design Fourier amplitude sensitivity test and extended Fourier amplitude sensitivity test in the parameter sensitivity analysis of land surface pro cess mo del

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红祺

    2015-01-01

    探讨了随机平衡傅里叶振幅敏感性分析方法(RBD-FAST)和扩展傅里叶振幅敏感性分析方法(EFAST)在陆面过程模式参数敏感性研究中的应用。试验中使用通用陆面过程模式(CoLM)和通榆退化草地2008年夏季观测资料,针对陆气相互作用中重要的要素:感热通量(SH)、潜热通量(LH)、地表温度(ST),2 m气温(T2m)和2 m湿度(Q2m),分析了11个参数(土深、1—5层黏土比率、孔隙度、最大露水厚度、50%植物根深、地表空气粗糙度和冠层下土壤拖曳系数)的敏感性大小。结果表明, RBD-FAST和EFAST对参数的一阶敏感性检验结果较为一致且与之前的研究结果类似, EFAST方法还可以得到考虑了参数间相互作用的整体敏感性。 RBD-FAST的优势主要表现为在极大地减少了计算消耗机的同时,一次取样即可计算所有参数的一阶敏感性,而EFAST的优势则在于通盘考虑了参数之间的相互影响,可以得到更为合理的整体敏感性序列。针对不同需求,选择使用这两种敏感性分析方法,有助于提高陆面过程模式参数化方案的改进效率。%In this paper, we discuss the applications of random balance design Fourier amplitude sensitivity test (RBD-FAST) and extended Fourier amplitude sensitivity test (EFAST) in the parameter sensitivity analysis of land surface process model. We use the common land model and data of Tongyu station, which is a reference site of CEOP in the semi-arid regions, use five model outputs (sensible heat flux, latent heat flux, surface temperature, temperature of air at 2 m over surface, moisture of air at 2 m over surface) as focus output, and use 11 model parameter (soil depth, the soil proportion of 1–5 layers of soil, the porosity of soil, the max dew depth, the roughness of the air between surface and the canopy, and the drag coefficient under the canopy) as the parameters to be analyzed. After the 10 RBD-FAST experiments, we obtain the

  14. Sensitivity analysis and related analysis : A survey of statistical techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art in five related types of analysis, namely (i) sensitivity or what-if analysis, (ii) uncertainty or risk analysis, (iii) screening, (iv) validation, and (v) optimization. The main question is: when should which type of analysis be applied; which statistical

  15. NIR sensitivity analysis with the VANE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Justin T.; Goodin, Christopher T.; Baylot, Alex E.

    2016-05-01

    Near infrared (NIR) cameras, with peak sensitivity around 905-nm wavelengths, are increasingly used in object detection applications such as pedestrian detection, occupant detection in vehicles, and vehicle detection. In this work, we present the results of simulated sensitivity analysis for object detection with NIR cameras. The analysis was conducted using high performance computing (HPC) to determine the environmental effects on object detection in different terrains and environmental conditions. The Virtual Autonomous Navigation Environment (VANE) was used to simulate highresolution models for environment, terrain, vehicles, and sensors. In the experiment, an active fiducial marker was attached to the rear bumper of a vehicle. The camera was mounted on a following vehicle that trailed at varying standoff distances. Three different terrain conditions (rural, urban, and forest), two environmental conditions (clear and hazy), three different times of day (morning, noon, and evening), and six different standoff distances were used to perform the sensor sensitivity analysis. The NIR camera that was used for the simulation is the DMK firewire monochrome on a pan-tilt motor. Standoff distance was varied along with environment and environmental conditions to determine the critical failure points for the sensor. Feature matching was used to detect the markers in each frame of the simulation, and the percentage of frames in which one of the markers was detected was recorded. The standoff distance produced the biggest impact on the performance of the camera system, while the camera system was not sensitive to environment conditions.

  16. SENSITIVITY OF IMPRESSION CYTOLOGY IN DIAGNOSING OCULAR SURFACE SQUAMOUS NEOPLASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malleswari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available OSSN describes a spectrum of neoplastic lesions, originating from squamous epithelium ranging from simple dysplasia to invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, involving the conjunctiva, limbus and the cornea. Impression cytology refers to the technique by which superficial layers of the ocular surface are removed through application of cellulose acetate filter material onto the ocular surface AIM: To Assess the Sensitivity of Impression Cytology in the Diagnosis of Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia Using Millipore Filter Paper. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a Prospective Observational and Interventional Study conducted at Sarojini Devi Eye Hospital and Gandhi Medical College/Hospital, Hyderabad. Study was conducted from July2013 to Feb2015 and included 50patients presenting with conjunctival mass at the limbus or on the conjunctiva Hospital ethics committee approval was obtained No financials involved in the study. RESULTS: A total of 50Excision biopsies of 50patients suspected for OSSN were performed there were 40 males and 10females Excision biopsy confirmed the Impression Cytology results in 44 cases. In 6 cases there was poor correlation among which 4cases showed mild dysplasia in Impression Cytology while HPE showed Invasive Squamous cell carcinoma in 2cases few dysplastic cells were noted in Impression cytology but HPE showed Carcinoma in situ. CONCLUSION: This study shows that Impression Cytology has a promising role in diagnosing Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia for its high positive predictive accuracy (95.65% compared with tissue histology.

  17. Standardization of surface contamination analysis systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothe, Richard E.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion products, oils and greases can potentially degrade material bonding properties. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Surface Contamination Analysis Team (SCAT) utilizes a variety of analytical equipment to detect identify and quantify contamination on metallic and non-metallic substrates. Analysis techniques include FT-IR Microscopy (FT-IR), Near Infrared Optical Fiber Spectrometry (NIR), Optically Stimulated Electron Emission (OSEE), Ultraviolet Fluorescence (UVF) and Ellipsometry. To insure that consistent qualitative and quantitative information are obtained, standards are required to develop analysis techniques, to establish instrument sensitivity to potential contaminants, and to develop calibration curves. This paper describes techniques for preparing and preserving contamination standards. Calibration of surface contamination analysis systems is discussed, and methods are presented for evaluating the effects of potential contaminants on bonding properties.

  18. Reliability Sensitivity Analysis for Location Scale Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪东跑; 张海瑞

    2011-01-01

    Many products always operate under various complex environment conditions. To describe the dynamic influence of environment factors on their reliability, a method of reliability sensitivity analysis is proposed. In this method, the location parameter is assumed as a function of relevant environment variables while the scale parameter is assumed as an un- known positive constant. Then, the location parameter function is constructed by using the method of radial basis function. Using the varied environment test data, the log-likelihood function is transformed to a generalized linear expression by de- scribing the indicator as Poisson variable. With the generalized linear model, the maximum likelihood estimations of the model coefficients are obtained. With the reliability model, the reliability sensitivity is obtained. An instance analysis shows that the method is feasible to analyze the dynamic variety characters of reliability along with environment factors and is straightforward for engineering application.

  19. Demonstration sensitivity analysis for RADTRAN III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhauser, K S; Reardon, P C

    1986-10-01

    A demonstration sensitivity analysis was performed to: quantify the relative importance of 37 variables to the total incident free dose; assess the elasticity of seven dose subgroups to those same variables; develop density distributions for accident dose to combinations of accident data under wide-ranging variations; show the relationship between accident consequences and probabilities of occurrence; and develop limits for the variability of probability consequence curves.

  20. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchang Hao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of an R-SAW resonator by a P-matrix cascading technique. Cascading the P-matrixes of unloaded areas with mass loaded areas, the sensitivity for different sensitive areas was obtained by analyzing the frequency shift. The performance of the sensitivity analysis was confirmed by the measured responses from the silicon dioxide (SiO2 deposited on different sensitive areas of R-SAW resonators. It is shown that the mass sensitivity varies strongly for different sensitive areas, and the optimal sensitive area lies towards the center of the device.

  1. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenchang; Liu, Jiuling; Liu, Minghua; Liang, Yong; He, Shitang

    2016-04-20

    The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW) sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM) approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM) parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of an R-SAW resonator by a P-matrix cascading technique. Cascading the P-matrixes of unloaded areas with mass loaded areas, the sensitivity for different sensitive areas was obtained by analyzing the frequency shift. The performance of the sensitivity analysis was confirmed by the measured responses from the silicon dioxide (SiO₂) deposited on different sensitive areas of R-SAW resonators. It is shown that the mass sensitivity varies strongly for different sensitive areas, and the optimal sensitive area lies towards the center of the device.

  2. Sensitivity Analysis of Fire Dynamics Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.; Petersen, Arnkell J.

    2007-01-01

    equations require solution of the issues of combustion and gas radiation to mention a few. This paper performs a sensitivity analysis of a fire dynamics simulation on a benchmark case where measurement results are available for comparison. The analysis is performed using the method of Elementary Effects......In case of fire dynamics simulation requirements to reliable results are most often very high due to the severe consequences of erroneous results. At the same time it is a well known fact that fire dynamics simulation constitutes rather complex physical phenomena which apart from flow and energy...

  3. Sensitivity of a general circulation model to land surface parameters in African tropical deforestation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, K.; Royer, J.F. [Meteo-France CNRM, 42 Avenue G. Coriolis, 31057, Toulouse Cedex 1 (France)

    2004-06-01

    During the last two decades, several land surface schemes for use in climate, regional and/or mesoscale, hydrological and ecological models have been designed. Incorrect parametrization of land-surface processes and prescription of the surface parameters in atmospheric modeling, can result in artificial changes of the horizontal gradient of the sensible heat flux. Thus, an error in horizontal temperature gradient within the lower atmosphere may be introduced. The reliability of the model depends on the quality of boundary layer scheme implemented and its sensitivity to the bare soil and vegetation parameters. In this study, a series of sensitivity experiments has been conducted over broad time scales, using a version of the ARPEGE Climate Model coupled to the ISBA land surface scheme in order to investigate model sensitivity to separate changes in land surface parameters over Africa. Effects of perturbing vegetation cover, distribution of soil depth, albedo of vegetation, roughness length, leaf area index and minimum stomatal resistance were explored by using a simple statistical analysis. Identifying which parameters are important in controlling turbulent energy fluxes, temperature and soil moisture is dependent on which variables are used to determine sensibility, which type of vegetation and climate regime is being simulated and the magnitude and sign of the parameter change. This study does not argue that a particular parameter is important in ISBA, rather it shows that no general ranking of parameters is possible. So, it is essential to specify all land surface parameters with greater precision when attempting to determine the climate response to modification of the land surface. The implication of ISBA being sensitive to parameters that cannot be validated suggests that there will always be considerable doubt over the predictive quality of land-surface schemes. (orig.)

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of Automated Ice Edge Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Mari-Ann N.; Isaksem, Hugo; Debien, Annekatrien

    2016-08-01

    The importance of highly detailed and time sensitive ice charts has increased with the increasing interest in the Arctic for oil and gas, tourism, and shipping. Manual ice charts are prepared by national ice services of several Arctic countries. Methods are also being developed to automate this task. Kongsberg Satellite Services uses a method that detects ice edges within 15 minutes after image acquisition. This paper describes a sensitivity analysis of the ice edge, assessing to which ice concentration class from the manual ice charts it can be compared to. The ice edge is derived using the Ice Tracking from SAR Images (ITSARI) algorithm. RADARSAT-2 images of February 2011 are used, both for the manual ice charts and the automatic ice edges. The results show that the KSAT ice edge lies within ice concentration classes with very low ice concentration or open water.

  5. The sensitivity analysis of population projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hal Caswell

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Population projections using the cohort component method can be written as time-varyingmatrix population models. The matrices are parameterized by schedules of mortality, fertility,immigration, and emigration over the duration of the projection. A variety of dependentvariables are routinely calculated (the population vector, various weighted population sizes, dependency ratios, etc. from such projections. Objective: Our goal is to derive and apply theory to compute the sensitivity and the elasticity (proportional sensitivity of any projection outcome to changes in any of the parameters, where those changes are applied at any time during the projection interval. Methods: We use matrix calculus to derive a set of equations for the sensitivity and elasticity of any vector valued outcome ξ(t at time t to any perturbation of a parameter vector Ɵ(s at anytime s. Results: The results appear in the form of a set of dynamic equations for the derivatives that areintegrated in parallel with the dynamic equations for the projection itself. We show resultsfor single-sex projections and for the more detailed case of projections including age distributions for both sexes. We apply the results to a projection of the population of Spain, from 2012 to 2052, prepared by the Instituto Nacional de Estadística, and determine the sensitivity and elasticity of (1 total population, (2 the school-age population, (3 the population subject to dementia, (4 the total dependency ratio, and (5 the economicsupport ratio. Conclusions: Writing population projections in matrix form makes sensitivity analysis possible. Such analyses are a powerful tool for the exploration of how detailed aspects of the projectionoutput are determined by the mortality, fertility, and migration schedules that underlie theprojection.

  6. Measuring Road Network Vulnerability with Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun-qiang, Leng; Long-hai, Yang; Liu, Wei-yi; Zhao, Lin

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a method for road network vulnerability analysis, from the perspective of capacity degradation, which seeks to identify the critical infrastructures in the road network and the operational performance of the whole traffic system. This research involves defining the traffic utility index and modeling vulnerability of road segment, route, OD (Origin Destination) pair and road network. Meanwhile, sensitivity analysis method is utilized to calculate the change of traffic utility index due to capacity degradation. This method, compared to traditional traffic assignment, can improve calculation efficiency and make the application of vulnerability analysis to large actual road network possible. Finally, all the above models and calculation method is applied to actual road network evaluation to verify its efficiency and utility. This approach can be used as a decision-supporting tool for evaluating the performance of road network and identifying critical infrastructures in transportation planning and management, especially in the resource allocation for mitigation and recovery. PMID:28125706

  7. Characterization of Floating Surface Layers of Lipids and Lipopolymers by Surface-Sensitive Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Peter; Lösche, Mathias

    Nanotechnology and molecular (bio-)engineering are making ever deepening inroads into everybodys daily life. Physicochemical and biotechnological achievements in the design of physiologically active supramolecular assemblies have brought about the quest for their submolecular-level characterization. We employ surface-sensitive scattering techniques for the investigation of planar lipid membranes - floating monolayers on aqueous surfaces - to correlate structural, functional and dynamic aspects of biomembrane models. This chapter surveys recent work on the submolecular structure of floating phospholipid monolayers - where the advent of third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources has driven the development of realistic, submolecular-scale quasi-chemical models - as well as of more complex systems: cation binding to anionic lipid surfaces; conformational changes of lipopolymers undergoing phase transitions; the conformational organization of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositides, as examples of physiologically important lipids; and the adsorption of peptides (neuropeptide Y, NPY) or solvents (dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO) onto phospholipid surface layers.

  8. LCA data quality: sensitivity and uncertainty analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, M; Murphy, R J

    2012-10-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) data quality issues were investigated by using case studies on products from starch-polyvinyl alcohol based biopolymers and petrochemical alternatives. The time horizon chosen for the characterization models was shown to be an important sensitive parameter for the environmental profiles of all the polymers. In the global warming potential and the toxicity potential categories the comparison between biopolymers and petrochemical counterparts altered as the time horizon extended from 20 years to infinite time. These case studies demonstrated that the use of a single time horizon provide only one perspective on the LCA outcomes which could introduce an inadvertent bias into LCA outcomes especially in toxicity impact categories and thus dynamic LCA characterization models with varying time horizons are recommended as a measure of the robustness for LCAs especially comparative assessments. This study also presents an approach to integrate statistical methods into LCA models for analyzing uncertainty in industrial and computer-simulated datasets. We calibrated probabilities for the LCA outcomes for biopolymer products arising from uncertainty in the inventory and from data variation characteristics this has enabled assigning confidence to the LCIA outcomes in specific impact categories for the biopolymer vs. petrochemical polymer comparisons undertaken. Uncertainty combined with the sensitivity analysis carried out in this study has led to a transparent increase in confidence in the LCA findings. We conclude that LCAs lacking explicit interpretation of the degree of uncertainty and sensitivities are of limited value as robust evidence for decision making or comparative assertions.

  9. Focus variation microscope: linear theory and surface tilt sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Nikolay; Petzing, Jon; Coupland, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    In a recent publication [3rd International Conference on Surface Metrology, Annecy, France, 2012, p. 1] it was shown that surface roughness measurements made using a focus variation microscope (FVM) are influenced by surface tilt. The effect appears to be most significant when the surface has microscale roughness (Ra≈50  nm) that is sufficient to provide a diffusely scattered signal that is comparable in magnitude to the specular component. This paper explores, from first principles, image formation using the focus variation method. With the assumption of incoherent scattering, it is shown that the process is linear and the 3D point spread characteristics and transfer characteristics of the instrument are well defined. It is argued that for the case of microscale roughness and through the objective illumination, the assumption of incoherence cannot be justified and more rigorous analysis is required. Using a foil model of surface scattering, the images that are recorded by a FVM have been calculated. It is shown that for the case of through-the-objective illumination at small tilt angles, the signal quality is degraded in a systematic manner. This is attributed to the mixing of specular and diffusely reflected components and leads to an asymmetry in the k-space representation of the output signals. It is shown that by using extra-aperture illumination or tilt angles greater than the acceptance angle of aperture (such that the specular component is lost), the incoherent assumption can be justified once again. The work highlights the importance of using ring-light illumination and/or polarizing optics, which are often available as options on commercial instruments, as a means to mitigate or prevent these effects.

  10. Dynamic Resonance Sensitivity Analysis in Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Esmaeil; Blaabjerg, Frede; Wang, Xiongfei

    2017-01-01

    Unlike conventional power systems, where resonance frequencies are mainly determined by passive impedances, wind farms present a more complex situation, where the control systems of the power electronic converters introduce also active impedances. This paper presents an approach to find the reson......Unlike conventional power systems, where resonance frequencies are mainly determined by passive impedances, wind farms present a more complex situation, where the control systems of the power electronic converters introduce also active impedances. This paper presents an approach to find...... (PFs) are calculated by critical eigenvalue sensitivity analysis versus the entries of the MIMO matrix. The PF analysis locates the most exciting bus of the resonances, where can be the best location to install the passive or active filters to reduce the harmonic resonance problems. Time...

  11. How to assess the Efficiency and "Uncertainty" of Global Sensitivity Analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghnegahdar, Amin; Razavi, Saman

    2016-04-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) is an important paradigm for understanding model behavior, characterizing uncertainty, improving model calibration, etc. Conventional "global" SA (GSA) approaches are rooted in different philosophies, resulting in different and sometime conflicting and/or counter-intuitive assessment of sensitivity. Moreover, most global sensitivity techniques are highly computationally demanding to be able to generate robust and stable sensitivity metrics over the entire model response surface. Accordingly, a novel sensitivity analysis method called Variogram Analysis of Response Surfaces (VARS) is introduced to overcome the aforementioned issues. VARS uses the Variogram concept to efficiently provide a comprehensive assessment of global sensitivity across a range of scales within the parameter space. Based on the VARS principles, in this study we present innovative ideas to assess (1) the efficiency of GSA algorithms and (2) the level of confidence we can assign to a sensitivity assessment. We use multiple hydrological models with different levels of complexity to explain the new ideas.

  12. Sensitivity of metal nanoparticle surface plasmon resonance to the dielectric environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Molly M; Lazarides, Anne A

    2005-11-24

    Electrodynamic simulations of gold nanoparticle spectra were used to investigate the sensitivity of localized surface plasmon band position to the refractive index, n, of the medium for nanoparticles of various shapes and nanoshells of various structures. Among single-component nanoparticles less than 130 nm in size, sensitivities of dipole resonance positions to bulk refractive index are found to depend only upon the wavelength of the resonance and the dielectric properties of the metal and the medium. Among particle plasmons that peak in the frequency range where the real part of the metal dielectric function varies linearly with wavelength and the imaginary part is small and slowly varying, the sensitivity of the peak wavelength, lambda, to refractive index, n, is found to be a linearly increasing function of lambda, regardless of the structural features of the particle that determine lambda. Quasistatic theory is used to derive an analytical expression for the refractive index sensitivity of small particle plasmon peaks. Through this analysis, the dependence of sensitivity on band position is found to be determined by the wavelength dependence of the real part, epsilon', of the particle dielectric function, and the sensitivity results are found to extend to all particles with resonance conditions of the form, epsilon' = -2chin(2), where chi is a function of geometric parameters and other constants. The sensitivity results observed using accurate computational methods for dipolar plasmon bands of gold nanodisks, nanorods, and hollow nanoshells extend, therefore, to particles of other shapes (such as hexagonal and chopped tetrahedral), composed of other metals, and to higher-order modes. The bulk refractive index sensitivity yielded by the theory serves as an upper bound to sensitivities of nanoparticles on dielectric substrates and sensitivities of nanoparticles to local refractive index changes, such as those associated with biomolecule sensing.

  13. Applied surface analysis in magnetic storage technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windeln, Johannes; Bram, Christian; Eckes, Heinz-Ludwig; Hammel, Dirk; Huth, Johanna; Marien, Jan; Röhl, Holger; Schug, Christoph; Wahl, Michael; Wienss, Andreas

    2001-07-01

    This paper gives a synopsis of today's challenges and requirements for a surface analysis and materials science laboratory with a special focus on magnetic recording technology. The critical magnetic recording components, i.e. the protective carbon overcoat (COC), the disk layer structure, the read/write head including the giant-magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, are described and options for their characterization with specific surface and structure analysis techniques are given. For COC investigations, applications of Raman spectroscopy to the structural analysis and determination of thickness, hydrogen and nitrogen content are discussed. Hardness measurements by atomic force microscopy (AFM) scratching techniques are presented. Surface adsorption phenomena on disk substrates or finished disks are characterized by contact angle analysis or so-called piezo-electric mass adsorption systems (PEMAS), also known as quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). A quickly growing field of applications is listed for various X-ray analysis techniques, such as disk magnetic layer texture analysis for X-ray diffraction, compositional characterization via X-ray fluorescence, compositional analysis with high lateral resolution via electron microprobe analysis. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) has become a standard method for the absolute measurement of individual layer thicknesses contained in multi-layer stacks and thus, is the successor of ellipsometry for this application. Due to the ongoing reduction of critical feature sizes, the analytical challenges in terms of lateral resolution, sensitivity limits and dedicated nano-preparation have been consistently growing and can only be met by state-of-the-art Auger electron spectrometers (AES), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) characterization, focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning and TEM lamella preparation via FIB. The depth profiling of GMR sensor full stacks was significantly

  14. A Sensitivity Analysis of SOLPS Plasma Detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D. L.; Canik, J. M.; Eldon, D.; Meneghini, O.; AToM SciDAC Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Predicting the scrape off layer plasma conditions required for the ITER plasma to achieve detachment is an important issue when considering divertor heat load management options that are compatible with desired core plasma operational scenarios. Given the complexity of the scrape off layer, such predictions often rely on an integrated model of plasma transport with many free parameters. However, the sensitivity of any given prediction to the choices made by the modeler is often overlooked due to the logistical difficulties in completing such a study. Here we utilize an OMFIT workflow to enable a sensitivity analysis of the midplane density at which detachment occurs within the SOLPS model. The workflow leverages the TaskFarmer technology developed at NERSC to launch many instances of the SOLPS integrated model in parallel to probe the high dimensional parameter space of SOLPS inputs. We examine both predictive and interpretive models where the plasma diffusion coefficients are chosen to match an empirical scaling for divertor heat flux width or experimental profiles respectively. This research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, and is supported under Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231, DE-AC05-00OR22725 and DE-SC0012656.

  15. Synthesis, Characterization, and Sensitivity Analysis of Urea Nitrate (UN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    ARL-TR-7250 ● APR 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Synthesis, Characterization, and Sensitivity Analysis of Urea Nitrate (UN...Characterization, and Sensitivity Analysis of Urea Nitrate (UN) by William M Sherrill Weapons and Materials Research Directorate...Characterization, and Sensitivity Analysis of Urea Nitrate (UN) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  16. Scalable analysis tools for sensitivity analysis and UQ (3160) results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karelitz, David B.; Ice, Lisa G.; Thompson, David C.; Bennett, Janine C.; Fabian, Nathan; Scott, W. Alan; Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2009-09-01

    The 9/30/2009 ASC Level 2 Scalable Analysis Tools for Sensitivity Analysis and UQ (Milestone 3160) contains feature recognition capability required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks focused around sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification (UQ). These feature recognition capabilities include crater detection, characterization, and analysis from CTH simulation data; the ability to call fragment and crater identification code from within a CTH simulation; and the ability to output fragments in a geometric format that includes data values over the fragments. The feature recognition capabilities were tested extensively on sample and actual simulations. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including the ability to visualize CTH tracer particles and the ability to visualize output from within an S3D simulation.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of periodic matrix population models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Hal; Shyu, Esther

    2012-12-01

    Periodic matrix models are frequently used to describe cyclic temporal variation (seasonal or interannual) and to account for the operation of multiple processes (e.g., demography and dispersal) within a single projection interval. In either case, the models take the form of periodic matrix products. The perturbation analysis of periodic models must trace the effects of parameter changes, at each phase of the cycle, on output variables that are calculated over the entire cycle. Here, we apply matrix calculus to obtain the sensitivity and elasticity of scalar-, vector-, or matrix-valued output variables. We apply the method to linear models for periodic environments (including seasonal harvest models), to vec-permutation models in which individuals are classified by multiple criteria, and to nonlinear models including both immediate and delayed density dependence. The results can be used to evaluate management strategies and to study selection gradients in periodic environments.

  18. Objective analysis of the ARM IOP data: method and sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cedarwall, R; Lin, J L; Xie, S C; Yio, J J; Zhang, M H

    1999-04-01

    Motivated by the need of to obtain accurate objective analysis of field experimental data to force physical parameterizations in numerical models, this paper -first reviews the existing objective analysis methods and interpolation schemes that are used to derive atmospheric wind divergence, vertical velocity, and advective tendencies. Advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed. It is shown that considerable uncertainties in the analyzed products can result from the use of different analysis schemes and even more from different implementations of a particular scheme. The paper then describes a hybrid approach to combine the strengths of the regular grid method and the line-integral method, together with a variational constraining procedure for the analysis of field experimental data. In addition to the use of upper air data, measurements at the surface and at the top-of-the-atmosphere are used to constrain the upper air analysis to conserve column-integrated mass, water, energy, and momentum. Analyses are shown for measurements taken in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Programs (ARM) July 1995 Intensive Observational Period (IOP). Sensitivity experiments are carried out to test the robustness of the analyzed data and to reveal the uncertainties in the analysis. It is shown that the variational constraining process significantly reduces the sensitivity of the final data products.

  19. Multichannel analysis of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.

    1999-01-01

    The frequency-dependent properties of Rayleigh-type surface waves can be utilized for imaging and characterizing the shallow subsurface. Most surface-wave analysis relies on the accurate calculation of phase velocities for the horizontally traveling fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave acquired by stepping out a pair of receivers at intervals based on calculated ground roll wavelengths. Interference by coherent source-generated noise inhibits the reliability of shear-wave velocities determined through inversion of the whole wave field. Among these nonplanar, nonfundamental-mode Rayleigh waves (noise) are body waves, scattered and nonsource-generated surface waves, and higher-mode surface waves. The degree to which each of these types of noise contaminates the dispersion curve and, ultimately, the inverted shear-wave velocity profile is dependent on frequency as well as distance from the source. Multichannel recording permits effective identification and isolation of noise according to distinctive trace-to-trace coherency in arrival time and amplitude. An added advantage is the speed and redundancy of the measurement process. Decomposition of a multichannel record into a time variable-frequency format, similar to an uncorrelated Vibroseis record, permits analysis and display of each frequency component in a unique and continuous format. Coherent noise contamination can then be examined and its effects appraised in both frequency and offset space. Separation of frequency components permits real-time maximization of the S/N ratio during acquisition and subsequent processing steps. Linear separation of each ground roll frequency component allows calculation of phase velocities by simply measuring the linear slope of each frequency component. Breaks in coherent surface-wave arrivals, observable on the decomposed record, can be compensated for during acquisition and processing. Multichannel recording permits single-measurement surveying of a broad depth range, high levels of

  20. Atomic force microscopy analysis of different surface treatments of Ti dental implant surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathomarco, Ti R. V.; Solorzano, G.; Elias, C. N.; Prioli, R.

    2004-06-01

    The surface of commercial unalloyed titanium, used in dental implants, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The morphology, roughness, and surface area of the samples, submitted to mechanically-induced erosion, chemical etching and a combination of both, were compared. The results show that surface treatments strongly influence the dental implant physical and chemical properties. An analysis of the length dependence of the implant surface roughness shows that, for scan sizes larger than 50 μm, the average surface roughness is independent of the scanning length and that the surface treatments lead to average surface roughness in the range of 0.37 up to 0.48 μm. It is shown that the implant surface energy is sensitive to the titanium surface area. As the area increases there is a decrease in the surface contact angle.

  1. Atomic force microscopy analysis of different surface treatments of Ti dental implant surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathomarco, R.V.; Solorzano, G.; Elias, C.N.; Prioli, R

    2004-06-30

    The surface of commercial unalloyed titanium, used in dental implants, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The morphology, roughness, and surface area of the samples, submitted to mechanically-induced erosion, chemical etching and a combination of both, were compared. The results show that surface treatments strongly influence the dental implant physical and chemical properties. An analysis of the length dependence of the implant surface roughness shows that, for scan sizes larger than 50 {mu}m, the average surface roughness is independent of the scanning length and that the surface treatments lead to average surface roughness in the range of 0.37 up to 0.48 {mu}m. It is shown that the implant surface energy is sensitive to the titanium surface area. As the area increases there is a decrease in the surface contact angle.

  2. Longitudinal Genetic Analysis of Anxiety Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavos, Helena M. S.; Gregory, Alice M.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity is associated with both anxiety and depression and has been shown to be heritable. Little, however, is known about the role of genetic influence on continuity and change of symptoms over time. The authors' aim was to examine the stability of anxiety sensitivity during adolescence. By using a genetically sensitive design, the…

  3. Reliability-based design and load tolerance evaluation using stochastic response surface and probabilistic sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyu

    Uncertainty is inevitable in structural design. This research presents an efficient uncertainty analysis technique based on stochastic response surfaces (SRS). The focus is on calculating uncertainty propagation using fewer number of function evaluations. Due to sensitivity analysis, the gradient information of the performance is efficiently calculated and used in constructing SRS. Based on SRS, reliability-based design optimization (RBDO) is studied intensively in this research. Probability sensitivity analysis using the sampling technique is also proposed. Since the computational cost of RBDO increases significantly proportional to the increasing number of random variables, global sensitivity analysis is introduced to adaptively reduce unessential random variables. It has been shown that the global sensitivity indices can be calculated analytically because the SRS employs the Hermite polynomials as bases. Traditional structural design focuses on designing a reliable structure under well characterized random factors (dimensions, shape, material properties, etc). Variations of these parameters are relatively small and well characterized. However, everyday engineering life tends to use the existing structural part in a different applications instead of designing a completely new part. In this research, a reliability-based safety envelope concept for load tolerance is introduced. This shows the capacity of the current design as a future reference for design upgrade, maintenance and control. The safety envelope is applied to estimate the load tolerance of a structural part with respect to the reliability of fatigue life. Stochastic response surface is also applied on robust design in this research. It is shown that the polynomial chaos expansion with appropriate bases provides an accurate and efficient tool in evaluating the performance variance. In addition, the sensitivity of the output variance, which is critical in the mathematical programming method, is

  4. SENSITIVE ERROR ANALYSIS OF CHAOS SYNCHRONIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG XIAN-GAO; XU JIAN-XUE; HUANG WEI; L(U) ZE-JUN

    2001-01-01

    We study the synchronizing sensitive errors of chaotic systems for adding other signals to the synchronizing signal.Based on the model of the Henon map masking, we examine the cause of the sensitive errors of chaos synchronization.The modulation ratio and the mean square error are defined to measure the synchronizing sensitive errors by quality.Numerical simulation results of the synchronizing sensitive errors are given for masking direct current, sinusoidal and speech signals, separately. Finally, we give the mean square error curves of chaos synchronizing sensitivity and threedimensional phase plots of the drive system and the response system for masking the three kinds of signals.

  5. Spectroscopy Surface Analysis of Paracetamol and Paracetamol and Excipient Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Zaki, Hamizah

    2011-01-01

    A detailed, fundamental understanding of the surface properties of molecular crystals and their interaction with adsorbing molecules (e.g. excipients) is important for tailoring the stability of formulations and the bioavailability of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (APIs). Few fundamental experimental studies with surface sensitive probes have been carried out for organic molecular crystals. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is an established surface analysis method in the fields of ad...

  6. Rough surface Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles to fabricating high sensitivity SERS immunochromatographic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiangqiang; Liu, Hongwu Liu; Wu, Ze; Liu, An; Yao, Cuize; Li, Xiuqing; Xiao, Wei; Yu, Shiting; Luo, Zhi; Tang, Yong

    2015-11-14

    Immunochromatographic sensors (ICSs) are inexpensive, simple, portable, and robust, thus making ICSs commonplace in clinical diagnoses, food testing, and environmental monitoring. However, commonly used gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) ICSs have low sensitivity. Therefore, we developed highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) ICSs. To enhance the sensitivity of SERS ICSs, rough surface core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles (RSAu@AgNPs) were prepared by coating silver on the surface of gold nanoflowers (AuNFs). Then these nanoparticles were used as SERS substrate in the SERS ICSs, after which the SERS ICSs were implemented to detect haemoglobin and heavy metal cadmium ion (Cd(2+)). The limit of detection (LOD) of the SERS ICSs for detecting haemoglobin was 8 ng/mL, and the linear range of the SERS ICSs was from 31.3 to 2000 ng/mL. The LOD of the SERS ICSs for detecting Cd(2+) was 0.05 ng/mL and the linear analysis range was from 0.05 to 25 ng/mL. The cross reactivity of the SERS ICSs was studied and results showed that the SERS ICSs exhibited highly specific for detection of haemoglobin and Cd(2+), respectively. The SERS ICSs were then used to detect haemoglobin (spiked in serum and in stool) and Cd(2+) (spiked in tap water, river water, and soil leaching water), and the results showed high recovery. These characteristics indicated that SERS ICSs were ideal tools for clinical diagnosis and environmental pollution monitoring.

  7. Highly specific and sensitive electrochemical genotyping via gap ligation reaction and surface hybridization detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Zhang, Yan-Li; Xu, Xiangmin; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2009-02-25

    This paper developed a novel electrochemical genotyping strategy based on gap ligation reaction with surface hybridization detection. This strategy utilized homogeneous enzymatic reactions to generate molecular beacon-structured allele-specific products that could be cooperatively annealed to capture probes stably immobilized on the surface via disulfide anchors, thus allowing ultrasensitive surface hybridization detection of the allele-specific products through redox tags in close proximity to the electrode. Such a unique biphasic architecture provided a universal methodology for incorporating enzymatic discrimination reactions in electrochemical genotyping with desirable reproducibility, high efficiency and no interferences from interficial steric hindrance. The developed technique was demonstrated to show intrinsic high sensitivity for direct genomic analysis, and excellent specificity with discriminativity of single nucleotide variations.

  8. The influence of surface finishing methods on touch-sensitive reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukhta, M. S.; Sokolov, A. P.; Krauinsh, P. Y.; Kozlova, A. D.; Bouchard, C.

    2017-02-01

    This paper describes the modern technological development trends in jewelry design. In the jewelry industry, new trends, associated with the introduction of updated non-traditional materials and finishing techniques, are appearing. The existing information-oriented society enhances the visual aesthetics of new jewelry forms, decoration techniques (depth and surface), synthesis of different materials, which, all in all, reveal a bias towards positive effects of visual design. Today, the jewelry industry includes not only traditional techniques, but also such improved techniques as computer-assisted design, 3D-prototyping and other alternatives to produce an updated level of jewelry material processing. The authors present the specific features of ornamental pattern designing, decoration types (depth and surface) and comparative analysis of different approaches in surface finishing. Identifying the appearance or the effect of jewelry is based on proposed evaluation criteria, providing an advanced visual aesthetics basis is predicated on touch-sensitive responses.

  9. Track sensitivity and the surface roughness measurements of CR-39 with atomic force microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Yasuda, N; Amemiya, K; Takahashi, H; Kyan, A; Ogura, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been applied to evaluate the surface roughness and the track sensitivity of CR-39 track detector. We experimentally confirmed the inverse correlation between the track sensitivity and the roughness of the detector surface after etching. The surface of CR-39 (CR-39 doped with antioxidant (HARZLAS (TD-1)) and copolymer of CR-39/NIPAAm (TNF-1)) with high sensitivity becomes rough by the etching, while the pure CR-39 (BARYOTRAK) with low sensitivity keeps its original surface clarity even for the long etching.

  10. Structure sensitivity of CO dissociation on Rh surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mavrikakis, Manos; Baumer, M.; Freund, H.J.;

    2002-01-01

    Using periodic self-consistent density functional calculations it is shown that the barrier for CO dissociation is similar to120 kJ/mol lower on the stepped Rh(211) surface than on the close-packed Rh(111) surface. The stepped surface binds molecular CO and the dissociation products more strongly...... than the flat surface, but the effect is considerably weaker than the effect of surface structure on the dissociation barrier. Our findings are compared with available experimental data, and the consequences for CO activation in methanation and Fischer-Tropsch reactions are discussed....

  11. Sensitivity analysis of retrovirus HTLV-1 transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradin, Alberto; Di Camillo, Barbara; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Toffolo, Gianna; Cobelli, Claudio

    2011-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 is a human retrovirus endemic in many areas of the world. Although many studies indicated a key role of the viral protein Tax in the control of viral transcription, the mechanisms controlling HTLV-1 expression and its persistence in vivo are still poorly understood. To assess Tax effects on viral kinetics, we developed a HTLV-1 model. Two parameters that capture both its deterministic and stochastic behavior were quantified: Tax signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which measures the effect of stochastic phenomena on Tax expression as the ratio between the protein steady-state level and the variance of the noise causing fluctuations around this value; t(1/2), a parameter representative of the duration of Tax transient expression pulses, that is, of Tax bursts due to stochastic phenomena. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the major determinant of Tax SNR is the transactivation constant, the system parameter weighting the enhancement of retrovirus transcription due to transactivation. In contrast, t(1/2) is strongly influenced by the degradation rate of the mRNA. In addition to shedding light into the mechanism of Tax transactivation, the obtained results are of potential interest for novel drug development strategies since the two parameters most affecting Tax transactivation can be experimentally tuned, e.g. by perturbing protein phosphorylation and by RNA interference.

  12. Supercritical extraction of oleaginous: parametric sensitivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos M.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The economy has become universal and competitive, thus the industries of vegetable oil extraction must advance in the sense of minimising production costs and, at the same time, generating products that obey more rigorous patterns of quality, including solutions that do not damage the environment. The conventional oilseed processing uses hexane as solvent. However, this solvent is toxic and highly flammable. Thus the search of substitutes for hexane in oleaginous extraction process has increased in the last years. The supercritical carbon dioxide is a potential substitute for hexane, but it is necessary more detailed studies to understand the phenomena taking place in such process. Thus, in this work a diffusive model for semi-continuous (batch for the solids and continuous for the solvent isothermal and isobaric extraction process using supercritical carbon dioxide is presented and submitted to a parametric sensitivity analysis by means of a factorial design in two levels. The model parameters were disturbed and their main effects analysed, so that it is possible to propose strategies for high performance operation.

  13. An addendum on sensitivity analysis of the optimal assignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volgenant, A.

    2006-01-01

    We point out that sensitivity results for the linear assignment problem can be produced by a shortest path based approach in a straightforward manner and as efficient as finding an optimal solution. Keywords: Assignment; Sensitivity analysis

  14. A Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Immunosensors for Sensitive Detection of Heroin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhong-cheng; Chen, Wen-ge; Wang, Lian-chao; Ge, Yu; Yu, Cheng-duan; Fang, Ting-jian

    2000-12-01

    A simple technique for sensitive detection of heroin based on surface-plasmon-resonance has been theoretically and experimentally investigated. The experiment was realized by using an anti-MO monoclonal antibody and a morphine (MO)-bovine serum albumin (MO-BSA) conjugate (antigen). The reason for using MO-BSA in the detection of heroine was also discussed. MO-BSA was immobilized on a gold thin film of SPR sensor chip by physical adsorption. The configuration of the device is allowed to be further miniaturized, which is required for the construction of a portable SPR device in the application of in-situ analysis.

  15. What Do We Mean By Sensitivity Analysis? The Need For A Comprehensive Characterization Of Sensitivity In Earth System Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, S.; Gupta, H. V.

    2014-12-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) is an important paradigm in the context of Earth System model development and application, and provides a powerful tool that serves several essential functions in modelling practice, including 1) Uncertainty Apportionment - attribution of total uncertainty to different uncertainty sources, 2) Assessment of Similarity - diagnostic testing and evaluation of similarities between the functioning of the model and the real system, 3) Factor and Model Reduction - identification of non-influential factors and/or insensitive components of model structure, and 4) Factor Interdependence - investigation of the nature and strength of interactions between the factors, and the degree to which factors intensify, cancel, or compensate for the effects of each other. A variety of sensitivity analysis approaches have been proposed, each of which formally characterizes a different "intuitive" understanding of what is meant by the "sensitivity" of one or more model responses to its dependent factors (such as model parameters or forcings). These approaches are based on different philosophies and theoretical definitions of sensitivity, and range from simple local derivatives and one-factor-at-a-time procedures to rigorous variance-based (Sobol-type) approaches. In general, each approach focuses on, and identifies, different features and properties of the model response and may therefore lead to different (even conflicting) conclusions about the underlying sensitivity. This presentation revisits the theoretical basis for sensitivity analysis, and critically evaluates existing approaches so as to demonstrate their flaws and shortcomings. With this background, we discuss several important properties of response surfaces that are associated with the understanding and interpretation of sensitivity. Finally, a new approach towards global sensitivity assessment is developed that is consistent with important properties of Earth System model response surfaces.

  16. Sensitivity enhancement of surface thermal lens technique with a short-wavelength probe beam: Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaorong [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Key Laboratory of Optical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610209 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Bincheng [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Key Laboratory of Optical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610209 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Surface thermal lens is a highly sensitive photothermal technique to measure low absorption losses of various solid materials. In such applications, the sensitivity of surface thermal lens is a key parameter for measuring extremely low absorption. In this paper, we experimentally investigated the influence of probe beam wavelength on the sensitivity of surface thermal lens for measuring the low absorptance of optical laser components. Three probe lasers with wavelength 375 nm, 633 nm, and 1570 nm were used, respectively, to detect the surface thermal lens amplitude of a highly reflective coating sample excited by a cw modulated Gaussian beam at 1064 nm. The experimental results showed that the maximum amplitude of surface thermal lens signal obtained at corresponding optimized detection distance was inversely proportional to the wavelength of the probe beam, as predicted by previous theoretical model. The sensitivity of surface thermal lens could, therefore, be improved by detecting surface thermal lens signal with a short-wavelength probe beam.

  17. Highly sensitive detection of zearalenone in feed samples using competitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianzhi; Hu, Yongjun; Zhu, Guichi; Zhou, Xiaoming; Jia, Li; Zhang, Tao

    2014-08-20

    Accurate and quantitative analysis of mycotoxin (such as zearalenone) is particularly imperative in the field of food safety and animal husbandry. Here, we develop a sensitive and specific method for zearalenone detection using competitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) immunoassay. In this assay, a functional gold nanoparticle was labeled with the Raman reporter and the zearalenone antibody, and a modified substrate was assembled with the zearalenone-bovine serum albumin. With the addition of free zearalenone, the competitive immune reaction between free zearalenone and zearalenone-bovine serum albumin was initiated for binding with zearalenone antibody labeled on gold nanoparticle, resulting in the change of SERS signal intensity. The proposed method exhibits high sensitivity with a detection limit of 1 pg/mL and a wide dynamic range from 1 to 1000 pg/mL. Furthermore, this method can be further applied to analyze the multiple natural feed samples contaminated with zearalenone, holding great potential for real sample detection.

  18. Computational Sensitivity Analysis for the Aerodynamic Design of Supersonic and Hypersonic Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-18

    surface would take the form of a three dimensional surface similar to those in undergraduate courses in multivariable calculus . Sensitivity Analysis...York, 2012, pp.844-850. [9] J. J. Bertin and R. M. Cummings, “Newtonian Flow Model,” Aerodynamics for Engineers, 6th ed., Pearson Education, Saddle

  19. A discourse on sensitivity analysis for discretely-modeled structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Howard M.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1991-01-01

    A descriptive review is presented of the most recent methods for performing sensitivity analysis of the structural behavior of discretely-modeled systems. The methods are generally but not exclusively aimed at finite element modeled structures. Topics included are: selections of finite difference step sizes; special consideration for finite difference sensitivity of iteratively-solved response problems; first and second derivatives of static structural response; sensitivity of stresses; nonlinear static response sensitivity; eigenvalue and eigenvector sensitivities for both distinct and repeated eigenvalues; and sensitivity of transient response for both linear and nonlinear structural response.

  20. Assessing the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY atmospheric CO2 retrieved using (FSI WFM-DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vinnichenko

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite observations of atmospheric CO2 offer the potential to identify regional carbon surface sources and sinks and to investigate carbon cycle processes. The extent to which satellite measurements are useful however, depends on the near surface sensitivity of the chosen sensor. In this paper, the capability of the SCIAMACHY instrument on board ENVISAT, to observe lower tropospheric and surface CO2 variability is examined. To achieve this, atmospheric CO2 retrieved from SCIAMACHY near infrared (NIR spectral measurements, using the Full Spectral Initiation (FSI WFM-DOAS algorithm, is compared to in situ aircraft observations over Siberia and additionally to tower and surface CO2 data over Mongolia, Europe and North America. Preliminary validation of daily averaged SCIAMACHY/FSI CO2 against ground based Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS column measurements made at Park Falls, reveal a negative bias of about −2.0% for collocated measurements within ±1.0degree of the site. However, at this spatial threshold SCIAMACHY can only capture the variability of the FTS observations at monthly timescales. To observe day to day variability of the FTS observations, the collocation limits must be increased. Furthermore, comparisons to in-situ CO2 observations demonstrate that SCIAMACHY is capable of observing lower tropospheric variability on (at least monthly timescales. Out of seventeen time series comparisons, eleven have correlation coefficients of 0.7 or more, and have similar seasonal cycle amplitudes. Additional evidence of the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY, is provided through the significant correlation of FSI derived CO2 with MODIS vegetation indices at over twenty selected locations in the United States. The SCIAMACHY/MODIS comparison reveals that at many of the sites, the amount of CO2 variability is coincident with the amount of vegetation activity. It is evident, from this analysis, that SCIAMACHY therefore has the potential to

  1. Assessing the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY atmospheric CO2 retrieved using (FSI WFM-DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vinnichenko

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Satellite observations of atmospheric CO2 offer the potential to identify regional carbon surface sources and sinks and to investigate carbon cycle processes. The extent to which satellite measurements are useful however, depends on the near surface sensitivity of the chosen sensor. In this paper, the capability of the SCIAMACHY instrument on board ENVISAT, to observe lower tropospheric and surface CO2 variability is examined. To achieve this, atmospheric CO2 retrieved from SCIAMACHY near infrared (NIR spectral measurements, using the Full Spectral Initiation (FSI WFM-DOAS algorithm, is compared to in-situ aircraft observations over Siberia and additionally to tower and surface CO2 data over Mongolia, Europe and North America. Preliminary validation of daily averaged SCIAMACHY/FSI CO2 against ground based Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS column measurements made at Park Falls, reveal a negative bias of about −2.0% for collocated measurements within ±1.0° of the site. However, at this spatial threshold SCIAMACHY can only capture the variability of the FTS observations at monthly timescales. To observe day to day variability of the FTS observations, the collocation limits must be increased. Furthermore, comparisons to in-situ CO2 observations demonstrate that SCIAMACHY is capable of observing a seasonal signal that is representative of lower tropospheric variability on (at least monthly timescales. Out of seventeen time series comparisons, eleven have correlation coefficients of 0.7 or more, and have similar seasonal cycle amplitudes. Additional evidence of the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY, is provided through the significant correlation of FSI derived CO2 with MODIS vegetation indices at over twenty selected locations in the United States. The SCIAMACHY/MODIS comparison reveals that at many of the sites, the amount of CO2 variability is coincident with the amount of vegetation activity. The presented analysis suggests that

  2. Photosynthesis sensitivity to climate change in land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique-Sunen, Andrea; Black, Emily; Verhoef, Anne; Balsamo, Gianpaolo

    2016-04-01

    Accurate representation of vegetation processes within land surface models is key to reproducing surface carbon, water and energy fluxes. Photosynthesis determines the amount of CO2 fixated by plants as well as the water lost in transpiration through the stomata. Photosynthesis is calculated in land surface models using empirical equations based on plant physiological research. It is assumed that CO2 assimilation is either CO2 -limited, radiation -limited ; and in some models export-limited (the speed at which the products of photosynthesis are used by the plant) . Increased levels of atmospheric CO2 concentration tend to enhance photosynthetic activity, but the effectiveness of this fertilization effect is regulated by environmental conditions and the limiting factor in the photosynthesis reaction. The photosynthesis schemes at the 'leaf level' used by land surface models JULES and CTESSEL have been evaluated against field photosynthesis observations. Also, the response of photosynthesis to radiation, atmospheric CO2 and temperature has been analysed for each model, as this is key to understanding the vegetation response that climate models using these schemes are able to reproduce. Particular emphasis is put on the limiting factor as conditions vary. It is found that while at present day CO2 concentrations export-limitation is only relevant at low temperatures, as CO2 levels rise it becomes an increasingly important restriction on photosynthesis.

  3. Design of Highly Sensitive Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors Using Planar Metallic Films Closely Coupled to Nanogratings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-Yan; XIE Wen-Chong; LIU De-Ming

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity enhancement of surface plasmon resonance(SPR)sensors using planar metallic films closely coupled to nanogratings.The strong coupling between localized surface plasmon resonances(LSPRs)presenting in metallic nanostructures and surface plasmon polaritons(SPPs)propagating at the metallic film surface leads to changes of resonance reflection properties,resulting in enhanced sensitivity of SPR sensors.The effects of thickness of the metallic films,grating period and metal materials on the refractive index sensitivity of the device are investigated.The refractive index sensitivity of nanograting-based SPR sensors is predicted to be about 543 nm/RIU(refractive index unit)using optimized structure parameters.Our study on SPR sensors using planar metallic films closely coupled to nanogratings demonstrates the potential for significant improvement in refractive index sensitivity.

  4. Implementation of efficient sensitivity analysis for optimization of large structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaretiya, J. R.; Kamil, H.

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents the theoretical bases and implementation techniques of sensitivity analyses for efficient structural optimization of large structures, based on finite element static and dynamic analysis methods. The sensitivity analyses have been implemented in conjunction with two methods for optimization, namely, the Mathematical Programming and Optimality Criteria methods. The paper discusses the implementation of the sensitivity analysis method into our in-house software package, AutoDesign.

  5. Parameter identification and global sensitivity analysis of Xinanjiang model using meta-modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-meng SONG

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parameter identification, model calibration, and uncertainty quantification are important steps in the model-building process, and are necessary for obtaining credible results and valuable information. Sensitivity analysis of hydrological model is a key step in model uncertainty quantification, which can identify the dominant parameters, reduce the model calibration uncertainty, and enhance the model optimization efficiency. There are, however, some shortcomings in classical approaches, including the long duration of time and high computation cost required to quantitatively assess the sensitivity of a multiple-parameter hydrological model. For this reason, a two-step statistical evaluation framework using global techniques is presented. It is based on (1 a screening method (Morris for qualitative ranking of parameters, and (2 a variance-based method integrated with a meta-model for quantitative sensitivity analysis, i.e., the Sobol method integrated with the response surface model (RSMSobol. First, the Morris screening method was used to qualitatively identify the parameters’ sensitivity, and then ten parameters were selected to quantify the sensitivity indices. Subsequently, the RSMSobol method was used to quantify the sensitivity, i.e., the first-order and total sensitivity indices based on the response surface model (RSM were calculated. The RSMSobol method can not only quantify the sensitivity, but also reduce the computational cost, with good accuracy compared to the classical approaches. This approach will be effective and reliable in the global sensitivity analysis of a complex large-scale distributed hydrological model.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of Situational Awareness Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, R. J.; Davison, H. J.; Burdick, M. D.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A great deal of effort has been invested in attempts to define situational awareness, and subsequently to measure this construct. However, relatively less work has focused on the sensitivity of these measures to manipulations that affect the SA of the pilot. This investigation was designed to manipulate SA and examine the sensitivity of commonly used measures of SA. In this experiment, we tested the most commonly accepted measures of SA: SAGAT, objective performance measures, and SART, against different levels of SA manipulation to determine the sensitivity of such measures in the rotorcraft flight environment. SAGAT is a measure in which the simulation blanks in the middle of a trial and the pilot is asked specific, situation-relevant questions about the state of the aircraft or the objective of a particular maneuver. In this experiment, after the pilot responded verbally to several questions, the trial continued from the point frozen. SART is a post-trial questionnaire that asked for subjective SA ratings from the pilot at certain points in the previous flight. The objective performance measures included: contacts with hazards (power lines and towers) that impeded the flight path, lateral and vertical anticipation of these hazards, response time to detection of other air traffic, and response time until an aberrant fuel gauge was detected. An SA manipulation of the flight environment was chosen that undisputedly affects a pilot's SA-- visibility. Four variations of weather conditions (clear, light rain, haze, and fog) resulted in a different level of visibility for each trial. Pilot SA was measured by either SAGAT or the objective performance measures within each level of visibility. This enabled us to not only determine the sensitivity within a measure, but also between the measures. The SART questionnaire and the NASA-TLX, a measure of workload, were distributed after every trial. Using the newly developed rotorcraft part-task laboratory (RPTL) at NASA Ames

  7. Sensitivity analysis of soil parameters based on interval

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Interval analysis is a new uncertainty analysis method for engineering struc-tures. In this paper, a new sensitivity analysis method is presented by introducing interval analysis which can expand applications of the interval analysis method. The interval anal-ysis process of sensitivity factor matrix of soil parameters is given. A method of parameter intervals and decision-making target intervals is given according to the interval analysis method. With FEM, secondary developments are done for Marc and the Duncan-Chang nonlinear elastic model. Mutual transfer between FORTRAN and Marc is implemented. With practial examples, rationality and feasibility are validated. Comparison is made with some published results.

  8. What do we mean by sensitivity analysis? The need for comprehensive characterization of "global" sensitivity in Earth and Environmental systems models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Saman; Gupta, Hoshin V.

    2015-05-01

    Sensitivity analysis is an essential paradigm in Earth and Environmental Systems modeling. However, the term "sensitivity" has a clear definition, based in partial derivatives, only when specified locally around a particular point (e.g., optimal solution) in the problem space. Accordingly, no unique definition exists for "global sensitivity" across the problem space, when considering one or more model responses to different factors such as model parameters or forcings. A variety of approaches have been proposed for global sensitivity analysis, based on different philosophies and theories, and each of these formally characterizes a different "intuitive" understanding of sensitivity. These approaches focus on different properties of the model response at a fundamental level and may therefore lead to different (even conflicting) conclusions about the underlying sensitivities. Here we revisit the theoretical basis for sensitivity analysis, summarize and critically evaluate existing approaches in the literature, and demonstrate their flaws and shortcomings through conceptual examples. We also demonstrate the difficulty involved in interpreting "global" interaction effects, which may undermine the value of existing interpretive approaches. With this background, we identify several important properties of response surfaces that are associated with the understanding and interpretation of sensitivities in the context of Earth and Environmental System models. Finally, we highlight the need for a new, comprehensive framework for sensitivity analysis that effectively characterizes all of the important sensitivity-related properties of model response surfaces.

  9. Near-surface sensitivity suppression way for diffuse reflective optical tomography: simulation and a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Keiko; Fujii, Mamiko

    2007-07-01

    Diffuse reflective optical measurement is a useful approach for monitoring the oxygen consumption of living tissue such as brain and muscle. To improve the oxygen consumption measurement accuracy, we propose a method for suppressing the near-surface sensitivity. Diffuse reflective light is detected at the aperture used for irradiating the light and is used as a cancellation signal for near-field sensitivity in the conventional measurement scheme. Photon fluence density functions and positional dependences of detected light sensitivity to change in absorbance were simulated. The sensitivity detected at the same position (aperture) as irradiation was significantly high for the near-surface region. With our method, the near-surface sensitivity is reduced by more than 90% while keeping target sensitivity almost constant (only 3% deterioration). The near-surface and deep-field sensitivity was measured with a phantom with light (785 nm) modulated at 1 kHz through an optical fiber bundle. It confirmed suppressed the near-surface sensitivity by subtracting the light detected at the same aperture from the light detected at another aperture.

  10. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Scott B.; Zender, Charles S.

    2009-05-01

    Global ocean wind power has recently been assessed (W. T. Liu et al., 2008) using scatterometry-based 10 m winds. We characterize, for the first time, wind power at 80 m (typical wind turbine hub height) above the global ocean surface, and account for the effects of surface layer stability. Accounting for realistic turbine height and atmospheric stability increases mean global ocean wind power by +58% and -4%, respectively. Our best estimate of mean global ocean wind power is 731 W m-2, about 50% greater than the 487 W m-2 based on previous methods. 80 m wind power is 1.2-1.5 times 10 m power equatorward of 30° latitude, between 1.4 and 1.7 times 10 m power in wintertime storm track regions and >6 times 10 m power in stable regimes east of continents. These results are relatively insensitive to methodology as wind power calculated using a fitted Weibull probability density function is within 10% of power calculated from discrete wind speed measurements over most of the global oceans.

  11. Global Analysis of Minimal Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dierkes, Ulrich; Tromba, Anthony J

    2010-01-01

    Many properties of minimal surfaces are of a global nature, and this is already true for the results treated in the first two volumes of the treatise. Part I of the present book can be viewed as an extension of these results. For instance, the first two chapters deal with existence, regularity and uniqueness theorems for minimal surfaces with partially free boundaries. Here one of the main features is the possibility of 'edge-crawling' along free parts of the boundary. The third chapter deals with a priori estimates for minimal surfaces in higher dimensions and for minimizers of singular integ

  12. Optimal wavy surface to suppress vortex shedding using second-order sensitivity to shape changes

    CERN Document Server

    Tammisola, Outi

    2016-01-01

    A method to find optimal 2nd-order perturbations is presented, and applied to find the optimal spanwise-wavy surface for suppression of cylinder wake instability. Second-order perturbations are required to capture the stabilizing effect of spanwise waviness, which is ignored by standard adjoint-based sensitivity analyses. Here, previous methods are extended so that (i) 2nd-order sensitivity is formulated for base flow changes satisfying linearised Navier-Stokes, and (ii) the resulting method is applicable to a 2D global instability problem. This makes it possible to formulate 2nd-order sensitivity to shape modifications. Using this formulation, we find the optimal shape to suppress the a cylinder wake instability. The optimal shape is then perturbed by random distributions in full 3D stability analysis to confirm that it is a local optimal at the given amplitude and wavelength. Furthermore, it is shown that none of the 10 random wavy shapes alone stabilize the wake flow at Re=50, while the optimal shape does....

  13. Sensitivity of land surface and Cumulus schemes for Thunderstorm prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Mohanty, U. C.; Kumar, Krishan

    2016-06-01

    The cloud processes play an important role in all forms of precipitation. Its proper representation is one of the challenging tasks in mesoscale numerical simulation. Studies have revealed that mesoscale feature require proper initialization which may likely to improve the convective system rainfall forecasts. Understanding the precipitation process, model initial condition accuracy and resolved/sub grid-scale precipitation processes representation, are the important areas which needed to improve in order to represent the mesoscale features properly. Various attempts have been done in order to improve the model performance through grid resolution, physical parameterizations, etc. But it is the physical parameterizations which provide a convective atmosphere for the development and intensification of convective events. Further, physical parameterizations consist of cumulus convection, surface fluxes of heat, moisture, momentum, and vertical mixing in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). How PBL and Cumulus schemes capture the evolution of thunderstorm have been analysed by taking thunderstorm cases occurred over Kolkata, India in the year 2011. PBL and cumulus schemes were customized for WSM-6 microphysics because WSM series has been widely used in operational forecast. Results have shown that KF (PBL scheme) and WSM-6 (Cumulus Scheme) have reproduced the evolution of surface variable such as CAPE, temperature and rainfall very much like observation. Further, KF and WSM-6 scheme also provided the increased moisture availability in the lower atmosphere which was taken to higher level by strong vertical velocities providing a platform to initiate a thunderstorm much better. Overestimation of rain in WSM-6 occurs primarily because of occurrence of melting and freezing process within a deeper layer in WSM-6 scheme. These Schemes have reproduced the spatial pattern and peak rainfall coverage closer to TRMM observation. It is the the combination of WSM-6, and KF schemes

  14. Sensitivity of land surface and Cumulus schemes for Thunderstorm prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The cloud processes play an important role in all forms of precipitation. Its proper representation is one of the challenging tasks in mesoscale numerical simulation. Studies have revealed that mesoscale feature require proper initialization which may likely to improve the convective system rainfall forecasts. Understanding the precipitation process, model initial condition accuracy and resolved/sub grid-scale precipitation processes representation, are the important areas which needed to improve in order to represent the mesoscale features properly. Various attempts have been done in order to improve the model performance through grid resolution, physical parameterizations, etc. But it is the physical parameterizations which provide a convective atmosphere for the development and intensification of convective events. Further, physical parameterizations consist of cumulus convection, surface fluxes of heat, moisture, momentum, and vertical mixing in the planetary boundary layer (PBL. How PBL and Cumulus schemes capture the evolution of thunderstorm have been analysed by taking thunderstorm cases occurred over Kolkata, India in the year 2011. PBL and cumulus schemes were customized for WSM-6 microphysics because WSM series has been widely used in operational forecast. Results have shown that KF (PBL scheme and WSM-6 (Cumulus Scheme have reproduced the evolution of surface variable such as CAPE, temperature and rainfall very much like observation. Further, KF and WSM-6 scheme also provided the increased moisture availability in the lower atmosphere which was taken to higher level by strong vertical velocities providing a platform to initiate a thunderstorm much better. Overestimation of rain in WSM-6 occurs primarily because of occurrence of melting and freezing process within a deeper layer in WSM-6 scheme. These Schemes have reproduced the spatial pattern and peak rainfall coverage closer to TRMM observation. It is the the combination of WSM-6

  15. Accelerated Sensitivity Analysis in High-Dimensional Stochastic Reaction Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A; Pantazis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Existing sensitivity analysis approaches are not able to handle efficiently stochastic reaction networks with a large number of parameters and species, which are typical in the modeling and simulation of complex biochemical phenomena. In this paper, a two-step strategy for parametric sensitivity analysis for such systems is proposed, exploiting advantages and synergies between two recently proposed sensitivity analysis methodologies for stochastic dynamics. The first method performs sensitivity analysis of the stochastic dynamics by means of the Fisher Information Matrix on the underlying distribution of the trajectories; the second method is a reduced-variance, finite-difference, gradient-type sensitivity approach relying on stochastic coupling techniques for variance reduction. Here we demonstrate that these two methods can be combined and deployed together by means of a new sensitivity bound which incorporates the variance of the quantity of interest as well as the Fisher Information Matrix estimated from the first method. The first step of the proposed strategy labels sensitivities using the bound and screens out the insensitive parameters in a controlled manner. In the second step of the proposed strategy, a finite-difference method is applied only for the sensitivity estimation of the (potentially) sensitive parameters that have not been screened out in the first step. Results on an epidermal growth factor network with fifty parameters and on a protein homeostasis with eighty parameters demonstrate that the proposed strategy is able to quickly discover and discard the insensitive parameters and in the remaining potentially sensitive parameters it accurately estimates the sensitivities. The new sensitivity strategy can be several times faster than current state-of-the-art approaches that test all parameters, especially in "sloppy" systems. In particular, the computational acceleration is quantified by the ratio between the total number of parameters over the

  16. Sensitivity Analysis and Insights into Hydrological Processes and Uncertainty at Different Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghnegahdar, A.; Razavi, S.; Wheater, H. S.; Gupta, H. V.

    2015-12-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) is an essential tool for providing insight into model behavior, and conducting model calibration and uncertainty assessment. Numerous techniques have been used in environmental modelling studies for sensitivity analysis. However, it is often overlooked that the scale of modelling study, and the metric choice can significantly change the assessment of model sensitivity and uncertainty. In order to identify important hydrological processes across various scales, we conducted a multi-criteria sensitivity analysis using a novel and efficient technique, Variogram Analysis of Response Surfaces (VARS). The analysis was conducted using three different hydrological models, HydroGeoSphere (HGS), Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), and Modélisation Environmentale-Surface et Hydrologie (MESH). Models were applied at various scales ranging from small (hillslope) to large (watershed) scales. In each case, the sensitivity of simulated streamflow to model processes (represented through parameters) were measured using different metrics selected based on various hydrograph characteristics such as high flows, low flows, and volume. We demonstrate how the scale of the case study and the choice of sensitivity metric(s) can change our assessment of sensitivity and uncertainty. We present some guidelines to better align the metric choice with the objective and scale of a modelling study.

  17. Chemistry in Protoplanetary Disks: A Sensitivity Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Vasyunin, A I; Henning, T; Wakelam, V; Herbst, E; Sobolev, A M

    2007-01-01

    We study how uncertainties in the rate coefficients of chemical reactions in the RATE06 database affect abundances and column densities of key molecules in protoplanetary disks. We randomly varied the gas-phase reaction rates within their uncertainty limits and calculated the time-dependent abundances and column densities using a gas-grain chemical model and a flaring steady-state disk model. We find that key species can be separated into two distinct groups according to the sensitivity of their column densities to the rate uncertainties. The first group includes CO, C$^+$, H$_3^+$, H$_2$O, NH$_3$, N$_2$H$^+$, and HCNH$^+$. For these species, the column densities are not very sensitive to the rate uncertainties but the abundances in specific regions are. The second group includes CS, CO$_2$, HCO$^+$, H$_2$CO, C$_2$H, CN, HCN, HNC and other, more complex species, for which high abundances and abundance uncertainties co-exist in the same disk region, leading to larger scatters in the column densities. However, ...

  18. Gap Surface Plasmon Waveguide Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Grøndahl; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic waveguides supporting gap surface plasmons (GSPs) localized in a dielectric spacer between metal films are investigated numerically and the waveguiding properties at telecommunication wavelengths are presented. Especially, we emphasize that the mode confinement can advantageously...

  19. SECTION 6.2 SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY ANALYSIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seah, M. P.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    Surface physical analysis, i.e. topography characterisation, encompasses measurement, visualisation, and quantification. This is critical for both component form and for surface finish at macro-, micro- and nano-scales. The principal methods of surface topography measurement are stylus profilomet...

  20. Highly Sensitive Local Surface Plasmon Resonance in Anisotropic Au Nanoparticles Deposited on Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanari Saigusa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the facile and high-throughput fabrication method of anisotropic Au nanoparticles with a highly sensitive local surface plasmon resonance (LPR using cylindrical nanofibers as substrates. The substrates consisting of nanofibers were prepared by the electrospinning of poly(vinylidene fluoride (PVDF. The Au nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of electrospun nanofibers by vacuum evaporation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a curved Au island structure on the surface of cylindrical nanofibers. Polarized UV-visible extinction spectroscopy showed anisotropy in their LPR arising from the high surface curvature of the nanofiber. The LPR of the Au nanoparticles on the thinnest nanofiber with a diameter of ~100 nm showed maximum refractive index (RI sensitivity over 500 nm/RI unit (RIU. The close correlation between the fiber diameter dependence of the RI sensitivity and polarization dependence of the LPR suggests that anisotropic Au nanoparticles improve RI sensitivity.

  1. Sensitivity Dependence of Surface Plasmon Resonance Based Sensors on Prism Refractive Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that refractive index of the prism used toload metal film has significant influence on sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance based sensors. Theprism with lower refractive index gives the sensors a higher sensitivity in detecting refractive index varia-tions of a sample. We attribute this effect to the fact that a prism with low refractive index will increasecoupling distance between surface plasmons and the medium under investigation.

  2. Plans for a sensitivity analysis of bridge-scour computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, David D.; Smith, Peter N.

    1993-01-01

    Plans for an analysis of the sensitivity of Level 2 bridge-scour computations are described. Cross-section data from 15 bridge sites in Texas are modified to reflect four levels of field effort ranging from no field surveys to complete surveys. Data from United States Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps will be used to supplement incomplete field surveys. The cross sections are used to compute the water-surface profile through each bridge for several T-year recurrence-interval design discharges. The effect of determining the downstream energy grade-line slope from topographic maps is investigated by systematically varying the starting slope of each profile. The water-surface profile analyses are then used to compute potential scour resulting from each of the design discharges. The planned results will be presented in the form of exceedance-probability versus scour-depth plots with the maximum and minimum scour depths at each T-year discharge presented as error bars.

  3. In-vacuum scattered light reduction with cupric oxide surfaces for sensitive fluorescence detection

    CERN Document Server

    Norrgard, Eric B; Barry, John F; McCarron, Daniel J; Steinecker, Matthew H; DeMille, David

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple and easy method for producing low-reflectivity surfaces that are ultra-high vacuum compatible, may be baked to high temperatures, and are easily applied even on complex surface geometries. Black cupric oxide (CuO) surfaces are chemically grown in minutes on any copper surface, allowing for low-cost, rapid prototyping and production. The reflective properties are measured to be comparable to commercially available products for creating optically black surfaces. We describe a vacuum apparatus which uses multiple blackened copper surfaces for sensitive, low-background detection of molecules using laser-induced fluorescence.

  4. Highly sensitive surface plasmon resonance chemical sensor based on Goos-Hanchen effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaobo; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2006-08-01

    The resonance enhanced Goos-Hanchen shifts at attenuated total internal reflection enables the possibility for highly sensitive surface plasmon resonance sensor. The observed giant displacements result from the singular phase retardation at the resonance where the phase is continuous but changes dramatically. The phenomenon is proposed for chemical sensing and the superior sensitivity is demonstrated.

  5. Analysis of laser alloyed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, D.C.; Augustyniak, W.M.; Buene, L.; Draper, C.W.; Poate, J.M.

    1981-04-01

    Surface alloys of precious metals have many advantages over bulk alloys, the most obvious of which is cost reduction due to the reduced consumption of precious metal. There are several techniques for producing surface alloys. In this paper the laser irradiation technique is presented. The following lasers: CW CO/sub 2/, Q-switched Nd-YAG, frequency double Q-switched Nd-YAG, and pulsed ruby were used to irradiate and melt thin solid films of precious metals on metal substrates. This causes the surfaces to melt to a depth of approximately 10,000A. Alloying then takes place in the liquid phase where most metals are miscible. The high quench rates obtainable by this method of melting can result in the forming of metastable alloys. This melting and regrowth process is well understood and has been discussed in the literature over the last few years. This paper deals with two binary alloy systems, Au-Ni and Pd-Ti. Surface alloys of Au-Ni with a wide range of concentrations have been produced by laser irradiation of thin Au films on Ni. These films have been analyzed using Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and channeling. Many thin film metals other than Au have also been successfully alloyed using these methods. An example of a potential application is the laser surface alloying of Pd to Ti for corrosion passivation.

  6. SECTION 6.2 SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY ANALYSIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seah, M. P.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    Surface physical analysis, i.e. topography characterisation, encompasses measurement, visualisation, and quantification. This is critical for both component form and for surface finish at macro-, micro- and nano-scales. The principal methods of surface topography measurement are stylus profilometry...... representing some average property of the surface under examination. Measurement methods, as well as their application and limitations, are briefly reviewed, including standardisation and traceability issues....

  7. Least Squares Shadowing for Sensitivity Analysis of Turbulent Fluid Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Blonigan, Patrick; Wang, Qiqi

    2014-01-01

    Computational methods for sensitivity analysis are invaluable tools for aerodynamics research and engineering design. However, traditional sensitivity analysis methods break down when applied to long-time averaged quantities in turbulent fluid flow fields, specifically those obtained using high-fidelity turbulence simulations. This is because of a number of dynamical properties of turbulent and chaotic fluid flows, most importantly high sensitivity of the initial value problem, popularly known as the "butterfly effect". The recently developed least squares shadowing (LSS) method avoids the issues encountered by traditional sensitivity analysis methods by approximating the "shadow trajectory" in phase space, avoiding the high sensitivity of the initial value problem. The following paper discusses how the least squares problem associated with LSS is solved. Two methods are presented and are demonstrated on a simulation of homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky (KS) equation, a 4th order c...

  8. Proteolysis on the body surface of pyrethroid-sensitive and resistant Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachecka, Aneta; Borsuk, Grzegorz; Olszewski, Krzysztof; Paleolog, Jerzy; Lipiński, Zbigniew

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the activity of proteases and protease inhibitors sampled from the body surface of tau-fluvalinate-sensitive and resistant V. destructor. Proteins were isolated from the tau-fluvalinate-sensitive and resistant mites, while mites untreated with tau-fluvalinate constituted the control. Subsequently, the following methodology was applied: protein concentration assay by the Lowry method - as modified by Schacterle and Pollack; assay of proteolytic activity in relation to various substrates (gelatine, haemoglobin, ovoalbumin, albumin, cytochrome C, casein) by the modified Anson method; identification of proteolytic activity in relation to diagnostic inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes (pepstatin A, PMSF, iodoacetamide, o-phenantrolin), using the Lee and Lin method; identification of acidic, neutral and basic protease activities by means of the modified Anson method; electrophoretic analysis of proteins in a polyacrylamide gel for protease detection with the Laemmli method and for protease inhibitor detection with the Felicioli method. The highest value of protein concentration was found in the tau-fluvalinate-sensitive V. destructor, while the highest activity levels of acidic, neutral and alkaline proteases were observed in the tau-fluvalinate-resistant mites. Aspartic, serine, thiolic and metallic proteases were found in the drug-resistant and drug-sensitive Varroa mites. The control samples were found to contain aspartic and serine proteases. In an acidic and alkaline environment, the results revealed a complete loss of inhibitor activities in the in vitro analyses and electrophoresis. Serine protease inhibitor activities (at pH 7.0) were high, especially in the group of tau-fluvalinate-resistant mites.

  9. A Multivariate Analysis of Extratropical Cyclone Environmental Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, G.; Posselt, D. J.; Booth, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    The implications of a changing climate system include more than a simple temperature increase. A changing climate also modifies atmospheric conditions responsible for shaping the genesis and evolution of atmospheric circulations. In the mid-latitudes, the effects of climate change on extratropical cyclones (ETCs) can be expressed through changes in bulk temperature, horizontal and vertical temperature gradients (leading to changes in mean state winds) as well as atmospheric moisture content. Understanding how these changes impact ETC evolution and dynamics will help to inform climate mitigation and adaptation strategies, and allow for better informed weather emergency planning. However, our understanding is complicated by the complex interplay between a variety of environmental influences, and their potentially opposing effects on extratropical cyclone strength. Attempting to untangle competing influences from a theoretical or observational standpoint is complicated by nonlinear responses to environmental perturbations and a lack of data. As such, numerical models can serve as a useful tool for examining this complex issue. We present results from an analysis framework that combines the computational power of idealized modeling with the statistical robustness of multivariate sensitivity analysis. We first establish control variables, such as baroclinicity, bulk temperature, and moisture content, and specify a range of values that simulate possible changes in a future climate. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model serves as the link between changes in climate state and ETC relevant outcomes. A diverse set of output metrics (e.g., sea level pressure, average precipitation rates, eddy kinetic energy, and latent heat release) facilitates examination of storm dynamics, thermodynamic properties, and hydrologic cycles. Exploration of the multivariate sensitivity of ETCs to changes in control parameters space is performed via an ensemble of WRF runs coupled with

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of the Critical Speed in Railway Vehicle Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; True, Hans; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2014-01-01

    We present an approach to global sensitivity analysis aiming at the reduction of its computational cost without compromising the results. The method is based on sampling methods, cubature rules, High-Dimensional Model Representation and Total Sensitivity Indices. The approach has a general applic...

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of the Critical Speed in Railway Vehicle Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; True, Hans; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2013-01-01

    We present an approach to global sensitivity analysis aiming at the reduction of its computational cost without compromising the results. The method is based on sampling methods, cubature rules, High-Dimensional Model Representation and Total Sensitivity Indices. The approach has a general applic...

  12. Global and local sensitivity analysis methods for a physical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morio, Jerome, E-mail: jerome.morio@onera.fr [Onera-The French Aerospace Lab, F-91761, Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2011-11-15

    Sensitivity analysis is the study of how the different input variations of a mathematical model influence the variability of its output. In this paper, we review the principle of global and local sensitivity analyses of a complex black-box system. A simulated case of application is given at the end of this paper to compare both approaches.

  13. Electromagnetic and seismoelectric sensitivity analysis using resolution functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, P.J.; Grobbe, N.; Slob, E.C.; Mulder, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    For multi-parameter problems, such as the seismoelectric system, sensitivity analysis through resolution functions is a low-cost, fast method of determining whether measured fields are sensitive to certain subsurface parameters. We define a seismoelectric resolution function for the inversion of a

  14. Global and Local Sensitivity Analysis Methods for a Physical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morio, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is the study of how the different input variations of a mathematical model influence the variability of its output. In this paper, we review the principle of global and local sensitivity analyses of a complex black-box system. A simulated case of application is given at the end of this paper to compare both approaches.…

  15. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of high frequency structures with Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Bakr, Mohamed; Demir, Veysel

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the theory of adjoint sensitivity analysis and uses the popular FDTD (finite-difference time-domain) method to show how wideband sensitivities can be efficiently estimated for different types of materials and structures. It includes a variety of MATLAB® examples to help readers absorb the content more easily.

  16. Sensitivity of summer precipitation to tropical sea surface temperatures over East Asia in the GRIMs GMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Eun-Chul; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Hong, Song-You; Wu, Renguang

    2013-05-01

    In this study, uncoupled atmospheric general circulation model experiments are conducted to examine the sensitivity of tropical Ocean basins from the Indian Ocean to the tropical Pacific Ocean on the summer precipitation variability over East Asia. It is remarkable that the Indian Ocean basin sea surface temperature (SST) and the tropical Pacific basin SST act on summer precipitation variability over Northeast Asia and southern China quite differently. That is, SST warming in the Indian Ocean largely contributes to the increase in the amount of summer precipitation over East Asia, which is in contrast to the warming of the western tropical Pacific Ocean. Our further analysis indicates that an altered large-scale atmospheric circulation over the western tropical Pacific contributes to contrasting atmospheric motion over East Asia due to the tropics-East Asia teleconnections, which results in changes in the amount of summer precipitation due to the warming of the Indian and western tropical Pacific Oceans.

  17. Measuring Surface Pressure on Rotating Compressor Blades Using Pressure Sensitive Paint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Pastuhoff

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pressure sensitive paint (PSP was used to measure pressure on the blades of a radial compressor with a 51 mm inlet diameter rotating at speeds up to 50 krpm using the so called lifetime method. A diode laser with a scanning-mirror system was used to illuminate the paint and the luminescent lifetime was registered using a photo multiplier. With the described technique the surface-pressure fields were acquired for eight points in the compressor map, useful for general understanding of the flow field and for CFD validation. The PSP was of so called fast type, which makes it possible to observe pressure variations with frequencies up to several kHz. Through frequency spectrum analysis we were able to detect the pulsating flow frequency when the compressor was driven to surge.

  18. Sensitivity analysis of geometric errors in additive manufacturing medical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Jose Miguel; Arrieta, Cristobal; Andia, Marcelo E; Uribe, Sergio; Ramos-Grez, Jorge; Vargas, Alex; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Tejos, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) models are used in medical applications for surgical planning, prosthesis design and teaching. For these applications, the accuracy of the AM models is essential. Unfortunately, this accuracy is compromised due to errors introduced by each of the building steps: image acquisition, segmentation, triangulation, printing and infiltration. However, the contribution of each step to the final error remains unclear. We performed a sensitivity analysis comparing errors obtained from a reference with those obtained modifying parameters of each building step. Our analysis considered global indexes to evaluate the overall error, and local indexes to show how this error is distributed along the surface of the AM models. Our results show that the standard building process tends to overestimate the AM models, i.e. models are larger than the original structures. They also show that the triangulation resolution and the segmentation threshold are critical factors, and that the errors are concentrated at regions with high curvatures. Errors could be reduced choosing better triangulation and printing resolutions, but there is an important need for modifying some of the standard building processes, particularly the segmentation algorithms. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Imaging of surface plasmon polariton interference using phase-sensitive scanning tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, J.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2011-01-01

    We report the surface plasmon polariton interference, generated via a ‘buried’ gold grating, and imaged using a phase-sensitive Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope (PSTM). The phase-resolved PSTM measurement unravels the complex surface plasmon polariton interference fields at the gold-air

  20. Engineering of Surface Chemistry for Enhanced Sensitivity in Nanoporous Interferometric Sensing Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Cheryl Suwen; Sylvia, Georgina M; Nemati, Madieh; Yu, Jingxian; Losic, Dusan; Abell, Andrew D; Santos, Abel

    2017-03-15

    We explore new approaches to engineering the surface chemistry of interferometric sensing platforms based on nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) and reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS). Two surface engineering strategies are presented, namely (i) selective chemical functionalization of the inner surface of NAA pores with amine-terminated thiol molecules and (ii) selective chemical functionalization of the top surface of NAA with dithiol molecules. The strong molecular interaction of Au(3+) ions with thiol-containing functional molecules of alkane chain or peptide character provides a model sensing system with which to assess the sensitivity of these NAA platforms by both molecular feature and surface engineering. Changes in the effective optical thickness of the functionalized NAA photonic films (i.e., sensing principle), in response to gold ions, are monitored in real-time by RIfS. 6-Amino-1-hexanethiol (inner surface) and 1,6-hexanedithiol (top surface), the most sensitive functional molecules from approaches i and ii, respectively, were combined into a third sensing strategy whereby the NAA platforms are functionalized on both the top and inner surfaces concurrently. Engineering of the surface according to this approach resulted in an additive enhancement in sensitivity of up to 5-fold compared to previously reported systems. This study advances the rational engineering of surface chemistry for interferometric sensing on nanoporous platforms with potential applications for real-time monitoring of multiple analytes in dynamic environments.

  1. Sensitivity Analysis of the Gap Heat Transfer Model in BISON.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Schmidt, Rodney C.; Williamson, Richard (INL); Perez, Danielle (INL)

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on sensitivity analysis of the heat transfer model in the gap between the fuel rod and the cladding used in the BISON fuel performance code of Idaho National Laboratory. Using the gap heat transfer models in BISON, the sensitivity of the modeling parameters and the associated responses is investigated. The study results in a quantitative assessment of the role of various parameters in the analysis of gap heat transfer in nuclear fuel.

  2. Surface computing and collaborative analysis work

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Judith; Gossage, Stevenson; Hack, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Large surface computing devices (wall-mounted or tabletop) with touch interfaces and their application to collaborative data analysis, an increasingly important and prevalent activity, is the primary topic of this book. Our goals are to outline the fundamentals of surface computing (a still maturing technology), review relevant work on collaborative data analysis, describe frameworks for understanding collaborative processes, and provide a better understanding of the opportunities for research and development. We describe surfaces as display technologies with which people can interact directly, and emphasize how interaction design changes when designing for large surfaces. We review efforts to use large displays, surfaces or mixed display environments to enable collaborative analytic activity. Collaborative analysis is important in many domains, but to provide concrete examples and a specific focus, we frequently consider analysis work in the security domain, and in particular the challenges security personne...

  3. Surface analysis of selected hydrophobic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewska, Sylwia Katarzyna

    This dissertation contains a series of studies on hydrophobic surfaces by various surface sensitive techniques such as contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Hydrophobic surfaces have been classified as mineral surfaces, organic synthetic surfaces, or natural biological surfaces. As a model hydrophobic mineral surface, elemental sulfur has been selected. The sulfur surface has been characterized for selected allotropic forms of sulfur such as rhombic, monoclinic, plastic, and cyclohexasulfur. Additionally, dextrin adsorption at the sulfur surface was measured. The structure of a dextrin molecule showing hydrophobic sites has been presented to support the proposed hydrophobic bonding nature of dextrin adsorption at the sulfur surface. As a model organic hydrophobic surface, primary fatty amines such as dodecylamine, hexadecylamine, and octadecylamine were chosen. An increase of hydrophobicity, significant changes of infrared bands, and surface topographical changes with time were observed for each amine. Based on the results it was concluded that hydrocarbon chain rearrangement associated with recrystallization took place at the surface during contact with air. A barley straw surface was selected as a model of biological hydrophobic surfaces. The differences in the contact angles for various straw surfaces were explained by the presence of a wax layer. SEM images confirmed the heterogeneity and complexity of the wax crystal structure. AFM measurements provided additional structural details including a measure of surface roughness. Additionally, straw degradation as a result of conditioning in an aqueous environment was studied. Significant contact angle changes were observed as soon as one day after conditioning. FTIR studies showed a gradual wax layer removal due to straw surface decomposition. SEM and AFM images revealed topographical changes and biological

  4. Sensitivity analysis on fuel scenario associated magnitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Martinez, M.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear fuel cycle scenario analyses are needed as a support for policy makers in terms of sustainability, fuel diversity, security of supply, and social and environmental effects. These analyses are usually aimed to the study of the impact of certain hypotheses on some fuel cycle indicators, without considering the uncertainties on those hypotheses. The expert group of the NEA/OECD on Advanced Fuel Cycle Scenarios, where this work is framed, is devoted to fill this gap, laying the foundations for deep analysis of the sensibilities on fuel cycle indicators. (Author)

  5. Dispersion sensitivity analysis & consistency improvement of APFSDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Sharma Panda

    2017-08-01

    In Bore Balloting Motion simulation shows that reduction in residual spin by about 5% results in drastic 56% reduction in first maximum yaw. A correlation between first maximum yaw and residual spin is observed. Results of data analysis are used in design modification for existing ammunition. Number of designs are evaluated numerically before freezing five designs for further soundings. These designs are critically assessed in terms of their comparative performance during In-bore travel & external ballistics phase. Results are validated by free flight trials for the finalised design.

  6. Fixed point sensitivity analysis of interacting structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabás, György; Meszéna, Géza; Ostling, Annette

    2014-03-01

    Sensitivity analysis of structured populations is a useful tool in population ecology. Historically, methodological development of sensitivity analysis has focused on the sensitivity of eigenvalues in linear matrix models, and on single populations. More recently there have been extensions to the sensitivity of nonlinear models, and to communities of interacting populations. Here we derive a fully general mathematical expression for the sensitivity of equilibrium abundances in communities of interacting structured populations. Our method yields the response of an arbitrary function of the stage class abundances to perturbations of any model parameters. As a demonstration, we apply this sensitivity analysis to a two-species model of ontogenetic niche shift where each species has two stage classes, juveniles and adults. In the context of this model, we demonstrate that our theory is quite robust to violating two of its technical assumptions: the assumption that the community is at a point equilibrium and the assumption of infinitesimally small parameter perturbations. Our results on the sensitivity of a community are also interpreted in a niche theoretical context: we determine how the niche of a structured population is composed of the niches of the individual states, and how the sensitivity of the community depends on niche segregation.

  7. Analysis of the sensitivity properties of a model of vector-borne bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzby, Megan; Neckels, David; Antolin, Michael F; Estep, Donald

    2008-09-06

    Model sensitivity is a key to evaluation of mathematical models in ecology and evolution, especially in complex models with numerous parameters. In this paper, we use some recently developed methods for sensitivity analysis to study the parameter sensitivity of a model of vector-borne bubonic plague in a rodent population proposed by Keeling & Gilligan. The new sensitivity tools are based on a variational analysis involving the adjoint equation. The new approach provides a relatively inexpensive way to obtain derivative information about model output with respect to parameters. We use this approach to determine the sensitivity of a quantity of interest (the force of infection from rats and their fleas to humans) to various model parameters, determine a region over which linearization at a specific parameter reference point is valid, develop a global picture of the output surface, and search for maxima and minima in a given region in the parameter space.

  8. Stochastic sensitivity analysis using HDMR and score function

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajib Chowdhury; B N Rao; A Meher Prasad

    2009-12-01

    Probabilistic sensitivities provide an important insight in reliability analysis and often crucial towards understanding the physical behaviour underlying failure and modifying the design to mitigate and manage risk. This article presents a new computational approach for calculating stochastic sensitivities of mechanical systems with respect to distribution parameters of random variables. The method involves high dimensional model representation and score functions associated with probability distribution of a random input. The proposed approach facilitates first-and second-order approximation of stochastic sensitivity measures and statistical simulation. The formulation is general such that any simulation method can be used for the computation such as Monte Carlo, importance sampling, Latin hypercube, etc. Both the probabilistic response and its sensitivities can be estimated from a single probabilistic analysis, without requiring gradients of performance function. Numerical results indicate that the proposed method provides accurate and computationally efficient estimates of sensitivities of statistical moments or reliability of structural system.

  9. Theoretical modelling of a bi-dimensional U-shaped surface plasmon resonance based fibre optic sensor for sensitivity enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, R K; Gupta, B D [Physics Department, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)], E-mail: bdgupta@physics.iitd.ernet.in

    2008-05-07

    Theoretical analysis of a surface plasmon resonance based fibre optic sensor with a uniform semi-metal coated U-shaped probe is carried out using a bi-dimensional model. All the rays of the p-polarized light launched in the fibre and their electric vectors are assumed to be confined in the plane of bending of the U-shaped probe. The effect of the bending radius of the probe on the sensitivity of the sensor is studied. The study shows that as the bending radius of the probe decreases the sensitivity of the sensor increases. For the light launching conditions used, the maximum sensitivity achieved is several times more than that reported for a fibre optic tapered probe. In addition to high sensitivity, the most advantageous feature of a U-shaped probe is that it can be used as a point sensor.

  10. Applications of surface analysis and surface theory in tribology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    Tribology, the study of adhesion, friction and wear of materials, is a complex field which requires a knowledge of solid state physics, surface physics, chemistry, material science, and mechanical engineering. It has been dominated, however, by the more practical need to make equipment work. With the advent of surface analysis and advances in surface and solid-state theory, a new dimension has been added to the analysis of interactions at tribological interfaces. In this paper the applications of tribological studies and their limitations are presented. Examples from research at the NASA Lewis Research Center are given. Emphasis is on fundamental studies involving the effects of monolayer coverage and thick films on friction and wear. A summary of the current status of theoretical calculations of defect energetics is presented. In addition, some new theoretical techniques which enable simplified quantitative calculations of adhesion, fracture, and friction are discussed.

  11. Advancing sensitivity analysis to precisely characterize temporal parameter dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guse, Björn; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Strauch, Michael; Reusser, Dominik; Lüdtke, Stefan; Volk, Martin; Gupta, Hoshin; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Parameter sensitivity analysis is a strategy for detecting dominant model parameters. A temporal sensitivity analysis calculates daily sensitivities of model parameters. This allows a precise characterization of temporal patterns of parameter dominance and an identification of the related discharge conditions. To achieve this goal, the diagnostic information as derived from the temporal parameter sensitivity is advanced by including discharge information in three steps. In a first step, the temporal dynamics are analyzed by means of daily time series of parameter sensitivities. As sensitivity analysis method, we used the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) applied directly onto the modelled discharge. Next, the daily sensitivities are analyzed in combination with the flow duration curve (FDC). Through this step, we determine whether high sensitivities of model parameters are related to specific discharges. Finally, parameter sensitivities are separately analyzed for five segments of the FDC and presented as monthly averaged sensitivities. In this way, seasonal patterns of dominant model parameter are provided for each FDC segment. For this methodical approach, we used two contrasting catchments (upland and lowland catchment) to illustrate how parameter dominances change seasonally in different catchments. For all of the FDC segments, the groundwater parameters are dominant in the lowland catchment, while in the upland catchment the controlling parameters change seasonally between parameters from different runoff components. The three methodical steps lead to clear temporal patterns, which represent the typical characteristics of the study catchments. Our methodical approach thus provides a clear idea of how the hydrological dynamics are controlled by model parameters for certain discharge magnitudes during the year. Overall, these three methodical steps precisely characterize model parameters and improve the understanding of process dynamics in hydrological

  12. Sensitivity of Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance to surface albedo parameterization: a study with a regional climate model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Angelen, J.H.; Lenaerts, J.T.M.; Lhermitte, S.; Fettweis, X.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; van den Broeke, M.R.; van Meijgaard, E.; Smeets, C.J.P.P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a sensitivity study of the surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as modeled using a regional atmospheric climate model, to various parameter settings in the albedo scheme. The snow albedo scheme uses grain size as a prognostic variable and further depends on cloud cover,

  13. Application of Stochastic Sensitivity Analysis to Integrated Force Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. F. Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As a new formulation in structural analysis, Integrated Force Method has been successfully applied to many structures for civil, mechanical, and aerospace engineering due to the accurate estimate of forces in computation. Right now, it is being further extended to the probabilistic domain. For the assessment of uncertainty effect in system optimization and identification, the probabilistic sensitivity analysis of IFM was further investigated in this study. A set of stochastic sensitivity analysis formulation of Integrated Force Method was developed using the perturbation method. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate its application. Its efficiency and accuracy were also substantiated with direct Monte Carlo simulations and the reliability-based sensitivity method. The numerical algorithm was shown to be readily adaptable to the existing program since the models of stochastic finite element and stochastic design sensitivity are almost identical.

  14. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis of central-loop MRS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozmand, Ahmad; Auken, Esben; Dalgaard, Esben; Rejkjaer, Simon

    2014-05-01

    In this study we investigate the sensitivity analysis of separated-loop magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) data and, in light of deploying a separate MRS receiver system from the transmitter system, compare the parameter determination of the central-loop with the conventional coincident-loop MRS data. MRS, also called surface NMR, has emerged as a promising surface-based geophysical technique for groundwater investigations, as it provides a direct estimate of the water content and, through empirical relations, is linked to hydraulic properties of the subsurface such as hydraulic conductivity. The method works based on the physical principle of NMR during which a large volume of protons of the water molecules in the subsurface is excited at the specific Larmor frequency. The measurement consists of a large wire loop deployed on the surface which typically acts as both a transmitter and a receiver, the so-called coincident-loop configuration. An alternating current is passed through the loop deployed and the superposition of signals from all precessing protons within the investigated volume is measured in a receiver loop; a decaying NMR signal called Free Induction Decay (FID). To provide depth information, the FID signal is measured for a series of pulse moments (Q; product of current amplitude and transmitting pulse length) during which different earth volumes are excited. One of the main and inevitable limitations of MRS measurements is a relatively long measurement dead time, i.e. a non-zero time between the end of the energizing pulse and the beginning of the measurement, which makes it difficult, and in some places impossible, to record MRS signal from fine-grained geologic units and limits the application of advanced pulse sequences. Therefore, one of the current research activities is the idea of building separate receiver units, which will diminish the dead time. In light of that, the aims of this study are twofold: 1) Using a forward modeling approach, the

  15. Analysis of the p-i-n-structures Electrophysical Characteristics Influence on the Spectral Characteristics Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Murashev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the simulation of the silicon p-i-n-photodiodes spectral sensitivity characteristics was carried out. The analysis of the semiconductor material characteristics (the doping level, lifetime, surface recombination velocity, the construction and operation modes on the photosensitive structures characteristics in order to optimize them were investigated.

  16. Benchmarking sensitivity of biophysical processes to leaf area changes in land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzieri, Giovanni; Duveiller, Gregory; Georgievski, Goran; Li, Wei; Robestson, Eddy; Kautz, Markus; Lawrence, Peter; Ciais, Philippe; Pongratz, Julia; Sitch, Stephen; Wiltshire, Andy; Arneth, Almut; Cescatti, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    Land surface models (LSM) are widely applied as supporting tools for policy-relevant assessment of climate change and its impact on terrestrial ecosystems, yet knowledge of their performance skills in representing the sensitivity of biophysical processes to changes in vegetation density is still limited. This is particularly relevant in light of the substantial impacts on regional climate associated with the changes in leaf area index (LAI) following the observed global greening. Benchmarking LSMs on the sensitivity of the simulated processes to vegetation density is essential to reduce their uncertainty and improve the representation of these effects. Here we present a novel benchmark system to assess model capacity in reproducing land surface-atmosphere energy exchanges modulated by vegetation density. Through a collaborative effort of different modeling groups, a consistent set of land surface energy fluxes and LAI dynamics has been generated from multiple LSMs, including JSBACH, JULES, ORCHIDEE, CLM4.5 and LPJ-GUESS. Relationships of interannual variations of modeled surface fluxes to LAI changes have been analyzed at global scale across different climatological gradients and compared with satellite-based products. A set of scoring metrics has been used to assess the overall model performances and a detailed analysis in the climate space has been provided to diagnose possible model errors associated to background conditions. Results have enabled us to identify model-specific strengths and deficiencies. An overall best performing model does not emerge from the analyses. However, the comparison with other models that work better under certain metrics and conditions indicates that improvements are expected to be potentially achievable. A general amplification of the biophysical processes mediated by vegetation is found across the different land surface schemes. Grasslands are characterized by an underestimated year-to-year variability of LAI in cold climates

  17. Global sensitivity analysis in stochastic simulators of uncertain reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Jimenez, M.; Le Maître, O. P.; Knio, O. M.

    2016-12-01

    Stochastic models of chemical systems are often subjected to uncertainties in kinetic parameters in addition to the inherent random nature of their dynamics. Uncertainty quantification in such systems is generally achieved by means of sensitivity analyses in which one characterizes the variability with the uncertain kinetic parameters of the first statistical moments of model predictions. In this work, we propose an original global sensitivity analysis method where the parametric and inherent variability sources are both treated through Sobol's decomposition of the variance into contributions from arbitrary subset of uncertain parameters and stochastic reaction channels. The conceptual development only assumes that the inherent and parametric sources are independent, and considers the Poisson processes in the random-time-change representation of the state dynamics as the fundamental objects governing the inherent stochasticity. A sampling algorithm is proposed to perform the global sensitivity analysis, and to estimate the partial variances and sensitivity indices characterizing the importance of the various sources of variability and their interactions. The birth-death and Schlögl models are used to illustrate both the implementation of the algorithm and the richness of the proposed analysis method. The output of the proposed sensitivity analysis is also contrasted with a local derivative-based sensitivity analysis method classically used for this type of systems.

  18. Global sensitivity analysis in stochastic simulators of uncertain reaction networks

    KAUST Repository

    Navarro Jimenez, M.

    2016-12-26

    Stochastic models of chemical systems are often subjected to uncertainties in kinetic parameters in addition to the inherent random nature of their dynamics. Uncertainty quantification in such systems is generally achieved by means of sensitivity analyses in which one characterizes the variability with the uncertain kinetic parameters of the first statistical moments of model predictions. In this work, we propose an original global sensitivity analysis method where the parametric and inherent variability sources are both treated through Sobol’s decomposition of the variance into contributions from arbitrary subset of uncertain parameters and stochastic reaction channels. The conceptual development only assumes that the inherent and parametric sources are independent, and considers the Poisson processes in the random-time-change representation of the state dynamics as the fundamental objects governing the inherent stochasticity. A sampling algorithm is proposed to perform the global sensitivity analysis, and to estimate the partial variances and sensitivity indices characterizing the importance of the various sources of variability and their interactions. The birth-death and Schlögl models are used to illustrate both the implementation of the algorithm and the richness of the proposed analysis method. The output of the proposed sensitivity analysis is also contrasted with a local derivative-based sensitivity analysis method classically used for this type of systems.

  19. Global sensitivity analysis in stochastic simulators of uncertain reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Jimenez, M; Le Maître, O P; Knio, O M

    2016-12-28

    Stochastic models of chemical systems are often subjected to uncertainties in kinetic parameters in addition to the inherent random nature of their dynamics. Uncertainty quantification in such systems is generally achieved by means of sensitivity analyses in which one characterizes the variability with the uncertain kinetic parameters of the first statistical moments of model predictions. In this work, we propose an original global sensitivity analysis method where the parametric and inherent variability sources are both treated through Sobol's decomposition of the variance into contributions from arbitrary subset of uncertain parameters and stochastic reaction channels. The conceptual development only assumes that the inherent and parametric sources are independent, and considers the Poisson processes in the random-time-change representation of the state dynamics as the fundamental objects governing the inherent stochasticity. A sampling algorithm is proposed to perform the global sensitivity analysis, and to estimate the partial variances and sensitivity indices characterizing the importance of the various sources of variability and their interactions. The birth-death and Schlögl models are used to illustrate both the implementation of the algorithm and the richness of the proposed analysis method. The output of the proposed sensitivity analysis is also contrasted with a local derivative-based sensitivity analysis method classically used for this type of systems.

  20. IASI's sensitivity to near-surface carbon monoxide (CO): Theoretical analyses and retrievals on test cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauduin, Sophie; Clarisse, Lieven; Theunissen, Michael; George, Maya; Hurtmans, Daniel; Clerbaux, Cathy; Coheur, Pierre-François

    2017-03-01

    Separating concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) in the boundary layer from the rest of the atmosphere with nadir satellite measurements is of particular importance to differentiate emission from transport. Although thermal infrared (TIR) satellite sounders are considered to have limited sensitivity to the composition of the near-surface atmosphere, previous studies show that they can provide information on CO close to the ground in case of high thermal contrast. In this work we investigate the capability of IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) to retrieve near-surface CO concentrations, and we quantitatively assess the influence of thermal contrast on such retrievals. We present a 3-part analysis, which relies on both theoretical forward simulations and retrievals on real data, performed for a large range of negative and positive thermal contrast situations. First, we derive theoretically the IASI detection threshold of CO enhancement in the boundary layer, and we assess its dependence on thermal contrast. Then, using the optimal estimation formalism, we quantify the role of thermal contrast on the error budget and information content of near-surface CO retrievals. We demonstrate that, contrary to what is usually accepted, large negative thermal contrast values (ground cooler than air) lead to a better decorrelation between CO concentrations in the low and the high troposphere than large positive thermal contrast (ground warmer than the air). In the last part of the paper we use Mexico City and Barrow as test cases to contrast our theoretical predictions with real retrievals, and to assess the accuracy of IASI surface CO retrievals through comparisons to ground-based in-situ measurements.

  1. A practical approach to the sensitivity analysis for kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Max J; Matera, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have become a vital tool for predictive quality atomistic understanding of complex surface chemical reaction kinetics over a wide range of reaction conditions. In order to expand their practical value in terms of giving guidelines for atomic level design of catalytic systems, it is very desirable to readily evaluate a sensitivity analysis for a given model. The result of such a sensitivity analysis quantitatively expresses the dependency of the turnover frequency, being the main output variable, on the rate constants entering the model. In the past the application of sensitivity analysis, such as Degree of Rate Control, has been hampered by its exuberant computational effort required to accurately sample numerical derivatives of a property that is obtained from a stochastic simulation method. In this study we present an efficient and robust three stage approach that is capable of reliably evaluating the sensitivity measures for stiff microkinetic models as we demonstrat...

  2. Structural sensitivity studies of ethylene hydrogenation on platinum and rhodium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinlan, M.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene and hydrogen on the well characterized surfaces of the noble metals platinum and rhodium has been studied for the purposes of determining the relative activity of these two substrates as well as the degree of structure sensitivity. The Pt(111) and the Rh(755) single crystal surfaces,as well as Pt and Rh foils, were employed as substrates to study the effect of surface step structure on reactivity. In addition, vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed for ethylene adsorption on the stepped Rh(755) surface. The catalytic reaction were obtained using a combined ultrahigh vacuum chamber coupled with an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber that functioned as a batch reactor. Samples could be prepared using standard surface science techniques and characterized for surface composition and geometry using Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction. A comparison of the reactivity of Rh(111) with the results from this study on Rh(755) allows a direct determination of the effect of step structure on ethylene hydrogenation activity. Structure sensitivity is expected to exhibit orders of magnitude differences in rate as surface orientation is varied. In this case, no significant differences were found, confirming the structure insensitivity of this reaction over this metal. The turnover frequency of the Rh(111) surface, 5 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1}, is in relatively good agreement with the turnover frequency of 9 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1} measured for the Rh(755) surface. Rate measurements made on the Pt(111) surface and the Pt foil are in excellent agreement, both measuring 3 {times} 10{sup 2} s{sup minus}1. Likewise, it is concluded that no strong structure sensitivity for the platinum surfaces exists. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy studies of adsorbed ethylene on the Rh(755) surface compare favorably with the ethylidyne spectra obtained on the Rh(111) and Rh(100) surfaces.

  3. Autonomous Aerobraking: Thermal Analysis and Response Surface Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, John A.; Thornblom, Mark N.

    2011-01-01

    A high-fidelity thermal model of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter was developed for use in an autonomous aerobraking simulation study. Response surface equations were derived from the high-fidelity thermal model and integrated into the autonomous aerobraking simulation software. The high-fidelity thermal model was developed using the Thermal Desktop software and used in all phases of the analysis. The use of Thermal Desktop exclusively, represented a change from previously developed aerobraking thermal analysis methodologies. Comparisons were made between the Thermal Desktop solutions and those developed for the previous aerobraking thermal analyses performed on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter during aerobraking operations. A variable sensitivity screening study was performed to reduce the number of variables carried in the response surface equations. Thermal analysis and response surface equation development were performed for autonomous aerobraking missions at Mars and Venus.

  4. A Novel Multiobjective Optimization Method Based on Sensitivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiane Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For multiobjective optimization problems, different optimization variables have different influences on objectives, which implies that attention should be paid to the variables according to their sensitivity. However, previous optimization studies have not considered the variables sensitivity or conducted sensitivity analysis independent of optimization. In this paper, an integrated algorithm is proposed, which combines the optimization method SPEA (Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm with the sensitivity analysis method SRCC (Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient. In the proposed algorithm, the optimization variables are worked as samples of sensitivity analysis, and the consequent sensitivity result is used to guide the optimization process by changing the evolutionary parameters. Three cases including a mathematical problem, an airship envelope optimization, and a truss topology optimization are used to demonstrate the computational efficiency of the integrated algorithm. The results showed that this algorithm is able to simultaneously achieve parameter sensitivity and a well-distributed Pareto optimal set, without increasing the computational time greatly in comparison with the SPEA method.

  5. Contact Analysis of Nominally Flat Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    specifically surface topography. Starting with the Weierstrass- Mandelbrot Equation (fractal equation), the engineers approximated the power spectrum, and...Komvopoulos, the Weierstrass- Mandelbrot function was used to model the surface topography. A finite element analysis was performed using the commercial... Mandelbrot of Poland. Mandelbrot was the first to point out the feasibility of modeling natural, physical objects with the concept. The property

  6. Sensitivity analysis of simulated SOA loadings using a variance-based statistical approach: SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF SOA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, Manish [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Zhao, Chun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Easter, Richard C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Qian, Yun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Zelenyuk, Alla [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Fast, Jerome D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Liu, Ying [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Zhang, Qi [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California Davis, California USA; Guenther, Alex [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine California USA

    2016-04-08

    We investigate the sensitivity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) loadings simulated by a regional chemical transport model to 7 selected tunable model parameters: 4 involving emissions of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds, anthropogenic semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organics (SIVOCs), and NOx, 2 involving dry deposition of SOA precursor gases, and one involving particle-phase transformation of SOA to low volatility. We adopt a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling approach to effectively sample the high-dimensional parameter space, and perform a 250 member ensemble of simulations using a regional model, accounting for some of the latest advances in SOA treatments based on our recent work. We then conduct a variance-based sensitivity analysis using the generalized linear model method to study the responses of simulated SOA loadings to the tunable parameters. Analysis of SOA variance from all 250 simulations shows that the volatility transformation parameter, which controls whether particle-phase transformation of SOA from semi-volatile SOA to non-volatile is on or off, is the dominant contributor to variance of simulated surface-level daytime SOA (65% domain average contribution). We also split the simulations into 2 subsets of 125 each, depending on whether the volatility transformation is turned on/off. For each subset, the SOA variances are dominated by the parameters involving biogenic VOC and anthropogenic SIVOC emissions. Furthermore, biogenic VOC emissions have a larger contribution to SOA variance when the SOA transformation to non-volatile is on, while anthropogenic SIVOC emissions have a larger contribution when the transformation is off. NOx contributes less than 4.3% to SOA variance, and this low contribution is mainly attributed to dominance of intermediate to high NOx conditions throughout the simulated domain. The two parameters related to dry deposition of SOA precursor gases also have very low contributions to SOA variance

  7. The sensitivity of biological finite element models to the resolution of surface geometry: a case study of crocodilian crania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. McCurry

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of finite element analysis (FEA in biomechanical investigations depends upon understanding the influence of model assumptions. In producing finite element models, surface mesh resolution is influenced by the resolution of input geometry, and influences the resolution of the ensuing solid mesh used for numerical analysis. Despite a large number of studies incorporating sensitivity studies of the effects of solid mesh resolution there has not yet been any investigation into the effect of surface mesh resolution upon results in a comparative context. Here we use a dataset of crocodile crania to examine the effects of surface resolution on FEA results in a comparative context. Seven high-resolution surface meshes were each down-sampled to varying degrees while keeping the resulting number of solid elements constant. These models were then subjected to bite and shake load cases using finite element analysis. The results show that incremental decreases in surface resolution can result in fluctuations in strain magnitudes, but that it is possible to obtain stable results using lower resolution surface in a comparative FEA study. As surface mesh resolution links input geometry with the resulting solid mesh, the implication of these results is that low resolution input geometry and solid meshes may provide valid results in a comparative context.

  8. Wavelet Denoising and Surface Electromyography Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, M.S.; Md. Mamun

    2012-01-01

    In this research, Surface Electromyography (SEMG) signal analysis from the right rectus femoris muscle is performed during walk. Wavelet Transform (WT) has been applied for removing noise from the surface SEMG. Gaussianity tests are conducted to understand changes in muscle contraction and to quantify the effectiveness of the noise removal process. Results show that the proposed method can effectively remove noise from the raw SEMG signals for further analysis.

  9. Sensitivity analysis of small circular cylinders as wake control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Julio; Patino, Gustavo; Gioria, Rafael

    2016-11-01

    We apply a sensitivity analysis to a steady external force regarding control vortex shedding from a circular cylinder using active and passive small control cylinders. We evaluate the changes on the flow produced by the device on the flow near the primary instability, transition to wake. We numerically predict by means of sensitivity analysis the effective regions to place the control devices. The quantitative effect of the hydrodynamic forces produced by the control devices is also obtained by a sensitivity analysis supporting the prediction of minimum rotation rate. These results are extrapolated for higher Reynolds. Also, the analysis provided the positions of combined passive control cylinders that suppress the wake. The latter shows that these particular positions for the devices are adequate to suppress the wake unsteadiness. In both cases the results agree very well with experimental cases of control devices previously published.

  10. A tool model for predicting atmospheric kinetics with sensitivity analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A package( a tool model) for program of predicting atmospheric chemical kinetics with sensitivity analysis is presented. The new direct method of calculating the first order sensitivity coefficients using sparse matrix technology to chemical kinetics is included in the tool model, it is only necessary to triangularize the matrix related to the Jacobian matrix of the model equation. The Gear type procedure is used to integrate amodel equation and its coupled auxiliary sensitivity coefficient equations. The FORTRAN subroutines of the model equation, the sensitivity coefficient equations, and their Jacobian analytical expressions are generated automatically from a chemical mechanism. The kinetic representation for the model equation and its sensitivity coefficient equations, and their Jacobian matrix is presented. Various FORTRAN subroutines in packages, such as SLODE, modified MA28, Gear package, with which the program runs in conjunction are recommended.The photo-oxidation of dimethyl disulfide is used for illustration.

  11. Electron band bending and surface sensitivity: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of polar GaN surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoš, I.; Romanyuk, O.; Paskova, T.; Jiříček, P.

    2017-10-01

    The role of electron band bending and surface sensitivity in determining the core level binding energies by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is investigated. A dominating contribution of surface atomic layers to photoemission intensity is confirmed for normal photoemission. The energy of the photoelectron core level peak does not deviate from core level peak energies of electrons photoemitted from the surface atomic layers of the crystal. The higher surface sensitivity regime, achieved e.g. at off-normal photoelectron detection angle, can be used to study the surface potential barrier in just a few topmost atomic layers. In addition, it is demonstrated that core level binding energy measured by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reflect the electron attenuation anisotropy. In particular, core level binding energy changes with emission angle and correlates with the forward focusing directions in a crystal. This effect is demonstrated by measuring the polar angle dependence of Ga 3d core levels on clean GaN(0001) and GaN(000 1 bar) surfaces with a higher and a lower band bending, respectively. The effect is explained by variation of emission depth in a crystal for normal and off-normal photoelectron emission angles.

  12. Sensitivity Analysis of a Dynamical System Using C++

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Calhoun

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces basic principles of first order sensitivity analysis and presents an algorithm that can be used to compute the sensitivity of a dynamical system to a selected parameter. This analysis is performed by extending with sensitivity equations the set of differential equations describing the dynamical system. These additional equations require the evaluation of partial derivatives, and so a technique known as the table algorithm, which can be used to exactly and automatically compute these derivatives, is described. A C++ class which can be used to implement the table algorithm is presented along with a driver routine for evaluating the output of a model and its sensitivity to a single parameter. The use of this driver routine is illustrated with a specific application from environmental hazards modeling.

  13. Zero-D sensitivity studies with the NCAR CCM land surface parameterization scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; Wilson, M. F.; Dickinson, R. E.

    1986-05-01

    The boundary package of a version of the NCAR Community Climate Model was run as a stand alone zero-dimensional model. Soil data and a soil parameterization scheme were added to the vegetation parameterization. Sensitivity experiments, including conditions representative of a low latitude evergreen forest, a sand desert, a high latitude coniferous forest, high latitude tundra, and prairie grassland were undertaken. The land surface scheme shows the greatest sensitivity to soil texture variation, particularly to changes in hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity.

  14. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Wenchang Hao; Jiuling Liu; Minghua Liu; Yong Liang; Shitang He

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW) sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM) approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM) parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of...

  15. Finite element contact analysis of fractal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, Prasanta; Ghosh, Niloy [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2007-07-21

    The present study considers finite element analysis of non-adhesive, frictionless elastic/elastic-plastic contact between a rigid flat plane and a self-affine fractal rough surface using the commercial finite element package ANSYS. Three-dimensional rough surfaces are generated using a modified two-variable Weierstrass-Mandelbrot function with given fractal parameters. Parametric studies are done to consider the general relations between contact properties and key material and surface parameters. The present analysis is validated with available experimental results in the literature. Non-dimensional contact area and displacement are obtained as functions of non-dimensional load for varying fractal surface parameters in the case of elastic contact and for varying rates of strain hardening in the case of elastic-plastic contact of fractal surfaces.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Uncertainties in Urban Surface Runoff Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Schaarup-Jensen, Kjeld

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper a comparison between three different surface runoff models, in the numerical urban drainage tool MOUSE, is conducted. Analysing parameter uncertainty, it is shown that the models are very sensitive with regards to the choice of hydrological parameters, when combined overflow...... analysis, further research in improved parameter assessment for surface runoff models is needed....... volumes are compared - especially when the models are uncalibrated. The occurrences of flooding and surcharge are highly dependent on both hydrological and hydrodynamic parameters. Thus, the conclusion of the paper is that if the use of model simulations is to be a reliable tool for drainage system...

  17. Analysis of implicit and explicit lattice sensitivities using DRAGON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, M.R., E-mail: ballmr@mcmaster.ca; Novog, D.R., E-mail: novog@mcmaster.ca; Luxat, J.C., E-mail: luxatj@mcmaster.ca

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We developed a way to propagate point-wise perturbations using only WIMS-D4 multigroup data. • The method inherently includes treatment of multi-group implicit sensitivities. • We compared our calculated sensitivities to an industry standard tool (TSUNAMI-1D). • In general, our results agreed well with TSUNAMI-1D. - Abstract: Deterministic lattice physics transport calculations are used extensively within the context of operational and safety analysis of nuclear power plants. As such the sensitivity and uncertainty in the evaluated nuclear data used to predict neutronic interactions and other key transport phenomena are critical topics for research. Sensitivity analysis of nuclear systems with respect to fundamental nuclear data using multi-energy-group discretization is complicated by the dilution dependency of multi-group macroscopic cross-sections as a result of resonance self-shielding. It has become common to group sensitivities into implicit and explicit effects to aid in the understanding of the nature of the sensitivities involved in the calculations, however the overall sensitivity is an integral of these effects. Explicit effects stem from perturbations performed for a specific nuclear data for a given isotope and at a specific energy, and their direct impact on the end figure of merit. Implicit effects stem from resonance self-shielding effects and can change the nature of their own sensitivities at other energies, or that for other reactions or even other isotopes. Quantification of the implicit sensitivity component involves some manner of treatment of resonance parameters in a way that is self-consistent with perturbations occurring in associated multi-group cross-sections. A procedure for assessing these implicit effects is described in the context of the Bondarenko method of self-shielding and implemented using a WIMS-D4 multi-group nuclear library and the lattice solver DRAGON. The resulting sensitivity results were compared

  18. Hyperspectral image-based analysis of weathering sensitivity for safety diagnosis of Seongsan Ilchulbong Peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungho; Kim, Heekang

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a weathering sensitivity analysis method for the safety diagnosis of Seongsan Ilchulbong Peak using hyperspectral images. Remote sensing-based safety diagnosis is important for preventing accidents in famous mountains. A hyperspectral correlation-based method is proposed to evaluate the weathering sensitivity. The three issues are how to reduce the illumination effect, how to remove camera motion while acquiring images on a boat, and how to define the weathering sensitivity index. A novel minimum subtraction and maximum normalization (MSM-norm) method is proposed to solve the shadow and specular illumination problem. Geometrically distorted hyperspectral images are corrected by estimating the borderline of the mountain and sea surface. The final issue is solved by proposing a weathering sensitivity index (WS-Index) based on a spectral angle mapper. Real experiments on the Seongsan Ilchulbong Peak (UNESCO, World Natural Heritage) highlighted the feasibility of the proposed method in safety diagnosis by the weathering sensitivity index.

  19. Forty-Four Pass Fibre Optic Loop for Improving the Sensitivity of Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Chin B

    2007-01-01

    A forty-four pass fibre optic surface plasmon resonance sensor that enhances detection sensitivity according to the number of passes is demonstrated for the first time. The technique employs a fibre optic recirculation loop that passes the detection spot forty- four times, thus enhancing sensitivity by a factor of forty-four. Presently, the total number of passes is limited by the onset of lasing action of the recirculation loop. This technique offers a significant sensitivity improvement for various types of plasmon resonance sensors that may be used in chemical and biomolecule detections.

  20. Investigation into Mass Loading Sensitivity of Sezawa Wave Mode-Based Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ramakrishnan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW device is investigated through finite element method (FEM simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film made of an arbitrary material is coated over the ZnO surface and the resonance frequency shift caused by mass loading of the film is estimated. It was observed that Sezawa wave mode shows significant sensitivity to change in mass loading and has higher sensitivity (eight times higher than Rayleigh wave mode for the same device configuration. Further, the mass loading sensitivity was observed to be greater for a low ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio. Accordingly, highly sensitive SAW sensors can be developed by coating a sensing medium over a layered SAW device and operating at Sezawa mode resonance frequency. The sensitivity can be increased by tuning the ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio.

  1. Investigation into mass loading sensitivity of sezawa wave mode-based surface acoustic wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanan, Ajay Achath; Islam, Md Shabiul; Ali, Sawal Hamid; Parthiban, R; Ramakrishnan, N

    2013-02-06

    In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW) device is investigated through finite element method (FEM) simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film made of an arbitrary material is coated over the ZnO surface and the resonance frequency shift caused by mass loading of the film is estimated. It was observed that Sezawa wave mode shows significant sensitivity to change in mass loading and has higher sensitivity (eight times higher) than Rayleigh wave mode for the same device configuration. Further, the mass loading sensitivity was observed to be greater for a low ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio. Accordingly, highly sensitive SAW sensors can be developed by coating a sensing medium over a layered SAW device and operating at Sezawa mode resonance frequency. The sensitivity can be increased by tuning the ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio.

  2. Sensitivity of land surface modeling to parameters: An uncertainty quantification method applied to the Community Land Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciuto, D. M.; Mei, R.; Mao, J.; Hoffman, F. M.; Kumar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainties in land parameters could have important impacts on simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will consequently affect atmospheric and biogeochemical processes. Therefore, quantification of such parameter uncertainties using a land surface model is the first step towards better understanding of predictive uncertainty in Earth system models. In this study, we applied a random-sampling, high-dimensional model representation (RS-HDMR) method to analyze the sensitivity of simulated photosynthesis, surface energy fluxes and surface hydrological components to selected land parameters in version 4.5 of the Community Land Model (CLM4.5). Because of the large computational expense of conducting ensembles of global gridded model simulations, we used the results of a previous cluster analysis to select one thousand representative land grid cells for simulation. Plant functional type (PFT)-specific uniform prior ranges for land parameters were determined using expert opinion and literature survey, and samples were generated with a quasi-Monte Carlo approach-Sobol sequence. Preliminary analysis of 1024 simulations suggested that four PFT-dependent parameters (including slope of the conductance-photosynthesis relationship, specific leaf area at canopy top, leaf C:N ratio and fraction of leaf N in RuBisco) are the dominant sensitive parameters for photosynthesis, surface energy and water fluxes across most PFTs, but with varying importance rankings. On the other hand, for surface ans sub-surface runoff, PFT-independent parameters, such as the depth-dependent decay factors for runoff, play more important roles than the previous four PFT-dependent parameters. Further analysis by conditioning the results on different seasons and years are being conducted to provide guidance on how climate variability and change might affect such sensitivity. This is the first step toward coupled simulations including biogeochemical processes, atmospheric processes

  3. Noise analysis for sensitivity-based structural damage detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Tao; ZHU Hong-ping; YU Ling

    2007-01-01

    As vibration-based structural damage detection methods are easily affected by environmental noise, a new statistic-based noise analysis method is proposed together with the Monte Carlo technique to investigate the influence of experimental noise of modal data on sensitivity-based damage detection methods. Different from the commonly used random perturbation technique, the proposed technique is deduced directly by Moore-Penrose generalized inverse of the sensitivity matrix, which does not only make the analysis process more efficient but also can analyze the influence of noise on both frequencies and mode shapes for three commonly used sensitivity-based damage detection methods in a similar way. A one-story portal frame is adopted to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed noise analysis technique.

  4. Sensitivity analysis for missing data in regulatory submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permutt, Thomas

    2016-07-30

    The National Research Council Panel on Handling Missing Data in Clinical Trials recommended that sensitivity analyses have to be part of the primary reporting of findings from clinical trials. Their specific recommendations, however, seem not to have been taken up rapidly by sponsors of regulatory submissions. The NRC report's detailed suggestions are along rather different lines than what has been called sensitivity analysis in the regulatory setting up to now. Furthermore, the role of sensitivity analysis in regulatory decision-making, although discussed briefly in the NRC report, remains unclear. This paper will examine previous ideas of sensitivity analysis with a view to explaining how the NRC panel's recommendations are different and possibly better suited to coping with present problems of missing data in the regulatory setting. It will also discuss, in more detail than the NRC report, the relevance of sensitivity analysis to decision-making, both for applicants and for regulators. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of a sound absorption model with correlated inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, W.; Christen, J.-L.; Zine, A.-M.; Ichchou, M.

    2017-04-01

    Sound absorption in porous media is a complex phenomenon, which is usually addressed with homogenized models, depending on macroscopic parameters. Since these parameters emerge from the structure at microscopic scale, they may be correlated. This paper deals with sensitivity analysis methods of a sound absorption model with correlated inputs. Specifically, the Johnson-Champoux-Allard model (JCA) is chosen as the objective model with correlation effects generated by a secondary micro-macro semi-empirical model. To deal with this case, a relatively new sensitivity analysis method Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test with Correlation design (FASTC), based on Iman's transform, is taken into application. This method requires a priori information such as variables' marginal distribution functions and their correlation matrix. The results are compared to the Correlation Ratio Method (CRM) for reference and validation. The distribution of the macroscopic variables arising from the microstructure, as well as their correlation matrix are studied. Finally the results of tests shows that the correlation has a very important impact on the results of sensitivity analysis. Assessment of correlation strength among input variables on the sensitivity analysis is also achieved.

  6. Sensitivity analysis approach to multibody systems described by natural coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiufeng; Wang, Yabin

    2014-03-01

    The classical natural coordinate modeling method which removes the Euler angles and Euler parameters from the governing equations is particularly suitable for the sensitivity analysis and optimization of multibody systems. However, the formulation has so many principles in choosing the generalized coordinates that it hinders the implementation of modeling automation. A first order direct sensitivity analysis approach to multibody systems formulated with novel natural coordinates is presented. Firstly, a new selection method for natural coordinate is developed. The method introduces 12 coordinates to describe the position and orientation of a spatial object. On the basis of the proposed natural coordinates, rigid constraint conditions, the basic constraint elements as well as the initial conditions for the governing equations are derived. Considering the characteristics of the governing equations, the newly proposed generalized-α integration method is used and the corresponding algorithm flowchart is discussed. The objective function, the detailed analysis process of first order direct sensitivity analysis and related solving strategy are provided based on the previous modeling system. Finally, in order to verify the validity and accuracy of the method presented, the sensitivity analysis of a planar spinner-slider mechanism and a spatial crank-slider mechanism are conducted. The test results agree well with that of the finite difference method, and the maximum absolute deviation of the results is less than 3%. The proposed approach is not only convenient for automatic modeling, but also helpful for the reduction of the complexity of sensitivity analysis, which provides a practical and effective way to obtain sensitivity for the optimization problems of multibody systems.

  7. PHOTOGRAMMETRIC TECHNIQUES FOR ROAD SURFACE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Knyaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The quality and condition of a road surface is of great importance for convenience and safety of driving. So the investigations of the behaviour of road materials in laboratory conditions and monitoring of existing roads are widely fulfilled for controlling a geometric parameters and detecting defects in the road surface. Photogrammetry as accurate non-contact measuring method provides powerful means for solving different tasks in road surface reconstruction and analysis. The range of dimensions concerned in road surface analysis can have great variation from tenths of millimetre to hundreds meters and more. So a set of techniques is needed to meet all requirements of road parameters estimation. Two photogrammetric techniques for road surface analysis are presented: for accurate measuring of road pavement and for road surface reconstruction based on imagery obtained from unmanned aerial vehicle. The first technique uses photogrammetric system based on structured light for fast and accurate surface 3D reconstruction and it allows analysing the characteristics of road texture and monitoring the pavement behaviour. The second technique provides dense 3D model road suitable for road macro parameters estimation.

  8. Photogrammetric Techniques for Road Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyaz, V. A.; Chibunichev, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    The quality and condition of a road surface is of great importance for convenience and safety of driving. So the investigations of the behaviour of road materials in laboratory conditions and monitoring of existing roads are widely fulfilled for controlling a geometric parameters and detecting defects in the road surface. Photogrammetry as accurate non-contact measuring method provides powerful means for solving different tasks in road surface reconstruction and analysis. The range of dimensions concerned in road surface analysis can have great variation from tenths of millimetre to hundreds meters and more. So a set of techniques is needed to meet all requirements of road parameters estimation. Two photogrammetric techniques for road surface analysis are presented: for accurate measuring of road pavement and for road surface reconstruction based on imagery obtained from unmanned aerial vehicle. The first technique uses photogrammetric system based on structured light for fast and accurate surface 3D reconstruction and it allows analysing the characteristics of road texture and monitoring the pavement behaviour. The second technique provides dense 3D model road suitable for road macro parameters estimation.

  9. Sensitivity analysis of dynamic biological systems with time-delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wu Hsiung; Wang, Feng Sheng; Chang, Maw Shang

    2010-10-15

    Mathematical modeling has been applied to the study and analysis of complex biological systems for a long time. Some processes in biological systems, such as the gene expression and feedback control in signal transduction networks, involve a time delay. These systems are represented as delay differential equation (DDE) models. Numerical sensitivity analysis of a DDE model by the direct method requires the solutions of model and sensitivity equations with time-delays. The major effort is the computation of Jacobian matrix when computing the solution of sensitivity equations. The computation of partial derivatives of complex equations either by the analytic method or by symbolic manipulation is time consuming, inconvenient, and prone to introduce human errors. To address this problem, an automatic approach to obtain the derivatives of complex functions efficiently and accurately is necessary. We have proposed an efficient algorithm with an adaptive step size control to compute the solution and dynamic sensitivities of biological systems described by ordinal differential equations (ODEs). The adaptive direct-decoupled algorithm is extended to solve the solution and dynamic sensitivities of time-delay systems describing by DDEs. To save the human effort and avoid the human errors in the computation of partial derivatives, an automatic differentiation technique is embedded in the extended algorithm to evaluate the Jacobian matrix. The extended algorithm is implemented and applied to two realistic models with time-delays: the cardiovascular control system and the TNF-α signal transduction network. The results show that the extended algorithm is a good tool for dynamic sensitivity analysis on DDE models with less user intervention. By comparing with direct-coupled methods in theory, the extended algorithm is efficient, accurate, and easy to use for end users without programming background to do dynamic sensitivity analysis on complex biological systems with time-delays.

  10. Carbon dioxide capture processes: Simulation, design and sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Lee, Jay Hyung; Gani, Rafiqul

    2012-01-01

    performance of the process to the L/G ratio to the absorber, CO2 lean solvent loadings, and striper pressure are presented in this paper. Based on the sensitivity analysis process optimization problems have been defined and solved and, a preliminary control structure selection has been made.......Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas and its major source is combustion of fossil fuels for power generation. The objective of this study is to carry out the steady-state sensitivity analysis for chemical absorption of carbon dioxide capture from flue gas using monoethanolamine solvent. First...

  11. Sensitivity analysis of the fission gas behavior model in BISON.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Pastore, Giovanni; Perez, Danielle; Williamson, Richard

    2013-05-01

    This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on sensitivity analysis of a new model for the fission gas behavior (release and swelling) in the BISON fuel performance code of Idaho National Laboratory. Using the new model in BISON, the sensitivity of the calculated fission gas release and swelling to the involved parameters and the associated uncertainties is investigated. The study results in a quantitative assessment of the role of intrinsic uncertainties in the analysis of fission gas behavior in nuclear fuel.

  12. Carbon dioxide capture processes: Simulation, design and sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Lee, Jay Hyung; Gani, Rafiqul

    2012-01-01

    performance of the process to the L/G ratio to the absorber, CO2 lean solvent loadings, and striper pressure are presented in this paper. Based on the sensitivity analysis process optimization problems have been defined and solved and, a preliminary control structure selection has been made.......Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas and its major source is combustion of fossil fuels for power generation. The objective of this study is to carry out the steady-state sensitivity analysis for chemical absorption of carbon dioxide capture from flue gas using monoethanolamine solvent. First...

  13. Applying DEA sensitivity analysis to efficiency measurement of Vietnamese universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Thanh Huyen Nguyen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this study is to measure the technical efficiency of 30 doctorate-granting universities, the universities or the higher education institutes with PhD training programs, in Vietnam, applying the sensitivity analysis of data envelopment analysis (DEA. The study uses eight sets of input-output specifications using the replacement as well as aggregation/disaggregation of variables. The measurement results allow us to examine the sensitivity of the efficiency of these universities with the sets of variables. The findings also show the impact of variables on their efficiency and its “sustainability”.

  14. Correlation between the Sensitivity to TRAIL and the Expression Level of DR5 on the Surface of Tumor Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanfang Ma; Jun Zhang; Yueping Zhao

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the correlation between the sensitivity to the tumor necrosis factor- related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and the level of expression of the death receptor 5 (DR5) on the surface of tumor cells.METHODS Anti-DR5 mAbs were used to directly detect the level of expression of DR5 on the surface of tumor cells. Using a TRAIL apoptosis kit and flow cytometry, the sensitivity of the tumor cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis was determined and the correlation between DR5 expression and sensitivity to TRAIL analyzed.RESULTS The expression level of DR5 on the surface of different tumor cells was as follows: 97.9% in U937 cells, 95.1% in Jurkat cells, 93.8% in SW480 cells, 86.2% in HCT116 cells, 64.2% in HL-60 cells, 46.6% in Hela cells and 13.1% in K562 cells. The TRAIL-induced apoptotic rate was 72.6% in U937 cells, 85.2% in Jurkat cells, 78.6% in SW480 cells, 70.2% in HCT116 cells,60.1% in HL-60 cells, 45.4% in Hela cells and 12.3% in K562 cells. Statistical analysis showed there was a significant positive correlation (r=0.997, P<0.001) between DR5 expression and sensitivity to TRAIL.CONCLUSION The sensitivity of tumor cells to TRAIL is related to the level of expression of DR5 on the surface of tumor cells. These results confirm the importance of DR5 expression for induction of apoptosis by TRAIL.

  15. Friction Sensitivity of Nitramines. Part Ⅳ:Links to Surface Electrostatic Potentials%Friction Sensitivity of Nitramines.Part Ⅳ: Links to Surface Electrostatic Potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zdeněk Frledl; Marcela Jungová; Svatopluk Zeman; Adéla Husarová

    2011-01-01

    The friction sensitivity (FS) of five aliphatic linear and eight cyclic nitramines has been determined and correlated with DFT B3LYP/6-31-G(d,p) // 6-311 + G(d,p) positive ( VS,max ) and negative ( VS,min ) extremes of molecular surface electrostatic potentials VS (r).While there is an ambiguous relationship between the VS.max values and FS values,the decrease of FS is connected ( more or less) with increase in VS,min values.

  16. Surface chemistry regulates the sensitivity and tolerability of osteoblasts to various magnitudes of fluid shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Jinfeng; Xing, Juan; Wang, Yuanliang; Luo, Yanfeng

    2016-12-01

    Scaffolds provide a physical support for osteoblasts and act as the medium to transfer mechanical stimuli to cells. To verify our hypothesis that the surface chemistry of scaffolds regulates the perception of cells to mechanical stimuli, the sensitivity and tolerability of osteoblasts to fluid shear stress (FSS) of various magnitudes (5, 12, 20 dynes/cm(2) ) were investigated on various surface chemistries (-OH, -CH3 , -NH2 ), and their follow-up effects on cell proliferation and differentiation were examined as well. The sensitivity was characterized by the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) while the tolerability was by cellular membrane integrity. The cell proliferation was characterized by S-phase cell fraction and the differentiation by ALP activity and ECM expression (fibronectin and type I collagen). As revealed, osteoblasts demonstrated higher sensitivity and lower tolerability on OH and CH3 surfaces, yet lower sensitivity and higher tolerability on NH2 surfaces. Observations on the focal adhesion formation, F-actin organization and cellular orientation before and after FSS exposure suggest that the potential mechanism lies in the differential control of F-actin organization and focal adhesion formation by surface chemistry, which further divergently mediates the sensitivity and tolerability of ROBs to FSS and the follow-up cell proliferation and differentiation. These findings are essentially valuable for design/selection of desirable surface chemistry to orchestrate with FSS stimuli, inducing appropriate cell responses and promoting bone formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2978-2991, 2016.

  17. SURFACE ENERGY BALANCE OVER ORANGE ORCHARD USING SURFACE RENEWAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Barbagallo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Reliable estimation of surface sensible and latent heat flux is the most important process to appraise energy and mass exchange among atmosphere and biosphere. In this study the surface energy fluxes were measured over an irrigated orange orchard during 2005-2008 monitoring periods using a Surface Renewal- Energy Balance approach. The experimental area is located in a representative orchard growing area of eastern Sicily (Italy. The performance of Surface Renewal (SR analysis for estimating sensible heat flux (H was analysed and evaluated in terms of correlation with H fluxes from the eddy covariance (EC method. Study revealed that the mean available energy (RN- G and latent heat flux (LE were of about 300 W m-2 and 237 W m-2, respectively, during dry periods and unstable-case atmospheric conditions. The estimated crop coefficient Kc values for the orchard crop averaged close to 0.80, which is considerably higher than previous FAO studies that found the value to be 0.65 for citrus with 70% of ground cover. The intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (LI PAR by the crop was measured and relationships between LAI and crop coefficient (Kc were established.

  18. A Global Sensitivity Analysis Methodology for Multi-physics Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, C H; Graziani, F R

    2007-02-02

    Experiments are conducted to draw inferences about an entire ensemble based on a selected number of observations. This applies to both physical experiments as well as computer experiments, the latter of which are performed by running the simulation models at different input configurations and analyzing the output responses. Computer experiments are instrumental in enabling model analyses such as uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis. This report focuses on a global sensitivity analysis methodology that relies on a divide-and-conquer strategy and uses intelligent computer experiments. The objective is to assess qualitatively and/or quantitatively how the variabilities of simulation output responses can be accounted for by input variabilities. We address global sensitivity analysis in three aspects: methodology, sampling/analysis strategies, and an implementation framework. The methodology consists of three major steps: (1) construct credible input ranges; (2) perform a parameter screening study; and (3) perform a quantitative sensitivity analysis on a reduced set of parameters. Once identified, research effort should be directed to the most sensitive parameters to reduce their uncertainty bounds. This process is repeated with tightened uncertainty bounds for the sensitive parameters until the output uncertainties become acceptable. To accommodate the needs of multi-physics application, this methodology should be recursively applied to individual physics modules. The methodology is also distinguished by an efficient technique for computing parameter interactions. Details for each step will be given using simple examples. Numerical results on large scale multi-physics applications will be available in another report. Computational techniques targeted for this methodology have been implemented in a software package called PSUADE.

  19. Sensitivity Analysis of a Bioinspired Refractive Index Based Gas Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Gao; Qi Xia; Guanglan Liao; Tielin Shi

    2011-01-01

    It was found out that the change of refractive index of ambient gas can lead to obvious change of the color of Morpho butterfly's wing. Such phenomenon has been employed as a sensing principle for detecting gas. In the present study, Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis (RCWA) was described briefly, and the partial derivative of optical reflection efficiency with respect to the refractive index of ambient gas, i.e., sensitivity of the sensor, was derived based on RCWA. A bioinspired grating model was constructed by mimicking the nanostructure on the ground scale of Morpho didius butterfly's wing. The analytical sensitivity was verified and the effect of the grating shape on the reflection spectra and its sensitivity were discussed. The results show that by tuning shape parameters of the grating, we can obtain desired reflection spectra and sensitivity, which can be applied to the design of the bioinspired refractive index based gas sensor.

  20. A novel optimal sensitivity design scheme for yarn tension sensor using surface acoustic wave device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bingbing; Lu, Wenke; Zhu, Changchun; Liu, Qinghong; Zhang, Haoxin

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel optimal sensitivity design scheme for the yarn tension sensor using surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. In order to obtain the best sensitivity, the regression model between the size of the SAW yarn tension sensor substrate and the sensitivity of the SAW yarn tension sensor was established using the least square method. The model was validated too. Through analyzing the correspondence between the regression function monotonicity and its partial derivative sign, the effect of the SAW yarn tension sensor substrate size on the sensitivity of the SAW yarn tension sensor was investigated. Based on the regression model, a linear programming model was established to gain the optimal sensitivity of the SAW yarn tension sensor. The linear programming result shows that the maximum sensitivity will be achieved when the SAW yarn tension sensor substrate length is equal to 15 mm and its width is equal to 3mm within a fixed interval of the substrate size. An experiment of SAW yarn tension sensor about 15 mm long and 3mm wide was presented. Experimental results show that the maximum sensitivity 1982.39 Hz/g was accomplished, which confirms that the optimal sensitivity design scheme is useful and effective. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Structural Optimization of Slender Robot Arm Based on Sensitivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Luo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An effective structural optimization method based on a sensitivity analysis is proposed to optimize the variable section of a slender robot arm. The structure mechanism and the operating principle of a polishing robot are introduced firstly, and its stiffness model is established. Then, a design of sensitivity analysis method and a sequential linear programming (SLP strategy are developed. At the beginning of the optimization, the design sensitivity analysis method is applied to select the sensitive design variables which can make the optimized results more efficient and accurate. In addition, it can also be used to determine the scale of moving step which will improve the convergency during the optimization process. The design sensitivities are calculated using the finite difference method. The search for the final optimal structure is performed using the SLP method. Simulation results show that the proposed structure optimization method is effective in enhancing the stiffness of the robot arm regardless of the robot arm suffering either a constant force or variable forces.

  2. Enhanced Sensitivity of Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor Based on Bilayers of Silver-Barium Titanate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fouad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors have been widely adopted with various fields such as physics, chemistry, biology and biochemistry. SPR sensor has many advantages like the less number of sensing samples required, freedom of electromagnetic interference and higher sensitivity. This research investigates the phase interrogation technique of a surface plasmon resonance sensor based on silver and thin film dielectric material of Barium titanate layers. Barium titanate (BaTiO3 layer is adopted due to its excellent dielectric properties such as high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss. The numerical results demonstrate that the fusion of the proposed material BaTiO3 layer into surface plasmon resonance sensor yields a higher sensitivity of 280 degree/RIU in comparison with surface plasmon resonance sensor without BaTiO3 layer which shows only a sensitivity of 120 degree/RIU. As the thickness of this layer increases from 5 nm to 10 nm, the sensitivity is enhanced from 160 degree/RIU to 280 degree/RIU for a fixed metal layer of silver with a thickness of (70 nm.

  3. Enhancing the gas sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance with a nanoporous silica matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrier, A.; Offermans, P.; Cools, R.; Megen, B. van; Knoben, W.; Vecchi, G.; Rivas, J.G.; Crego-Calama, M.; Brongersma, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    The development of sensing schemes for the detection of health-threatening gases is an attractive subject for research towards novel integrated autonomous sensor systems. We report here on a novel way of sensing NO\\2 by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using a gas-sensitive layer composed of

  4. Influence of electromagnetic interferences on the gravimetric sensitivity of surface acoustic waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Francis, L; De Palma, R; Bertrand, P; Campitelli, A

    2003-01-01

    Surface acoustic waveguides are increasing in interest for (bio)chemical detection. The surface mass modification leads to measurable changes in the propagation properties of the waveguide. Among a wide variety of waveguides, Love mode has been investigated because of its high gravimetric sensitivity. The acoustic signal launched and detected in the waveguide by electrical transducers is accompanied by an electromagnetic wave; the interaction of the two signals, easily enhanced by the open structure of the sensor, creates interference patterns in the transfer function of the sensor. The influence of these interferences on the gravimetric sensitivity is presented, whereby the structure of the entire sensor is modelled. We show that electromagnetic interferences generate an error in the experimental value of the sensitivity. This error is different for the open and the closed loop configurations of the sensor. The theoretical approach is completed by the experimentation of an actual Love mode sensor operated un...

  5. Enhancement and control of surface plasmon resonance sensitivity using grating in conical mounting configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perino, M; Pasqualotto, E; Scaramuzza, M; De Toni, A; Paccagnella, A

    2015-01-15

    In this work we propose a method to enhance and control the angular sensitivity of a grating coupled surface plasmon resonance (GCSPR) sensor. We lighted a silver grating, mounted in conical configuration, with a laser source and we measured the transmittance of the grating as a function of the azimuthal angle. To evaluate the sensitivity, grating surface was functionalized with four different alkanethiol self assembled monolayers (SAM) and the correspondent azimuthal transmittance peak shifts were measured. The sensitivity control was performed by simply change the light incident angle. This method offers the possibility to design dynamic GCSPR sensor benches that can be used to amplify the SPR angle shift at any step of a biological detection process.

  6. Calculating the sensitivity of wind turbine loads to wind inputs using response surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinker, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to calculate wind turbine load sensitivities to turbulence parameters through the use of response surfaces. A response surface is a high-dimensional polynomial surface that can be calibrated to any set of input/output data and then used to generate synthetic data...... parameters examined in this paper, the variance caused by the Kaimal length scale and nonstationarity parameter are negligible. Thus, the findings in this paper represent the first systematic evidence that stochastic wind turbine load response statistics can be modeled purely by mean wind wind speed...

  7. Shape sensitivity analysis in numerical modelling of solidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Majchrzak

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The methods of sensitivity analysis constitute a very effective tool on the stage of numerical modelling of casting solidification. It is possible, among others, to rebuilt the basic numerical solution on the solution concerning the others disturbed values of physical and geometrical parameters of the process. In this paper the problem of shape sensitivity analysis is discussed. The non-homogeneous casting-mould domain is considered and the perturbation of the solidification process due to the changes of geometrical dimensions is analyzed. From the mathematical point of view the sensitivity model is rather complex but its solution gives the interesting information concerning the mutual connections between the kinetics of casting solidification and its basic dimensions. In the final part of the paper the example of computations is shown. On the stage of numerical realization the finite difference method has been applied.

  8. Sensitivity analysis in a Lassa fever deterministic mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Mohammed Baba; Doko, Umar Chado; Mamuda, Mamman

    2015-05-01

    Lassa virus that causes the Lassa fever is on the list of potential bio-weapons agents. It was recently imported into Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States as a consequence of the rapid growth of international traffic. A model with five mutually exclusive compartments related to Lassa fever is presented and the basic reproduction number analyzed. A sensitivity analysis of the deterministic model is performed. This is done in order to determine the relative importance of the model parameters to the disease transmission. The result of the sensitivity analysis shows that the most sensitive parameter is the human immigration, followed by human recovery rate, then person to person contact. This suggests that control strategies should target human immigration, effective drugs for treatment and education to reduced person to person contact.

  9. Blurring the Inputs: A Natural Language Approach to Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleb, William L.; Thompson, Richard A.; Johnston, Christopher O.

    2007-01-01

    To document model parameter uncertainties and to automate sensitivity analyses for numerical simulation codes, a natural-language-based method to specify tolerances has been developed. With this new method, uncertainties are expressed in a natural manner, i.e., as one would on an engineering drawing, namely, 5.25 +/- 0.01. This approach is robust and readily adapted to various application domains because it does not rely on parsing the particular structure of input file formats. Instead, tolerances of a standard format are added to existing fields within an input file. As a demonstration of the power of this simple, natural language approach, a Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis is performed for three disparate simulation codes: fluid dynamics (LAURA), radiation (HARA), and ablation (FIAT). Effort required to harness each code for sensitivity analysis was recorded to demonstrate the generality and flexibility of this new approach.

  10. Sensitivity analysis for reliable design verification of nuclear turbosets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zentner, Irmela, E-mail: irmela.zentner@edf.f [Lamsid-Laboratory for Mechanics of Aging Industrial Structures, UMR CNRS/EDF, 1, avenue Du General de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France); EDF R and D-Structural Mechanics and Acoustics Department, 1, avenue Du General de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France); Tarantola, Stefano [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission-Institute for Protection and Security of the Citizen, T.P. 361, 21027 Ispra (Italy); Rocquigny, E. de [Ecole Centrale Paris-Applied Mathematics and Systems Department (MAS), Grande Voie des Vignes, 92 295 Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, we present an application of sensitivity analysis for design verification of nuclear turbosets. Before the acquisition of a turbogenerator, energy power operators perform independent design assessment in order to assure safe operating conditions of the new machine in its environment. Variables of interest are related to the vibration behaviour of the machine: its eigenfrequencies and dynamic sensitivity to unbalance. In the framework of design verification, epistemic uncertainties are preponderant. This lack of knowledge is due to inexistent or imprecise information about the design as well as to interaction of the rotating machinery with supporting and sub-structures. Sensitivity analysis enables the analyst to rank sources of uncertainty with respect to their importance and, possibly, to screen out insignificant sources of uncertainty. Further studies, if necessary, can then focus on predominant parameters. In particular, the constructor can be asked for detailed information only about the most significant parameters.

  11. Sensitivity analysis of the critical speed in railway vehicle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigoni, D.; True, H.; Engsig-Karup, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    We present an approach to global sensitivity analysis aiming at the reduction of its computational cost without compromising the results. The method is based on sampling methods, cubature rules, high-dimensional model representation and total sensitivity indices. It is applied to a half car with a two-axle Cooperrider bogie, in order to study the sensitivity of the critical speed with respect to the suspension parameters. The importance of a certain suspension component is expressed by the variance in critical speed that is ascribable to it. This proves to be useful in the identification of parameters for which the accuracy of their values is critically important. The approach has a general applicability in many engineering fields and does not require the knowledge of the particular solver of the dynamical system. This analysis can be used as part of the virtual homologation procedure and to help engineers during the design phase of complex systems.

  12. Geometry-independent neutral desorption device for the sensitive EESI-MS detection of explosives on various surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Haiwei; Yang, Shuiping; Li, Jianqiang; Hu, Bin; Chen, Huanwen; Zhang, Lili; Fei, Qiang

    2010-04-01

    A novel geometry-independent neutral desorption (GIND) device was successfully developed, which made neutral desorption (ND) sampling easier and more robust on virtually all types of surfaces. The GIND device features a small air-tight enclosure with fixed space between the ND gas emitter, the sample surface, and the sample collector. Besides easy fabrication and convenient use, this configuration facilitates efficient neutral sample transfer and results in high sensitivity by preventing material loss during the ND process. The effects of various operating parameters of the GIND device such as desorption gas composition, surface wetness, gas flow rate, distance between the surface and the gas emitter, internal diameter of the sample outlet, and GIND device material were experimentally investigated. By using the GIND device, trace amounts of typical explosives such as TNT, RDX, HMX, TATP, etc., were successfully sampled from many different kinds of surfaces, including human skin, glove, glass, envelope, plastic, leather, glass, and clothes. GIND-sampled explosives were detected by multiple-stage extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS). Ion/molecule reactions of explosives such as RDX and TATP were implemented in the EESI source for the rapid detection with enhanced sensitivity and specificity. The typical time for a single sample analysis was a few seconds. Successful transportation of the neutral analytes over a distance longer than 10 m was demonstrated, without either significant signal loss or serious delay of signal response. The limit of detection for these explosives in the study was in the range of ca. 59-842 fg (S/N = 3, n = 8) on various surfaces. Acceptable relative standard deviation (RSD) values (ca. 4.6-10.2%, n = 8) were obtained for all the surfaces tested, showing the successful sampling of trace non-volatile explosive compounds (sub-picogram) by the GIND device for the EESI mass spectrometric analysis.

  13. Multiobjective sensitivity analysis and optimization of a distributed hydrologic model MOBIDIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Calibration of distributed hydrologic models usually involves how to deal with the large number of distributed parameters and optimization problems with multiple but often conflicting objectives which arise in a natural fashion. This study presents a multiobjective sensitivity and optimization approach to handle these problems for a distributed hydrologic model MOBIDIC, which combines two sensitivity analysis techniques (Morris method and State Dependent Parameter method with a multiobjective optimization (MOO approach ϵ-NSGAII. This approach was implemented to calibrate MOBIDIC with its application to the Davidson watershed, North Carolina with three objective functions, i.e., standardized root mean square error of logarithmic transformed discharge, water balance index, and mean absolute error of logarithmic transformed flow duration curve, and its results were compared with those with a single objective optimization (SOO with the traditional Nelder–Mead Simplex algorithm used in MOBIDIC by taking the objective function as the Euclidean norm of these three objectives. Results show: (1 the two sensitivity analysis techniques are effective and efficient to determine the sensitive processes and insensitive parameters: surface runoff and evaporation are very sensitive processes to all three objective functions, while groundwater recession and soil hydraulic conductivity are not sensitive and were excluded in the optimization; (2 both MOO and SOO lead to acceptable simulations, e.g., for MOO, average Nash–Sutcliffe is 0.75 in the calibration period and 0.70 in the validation period; (3 evaporation and surface runoff shows similar importance to watershed water balance while the contribution of baseflow can be ignored; (4 compared to SOO which was dependent of initial starting location, MOO provides more insight on parameter sensitivity and conflicting characteristics of these objective functions. Multiobjective sensitivity analysis and

  14. Automated Sensitivity Analysis of Interplanetary Trajectories for Optimal Mission Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, Jeremy; Hughes, Kyle; Englander, Jacob; Sarli, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    This work describes a suite of Python tools known as the Python EMTG Automated Trade Study Application (PEATSA). PEATSA was written to automate the operation of trajectory optimization software, simplify the process of performing sensitivity analysis, and was ultimately found to out-perform a human trajectory designer in unexpected ways. These benefits will be discussed and demonstrated on sample mission designs.

  15. Lower extremity angle measurement with accelerometers - error and sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Antoon Th.M.; Frigo, Carlo; Boom, Herman B.K.

    1991-01-01

    The use of accelerometers for angle assessment of the lower extremities is investigated. This method is evaluated by an error-and-sensitivity analysis using healthy subject data. Of three potential error sources (the reference system, the accelerometers, and the model assumptions) the last is found

  16. Omitted Variable Sensitivity Analysis with the Annotated Love Plot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ben B.; Fredrickson, Mark M.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this research is to make sensitivity analysis accessible not only to empirical researchers but also to the various stakeholders for whom educational evaluations are conducted. To do this it derives anchors for the omitted variable (OV)-program participation association intrinsically, using the Love plot to present a wide range of…

  17. Carbon dioxide capture processes: Simulation, design and sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Lee, Jay Hyung; Gani, Rafiqul

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas and its major source is combustion of fossil fuels for power generation. The objective of this study is to carry out the steady-state sensitivity analysis for chemical absorption of carbon dioxide capture from flue gas using monoethanolamine solvent. First...

  18. Sensitivity analysis on parameters and processes affecting vapor intrusion risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picone, S.; Valstar, J.R.; Gaans, van P.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model was developed and used to identify the key processes controlling vapor intrusion risks by means of a sensitivity analysis. The model simulates the fate of a dissolved volatile organic compound present below the ventilated crawl space of a house. In contrast to the v

  19. Detecting tipping points in ecological models with sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, G.A. ten; Voorn, van G.A.K.; Kooi, B.W.; Molenaar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Simulation models are commonly used to understand and predict the developmentof ecological systems, for instance to study the occurrence of tipping points and their possibleecological effects. Sensitivity analysis is a key tool in the study of model responses to change s in conditions. The applicabi

  20. Detecting Tipping points in Ecological Models with Sensitivity Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, ten G.A.; Voorn, van G.A.K.; Kooi, B.W.; Molenaar, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    Simulation models are commonly used to understand and predict the development of ecological systems, for instance to study the occurrence of tipping points and their possible ecological effects. Sensitivity analysis is a key tool in the study of model responses to changes in conditions. The appli

  1. Methods for global sensitivity analysis in life cycle assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Evelyne A.; Bokkers, Eddy; Heijungs, Reinout; Boer, de Imke J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Input parameters required to quantify environmental impact in life cycle assessment (LCA) can be uncertain due to e.g. temporal variability or unknowns about the true value of emission factors. Uncertainty of environmental impact can be analysed by means of a global sensitivity analysis to

  2. Design tradeoff studies and sensitivity analysis. Appendix B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-05-25

    The results of the design trade-off studies and the sensitivity analysis of Phase I of the Near Term Hybrid Vehicle (NTHV) Program are presented. The effects of variations in the design of the vehicle body, propulsion systems, and other components on vehicle power, weight, cost, and fuel economy and an optimized hybrid vehicle design are discussed. (LCL)

  3. Leveraging zinc interstitials and oxygen vacancies for sensitive biomolecule detection through selective surface functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Chaudhry, Shajee; Prasad, Shalini

    2015-03-01

    In this study, functionally engineered EIS technique was implemented to investigate the influence of surface functionalization on sensitivity of biomolecule detection using nanostructured ZnO platform. Organic molecules with thiol and carboxylic functional groups were chosen to control biomolecule immobilization on zinc and oxygen-terminated 2D planar and 1D nanostructured ZnO surfaces. The amount of functionalization and its influence on charge perturbations at the ZnO-electrolyte interface were studied using fluorescence and EIS measurements. We observed the dependence of charge transfer on both the polarity of platform and concentration of cross-linker molecules. Such selectively modified surfaces were used for detection of cortisol, a major stress indicator. Results demonstrated preferential binding of thiol groups to Zn terminations and thus leveraging ZnO interstitials increases the sensitivity of detection over larger dynamic range with detection limit at 10fg/mL.

  4. Communication: Chemisorption of muonium on gold nanoparticles: A sensitive new probe of surface magnetism and reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehn, M. H.; Arseneau, D. J.; Böni, P.; Bridges, M. D.; Buck, T.; Cortie, D. L.; Fleming, D. G.; Kelly, J. A.; MacFarlane, W. A.; MacLachlan, M. J.; McFadden, R. M. L.; Morris, G. D.; Wang, P.-X.; Xiao, J.; Zamarion, V. M.; Kiefl, R. F.

    2016-11-01

    Chemisorption of muonium onto the surface of gold nanoparticles has been observed. Muonium (μ+e- ), a light hydrogen-like atom, reacts chemically with uncapped 7 nm gold nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous silica (SBA-15) with a strong temperature-dependent rate. The addition rate is fast enough to allow coherent spin transfer into a diamagnetic muon state on the nanoparticle surface. The muon is well established as a sensitive probe of static or slowly fluctuating magnetic fields in bulk matter. These results represent the first muon spin rotation signal on a nanoparticle surface or any metallic surface. Only weak magnetic effects are seen on the surface of these Au nanoparticles consistent with Pauli paramagnetism.

  5. Simulating increased Lamb wave detection sensitivity of surface bonded fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, J.; Hackney, D. A.; Bradford, P. D.; Peters, K. J.

    2017-04-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are excellent transducers for collecting ultrasonic wave signals for structural health monitoring (SHM). Typically, FBG sensors are directly bonded to the surface of a structure to detect signals. Unfortunately, demodulating relevant information from the collected signal demands a high signal-to-noise ratio because the structural ultrasonic waves have low amplitudes. Our previous experimental work demonstrated that the optical fiber could be bonded at a distance away from the FBG location, referred to here as remote bonding. This remote bonding technique increased the output signal amplitude compared to the direct bonding case, however the mechanism causing the increase was not explored. In this work, we simulate the previous experimental work through transient analysis based on the finite element method, and the output FBG response is calculated through the transfer matrix method. The model is first constructed without an adhesive to assume an ideal bonding condition, investigating the difference in excitation signal coherence along the FBG length between the two bonding configurations. A second model is constructed with an adhesive to investigate the effect of the presence of the adhesive around the FBG. The results demonstrate that the amplitude increase is originated not from the excitation signal coherence, but from the shear lag effect which causes immature signal amplitude development in the direct bonding case compared to the remote bonding case. The results also indicate that depending on the adhesive properties the surface-bonded optical fiber manifests varying resonant frequency, therefore resulting in a peak amplitude response when the input excitation frequency is matched. This work provides beneficial reference for selecting adhesive and calibrating sensing system for maximum ultrasonic detection sensitivity using the FBG sensor.

  6. A geostatistics-informed hierarchical sensitivity analysis method for complex groundwater flow and transport modeling: GEOSTATISTICAL SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Heng [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Chen, Xingyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Ye, Ming [Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, Tallahassee Florida USA; Song, Xuehang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Zachara, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2017-05-01

    Sensitivity analysis is an important tool for quantifying uncertainty in the outputs of mathematical models, especially for complex systems with a high dimension of spatially correlated parameters. Variance-based global sensitivity analysis has gained popularity because it can quantify the relative contribution of uncertainty from different sources. However, its computational cost increases dramatically with the complexity of the considered model and the dimension of model parameters. In this study we developed a hierarchical sensitivity analysis method that (1) constructs an uncertainty hierarchy by analyzing the input uncertainty sources, and (2) accounts for the spatial correlation among parameters at each level of the hierarchy using geostatistical tools. The contribution of uncertainty source at each hierarchy level is measured by sensitivity indices calculated using the variance decomposition method. Using this methodology, we identified the most important uncertainty source for a dynamic groundwater flow and solute transport in model at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The results indicate that boundary conditions and permeability field contribute the most uncertainty to the simulated head field and tracer plume, respectively. The relative contribution from each source varied spatially and temporally as driven by the dynamic interaction between groundwater and river water at the site. By using a geostatistical approach to reduce the number of realizations needed for the sensitivity analysis, the computational cost of implementing the developed method was reduced to a practically manageable level. The developed sensitivity analysis method is generally applicable to a wide range of hydrologic and environmental problems that deal with high-dimensional spatially-distributed parameters.

  7. Enhanced Sensitivity of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors Incorporating Metallic Dot Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A new surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz∙deg∙s−1 and good linearity were observed.

  8. Sensitivity-Based Modeling of Evaluating Surface Runoff and Sediment Load using Digital and Analog Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olotu Yahaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of runoff- sediment measurement and evaluation using automated and convectional runoff-meters was carried out at Meteorological and Hydrological Station of Auchi Polytechnic, Auchi using two runoff plots (ABCDa and EFGHm of area 2m 2 each, depth 0.26 m and driven into the soil to the depth of 0.13m. Runoff depths and intensities were measured from each of the positioned runoff plot. Automated runoff-meter has a measuring accuracy of ±0.001l/±0.025 mm and rainfall depth-intensity was measured using tipping-bucket rainguage during the period of 14-month of experimentation. Minimum and maximum rainfall depths of 1.2 and 190.3 mm correspond to measured runoff depths (MRo of 0.0 mm for both measurement approaches and 60.4 mm and 48.9 mm respectively. Automated runoffmeter provides precise, accurate and instantaneous result over the convectional measurement of surface runoff. Runoff measuring accuracy for automated runoff-meter from the plot (ABCDa produces R 2 = 0.99; while R 2 = 0.96 for manual evaluation in plot (EFGHm. WEPP and SWAT models were used to simulate the obtained hydrological variables from the applied measurement mechanisms. The outputs of sensitivity simulation analysis indicate that data from automated measuring systems gives a better modelling index and such could be used for running robust runoff-sediment predictive modelling technique under different reservoir sedimentation and water management scenarios.

  9. Enhanced sensitivity of surface acoustic wave-based rate sensors incorporating metallic dot arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Shao, Xiuting; Liu, Xinlu; Liu, Jiuling; He, Shitang

    2014-02-26

    A new surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu) dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs) and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours) frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz∙deg∙s(-1)) and good linearity were observed.

  10. Integrative "omic" analysis for tamoxifen sensitivity through cell based models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Weng

    Full Text Available It has long been observed that tamoxifen sensitivity varies among breast cancer patients. Further, ethnic differences of tamoxifen therapy between Caucasian and African American have also been reported. Since most studies have been focused on Caucasian people, we sought to comprehensively evaluate genetic variants related to tamoxifen therapy in African-derived samples. An integrative "omic" approach developed by our group was used to investigate relationships among endoxifen (an active metabolite of tamoxifen sensitivity, SNP genotype, mRNA and microRNA expressions in 58 HapMap YRI lymphoblastoid cell lines. We identified 50 SNPs that associate with cellular sensitivity to endoxifen through their effects on 34 genes and 30 microRNA expression. Some of these findings are shared in both Caucasian and African samples, while others are unique in the African samples. Among gene/microRNA that were identified in both ethnic groups, the expression of TRAF1 is also correlated with tamoxifen sensitivity in a collection of 44 breast cancer cell lines. Further, knock-down TRAF1 and over-expression of hsa-let-7i confirmed the roles of hsa-let-7i and TRAF1 in increasing tamoxifen sensitivity in the ZR-75-1 breast cancer cell line. Our integrative omic analysis facilitated the discovery of pharmacogenomic biomarkers that potentially affect tamoxifen sensitivity.

  11. Differentially Private Data Analysis of Social Networks via Restricted Sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Blocki, Jeremiah; Datta, Anupam; Sheffet, Or

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the notion of restricted sensitivity as an alternative to global and smooth sensitivity to improve accuracy in differentially private data analysis. The definition of restricted sensitivity is similar to that of global sensitivity except that instead of quantifying over all possible datasets, we take advantage of any beliefs about the dataset that a querier may have, to quantify over a restricted class of datasets. Specifically, given a query f and a hypothesis H about the structure of a dataset D, we show generically how to transform f into a new query f_H whose global sensitivity (over all datasets including those that do not satisfy H) matches the restricted sensitivity of the query f. Moreover, if the belief of the querier is correct (i.e., D is in H) then f_H(D) = f(D). If the belief is incorrect, then f_H(D) may be inaccurate. We demonstrate the usefulness of this notion by considering the task of answering queries regarding social-networks, which we model as a combination of a graph and a ...

  12. Nonlinear mathematical modeling and sensitivity analysis of hydraulic drive unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Yu, Bin; Quan, Lingxiao; Ba, Kaixian; Wu, Liujie

    2015-09-01

    The previous sensitivity analysis researches are not accurate enough and also have the limited reference value, because those mathematical models are relatively simple and the change of the load and the initial displacement changes of the piston are ignored, even experiment verification is not conducted. Therefore, in view of deficiencies above, a nonlinear mathematical model is established in this paper, including dynamic characteristics of servo valve, nonlinear characteristics of pressure-flow, initial displacement of servo cylinder piston and friction nonlinearity. The transfer function block diagram is built for the hydraulic drive unit closed loop position control, as well as the state equations. Through deriving the time-varying coefficient items matrix and time-varying free items matrix of sensitivity equations respectively, the expression of sensitivity equations based on the nonlinear mathematical model are obtained. According to structure parameters of hydraulic drive unit, working parameters, fluid transmission characteristics and measured friction-velocity curves, the simulation analysis of hydraulic drive unit is completed on the MATLAB/Simulink simulation platform with the displacement step 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm, respectively. The simulation results indicate that the developed nonlinear mathematical model is sufficient by comparing the characteristic curves of experimental step response and simulation step response under different constant load. Then, the sensitivity function time-history curves of seventeen parameters are obtained, basing on each state vector time-history curve of step response characteristic. The maximum value of displacement variation percentage and the sum of displacement variation absolute values in the sampling time are both taken as sensitivity indexes. The sensitivity indexes values above are calculated and shown visually in histograms under different working conditions, and change rules are analyzed. Then the sensitivity

  13. A study of charge transfer kinetics in dye-sensitized surface conductivity solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Dennis

    2011-05-15

    The efficiency of the quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell developed by Junghaenel and Tributsch, the so-called Nano Surface Conductivity Solar Cell (NSCSC), was improved from 2% to 3.5% introducing a compact TiO{sub 2} underlayer, modifying the surface of the mesoporous TiO{sub 2} electrode, optimizing the deposition process of the electrolyte film, and replacing the platinum counter electrode by a carbon layer. Space-resolved photocurrent images revealed the importance of a homogeneous distribution of the electrolyte film. An uneven dispersion led to localized areas of high and low photocurrents, whereas the latter were attributed to an insufficient concentration of the redox couple. Impedance spectroscopy was performed on cells containing different concentrations of the redox couple. By modeling the spectra using an equivalent circuit with a transmission line of resistive and capacitive elements, the characteristic parameters of electron transport in the TiO{sub 2}, such as diffusion length and electron lifetime were obtained. The measurements indicated that the transport of the positive charge to the counter electrode is the main process limiting the efficiency of the cells. Excess charge carrier decay in functioning devices was analyzed by contactless transient photoconductance measurements in the microwave frequency range (TRMC). The lifetime of the photogenerated charge carriers was observed to decrease with increasing applied potential, reaching its maximum close to the opencircuit potential of the cell, where the photocurrent density was minimal, i.e. the potential dependent decay observed was limited by the injection of electrons into the front contact. The functioning of this NSCSC indicated that the transport of the positive charge occurs by solid-state diffusion at the surface of the TiO{sub 2} particles. TRMC measurements on subset devices in the form of sensitized TiO{sub 2} layers revealed charge carrier kinetics strongly dependent on the

  14. Design of Ag nanorods for sensitivity and thermal stability of surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lingwei; Zhang, Zhengjun; Huang, Hanchen

    2017-10-01

    The technology of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has found many applications and may find more if it can possess both sensitivity and thermal stability. This paper reports a rational design of Ag nanorods to simultaneously achieve two competing goals: the sensitivity and the thermal stability of SERS substrates. The Ag nanorods are designed and synthesized using physical vapor deposition under the condition of glancing angle incidence. The working pressure of the vacuum chamber is controlled so the mean free path of depositing atoms is comparable to the dimension of the chamber, so as to grow Ag nanorods with small diameter, and small but clear separation for optimal SERS sensitivity. Such Ag nanorods are further capped with Al2O3 on their top surfaces to reduce the diffusion-induced coarsening at high temperatures, and thereby to improve the thermal stability for SERS detections. Meanwhile, since the side surfaces of Ag nanorods are not coated with oxides in this approach, the SERS sensitivity is largely preserved while good thermal stability is achieved.

  15. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis of the GFR MOX Fuel Subassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüley, J.; Vrban, B.; Čerba, Š.; Haščík, J.; Nečas, V.; Pelloni, S.

    2014-04-01

    We performed sensitivity and uncertainty analysis as well as benchmark similarity assessment of the MOX fuel subassembly designed for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) as a representative material of the core. Material composition was defined for each assembly ring separately allowing us to decompose the sensitivities not only for isotopes and reactions but also for spatial regions. This approach was confirmed by direct perturbation calculations for chosen materials and isotopes. Similarity assessment identified only ten partly comparable benchmark experiments that can be utilized in the field of GFR development. Based on the determined uncertainties, we also identified main contributors to the calculation bias.

  16. Application of Sensitivity Analysis in Design of Sustainable Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Hesselholt, Allan Tind

    2007-01-01

    satisfies the design requirements and objectives. In the design of sustainable Buildings it is beneficial to identify the most important design parameters in order to develop more efficiently alternative design solutions or reach optimized design solutions. A sensitivity analysis makes it possible...... to identify the most important parameters in relation to building performance and to focus design and optimization of sustainable buildings on these fewer, but most important parameters. The sensitivity analyses will typically be performed at a reasonably early stage of the building design process, where...

  17. Rethinking Sensitivity Analysis of Nuclear Simulations with Topology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Paul Rosen; Andrea Alfonsi; Giovanni Pastore; Cristian Rabiti; Valerio Pascucci

    2016-01-01

    In nuclear engineering, understanding the safety margins of the nuclear reactor via simulations is arguably of paramount importance in predicting and preventing nuclear accidents. It is therefore crucial to perform sensitivity analysis to understand how changes in the model inputs affect the outputs. Modern nuclear simulation tools rely on numerical representations of the sensitivity information -- inherently lacking in visual encodings -- offering limited effectiveness in communicating and exploring the generated data. In this paper, we design a framework for sensitivity analysis and visualization of multidimensional nuclear simulation data using partition-based, topology-inspired regression models and report on its efficacy. We rely on the established Morse-Smale regression technique, which allows us to partition the domain into monotonic regions where easily interpretable linear models can be used to assess the influence of inputs on the output variability. The underlying computation is augmented with an intuitive and interactive visual design to effectively communicate sensitivity information to the nuclear scientists. Our framework is being deployed into the multi-purpose probabilistic risk assessment and uncertainty quantification framework RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual Control Environment). We evaluate our framework using an simulation dataset studying nuclear fuel performance.

  18. Sensitivity Analysis of a Simplified Fire Dynamic Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Nielsen, Anker

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses a method for performing a sensitivity analysis of parameters used in a simplified fire model for temperature estimates in the upper smoke layer during a fire. The results from the sensitivity analysis can be used when individual parameters affecting fire safety are assessed...... are the most significant in each case. We apply the Sobol method, which is a quantitative method that gives the percentage of the total output variance that each parameter accounts for. The most important parameter is found to be the energy release rate that explains 92% of the uncertainty in the calculated...... results for the period before thermal penetration (tp) has occurred. The analysis is also done for all combinations of two parameters in order to find the combination with the largest effect. The Sobol total for pairs had the highest value for the combination of energy release rate and area of opening...

  19. Evaluation on mass sensitivity of SAW sensors for different piezoelectric materials using finite-element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Amir; Jiang, Zhongwei; Arabshahi, Sayyed Alireza

    2007-12-01

    The mass sensitivity of the piezoelectric surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors is an important factor in the selection of the best gravimetric sensors for different applications. To determine this value without facing the practical problems and the long theoretical calculation time, we have shown that the mass sensitivity of SAW sensors can be calculated by a simple three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element analysis (FEA) using a commercial finite-element platform. The FEA data are used to calculate the wave propagation speed, surface particle displacements, and wave energy distribution on different cuts of various piezoelectric materials. The results are used to provide a simple method for evaluation of their mass sensitivities. Meanwhile, to calculate more accurate results from FEA data, surface and bulk wave reflection problems are considered in the analyses. In this research, different cuts of lithium niobate, quartz, lithium tantalate, and langasite piezoelectric materials are applied to investigate their acoustic wave properties. Our analyses results for these materials have a good agreement with other researchers' results. Also, the mass sensitivity value for the novel cut of langasite was calculated through these analyses. It was found that its mass sensitivity is higher than that of the conventional Rayleigh mode quartz sensor.

  20. A global sensitivity analysis approach for morphogenesis models

    KAUST Repository

    Boas, Sonja E. M.

    2015-11-21

    Background Morphogenesis is a developmental process in which cells organize into shapes and patterns. Complex, non-linear and multi-factorial models with images as output are commonly used to study morphogenesis. It is difficult to understand the relation between the uncertainty in the input and the output of such ‘black-box’ models, giving rise to the need for sensitivity analysis tools. In this paper, we introduce a workflow for a global sensitivity analysis approach to study the impact of single parameters and the interactions between them on the output of morphogenesis models. Results To demonstrate the workflow, we used a published, well-studied model of vascular morphogenesis. The parameters of this cellular Potts model (CPM) represent cell properties and behaviors that drive the mechanisms of angiogenic sprouting. The global sensitivity analysis correctly identified the dominant parameters in the model, consistent with previous studies. Additionally, the analysis provided information on the relative impact of single parameters and of interactions between them. This is very relevant because interactions of parameters impede the experimental verification of the predicted effect of single parameters. The parameter interactions, although of low impact, provided also new insights in the mechanisms of in silico sprouting. Finally, the analysis indicated that the model could be reduced by one parameter. Conclusions We propose global sensitivity analysis as an alternative approach to study the mechanisms of morphogenesis. Comparison of the ranking of the impact of the model parameters to knowledge derived from experimental data and from manipulation experiments can help to falsify models and to find the operand mechanisms in morphogenesis. The workflow is applicable to all ‘black-box’ models, including high-throughput in vitro models in which output measures are affected by a set of experimental perturbations.

  1. Enhancing dye-sensitized solar cell efficiency by anode surface treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chao-Hsuan [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hsin-Han [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chin-Cheng [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Hong, Franklin C.-N., E-mail: hong@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03

    In this study, titanium substrates treated with HF solution and KOH solution sequentially forming micro- and nano-structures were used for the fabrication of flexible dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). After wet etching treatments, the titanium substrates were then exposed to the O{sub 2} plasma treatment and further immersed in titanium tetrachloride (TiCl{sub 4}) solution. The process conditions for producing a very thin TiO{sub 2} blocking layer were studied, in order to avoid solar cell current leakage for increasing the solar cell efficiency. Subsequently, TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were spin-coated on Ti substrates with varied thickness. The dye-sensitized solar cells on the titanium substrates were subjected to simulate AM 1.5 G irradiation of 100 mW/cm{sup 2} using backside illumination mode. Surface treatments of Ti substrate and TiO{sub 2} anode were found to play a significant role in improving the efficiency of DSSC. The efficiencies of the backside illumination solar cells were raised from 4.6% to 7.8% by integrating these surface treatments. - Highlights: • The flexible dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) device can be fabricated. • Many effective surface treatment methods to improve DSSC efficiency are elucidated. • The efficiency is dramatically enhanced by integrating surface treatment methods. • The back-illuminated DSSC efficiency was raised from 4.6% to 7.8%.

  2. Analysis of Sea Ice Cover Sensitivity in Global Climate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Parhomenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents joint calculations using a 3D atmospheric general circulation model, an ocean model, and a sea ice evolution model. The purpose of the work is to analyze a seasonal and annual evolution of sea ice, long-term variability of a model ice cover, and its sensitivity to some parameters of model as well to define atmosphere-ice-ocean interaction.Results of 100 years simulations of Arctic basin sea ice evolution are analyzed. There are significant (about 0.5 m inter-annual fluctuations of an ice cover.The ice - atmosphere sensible heat flux reduced by 10% leads to the growth of average sea ice thickness within the limits of 0.05 m – 0.1 m. However in separate spatial points the thickness decreases up to 0.5 m. An analysis of the seasonably changing average ice thickness with decreasing, as compared to the basic variant by 0.05 of clear sea ice albedo and that of snow shows the ice thickness reduction in a range from 0.2 m up to 0.6 m, and the change maximum falls for the summer season of intensive melting. The spatial distribution of ice thickness changes shows, that on the large part of the Arctic Ocean there was a reduction of ice thickness down to 1 m. However, there is also an area of some increase of the ice layer basically in a range up to 0.2 m (Beaufort Sea. The 0.05 decrease of sea ice snow albedo leads to reduction of average ice thickness approximately by 0.2 m, and this value slightly depends on a season. In the following experiment the ocean – ice thermal interaction influence on the ice cover is estimated. It is carried out by increase of a heat flux from ocean to the bottom surface of sea ice by 2 W/sq. m in comparison with base variant. The analysis demonstrates, that the average ice thickness reduces in a range from 0.2 m to 0.35 m. There are small seasonal changes of this value.The numerical experiments results have shown, that an ice cover and its seasonal evolution rather strongly depend on varied parameters

  3. Sensitivity of Asian Summer Monsoon precipitation to tropical sea surface temperature anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lei; Shin, Sang-Ik; Liu, Zhengyu; Liu, Qinyu

    2016-10-01

    Sensitivity of Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) precipitation to tropical sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies was estimated from ensemble simulations of two atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) with an array of idealized SST anomaly patch prescriptions. Consistent sensitivity patterns were obtained in both models. Sensitivity of Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) precipitation to cooling in the East Pacific was much weaker than to that of the same magnitude in the local Indian-western Pacific, over which a meridional pattern of warm north and cold south was most instrumental in increasing ISM precipitation. This indicates that the strength of the ENSO-ISM relationship is due to the large-amplitude East Pacific SST anomaly rather than its sensitivity value. Sensitivity of the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM), represented by the Yangtze-Huai River Valley (YHRV, also known as the meiyu-baiu front) precipitation, is non-uniform across the Indian Ocean basin. YHRV precipitation was most sensitive to warm SST anomalies over the northern Indian Ocean and the South China Sea, whereas the southern Indian Ocean had the opposite effect. This implies that the strengthened EASM in the post-Niño year is attributable mainly to warming of the northern Indian Ocean. The corresponding physical links between these SST anomaly patterns and ASM precipitation were also discussed. The relevance of sensitivity maps was justified by the high correlation between sensitivity-map-based reconstructed time series using observed SST anomaly patterns and actual precipitation series derived from ensemble-mean atmospheric GCM runs with time-varying global SST prescriptions during the same period. The correlation results indicated that sensitivity maps derived from patch experiments were far superior to those based on regression methods.

  4. High order sensitivity analysis of complex, coupled systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1990-01-01

    The Sobieszczanski-Sobieski (1988) algorithm is extended to include second- and higher-order derivatives while retaining the obviation of finite-differencing of the system analysis. This is accomplished by means of a recursive application of the same implicit function theorem as in the original algorithm. In optimization, the computational cost of the higher-order derivatives is relative to the aggregate cost of analysis together with a repetition of the first-order sensitivity analysis as often as is required to produce the equivalent information by successive linearizations within move limits.

  5. Investigation into Mass Loading Sensitivity of Sezawa Wave Mode-Based Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    N. Ramakrishnan; Parthiban, R.; Sawal Hamid Md Ali; Md. Shabiul Islam; Ajay Achath Mohanan

    2013-01-01

    In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW) device is investigated through finite element method (FEM) simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film...

  6. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Puiu; Ana-Maria Gurban; Lucian Rotariu; Simona Brajnicov; Cristian Viespe; Camelia Bala

    2015-01-01

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporat...

  7. Improvement of the sensitivity of the surface plasmon resonance sensors based on multi-layer modulation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xihong; Chu-Su, Yu; Tsai, Woo-Hu; Wang, Ching-Ho; Chuang, Tsung-Liang; Lin, Chii-Wann; Tsao, Yu-Chia; Wu, Mu-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a multi-layer modulation technique was used in an SPR optical fiber sensor to enhance the sensitivity of the SPR optical fiber sensor by adjusting the SPR resonant wavelength. The sputtering process deposited 20 nm of TiO2, 11 nm of SiO2 and 30 nm of gold film on the material surface to change the refractive index. Regardless of the different refractive index solutions (1.32 and 1.36), the sensitivities in wavelength interrogation of the SPR optical fiber with the single gold thin film and multi-layers modulation were 1.08×10-5 RIUs and 1.74×10-6 RIUs, respectively. The results showed the significant differences between the different refractive index solutions of 1.32 and 1.36 using the 850 nm light source to analyze the SPR optical fiber sensor in real-time. The sensitivities in intensity interrogation of the SPR optical fiber with the single gold thin film and multi-layers modulation were 1.08×10-3 RIUs and 1.73×10-4 RIUs, respectively, which indicated that the multi-layer modulation techniques could enhance the sensitivity of the SPR optical fiber sensor. The compact size of the multi-layer SPR fiber sensor had a wider detecting range of the refractive index and higher sensitivity, which had the potential for other applications in biological analysis with suitable wavelength.

  8. Repository surface design site layout analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montalvo, H.R.

    1998-02-27

    The purpose of this analysis is to establish the arrangement of the Yucca Mountain Repository surface facilities and features near the North Portal. The analysis updates and expands the North Portal area site layout concept presented in the ACD, including changes to reflect the resizing of the Waste Handling Building (WHB), Waste Treatment Building (WTB), Carrier Preparation Building (CPB), and site parking areas; the addition of the Carrier Washdown Buildings (CWBs); the elimination of the Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF); and the development of a concept for site grading and flood control. The analysis also establishes the layout of the surface features (e.g., roads and utilities) that connect all the repository surface areas (North Portal Operations Area, South Portal Development Operations Area, Emplacement Shaft Surface Operations Area, and Development Shaft Surface Operations Area) and locates an area for a potential lag storage facility. Details of South Portal and shaft layouts will be covered in separate design analyses. The objective of this analysis is to provide a suitable level of design for the Viability Assessment (VA). The analysis was revised to incorporate additional material developed since the issuance of Revision 01. This material includes safeguards and security input, utility system input (size and location of fire water tanks and pump houses, potable water and sanitary sewage rates, size of wastewater evaporation pond, size and location of the utility building, size of the bulk fuel storage tank, and size and location of other exterior process equipment), main electrical substation information, redundancy of water supply and storage for the fire support system, and additional information on the storm water retention pond.

  9. Efficient sensitivity analysis and optimization of a helicopter rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joon W.; Chopra, Inderjit

    1989-01-01

    Aeroelastic optimization of a system essentially consists of the determination of the optimum values of design variables which minimize the objective function and satisfy certain aeroelastic and geometric constraints. The process of aeroelastic optimization analysis is illustrated. To carry out aeroelastic optimization effectively, one needs a reliable analysis procedure to determine steady response and stability of a rotor system in forward flight. The rotor dynamic analysis used in the present study developed inhouse at the University of Maryland is based on finite elements in space and time. The analysis consists of two major phases: vehicle trim and rotor steady response (coupled trim analysis), and aeroelastic stability of the blade. For a reduction of helicopter vibration, the optimization process requires the sensitivity derivatives of the objective function and aeroelastic stability constraints. For this, the derivatives of steady response, hub loads and blade stability roots are calculated using a direct analytical approach. An automated optimization procedure is developed by coupling the rotor dynamic analysis, design sensitivity analysis and constrained optimization code CONMIN.

  10. Phase-sensitive surface plasmon resonance biosensors: methodology, instrumentation and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y.H. [Department of Electronic Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT (China); Center for Environmental Sensing and Modeling, Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (Singapore); Ho, H.P. [Department of Electronic Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT (China); Kong, S.K. [Programme of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT (China); Kabashin, A.V. [Laboratoire Lasers, Plasmas et Procedes Photoniques (LP3, UMR 7341 CNRS), Faculte des Sciences de Luminy, Aix-Marseille University, 163 Avenue de Luminy, C. P. 917, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France)

    2012-11-15

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) has become a central tool for label-free characterization of biomolecular interactions. Based on monitoring of amplitude characteristics, conventional SPR sensors have been extensively explored, commercialized and applied for studies of many important interactions (antigen-antibody, protein-ligand etc), but this technology still lacks of sensitivity for the detection of relatively small and low copy number compounds. Phase-sensitive SPR has recently emerged as an upgrade of this technology to resolve the sensitivity issue. Profiting from a sharp phase jump under SPR and ultra-sensitive tools of its control, this technology offers up to 100-time improvement of the detection limit, giving access to the detection of trace amounts of small molecular weight analytes (drugs etc). This paper intends to provide a tutorial on basic concepts of phase detection in SPR sensing, compare the performance of phase- and amplitude-sensitive sensors, review recent progress in the development and applications of phase-sensitive SPR sensors, and outline future prospects and trends of this technology. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Sensitivity analysis of influencing parameters in cavern stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abolfazl Abdollahipour; Reza Rahmannejad

    2012-01-01

    In order to analyze the stability of the underground rock structures,knowing the sensitivity of geomechanical parameters is important.To investigate the priority of these geomechanical properties in the stability of cavern,a sensitivity analysis has been performed on a single cavern in various rock mass qualities according to RMR using Phase 2.The stability of cavern has been studied by investigating the side wall deformation.Results showed that most sensitive properties are coefficient of lateral stress and modulus of deformation.Also parameters of Hoek-Brown criterion and σc have no sensitivity when cavern is in a perfect elastic state.But in an elasto-plastic state,parameters of Hoek-Brown criterion and σc affect the deformability; such effect becomes more remarkable with increasing plastic area.Other parameters have different sensitivities concerning rock mass quality (RMR).Results have been used to propose the best set of parameters for study on prediction of sidewall displacement.

  12. SURFACE TEXTURE ANALYSIS FOR FUNCTIONALITY CONTROL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Tosello, Guido

    This document is used in connection with three exercises of 3 hours duration as a part of the course VISION ONLINE – One week course on Precision & Nanometrology. The exercises concern surface texture analysis for functionality control, in connection with three different case stories. This docume...... contains a short description of each case story, 3-D roughness parameters analysis and relation with the product’s functionality.......This document is used in connection with three exercises of 3 hours duration as a part of the course VISION ONLINE – One week course on Precision & Nanometrology. The exercises concern surface texture analysis for functionality control, in connection with three different case stories. This document...

  13. A sensitive electrochemiluminescence cytosensor for quantitative evaluation of epidermal growth factor receptor expressed on cell surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yanjuan; Zhang, Shaolian; Wen, Qingqing; Huang, Hongxing; Yang, Peihui, E-mail: typh@jnu.edu.cn

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • EGF-cytosensor was used for evaluating EGFR expression level on cell surfaces. • CdSQDs and EGF were coated on magnetic beads (MBs) for ECL-probe. • Good sensitivity was achieved due to the signal amplification of ECL-probe. - Abstract: A sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) strategy for evaluating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression level on cell surfaces was designed by integrating the specific recognition of EGFR expressed on MCF-7 cell surfaces with an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-funtionalized CdS quantum dots (CdSQDs)-capped magnetic bead (MB) probe. The high sensitivity of ECL probe of EGF-funtionalized CdSQD-capped-MB was used for competitive recognition with EGFR expressed on cell surfaces with recombinant EGFR protein. The changes of ECL intensity depended on both the cell number and the expression level of EGFR receptor on cell surfaces. A wide linear response to cells ranging from 80 to 4 × 10{sup 6} cells mL{sup −1} with a detection limit of 40 cells mL{sup −1} was obtained. The EGF-cytosensor was used to evaluate EGFR expression levels on MCF-7 cells, and the average number of EGFR receptor on single MCF-7 cells was 1.35 × 10{sup 5} with the relative standard deviation of 4.3%. This strategy was further used for in-situ and real-time evaluating EGFR receptor expressed on cell surfaces in response to drugs stimulation at different concentration and incubation time. The proposed method provided potential applications in the detection of receptors on cancer cells and anticancer drugs screening.

  14. An overview of the design and analysis of simulation experiments for sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis may serve validation, optimization, and risk analysis of simulation models. This review surveys 'classic' and 'modern' designs for experiments with simulation models. Classic designs were developed for real, non-simulated systems in agriculture, engineering, etc. These designs

  15. Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on High Surface Area Nanocrystalline Zinc Oxide Spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavuluri Srinivasu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High surface area nanocrystalline zinc oxide material is fabricated using mesoporous nanostructured carbon as a sacrificial template through combustion process. The resulting material is characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption, HR-SEM, and HR-TEM. The nitrogen adsorption measurement indicates that the materials possess BET specific surface area ca. 30 m2/g. Electron microscopy images prove that the zinc oxide spheres possess particle size in the range of 0.12 μm–0.17 μm. The nanocrystalline zinc oxide spheres show 1.0% of energy conversion efficiency for dye-sensitized solar cells.

  16. Sensitivity of the Mediterranean sea level to atmospheric pressure and free surface elevation numerical formulation in NEMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Oddo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of the dynamics of the Mediterranean Sea to atmospheric pressure and free surface elevation formulation using NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean was evaluated. Four different experiments were carried out in the Mediterranean Sea using filtered or explicit free surface numerical schemes and accounting for the effect of atmospheric pressure in addition to wind and buoyancy fluxes. Model results were evaluated by coherency and power spectrum analysis with tide gauge data. We found that atmospheric pressure plays an important role for periods shorter than 100 days. The free surface formulation is important to obtain the correct ocean response for periods shorter than 30 days. At frequencies higher than 15 days−1 the Mediterranean basin's response to atmospheric pressure was not coherent and the performance of the model strongly depended on the specific area considered. A large amplitude seasonal oscillation observed in the experiments using a filtered free surface was not evident in the corresponding explicit free surface formulation case which was due to a phase shift between mass fluxes in the Gibraltar Strait and at the surface. The configuration with time splitting and atmospheric pressure always performed best; the differences were enhanced at very high frequencies.

  17. Sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation of Lassa, vaccinia, and Ebola viruses dried on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagripanti, Jose-Luis; Lytle, C David

    2011-03-01

    Germicidal UV (also known as UVC) provides a means to decontaminate infected environments as well as a measure of viral sensitivity to sunlight. The present study determined UVC inactivation slopes (and derived D(37) values) of viruses dried onto nonporous (glass) surfaces. The data obtained indicate that the UV resistance of Lassa virus is higher than that of Ebola virus. The UV sensitivity of vaccinia virus (a surrogate for variola virus) appeared intermediate between that of the two virulent viruses studied. In addition, the three viruses dried on surfaces showed a relatively small but significant population of virions (from 3 to 10 % of virus in the inoculum) that appeared substantially more protected by their environment from the effect of UV than the majority of virions tested. The findings reported in this study should assist in estimating the threat posed by the persistence of virus in environments contaminated during epidemics or after an accidental or intentional release.

  18. Hafnium dioxide as a dielectric for highly-sensitive waveguide-coupled surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Tiwari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hafnium dioxide has been recognized as an excellent dielectric for microelectronics. However, its usefulness for the surface plasmon based sensors has not yet been tested. Here we investigate its usefulness for waveguide-coupled bi-metallic surface plasmon resonance sensors. Several Ag/HfO2/Au multilayer structure sensors were fabricated and evaluated by optical measurements and computer simulations. The resulting data establish correlations between the growth parameters and sensor performance. The sensor sensitivity to refractive index of analytes is determined to be S n = ∂ θ SPR ∂ n ≥ 4 7 0 . The sensitivity data are supported by simulations, which also predict 314 nm for the evanescent field decay length in air.

  19. 3D Ag/ZnO hybrids for sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chenyue; Xu, Chunxiang; Lu, Junfeng; Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Zhengshan

    2016-03-01

    To combine the surface plasma resonance of metal and local field enhancement in metal/semiconductor interface, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled on a ZnO nanorod array which was grown by hydrothermally on carbon fibers. The construction of dimensional (3D) Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate is used for the sensitive detection of organic pollutants with the advantages such as facile synthesis, short detection time and low cost. The hybrid substrate was manifested a high sensitivity to phenol red at a lower concentration of 1 × 10-9 M and a higher enhancement factor of 3.18 × 109. Moreover, the ZnO nanostructures decorated with Ag NPs were demonstrated self-cleaning function under UV irradiation via photocatalytic degradation of the analytic molecules. The fabrication process of the materials and sensors, optimization of the SERS behaviors for different sized Ag NPs, the mechanism of SERS and recovery were presented with a detailed discussion.

  20. A simple and sensitive quantitation of N,N-dimethyltryptamine by gas chromatography with surface ionization detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, A; Seno, H; Suzuki, O; Hattori, H; Kumazawa, T

    1997-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) by gas chromatography (GC) with surface ionization detection (SID) is presented. Whole blood or urine, containing DMT and gramine (internal standard), was subjected to solid-phase extraction with a Sep-Pak C18 cartridge before analysis by GC-SID. The calibration curve was linear in the DMT range of 1.25-20 ng/mL blood or urine. The detection limit of DMT was about 0.5 ng/mL (10 pg on-column). The recovery of both DMT and gramine spiked in biological fluids was above 86%.

  1. The Methods of Sensitivity Analysis and Their Usage for Analysis of Multicriteria Decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rūta Simanavičienė

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the application's fields of the sensitivity analysis methods. We pass in review the application of these methods in multiple criteria decision making, when the initial data are numbers. We formulate the problem, which of the sensitivity analysis methods is more effective for the usage in the decision making process.Article in Lithuanian

  2. Surface analysis with STM and AFM

    CERN Document Server

    Magonov, Sergi N

    1996-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are powerful tools for surface examination. In the past, many STM and AFM studies led to erroneous conclusions due to lack of proper theoretical considerations and of an understanding of how image patterns are affected by measurement conditions. For this book, two world experts, one on theoretical analysis and the other on experimental characterization, have joined forces to bring together essential components of STM and AFM studies: The practical aspects of STM, the image simulation by surface electron density plot calculat

  3. Surface analysis of nanostructured carbonaceous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wepasnick, Kevin Andrew

    microscopy (STM), auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and XPS. Chemical and structural analysis of the clusters reveal that the oxidation state of the metal is tunable based on preparation conditions and that the oxidation state affects the mobility and structure of the clusters upon the graphite surfaces. Collectively, the results of these studies have shown the value of understanding the surface chemistry of a material in understanding their behavior even at the nanoscopic level.

  4. Design of guided Bloch surface wave resonance bio-sensors with high sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiu-Bao; Wen, Li-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Guo

    2017-01-01

    The sensing performance of bio-sensors based on guided Bloch surface wave (BSW) resonance (GBR) is studied. GBR is realized by coupling the propagating electromagnetic wave with BSW on one side of a one-dimensional photonic crystal slab via the grating on the other side. The sensitivity of the designed bio-sensors is proportional to the grating constant when the wavelength spectrum is analyzed, and inversely proportional to the normal wave vector of the incident electromagnetic wave when the angular spectrum is resolved. For a GBR bio-sensor designed to operate near 70° angle of incidence from air, the angular sensitivity is very high, reaching 128 deg RIU-1. The sensitivity can be substantially increased by designing bio-sensors for operating at larger angles of incidence.

  5. Interactive Building Design Space Exploration Using Regionalized Sensitivity Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Maagaard, Steffen; Østergård, Torben

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations combined with regionalized sensitivity analysis provide the means to explore a vast, multivariate design space in building design. Typically, sensitivity analysis shows how the variability of model output relates to the uncertainties in models inputs. This reveals which...... in combination with the interactive parallel coordinate plot (PCP). The latter is an effective tool to explore stochastic simulations and to find high-performing building designs. The proposed methods help decision makers to focus their attention to the most important design parameters when exploring...... a multivariate design space. As case study, we consider building performance simulations of a 15.000 m² educational centre with respect to energy demand, thermal comfort, and daylight....

  6. An analytic method for sensitivity analysis of complex systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yueying; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is concerned with understanding how the model output depends on uncertainties (variances) in inputs and then identifies which inputs are important in contributing to the prediction imprecision. Uncertainty determination in output is the most crucial step in sensitivity analysis. In the present paper, an analytic expression, which can exactly evaluate the uncertainty in output as a function of the output's derivatives and inputs' central moments, is firstly deduced for general multivariate models with given relationship between output and inputs in terms of Taylor series expansion. A $\\gamma$-order relative uncertainty for output, denoted by $\\mathrm{R^{\\gamma}_v}$, is introduced to quantify the contributions of input uncertainty of different orders. On this basis, it is shown that the widely used approximation considering the first order contribution from the variance of input variable can satisfactorily express the output uncertainty only when the input variance is very small or the inpu...

  7. Sensitivity analysis techniques for models of human behavior.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bier, Asmeret Brooke

    2010-09-01

    Human and social modeling has emerged as an important research area at Sandia National Laboratories due to its potential to improve national defense-related decision-making in the presence of uncertainty. To learn about which sensitivity analysis techniques are most suitable for models of human behavior, different promising methods were applied to an example model, tested, and compared. The example model simulates cognitive, behavioral, and social processes and interactions, and involves substantial nonlinearity, uncertainty, and variability. Results showed that some sensitivity analysis methods create similar results, and can thus be considered redundant. However, other methods, such as global methods that consider interactions between inputs, can generate insight not gained from traditional methods.

  8. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of a homologous series of barbiturates in the rat: a sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestorov, I A; Aarons, L J; Rowland, M

    1997-08-01

    Sensitivity analysis studies the effects of the inherent variability and uncertainty in model parameters on the model outputs and may be a useful tool at all stages of the pharmacokinetic modeling process. The present study examined the sensitivity of a whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the distribution kinetics of nine 5-n-alkyl-5-ethyl barbituric acids in arterial blood and 14 tissues (lung, liver, kidney, stomach, pancreas, spleen, gut, muscle, adipose, skin, bone, heart, brain, testes) after i.v. bolus administration to rats. The aims were to obtain new insights into the model used, to rank the model parameters involved according to their impact on the model outputs and to study the changes in the sensitivity induced by the increase in the lipophilicity of the homologues on ascending the series. Two approaches for sensitivity analysis have been implemented. The first, based on the Matrix Perturbation Theory, uses a sensitivity index defined as the normalized sensitivity of the 2-norm of the model compartmental matrix to perturbations in its entries. The second approach uses the traditional definition of the normalized sensitivity function as the relative change in a model state (a tissue concentration) corresponding to a relative change in a model parameter. Autosensitivity has been defined as sensitivity of a state to any of its parameters; cross-sensitivity as the sensitivity of a state to any other states' parameters. Using the two approaches, the sensitivity of representative tissue concentrations (lung, liver, kidney, stomach, gut, adipose, heart, and brain) to the following model parameters: tissue-to-unbound plasma partition coefficients, tissue blood flows, unbound renal and intrinsic hepatic clearance, permeability surface area product of the brain, have been analyzed. Both the tissues and the parameters were ranked according to their sensitivity and impact. The following general conclusions were drawn: (i) the overall

  9. Sensitivity Analysis of the Scattering-Based SARBM3D Despeckling Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Simone, Alessio

    2016-06-25

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery greatly suffers from multiplicative speckle noise, typical of coherent image acquisition sensors, such as SAR systems. Therefore, a proper and accurate despeckling preprocessing step is almost mandatory to aid the interpretation and processing of SAR data by human users and computer algorithms, respectively. Very recently, a scattering-oriented version of the popular SAR Block-Matching 3D (SARBM3D) despeckling filter, named Scattering-Based (SB)-SARBM3D, was proposed. The new filter is based on the a priori knowledge of the local topography of the scene. In this paper, an experimental sensitivity analysis of the above-mentioned despeckling algorithm is carried out, and the main results are shown and discussed. In particular, the role of both electromagnetic and geometrical parameters of the surface and the impact of its scattering behavior are investigated. Furthermore, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis of the SB-SARBM3D filter against the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution and the SAR image-DEM coregistration step is also provided. The sensitivity analysis shows a significant robustness of the algorithm against most of the surface parameters, while the DEM resolution plays a key role in the despeckling process. Furthermore, the SB-SARBM3D algorithm outperforms the original SARBM3D in the presence of the most realistic scattering behaviors of the surface. An actual scenario is also presented to assess the DEM role in real-life conditions.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of the Scattering-Based SARBM3D Despeckling Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Di Simone

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR imagery greatly suffers from multiplicative speckle noise, typical of coherent image acquisition sensors, such as SAR systems. Therefore, a proper and accurate despeckling preprocessing step is almost mandatory to aid the interpretation and processing of SAR data by human users and computer algorithms, respectively. Very recently, a scattering-oriented version of the popular SAR Block-Matching 3D (SARBM3D despeckling filter, named Scattering-Based (SB-SARBM3D, was proposed. The new filter is based on the a priori knowledge of the local topography of the scene. In this paper, an experimental sensitivity analysis of the above-mentioned despeckling algorithm is carried out, and the main results are shown and discussed. In particular, the role of both electromagnetic and geometrical parameters of the surface and the impact of its scattering behavior are investigated. Furthermore, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis of the SB-SARBM3D filter against the Digital Elevation Model (DEM resolution and the SAR image-DEM coregistration step is also provided. The sensitivity analysis shows a significant robustness of the algorithm against most of the surface parameters, while the DEM resolution plays a key role in the despeckling process. Furthermore, the SB-SARBM3D algorithm outperforms the original SARBM3D in the presence of the most realistic scattering behaviors of the surface. An actual scenario is also presented to assess the DEM role in real-life conditions.

  11. A SENSITIVE AND STABLE CONFOCAL FABRY-PEROT INTERFEROMETER FOR SURFACE ULTRASONIC VIBRATION DETECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING HONG-SHENG; TONG LI-GE; CHEN GENG-HUA

    2001-01-01

    A new confocal Fabry-Pérot interferometer (CFPI) has been constructed. By using both of the conjugate rays,the sensitivity of the system was doubled. Moreover, the negative feedback control loop of a single-chip microcomputer (MCS-51) was applied to stabilize the working point at an optimum position. The system has been used in detecting the piezoelectric ultrasonic vibration on the surface of an aluminium sample.

  12. A Sensitivity Analysis on Component Reliability from Fatigue Life Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    AD-A247 430 MTL TR 92-5 AD A SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS ON COMPONENT RELIABILITY FROM FATIGUE LIFE COMPUTATIONS DONALD M. NEAL, WILLIAM T. MATTHEWS, MARK G...HAGI OR GHANI NUMBI:H(s) Donald M. Neal, William T. Matthews, Mark G. Vangel, and Trevor Rudalevige 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS lU...Technical Information Center, Cameron Station, Building 5, 5010 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22304-6145 2 ATTN: DTIC-FDAC I MIAC/ CINDAS , Purdue

  13. Global analysis of sensitivity of bioretention cell design elements to hydrologic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-wei SUN

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of sensitivity of bioretention cell design elements to their hydrologic performances is meaningful in offering theoretical guidelines for proper design. Hydrologic performance of bioretention cells was facilitated with consideration of four metrics: the overflow ratio, groundwater recharge ratio, ponding time, and runoff coefficients. The storm water management model (SWMM and the bioretention infiltration model RECARGA were applied to generating runoff and outflow time series for calculation of hydrologic performance metrics. Using a parking lot to build a bioretention cell, as an example, the Morris method was used to conduct global sensitivity analysis for two groups of bioretention samples, one without underdrain and the other with underdrain. Results show that the surface area is the most sensitive element to most of the hydrologic metrics, while the gravel depth is the least sensitive element whether bioretention cells are installed with underdrain or not. The saturated infiltration rate of planting soil and the saturated infiltration rate of native soil are the other two most sensitive elements for bioretention cells without underdrain, while the saturated infiltration rate of native soil and underdrain size are the two most sensitive design elements for bioretention cells with underdrain.

  14. Sensitivity- and effort-gain analysis: multilead ECG electrode array selection for activation time imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermüller, Christoph; Seger, Michael; Pfeifer, Bernhard; Fischer, Gerald; Modre, Robert; Tilg, Bernhard

    2006-10-01

    Methods for noninvasive imaging of electric function of the heart might become clinical standard procedure the next years. Thus, the overall procedure has to meet clinical requirements as an easy and fast application. In this paper, we propose a new electrode array which improves the resolution of methods for activation time imaging considering clinical constraints such as easy to apply and compatibility with routine leads. For identifying the body-surface regions where the body surface potential (BSP) is most sensitive to changes in transmembrane potential (TMP), a virtual array method was used to compute local linear dependency (LLD) maps. The virtual array method computes a measure for the LLD in every point on the body surface. The most suitable number and position of the electrodes within the sensitive body surface regions was selected by constructing effort gain (EG) plots. Such a plot depicts the relative attainable rank of the leadfield matrix in relation to the increase in number of electrodes required to build the electrode array. The attainable rank itself was computed by a detector criterion. Such a criterion estimates the maximum number of source space eigenvectors not covered by noise when being mapped to the electrode space by the leadfield matrix and recorded by a detector. From the sensitivity maps, we found that the BSP is most sensitive to changes in TMP on the upper left frontal and dorsal body surface. These sensitive regions are covered best by an electrode array consisting of two L-shaped parts of approximately 30 cm x 30 cm and approximately 20 cm x 20 cm. The EG analysis revealed that the array meeting clinical requirements best and improving the resolution of activation time imaging consists of 125 electrodes with a regular horizontal and vertical spacing of 2-3 cm.

  15. Sensitivity analysis in multiple imputation in effectiveness studies of psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crameri, Aureliano; von Wyl, Agnes; Koemeda, Margit; Schulthess, Peter; Tschuschke, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The importance of preventing and treating incomplete data in effectiveness studies is nowadays emphasized. However, most of the publications focus on randomized clinical trials (RCT). One flexible technique for statistical inference with missing data is multiple imputation (MI). Since methods such as MI rely on the assumption of missing data being at random (MAR), a sensitivity analysis for testing the robustness against departures from this assumption is required. In this paper we present a sensitivity analysis technique based on posterior predictive checking, which takes into consideration the concept of clinical significance used in the evaluation of intra-individual changes. We demonstrate the possibilities this technique can offer with the example of irregular longitudinal data collected with the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (OQ-45) and the Helping Alliance Questionnaire (HAQ) in a sample of 260 outpatients. The sensitivity analysis can be used to (1) quantify the degree of bias introduced by missing not at random data (MNAR) in a worst reasonable case scenario, (2) compare the performance of different analysis methods for dealing with missing data, or (3) detect the influence of possible violations to the model assumptions (e.g., lack of normality). Moreover, our analysis showed that ratings from the patient's and therapist's version of the HAQ could significantly improve the predictive value of the routine outcome monitoring based on the OQ-45. Since analysis dropouts always occur, repeated measurements with the OQ-45 and the HAQ analyzed with MI are useful to improve the accuracy of outcome estimates in quality assurance assessments and non-randomized effectiveness studies in the field of outpatient psychotherapy. PMID:26283989

  16. Surface contamination analysis technology team overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, H. Dewitt

    1995-01-01

    A team was established which consisted of representatives from NASA (Marshall Space Flight Center and Langley Research Center), Thiokol Corporation, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, AC Engineering, SAIC, Martin Marietta, and Aerojet. The team's purpose was to bring together the appropriate personnel to determine what surface inspection techniques were applicable to multiprogram bonding surface cleanliness inspection. In order to identify appropriate techniques and their sensitivity to various contaminant families, calibration standards were developed. Producing standards included development of consistent low level contamination application techniques. Oxidation was also considered for effect on inspection equipment response. Ellipsometry was used for oxidation characterization. Verification testing was then accomplished to show that selected inspection techniques could detect subject contaminants at levels found to be detrimental to critical bond systems of interest. Once feasibility of identified techniques was shown, selected techniques and instrumentation could then be incorporated into a multipurpose inspection head and integrated with a robot for critical surface inspection. Inspection techniques currently being evaluated include optically stimulated electron emission (OSEE); near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy utilizing fiber optics; Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy; and ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence. Current plans are to demonstrate an integrated system in MSFC's Productivity Enhancement Complex within five years from initiation of this effort in 1992 assuming appropriate funding levels are maintained. This paper gives an overview of work accomplished by the team and future plans.

  17. Surface analysis methods in materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Sexton, Brett; Smart, Roger

    1992-01-01

    The idea for this book stemmed from a remark by Philip Jennings of Murdoch University in a discussion session following a regular meeting of the Australian Surface Science group. He observed that a text on surface analysis and applica­ tions to materials suitable for final year undergraduate and postgraduate science students was not currently available. Furthermore, the members of the Australian Surface Science group had the research experience and range of coverage of sur­ face analytical techniques and applications to provide a text for this purpose. A of techniques and applications to be included was agreed at that meeting. The list intended readership of the book has been broadened since the early discussions, particularly to encompass industrial users, but there has been no significant alter­ ation in content. The editors, in consultation with the contributors, have agreed that the book should be prepared for four major groups of readers: - senior undergraduate students in chemistry, physics, metallur...

  18. Cross Validation Through Two-dimensional Solution Surface for Cost-Sensitive SVM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bin; Sheng, Victor; Tay, Keng; Romano, Walter; Li, Shuo

    2016-06-08

    Model selection plays an important role in cost-sensitive SVM (CS-SVM). It has been proven that the global minimum cross validation (CV) error can be efficiently computed based on the solution path for one parameter learning problems. However, it is a challenge to obtain the global minimum CV error for CS-SVM based on one-dimensional solution path and traditional grid search, because CS-SVM is with two regularization parameters. In this paper, we propose a solution and error surfaces based CV approach (CV-SES). More specifically, we first compute a two-dimensional solution surface for CS-SVM based on a bi-parameter space partition algorithm, which can fit solutions of CS-SVM for all values of both regularization parameters. Then, we compute a two-dimensional validation error surface for each CV fold, which can fit validation errors of CS-SVM for all values of both regularization parameters. Finally, we obtain the CV error surface by superposing K validation error surfaces, which can find the global minimum CV error of CS-SVM. Experiments are conducted on seven datasets for cost sensitive learning and on four datasets for imbalanced learning. Experimental results not only show that our proposed CV-SES has a better generalization ability than CS-SVM with various hybrids between grid search and solution path methods, and than recent proposed cost-sensitive hinge loss SVM with three-dimensional grid search, but also show that CV-SES uses less running time.

  19. On the variational data assimilation problem solving and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcucci, Rossella; D'Amore, Luisa; Pistoia, Jenny; Toumi, Ralf; Murli, Almerico

    2017-04-01

    We consider the Variational Data Assimilation (VarDA) problem in an operational framework, namely, as it results when it is employed for the analysis of temperature and salinity variations of data collected in closed and semi closed seas. We present a computing approach to solve the main computational kernel at the heart of the VarDA problem, which outperforms the technique nowadays employed by the oceanographic operative software. The new approach is obtained by means of Tikhonov regularization. We provide the sensitivity analysis of this approach and we also study its performance in terms of the accuracy gain on the computed solution. We provide validations on two realistic oceanographic data sets.

  20. Probability and sensitivity analysis of machine foundation and soil interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Králik J., jr.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the possibility of the sensitivity and probabilistic analysis of the reliability of the machine foundation depending on variability of the soil stiffness, structure geometry and compressor operation. The requirements to design of the foundation under rotating machines increased due to development of calculation method and computer tools. During the structural design process, an engineer has to consider problems of the soil-foundation and foundation-machine interaction from the safety, reliability and durability of structure point of view. The advantages and disadvantages of the deterministic and probabilistic analysis of the machine foundation resistance are discussed. The sensitivity of the machine foundation to the uncertainties of the soil properties due to longtime rotating movement of machine is not negligible for design engineers. On the example of compressor foundation and turbine fy. SIEMENS AG the affectivity of the probabilistic design methodology was presented. The Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS simulation method for the analysis of the compressor foundation reliability was used on program ANSYS. The 200 simulations for five load cases were calculated in the real time on PC. The probabilistic analysis gives us more complex information about the soil-foundation-machine interaction as the deterministic analysis.

  1. Maternal Sensitivity in Parenting Preterm Children: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Ayten; Wolke, Dieter

    2015-07-01

    Preterm birth is a significant stressor for parents and may adversely impact maternal parenting behavior. However, findings have been inconsistent. The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine whether mothers of preterm children behave differently (eg, less responsive or sensitive) in their interactions with their children after they are discharged from the hospital than mothers of term children. Medline, PsychInfo, ERIC, PubMed, and Web of Science were searched from January 1980 through May 2014 with the following keywords: "premature", "preterm", "low birth weight" in conjunction with "maternal behavio*r", "mother-infant interaction", "maternal sensitivity", and "parenting". Both longitudinal and cross-sectional studies that used an observational measure of maternal parenting behavior were eligible. Study results relating to parenting behaviors defined as sensitivity, facilitation, and responsivity were extracted, and mean estimates were combined with random-effects meta-analysis. Thirty-four studies were included in the meta-analysis. Mothers of preterm and full-term children did not differ significantly from each other in terms of their behavior toward their children (Hedges' g = -0.07; 95% confidence interval: -0.22 to 0.08; z = -0.94; P = .35). The heterogeneity between studies was significant and high (Q = 156.42; I(2) = 78.9, P = .001) and not explained by degree of prematurity, publication date, geographical area, infant age, or type of maternal behavior. Mothers of preterm children were not found to be less sensitive or responsive toward their children than mothers of full-term children. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Effect of Surface Microstructure on the Temperature sensitivity of Burning Rate of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kishore

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering Vielle's law and the new thermodynamic model which the authors have developed recently the true dependence of temperature sensitivity of burning rate of ammonium perchlorate (AP on pressure is resolved and experimentally verified for bellet burning. The value of decreases with pressure steeply in regime I' (below 20 atm, but gently in regime I (above 20 atm. The value of powder AP has been determined and it is observed that (powder > (pellet, which clearly suggests that of is innuenced by the surface temperature sensitive parameter and hence by the surface/subsurface microstructure. In powder burning, the buoyant lifting of the particles into the gas phase occurs, Which constitutes the so-called 'free board region' (FER extending just above the true surface. Consequent to the decomposition of AP particles in FER, the condensed phase heat release gets curtailed and (powder becomes larger. A general relationship for in terms of density and surface temperature is suggested, which is applicable to both pellet and powder AP.

  3. PROSA-1: a probabilistic response-surface analysis code. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaurio, J. K.; Mueller, C.

    1978-06-01

    Techniques for probabilistic response-surface analysis have been developed to obtain the probability distributions of the consequences of postulated nuclear-reactor accidents. The uncertainties of the consequences are caused by the variability of the system and model input parameters used in the accident analysis. Probability distributions are assigned to the input parameters, and parameter values are systematically chosen from these distributions. These input parameters are then used in deterministic consequence analyses performed by mechanistic accident-analysis codes. The results of these deterministic consequence analyses are used to generate the coefficients for analytical functions that approximate the consequences in terms of the selected input parameters. These approximating functions are used to generate the probability distributions of the consequences with random sampling being used to obtain values for the accident parameters from their distributions. A computer code PROSA has been developed for implementing the probabilistic response-surface technique. Special features of the code generate or treat sensitivities, statistical moments of the input and output variables, regionwise response surfaces, correlated input parameters, and conditional distributions. The code can also be used for calculating important distributions of the input parameters. The use of the code is illustrated in conjunction with the fast-running accident-analysis code SACO to provide probability studies of LMFBR hypothetical core-disruptive accidents. However, the methods and the programming are general and not limited to such applications.

  4. Sensitivity analysis of fine sediment models using heterogeneous data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, A. M. Yousif; Bhattacharya, B.; El Serafy, G. Y.; van Kessel, T.; Solomatine, D. P.

    2012-04-01

    Sediments play an important role in many aquatic systems. Their transportation and deposition has significant implication on morphology, navigability and water quality. Understanding the dynamics of sediment transportation in time and space is therefore important in drawing interventions and making management decisions. This research is related to the fine sediment dynamics in the Dutch coastal zone, which is subject to human interference through constructions, fishing, navigation, sand mining, etc. These activities do affect the natural flow of sediments and sometimes lead to environmental concerns or affect the siltation rates in harbours and fairways. Numerical models are widely used in studying fine sediment processes. Accuracy of numerical models depends upon the estimation of model parameters through calibration. Studying the model uncertainty related to these parameters is important in improving the spatio-temporal prediction of suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations, and determining the limits of their accuracy. This research deals with the analysis of a 3D numerical model of North Sea covering the Dutch coast using the Delft3D modelling tool (developed at Deltares, The Netherlands). The methodology in this research was divided into three main phases. The first phase focused on analysing the performance of the numerical model in simulating SPM concentrations near the Dutch coast by comparing the model predictions with SPM concentrations estimated from NASA's MODIS sensors at different time scales. The second phase focused on carrying out a sensitivity analysis of model parameters. Four model parameters were identified for the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis: the sedimentation velocity, the critical shear stress above which re-suspension occurs, the shields shear stress for re-suspension pick-up, and the re-suspension pick-up factor. By adopting different values of these parameters the numerical model was run and a comparison between the

  5. Sensitivity Analysis for DHRS Heat Exchanger Performance Tests of PGSFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jonggan; Eoh, Jaehyuk; Kim, Dehee; Lee, Taeho; Jeong, Jiyoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The STELLA-1 facility has been constructed and separate effect tests of heat exchangers for DHRS are going to be conducted. Two kinds of heat exchangers including DHX (shell-and-tube sodium-to-sodium heat exchanger) and AHX (helical-tube sodium-to-air heat exchanger) will be tested for design codes V and V. Main test points are a design point and a plant normal operation point of each heat exchanger. Additionally, some plant transient conditions are taken into account for establishing a test condition set. To choose the plant transient test conditions, a sensitivity analysis has been conducted using the design codes for each heat exchanger. The sensitivity of the PGSFR DHRS heat exchanger tests (the DHX and AHX in the STELLA-1 facility) has been analyzed through a parametric study using the design codes SHXSA and AHXSA at the design point and the plant normal operation point. The DHX heat transfer performance was sensitive to the change in the inlet temperature of the shell-side and the AHX heat transfer performance was sensitive to the change in the inlet temperature of the tube side. The results of this work will contribute to an improvement of the test matrix for the separate effect test of each heat exchanger.

  6. Fabrication of pH sensitive nanovalves using smart surface coated nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Soto, A. M.; Diaz-Maldonado, D. K.; Rios Angarita, F. A.

    2017-01-01

    A pH sensitive nanovalve was fabricated using different smart surfaces covalently attached to an anodized aluminium oxide membrane (AAO). The smart surfaces were synthesized using a mixture of aliphatic and aminated silanes. Effect on the contact angle of the aliphatic silane chain length was evaluated. The smart surface, in conjunction with a nanoporous membrane, allowed the formation of a hydrophobic plug which controlled the transport of the molecule safranine depending on the pH of the solution. It was demonstrated that mixtures of butyl and methyl-trimethoxysilane with aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane were able to perform as effective nanovalves creating a plug that remained closed at pH>7 and opened up at pH<5.

  7. Immobilized fluorescent dyes for sensitive pH measurements on enamel surfaces with fiber optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumphorst, A.; Seeger, Stefan; Duschner, H.

    1996-01-01

    Information on the pH directly on surfaces of dental enamel is an important aspect in research on tooth decay. As an alternative to pH-electrodes our approach to the problem is the optical determination of pH by pH sensitive fluorescent dyes immobilized to tooth surfaces. In this study a model for measuring pH either on aminated cellulose substrates or on enamel (in vitro) with a fluorescein type dye is presented. The experimental realization is a fiber optic sensor with a nitrogen-pumped dye laser system and photodiode for the detection of the emitted fluorescence light. The surface pH values in the range between 4 and 7 were derived from the ratios of the excitation bands at 490 nm and 460 nm.

  8. Sensitivity of surface air temperature change to land use/cover types in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XuChao; ZHANG YiLi; LIU LinShan; ZHANG Wei; DING MingJun; WANG ZhaoFeng

    2009-01-01

    Using CRU high resolution grid observational temperature and ERA40 reanalysie surface air temperature data during 1960--1999, we investigated the sensitivity of surface air temperature change to land use/cover types in China by subtracting the reanalysis from the observed surface air temperature (observation minus reanalysis, OMR). The results show that there is a stable and systemic impact of land use/cover types on surface air temperature. The surface warming of each land use/cover type reacted differently to global warming. The OMR trends of unused land (≥0.17℃/decade), mainly comprised by sandy land, Gobi and bare rock gravel land, are obviously larger than those of the other land use/cover types. The OMR over grassland, farmland and construction land shows a moderate decadal a significant warming trend (0.06"C/decade). The overall assessment indicates that the surface warming is larger for areas that are barren and anthropogenically developed. The better the vegetation cover, the smaller the OMR warming trend. Responses of surface air temperature to land use/cover types with similar physical and chemical properties and biological processes have no significant difference. The surface air temperature would not react significantly until the intensity of land cover changes reach a certain degree. Within the same land use/cover type, areas in eastern China with intensive human activities exhibit larger warming trend. The results provide observational evidence for modeling research on the impact of land use/cover change on regional climate. Thus, projecting further surface climate of China in regional scale should not only take greenhouse gas increase into account, but also consider the impact of land use/cover types and land cover change.

  9. Sensitivity of surface air temperature change to land use/cover types in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Using CRU high resolution grid observational temperature and ERA40 reanalysis surface air temperature data during 1960-1999, we investigated the sensitivity of surface air temperature change to land use/cover types in China by subtracting the reanalysis from the observed surface air temperature (observation minus reanalysis, OMR). The results show that there is a stable and systemic impact of land use/cover types on surface air temperature. The surface warming of each land use/cover type reacted differently to global warming. The OMR trends of unused land (≥0.17℃/decade), mainly comprised by sandy land, Gobi and bare rock gravel land, are obviously larger than those of the other land use/cover types. The OMR over grassland, farmland and construction land shows a moderate decadal warming about 0.12℃ /decade, 0.10℃/decade, 0.12 ℃ /decade, respectively. Woodland areas do not show a significant warming trend (0.06 ℃ /decade). The overall assessment indicates that the surface warming is larger for areas that are barren and anthropogenically developed. The better the vegetation cover, the smaller the OMR warming trend. Responses of surface air temperature to land use/cover types with similar physical and chemical properties and biological processes have no significant difference. The surface air temperature would not react significantly until the intensity of land cover changes reach a certain degree. Within the same land use/cover type, areas in eastern China with intensive human activities exhibit larger warming trend. The results provide observational evidence for modeling research on the impact of land use/cover change on regional climate. Thus, projecting further surface climate of China in regional scale should not only take greenhouse gas increase into account, but also consider the impact of land use/cover types and land cover change.

  10. Surface energy balance sensitivity to meteorological variability on Haig Glacier, Canadian Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Samaneh; Marshall, Shawn J.

    2016-11-01

    Energy exchanges between the atmosphere and the glacier surface control the net energy available for snow and ice melt. This paper explores the response of a midlatitude glacier in the Canadian Rocky Mountains to daily and interannual variations in the meteorological parameters that govern the surface energy balance. We use an energy balance model to run sensitivity tests to perturbations in temperature, specific humidity, wind speed, incoming shortwave radiation, glacier surface albedo, and winter snowpack depth. Variables are perturbed (i) in isolation, (ii) including internal feedbacks, and (iii) with co-evolution of meteorological perturbations, derived from the North American regional climate reanalysis (NARR) over the period 1979-2014. Summer melt at this site has the strongest sensitivity to interannual variations in temperature, albedo, and specific humidity, while fluctuations in cloud cover, wind speed, and winter snowpack depth have less influence. Feedbacks to temperature forcing, in particular summer albedo evolution, double the melt sensitivity to a temperature change. When meteorological perturbations covary through the NARR forcing, summer temperature anomalies remain important in driving interannual summer energy balance and melt variability, but they are reduced in importance relative to an isolated temperature forcing. Covariation of other variables (e.g., clear skies, giving reduced incoming longwave radiation) may be partially compensating for the increase in temperature. The methods introduced in this paper provide a framework that can be extended to compare the sensitivity of glaciers in different climate regimes, e.g., polar, maritime, or tropical environments, and to assess the importance of different meteorological parameters in different regions.

  11. Sensitivity of biogenic volatile organic compounds to land surface parameterizations and vegetation distributions in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chun; Huang, Maoyi; Fast, Jerome D.; Berg, Larry K.; Qian, Yun; Guenther , A.; Gu, Dasa; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Liu, Ying; Walters, Stacy; Pfister, G.; Jin, Jiming; Shilling, John E.; Warneke, Carsten

    2016-05-27

    Current climate models still have large uncertainties 24 in estimating biogenic trace gases, which can significantly affect atmospheric chemistry and secondary aerosol formation that ultimately influences air quality and aerosol radiative forcing. These uncertainties result from many factors, including uncertainties in land-surface processes and specification of vegetation types, both of which can affect the simulated near-surface fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). In this study, the latest version of Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature MEGAN (MEGAN v2.1) is coupled within the land surface parameterization CLM4 in the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem). In this implement, MEGAN v2.1 shares a consistent vegetation map with CLM4 for estimating BVOC emissions. This is unlike MEGAN v2.0 in the public version of WRF-Chem that uses a standalone vegetation map that differs from what is used by land surface parameterizations. This improved modeling framework is used to investigate the impact of two land surface parameterizations, CLM4 and Noah, on BVOCs and examine the sensitivity of BVOCs to vegetation distributions in California. The measurements collected during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) and the California Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Experiment (CalNex) conducted during June of 2010 provide an opportunity to evaluate the simulated BVOCs. Sensitivity experiments show that land surface parameterizations do influence the simulated BVOCs, but that impact is much smaller than that of vegetation distributions. This study indicates that more effort is needed to obtain the most appropriate and accurate land cover datasets for climate and air quality models in terms of simulating BVOCs, oxidant chemistry, and consequently secondary organic aerosol formation.

  12. Analysis of Frequency Characteristics and Sensitivity of Compliant Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shanzeng; DAI Jiansheng; LI Aimin; SUN Zhaopeng; FENG Shizhe; CAO Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Based on a modified pseudo-rigid-body model, the frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the large-deformation compliant mechanism are studied. Firstly, the pseudo-rigid-body model under the static and kinetic conditions is modified to enable the modified pseudo-rigid-body model to be more suitable for the dynamic analysis of the compliant mechanism. Subsequently, based on the modified pseudo-rigid-body model, the dynamic equations of the ordinary compliant four-bar mechanism are established using the analytical mechanics. Finally, in combination with the finite element analysis software ANSYS, the frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the compliant mechanism are analyzed by taking the compliant parallel-guiding mechanism and the compliant bistable mechanism as examples. From the simulation results, the dynamic characteristics of compliant mechanism are relatively sensitive to the structure size, section parameter, and characteristic parameter of material on mechanisms. The results could provide great theoretical significance and application values for the structural optimization of compliant mechanisms, the improvement of their dynamic properties and the expansion of their application range.

  13. An analytic method for sensitivity analysis of complex systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yueying; Wang, Qiuping Alexandre; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu

    2017-03-01

    Sensitivity analysis is concerned with understanding how the model output depends on uncertainties (variances) in inputs and identifying which inputs are important in contributing to the prediction imprecision. Uncertainty determination in output is the most crucial step in sensitivity analysis. In the present paper, an analytic expression, which can exactly evaluate the uncertainty in output as a function of the output's derivatives and inputs' central moments, is firstly deduced for general multivariate models with given relationship between output and inputs in terms of Taylor series expansion. A γ-order relative uncertainty for output, denoted by Rvγ, is introduced to quantify the contributions of input uncertainty of different orders. On this basis, it is shown that the widely used approximation considering the first order contribution from the variance of input variable can satisfactorily express the output uncertainty only when the input variance is very small or the input-output function is almost linear. Two applications of the analytic formula are performed to the power grid and economic systems where the sensitivities of both actual power output and Economic Order Quantity models are analyzed. The importance of each input variable in response to the model output is quantified by the analytic formula.

  14. Analysis of frequency characteristics and sensitivity of compliant mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanzeng; Dai, Jiansheng; Li, Aimin; Sun, Zhaopeng; Feng, Shizhe; Cao, Guohua

    2016-07-01

    Based on a modified pseudo-rigid-body model, the frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the large-deformation compliant mechanism are studied. Firstly, the pseudo-rigid-body model under the static and kinetic conditions is modified to enable the modified pseudo-rigid-body model to be more suitable for the dynamic analysis of the compliant mechanism. Subsequently, based on the modified pseudo-rigid-body model, the dynamic equations of the ordinary compliant four-bar mechanism are established using the analytical mechanics. Finally, in combination with the finite element analysis software ANSYS, the frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the compliant mechanism are analyzed by taking the compliant parallel-guiding mechanism and the compliant bistable mechanism as examples. From the simulation results, the dynamic characteristics of compliant mechanism are relatively sensitive to the structure size, section parameter, and characteristic parameter of material on mechanisms. The results could provide great theoretical significance and application values for the structural optimization of compliant mechanisms, the improvement of their dynamic properties and the expansion of their application range.

  15. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Geoffrey; Hickmann, Kyle S; Mniszewski, Susan M; Del Valle, Sara Y; Hyman, James M

    2014-12-01

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule's regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity's regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimization problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. We use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations.

  16. ZnO sensing film thickness effects on the sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance sensors with angular interrogation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao Ming; Li Ge; Jiang Dongmei; Cheng Wenjuan [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Ma Xueming, E-mail: xmma@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2010-07-25

    The effects of ZnO sensing film thickness on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) curve have been investigated. ZnO sensing films with the thickness of 20 nm, 30 nm, 200 nm, 220 nm and 240 nm have been deposited onto Ag/glass substrates by radio frequency magnetron (RF) sputtering and thermally treated at 300 deg. C in air for 1 h. The surface morphology of the sample was inspected using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The refractive index of the ZnO films was extracted by using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Theoretical analysis of the sensitivity of the SPR sensors with different ZnO sensing film thickness is discussed, and the experimental results are in agreement with the calculated value. Also, the theoretical calculation of the effects of ZnO film thickness on the SPR curves in the presence of different analytes are presented and studied. It is demonstrated that SPR sensors with angular interrogation may attain higher sensitivity and can detect higher surface environment refractive index with proper ZnO sensing film thickness.

  17. Sensitivity of thermal inertia calculations to variations in environmental factors. [in mapping of Earth's surface by remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, A. B.; Alley, R. E.; Schieldge, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The sensitivity of thermal inertia (TI) calculations to errors in the measurement or parameterization of a number of environmental factors is considered here. The factors include effects of radiative transfer in the atmosphere, surface albedo and emissivity, variations in surface turbulent heat flux density, cloud cover, vegetative cover, and topography. The error analysis is based upon data from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) satellite for July 1978 at three separate test sites in the deserts of the western United States. Results show that typical errors in atmospheric radiative transfer, cloud cover, and vegetative cover can individually cause root-mean-square (RMS) errors of about 10 percent (with atmospheric effects sometimes as large as 30-40 percent) in HCMM-derived thermal inertia images of 20,000-200,000 pixels.

  18. Sensitivity of thermal inertia calculations to variations in environmental factors. [in mapping of Earth's surface by remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, A. B.; Alley, R. E.; Schieldge, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The sensitivity of thermal inertia (TI) calculations to errors in the measurement or parameterization of a number of environmental factors is considered here. The factors include effects of radiative transfer in the atmosphere, surface albedo and emissivity, variations in surface turbulent heat flux density, cloud cover, vegetative cover, and topography. The error analysis is based upon data from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) satellite for July 1978 at three separate test sites in the deserts of the western United States. Results show that typical errors in atmospheric radiative transfer, cloud cover, and vegetative cover can individually cause root-mean-square (RMS) errors of about 10 percent (with atmospheric effects sometimes as large as 30-40 percent) in HCMM-derived thermal inertia images of 20,000-200,000 pixels.

  19. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis of Regional Marine Ecosystem Services Value

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Honghua; ZHENG Wei; WANG Zongling; DING Dewen

    2009-01-01

    Marine ecosystem services are the benefits which people obtain from the marine ecosystem, including provisioning ser-vices, regulating services, cultural services and supporting services. The human species, while buffered against environmental changes by culture and technology, is fundamentally dependent on the flow of ecosystem services. Marine ecosystem services be-come increasingly valuable as the terrestrial resources become scarce. The value of marine ecosystem services is the monetary flow of ecosystem services on specific temporal and spatial scales, which often changes due to the variation of the goods prices, yields and the status of marine exploitation. Sensitivity analysis is to study the relationship between the value of marine ecosystem services and the main factors which affect it. Uncertainty analysis based on varying prices, yields and status of marine exploitation was carried out. Through uncertainty analysis, a more credible value range instead of a fixed value of marine ecosystem services was obtained in this study. Moreover, sensitivity analysis of the marine ecosystem services value revealed the relative importance of different factors.

  20. Multi-criteria decision making: an example of sensitivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan S. Pamučar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study provides a model for result consistency evaluation of multicriterial decision making (MDM methods and selection of the optimal one. The model is based on the analysis of results of MDM methods, that is, the analysis of changes in rankings of MDM methods that occur as a result of alterations in input parameters. In the recommended model, we examine sensitivity analysis of MDM methods to changes in criteria weight and result consistency of methods to changes in measurement scale and the way in which we formulate criteria. In the final phase of the model, we select the most suitable method to solve the observed problem and the optimal alternative. The model is tested on an example, when the optimal MDM method selection was required in order to determine the location of the logistical center. During the selection process, TOPSIS, COPRAS, VIKOR and ELECTRE methods were considered. VIKOR method demonstrated the biggest stability of rankings and was selected as the most fit method for ranking the locations of the logistical center. Results of the demonstrated analysis indicate sensitivity of standard MDM methods to criteria considered in this work. Therefore, it is necessary, to take into account stability of the considered method during the selection process of the optimal method.

  1. Surface analysis of stone and bone tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemp, W. James; Watson, Adam S.; Evans, Adrian A.

    2016-03-01

    Microwear (use-wear) analysis is a powerful method for identifying tool use that archaeologists and anthropologists employ to determine the activities undertaken by both humans and their hominin ancestors. Knowledge of tool use allows for more accurate and detailed reconstructions of past behavior, particularly in relation to subsistence practices, economic activities, conflict and ritual. It can also be used to document changes in these activities over time, in different locations, and by different members of society, in terms of gender and status, for example. Both stone and bone tools have been analyzed using a variety of techniques that focus on the observation, documentation and interpretation of wear traces. Traditionally, microwear analysis relied on the qualitative assessment of wear features using microscopes and often included comparisons between replicated tools used experimentally and the recovered artifacts, as well as functional analogies dependent upon modern implements and those used by indigenous peoples from various places around the world. Determination of tool use has also relied on the recovery and analysis of both organic and inorganic residues of past worked materials that survived in and on artifact surfaces. To determine tool use and better understand the mechanics of wear formation, particularly on stone and bone, archaeologists and anthropologists have increasingly turned to surface metrology and tribology to assist them in their research. This paper provides a history of the development of traditional microwear analysis in archaeology and anthropology and also explores the introduction and adoption of more modern methods and technologies for documenting and identifying wear on stone and bone tools, specifically those developed for the engineering sciences to study surface structures on micro- and nanoscales. The current state of microwear analysis is discussed as are the future directions in the study of microwear on stone and bone tools.

  2. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Mett, Richard R. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Department of Physics and Chemistry, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202 (United States); Swarts, Steven G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32610 (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Department of Radiology, Geisel Medical School at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  3. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.; Hyde, James S.

    2014-10-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg2+ doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  4. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidabras, Jason W; Varanasi, Shiv K; Mett, Richard R; Swarts, Steven G; Swartz, Harold M; Hyde, James S

    2014-10-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg(2+) doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  5. Sensitivity Analysis Applied in Design of Low Energy Office Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Building performance can be expressed by different indicators as primary energy use, environmental load and/or the indoor environmental quality and a building performance simulation can provide the decision maker with a quantitative measure of the extent to which an integrated design solution...... satisfies the design requirements and objectives. In the design of sustainable Buildings it is beneficial to identify the most important design parameters in order to develop more efficiently alternative design solutions or reach optimized design solutions. A sensitivity analysis makes it possible...... to identify the most important parameters in relation to building performance and to focus design and optimization of sustainable buildings on these fewer, but most important parameters. The sensitivity analyses will typically be performed at a reasonably early stage of the building design process, where...

  6. Sensitivity analysis of GSI based mechanical characterization of rock mass

    CERN Document Server

    Ván, P

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the rock mechanical and rock engineering designs and calculations are frequently based on Geological Strength Index (GSI) method, because it is the only system that provides a complete set of mechanical properties for design purpose. Both the failure criteria and the deformation moduli of the rock mass can be calculated with GSI based equations, which consists of the disturbance factor, as well. The aim of this paper is the sensitivity analysis of GSI and disturbance factor dependent equations that characterize the mechanical properties of rock masses. The survey of the GSI system is not our purpose. The results show that the rock mass strength calculated by the Hoek-Brown failure criteria and both the Hoek-Diederichs and modified Hoek-Diederichs deformation moduli are highly sensitive to changes of both the GSI and the D factor, hence their exact determination is important for the rock engineering design.

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of Hardwired Parameters in GALE Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geelhood, Kenneth J.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Droppo, James G.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide a data-gathering plan for updating the hardwired data tables and parameters of the Gaseous and Liquid Effluents (GALE) codes to reflect current nuclear reactor performance. This would enable the GALE codes to make more accurate predictions about the normal radioactive release source term applicable to currently operating reactors and to the cohort of reactors planned for construction in the next few years. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to define the importance of hardwired parameters in terms of each parameter’s effect on the emission rate of the nuclides that are most important in computing potential exposures. The results of this study were used to compile a list of parameters that should be updated based on the sensitivity of these parameters to outputs of interest.

  8. Stability and Sensitivity Analysis of Fuzzy Control Systems. Mechatronics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu-Emil Precup

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of fuzzy control systems is usually performed by heuristicmeans, incorporating human skills, the drawback being in the lack of general-purposedevelopment methods. A major problem, which follows from this development, is theanalysis of the structural properties of the control system, such as stability, controllabilityand robustness. Here comes the first goal of the paper, to present a stability analysismethod dedicated to fuzzy control systems with mechatronics applications based on the useof Popov’s hyperstability theory. The second goal of this paper is to perform the sensitivityanalysis of fuzzy control systems with respect to the parametric variations of the controlledplant for a class of servo-systems used in mechatronics applications based on theconstruction of sensitivity models. The stability and sensitivity analysis methods provideuseful information to the development of fuzzy control systems. The case studies concerningfuzzy controlled servo-systems, accompanied by digital simulation results and real-timeexperimental results, validate the presented methods.

  9. Parametric Variations Sensitivity Analysis on IM Discrete Speed Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed BEN MESSAOUD

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: This paper will discuss sensitivity issues in rotor speed estimation for induction machine (IM drives using only voltage and current measurements. A supervised estimation algorithm is proposed with the aim to achieve good performances in the large variations of the speed. After a brief presentation on discrete feedback structure of the estimator formulated from d-q axis equations, we will expose its performances for machine parameters variations.Method: Hyperstability concept was applied to the synthesis adaptation low. A heuristic term is added to the algorithm to maintain good speed estimation factor in high speeds.Results: In simulation, the estimation error is maintained relatively low in wide range of speeds, and the robustness of the estimation algorithm is shown for machine parametric variations.Conclusions: Sensitivity analysis to motor parameter changes of proposed sensorless IM is then performed.

  10. 3D Ag/ZnO hybrids for sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chenyue, E-mail: 493958623@qq.com; Xu, Chunxiang, E-mail: xcxseu@seu.edu.cn; Lu, Junfeng, E-mail: ljf870813@126.com; Li, Zhaohui, E-mail: zhhuilee@sohu.com; Tian, Zhengshan, E-mail: tianzhengshan@163.com

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ag/ZnO hybrids are fabricated and optimized as SERS substrates. • The enhancement contribution of each component in the substrates is discussed. • The substrates have high reproducibility and sensitivity. • The substrates show good photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: To combine the surface plasma resonance of metal and local field enhancement in metal/semiconductor interface, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled on a ZnO nanorod array which was grown by hydrothermally on carbon fibers. The construction of dimensional (3D) Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate is used for the sensitive detection of organic pollutants with the advantages such as facile synthesis, short detection time and low cost. The hybrid substrate was manifested a high sensitivity to phenol red at a lower concentration of 1 × 10{sup –9} M and a higher enhancement factor of 3.18 × 10{sup 9}. Moreover, the ZnO nanostructures decorated with Ag NPs were demonstrated self-cleaning function under UV irradiation via photocatalytic degradation of the analytic molecules. The fabrication process of the materials and sensors, optimization of the SERS behaviors for different sized Ag NPs, the mechanism of SERS and recovery were presented with a detailed discussion.

  11. The BetaCage, an ultra-sensitive screener for surface contamination

    CERN Document Server

    Bunker, R; Bowles, M A; Golwala, S R; Grant, D R; Kos, M; Nelson, R H; Schnee, R W; Rider, A; Wang, B; Zahn, A

    2014-01-01

    Material screening for identifying low-energy electron emitters and alpha-decaying isotopes is now a prerequisite for rare-event searches (e.g., dark-matter direct detection and neutrinoless double-beta decay) for which surface radiocontamination has become an increasingly important background. The BetaCage, a gaseous neon time-projection chamber, is a proposed ultra-sensitive (and nondestructive) screener for alpha- and beta-emitting surface contaminants to which existing screening facilities are insufficiently sensitive. Sensitivity goals are 0.1 betas per keV-m$^2$-day and 0.1 alphas per m$^2$-day, with the former limited by Compton scattering of photons in the screening samples and (thanks to tracking) the latter expected to be signal-limited; radioassays and simulations indicate backgrounds from detector materials and radon daughters should be subdominant. We report on details of the background simulations and detector design that provide the discrimination, shielding, and radiopurity necessary to reach ...

  12. Biosphere dose conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Wasiolek

    2004-10-15

    This report presents importance and sensitivity analysis for the environmental radiation model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN). ERMYN is a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis concerns the output of the model, biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater, and the volcanic ash exposure scenarios. It identifies important processes and parameters that influence the BDCF values and distributions, enhances understanding of the relative importance of the physical and environmental processes on the outcome of the biosphere model, includes a detailed pathway analysis for key radionuclides, and evaluates the appropriateness of selected parameter values that are not site-specific or have large uncertainty.

  13. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Puiu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT applications.

  14. Enhanced sensitive love wave surface acoustic wave sensor designed for immunoassay formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiu, Mihaela; Gurban, Ana-Maria; Rotariu, Lucian; Brajnicov, Simona; Viespe, Cristian; Bala, Camelia

    2015-05-05

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT) applications.

  15. A practical approach to the sensitivity analysis for kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Max J.; Engelmann, Felix; Matera, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have become a vital tool for predictive quality atomistic understanding of complex surface chemical reaction kinetics over a wide range of reaction conditions. In order to expand their practical value in terms of giving guidelines for the atomic level design of catalytic systems, it is very desirable to readily evaluate a sensitivity analysis for a given model. The result of such a sensitivity analysis quantitatively expresses the dependency of the turnover frequency, being the main output variable, on the rate constants entering the model. In the past, the application of sensitivity analysis, such as degree of rate control, has been hampered by its exuberant computational effort required to accurately sample numerical derivatives of a property that is obtained from a stochastic simulation method. In this study, we present an efficient and robust three-stage approach that is capable of reliably evaluating the sensitivity measures for stiff microkinetic models as we demonstrate using the CO oxidation on RuO2(110) as a prototypical reaction. In the first step, we utilize the Fisher information matrix for filtering out elementary processes which only yield negligible sensitivity. Then we employ an estimator based on the linear response theory for calculating the sensitivity measure for non-critical conditions which covers the majority of cases. Finally, we adapt a method for sampling coupled finite differences for evaluating the sensitivity measure for lattice based models. This allows for an efficient evaluation even in critical regions near a second order phase transition that are hitherto difficult to control. The combined approach leads to significant computational savings over straightforward numerical derivatives and should aid in accelerating the nano-scale design of heterogeneous catalysts.

  16. Multi-objective global sensitivity analysis of the WRF model parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Jiping; Di, Zhenhua; Duan, Qingyun; Gong, Wei; Wang, Chen

    2015-04-01

    Tuning model parameters to match model simulations with observations can be an effective way to enhance the performance of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models such as Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. However, this is a very complicated process as a typical NWP model involves many model parameters and many output variables. One must take a multi-objective approach to ensure all of the major simulated model outputs are satisfactory. This talk presents the results of an investigation of multi-objective parameter sensitivity analysis of the WRF model to different model outputs, including conventional surface meteorological variables such as precipitation, surface temperature, humidity and wind speed, as well as atmospheric variables such as total precipitable water, cloud cover, boundary layer height and outgoing long radiation at the top of the atmosphere. The goal of this study is to identify the most important parameters that affect the predictive skill of short-range meteorological forecasts by the WRF model. The study was performed over the Greater Beijing Region of China. A total of 23 adjustable parameters from seven different physical parameterization schemes were considered. Using a multi-objective global sensitivity analysis method, we examined the WRF model parameter sensitivities to the 5-day simulations of the aforementioned model outputs. The results show that parameter sensitivities vary with different model outputs. But three to four of the parameters are shown to be sensitive to all model outputs considered. The sensitivity results from this research can be the basis for future model parameter optimization of the WRF model.

  17. Highly sensitive graphene biosensor by monomolecular self-assembly of receptors on graphene surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Eun; No, Young Hyun; Kim, Joo Nam; Shin, Yong Seon; Kang, Won Tae; Kim, Young Rae; Kim, Kun Nyun; Kim, Yong Ho; Yu, Woo Jong

    2017-05-01

    Graphene has attracted a great deal of interest for applications in bio-sensing devices because of its ultra-thin structure, which enables strong electrostatic coupling with target molecules, and its excellent electrical mobility promising for ultra-fast sensing speeds. However, thickly stacked receptors on the graphene's surface interrupts electrostatic coupling between graphene and charged biomolecules, which can reduce the sensitivity of graphene biosensors. Here, we report a highly sensitive graphene biosensor by the monomolecular self-assembly of designed peptide protein receptors. The graphene channel was non-covalently functionalized using peptide protein receptors via the π-π interaction along the graphene's Bravais lattice, allowing ultra-thin monomolecular self-assembly through the graphene lattice. In thickness dependent characterization, a graphene sensor with a monomolecular receptor (thickness less than 3 nm) showed five times higher sensitivity and three times higher voltage shifts than graphene sensors with thick receptor stacks (thicknesses greater than 20 nm), which is attributed to excellent gate coupling between graphene and streptavidin via an ultrathin receptor insulator. In addition to having a fast-inherent response time (less than 0.6 s) based on fast binding speed between biotin and streptavidin, our graphene biosensor is a promising platform for highly sensitive real-time monitoring of biomolecules with high spatiotemporal resolution.

  18. Highly sensitive surface plasmon resonance sensor utilizing a long period grating with photosensitive cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhihong; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Zhaogang; Zhou, Yanming; Li, Dan; Xie, Zhong

    2016-02-20

    In this study, we propose and investigate a novel grating-assisted surface plasmon resonance (SPR) platform based on a silver coated long period fiber grating having a photosensitive cladding (C-LPFG). We show that the SPR mode is transited from the higher EH mode with an effective refractive index (ERI) close to that of the surrounding refractive index (SRI) and is highly sensitive to a change in the SRI. Compared with a conventional SPR sensor, a much higher sensitivity is obtained for the novel C-LPFG-based SPR sensor. The sensitivity can be further improved by reducing the fiber diameter. The numerical results show that the highest local sensitivity, which can be as high as ∼4900  nm/RIU, and the corresponding resolution of ∼2.04×10(-6)  RIU are achieved for the reduced silver coated C-LPFG sensor. Moreover, the Q-factor and the figure of merit exhibit better characteristics than those of the conventional LPFG-based SPR sensor. Our findings provide insight into the C-LPFG-based SPR platform being a potentially important area to explore for biochemical sensing.

  19. Position-sensitive radiation monitoring (surface contamination monitor). Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-06-01

    The Shonka Research Associates, Inc. Position-Sensitive Radiation Monitor both detects surface radiation and prepares electronic survey map/survey report of surveyed area automatically. The electronically recorded map can be downloaded to a personal computer for review and a map/report can be generated for inclusion in work packages. Switching from beta-gamma detection to alpha detection is relatively simple and entails moving a switch position to alpha and adjusting the voltage level to an alpha detection level. No field calibration is required when switching from beta-gamma to alpha detection. The system can be used for free-release surveys because it meets the federal detection level sensitivity limits requires for surface survey instrumentation. This technology is superior to traditionally-used floor contamination monitor (FCM) and hand-held survey instrumentation because it can precisely register locations of radioactivity and accurately correlate contamination levels to specific locations. Additionally, it can collect and store continuous radiological data in database format, which can be used to produce real-time imagery as well as automated graphics of survey data. Its flexible design can accommodate a variety of detectors. The cost of the innovative technology is 13% to 57% lower than traditional methods. This technology is suited for radiological surveys of flat surfaces at US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) sites or similar public or commercial sites.

  20. Sensitivity Analysis of OECD Benchmark Tests in BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gamble, Kyle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmidt, Rodney C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williamson, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes a NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) project focused on sensitivity analysis of a fuels performance benchmark problem. The benchmark problem was defined by the Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling working group of the Nuclear Science Committee, part of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD ). The benchmark problem involv ed steady - state behavior of a fuel pin in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The problem was created in the BISON Fuels Performance code. Dakota was used to generate and analyze 300 samples of 17 input parameters defining core boundary conditions, manuf acturing tolerances , and fuel properties. There were 24 responses of interest, including fuel centerline temperatures at a variety of locations and burnup levels, fission gas released, axial elongation of the fuel pin, etc. Pearson and Spearman correlatio n coefficients and Sobol' variance - based indices were used to perform the sensitivity analysis. This report summarizes the process and presents results from this study.

  1. Molecularly imprinted polymers for highly sensitive detection of morphine using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Xia Hao; Hong Zhou; Jing Chang; Jun Zhu; Tian Xin Wei

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imprinting technology is applied in surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy for highly sensitive and selective detection of morphine (MO). As SPR-based sensor of MO, the preparation of molecular imprinted polymer is as follows: methacrylic acids (MAA), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA), azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN) were used as functional monomer, cross-linker and initiator, respectively. The experiment results showed that morphine imprinted polymer had the performance of high sensitivity and specificity, i.e. the relative signal of SPR response was proportional to the concentration of morphine in acetonitrile in the range of 10-9 mol/L to 10-6mol/L (1 ppb-1 ppm) with LOD of 10-10mol/L, and MO was distinguished from its analogs, such as codeine.

  2. A high sensitivity wireless mass-loading surface acoustic wave DNA biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hua-Lin; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Yi-Han; Zhou, Chang-Jian; Guo, Cang-Ran; Liu, Jing; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor with gold delay area on LiNbO3 substrate detecting DNA sequences is proposed. By well-designed device parameters of the SAW sensor, it achieves a high performance for highly sensitive detection of target DNA. In addition, an effective biological treatment method for DNA immobilization and abundant experimental verification of the sensing effect have made it a reliable device in DNA detection. The loading mass of the probe and target DNA sequences is obtained from the frequency shifts, which are big enough in this work due to an effective biological treatment. The experimental results show that the biosensor has a high sensitivity of 1.2 pg/ml/Hz and high selectivity characteristic is also verified by the few responses of other substances. In combination with wireless transceiver, we develop a wireless receiving and processing system that can directly display the detection results.

  3. Direction-sensitive dark matter search results in a surface laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miuchi, Kentaro [Cosmic-Ray Group, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: miuchi@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Hattori, Kaori; Kabuki, Shigeto; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Nishimura, Hironobu; Okada, Yoko; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Tsuchiya, Ken' ichi; Ueno, Kazuki [Cosmic-Ray Group, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Atsushi [Kamioka Observatory, ICRR, University of Tokyo Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka cho, Hida 506-1205 (Japan)

    2007-10-11

    We developed a three-dimensional gaseous tracking device and performed a direction-sensitive dark matter search in a surface laboratory. By using 150 Torr carbon-tetrafluoride (CF{sub 4}) gas, we obtained a sky map drawn with the recoil directions of the carbon and fluorine nuclei, and set the first limit on the spin-dependent WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles)-proton cross section by a direction-sensitive method. Thus, we showed that a WIMP-search experiment with a gaseous tracking device can actually set limits. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this method will potentially play a certain role in revealing the nature of dark matter when a low-background large-volume detector is developed.

  4. Path-sensitive analysis for reducing rollback overheads

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, John K.P.; Wang, Kai-Ting Amy; Yamashita, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaotong

    2014-07-22

    A mechanism is provided for path-sensitive analysis for reducing rollback overheads. The mechanism receives, in a compiler, program code to be compiled to form compiled code. The mechanism divides the code into basic blocks. The mechanism then determines a restore register set for each of the one or more basic blocks to form one or more restore register sets. The mechanism then stores the one or more register sets such that responsive to a rollback during execution of the compiled code. A rollback routine identifies a restore register set from the one or more restore register sets and restores registers identified in the identified restore register set.

  5. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT COLUMN DEGRADATION ANALYSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G.

    2014-10-28

    PORFLOW related analyses supporting a Sensitivity Analysis for Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) column degradation were performed. Previous analyses, Flach and Taylor 2014, used a model in which the SDU columns degraded in a piecewise manner from the top and bottom simultaneously. The current analyses employs a model in which all pieces of the column degrade at the same time. Information was extracted from the analyses which may be useful in determining the distribution of Tc-99 in the various SDUs throughout time and in determining flow balances for the SDUs.

  6. Potential evaporation estimation through an unstressed surface energy balance and its sensitivity to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barella-Ortiz, A.; Polcher, J.; Tuzet, A.; Laval, K.

    2013-06-01

    Potential evaporation (ETP) is a basic input for hydrological and agronomic models, as well as a key variable in most actual evaporation estimations. It has been approached through several diffusive and energy balance methods, out of which the Penman-Monteith equation is recommended as the standard one. In order to deal with the diffusive approach, ETP must be estimated at a sub-diurnal frequency, as currently done in land surface models (LSM). This study presents an improved method, developed in the ORCHIDEE LSM, which consists in estimating ETP through an unstressed surface energy balance (USEB method). The results confirm the quality of the estimation which is currently implemented in the model (Milly, 1992). ETP has also been estimated using a reference equation (computed at a daily time step) provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). First, a comparison for a reference period under current climate conditions, shows that both formulations differ, specially in arid areas. However, they supply similar values when FAO's assumption of neutral stability conditions is relaxed, by replacing FAO's aerodynamic resistance by the model's one. Furthermore, if the vapour pressure deficit (VPD) estimated for FAO's equation, is substituted by ORCHIDEE's VPD or its humidity gradient, the daily mean estimate is further improved. In a second step, ETP's sensitivity to climate change is assessed comparing trends in both formulations for the 21st Century. It is found that the USEB method shows a higher sensitivity. Both VPD and the model's humidity gradient, as well as the aerodynamic resistance have been identified as key parameters in governing ETP trends. Finally, the sensitivity study is extended to three empirical approximations based on temperature, net radiation and mass transfer (Hargreaves, Priestley-Taylor and Rohwer, respectively). The sensitivity of these methods is compared to the USEB method's one to test if simplified equations are able to reproduce

  7. Potential evaporation estimation through an unstressed surface energy balance and its sensitivity to climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barella-Ortiz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Potential evaporation (ETP is a basic input for hydrological and agronomic models, as well as a key variable in most actual evaporation estimations. It has been approached through several diffusive and energy balance methods, out of which the Penman–Monteith equation is recommended as the standard one. In order to deal with the diffusive approach, ETP must be estimated at a sub-diurnal frequency, as currently done in land surface models (LSM. This study presents an improved method, developed in the ORCHIDEE LSM, which consists in estimating ETP through an unstressed surface energy balance (USEB method. The results confirm the quality of the estimation which is currently implemented in the model (Milly, 1992. ETP has also been estimated using a reference equation (computed at a daily time step provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO. First, a comparison for a reference period under current climate conditions, shows that both formulations differ, specially in arid areas. However, they supply similar values when FAO's assumption of neutral stability conditions is relaxed, by replacing FAO's aerodynamic resistance by the model's one. Furthermore, if the vapour pressure deficit (VPD estimated for FAO's equation, is substituted by ORCHIDEE's VPD or its humidity gradient, the daily mean estimate is further improved. In a second step, ETP's sensitivity to climate change is assessed comparing trends in both formulations for the 21st Century. It is found that the USEB method shows a higher sensitivity. Both VPD and the model's humidity gradient, as well as the aerodynamic resistance have been identified as key parameters in governing ETP trends. Finally, the sensitivity study is extended to three empirical approximations based on temperature, net radiation and mass transfer (Hargreaves, Priestley–Taylor and Rohwer, respectively. The sensitivity of these methods is compared to the USEB method's one to test if simplified equations are

  8. N170 sensitivity to facial expression: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, J A; Mercado, F; Carretié, L

    2015-08-01

    The N170 component is the most important electrophysiological index of face processing. Early studies concluded that it was insensitive to facial expression, thus supporting dual theories postulating separate mechanisms for identity and expression encoding. However, recent evidence contradicts this assumption. We conducted a meta-analysis to resolve inconsistencies and to derive theoretical implications. A systematic revision of 128 studies analyzing N170 in response to neutral and emotional expressions yielded 57 meta-analyzable experiments (involving 1645 healthy adults). First, the N170 was found to be sensitive to facial expressions, supporting proposals arguing for integrated rather than segregated mechanisms in the processing of identity and expression. Second, this sensitivity is heterogeneous, with anger, fear and happy faces eliciting the largest N170 amplitudes. Third, we explored some modulatory factors, including the focus of attention - N170 amplitude was found to be also sensitive to unattended expressions - or the reference electrode -common reference reinforcing the effects- . In sum, N170 is a valuable tool to study the neural processing of facial expressions in order to develop current theories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Do spike insoles enhance postural stability and plantar-surface cutaneous sensitivity in the elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palluel, Estelle; Nougier, Vincent; Olivier, Isabelle

    2008-03-01

    Balance problems are often related to a loss of plantar-sensitivity in elderly people. The purpose of this study was to explore the contribution of plantar cutaneous inputs induced by a spike support surface to the control of stance. Nineteen elderly (mean age 69.0 years, range 62-80) and 19 young adults (mean age 25.9 years, range 21-32) were instructed to stand (standing session) or to walk (walking session) for 5 min with sandals equipped with spike insoles (spike condition). Both sessions also involved a no spike condition in which participants stood or walked for 5 min without these insoles (no spike condition). In all conditions, postural responses were assessed during unperturbed stance and were performed (1) immediately after putting the spike or the no spike insoles, and (2) 5 min after standing or walking with them. Sway parameters, such as centre of foot pressure mean location, surface area, mean speed, root mean square and median frequency on the antero-posterior and medio-lateral axes, were calculated. As postural performances are often related to plantar-surface sensitivity, cutaneous sensitivity threshold was also evaluated with Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments. Although no immediate effect of the spike insoles was found, results indicated that standing or walking for 5 min with sandals equipped with spike insoles led to a significant improvement of quiet standing in the elderly. Balance improvement was also observed in young adults. The results provided evidence that wearing sandals with spike insoles can contribute, at least temporarily, to the improvement of unperturbed stance in elderly people with relatively intact plantar cutaneous sensation. Further research is needed to assess the effects of longer and discontinuous stimulations with spike insoles on postural control.

  10. Enhancement of dynamic sensitivity of multiple surface-plasmonic-polaritonic sensor using silver nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, Farhat; Swiontek, Stephen E; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-01-01

    Multiple surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves excited at the interface of a homogeneous isotropic metal and a chiral sculptured thin film (STF) impregnated with silver nanoparticles were theoretically assessed for the multiple-SPP-waves-based sensing of a fluid uniformly infiltrating the chiral STF. The Bruggemann homogenization formalism was used in two different modalities to determine the three principal relative permittivity scalars of the silver-nanoparticle-impregnated chiral STF infiltrated uniformly by the fluid. The dynamic sensitivity increased when silver nanoparticles were present, provided their volume fraction did not exceed about 1%.

  11. Measurement of unsteady surface pressure on rotor blades of fans by pressure-sensitive paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Miura, Kouhei; Iida, Akiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    To clarify the unsteady pressure distributions on the rotor blades of an axial fan, a pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) technique was used. To capture the image of the rotating fan as a static image, an optical derotator method with a dove prism was adopted. It was confirmed by preliminary experiments with a resonator and a speaker that the pressure fluctuations with 347 Hz can be measured by the present PSP. The measured mean pressure distributions were compared with the predicted results based on large-eddy simulations. The measured instantaneous surface pressure is instrumental to identify acoustic source of fan noise in the design stage.

  12. Dynamic surface pressure measurements on a square cylinder with pressure sensitive paint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw, C.M.; Khalil, G.; Callis, J.B. [University of Washington, Department of Chemistry, Seattle, WA (United States); Bell, J.H. [Ames Research Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Moffett Field, CA (United States)

    2006-02-01

    The dynamic and static surface pressure on a square cylinder during vortex shedding was measured with pressure sensitive paints (PSPs) at three angles of incidence and a Reynolds number of 8.9 x 10{sup 4}. Oscillations in the phosphorescence intensity of the PSP that occurred at the vortex shedding frequency were observed. From these phosphorescent oscillations, the time-dependent changes in pressure distribution were calculated. This work extends PSP's useful range to dynamic systems where oscillating pressure changes are on the order of 230 Pa and occur at frequencies in the range of 95-125 Hz. (orig.)

  13. Improving the sensitivity limit of surface plasmon resonance biosensors by detecting mixed interference signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, W.; Ho, H. P.; Suen, Y. K.; Kong, S. K.; Lin, Chinlon

    2007-11-01

    We demonstrate that the sensitivity limit of intensity-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors can be enhanced when we combine the effects of the phase and amplitude contributions instead of detecting the amplitude variation only. Experimental results indicate that an enhancement factor of as much as 20 times is achievable, yet with no compromise in measurement dynamic range. While existing SPR biosensor systems are predominantly based on the angular scheme, which relies on detecting intensity variations associated with amplitude changes only, the proposed scheme may serve as a direct system upgrade approach for these systems. The new measurement scheme may therefore lead to a strong impact in the design of SPR biosensors.

  14. A new framework for comprehensive, robust, and efficient global sensitivity analysis: 1. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Saman; Gupta, Hoshin V.

    2016-01-01

    Computer simulation models are continually growing in complexity with increasingly more factors to be identified. Sensitivity Analysis (SA) provides an essential means for understanding the role and importance of these factors in producing model responses. However, conventional approaches to SA suffer from (1) an ambiguous characterization of sensitivity, and (2) poor computational efficiency, particularly as the problem dimension grows. Here, we present a new and general sensitivity analysis framework (called VARS), based on an analogy to "variogram analysis," that provides an intuitive and comprehensive characterization of sensitivity across the full spectrum of scales in the factor space. We prove, theoretically, that Morris (derivative-based) and Sobol (variance-based) methods and their extensions are special cases of VARS, and that their SA indices can be computed as by-products of the VARS framework. Synthetic functions that resemble actual model response surfaces are used to illustrate the concepts, and show VARS to be as much as two orders of magnitude more computationally efficient than the state-of-the-art Sobol approach. In a companion paper, we propose a practical implementation strategy, and demonstrate the effectiveness, efficiency, and reliability (robustness) of the VARS framework on real-data case studies.

  15. Analysis of cell surface antigens by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, I.; Schasfoort, R.B.M.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is most commonly used to measure bio-molecular interactions. SPR is used significantly less frequent for measuring whole cell interactions. Here we introduce a method to measure whole cells label free using the specific binding of cell surface antigens expressed on th

  16. Analysis of cell surface antigens by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, Ivan; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie

    2013-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is most commonly used to measure bio-molecular interactions. SPR is used significantly less frequent for measuring whole cell interactions. Here we introduce a method to measure whole cells label free using the specific binding of cell surface antigens expressed on th

  17. Surface-selective laser sintering of thermolabile polymer particles using water as heating sensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonov, E N; Krotova, L I; Minaev, N V; Minaeva, S A; Mironov, A V; Popov, V K [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies of the Russian Academy of Sciencies, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bagratashvili, V N [Department of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    We report the implementation of a novel scheme for surface-selective laser sintering (SSLS) of polymer particles, based on using water as a sensitizer of laser heating and sintering of particles as well as laser radiation at a wavelength of 1.94 μm, corresponding to the strong absorption band of water. A method of sintering powders of poly(lactide-co-glycolide), a hydrophobic bioresorbable polymer, after modifying its surface with an aqueous solution of hyaluronic acid is developed. The sintering thresholds for wetted polymer are by 3 – 4 times lower than those for sintering in air. The presence of water restricts the temperature of the heated polymer, preventing its thermal destruction. Polymer matrices with a developed porous structure are obtained. The proposed SSLS method can be applied to produce bioresorbable polymer matrices for tissue engineering. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  18. Improved Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Using a Diethyldithiocarbamate-Modified Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. B. P. Ariyasinghe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface modification of a TiO2 electrode with diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs was studied. Results from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS indicate that over half of the sulfur atoms become positively charged after the DEDTC treatment of the TiO2 surface. DSSCs were fabricated with TiO2 electrodes modified by adsorbing DEDTC using a simple dip-coating process. The conversion efficiency of the DSSCs has been optimized to 6.6% through the enhancement of the short-circuit current density ( mA/cm2. This is substantially higher compared to the efficiency of 5.9% ( mA/cm2 for the DSSCs made with untreated TiO2 electrodes.

  19. Experimental evidence for extreme surface sensitivity in Auger-Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) from solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liscio, A.; Gotter, R.; Ruocco, A.; Iacobucci, S.; Danese, A.G.; Bartynski, R.A.; Stefani, G

    2004-07-01

    Core hole creation and subsequent Auger decay processes are studied with unprecedented discrimination by Auger-Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS). Early works in this field have already pointed out the intrinsic surface sensitivity of these experiments. However, it was not until recently that a model calculation was developed to quantitatively evaluate it. Here we present the first attempt to experimentally establish an effective target thickness for such experiments. The angular distribution of 3p{sub 3/2} photoelectron with kinetic energy of 160 eV is measured in coincidence with the M{sub 3}VV Auger electron with kinetic energy of 55 eV on a Cu (1 1 1) surface. Coincidence and non-coincidence photoelectron angular distributions display differences that, to large extent, are explained by confining the source of the coincident signal within the first two layers of Cu target, thus establishing an experimental upper limit for the effective target thickness of the APECS experiment.

  20. On the extension of the sensitive area of an extensive air shower surface array

    CERN Document Server

    Kh, H Hedayati

    2016-01-01

    A large distance between true and reconstructed core locations of an extensive air shower (EAS) may results in great systematic mis-estimation of EAS parameters. The reconstruction of those EASs whose core locations are outside the boundary of a surface array (outside EAS (OEAS)) results in a large distance of the reconstructed core location from the true one, especially when the true core is far outside the array. Although it may not be mentioned, the identification of OEASs is a necessary and important step in the reconstruction procedure of an EAS. In this paper, an existing technique is optimized for the identification of OEASs. The simultaneous use of this technique and a recently developed approach for reconstructing the core location of an EAS can significantly increase the sensitive area of a surface array.

  1. Redox environment effect on redox sensitive elements in surface sediments of the Changjiang Estuary hypoxia zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shumei XU; Shikui ZHAI; Aibin ZHANG; Huaijing ZHANG; Haijian LU

    2008-01-01

    The grain size and element (including redox sensitive elements and terrigenous elements) concentration of surface sediments from the Changjiang Estuary hypoxia zone and its adjacent sea area were measured in this research.Based on the obtained data,the hypoxic environment's influence on the distribution of elements in surface sediments was further studied.We believe that the "redox environment effect" greatly influences the distribution of the RSE,which reveals the "patchy enrichment pattern" offshore in the hypoxia zone,while the distribution of the terrigenous elements which shows the "stripped enrichment pattern" near shore is mainly affected by "granularity effects".Due to the existence of the hypoxia zone of the Changjiang Estuary,the distribution of the RSE such as Mo,Cd and V in the study area exhibits the characteristics of "redox environment effects".

  2. Parametric sensitivity analysis for temperature control in outdoor photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Darlan A; Rodrigues, Vinicius O; Gómez, Sonia V; Sales, Emerson A; Jorquera, Orlando

    2013-09-01

    In this study a critical analysis of input parameters on a model to describe the broth temperature in flat plate photobioreactors throughout the day is carried out in order to assess the effect of these parameters on the model. Using the design of experiment approach, variation of selected parameters was introduced and the influence of each parameter on the broth temperature was evaluated by a parametric sensitivity analysis. The results show that the major influence on the broth temperature is that from the reactor wall and the shading factor, both related to the direct and reflected solar irradiation. Other parameter which play an important role on the temperature is the distance between plates. This study provides information to improve the design and establish the most appropriate operating conditions for the cultivation of microalgae in outdoor systems.

  3. Sensitivity analysis of stochastically forced quasiperiodic self-oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Bashkirtseva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We study a problem of stochastically forced quasi-periodic self-oscillations of nonlinear dynamic systems, which are modelled by an invariant torus in the phase space. For weak noise, an asymptotic of the stationary distribution of random trajectories is studied using the quasipotential. For the constructive analysis of a probabilistic distribution near a torus, we use a quadratic approximation of the quasipotential. A parametric description of this approximation is based on the stochastic sensitivity functions (SSF technique. Using this technique, we create a new mathematical method for the probabilistic analysis of stochastic flows near the torus. The construction of SSF is reduced to a boundary value problem for a linear differential matrix equation. For the case of the two-torus in the three-dimensional space, a constructive solution of this problem is given. Our theoretical results are illustrated with an example.

  4. Assessing modeled Greenland surface mass balance in the GISS Model E2 and its sensitivity to surface albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Patrick; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Koenig, Lora S.; Tedesco, Marco; Moustafa, Samiah E.; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Fischer, Robert P.; Fettweis, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) plays an important role in global sea level change. Regional Climate Models (RCMs) such as the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) have been employed at high spatial resolution with relatively complex physics to simulate ice sheet SMB. Global climate models (GCMs) incorporate less sophisticated physical schemes and provide outputs at a lower spatial resolution, but have the advantage of modeling the interaction between different components of the earth's oceans, climate, and land surface at a global scale. Improving the ability of GCMs to represent ice sheet SMB is important for making predictions of future changes in global sea level. With the ultimate goal of improving SMB simulated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Model E2 GCM, we compare simulated GrIS SMB against the outputs of the MAR model and radar-derived estimates of snow accumulation. In order to reproduce present-day climate variability in the Model E2 simulation, winds are constrained to match the reanalysis datasets used to force MAR at the lateral boundaries. We conduct a preliminary assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated Model E2 SMB to surface albedo, a parameter that is known to strongly influence SMB. Model E2 albedo is set to a fixed value of 0.8 over the entire ice sheet in the initial configuration of the model (control case). We adjust this fixed value in an ensemble of simulations over a range of 0.4 to 0.8 (roughly the range of observed summer GrIS albedo values) to examine the sensitivity of ice-sheet-wide SMB to albedo. We prescribe albedo from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) MCD43A3 v6 to examine the impact of a more realistic spatial and temporal variations in albedo. An age-dependent snow albedo parameterization is applied, and its impact on SMB relative to observations and the RCM is assessed.

  5. Improved environmental multimedia modeling and its sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Elektorowicz, Maria; Chen, Zhi

    2011-01-01

    Modeling of multimedia environmental issues is extremely complex due to the intricacy of the systems with the consideration of many factors. In this study, an improved environmental multimedia modeling is developed and a number of testing problems related to it are examined and compared with each other with standard numerical and analytical methodologies. The results indicate the flux output of new model is lesser in the unsaturated zone and groundwater zone compared with the traditional environmental multimedia model. Furthermore, about 90% of the total benzene flux was distributed to the air zone from the landfill sources and only 10% of the total flux emitted into the unsaturated, groundwater zones in non-uniform conditions. This paper also includes functions of model sensitivity analysis to optimize model parameters such as Peclet number (Pe). The analyses results show that the Pe can be considered as deterministic input variables for transport output. The oscillatory behavior is eliminated with the Pe decreased. In addition, the numerical methods are more accurate than analytical methods with the Pe increased. In conclusion, the improved environmental multimedia model system and its sensitivity analysis can be used to address the complex fate and transport of the pollutants in multimedia environments and then help to manage the environmental impacts.

  6. A Workflow for Global Sensitivity Analysis of PBPK Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eMcNally

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models have a potentially significant role in the development of a reliable predictive toxicity testing strategy. The structure of PBPK models are ideal frameworks into which disparate in vitro and in vivo data can be integrated and utilised to translate information generated, using alternative to animal measures of toxicity and human biological monitoring data, into plausible corresponding exposures. However, these models invariably include the description of well known non-linear biological processes such as, enzyme saturation and interactions between parameters such as, organ mass and body mass. Therefore, an appropriate sensitivity analysis technique is required which can quantify the influences associated with individual parameters, interactions between parameters and any non-linear processes. In this report we have defined a workflow for sensitivity analysis of PBPK models that is computationally feasible, accounts for interactions between parameters, and can be displayed in the form of a bar chart and cumulative sum line (Lowry plot, which we believe is intuitive and appropriate for toxicologists, risk assessors and regulators.

  7. Orbit uncertainty propagation and sensitivity analysis with separated representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balducci, Marc; Jones, Brandon; Doostan, Alireza

    2017-09-01

    Most approximations for stochastic differential equations with high-dimensional, non-Gaussian inputs suffer from a rapid (e.g., exponential) increase of computational cost, an issue known as the curse of dimensionality. In astrodynamics, this results in reduced accuracy when propagating an orbit-state probability density function. This paper considers the application of separated representations for orbit uncertainty propagation, where future states are expanded into a sum of products of univariate functions of initial states and other uncertain parameters. An accurate generation of separated representation requires a number of state samples that is linear in the dimension of input uncertainties. The computation cost of a separated representation scales linearly with respect to the sample count, thereby improving tractability when compared to methods that suffer from the curse of dimensionality. In addition to detailed discussions on their construction and use in sensitivity analysis, this paper presents results for three test cases of an Earth orbiting satellite. The first two cases demonstrate that approximation via separated representations produces a tractable solution for propagating the Cartesian orbit-state uncertainty with up to 20 uncertain inputs. The third case, which instead uses Equinoctial elements, reexamines a scenario presented in the literature and employs the proposed method for sensitivity analysis to more thoroughly characterize the relative effects of uncertain inputs on the propagated state.

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of a Riparian Vegetation Growth Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Nones

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a sensitivity analysis of two main parameters used in a mathematic model able to evaluate the effects of changing hydrology on the growth of riparian vegetation along rivers and its effects on the cross-section width. Due to a lack of data in existing literature, in a past study the schematization proposed here was applied only to two large rivers, assuming steady conditions for the vegetational carrying capacity and coupling the vegetal model with a 1D description of the river morphology. In this paper, the limitation set by steady conditions is overcome, imposing the vegetational evolution dependent upon the initial plant population and the growth rate, which represents the potential growth of the overall vegetation along the watercourse. The sensitivity analysis shows that, regardless of the initial population density, the growth rate can be considered the main parameter defining the development of riparian vegetation, but it results site-specific effects, with significant differences for large and small rivers. Despite the numerous simplifications adopted and the small database analyzed, the comparison between measured and computed river widths shows a quite good capability of the model in representing the typical interactions between riparian vegetation and water flow occurring along watercourses. After a thorough calibration, the relatively simple structure of the code permits further developments and applications to a wide range of alluvial rivers.

  9. Sensitivity analysis of numerical model of prestressed concrete containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bílý, Petr, E-mail: petr.bily@fsv.cvut.cz; Kohoutková, Alena, E-mail: akohout@fsv.cvut.cz

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • FEM model of prestressed concrete containment with steel liner was created. • Sensitivity analysis of changes in geometry and loads was conducted. • Steel liner and temperature effects are the most important factors. • Creep and shrinkage parameters are essential for the long time analysis. • Prestressing schedule is a key factor in the early stages. - Abstract: Safety is always the main consideration in the design of containment of nuclear power plant. However, efficiency of the design process should be also taken into consideration. Despite the advances in computational abilities in recent years, simplified analyses may be found useful for preliminary scoping or trade studies. In the paper, a study on sensitivity of finite element model of prestressed concrete containment to changes in geometry, loads and other factors is presented. Importance of steel liner, reinforcement, prestressing process, temperature changes, nonlinearity of materials as well as density of finite elements mesh is assessed in the main stages of life cycle of the containment. Although the modeling adjustments have not produced any significant changes in computation time, it was found that in some cases simplified modeling process can lead to significant reduction of work time without degradation of the results.

  10. Sensitivity of Land Surface Parameters on Thunderstorm Simulation through HRLDAS-WRF Coupling Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Kumar, Krishan; Mohanty, U. C.; Kisore Osuri, Krishna

    2016-07-01

    assimilation of soil moisture and soil temperature at the initial condition which helped to improve the exchange fluxes at lower atmospheric level. Mixing ratio were increased along with elevated theta-e at lower level giving a signature of improvement in LDAS experiment leading to a suitable condition for convection. In the analysis, moisture convergence, mixing ratio and vertical velocities have improved significantly in terms of intensity and time lag. Surface variables like soil moisture, soil temperature, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux have progressed in a possible realistic pattern. Above discussion suggests that assimilation of soil moisture and soil temperature improves the overall simulations significantly.

  11. Thermodynamics-based Metabolite Sensitivity Analysis in metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiparissides, A; Hatzimanikatis, V

    2017-01-01

    The increasing availability of large metabolomics datasets enhances the need for computational methodologies that can organize the data in a way that can lead to the inference of meaningful relationships. Knowledge of the metabolic state of a cell and how it responds to various stimuli and extracellular conditions can offer significant insight in the regulatory functions and how to manipulate them. Constraint based methods, such as Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and Thermodynamics-based flux analysis (TFA), are commonly used to estimate the flow of metabolites through genome-wide metabolic networks, making it possible to identify the ranges of flux values that are consistent with the studied physiological and thermodynamic conditions. However, unless key intracellular fluxes and metabolite concentrations are known, constraint-based models lead to underdetermined problem formulations. This lack of information propagates as uncertainty in the estimation of fluxes and basic reaction properties such as the determination of reaction directionalities. Therefore, knowledge of which metabolites, if measured, would contribute the most to reducing this uncertainty can significantly improve our ability to define the internal state of the cell. In the present work we combine constraint based modeling, Design of Experiments (DoE) and Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) into the Thermodynamics-based Metabolite Sensitivity Analysis (TMSA) method. TMSA ranks metabolites comprising a metabolic network based on their ability to constrain the gamut of possible solutions to a limited, thermodynamically consistent set of internal states. TMSA is modular and can be applied to a single reaction, a metabolic pathway or an entire metabolic network. This is, to our knowledge, the first attempt to use metabolic modeling in order to provide a significance ranking of metabolites to guide experimental measurements.

  12. Dynamic sensitivity analysis of long running landslide models through basis set expansion and meta-modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the temporal evolution of landslides is typically supported by numerical modelling. Dynamic sensitivity analysis aims at assessing the influence of the landslide properties on the time-dependent predictions (e.g., time series of landslide displacements). Yet two major difficulties arise: 1. Global sensitivity analysis require running the landslide model a high number of times (> 1000), which may become impracticable when the landslide model has a high computation time cost (> several hours); 2. Landslide model outputs are not scalar, but function of time, i.e. they are n-dimensional vectors with n usually ranging from 100 to 1000. In this article, I explore the use of a basis set expansion, such as principal component analysis, to reduce the output dimensionality to a few components, each of them being interpreted as a dominant mode of variation in the overall structure of the temporal evolution. The computationally intensive calculation of the Sobol' indices for each of these components are then achieved through meta-modelling, i.e. by replacing the landslide model by a "costless-to-evaluate" approximation (e.g., a projection pursuit regression model). The methodology combining "basis set expansion - meta-model - Sobol' indices" is then applied to the La Frasse landslide to investigate the dynamic sensitivity analysis of the surface horizontal displacements to the slip surface properties during the pore pressure changes. I show how to extract information on the sensitivity of each main modes of temporal behaviour using a limited number (a few tens) of long running simulations. In particular, I identify the parameters, which trigger the occurrence of a turning point marking a shift between a regime of low values of landslide displacements and one of high values.

  13. A New Framework for Effective and Efficient Global Sensitivity Analysis of Earth and Environmental Systems Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Saman; Gupta, Hoshin

    2015-04-01

    Earth and Environmental Systems (EES) models are essential components of research, development, and decision-making in science and engineering disciplines. With continuous advances in understanding and computing power, such models are becoming more complex with increasingly more factors to be specified (model parameters, forcings, boundary conditions, etc.). To facilitate better understanding of the role and importance of different factors in producing the model responses, the procedure known as 'Sensitivity Analysis' (SA) can be very helpful. Despite the availability of a large body of literature on the development and application of various SA approaches, two issues continue to pose major challenges: (1) Ambiguous Definition of Sensitivity - Different SA methods are based in different philosophies and theoretical definitions of sensitivity, and can result in different, even conflicting, assessments of the underlying sensitivities for a given problem, (2) Computational Cost - The cost of carrying out SA can be large, even excessive, for high-dimensional problems and/or computationally intensive models. In this presentation, we propose a new approach to sensitivity analysis that addresses the dual aspects of 'effectiveness' and 'efficiency'. By effective, we mean achieving an assessment that is both meaningful and clearly reflective of the objective of the analysis (the first challenge above), while by efficiency we mean achieving statistically robust results with minimal computational cost (the second challenge above). Based on this approach, we develop a 'global' sensitivity analysis framework that efficiently generates a newly-defined set of sensitivity indices that characterize a range of important properties of metric 'response surfaces' encountered when performing SA on EES models. Further, we show how this framework embraces, and is consistent with, a spectrum of different concepts regarding 'sensitivity', and that commonly-used SA approaches (e.g., Sobol

  14. Extremely sensitive sandwich assay of kanamycin using surface-enhanced Raman scattering of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole labeled gold@silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Adem; Tamer, Ugur; Caykara, Tuncer

    2014-03-19

    Herein, we report the development of extremely sensitive sandwich assay of kanamycin using a combination of anti-kanamycin functionalized hybrid magnetic (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (MNPs) and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole labeled Au-core@Ag-shell nanoparticles as the recognition and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate, respectively. The hybrid MNPs were first prepared via surface-mediated RAFT polymerization of N-acryloyl-L-glutamic acid in the presence of 2-(butylsulfanylcarbonylthiolsulfanyl) propionic acid-modified MNPs as a RAFT agent and then biofunctionalized with anti-kanamycin, which are both specific for kanamycin and can be collected via a simple magnet. After separating kanamycin from the sample matrix, they were sandwiched with the SERS substrate. According to our experimental results, the limit of detection (LOD) was determined to be 2pg mL(-1), this value being about 3-7 times more than sensitive than the LOD of previously reported results, which can be explained by the higher SERS activity of silver coated gold nanoparticles. The analysis time took less than 10min, including washing and optical detection steps. Furthermore, the sandwich assay was evaluated for investigating the kanamycin specificity on neomycin, gentamycin and streptomycin and detecting kanamycin in artificially contaminated milk.

  15. The clear-sky greenhouse effect sensitivity to a sea surface temperature change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvel, J. PH.; Breon, F. M.

    1991-01-01

    The clear-sky greenhouse effect response to a sea surface temperature (SST or Ts) change is studied using outgoing clear-sky longwave radiation measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Considering geographical distributions for July 1987, the relation between the SST, the greenhouse effect (defined as the outgoing infrared flux trapped by atmospheric gases), and the precipitable water vapor content (W), estimated by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager, is analyzed first. A fairly linear relation between W and the normalized greenhouse effect g, is found. On the contrary, the SST dependence of both W and g exhibits nonlinearities with, especially, a large increase for SST above 25 C. This enhanced sensitivity of g and W can be interpreted in part by a corresponding large increase of atmospheric water vapor content related to the transition from subtropical dry regions to equatorial moist regions. Using two years of data (1985 and 1986), the normalized greenhouse effect sensitivity to the sea surface temperature is computed from the interannual variation of monthly mean values.

  16. Voltage-sensitive styryl dyes as singlet oxygen targets on the surface of bilayer lipid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, V S; Gavrilchik, A N; Kulagina, A O; Meshkov, I N; Pohl, P; Gorbunova, Yu G

    2016-08-01

    Photosensitizers are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic agents killing cancer cells by photooxidation of their components. Development of new effective photosensitive molecules requires profound knowledge of possible targets for reactive oxygen species, especially for its singlet form. Here we studied photooxidation of voltage-sensitive styryl dyes (di-4-ANEPPS, di-8-ANEPPS, RH-421 and RH-237) by singlet oxygen on the surface of bilayer lipid membranes commonly used as cell membrane models. Oxidation was induced by irradiation of a photosensitizer (aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate) and monitored by the change of dipole potential on the surface of the membrane. We studied the drop of the dipole potential both in the case when the dye molecules were adsorbed on the same side of the lipid bilayer as the photosensitizer (cis-configuration) and in the case when they were adsorbed on the opposite side (trans-configuration). Based on a simple model, we determined the rate of oxidation of the dyes from the kinetics of change of the potential during and after irradiation. This rate is proportional to steady-state concentration of singlet oxygen in the membrane under irradiation. Comparison of the oxidation rates of various dyes reveals that compounds of ANEPPS series are more sensitive to singlet oxygen than RH type dyes, indicating that naphthalene group is primarily responsible for their oxidation.

  17. A new framework for comprehensive, robust, and efficient global sensitivity analysis: 2. Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Saman; Gupta, Hoshin V.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the theoretical framework for sensitivity analysis called "Variogram Analysis of Response Surfaces" (VARS), developed in the companion paper, we develop and implement a practical "star-based" sampling strategy (called STAR-VARS), for the application of VARS to real-world problems. We also develop a bootstrap approach to provide confidence level estimates for the VARS sensitivity metrics and to evaluate the reliability of inferred factor rankings. The effectiveness, efficiency, and robustness of STAR-VARS are demonstrated via two real-data hydrological case studies (a 5-parameter conceptual rainfall-runoff model and a 45-parameter land surface scheme hydrology model), and a comparison with the "derivative-based" Morris and "variance-based" Sobol approaches are provided. Our results show that STAR-VARS provides reliable and stable assessments of "global" sensitivity across the full range of scales in the factor space, while being 1-2 orders of magnitude more efficient than the Morris or Sobol approaches.

  18. A Highly Sensitive Gold-Coated Photonic Crystal Fiber Biosensor Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rabiul Hasan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we numerically demonstrate a two-layer circular lattice photonic crystal fiber (PCF biosensor based on the principle of surface plasmon resonance (SPR. The finite element method (FEM with circular perfectly matched layer (PML boundary condition is applied to evaluate the performance of the proposed sensor. A thin gold layer is deposited outside the PCF structure, which acts as the plasmonic material for this design. The sensing layer (analyte is implemented in the outermost layer, which permits easy and more practical fabrication process compared to analyte is put inside the air holes. It is demonstrated that, at gold layer thickness of 40 nm, the proposed sensor shows maximum sensitivity of 2200 nm/RIU using the wavelength interrogation method in the sensing range between 1.33–1.36. Besides, using an amplitude interrogation method, a maximum sensitivity of 266 RIU−1 and a maximum sensor resolution of 3.75 × 10−5 RIU are obtained. We also discuss how phase matching points are varied with different fiber parameters. Owing to high sensitivity and simple design, the proposed sensor may find important applications in biochemical and biological analyte detection.

  19. LSENS - GENERAL CHEMICAL KINETICS AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS CODE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    LSENS has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase, chemical kinetics problems. The motivation for the development of this program is the continuing interest in developing detailed chemical reaction mechanisms for complex reactions such as the combustion of fuels and pollutant formation and destruction. A reaction mechanism is the set of all elementary chemical reactions that are required to describe the process of interest. Mathematical descriptions of chemical kinetics problems constitute sets of coupled, nonlinear, first-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The number of ODEs can be very large because of the numerous chemical species involved in the reaction mechanism. Further complicating the situation are the many simultaneous reactions needed to describe the chemical kinetics of practical fuels. For example, the mechanism describing the oxidation of the simplest hydrocarbon fuel, methane, involves over 25 species participating in nearly 100 elementary reaction steps. Validating a chemical reaction mechanism requires repetitive solutions of the governing ODEs for a variety of reaction conditions. Analytical solutions to the systems of ODEs describing chemistry are not possible, except for the simplest cases, which are of little or no practical value. Consequently, there is a need for fast and reliable numerical solution techniques for chemical kinetics problems. In addition to solving the ODEs describing chemical kinetics, it is often necessary to know what effects variations in either initial condition values or chemical reaction mechanism parameters have on the solution. Such a need arises in the development of reaction mechanisms from experimental data. The rate coefficients are often not known with great precision and in general, the experimental data are not sufficiently detailed to accurately estimate the rate coefficient parameters. The development of a reaction mechanism is facilitated by a systematic sensitivity analysis

  20. GPU-based Integration with Application in Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassov, Emanouil; Ivanovska, Sofiya; Karaivanova, Aneta; Slavov, Dimitar

    2010-05-01

    The presented work is an important part of the grid application MCSAES (Monte Carlo Sensitivity Analysis for Environmental Studies) which aim is to develop an efficient Grid implementation of a Monte Carlo based approach for sensitivity studies in the domains of Environmental modelling and Environmental security. The goal is to study the damaging effects that can be caused by high pollution levels (especially effects on human health), when the main modeling tool is the Danish Eulerian Model (DEM). Generally speaking, sensitivity analysis (SA) is the study of how the variation in the output of a mathematical model can be apportioned to, qualitatively or quantitatively, different sources of variation in the input of a model. One of the important classes of methods for Sensitivity Analysis are Monte Carlo based, first proposed by Sobol, and then developed by Saltelli and his group. In MCSAES the general Saltelli procedure has been adapted for SA of the Danish Eulerian model. In our case we consider as factors the constants determining the speeds of the chemical reactions in the DEM and as output a certain aggregated measure of the pollution. Sensitivity simulations lead to huge computational tasks (systems with up to 4 × 109 equations at every time-step, and the number of time-steps can be more than a million) which motivates its grid implementation. MCSAES grid implementation scheme includes two main tasks: (i) Grid implementation of the DEM, (ii) Grid implementation of the Monte Carlo integration. In this work we present our new developments in the integration part of the application. We have developed an algorithm for GPU-based generation of scrambled quasirandom sequences which can be combined with the CPU-based computations related to the SA. Owen first proposed scrambling of Sobol sequence through permutation in a manner that improves the convergence rates. Scrambling is necessary not only for error analysis but for parallel implementations. Good scrambling is

  1. Potential Evaporation Computation through an Unstressed Surface Energy Balance and its Sensitivity to Climate Change Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barella-Ortiz, Anaïs; Polcher, Jan; Tuzet, Andrée; Laval, Katia

    2013-04-01

    Potential evaporation (ETP) is a basic input for hydrological and agronomic models, as well as a key variable in most actual evaporation estimations. It has been approached through several diffusive and energy balance methods, out of which the Penman-Monteith equation is recommended as the standard one. In order to deal with the diffusive approach, ETP must be estimated at a sub-diurnal frequency, as currently done in land surface models (LSM). This study presents an improved method, developed in the ORCHIDEE LSM, which consists in estimating ETP through an unstressed surface energy balance (USEB method). The values provided confirm the quality of the estimation which is currently implemented (Milly, 1992). ETP has also been estimated using a reference equation (computed at a daily time step) provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). In the first place, a comparison for a reference period of 11 years shows that both formulations differ, specially in arid areas. However, they supply similar values when FAO's assumption of neutral stability conditions is relaxed, by replacing FAO's aerodynamic resistance by the model's one. Additionally, if the vapour pressure deficit (VPD) is also substituted by either ORCHIDEE's VPD or its humidity gradient, the daily mean estimate is further improved. ETP's sensitivity to climate change is assessed comparing trends in both formulations for the 21st Century. It is found that the USEB method shows a higher sensitivity mainly due to FAO's assumption of neutral stability conditions and to a lesser extent, to the approximation proposed for the VPD. Both FAO's VPD and the model's humidity gradient, as well as ORCHIDEE's aerodynamic resistance have been identified as key parameters in governing ETP trends. Finally, the sensitivity study is extended to 3 empirical approximations based on temperature, net radiation and mass transfer (Hargreaves, Priestley - Taylor and Rohwer, respectively). When compared to the USEB method

  2. Aerodynamic Shape Sensitivity Analysis and Design Optimization of Complex Configurations Using Unstructured Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Newman, James C., III; Barnwell, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional unstructured grid approach to aerodynamic shape sensitivity analysis and design optimization has been developed and is extended to model geometrically complex configurations. The advantage of unstructured grids (when compared with a structured-grid approach) is their inherent ability to discretize irregularly shaped domains with greater efficiency and less effort. Hence, this approach is ideally suited for geometrically complex configurations of practical interest. In this work the nonlinear Euler equations are solved using an upwind, cell-centered, finite-volume scheme. The discrete, linearized systems which result from this scheme are solved iteratively by a preconditioned conjugate-gradient-like algorithm known as GMRES for the two-dimensional geometry and a Gauss-Seidel algorithm for the three-dimensional; similar procedures are used to solve the accompanying linear aerodynamic sensitivity equations in incremental iterative form. As shown, this particular form of the sensitivity equation makes large-scale gradient-based aerodynamic optimization possible by taking advantage of memory efficient methods to construct exact Jacobian matrix-vector products. Simple parameterization techniques are utilized for demonstrative purposes. Once the surface has been deformed, the unstructured grid is adapted by considering the mesh as a system of interconnected springs. Grid sensitivities are obtained by differentiating the surface parameterization and the grid adaptation algorithms with ADIFOR (which is an advanced automatic-differentiation software tool). To demonstrate the ability of this procedure to analyze and design complex configurations of practical interest, the sensitivity analysis and shape optimization has been performed for a two-dimensional high-lift multielement airfoil and for a three-dimensional Boeing 747-200 aircraft.

  3. Colorado Front Range Surface Ozone Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure-Begley, A.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Oltmans, S. J.; Kofler, J.; Petron, G.; Cothrel, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Colorado Front Range is a unique geographical region for air quality studies, including research of surface level ozone. Not only does surface ozone play a critical role in regulating the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere, but is a primary contributor to local smog and leads to public health complications and altered ecosystem functioning. The high frequency of sunny days, increasing population and pollution, and Mountain/Valley air dynamics of this region provide atmospheric conditions suitable for production and accumulation of ozone at the surface. This region of Colorado is currently in an ozone non-attainment status due to an assortment of contributing factors. Precursor emissions from pollution, wild-fires, and gas and oil production; along with stratosphere-troposphere exchange, can all result in high ozone episodes over the Colorado Front Range. To understand the dynamics of ozone accumulation in this region, Thermo-Scientific ozone monitors have been continuously sampling ozone from 4 different altitudes since the early 2000s. Analysis of ozone data in relation to Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Methane (CH4), Carbon Monoxide (CO), wind-conditions and back-trajectory air mass origins help to address local ozone precursor emissions and resulting high ozone episodes. Increased ozone episodes are scrutinized with regards to dominant wind direction to determine main precursor emission sources. Analysis of this data reveals a strong influence of precursor emissions from the North-East wind sector, with roughly 50% of ozone exceedances originating from winds prevailing from this direction. Further, correlation with methane is enhanced when prevailing winds are from the North-East; indicative of influence from natural gas processes and feedlot activity. Similar analysis is completed for the North-West wind sector exceedances, with strong correlation to carbon monoxide; likely related to emissions from biomass burning events and forest fires. In depth analysis of

  4. A sensitivity analysis of the WIPP disposal room model: Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labreche, D.A.; Beikmann, M.A. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Osnes, J.D. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Butcher, B.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The WIPP Disposal Room Model (DRM) is a numerical model with three major components constitutive models of TRU waste, crushed salt backfill, and intact halite -- and several secondary components, including air gap elements, slidelines, and assumptions on symmetry and geometry. A sensitivity analysis of the Disposal Room Model was initiated on two of the three major components (waste and backfill models) and on several secondary components as a group. The immediate goal of this component sensitivity analysis (Phase I) was to sort (rank) model parameters in terms of their relative importance to model response so that a Monte Carlo analysis on a reduced set of DRM parameters could be performed under Phase II. The goal of the Phase II analysis will be to develop a probabilistic definition of a disposal room porosity surface (porosity, gas volume, time) that could be used in WIPP Performance Assessment analyses. This report documents a literature survey which quantifies the relative importance of the secondary room components to room closure, a differential analysis of the creep consolidation model and definition of a follow-up Monte Carlo analysis of the model, and an analysis and refitting of the waste component data on which a volumetric plasticity model of TRU drum waste is based. A summary, evaluation of progress, and recommendations for future work conclude the report.

  5. Global in Time Analysis and Sensitivity Analysis for the Reduced NS- α Model of Incompressible Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebholz, Leo; Zerfas, Camille; Zhao, Kun

    2017-09-01

    We provide a detailed global in time analysis, and sensitivity analysis and testing, for the recently proposed (by the authors) reduced NS- α model. We extend the known analysis of the model to the global in time case by proving it is globally well-posed, and also prove some new results for its long time treatment of energy. We also derive PDE system that describes the sensitivity of the model with respect to the filtering radius parameter, and prove it is well-posed. An efficient numerical scheme for the sensitivity system is then proposed and analyzed, and proven to be stable and optimally accurate. Finally, two physically meaningful test problems are simulated: channel flow past a cylinder (including lift and drag calculations) and turbulent channel flow with {Re_{τ}=590}. The numerical results reveal that sensitivity is created near boundaries, and thus this is where the choice of the filtering radius is most critical.

  6. Enhanced sensitivity of localized surface plasmon resonance biosensor by phase interrogation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chung-Tien; Chen, How-foo; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2011-05-01

    We proposed an innovative phase interrogation method for localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) detection. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of LSPR biosensor by phase interrogation. LSPR is realized as the plasmonic resonance within confined metal nanoparticle. Nanoparticle couples the light by means of a non-radiative inter-band absorption, and a scattering from surface plasmon oscillation, the total contribution is the optical extinction of nanoparticles. Due to the variety of resonance types, LSPR is extensively studied in the field of biological sensing, imaging, and medical therapeutics. Generally, LSPR is probed by optical intensity variation of continuous wavelength, in other words, wavelength interrogation. LSPR sensitivity probed by this method is ranged from several tens nm/RIU to less than 1000nm/RIU depending on the nanostructure and metal species, which at least an order of magnitude less than conventional SPR biosensor in wavelength interrogation. In this work, an innovative common-path phase interrogation system is applied for LSPR detection. Phase difference in our home-made system is simply extracted through the correlation of optical intensity under different polarization without any heterodyne optical modulator or piezoelectric transducer, and thus low down the cost and complexity in optical setup. In addition, signal-to-noise ratio is substantially reduced since the signal wave and reference wave share the common path. In our preliminary results, LSPR resolution of Au nanodisk array is 1.74 x 10-4 RIU by wavelength interrogation; on the other side, LSPR resolution of Au nanodisk array is 2.02x10-6 RIU in phase interrogation. LSPR sensitivity is around one order of magnitude enhanced. In conclusion, we demonstrated that LSPR sensitivity can be further enhanced by phase interrogation.

  7. Robust and sensitive analysis of mouse knockout phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha A Karp

    Full Text Available A significant challenge of in-vivo studies is the identification of phenotypes with a method that is robust and reliable. The challenge arises from practical issues that lead to experimental designs which are not ideal. Breeding issues, particularly in the presence of fertility or fecundity problems, frequently lead to data being collected in multiple batches. This problem is acute in high throughput phenotyping programs. In addition, in a high throughput environment operational issues lead to controls not being measured on the same day as knockouts. We highlight how application of traditional methods, such as a Student's t-Test or a 2-way ANOVA, in these situations give flawed results and should not be used. We explore the use of mixed models using worked examples from Sanger Mouse Genome Project focusing on Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry data for the analysis of mouse knockout data and compare to a reference range approach. We show that mixed model analysis is more sensitive and less prone to artefacts allowing the discovery of subtle quantitative phenotypes essential for correlating a gene's function to human disease. We demonstrate how a mixed model approach has the additional advantage of being able to include covariates, such as body weight, to separate effect of genotype from these covariates. This is a particular issue in knockout studies, where body weight is a common phenotype and will enhance the precision of assigning phenotypes and the subsequent selection of lines for secondary phenotyping. The use of mixed models with in-vivo studies has value not only in improving the quality and sensitivity of the data analysis but also ethically as a method suitable for small batches which reduces the breeding burden of a colony. This will reduce the use of animals, increase throughput, and decrease cost whilst improving the quality and depth of knowledge gained.

  8. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A

    2014-03-28

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-"coupled"- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz-Kalos-Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary MATLAB

  9. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-"coupled"- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz-Kalos-Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary MATLAB

  10. A sensitivity analysis of hazardous waste disposal site climatic and soil design parameters using HELP3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelman, D.D. [Water Resources Engineer, Lincoln, NE (United States); Stansbury, J. [Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, NE (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle C, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, And Liability Act (CERCLA), and subsequent amendments have formed a comprehensive framework to deal with hazardous wastes on the national level. Key to this waste management is guidance on design (e.g., cover and bottom leachate control systems) of hazardous waste landfills. The objective of this research was to investigate the sensitivity of leachate volume at hazardous waste disposal sites to climatic, soil cover, and vegetative cover (Leaf Area Index) conditions. The computer model HELP3 which has the capability to simulate double bottom liner systems as called for in hazardous waste disposal sites was used in the analysis. HELP3 was used to model 54 combinations of climatic conditions, disposal site soil surface curve numbers, and leaf area index values to investigate how sensitive disposal site leachate volume was to these three variables. Results showed that leachate volume from the bottom double liner system was not sensitive to these parameters. However, the cover liner system leachate volume was quite sensitive to climatic conditions and less sensitive to Leaf Area Index and curve number values. Since humid locations had considerably more cover liner system leachate volume than and locations, different design standards may be appropriate for humid conditions than for and conditions.

  11. Dynamic global sensitivity analysis in bioreactor networks for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, M P; Estrada, V; Di Maggio, J; Hoch, P M

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic global sensitivity analysis (GSA) was performed for three different dynamic bioreactor models of increasing complexity: a fermenter for bioethanol production, a bioreactors network, where two types of bioreactors were considered: aerobic for biomass production and anaerobic for bioethanol production and a co-fermenter bioreactor, to identify the parameters that most contribute to uncertainty in model outputs. Sobol's method was used to calculate time profiles for sensitivity indices. Numerical results have shown the time-variant influence of uncertain parameters on model variables. Most influential model parameters have been determined. For the model of the bioethanol fermenter, μmax (maximum growth rate) and Ks (half-saturation constant) are the parameters with largest contribution to model variables uncertainty; in the bioreactors network, the most influential parameter is μmax,1 (maximum growth rate in bioreactor 1); whereas λ (glucose-to-total sugars concentration ratio in the feed) is the most influential parameter over all model variables in the co-fermentation bioreactor.

  12. A Sensitivity Analysis Approach to Identify Key Environmental Performance Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Life cycle assessment (LCA is widely used in design phase to reduce the product’s environmental impacts through the whole product life cycle (PLC during the last two decades. The traditional LCA is restricted to assessing the environmental impacts of a product and the results cannot reflect the effects of changes within the life cycle. In order to improve the quality of ecodesign, it is a growing need to develop an approach which can reflect the changes between the design parameters and product’s environmental impacts. A sensitivity analysis approach based on LCA and ecodesign is proposed in this paper. The key environmental performance factors which have significant influence on the products’ environmental impacts can be identified by analyzing the relationship between environmental impacts and the design parameters. Users without much environmental knowledge can use this approach to determine which design parameter should be first considered when (redesigning a product. A printed circuit board (PCB case study is conducted; eight design parameters are chosen to be analyzed by our approach. The result shows that the carbon dioxide emission during the PCB manufacture is highly sensitive to the area of PCB panel.

  13. Ensemble Solar Forecasting Statistical Quantification and Sensitivity Analysis: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, WanYin; Zhang, Jie; Florita, Anthony; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Lu, Siyuan; Hamann, Hendrik F.; Sun, Qian; Lehman, Brad

    2015-12-08

    Uncertainties associated with solar forecasts present challenges to maintain grid reliability, especially at high solar penetrations. This study aims to quantify the errors associated with the day-ahead solar forecast parameters and the theoretical solar power output for a 51-kW solar power plant in a utility area in the state of Vermont, U.S. Forecasts were generated by three numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, including the Rapid Refresh, the High Resolution Rapid Refresh, and the North American Model, and a machine-learning ensemble model. A photovoltaic (PV) performance model was adopted to calculate theoretical solar power generation using the forecast parameters (e.g., irradiance, cell temperature, and wind speed). Errors of the power outputs were quantified using statistical moments and a suite of metrics, such as the normalized root mean squared error (NRMSE). In addition, the PV model's sensitivity to different forecast parameters was quantified and analyzed. Results showed that the ensemble model yielded forecasts in all parameters with the smallest NRMSE. The NRMSE of solar irradiance forecasts of the ensemble NWP model was reduced by 28.10% compared to the best of the three NWP models. Further, the sensitivity analysis indicated that the errors of the forecasted cell temperature attributed only approximately 0.12% to the NRMSE of the power output as opposed to 7.44% from the forecasted solar irradiance.

  14. Sensitivity analysis on parameter changes in underground mine ventilation systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gary; KOCSIS Charles; HARDCASTLE Steve

    2011-01-01

    A more efficient mine ventilation system,the ventilation-on-demand (VOD) system,has been proposed and tested in Canadian mines recently.In order to supply the required air volumes to the production areas of a mine,operators need to know the cause and effect of any changes requested from the VOD system.The sensitivity analysis is developed through generating a cause and effect matrix of sensitivity factors on given parameter changes in a ventilation system.This new utility,which was incorporated in the 3D-CANVENT mine ventilation simulator,is able to predict the airflow distributions in a ventilation network when underground conditions and ventilation controls are changed.For a primary ventilation system,the software can determine the optimal operating speed of the main fans to satisfy the airflow requirements in underground workings without necessarily using booster fans and regulators locally.An optimized fan operating speed time-table would assure variable demand-based fresh air delivery to the production areas effectively,while generating significant savings in energy consumption and operating cost.

  15. Sensitivity analysis for high accuracy proximity effect correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrun, Xaver; Browning, Clyde; Choi, Kang-Hoon; Figueiro, Thiago; Hohle, Christoph; Saib, Mohamed; Schiavone, Patrick; Bartha, Johann W.

    2015-10-01

    A sensitivity analysis (SA) algorithm was developed and tested to comprehend the influences of different test pattern sets on the calibration of a point spread function (PSF) model with complementary approaches. Variance-based SA is the method of choice. It allows attributing the variance of the output of a model to the sum of variance of each input of the model and their correlated factors.1 The objective of this development is increasing the accuracy of the resolved PSF model in the complementary technique through the optimization of test pattern sets. Inscale® from Aselta Nanographics is used to prepare the various pattern sets and to check the consequences of development. Fraunhofer IPMS-CNT exposed the prepared data and observed those to visualize the link of sensitivities between the PSF parameters and the test pattern. First, the SA can assess the influence of test pattern sets for the determination of PSF parameters, such as which PSF parameter is affected on the employments of certain pattern. Secondly, throughout the evaluation, the SA enhances the precision of PSF through the optimization of test patterns. Finally, the developed algorithm is able to appraise what ranges of proximity effect correction is crucial on which portion of a real application pattern in the electron beam exposure.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis in a Complex Marine Ecological Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos D. Mateus

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity analysis (SA has long been recognized as part of best practices to assess if any particular model can be suitable to inform decisions, despite its uncertainties. SA is a commonly used approach for identifying important parameters that dominate model behavior. As such, SA address two elementary questions in the modeling exercise, namely, how sensitive is the model to changes in individual parameter values, and which parameters or associated processes have more influence on the results. In this paper we report on a local SA performed on a complex marine biogeochemical model that simulates oxygen, organic matter and nutrient cycles (N, P and Si in the water column, and well as the dynamics of biological groups such as producers, consumers and decomposers. SA was performed using a “one at a time” parameter perturbation method, and a color-code matrix was developed for result visualization. The outcome of this study was the identification of key parameters influencing model performance, a particularly helpful insight for the subsequent calibration exercise. Also, the color-code matrix methodology proved to be effective for a clear identification of the parameters with most impact on selected variables of the model.

  17. Ensemble Solar Forecasting Statistical Quantification and Sensitivity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, WanYin; Zhang, Jie; Florita, Anthony; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Lu, Siyuan; Hamann, Hendrik F.; Sun, Qian; Lehman, Brad

    2015-10-02

    Uncertainties associated with solar forecasts present challenges to maintain grid reliability, especially at high solar penetrations. This study aims to quantify the errors associated with the day-ahead solar forecast parameters and the theoretical solar power output for a 51-kW solar power plant in a utility area in the state of Vermont, U.S. Forecasts were generated by three numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, including the Rapid Refresh, the High Resolution Rapid Refresh, and the North American Model, and a machine-learning ensemble model. A photovoltaic (PV) performance model was adopted to calculate theoretical solar power generation using the forecast parameters (e.g., irradiance, cell temperature, and wind speed). Errors of the power outputs were quantified using statistical moments and a suite of metrics, such as the normalized root mean squared error (NRMSE). In addition, the PV model's sensitivity to different forecast parameters was quantified and analyzed. Results showed that the ensemble model yielded forecasts in all parameters with the smallest NRMSE. The NRMSE of solar irradiance forecasts of the ensemble NWP model was reduced by 28.10% compared to the best of the three NWP models. Further, the sensitivity analysis indicated that the errors of the forecasted cell temperature attributed only approximately 0.12% to the NRMSE of the power output as opposed to 7.44% from the forecasted solar irradiance.

  18. Sensitivity Analysis of Differential-Algebraic Equations and Partial Differential Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, L; Cao, Y; Li, S; Serban, R

    2005-08-09

    Sensitivity analysis generates essential information for model development, design optimization, parameter estimation, optimal control, model reduction and experimental design. In this paper we describe the forward and adjoint methods for sensitivity analysis, and outline some of our recent work on theory, algorithms and software for sensitivity analysis of differential-algebraic equation (DAE) and time-dependent partial differential equation (PDE) systems.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of different copper alloy surfaces against copper resistant and sensitive Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Libin; Elguindi, Jutta; Rensing, Christopher; Ravishankar, Sadhana

    2012-05-01

    Copper has shown antibacterial effects against foodborne pathogens. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of copper surfaces on copper resistant and sensitive strains of Salmonella enterica. Six different copper alloy coupons (60-99.9% copper) were tested along with stainless steel as the control. The coupons were surface inoculated with either S. Enteritidis or one of the 3 copper resistant strains, S. Typhimurium S9, S19 and S20; stored under various incubation conditions at room temperature; and sampled at various times up to 2 h. The results showed that under dry incubation conditions, Salmonella only survived 10-15 min on high copper content alloys. Salmonella on low copper content alloys showed 3-4 log reductions. Under moist incubation conditions, no survivors were detected after 30 min-2 h on high copper content alloys, while the cell counts decreased 2-4 logs on low copper content coupons. Although the copper resistant strains survived better than S. Enteritidis, they were either completely inactivated or survival was decreased. Copper coupons showed better antimicrobial efficacy in the absence of organic compounds. These results clearly show the antibacterial effects of copper and its potential as an alternative to stainless steel for selected food contact surfaces.

  20. Highly sensitive and reproducible silicon-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors for real applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Houyu; Jiang, Xiangxu; He, Yao

    2016-08-15

    During the past few decades, thanks to silicon nanomaterials' outstanding electronic/optical/mechanical properties, large surface-to-volume ratio, abundant surface chemistry, facile tailorability and good compatibility with modern semiconductor industry, different dimensional silicon nanostructures have been widely employed for rationally designing and fabricating high-performance surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors for the detection of various chemical and biological species. Among these, two-dimensional silicon nanostructures made of metal nanoparticle-modified silicon wafers and three-dimensional silicon nanostructures made of metal nanoparticle-decorated SiNW arrays are of particular interest, and have been extensively exploited as promising silicon-based SERS-active substrates for the construction of high-performance SERS sensors. With an aim to retrospect these important and exciting achievements, we herein focus on reviewing recent representative studies on silicon-based SERS sensors for sensing applications from a broad perspective and possible future direction, promoting readers' awareness of these novel powerful silicon-based SERS sensing technologies. Firstly, we summarize the two unique merits of silicon-based SERS sensors, and those are high sensitivity and good reproducibility. Next, we present recent advances of two- and three-dimensional silicon-based SERS sensors, especially for real applications. Finally, we discuss the major challenges and prospects for the development of silicon-based SERS sensors.

  1. Space Shuttle Orbiter entry guidance and control system sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, H. W.; Powell, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    An approach has been developed to determine the guidance and control system sensitivity to off-nominal aerodynamics for the Space Shuttle Orbiter during entry. This approach, which uses a nonlinear six-degree-of-freedom interactive, digital simulation, has been applied to both the longitudinal and lateral-directional axes for a portion of the orbiter entry. Boundary values for each of the aerodynamic parameters have been identified, the key parameters have been determined, and system modifications that will increase system tolerance to off-nominal aerodynamics have been recommended. The simulations were judged by specified criteria and the performance was evaluated by use of key dependent variables. The analysis is now being expanded to include the latest shuttle guidance and control systems throughout the entry speed range.

  2. Sensitivity analysis for oblique incidence reflectometry using Monte Carlo simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamran, Faisal; Andersen, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Oblique incidence reflectometry has developed into an effective, noncontact, and noninvasive measurement technology for the quantification of both the reduced scattering and absorption coefficients of a sample. The optical properties are deduced by analyzing only the shape of the reflectance...... profiles. This article presents a sensitivity analysis of the technique in turbid media. Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate the technique and its potential to distinguish the small changes between different levels of scattering. We present various regions of the dynamic range of optical...... properties in which system demands vary to be able to detect subtle changes in the structure of the medium, translated as measured optical properties. Effects of variation in anisotropy are discussed and results presented. Finally, experimental data of milk products with different fat content are considered...

  3. Global sensitivity analysis using emulators, with an example analysis of large fire plumes based on FDS simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, Adrian [Health and Safety Laboratory, Harpur Hill, Buxton (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Laboratory (SNL) in 2009. At the largest LNG release rate the flames did not cover the entire area of the LNG spill, this behaviour had not been observed in previous large-scale experiments. Also the height of the flames was also greater than expected from previous large-scale tests. One possible explanation for the observed behaviour is that in this very large-scale release the speed at which air and fuel vapour was drawn into the fire exceeded the flame speed. Therefore the flames could not propagate upwind to ignite the whole surface of the LNG pool. Fuel vapour from the unignited region, drawn into the fire, may also account for the higher flame height. A global sensitivity analysis allows the influence of uncertain parameters on the quantities of interest to be examined. This publication and the work it describes were funded by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Its contents, including any opinions and/or conclusions expressed, are those of the authors alone and do not necessarily reflect HSE policy.

  4. Fabrication of gold nanoparticle-embedded metal-organic framework for highly sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuling; Liao, Jia; Wang, Dongmei; Li, Gongke

    2014-04-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals strongly rely on the interactions and distance between analyte molecules and metallic nanostructures. In this work, the use of a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-embedded metal-organic framework was introduced for the highly sensitive SERS detection. The AuNPs were in situ grown and encapsulated within the host matrix of MIL-101 by a solution impregnation strategy. The as-synthesized AuNPs/MIL-101 nanocomposites combined the localized surface plasmon resonance properties of the gold nanoparticles and the high adsorption capability of metal-organic framework, making them highly sensitive SERS substrates by effectively preconcentrating analytes in close proximity to the electromagnetic fields at the SERS-active metal surface. We discussed the fabrication, physical characterization, and SERS activity of our novel substrates by measuring the Raman signals of a variety of model analytes. The SERS substrate was found to be highly sensitive, robust, and amiable to several different target analytes. A SERS detection limit of 41.75 and 0.54 fmol for Rhodamine 6G and benzadine, respectively, was demonstrated. The substrate also showed high stability and reproducibility, as well as molecular sieving effect thanks to the protective shell of the metal-organic framework. Subsequently, the potential practical application of the novel SERS substrate was evaluated by quantitative analysis of organic pollutant p-phenylenediamine in environmental water and tumor marker alpha-fetoprotein in human serum. The method showed good linearity between 1.0 and 100.0 ng/mL for p-phenylenediamine and 1.0-130.0 ng/mL for alpha-fetoprotein with the correlation coefficients of 0.9950 and -0.9938, respectively. The recoveries ranged from 80.5% to 114.7% for p-phenylenediamine in environmental water and 79.3% to 107.3% for alpha-fetoprotein in human serum. These results foresee promising application of the novel metal-organic framework based composites as

  5. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for photovoltaic system modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Clifford W.; Pohl, Andrew Phillip; Jordan, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    We report an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for modeling DC energy from photovoltaic systems. We consider two systems, each comprised of a single module using either crystalline silicon or CdTe cells, and located either at Albuquerque, NM, or Golden, CO. Output from a PV system is predicted by a sequence of models. Uncertainty in the output of each model is quantified by empirical distributions of each model's residuals. We sample these distributions to propagate uncertainty through the sequence of models to obtain an empirical distribution for each PV system's output. We considered models that: (1) translate measured global horizontal, direct and global diffuse irradiance to plane-of-array irradiance; (2) estimate effective irradiance from plane-of-array irradiance; (3) predict cell temperature; and (4) estimate DC voltage, current and power. We found that the uncertainty in PV system output to be relatively small, on the order of 1% for daily energy. Four alternative models were considered for the POA irradiance modeling step; we did not find the choice of one of these models to be of great significance. However, we observed that the POA irradiance model introduced a bias of upwards of 5% of daily energy which translates directly to a systematic difference in predicted energy. Sensitivity analyses relate uncertainty in the PV system output to uncertainty arising from each model. We found that the residuals arising from the POA irradiance and the effective irradiance models to be the dominant contributors to residuals for daily energy, for either technology or location considered. This analysis indicates that efforts to reduce the uncertainty in PV system output should focus on improvements to the POA and effective irradiance models.

  6. High ethanol sensitivity of palladium/TiO2 nanobelt surface heterostructures dominated by enlarged surface area and nano-Schottky junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongzhou; Zhou, Weijia; Hu, Peiguang; Guan, Yu; Chen, Limei; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Guancong; Liu, Hong; Wang, Jiyang; Cao, Guozhong; Jiang, Huaidong

    2012-12-15

    TiO(2) nanobelts were prepared by the hydrothermal growth method. The surface of the nanobelts was coarsened by selective acid corrosion and functionalized with Pd catalyst particles. Three nanobelt samples (TiO(2) nanobelts, surface-coarsened TiO(2) nanobelts and Pd nanoparticle/TiO(2) nanobelt surface heterostructures) were configured as gas sensors and their sensing ability was measured. Both the surface-coarsened nanobelts and the Pd nanoparticle-decorated TiO(2) nanobelts exhibited dramatically improved sensitivity to ethanol vapor. Pd nanoparticle-decorated TiO(2) nanobelts with surface heterostructures exhibited the best sensitivity, selectivity, working temperature, response/recovery time, and reproducibility. The excellent ethanol sensing performance is attributed to the large surface area and enhancement by Schottky barrier-type junctions between the Pd nanoparticles and TiO(2) nanobelts.

  7. Surface and interface analysis an electrochemists toolbox

    CERN Document Server

    Holze, Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    A broad, almost encyclopedic overview of spectroscopic and other analytical techniques useful for investigations of phase boundaries in electrochemistry is presented. The analysis of electrochemical interfaces and interphases on a microscopic, even molecular level, is of central importance for an improved understanding of the structure and dynamics of these phase boundaries. The gained knowledge will be needed for improvements of methods and applications reaching from electrocatalysis, electrochemical energy conversion, biocompatibility of metals, corrosion protection to galvanic surface treatment and finishing. The book provides an overview as complete as possible and enables the reader to choose methods most suitable for tackling his particular task. It is nevertheless compact and does not flood the reader with the details of review papers.

  8. Surface Management System Departure Event Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Gilena A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a data analysis of the Surface Management System (SMS) performance of departure events, including push-back and runway departure events.The paper focuses on the detection performance, or the ability to detect departure events, as well as the prediction performance of SMS. The results detail a modest overall detection performance of push-back events and a significantly high overall detection performance of runway departure events. The overall detection performance of SMS for push-back events is approximately 55%.The overall detection performance of SMS for runway departure events nears 100%. This paper also presents the overall SMS prediction performance for runway departure events as well as the timeliness of the Aircraft Situation Display for Industry data source for SMS predictions.

  9. Sensitivity analysis on various parameters for lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel with WIMS-AECL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok; Park, Jee Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The code WIMS-AECL has been used for the lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel. The lattice parameters calculated by the code is sensitive to the choice of number of parameters, such as the number of tracking lines, number of condensed groups, mesh spacing in the moderator region, other parameters vital to the calculation of probabilities and burnup analysis. We have studied this sensitivity with respect to these parameters and recommend their proper values which are necessary for carrying out the lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel.

  10. Potential evaporation estimation through an unstressed surface-energy balance and its sensitivity to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barella-Ortiz, A.; Polcher, J.; Tuzet, A.; Laval, K.

    2013-11-01

    Potential evaporation (ETP) is a basic input for many hydrological and agronomic models, as well as a key variable in most actual evaporation estimations. It has been approached through several diffusive and energy balance methods, out of which the Penman-Monteith equation is recommended as the standard one. In order to deal with the diffusive approach, ETP must be estimated at a sub-diurnal frequency, as currently done in land surface models (LSMs). This study presents an improved method, developed in the ORCHIDEE LSM, which consists of estimating ETP through an unstressed surface-energy balance (USEB method). The results confirm the quality of the estimation which is currently implemented in the model (Milly, 1992). The ETP underlying the reference evaporation proposed by the Food and Agriculture Organization, FAO, (computed at a daily time step) has also been analysed and compared. First, a comparison for a reference period under current climate conditions shows that USEB and FAO's ETP estimations differ, especially in arid areas. However, they produce similar values when the FAO's assumption of neutral stability conditions is relaxed, by replacing FAO's aerodynamic resistance by that of the model's. Furthermore, if the vapour pressure deficit (VPD) estimated for the FAO's equation, is substituted by ORCHIDEE's VPD or its humidity gradient, the agreement between the daily mean estimates of ETP is further improved. In a second step, ETP's sensitivity to climate change is assessed by comparing trends in these formulations for the 21st century. It is found that the USEB method shows a higher sensitivity than the FAO's. Both VPD and the model's humidity gradient, as well as the aerodynamic resistance have been identified as key parameters in governing ETP trends. Finally, the sensitivity study is extended to two empirical approximations based on net radiation and mass transfer (Priestley-Taylor and Rohwer, respectively). The sensitivity of these ETP estimates is

  11. Sensitivity of surface radiation budget to clouds over the Asian monsoon region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Balachandran; M Rajeevan

    2007-04-01

    Using the ISCCP–FD surface radiative flux data for the summer season (June to September) of the period 1992 to 1995, an analysis was done to understand the role of clouds on the surface radiation budget over the Asian monsoon region. At the top of atmosphere (TOA) of convective regions of the Asian monsoon region, the short wave radiative forcing (SWCRF) and long wave radiative forcing (LWCRF) do not cancel each other resulting in occurrence of the net cloud radiative forcing values exceeding −30W/m2. This type of imbalance between SWCRF and LWCRF at TOA is reflected down on the earth surface–atmosphere system also as an imbalance between surface netcloud radiative forcing (NETCRF) and atmospheric NETCRF. Based on the regression analysis of the cloud effects on the surface radiation budget quantities, it has been observed that generally, the variance explained by multiple type cloud data is 50% more than that of total cloud cover alone. In case of SWCRF, the total cloud cover can explain about 3% (7%) of the variance whereas the three cloud type descriptions of clouds can explain about 44% (42%) of the variance over oceanic (land) regions. This highlights the importance of cloud type information in explaining the variations of surface radiation budget. It has been observed that the clouds produce more cooling effect in short-wave band than the warming effect in long-wave band resulting in a net cooling at the surface. Over the oceanic region, variations in high cloud amount contribute more to variations in SWCRF while over land regions both middle and high cloud variations make substantial contributions to the variations in both SWCRF and NETCRF.

  12. Surface modifications of photoanodes in dye sensitized solar cells: enhanced light harvesting and reduced recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Vibha; Aswal, D. K.

    2015-06-01

    In a quest to harvest solar power, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have potential for low-cost eco-friendly photovoltaic devices. The major processes which govern the efficiency of a DSSC are photoelectron generation, injection of photo-generated electrons to the conduction band (CB) of the mesoporous nanocrystalline semiconductor (nc-SC); transport of CB electrons through nc-SC and subsequent collection of CB electrons at the counter electrode (CE) through the external circuit; and dye regeneration by redox couple or hole transport layer (HTL). Most of these processes occur at various interfaces of the photoanode. In addition, recombination losses of photo-generated electrons with either dye or redox molecules take place at the interfaces. Therefore, one of the key requirements for high efficiency is to improve light harvesting of the photoanode and to reduce the recombination losses at various interfaces. In this direction, surface modification of the photoanode is the simplest method among the various other approaches available in the literature. In this review, we present a comprehensive discussion on surface modification of the photoanode, which has been adopted in the literature for not only enhancing light harvesting but also reducing recombination. Various approaches towards surface modification of the photoanode discussed are (i) fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)/nc-SC interface modified via a compact layer of semiconductor material which blocks exposed sites of FTO to electrolyte (or HTL), (ii) nc-SC/dye interface modification either through acid treatment resulting in enhanced dye loading due to a positively charged surface or by depositing insulating/semiconducting blocking layer on the nc-SC surface, which acts as a tunneling barrier for recombination, (iii) nc-SC/dye interface modified by employing co-adsorbents which helps in reducing the dye aggregation and thereby recombination, and (iv) dye/electrolyte (or dye/HTL) interface modification using

  13. Sensitivity of Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance to surface albedo parameterization: a study with a regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. van Angelen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a sensitivity study of the surface mass balance (SMB of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as modeled using a regional atmospheric climate model, to various parameter settings in the albedo parameterization. The snow albedo parameterization uses grain size as a prognostic variable and further depends on cloud cover, solar zenith angle and black carbon concentration. For the control experiment the overestimation of absorbed shortwave radiation (+6 % at the K-transect (West Greenland for the period 2004–2009 is considerably reduced compared to the previous density-dependent albedo parameterization (+22 %. To simulate realistic snow albedo values, a small concentration of black carbon is needed. A background ice albedo field derived from MODIS imagery improves the agreement between the modeled and observed SMB gradient along the K-transect. The effect of enhanced retention and refreezing is a decrease of the albedo due to an increase in snow grain size. As a secondary effect of refreezing the snowpack is heated, enhancing melt and further lowering the albedo. Especially in a warmer climate this process is important, since it reduces the refreezing potential of the firn layer covering the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  14. Sensitivity of Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance to surface albedo parameterization: a study with a regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. van Angelen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a sensitivity study of the surface mass balance (SMB of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as modeled using a regional atmospheric climate model, to various parameter settings in the albedo scheme. The snow albedo scheme uses grain size as a prognostic variable and further depends on cloud cover, solar zenith angle and black carbon concentration. For the control experiment the overestimation of absorbed shortwave radiation (+6% at the K-transect (west Greenland for the period 2004–2009 is considerably reduced compared to the previous density-dependent albedo scheme (+22%. To simulate realistic snow albedo values, a small concentration of black carbon is needed, which has strongest impact on melt in the accumulation area. A background ice albedo field derived from MODIS imagery improves the agreement between the modeled and observed SMB gradient along the K-transect. The effect of enhanced meltwater retention and refreezing is a decrease of the albedo due to an increase in snow grain size. As a secondary effect of refreezing the snowpack is heated, enhancing melt and further lowering the albedo. Especially in a warmer climate this process is important, since it reduces the refreezing potential of the firn layer that covers the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  15. Preparation of Smooth Surface TiO2 Photoanode for High Energy Conversion Efficiency in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasipriya Kathirvel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs based on a TiO2 photoanode have been considered as an alternative source in the field of renewable energy resources. In DSSCs, photoanode plays a key role to achieve excellent photo-to-electric conversion efficiency. The surface morphology, surface area, TiO2 crystal phase, and the dispersion of TiO2 nanoparticles are the most important factors influencing the properties of a photoanode. The smooth TiO2 surface morphology of the photoanode indicates closely packed arrangement of TiO2 particles which enhance the light harvesting efficiency of the cell. In this paper, a smooth TiO2 photoanode has been successfully prepared using a well-dispersed anatase TiO2 nanosol via a simple hydrothermal process. The above TiO2 photoanode was then compared with the photoanode made from commercial TiO2 nanoparticle pastes. The morphological and structural analyses of both the aforementioned photoanodes were comprehensively characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The DSSC fabricated by using a-TiO2 nanosol-based photoelectrode exhibited an overall light conversion efficiency of 7.20% and a short-circuit current density of 13.34 mA cm−2, which was significantly higher than those of the DSSCs with the TiO2 nanoparticles-based electrodes.

  16. Sensitivity analysis, approximate analysis, and design optimization for internal and external viscous flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Hou, Gene W.; Korivi, Vamshi M.

    1991-01-01

    A gradient-based design optimization strategy for practical aerodynamic design applications is presented, which uses the 2D thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. The strategy is based on the classic idea of constructing different modules for performing the major tasks such as function evaluation, function approximation and sensitivity analysis, mesh regeneration, and grid sensitivity analysis, all driven and controlled by a general-purpose design optimization program. The accuracy of aerodynamic shape sensitivity derivatives is validated on two viscous test problems: internal flow through a double-throat nozzle and external flow over a NACA 4-digit airfoil. A significant improvement in aerodynamic performance has been achieved in both cases. Particular attention is given to a consistent treatment of the boundary conditions in the calculation of the aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives for the classic problems of external flow over an isolated lifting airfoil on 'C' or 'O' meshes.

  17. New sensitive micro-measurements of dynamic surface tension and diffusion coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinoshita, Koji; Ortiz, Elisa Parra; Needham, David

    2017-01-01

    . These limitations create inconsistencies for the kinetic analysis of surfactant adsorption/desorption, especially significant for ionic surfactants. Here, the “micropipette interfacial area-expansion method” was introduced and validated as a new DST measurement having a high enough sensitivity to detect diffusion...... controlled molecular adsorption at the air-water interfaces. To validate the new technique, the diffusion coefficient of 1-Octanol in water was investigated with existing models: the Ward Tordai model for the long time adsorption regime (1–100 s), and the Langmuir and Frumkin adsorption isotherm models...

  18. Geometrical parameter analysis of the high sensitivity fiber optic angular displacement sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, João M S; Kitano, Cláudio; Tittmann, Bernhard R

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present an analysis of the influence of the geometrical parameters on the sensitivity and linear range of the fiber optic angular displacement sensor, through computational simulations and experiments. The geometrical parameters analyzed were the lens focal length, the gap between fibers, the fibers cladding radii, the emitting fiber critical angle (or, equivalently, the emitting fiber numerical aperture), and the standoff distance (distance between the lens and the reflective surface). Besides, we analyzed the sensor sensitivity regarding any spurious linear displacement. The simulation and experimental results showed that the parameters which play the most important roles are the emitting fiber core radius, the lens focal length, and the light coupling efficiency, while the remaining parameters have little influence on sensor characteristics. This paper was published in Applied Optics and is made available as an electronic reprint with the permission of OSA. The paper can be found at the fo...

  19. Surface engineering of ZnO nanostructures for semiconductor-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Chen, Zhenhua; Zapien, Juan Antonio; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-08-20

    Semiconductor-sensitized solar cells (SSCs) are emerging as promising devices for achieving efficient and low-cost solar-energy conversion. The recent progress in the development of ZnO-nanostructure-based SSCs is reviewed here, and the key issues for their efficiency improvement, such as enhancing light harvesting and increasing carrier generation, separation, and collection, are highlighted from aspects of surface-engineering techniques. The impact of other factors such as electrolyte and counter electrodes on the photovoltaic performance is also addressed. The current challenges and perspectives for the further advance of ZnO-based SSCs are discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Nondestructive Analysis of Telescope Surfaces and Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Julie; Kintzel, Edward; Strolger, Louis; Wolff, Schuyler

    2010-10-01

    The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Western Kentucky University has a Large Chamber Scanning Electron Microscope (LCSEM) available for materials analysis. As one of 10 in the world, the capability exists for nondestructive analysis of large samples. Currently we are investigating using the LCSEM to quantify reflectivity and long-term integrity for large segments of optical elements and detectors for ground and space-based environments. Comparisons of reflectance ratios as a function of surface roughness for Al-Coated optical mirrors may be confirmed with the LCSEM. Long-term structural integrity of Al-coated thinned mirror segments at ground-based facilities due to weather (oxidation) and spaced-based high-radiation environments can be investigated. Fatigue behavior of these metallic films from active/adaptive actuation will be simulated using the LCSEM. New research possibilities across a broad multidisciplinary spectrum will be key to the success of the LCSEM facility. These partnerships will lead to the development of new and existing technologies.

  1. Spatial risk assessment for critical network infrastructure using sensitivity analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael M·derl; Wolfgang Rauch

    2011-01-01

    The presented spatial risk assessment method allows for managing critical network infrastructure in urban areas under abnormal and future conditions caused e.g.,by terrorist attacks,infrastructure deterioration or climate change.For the spatial risk assessment,vulnerability maps for critical network infrastructure are merged with hazard maps for an interfering process.Vulnerability maps are generated using a spatial sensitivity analysis of network transport models to evaluate performance decrease under investigated thread scenarios.Thereby parameters are varied according to the specific impact of a particular threat scenario.Hazard maps are generated with a geographical information system using raster data of the same threat scenario derived from structured interviews and cluster analysis of events in the past.The application of the spatial risk assessment is exemplified by means of a case study for a water supply system,but the principal concept is applicable likewise to other critical network infrastructure.The aim of the approach is to help decision makers in choosing zones for preventive measures.

  2. Analysis of painted arts by energy sensitive radiographic techniques with the Pixel Detector Timepix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemlicka, J; Jakubek, J; Kroupa, M [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Hradil, D [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, AS CR, v.v.i., ALMA, 50 68 Husinec-Oeez (Czech Republic); Hradilova, J; Mislerova, H, E-mail: jan.zemlicka@utef.cvut.cz [Academy of Fine Arts in Prague, ALMA, U Akademie 4, 170 2, Prague 7 (Czech Republic)

    2011-01-15

    Non-invasive techniques utilizing X-ray radiation offer a significant advantage in scientific investigations of painted arts and other cultural artefacts such as painted artworks or statues. In addition, there is also great demand for a mobile analytical and real-time imaging device given the fact that many fine arts cannot be transported. The highly sensitive hybrid semiconductor pixel detector, Timepix, is capable of detecting and resolving subtle and low-contrast differences in the inner composition of a wide variety of objects. Moreover, it is able to map the surface distribution of the contained elements. Several transmission and emission techniques are presented which have been proposed and tested for the analysis of painted artworks. This study focuses on the novel techniques of X-ray transmission radiography (conventional and energy sensitive) and X-ray induced fluorescence imaging (XRF) which can be realised at the table-top scale with the state-of-the-art pixel detector Timepix. Transmission radiography analyses the changes in the X-ray beam intensity caused by specific attenuation of different components in the sample. The conventional approach uses all energies from the source spectrum for the creation of the image while the energy sensitive alternative creates images in given energy intervals which enable identification and separation of materials. The XRF setup is based on the detection of characteristic radiation induced by X-ray photons through a pinhole geometry collimator. The XRF method is extremely sensitive to the material composition but it creates only surface maps of the elemental distribution. For the purpose of the analysis several sets of painted layers have been prepared in a restoration laboratory. The composition of these layers corresponds to those of real historical paintings from the 19{sup th} century. An overview of the current status of our methods will be given with respect to the instrumentation and the application in the field

  3. Metal-organic frameworks supported surface-imprinted nanoparticles for the sensitive detection of metolcarb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kun; Deng, Qiliang; Fang, Guozhen; Wang, Junping; Pan, Mingfei; Wang, Shuo; Pu, Yuehong

    2016-05-15

    A novel approach to synthesize molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) nanoparticles using a MIL-101 support (a type of metal-organic framework) is reported herein for the first time; the sample is referred as MIL@MIP. The nanoparticles were well distributed within the polymer film, and exhibit an octahedral shape, satisfied thermal stability, and a high specific surface area (SSA) of 1579.43 m(2)g(-1). The adsorption behavior of MIL@MIP toward metolcarb in aqueous solution was subsequently examined. The synthesized MIL@MIP displayed satisfactory high transfer mass rates and a high selective adsorption affinity for metolcarb. Based on these results, a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor based on MIL@MIP was subsequently constructed and examined for the sensitive detection of metolcarb. Under optimal conditions, the detection limit of the system assessed in pear juice was 0.0689 mg L(-1) within a linear concentration range of 0.1-0.9 mg L(-1). MIL@MIP-QCM system combines the advantages of MIL-101 and molecularly imprinted technology (MIT), thereby achieving high detection sensitivity and selectivity. The current findings suggest the potential of MIL@MIP for detecting trace level pesticides and veterinary drugs for food safety and environmental control.

  4. Quantifying Measurement Fluctuations from Stochastic Surface Processes on Sensors with Heterogeneous Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmet, Jérôme; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Daly, Ronan; Prasad, Abhinav; Thiruvenkathanathan, Pradyumna; Langley, Robin S.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in micro- and nanotechnology have enabled the development of ultrasensitive sensors capable of detecting small numbers of species. In general, however, the response induced by the random adsorption of a small number of objects onto the surface of such sensors results in significant fluctuations due to the heterogeneous sensitivity inherent to many such sensors coupled to statistical fluctuations in the particle number. At present, this issue is addressed by considering either the limit of very large numbers of analytes, where fluctuations vanish, or the converse limit, where the sensor response is governed by individual analytes. Many cases of practical interest, however, fall between these two limits and remain challenging to analyze. Here, we address this limitation by deriving a general theoretical framework for quantifying measurement variations on mechanical resonators resulting from statistical-number fluctuations of analyte species. Our results provide insights into the stochastic processes in the sensing environment and offer opportunities to improve the performance of mechanical-resonator-based sensors. This metric can be used, among others, to aid in the design of robust sensor platforms to reach ultrahigh-resolution measurements using an array of sensors. These concepts, illustrated here in the context of biosensing, are general and can therefore be adapted and extended to other sensors with heterogeneous sensitivity.

  5. High sensitivity detection of bacteria by surface plasmon resonance enhanced common path interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greef, Charles; Petropavlovskikh, Viatcheslav; Nilsen, Oyvind; Hacioglu, Bilge; Khattatov, Boris; Hall, John

    2007-04-01

    Real time monitoring of biowarfare agents (BWA) for military and civilian protection remains a high priority for homeland security and battlefield readiness. Available devices have adequate sensitivity, but the detection modules have limited periods of deployment, require frequent maintenance, employ single-use disposable components, and have limited multiplexing capability. Surface Plasmon Resonance enhanced Common Path Interferometry (SPR-CPI) is a label-free, high sensitivity biomolecular interaction measurement technology that allows multiplexed real-time measurement of biowarfare agents, including small molecules, proteins, and microbes. The technology permits continuous operation in a field-deployable detection module of an integrated BWA monitoring system. SPR-CPI measures difference in phase shift of polarized light reflected from the transducer interface caused by changes in refractive index induced by biomolecular interactions. The measurement is performed on a discrete 2-dimensional area functionalized with biomolecule capture reagents in a microarray format, allowing simultaneous measurement of up to 100 separate analytes. Output consists of simultaneous voltage measurements proportional to the phase differences resulting from the refractive index changes and is automatically processed and displayed graphically or delivered to a decision making algorithm. This enables a fully automatic field-deployable detection system capable of integration into existing modular BWA detection systems. Proof-of-concept experiments on surrogate models of anticipated BWA threats have demonstrated utility. Efforts are in progress for full development and deployment of the device.

  6. Mechanism of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering and Its Application to Highly Sensitive Protein Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ozaki Y; Itoh T; Yoshida K; Kitahama y; Han X X; Zhao B

    2009-01-01

    @@ Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering(SERRS)has recently attracted great interest in analytical science due to enormous enhancement factors that have decreased the detection limits of a wide variety of molecules tO the single molecule level.The SERRS-electromagnetic(EM)model describes single-molecule SERRS sensitivity at interparticle junctions and at sharp edges in Ag and Au nanoaggregatcs based on the fourth power of a local EM-field enhancement factor M The realization of SERRS enhancement factors |M|4 of up to 1014has made single-molecule sensitivity realistic.In other words,twofold EM enhancement processes are important for verifying SERRS enhancement factors that enable single molecules to be detected:in these processes the first enhancement iS due to coupling between incident photons and plasmons and the second enhancement is due tO coupling between SERRS photons and plasmons.The relationship between plasmon resonance,the SERRS intensity,and Ag-nanoparticle microstructures was comprehensively studied to verify EM enhancement in SERRS.However,the first and second enhancements were not treated independently in these investigations and thus they were not able tO provide conclusive evidence for twofold EM enhancements.

  7. Two Dimensional Array of Piezoresistive Nanomechanical Membrane-Type Surface Stress Sensor (MSS with Improved Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico F. de Rooij

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a new generation of piezoresistive nanomechanical Membrane-type Surface stress Sensor (MSS chips, which consist of a two dimensional array of MSS on a single chip. The implementation of several optimization techniques in the design and microfabrication improved the piezoresistive sensitivity by 3~4 times compared to the first generation MSS chip, resulting in a sensitivity about ~100 times better than a standard cantilever-type sensor and a few times better than optical read-out methods in terms of experimental signal-to-noise ratio. Since the integrated piezoresistive read-out of the MSS can meet practical requirements, such as compactness and not requiring bulky and expensive peripheral devices, the MSS is a promising transducer for nanomechanical sensing in the rapidly growing application fields in medicine, biology, security, and the environment. Specifically, its system compactness due to the integrated piezoresistive sensing makes the MSS concept attractive for the instruments used in mobile applications. In addition, the MSS can operate in opaque liquids, such as blood, where optical read-out techniques cannot be applied.

  8. Lock Acquisition and Sensitivity Analysis of Advanced LIGO Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynov, Denis

    Laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (LIGO) consists of two complex large-scale laser interferometers designed for direct detection of gravitational waves from distant astrophysical sources in the frequency range 10Hz - 5kHz. Direct detection of space-time ripples will support Einstein's general theory of relativity and provide invaluable information and new insight into physics of the Universe. The initial phase of LIGO started in 2002, and since then data was collected during the six science runs. Instrument sensitivity improved from run to run due to the effort of commissioning team. Initial LIGO has reached designed sensitivity during the last science run, which ended in October 2010. In parallel with commissioning and data analysis with the initial detector, LIGO group worked on research and development of the next generation of detectors. Major instrument upgrade from initial to advanced LIGO started in 2010 and lasted until 2014. This thesis describes results of commissioning work done at the LIGO Livingston site from 2013 until 2015 in parallel with and after the installation of the instrument. This thesis also discusses new techniques and tools developed at the 40m prototype including adaptive filtering, estimation of quantization noise in digital filters and design of isolation kits for ground seismometers. The first part of this thesis is devoted to the description of methods for bringing the interferometer into linear regime when collection of data becomes possible. States of longitudinal and angular controls of interferometer degrees of freedom during lock acquisition process and in low noise configuration are discussed in details. Once interferometer is locked and transitioned to low noise regime, instrument produces astrophysics data that should be calibrated to units of meters or strain. The second part of this thesis describes online calibration technique set up in both observatories to monitor the quality of the collected data in

  9. Buckling analysis of partially corroded steel plates with irregular surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmad Rahbar-Ranji

    2014-04-01

    Corrosion is a long-term, inevitable process, lessens the thickness and load carrying capacity of structures. Old steel structures are more vulnerable to buckling, yielding and fracture due to corrosion. In lieu of a detailed analysis, average thickness assumption is employed for general type of corrosion. However, the estimation of load carrying capacity reduction of corroded structures typically need a much higher level of accuracy, since the actual corroded plates would have irregular surfaces. The objective of this article is to determine the effect of general corrosion on reduction of elastic buckling strength of both-sided partially corroded plates with irregular surfaces. Eigenvalue analysis using finite element method is employed for Euler stress calculation of corroded plates. The effects of different influential parameters are investigated and it is found that, aspect ratio of plate, location of corroded area, standard deviation of thickness diminution and concentration of corrosion have influence on reduction of elastic buckling strength. Reduction of elastic buckling strength is very sensitive to the amount of corrosion loss. The higher the amount of corrosion loss, the more reduction of elastic buckling strength.

  10. Global sensitivity analysis in the identification of cohesive models using full-field kinematic data

    KAUST Repository

    Alfano, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Failure of adhesive bonded structures often occurs concurrent with the formation of a non-negligible fracture process zone in front of a macroscopic crack. For this reason, the analysis of damage and fracture is effectively carried out using the cohesive zone model (CZM). The crucial aspect of the CZM approach is the precise determination of the traction-separation relation. Yet it is usually determined empirically, by using calibration procedures combining experimental data, such as load-displacement or crack length data, with finite element simulation of fracture. Thanks to the recent progress in image processing, and the availability of low-cost CCD cameras, it is nowadays relatively easy to access surface displacements across the fracture process zone using for instance Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The rich information provided by correlation techniques prompted the development of versatile inverse parameter identification procedures combining finite element (FE) simulations and full field kinematic data. The focus of the present paper is to assess the effectiveness of these methods in the identification of cohesive zone models. In particular, the analysis is developed in the framework of the variance based global sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity of kinematic data to the sought cohesive properties is explored through the computation of the so-called Sobol sensitivity indexes. The results show that the global sensitivity analysis can help to ascertain the most influential cohesive parameters which need to be incorporated in the identification process. In addition, it is shown that suitable displacement sampling in time and space can lead to optimized measurements for identification purposes.

  11. Optimization of spectral sensitivities of mosaic five-band camera for estimating chromophore densities from skin images including shading and surface reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Misa; Akaho, Rina; Maita, Chikashi; Sugawara, Mai; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the spectral sensitivities of a mosaic five-band camera were optimized using a numerical skin phantom to perform the separation of chromophore densities, shading and surface reflection. To simulate the numerical skin phantom, the spectral reflectance of skin was first calculated by Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration for different concentrations of melanin, blood and oxygen saturation levels. The melanin and hemoglobin concentration distributions used in the numerical skin phantom were obtained from actual skin images by independent component analysis. The calculated components were assigned as concentration distributions. The spectral sensitivities of the camera were then optimized using a nonlinear technique to estimate the spectral reflectance for skin separation. In this optimization, the spectral sensitivities were assumed to be normally distributed, and the sensor arrangement was identical to that of a conventional mosaic five-band camera. Our findings demonstrated that spectral estimation could be significantly improved by optimizing the spectral sensitivities.

  12. Polydopamine Thin Films as Protein Linker Layer for Sensitive Detection of Interleukin-6 by Surface Plasmon Enhanced Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Mana; Tawa, Keiko

    2016-08-31

    Polydopamine (PDA) thin films are introduced to the surface modification of biosensor surfaces utilizing surface plasmon enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) as the linker layer of capture antibody on to the sensor surfaces. The capture antibody can be directly attached to the sensor surface without using any coupling agent by functionalizing the gold sensor surface with PDA thin films. The PDA coating is performed by a single-step preparation process by applying the dopamine solution on the sensor surface, which requires an extremely short incubation time (10 min). The real-time in situ measurement of the adsorption kinetics of the capture antibody onto the PDA-coated sensor surface is studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. It reveals that the immobilization of capture antibody immediately occurs after introduction of a solution containing capture antibody, and the sensor surface is fully covered with the capture antibody. The sensitive detection of the cytokine marker interleukin-6 (IL-6) is performed by SPFS using a sandwich assay format with fluorescently labeled detection antibody. The sensor chips functionalized by PDA chemistry exhibited sensitive sensor responses with low nonspecific adsorption of the detection antibody onto the sensor surface. The detection limit of IL-6 with the developed SPFS biosensor is determined to be 2 pg/mL (100 fM), which is within the range of the diagnostic criteria. Our observation elucidates the remarkable utility of PDA coatings for chemical modification of the metallic sensor surfaces by a simple, brief, and inexpensive manner.

  13. Can feedback analysis be used to uncover the physical origin of climate sensitivity and efficacy differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Vanessa S.; Dietmüller, Simone; Ponater, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Different strengths and types of radiative forcings cause variations in the climate sensitivities and efficacies. To relate these changes to their physical origin, this study tests whether a feedback analysis is a suitable approach. For this end, we apply the partial radiative perturbation method. Combining the forward and backward calculation turns out to be indispensable to ensure the additivity of feedbacks and to yield a closed forcing-feedback-balance at top of the atmosphere. For a set of CO2-forced simulations, the climate sensitivity changes with increasing forcing. The albedo, cloud and combined water vapour and lapse rate feedback are found to be responsible for the variations in the climate sensitivity. An O3-forced simulation (induced by enhanced NOx and CO surface emissions) causes a smaller efficacy than a CO2-forced simulation with a similar magnitude of forcing. We find that the Planck, albedo and most likely the cloud feedback are responsible for this effect. Reducing the radiative forcing impedes the statistical separability of feedbacks. We additionally discuss formal inconsistencies between the common ways of comparing climate sensitivities and feedbacks. Moreover, methodical recommendations for future work are given.

  14. APPLICATIONS OF SURFACE SPLINEFUNCTIONS TO STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS IN COAL GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HanJinyan; YuZhiwei

    1996-01-01

    A surface spline function is used to fit a coal seam surface in structural analysis in coal geology. From the surface spline function, the first and second partial derivatives can also be derived and used to structural analysis, especially for recognition of the concealed structures. The detection of structures related to faulting is emphasized.

  15. O2 Plasma Etching and Antistatic Gun Surface Modifications for CNT Yarn Microelectrode Improve Sensitivity and Antifouling Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Wang, Ying; Jacobs, Christopher B; Ivanov, Ilia N; Venton, B Jill

    2017-05-16

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based microelectrodes exhibit rapid and selective detection of neurotransmitters. While different fabrication strategies and geometries of CNT microelectrodes have been characterized, relatively little research has investigated ways to selectively enhance their electrochemical properties. In this work, we introduce two simple, reproducible, low-cost, and efficient surface modification methods for carbon nanotube yarn microelectrodes (CNTYMEs): O2 plasma etching and antistatic gun treatment. O2 plasma etching was performed by a microwave plasma system with oxygen gas flow and the optimized time for treatment was 1 min. The antistatic gun treatment flows ions by the electrode surface; two triggers of the antistatic gun was the optimized number on the CNTYME surface. Current for dopamine at CNTYMEs increased 3-fold after O2 plasma etching and 4-fold after antistatic gun treatment. When the two treatments were combined, the current increased 12-fold, showing the two effects are due to independent mechanisms that tune the surface properties. O2 plasma etching increased the sensitivity due to increased surface oxygen content but did not affect surface roughness while the antistatic gun treatment increased surface roughness but not oxygen content. The effect of tissue fouling on CNT yarns was studied for the first time, and the relatively hydrophilic surface after O2 plasma etching provided better resistance to fouling than unmodified or antistatic gun treated CNTYMEs. Overall, O2 plasma etching and antistatic gun treatment improve the sensitivity of CNTYMEs by different mechanisms, providing the possibility to tune the CNTYME surface and enhance sensitivity.

  16. Engineering and Characterization of Peptides and Proteins at Surfaces and Interfaces: A Case Study in Surface-Sensitive Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bei; Jasensky, Joshua; Li, Yaoxin; Chen, Zhan

    2016-06-21

    Understanding molecular structures of interfacial peptides and proteins impacts many research fields by guiding the advancement of biocompatible materials, new and improved marine antifouling coatings, ultrasensitive and highly specific biosensors and biochips, therapies for diseases related to protein amyloid formation, and knowledge on mechanisms for various membrane proteins and their interactions with ligands. Developing methods for measuring such unique systems, as well as elucidating the structure and function relationship of such biomolecules, has been the goal of our lab at the University of Michigan. We have made substantial progress to develop sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy into a powerful technique to study interfacial peptides and proteins, which lays a foundation to obtain unique and valuable insights when using SFG to probe various biologically relevant systems at the solid/liquid interface in situ in real time. One highlighting feature of this Account is the demonstration of the power of combining SFG with other techniques and methods such as ATR-FTIR, surface engineering, MD simulation, liquid crystal sensing, and isotope labeling in order to study peptides and proteins at interfaces. It is necessary to emphasize that SFG plays a major role in these studies, while other techniques and methods are supplemental. The central role of SFG is to provide critical information on interfacial peptide and protein structure (e.g., conformation and orientation) in order to elucidate how surface engineering (e.g., to vary the structure) can ultimately affect surface function (e.g., to optimize the activity). This Account focuses on the most significant recent progress in research on interfacial peptides and proteins carried out by our group including (1) the development of SFG analysis methods to determine orientations of regular as well as disrupted secondary structures, and the successful demonstration and application of an isotope

  17. Surface-sensitive conductivity measurement using a micro multi-point probe approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Edward; Barreto, Lucas; Wells, Justin; Hofmann, Philip

    2013-03-01

    An instrument for microscale electrical transport measurements in ultra-high vacuum is presented. The setup is constructed around collinear lithographically-created multi-point probes with a contact spacing down to 500 nm. Most commonly, twelve-point probes are used. These probes are approached to the surface via piezoelectric positioners. Standard four-point resistance measurements can be performed using any combination of contacts out of the twelve available. Current/voltage measurements are taken semi-automatically for a variety of the possible contact configurations, effectively emulating measurements with an equidistant four-point probe for a wide range of contact spacings. In this way, it is possible to distinguish between bulk-like and surface-like conduction. The paper describes the design of the instrument and the approach to data and error analysis. Application examples are given for epitaxial graphene on SiC and degenerately doped Bi₂Se₃.

  18. Phase sensitive spectral domain interferometry for label free biomolecular interaction analysis and biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirvi, Sajal

    Biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA) plays vital role in wide variety of fields, which include biomedical research, pharmaceutical industry, medical diagnostics, and biotechnology industry. Study and quantification of interactions between natural biomolecules (proteins, enzymes, DNA) and artificially synthesized molecules (drugs) is routinely done using various labeled and label-free BIA techniques. Labeled BIA (Chemiluminescence, Fluorescence, Radioactive) techniques suffer from steric hindrance of labels on interaction site, difficulty of attaching labels to molecules, higher cost and time of assay development. Label free techniques with real time detection capabilities have demonstrated advantages over traditional labeled techniques. The gold standard for label free BIA is surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) that detects and quantifies the changes in refractive index of the ligand-analyte complex molecule with high sensitivity. Although SPR is a highly sensitive BIA technique, it requires custom-made sensor chips and is not well suited for highly multiplexed BIA required in high throughput applications. Moreover implementation of SPR on various biosensing platforms is limited. In this research work spectral domain phase sensitive interferometry (SD-PSI) has been developed for label-free BIA and biosensing applications to address limitations of SPR and other label free techniques. One distinct advantage of SD-PSI compared to other label-free techniques is that it does not require use of custom fabricated biosensor substrates. Laboratory grade, off-the-shelf glass or plastic substrates of suitable thickness with proper surface functionalization are used as biosensor chips. SD-PSI is tested on four separate BIA and biosensing platforms, which include multi-well plate, flow cell, fiber probe with integrated optics and fiber tip biosensor. Sensitivity of 33 ng/ml for anti-IgG is achieved using multi-well platform. Principle of coherence multiplexing for multi

  19. Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) Sensitivity Analysis Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meemong; Bowman, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Geostationary Coastal and Air pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) is a NASA decadal survey mission to be designed to provide surface reflectance at high spectral, spatial, and temporal resolutions from a geostationary orbit necessary for studying regional-scale air quality issues and their impact on global atmospheric composition processes. GEO-CAPE's Atmospheric Science Questions explore the influence of both gases and particles on air quality, atmospheric composition, and climate. The objective of the GEO-CAPE Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) is to analyze the sensitivity of ozone to the global and regional NOx emissions and improve the science impact of GEO-CAPE with respect to the global air quality. The GEO-CAPE OSSE team at Jet propulsion Laboratory has developed a comprehensive OSSE framework that can perform adjoint-sensitivity analysis for a wide range of observation scenarios and measurement qualities. This report discusses the OSSE framework and presents the sensitivity analysis results obtained from the GEO-CAPE OSSE framework for seven observation scenarios and three instrument systems.

  20. Numerical daemons in hydrological modeling: Effects on uncertainty assessment, sensitivity analysis and model predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavetski, D.; Clark, M. P.; Fenicia, F.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrologists often face sources of uncertainty that dwarf those normally encountered in many engineering and scientific disciplines. Especially when representing large scale integrated systems, internal heterogeneities such as stream networks, preferential flowpaths, vegetation, etc, are necessarily represented with a considerable degree of lumping. The inputs to these models are themselves often the products of sparse observational networks. Given the simplifications inherent in environmental models, especially lumped conceptual models, does it really matter how they are implemented? At the same time, given the complexities usually found in the response surfaces of hydrological models, increasingly sophisticated analysis methodologies are being proposed for sensitivity analysis, parameter calibration and uncertainty assessment. Quite remarkably, rather than being caused by the model structure/equations themselves, in many cases model analysis complexities are consequences of seemingly trivial aspects of the model implementation - often, literally, whether the start-of-step or end-of-step fluxes are used! The extent of problems can be staggering, including (i) degraded performance of parameter optimization and uncertainty analysis algorithms, (ii) erroneous and/or misleading conclusions of sensitivity analysis, parameter inference and model interpretations and, finally, (iii) poor reliability of a calibrated model in predictive applications. While the often nontrivial behavior of numerical approximations has long been recognized in applied mathematics and in physically-oriented fields of environmental sciences, it remains a problematic issue in many environmental modeling applications. Perhaps detailed attention to numerics is only warranted for complicated engineering models? Would not numerical errors be an insignificant component of total uncertainty when typical data and model approximations are present? Is this really a serious issue beyond some rare isolated

  1. Autonomous Aerobraking Using Thermal Response Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Jill L.; Dec, John A.; Tolson, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    Aerobraking is a proven method of significantly increasing the science payload that can be placed into low Mars orbits when compared to an all propulsive capture. However, the aerobraking phase is long and has mission cost and risk implications. The main cost benefit is that aerobraking permits the use of a smaller and cheaper launch vehicle, but additional operational costs are incurred during the long aerobraking phase. Risk is increased due to the repeated thermal loading of spacecraft components and the multiple attitude and propulsive maneuvers required for successful aerobraking. Both the cost and risk burdens can be significantly reduced by automating the aerobraking operations phase. All of the previous Mars orbiter missions that have utilized aerobraking have increasingly relied on onboard calculations during aerobraking. Even though the temperature of spacecraft components has been the limiting factor, operational methods have relied on using a surrogate variable for mission control. This paper describes several methods, based directly on spacecraft component maximum temperature, for autonomously predicting the subsequent aerobraking orbits and prescribing apoapsis propulsive maneuvers to maintain the spacecraft within specified temperature limits. Specifically, this paper describes the use of thermal response surface analysis in predicting the temperature of the spacecraft components and the corresponding uncertainty in this temperature prediction.

  2. Sensitivity Analysis and Variational Data Assimilation for ice flow - Application to the Mertz ice-tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, N.; Monnier, J.

    2012-12-01

    To be confident in the accuracy of the modelling of ice flows requires to con- front numerical experiments to actual observations. This type of flow is strongly sensitive to its input parameters such as rheological parameters and boundary conditions like the friction on the bedrock. Using optimal control theory, we build a global 4D-Var algorithm using direct and adjoint model of the variational problem thus providing local sensitivity analysis and data assimilation (see [1]). In order to compute approximation of these flows, one consider the non newtonian velocity- pressure Stokes system described using mixed finite element method. The treat- ment of the free surface is performed using an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian de- scription with robus elastic deformation and the adjoint method is constructed by algorithmic differentiation of the direct code using Tapenade software (INRIA). We lean on prior developments of the software DassFlow (see [2]). One of the major question for inverse methods in glaciology is to infer the fric- tion coefficient at bottom through data assimilation because it cannot be measured. In other respect, our first results based on real data shows that the rheological expo- nent and/or the thermal coefficient of the constitutive law (distributed parameter) has the same type of influence (see Figure 1) and can be inferred as well. Another modeling issue lies in the dynamic of the grounding line when con- sidering the floating part of the ice domain. Then, sensitivity analysis of the model response with respect to this grounding line dynamic leads to a better understand- ing of this unstable process and its empirical modelling. We present a real data application on the Mertz ice-shelf (Antarctica). Topography and surface velocities data are being provided by B. Legrésy (see [3]). References [1] Martin, N. and Monnier, J. : A three fields finite elements solver for viscoplas- tic free surface flows and variational data assimilation. In

  3. The sensitivity of surface mass loading displacement response to perturbations in the elastic structure of the crust and mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Hilary R.; Rivera, Luis; Simons, Mark; Ito, Takeo

    2016-05-01

    Surface mass loads generate a rich spectrum of deformation responses in the solid Earth that might be exploited to probe the material properties of the crust and mantle. Here we present a detailed examination of load-induced surface displacements and their sensitivities to systematic perturbations in elastic Earth structure. We compute Love numbers and displacement load Green's functions (LGFs) by integrating the equations of motion for spheroidal deformation of a radially heterogeneous and self-gravitating Earth. Sensitivity kernels are derived for individual Love numbers numerically using finite differences and quasi-analytically using calculus of variations. We then generate sensitivity kernels for displacement LGFs by systematically perturbing the preliminary reference Earth model. We find that displacement LGFs are most sensitive to elastic structural perturbations within 500 km depth from the surface and for short source-receiver distances. For separate perturbations to the shear modulus, bulk modulus, and density within the crust and mantle, the sensitivity kernels exhibit unique patterns, consistent with the possibility to constrain the parameters independently given a spatially distributed set of sufficiently accurate loading response observations. The sensitivity to density structure, however, is generally weak in comparison to elastic structure. We also examine the sensitivity of surface displacements caused by M2 ocean tidal loading (OTL) to systematic perturbations in the elastic moduli and density. Since OTL-induced surface displacements are load and site dependent, we focus on high-resolution profiles across Iceland as a case study. The sensitivity kernels constitute a key element in the formulation of the inverse problem with application to geodetic tomography.

  4. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS BASED ON LANCZOS ALGORITHM IN STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李书; 王波; 胡继忠

    2003-01-01

    The sensitivity calculating formulas in structural dynamics was developed byutilizing the mathematical theorem and new definitions of sensitivities. So the singularityproblem of sensitivity with repeated eigenvalues is solved completely. To improve thecomputational efficiency, the reduction system is obtained based on Lanczos vectors. Afterincorporating the mathematical theory with the Lanczos algorithm, the approximatesensitivity solution can be obtained. A numerical example is presented to illustrate theperformance of the method.

  5. Surface Operations Data Analysis and Adaptation Tool Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This effort undertook the creation of a Surface Operations Data Analysis and Adaptation (SODAA) tool to store data relevant to airport surface research and...

  6. Performance Model and Sensitivity Analysis for a Solar Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Naveed Ur; Siddiqui, Mubashir Ali

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a regression model for evaluating the performance of solar concentrated thermoelectric generators (SCTEGs) is established and the significance of contributing parameters is discussed in detail. The model is based on several natural, design and operational parameters of the system, including the thermoelectric generator (TEG) module and its intrinsic material properties, the connected electrical load, concentrator attributes, heat transfer coefficients, solar flux, and ambient temperature. The model is developed by fitting a response curve, using the least-squares method, to the results. The sample points for the model were obtained by simulating a thermodynamic model, also developed in this paper, over a range of values of input variables. These samples were generated employing the Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) technique using a realistic distribution of parameters. The coefficient of determination was found to be 99.2%. The proposed model is validated by comparing the predicted results with those in the published literature. In addition, based on the elasticity for parameters in the model, sensitivity analysis was performed and the effects of parameters on the performance of SCTEGs are discussed in detail. This research will contribute to the design and performance evaluation of any SCTEG system for a variety of applications.

  7. Sensitivity Analysis for the CLIC Damping Ring Inductive Adder

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings will produce, through synchrotron radiation, ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge, necessary for the luminosity performance of the collider. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse generators for the damping ring kickers must provide extremely flat, high-voltage pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the CLIC damping rings are particularly demanding: the flattop of the output pulse must be 160 ns duration, 12.5 kV and 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 %. An inductive adder allows the use of different modulation techniques and is therefore a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. PSpice has been utilised to carry out a sensitivity analysis of the predicted output pulse to the value of both individual and groups of circuit compon...

  8. A Sensitivity Analysis of fMRI Balloon Model

    KAUST Repository

    Zayane, Chadia

    2015-04-22

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows the mapping of the brain activation through measurements of the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast. The characterization of the pathway from the input stimulus to the output BOLD signal requires the selection of an adequate hemodynamic model and the satisfaction of some specific conditions while conducting the experiment and calibrating the model. This paper, focuses on the identifiability of the Balloon hemodynamic model. By identifiability, we mean the ability to estimate accurately the model parameters given the input and the output measurement. Previous studies of the Balloon model have somehow added knowledge either by choosing prior distributions for the parameters, freezing some of them, or looking for the solution as a projection on a natural basis of some vector space. In these studies, the identification was generally assessed using event-related paradigms. This paper justifies the reasons behind the need of adding knowledge, choosing certain paradigms, and completing the few existing identifiability studies through a global sensitivity analysis of the Balloon model in the case of blocked design experiment.

  9. Performance Model and Sensitivity Analysis for a Solar Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Naveed Ur; Siddiqui, Mubashir Ali

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a regression model for evaluating the performance of solar concentrated thermoelectric generators (SCTEGs) is established and the significance of contributing parameters is discussed in detail. The model is based on several natural, design and operational parameters of the system, including the thermoelectric generator (TEG) module and its intrinsic material properties, the connected electrical load, concentrator attributes, heat transfer coefficients, solar flux, and ambient temperature. The model is developed by fitting a response curve, using the least-squares method, to the results. The sample points for the model were obtained by simulating a thermodynamic model, also developed in this paper, over a range of values of input variables. These samples were generated employing the Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) technique using a realistic distribution of parameters. The coefficient of determination was found to be 99.2%. The proposed model is validated by comparing the predicted results with those in the published literature. In addition, based on the elasticity for parameters in the model, sensitivity analysis was performed and the effects of parameters on the performance of SCTEGs are discussed in detail. This research will contribute to the design and performance evaluation of any SCTEG system for a variety of applications.

  10. GPS/INS Integration: A Performance Sensitivity Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jin-ling; H. K. Lee; C. Rizos

    2003-01-01

    Inertial Navigation System (INS) and Global Positioning System (GPS) technologies have been widely used in a variety of positioning and navigation applications. Both systems have their unique features and shortcomings. Therefore, the integration of GPS with INS is now critical to overcome each of their drawbacks and to maximize each of their benefits. The integration of GPS with INS can be implemented using a Kalman filter in such modes as loosely, tightly and ultra-tightly coupled. In all these integration modes the INS error states, together with any navigation state (position, velocity, attitude) and other unknown parameters of interest, are estimated using GPS measurements. In a high performance system it is expected that all these unknown states will be precisely estimated. Although it has been noted that both the quality of the GPS measurements and the trajectory and/or manoeuvre characteristics of the problem will have impacts on system performance, a systematic sensitivity analysis is still lacking. This paper will address this issue through real data analyses. The performance analysisresults are very relevant to system design and platform trajectory and/or manoeuvre optimisation.

  11. Sensitivity analysis on parameters and processes affecting vapor intrusion risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, Sara; Valstar, Johan; van Gaans, Pauline; Grotenhuis, Tim; Rijnaarts, Huub

    2012-05-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model was developed and used to identify the key processes controlling vapor intrusion risks by means of a sensitivity analysis. The model simulates the fate of a dissolved volatile organic compound present below the ventilated crawl space of a house. In contrast to the vast majority of previous studies, this model accounts for vertical variation of soil water saturation and includes aerobic biodegradation. The attenuation factor (ratio between concentration in the crawl space and source concentration) and the characteristic time to approach maximum concentrations were calculated and compared for a variety of scenarios. These concepts allow an understanding of controlling mechanisms and aid in the identification of critical parameters to be collected for field situations. The relative distance of the source to the nearest gas-filled pores of the unsaturated zone is the most critical parameter because diffusive contaminant transport is significantly slower in water-filled pores than in gas-filled pores. Therefore, attenuation factors decrease and characteristic times increase with increasing relative distance of the contaminant dissolved source to the nearest gas diffusion front. Aerobic biodegradation may decrease the attenuation factor by up to three orders of magnitude. Moreover, the occurrence of water table oscillations is of importance. Dynamic processes leading to a retreating water table increase the attenuation factor by two orders of magnitude because of the enhanced gas phase diffusion.

  12. Context Sensitive Article Ranking with Citation Context Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Doslu, Metin

    2015-01-01

    It is hard to detect important articles in a specific context. Information retrieval techniques based on full text search can be inaccurate to identify main topics and they are not able to provide an indication about the importance of the article. Generating a citation network is a good way to find most popular articles but this approach is not context aware. The text around a citation mark is generally a good summary of the referred article. So citation context analysis presents an opportunity to use the wisdom of crowd for detecting important articles in a context sensitive way. In this work, we analyze citation contexts to rank articles properly for a given topic. The model proposed uses citation contexts in order to create a directed and weighted citation network based on the target topic. We create a directed and weighted edge between two articles if citation context contains terms related with the target topic. Then we apply common ranking algorithms in order to find important articles in this newly cre...

  13. Sensitivity analysis on parameters and processes affecting vapor intrusion risk

    KAUST Repository

    Picone, Sara

    2012-03-30

    A one-dimensional numerical model was developed and used to identify the key processes controlling vapor intrusion risks by means of a sensitivity analysis. The model simulates the fate of a dissolved volatile organic compound present below the ventilated crawl space of a house. In contrast to the vast majority of previous studies, this model accounts for vertical variation of soil water saturation and includes aerobic biodegradation. The attenuation factor (ratio between concentration in the crawl space and source concentration) and the characteristic time to approach maximum concentrations were calculated and compared for a variety of scenarios. These concepts allow an understanding of controlling mechanisms and aid in the identification of critical parameters to be collected for field situations. The relative distance of the source to the nearest gas-filled pores of the unsaturated zone is the most critical parameter because diffusive contaminant transport is significantly slower in water-filled pores than in gas-filled pores. Therefore, attenuation factors decrease and characteristic times increase with increasing relative distance of the contaminant dissolved source to the nearest gas diffusion front. Aerobic biodegradation may decrease the attenuation factor by up to three orders of magnitude. Moreover, the occurrence of water table oscillations is of importance. Dynamic processes leading to a retreating water table increase the attenuation factor by two orders of magnitude because of the enhanced gas phase diffusion. © 2012 SETAC.

  14. Sensitivity analysis on an AC600 aluminum skin component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiguren, J.; Agirre, J.; Mugarra, E.; Galdos, L.; Saenz de Argandoña, E.

    2016-08-01

    New materials are been introduced on the car body in order to reduce weight and fulfil the international CO2 emission regulations. Among them, the application of aluminum alloys is increasing for skin panels. Even if these alloys are beneficial for the car design, the manufacturing of these components become more complex. In this regard, numerical simulations have become a necessary tool for die designers. There are multiple factors affecting the accuracy of these simulations e.g. hardening, anisotropy, lubrication, elastic behavior. Numerous studies have been conducted in the last years on high strength steels component stamping and on developing new anisotropic models for aluminum cup drawings. However, the impact of the correct modelling on the latest aluminums for the manufacturing of skin panels has been not yet analyzed. In this work, first, the new AC600 aluminum alloy of JLR-Novelis is characterized for anisotropy, kinematic hardening, friction coefficient, elastic behavior. Next, a sensitivity analysis is conducted on the simulation of a U channel (with drawbeads). Then, the numerical an experimental results are correlated in terms of springback and failure. Finally, some conclusions are drawn.

  15. Understanding earth system models: how Global Sensitivity Analysis can help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianosi, Francesca; Wagener, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Computer models are an essential element of earth system sciences, underpinning our understanding of systems functioning and influencing the planning and management of socio-economic-environmental systems. Even when these models represent a relatively low number of physical processes and variables, earth system models can exhibit a complicated behaviour because of the high level of interactions between their simulated variables. As the level of these interactions increases, we quickly lose the ability to anticipate and interpret the model's behaviour and hence the opportunity to check whether the model gives the right response for the right reasons. Moreover, even if internally consistent, an earth system model will always produce uncertain predictions because it is often forced by uncertain inputs (due to measurement errors, pre-processing uncertainties, scarcity of measurements, etc.). Lack of transparency about the scope of validity, limitations and the main sources of uncertainty of earth system models can be a strong limitation to their effective use for both scientific and decision-making purposes. Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) is a set of statistical analysis techniques to investigate the complex behaviour of earth system models in a structured, transparent and comprehensive way. In this presentation, we will use a range of examples across earth system sciences (with a focus on hydrology) to demonstrate how GSA is a fundamental element in advancing the construction and use of earth system models, including: verifying the consistency of the model's behaviour with our conceptual understanding of the system functioning; identifying the main sources of output uncertainty so to focus efforts for uncertainty reduction; finding tipping points in forcing inputs that, if crossed, would bring the system to specific conditions we want to avoid.

  16. Sensitivity enhancement based on application of multi-pass interferometry in phase-sensitive surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, H. P.; Yuan, W.; Wong, C. L.; Wu, S. Y.; Suen, Y. K.; Kong, S. K.; Lin, Chinlon

    2007-07-01

    A novel design of multi-pass surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor with differential phase interrogation based on multi-pass interferometry is presented. This new configuration provides an intrinsic phase amplification effect of over twofold by placing the SPR sensor head in a signal arm of the interferometer so that the interrogating optical beam will traverse the sensor surface infinite number of times. Experimental interferometers based on the Michelson and Fabry-Perot configurations have been employed to experimentally verify this amplification effect when they were compared with Mach-Zehnder configuration, results obtained from salt-water mixtures, antibody-antigen, and protein-DNA binding reaction confirmed the expected phase measurement enhancement, thus leading to the possibility of direct detection of small sized bio-molecules using SPR.

  17. Enhanced detection sensitivity of Escherichia coli O157:H7 using surface-modified gold nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasamy M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohankandhasamy Ramasamy,1 Dong Kee Yi,2,3 Seong Soo A An4 1School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, 2Department of Chemistry, 3Department of Energy and Biotechnology, Myongji University, Yongin, 4Department of BioNano Technology, Gachon University, Seongnam, Republic of Korea Abstract: Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157 is a Gram negative and highly virulent bacteria found in food and water sources, and is a leading cause of chronic diseases worldwide. Diagnosis and prevention from the infection require simple and rapid analysis methods for the detection of pathogens, including O157. Endogenous membrane peroxidase, an enzyme present on the surface of O157, was used for the colorimetric detection of bacteria by catalytic oxidation of the peroxidase substrate. In this study, we have analyzed the impact of the synthesized bare gold nanorods (AuNRs and silica-coated AuNRs on the growth of E. coli O157. Along with the membrane peroxidase activity of O157, other bacteria strains were analyzed. Different concentrations of nanorods were used to analyze the growth responses, enzymatic changes, and morphological alterations of bacteria by measuring optical density, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine assay, flow cytometry analysis, and microscopy studies. The results revealed that O157 showed higher and continuous membrane peroxidase activity than other bacteria. Furthermore, O157 treated with bare AuNRs showed a decreased growth rate in comparison with the bacteria with surface modified AuNRs. Interestingly, silica-coated AuNRs favored the growth of bacteria and also increased membrane peroxidase activity. This result can be particularly important for the enzymatic analysis of surface treated AuNRs in various microbiological applicants. Keywords: E. coli, O157:H7, endogenous membrane peroxidase, gold nanorod, silica-coated gold nanorod

  18. Surface-sensitive conductivity measurement using a micro multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkins, Edward; Barreto, Lucas; Wells, Justin

    2013-01-01

    An instrument for microscale electrical transport measurements in ultra-high vacuum is presented. The setup is constructed around collinear lithographically-created multi-point probes with a contact spacing down to 500 nm. Most commonly, twelve-point probes are used. These probes are approached...... measurements with an equidistant four-point probe for a wide range of contact spacings. In this way, it is possible to distinguish between bulk-like and surface-like conduction. The paper describes the design of the instrument and the approach to data and error analysis. Application examples are given...

  19. Smart structure with elastomeric contact surface for prosthetic fingertip sensitivity development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chunxin; Liu, Weiting; Yu, Ping; Cheng, Xiaoying; Fu, Xin

    2017-09-01

    Current flexible/compliant tactile sensors suffer from low sensitivity and high hysteresis introduced by the essential viscosity characteristic of soft material, either used as compliant sensing element or as flexible coverage. To overcome these disadvantages, this paper focuses on developing a tactile sensor with a smart hybrid structure to obtain comprehensive properties in terms of size, compliance, robustness and pressure sensing ability so as to meet the requirements of limited space applications such as prosthetic fingertips. Employing micro-fabricated tiny silicon-based pressure die as the sensing element, it is easy to have both small size and good mechanical performance. To protect it from potential damage and maintain the compliant surface, a rigid base and a soft layer form a sealed chamber and encapsulate the fixed die together with fluid. The fluid serves as highly efficient pressure propagation media of mechanical stimulus from the compliant skin to the pressure die without any hazard impacting the vulnerable connecting wires. To understand the pressure transmission mechanism, a simplified and concise analytic model of a spring system is proposed. Using easy fabrication technologies, a prototype of a 3 × 3 sensor array with total dimensions of 14 mm × 14 mm × 6.5 mm was developed. Based on the quasi-linear relationship between fluid volume and pressure, finite element modeling was developed to analyze the chamber deformation and pressure output of the sensor cell. Experimental tests of the sensor prototype were implemented. The results showed that the sensor cell had good sensing performance with sensitivity of 19.9 mV N-1, linearity of 0.998, repeatability error of 3.41%, and hysteresis error of 3.34%. The force sensing range was from 5 mN to 1.6 N.

  20. Effect of photoanode surface coverage by a sensitizer on the photovoltaic performance of titania based CdS quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajendra M B; Pathan, Habib M

    2016-04-08

    In spite of the promising design and architecture, quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) have a long way to go before they attain the actual projected photoconversion efficiencies. Such an inferior performance displayed by QDSSCs is primarily because of many unwanted recombination losses of charge carriers at various interfaces of the cell. Electron recombination due to back electron transfer at the photoanode/electrolyte interface is an important one that needs to be addressed, to improve the efficiency of these third generation nanostructured solar cells. The present work highlights the importance of conformal coverage of CdS quantum dots (QDs) on the surface of the nanocrystalline titania photoanode in arresting such recombinations, leading to improvement in the performance of the cells. Using the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) process, photoanodes are subjected to different amounts of CdS QD sensitization by varying the number of cycles of deposition. The sensitized electrodes are characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and transmission electron microscopy to evaluate the extent of surface coverage of titania electrodes by QDs. Sandwich solar cells are then fabricated using these electrodes and characterized employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and J-V characteristics. It is observed that maximum solar cell efficiency is obtained for photoanodes with conformal coating of QDs and any further deposition of sensitizer leads to QD aggregation and so reduces the performance of the solar cells.

  1. Mathematical analysis and calculation of molecular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Chaoyu; Stamm, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    In this article we derive a complete characterization of the Solvent Excluded Surface (SES) for molecular systems including a complete characterization of singularities of the surface. The theory is based on an implicit representation of the SES, which, in turn, is based on the signed distance function to the Solvent Accessible Surface (SAS). All proofs are constructive so that the theory allows for efficient algorithms in order to compute the area of the SES and the volume of the SES-cavity, or to visualize the surface. Further, we propose to refine the notion of SAS and SES in order to take inner holes in a solute molecule into account or not.

  2. Measurement and Analysis on Neutron Position Sensitive Detector at CARR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Jian-bo; HAO; Li-jie; LIU; Xin-zhi; MA; Xiao-bai; LI; Yu-qing

    2013-01-01

    Neutron position sensitive detector is one of the key components for neutron scattering spectrometer.As the eyes of the spectrometer,the detector is mainly used for recording the position and intensity of the neutrons.The 16 linear position sensitive detectors from GE Reuter-Stokes Company have been measured

  3. Uncertainty, sensitivity analysis and the role of data based mechanistic modeling in hydrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ratto

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the problem of calibration and uncertainty estimation for hydrologic systems from two points of view: a bottom-up, reductionist approach; and a top-down, data-based mechanistic (DBM approach. The two approaches are applied to the modelling of the River Hodder catchment in North-West England. The bottom-up approach is developed using the TOPMODEL, whose structure is evaluated by global sensitivity analysis (GSA in order to specify the most sensitive and important parameters; and the subsequent exercises in calibration and validation are carried out in the light of this sensitivity analysis. GSA helps to improve the calibration of hydrological models, making their properties more transparent and highlighting mis-specification problems. The DBM model provides a quick and efficient analysis of the rainfall-flow data, revealing important characteristics of the catchment-scale response, such as the nature of the effective rainfall nonlinearity and the partitioning of the effective rainfall into different flow pathways. TOPMODEL calibration takes more time and it explains the flow data a little less well than the DBM model. The main differences in the modelling results are in the nature of the models and the flow decomposition they suggest. The "quick'' (63% and "slow'' (37% components of the decomposed flow identified in the DBM model show a clear partitioning of the flow, with the quick component apparently accounting for the effects of surface and near surface processes; and the slow component arising from the displacement of groundwater into the river channel (base flow. On the other hand, the two output flow components in TOPMODEL have a different physical interpretation, with a single flow component (95% accounting for both slow (subsurface and fast (surface dynamics, while the other, very small component (5% is interpreted as an instantaneous surface runoff generated by rainfall falling on areas of

  4. Optimal pressure-sensitive cuts for surface acoustic waves on langasite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The crystal langasite manifests its unique advantages and potentials for high temperature applications due to a high electromechanical coupling coefficient, temperature compensated orientations for surface acoustic wave (SAW), and temperature stability. In order to analyze the pressure-induced frequency shift in SAW resonator type sensors at high temperature, this paper presents the electroelastic wave equations employing the effective material constants for small vibrations superimposed on biases originated from homogeneous temperature and external pressure fields in the Lagrangian description. Incorporated with the first-order perturbation integration, a model including both the mechanical and electrical perturbation items originating from thermal biases and small pressure fields is proposed. This universal model is suitable for substrate with high piezoelectricity and can be applied at either room temperature or high temperature circumstance. The criteria of optimal cuts for SAW pressure sensitivity, I.e., high electromechanical coupling coefficient and low temperature coefficient of delay, are proposed. A thorough investigation in trebly rotated cuts has shown that optimal pressure sensitive crystallographic areas can be obtained. The areas suitable for pressure sensors at room temperature are defined with Euler anglesThe areas suitable for pressure sensors at high temperature are defined with Euler anglesΩ1: φ= 0°―0.6°,θ= 144.4°―145.8°, ψ= 23.2°―24.1°,Ω2: φ=59.4°―61°,θ= 34.2°―36.2°, ψ= 24.1°―22.3°,Ω3: φ=119°―120°,θ = 143.8°―145.5°, ψ= 22.3°―23.5°.The areas suitable for pressure sensors at high temperature are defined with Euler anglesI:φ= 8°―30°,θ= 24°―36°,ψ= 4°―25°,II:φ = 30°―55°,θ= 144°―158°,ψ= 4°―28°.A set of experiments employing LGS (0, 150°, 22°) and (0, 90°, 0) has been performed to check the validity of the proposed calculation. The experimental relative sensitivity is

  5. Electroless-plated gold films for sensitive surface plasmon resonance detection of white spot syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yun; Chen, Hongyu; Dai, Heping; Zeng, Zhaorui; Lin, Yi; Zhou, Feimeng; Pang, Daiwen

    2008-02-28

    The paper describes the rapid and label-free detection of the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) device based on gold films prepared by electroless plating. The plating condition for obtaining films suitable for SPR measurements was optimized. Gold nanoparticles adsorbed on glass slides were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Detection of the WSSV was performed through the binding between WSSV in solution and the anti-WSSV single chain variable fragment (scFv antibody) preimmobilized onto the sensor surface. Morphologies of the as-prepared gold films, gold films modified with self-assembled alkanethiol monolayers, and films covered with antibody were examined using an atomic force microscope (AFM). To demonstrate the viability of the method for real sample analysis, WSSV of different concentrations present in a shrimp hemolymph matrix was determined upon optimizing the surface density of the antibody molecules. The SPR device based on the electroless-plated gold films is capable of detecting concentration of WSSV as low as 2.5 ng/mL in 2% shrimp hemolymph, which is one to two orders of magnitude lower than the level measurable by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays.

  6. Improving the Design of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers Aided with Sensitivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Martowicz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of analysis performed to search for feasible design improvements for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer. Carried out search has been aided with the sensitivity analysis and the application of Response Surface Method. The multiphysics approach has been taken into account in elaborated finite element model of one cell of described transducer in order to include significant physical phenomena present in modelled microdevice. The set of twelve input uncertain and design parameters consists of geometric, material and control properties. The amplitude of dynamic membrane deformation of the transducer has been chosen as studied parameter. The objective of performed study has been defined as the task of finding robust design configurations of the transducer, i.e. characterizing maximal value of deformation amplitude with its minimal variation.

  7. Surface Acoustic Wave Monitor for Deposition and Analysis of Ultra-Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) based thin film deposition monitor device and system for monitoring the deposition of ultra-thin films and nanomaterials and the analysis thereof is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include differential delay line device designs, and which can optionally have integral reference devices fabricated on the same substrate as the sensing device, or on a separate device in thermal contact with the film monitoring/analysis device, in order to provide inherently temperature compensated measurements. These deposition monitor and analysis devices can include inherent temperature compensation, higher sensitivity to surface interactions than quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and the ability to operate at extreme temperatures.

  8. Sensitivity of tropical cyclone characteristics to the radial distribution of sea surface temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepika Rai; S Pattnaik; P V Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Sea Surface Temperature (SST) is crucial for the development and maintenance of a tropical cyclone(TC) particularly below the storm core region. However, storm data below the core region is the mostdifficult to obtain, hence it is not clear yet that how sensitive the radial distribution of the SST impactthe storm characteristic features such as its inner-core structures, translational speed, track, rainfalland intensity particularly over the Bay of Bengal. To explore the effects of radial SST distributionon the TC characteristics, a series of numerical experiments were carried out by modifying the SSTat different radial extents using two-way interactive, triply-nested, nonhydrostatic Advanced WeatherResearch and Forecast (WRF-ARW) model. It is found that not only the SST under the eyewall (coreregion) contribute significantly to modulate storm track, translational speed and intensity, but also thoseoutside the eyewall region (i.e., 2–2.5 times the radius of maximum wind (RMW)) play a vital role indefining the storm’s characteristics and structure. Out of all the simulated experiments, storm wherethe positive radial change of SST inducted within the 75 km of the storm core (i.e., P75) produced thestrongest storm. In addition, N300 (negative radial changes at 300 km) produced the weakest storm.Further, it is found that SST, stronger within 2–2.5 times of the RMW for P75 experiment, plays adominant role in maintaining 10 m wind speed (WS10), surface entropy flux (SEF) and upward verticalvelocity (w) within the eyewall with warmer air temperature (T) and equivalent potential temperature(θe) within the storm’s eye compared to other experiments.

  9. Expansive soil-structure interaction and its sensitive analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Hong-bin; ZHANG Chun-shun; HE Jie; FAN Zhen-hui

    2007-01-01

    Several groups of direct shear tests of Nanning expansive soil samples were carried out by improved direct shear apparatus. The results of the characteristics of the ultimate shear stress and residual shear stress at the interface of expansive soil-structure are presented as follows: linear relation can approximately reflect changes between the both shear stress and the three factors: vertical load, water content and dry density, just different degrees from each other; increasing the vertical load from 25 kPa to 100 kPa (up by 300%) can cause the average increase of ultimate shear stress from 58% (for samples with 1.61 g/cm3) to 80% (for samples with 1.76 g/cm3), and an close average increase of 180% for the residual shear stress; increasing the water content from 14.1% to 20.8% (up by 47.5%) can cause the average decrease of the ultimate shear stress from 40% (for samples with 25 kPa) to 80% (for samples with 100 kPa), and the average decrease from 25% (for samples with 25 kPa) to 30% (for samples with 100 kPa)for the residual shear stress; increasing the dry density from 1.61 g/cm3 to 1.76 g/cm3 (up by 9.3%) can cause the average increase of ultimate shear stress from 92% (for samples with 25 kPa) to 138% (for samples with 100 kPa), and an average increase of 4% for the residual shear stress. Sensitive analysis was further made to explain reasons causing the differences of the both shear stress induced by the three factors.

  10. Sorption of redox-sensitive elements: critical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickert, R.G.

    1980-12-01

    The redox-sensitive elements (Tc, U, Np, Pu) discussed in this report are of interest to nuclear waste management due to their long-lived isotopes which have a potential radiotoxic effect on man. In their lower oxidation states these elements have been shown to be highly adsorbed by geologic materials occurring under reducing conditions. Experimental research conducted in recent years, especially through the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) and Waste/Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) program, has provided extensive information on the mechanisms of retardation. In general, ion-exchange probably plays a minor role in the sorption behavior of cations of the above three actinide elements. Formation of anionic complexes of the oxidized states with common ligands (OH/sup -/, CO/sup - -//sub 3/) is expected to reduce adsorption by ion exchange further. Pertechnetate also exhibits little ion-exchange sorption by geologic media. In the reduced (IV) state, all of the elements are highly charged and it appears that they form a very insoluble compound (oxide, hydroxide, etc.) or undergo coprecipitation or are incorporated into minerals. The exact nature of the insoluble compounds and the effect of temperature, pH, pe, other chemical species, and other parameters are currently being investigated. Oxidation states other than Tc (IV,VII), U(IV,VI), Np(IV,V), and Pu(IV,V) are probably not important for the geologic repository environment expected, but should be considered especially when extreme conditions exist (radiation, temperature, etc.). Various experimental techniques such as oxidation-state analysis of tracer-level isotopes, redox potential measurement and control, pH measurement, and solid phase identification have been used to categorize the behavior of the various valence states.

  11. Sensitivity analysis for a type of statically stable sailcrafts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-Xue Li; Jun-Feng Li; He-Xi Baoyin

    2012-01-01

    Two types of sensitivities are proposed for statically stable sailcrafts. One type is the sensitivities of solar-radiation-pressure force with respect to position of the center of mass,and the other type is the sensitivities of solar-radiation-pressure force with respect to attitude.The two types of sensitivities represent how the solar-radiationpressure force changes with the position of mass center and the attitude.Sailcrafts with larger sensitivities undergo larger error of the solar-radiation-pressure force,leading to larger orbit error,as demonstrated by simulation.Then as a case study,detailed formulas are derived to calculate the sensitivities for sailcrafts with four triangular sails.According to these formulas,in order to reduce both types of sensitivities,the angle between opposed sails should not be too large,and the center of mass should be as close to the axis of symmetry of the four sails as possible and as far away from the center of pressure of the sailcraft as possible.

  12. Imaging natural and artificial demineralization on dentin surfaces with polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manesh, Saman K; Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) to measure non-destructively the severity of natural and artificial caries lesions in dentin and determine the efficacy of intervention with anti-caries agents. Although several studies have demonstrated the utility of PS-OCT to image caries lesions in enamel and to quantify the lesion severity, only a few studies have focused on lesions in dentin. In this study images of natural root caries lesions on extracted human teeth were acquired with PS-OCT. In addition artificial lesions were produced in dentin after 12 days of exposure to a demineralization solution at a pH of 5.0. Before exposure, three incisions were made on the sample surfaces using Er:YAG laser irradiation and selected areas were treated with topical fluoride. PS-OCT images were acquired using a high power (45-mw) 1310-nm superluminescent diode with a bandwidth of 35-nm. PS-OCT was able to measure demineralization in dentin to a depth of ~ 1 mm. Polarized light microscopy and microradiography were used to measure lesion severity on histological thin sections for comparison. PS-OCT successfully measured the inhibition of demineralization by topical fluoride. Er:YAG laser irradiation did not significantly increase or decrease the rate of dentin demineralization.

  13. Sensitivities of NOx transformation and the effects on surface ozone and nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lei

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available As precursors for tropospheric ozone and nitrate aerosols, Nitrogen oxides (NOx in present atmosphere and its transformation in responding to emission and climate perturbations are studied by CAM-Chem model and air quality measurements including National Emission Inventory (NEI, Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET and Environmental Protection Agency Air Quality System (EPA AQS. It is found that not only the surface ozone formation but also the nitrate formation is associated with the relative emissions of NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOC. Due to the availability of VOC and associated NOx titration, ozone productions in industrial regions increase in warmer conditions and slightly decrease against NOx emission increase, which is converse to the response in farming region. The decrease or small increase in ozone concentrations over industrial regions result in the responded nitrate increasing rate staying above the increasing rate of NOx emissions. It is indicated that ozone concentration change is more directly affected by changes in climate and precursor emissions, while nitrate concentration change is also affected by local ozone production types and their seasonal transfer. The sensitivity to temperature perturbations shows that warmer climate accelerates the decomposition of odd nitrogen (NOy during the night. As a result, the transformation rate of NOx to nitrate decreases. Examinations on the historical emission and air quality records on typical pollution areas further confirm the conclusion drawn from modeling experiments.

  14. In-situ surface sensitive X-ray investigations of quench condensed thin metal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markert, Christian; Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, Dirk; Gertz, Sascha; Frahm, Ronald [Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Fachbereich C / Abteilung Physik, Gaussstrasse 20, 42119 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    We report of ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) experiments on ultra thin Au, Bi and Pb films (thickness less than 10 nm) deposited on atomically flat float-glass substrates which are held at cryogenic temperatures down to 10 K. For deposition temperatures below 100 K the formation of highly disordered or even amorphous metal films can be expected, because thermally activated diffusion of the ad atoms should be inhibited. An UHV chamber was constructed which is suited for grazing incidence X-ray experiments during the quench condensation of the metal films. Various X-ray methods were used for the in-situ investigation of the films growth and their structural evolution with the thickness and an subsequent annealing process. EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) in reflection is used to study the local structure of the films. Furthermore specular and non-specular X-ray reflectivity measurements were performed to get information about the films density and surface roughness parameters (correlation length, hurst parameter etc.). In addition in situ resistivity measurements which are sensitive towards changes of the films microstructure were performed in parallel to the X-ray experiments.

  15. Comparison of unsteady pressure fields on turrets with different surface features using pressure-sensitive paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeyev, Stanislav; De Lucca, Nicholas; Jumper, Eric J.; Hird, Kyle; Juliano, Thomas J.; Gregory, James W.; Thordahl, James; Wittich, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    Spatially temporally resolved unsteady pressure fields on a surface of a hemisphere-on-cylinder turret with either a flat or a conformal window with realistic features such as gaps and "smile" cutouts were characterized using fast-response pressure-sensitive paint at M = 0.33 for several window viewing angles. Various statistical properties of pressure fields were computed, and geometry effects on the unsteady pressure fields were analyzed and discussed. Proper orthogonal decomposition was also used to extract dominant pressure modes and corresponding temporal coefficients and to analyze and compare instantaneous pressure structures for different turret geometric features and the window viewing angles. An unsteady separation off the turret and a recirculation region downstream of the turret were identified as dominant sources of the unsteady pressure. It was found that while all geometric features affected the unsteady pressure field, the "smiles," positioned spanwise-symmetrically on both sides of the turret, were the leading cause of these changes, followed by the looking forward flat window. The gaps, the side- and the back-looking flat window introduced only small local changes.

  16. SBML-SAT: a systems biology markup language (SBML) based sensitivity analysis tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Zhike; Zheng, Yanan; Rundell, Ann E; Klipp, Edda

    2008-08-15

    It has long been recognized that sensitivity analysis plays a key role in modeling and analyzing cellular and biochemical processes. Systems biology markup language (SBML) has become a well-known platform for coding and sharing mathematical models of such processes. However, current SBML compatible software tools are limited in their ability to perform global sensitivity analyses of these models. This work introduces a fr