WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface science division

  1. Technical activities, 1990: Surface Science Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, C.J.

    1991-05-01

    The report summarizes technical activities and accomplishments of the NIST Surface Science Division during Fiscal Year 1990. Overviews are presented of the Division and of its three constituent groups: Surface Dynamical Processes, Thin Films and Interfaces, and Surface Spectroscopies and Standards. These overviews are followed by reports of selected technical accomplishments during the year. A summary is given of Division outputs and interactions that includes lists of publications, talks, committee assignments, seminars (including both Division seminars and Interface Science seminars arranged through the Division), conferences organized, and a standard reference material certified. Finally, lists are given of Division staff and of guest scientists who have worked in the Division during the past year

  2. Surface and catalysis science in the Materials and Molecular Research Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Surface science studies at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are detailed. Subject areas include: structure of surfaces and adsorbed monolayers; reduction and oxidation of surfaces; catalytic chemistry; and structure of interfaces and thin films

  3. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division`s annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  4. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  5. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals

  6. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    conjugation using genetically encoded aldehyde tags. Nature Protocols 7, 1052 (2012). abstract » J. Y. Shu, R . Onoe, R. A. Mathies and M. B. Francis. Direct Attachment of Microbial Organisms to Material Surfaces -modified proteins to their binding partners. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 109, 4834

  7. Division of information and quantum sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The advent of the digital society where tremendous amount of information is electronically accessible has brought the intelligent information processing technologies indispensable. This division consists of seven departments; Information Science Departments (Knowledge Science, Intelligent Media, Architecture for Intelligence, Reasoning for Intelligence), Quantum Science Departments (Photonic and Electronic Materials, Semiconductor Electronics, and Advanced Electron Devices. The former four and the latter three departments aim to establish fundamental techniques to support the advanced digital society in terms of software and hardware technologies respectively. The departments on the former software technologies work on the task of computerizing the intelligent human information processing capability to help solving difficult engineering problems and assist intellectual activities. The departments on the latter hardware technologies pursue various approaches in the fields of electronic materials design and tailoring, surface physics, nanometer scale materials fabrication and characterization, semiconductor nanostructures for quantum devices, semiconductor-based new bio/chemical sensors, organic materials and biomolecules. We challenge to output world-widely significant achievements under our systematic cooperation, and further collaborate with researchers of domestic and overseas universities, research institutes and private companies. Moreover, we educate many graduate students belonging to Graduate School of Science (Department of Physics), Graduate School of Engineering (Department of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Department of Applied Physics), Graduate School of Engineering Science (Department of Materials Engineering Science), and Graduate School of Information Science and Technology (Department of Computer Science, Department of Information and Physical Sciences) under the aim to grow young researchers having both advanced knowledge and

  8. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division`s research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth`s crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required.

  9. Medical Sciences Division report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This year's Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE's core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE)

  10. Earth Sciences Division, collected abstracts-1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quitiquit, W.A.; Ledbetter, G.P.; Henry, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1977 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. It is arranged alphabetically by author and includes a cross-reference by subject indicating the areas of research interest of the Earth Sciences Division

  11. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division's research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth's crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required

  12. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, A.L.; Schwartz, L.L.

    1980-01-01

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1979 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract iself is given only under the name of the first author or the first Earth Sciences Division author. A topical index at the end of the report provides useful cross references, while indicating major areas of research interest in the Earth Sciences Division

  13. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 59 papers of the 1981 annual report of the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The general topics covered included nuclear waste isolation, geophysics and reservoir engineering, and geosciences

  14. Earth Sciences Division, collected abstracts, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taasevigen, D.K.; Henry, A.L.; Madsen, S.K.

    1979-01-01

    Abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1978 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are compiled. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For any given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor. A topical index at the end provides useful cross references, while indicating major areas of research interest in the Earth Sciences Division

  15. Medical Sciences Division report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This year`s Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE`s core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  16. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, A.L.; Hornady, B.F. (eds.)

    1981-10-15

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, reports, and talks presented during 1980 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract itself is given only under the name of the first author (indicated in capital letters) or the first Earth Sciences Division author.

  17. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. We are proud to be able to bring you this report, which we hope will convey not only a description of the Division's scientific activities but also a sense of the enthusiasm and excitement present today in the Earth Sciences.

  18. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, A.L.; Hornady, B.F.

    1981-01-01

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, reports, and talks presented during 1980 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract itself is given only under the name of the first author (indicated in capital letters) or the first Earth Sciences Division author

  19. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences)

  20. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations

  1. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W.D. [ed.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  2. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    , which aims to showcase some of the latest material science and metallurgy content published in the Synthesis Condensed Matter and Materials Physics Scattering and Instrumentation Science Centers Center for intrinsically consist of atomic rotation Scientists Discover Material Ideal for Smart Photovoltaic Windows A

  3. Life Sciences Division annual report, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrone, B.L.; Cram, L.S. (comps.)

    1989-04-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Life Sciences Division for the calendar year 1988. Technical reports related to the current status of projects are presented in sufficient detail to permit the informed reader to assess their scope and significance. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the Group Leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  4. Life Sciences Division annual report, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrone, B.L.; Cram, L.S.

    1989-04-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Life Sciences Division for the calendar year 1988. Technical reports related to the current status of projects are presented in sufficient detail to permit the informed reader to assess their scope and significance. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the Group Leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information

  5. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oegerle, William; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2009-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. This report includes the Division's activities during 2008.

  6. Earth Sciences Division annual report, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornady, B.; Duba, A.

    1977-01-01

    This compilation lists abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1976 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Subjects include: coal gasification, gas stimulation, geothermal fields, oil shale retorting, radioactive waste management, geochemistry, geophysics, seismology, explosive phenomenology, and miscellaneous studies

  7. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-01

    Summaries of the highlights of programs in the Earth Sciences Division are presented under four headings; Geosciences, Geothermal Energy Development, Nuclear Waste Isolation, and Marine Sciences. Utilizing both basic and applied research in a wide spectrum of topics, these programs are providing results that will be of value in helping to secure the nation's energy future. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each project for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  8. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, N.

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions

  9. Environmental Sciences Division Groundwater Program Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This first edition of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) Groundwater Program Annual Report summarizes the work carried out by the Energy Systems GWPO for fiscal year (FY) 1993. This introductory section describes the GWPO's staffing, organization, and funding sources. The GWPO is responsible for coordination and oversight for all components of the groundwater program at the three Oak Ridge facilities [ORNL, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site], and the PGDP and PORTS, respectively. Several years ago, Energy systems senior management recognized that the manner in which groundwater activities were conducted at the five facilities could result in unnecessary duplication of effort, inadequate technical input to decisions related to groundwater issues, and could create a perception within the regulatory agencies of a confusing and inconsistent approach to groundwater issues at the different facilities. Extensive interactions among management from Environmental Compliance, Environmental Restoration (ER), Environmental Sciences Division, Environmental Safety and Health, and the five facilities ultimately led to development of a net technical umbrella organization for groundwater. On April 25, 1991, the GWPO was authorized to be set up within ORNL thereby establishing a central coordinating office that would develop a consistent technical and administrative direction for the groundwater programs of all facilities and result in compliance with all relevant U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations such as RCRA and Comprehensive Environmental Restoration, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) as well as U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and orders. For example, DOE Order 5400.1, issued on November 9, 1988, called for each DOE facility to develop an environmental monitoring program for all media (e.g., air, surface water, and groundwater)

  10. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kimberly A. (Editor); Reddy, Francis J. (Editor); Tyler, Patricia A. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for two orbiting astrophysics missions Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and Swift as well as the Science Support Center for Fermi. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  11. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oegerle, William (Editor); Reddy, Francis (Editor); Tyler, Pat (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum - from gamma rays to radio wavelengths - as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions - WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  12. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2012-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division(ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center(GSFC)is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radiowavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contract imaging techniques to serch for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, and provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and suppport the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new conepts and inventing new technologies.

  13. Nuclear Science Division 1994 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the period of January 1, 1994, to December 31, 1994. This was a time of significant accomplishment for all of the programs in the Division. Assembly of the solar neutrino detector at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is well under way. All of the components fabricated by LBL were shipped to Sudbury early in the year and our efforts are now divided between assisting the assembly of the detector and preparing software for data analysis once the detector is operational in 1996. Much of the activity at the 88-Inch Cyclotron centered on Gammasphere. The open-quotes early implementationclose quotes phase of the detector ended in September. This phase was extremely successful, involving over 60 experiments with nearly 200 users from 37 institutions worldwide. The mechanical structure was installed and the final electronic system is expected to operate in March 1995. The Division concurrently hosted a conference on physics for large γ-ray detector arrays at the Clark Kerr Campus at UC Berkeley in August. This was a very successful meeting, reflecting the enthusiasm for this field worldwide. Also at the Cyclotron, the progress toward weak interaction experiments using ultra-thin sources passed a major milestone with the trapping of radioactive 21 Na atoms. We are now engaged in a major upgrade of the experimental area and the outlook is very promising for these novel experiments. Another highlight of research at the Cyclotron was the confirmation of element 106. This development allowed the original LLNL/LBL discovery team to move forward with their proposal to name this element seaborgium

  14. Nuclear Science Division 1994 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W.D. [ed.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the period of January 1, 1994, to December 31, 1994. This was a time of significant accomplishment for all of the programs in the Division. Assembly of the solar neutrino detector at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is well under way. All of the components fabricated by LBL were shipped to Sudbury early in the year and our efforts are now divided between assisting the assembly of the detector and preparing software for data analysis once the detector is operational in 1996. Much of the activity at the 88-Inch Cyclotron centered on Gammasphere. The {open_quotes}early implementation{close_quotes} phase of the detector ended in September. This phase was extremely successful, involving over 60 experiments with nearly 200 users from 37 institutions worldwide. The mechanical structure was installed and the final electronic system is expected to operate in March 1995. The Division concurrently hosted a conference on physics for large {gamma}-ray detector arrays at the Clark Kerr Campus at UC Berkeley in August. This was a very successful meeting, reflecting the enthusiasm for this field worldwide. Also at the Cyclotron, the progress toward weak interaction experiments using ultra-thin sources passed a major milestone with the trapping of radioactive {sup 21}Na atoms. We are now engaged in a major upgrade of the experimental area and the outlook is very promising for these novel experiments. Another highlight of research at the Cyclotron was the confirmation of element 106. This development allowed the original LLNL/LBL discovery team to move forward with their proposal to name this element seaborgium.

  15. Earth Sciences Division, collected abstracts-1977. [Research programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quitiquit, W.A.; Ledbetter, G.P.; Henry, A.L.

    1978-05-24

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1977 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. It is arranged alphabetically by author and includes a cross-reference by subject indicating the areas of research interest of the Earth Sciences Division.

  16. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division Program Report, 1988--1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    In 1990, the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division begins its 17th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to decades and from local to global. Our modeling is now reaching out from its atmospheric focus to treat linkages with the oceans and the land. In this report, we describe the Division's goal and organizational structure. We also provide tables and appendices describing the Division's budget, personnel, models, and publications. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Environment and Medical Sciences Division Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainge, W.M.

    1980-06-01

    The 1979 annual progress report of the UKAEA Environmental and Medical Sciences Division covers both radiological and non-nuclear research programmes in the environmental and toxicological fields. The specific topics were 1) 'atmospheric pollution' which included the analysis of atmospheric trace gases by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, the life cycle of atmospheric sulphur compounds, photochemical pollution, studies on stratospheric reactions, stratospheric ozone and the effects of pollutants, upper air sampling and monitoring gaseous atmospheric pollutants with passive samplers; 2) miscellaneous 'environmental safety projects'; 3) 'radiation physics' projects concerning a) radioactive fallout, b) studies of stable trace elements in the atmospheric environment and studies of radioactivity in the environment, c) various aspects of dosimetry research including radiation biophysics, d) personnel dosimetry, e) applied radiation spectrometry and f) data systems; 5) 'aerosol and metabolic studies' including whole body counting studies; 6) 'inhalation toxicology and radionuclide analysis' studies including actinide inhalation, cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity of non-radioactive dusts, asbestos and glass fibre research, a Qauntimet 720 image analysis service and radionuclide analysis in biological materials; and 7) 'analytical services' used in relation to 'environmental safety and chemical analysis' projects. (U.K.)

  18. Resource Management in the Microgravity Science Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casselle, Justine

    2004-01-01

    In the Microgravity Science Division, the primary responsibilities of the Business Management Office are resource management and data collection. Resource management involves working with a budget to do a number of specific projects, while data collection involves collecting information such as the status of projects and workforce hours. This summer in the Business Management Office I assisted Margie Allen with resource planning and the implementation of specific microgravity projects. One of the main duties of a Project Control Specialists, such as my mentor, is to monitor and analyze project manager s financial plans. Project managers work from the bottom up to determine how much money their project will cost. They then set up a twelve month operating plan which shows when money will be spent. I assisted my mentor in checking for variances in her data against those of the project managers. In order to successfully check for those variances, we had to understand: where the project is including plans vs. actual performance, why it is in its present condition, and what the future impact will be based on known budgetary parameters. Our objective was to make sure that the plan, or estimated resources input, are a valid reflection of the actual cost. To help with my understanding of the process, over the course of my tenure I had to obtain skills in Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access.

  19. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  20. Nuclear Science Division, 1995--1996 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poskanzer, A.M.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) for the two-year period, January 1, 1995 to January 1, 1997. This was a time of major accomplishments for all research programs in the Division-many of which are highlighted in the reports of this document

  1. Nuclear Science Division, 1995--1996 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poskanzer, A.M. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) for the two-year period, January 1, 1995 to January 1, 1997. This was a time of major accomplishments for all research programs in the Division-many of which are highlighted in the reports of this document.

  2. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1981. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 59 papers of the 1981 annual report of the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The general topics covered included nuclear waste isolation, geophysics and reservoir engineering, and geosciences. (KRM)

  3. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division: Program report, FY 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    In 1988 the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division began its 15th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to years, and from kilometers to global, respectively. For this report, we have chosen to show a subset of results from several projects to illustrate the breadth, depth, and diversity of the modeling activities that are a major part of the Division's research, development, and application efforts. In addition, the recent reorganization of the Division, including the merger of another group with the Division, is described, and the budget, personnel, models, and publications are reviewed. 95 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Nutritional Science Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Materials Sciences Division long range plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The intent of this document is to provide a framework for programmatic guidance into the future for Materials Sciences. The Materials Sciences program is the basic research program for materials in the Department of Energy. It includes a wide variety of activities associated with the sciences related to materials. It also includes the support for developing, constructing, and operating major facilities which are used extensively but not exclusively by the materials sciences

  6. Interfacial and Surface Science | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science group within the Material Science Center. He oversees research studies of surfaces and interfaces Interfacial and Surface Science Interfacial and Surface Science Image of irregular-outlined, light address a broad range of fundamental and applied issues in surface and interfacial science that are

  7. Biomaterials surface science

    CERN Document Server

    Taubert, Andreas; Rodriguez-Cabello, José Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The book provides an overview of the highly interdisciplinary field of surface science in the context of biological and biomedical applications. The covered topics range from micro- and nanostructuring for imparting functionality in a top-down manner to the bottom-up fabrication of gradient surfaces by self-assembly, from interfaces between biomaterials and living matter to smart, stimuli-responsive surfaces, and from cell and surface mechanics to the elucidation of cell-chip interactions in biomedical devices.

  8. Earth Sciences Division. Annual report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    This annual report contains articles describing the research programs conducted during the year. Major areas of interest include geothermal exploration technology, geothermal energy conversion technology, reservoir engineering, geothermal environmental research, basic geosciences studies, applied geosciences studies, nuclear waste isolation, and marine sciences

  9. Earth Sciences Division. Annual report 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    This annual report contains articles describing the research programs conducted during the year. Major areas of interest include geothermal exploration technology, geothermal energy conversion technology, reservoir engineering, geothermal environmental research, basic geosciences studies, applied geosciences studies, nuclear waste isolation, and marine sciences. (ACR)

  10. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Cadenhead, D A; Rosenberg, M D

    1974-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 8 covers the developments in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses the applications of statistical mechanics to physical adsorption; the impact of electron spectroscopy and cognate techniques on the study of solid surfaces; and the ellipsometric studies of thin films. The text also describes the interfacial photochemistry of bilayer lipid membranes; cell junctions and their development; and the composition and function of the inner mitochondrial membrane. The role of the cell surface in contact inhibition of cell division

  11. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division 1991 Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    interventions , for performance aiding, for certification and for performance evaluation. As the Navy modernizes those systems to take advantage of potential...2223-2237. Livingstone, M., Drislane, F. and Galaburda, A. (1991, in press) Physiological evidence for a magnocellular defect in dyslexia . Science. 201...develop training interventions to counter the effects of stress on performance. Progress: This grant is new in FY91. Outside Funding: Funds for this

  12. Progress report, Health Sciences Division, 1 October - 31 December, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The work of the Health Sciences Division during the quarter included development of improved radiation counters and dosimeters, studies of radionuclide migration through the environment, investigations of the effects of radiation upon a variety of living organisms, and calculation of improved dosimetry factors

  13. Materials Science Division activity report 1991-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarendra, G.; Tiwari, A.M.; Subramanian, N.; Venugopal Rao, G.

    1995-01-01

    This progress report gives an account of the various research and developmental activities carried out at the Materials Science Division of the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam during 1991-93. It also gives a summary of the results of the research activities, describes the experimental facilities and also list the publications

  14. Environmental and Medical Sciences Division progress report January - December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, J.E.

    1976-07-01

    The activities of the AERE Environmental and Medical Sciences Division for January to December 1975 are reported under sections entitled: introduction; inhalation toxicology and radionuclide analysis; whole body counting; radiation physics; environmental analysis, atmospheric pollution; medical; chemical analysis group; publications. (U.K.)

  15. Geosciences program annual report 1978. [LBL Earth Sciences Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    This report is a reprint of the Geosciences section of the LBL Earth Sciences Division Annual Report 1978 (LBL-8648). It contains summary papers that describe fundamental studies addressing a variety of earth science problems of interest to the DOE. They have applications in such diverse areas as geothermal energy, oil recovery, in situ coal gasification, uranium resource evaluation and recovery, and earthquake prediction. Completed work has been reported or likely will be in the usual channels. (RWR)

  16. Surface science and catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1985-02-01

    Modern surface science studies have explored a large number of metal catalyst systems. Three classes of catalytic reactions can be identified: (1) those that occur over the metal surface; (2) reactions that take place on top of a strongly adsorbed overlayer and (3) reactions that occur on co-adsorbate modified surfaces. Case histories for each class are presented. 44 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology

  18. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology. (KRM)

  19. Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H 2 , and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO 2 , potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures

  20. Surface science an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, John

    1991-01-01

    The whole field of surface science is covered in this work. Starting with a description of the structure and thermodynamics of clean surfaces, the book goes on to discuss kinetic theory of gases and molecular beam formation. This is followed by a largesection on gas-surface interactions, and another major section on energetic particle-surface interactions. The final chapter provides the background to crystal nucleation and growth. The approach adopted is interdisciplinary and slanted towards theexperimental side, with practical analytical techniques being used to illustrate general princi

  1. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division: Annual report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    As the Chemical and Laser Sciences Division concludes its first year, the Division personnel can be proud of their many scientific and technical accomplishments. Among the important milestones which the Division achieved were significant demonstrations of the process performance in the Special Isotope Separation program, of beam sensing techniques for the NPB program, and of optical angular multiplexing and energy extraction from the ICF KrF laser. In addition, the Los Alamos FTS was brought to operational status and the Bright Source attained intensities on the order of 10 17 W/cm 2 . A few highlights of these and other research and development activities are presented in the following sections of this report

  2. Environmental Sciences Division: Summaries of research in FY 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This document describes the Fiscal Year 1996 activities and products of the Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. The report is organized into four main sections. The introduction identifies the basic program structure, describes the programs of the Environmental Sciences Division, and provides the level of effort for each program area. The research areas and project descriptions section gives program contact information, and provides descriptions of individual research projects including: three-year funding history, research objective and approach used in each project, and results to date. Appendixes provide postal and e-mail addresses for principal investigators and define acronyms used in the text. The indexes provide indexes of principal investigators, research institutions, and keywords for easy reference. Research projects are related to climatic change and remedial action.

  3. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cram, L.S.; Stafford, C. [comp.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Life Sciences Division and the biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1994. The technical portion of the report is divided into two parts, (1) selected research highlights and (2) research projects and accomplishments. The research highlights provide a more detailed description of a select set of projects. A technical description of all projects is presented in sufficient detail so that the informed reader will be able to assess the scope and significance of each project. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the group leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  4. Surface science techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Walls, JM

    2013-01-01

    This volume provides a comprehensive and up to the minute review of the techniques used to determine the nature and composition of surfaces. Originally published as a special issue of the Pergamon journal Vacuum, it comprises a carefully edited collection of chapters written by specialists in each of the techniques and includes coverage of the electron and ion spectroscopies, as well as the atom-imaging methods such as the atom probe field ion microscope and the scanning tunnelling microscope. Surface science is an important area of study since the outermost surface layers play a crucial role

  5. Atmospheric sciences division. Annual report, fiscal year 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynor, G.S.

    1981-12-01

    The research activities of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of the Department of Energy and Environment for FY 1981 are presented. Facilities and major items of equipment are described. Research programs are summarized in three categories, modeling, field and laboratory experiments and data management and analysis. Each program is also described individually with title, principal investigator, sponsor and funding levels for FY 1981 and FY 1982. Future plans are summarized. Publications for FY 1981 are listed with abstracts. A list of personnel is included

  6. Progress report - Health Sciences Division - 1985 July 01 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical. Some of the aspects discussed include measurement and application of environmental isotopes, dosimetry and employee monitoring, environmental processes of radioisotope transport, the effects of ionizing radiation on living cells (cancer, hyperthermia, DNA, etc.), and statistics of hospital procedures

  7. Environmental and Medical Sciences Division progress report January - December, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainge, W.M.

    1982-02-01

    A progress report on the work performed during 1980 by the Environmental and Medical Sciences Division at UKAEA Harwell is given. The programmes considered were atmospheric pollution; landfill research; monitoring of radioactive fallout and other radionuclides and trace elements in the environment; radioactive and non-radioactive aerosol metabolic studies; inhalation toxicology of radioactive aerosols and other hazardous materials; chemical analytical services; and radiation physics in dosimetry research, applied radiation spectrometry and data systems. (U.K.)

  8. Surface science techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Gianangelo

    2013-01-01

    The book describes the experimental techniques employed to study surfaces and interfaces. The emphasis is on the experimental method. Therefore all chapters start with an introduction of the scientific problem, the theory necessary to understand how the technique works and how to understand the results. Descriptions of real experimental setups, experimental results at different systems are given to show both the strength and the limits of the technique. In a final part the new developments and possible extensions of the techniques are presented. The included techniques provide microscopic as well as macroscopic information. They cover most of the techniques used in surface science.

  9. Materials Science Division progress report 1986-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vijay; Vasumathi, D.; Chandra Sekhar, N.V.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report on the various Research and Developmental (R and D) activities carried out in the Materials Science Division during the period 1986-88. Most contributions have been presented in the form of abstracts and wherever possible results of several contributions on a related problem have been consolidated into one. The R and D activities covered the following areas: (1) quasicrystalline phase, (2) high temperature superconducting behaviour in metal oxides, (3) physics of colloidal suspensions, (4) behaviour of materials under high pressure, (5) radiation effects in complex alloy systems, (6) inert gas behaviour in metals, and production of crystals, particularly of volatile semiconducting compounds. The lists of publications by the members of the Division and seminars held during 1986-88 are given at the end of the report. (a uthor)

  10. Progress report - Health Sciences Division - 1985 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical. Some of the main areas of interest discussed are the impact of studies on cultured human fibroblasts with abnormal carcinogen sensitivity. This includes mechanisms of DNA repair and for the initiation of cancer, contribution of such genes to overall societal cancer burden, impact on risk assessment, distribution of risk, and radiation protection, application to improved treatment of cancer, screening for abnormal carcinogen sensitivity and Roberts syndrome

  11. Communicating Ocean Science at the Lower-Division Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, A.

    2011-12-01

    Pacific Ocean Literacy for Youth, Publics, Professionals, and Scientists (POLYPPS) is an NSF-funded collaboration between the University of Hawai`i and the Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence (COSEE) - California, which is based at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California - Berkeley. One of the objectives of this project is to instutionalize ocean science communications courses at colleges and universities in Hawai`i. Although the focus of most of these communications courses has been on training graduate students and scientists, lower-division students interested in the ocean sciences are finding this background helpful. At the University of Hawai`i Maui College there are several marine science courses and certificate programs that require students to interact with the public through internships, research assistantships, and course-related service-learning projects. Oceanography 270, Communicating Ocean Science, is now offered to meet the needs of these students who engage with the public in informal educational settings. Other students who enroll in this course have a general interest in the marine environment and are considering careers in K-12 formal education. This course gives this group of students an opportunity to explore formal education by assisting classroom teachers and preparing and presenting problem-based, hands-on, inquiry activities. Employers at marine-related businesses and in the tourist industry have welcomed this course with a focus on communication skills and indicate that they prefer to hire local people with strong backgrounds in marine and natural sciences. A basic premise of POLYPPS is that science education must draw not only from the latest advances in science and technology but also from the cultural contexts in which the learners are embedded and that this will achieve increased understanding and stewardship of ocean environments. Students in Oceanography 270 integrate traditional Hawaiian knowledge into their

  12. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2002-2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2003-11-01

    Research in earth and atmospheric sciences is becoming increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than hydrocarbons and the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases (such as carbon dioxide and methane) are critical to the future energy needs and environmental safety of this planet. In addition, the cleanup of many contaminated sites in the U.S., along with the preservation and management of our water supply, remain key challenges for us as well as future generations. Addressing these energy, climate change, and environmental issues requires the timely integration of earth sciences' disciplines (such as geology, hydrology, oceanography, climatology, geophysics, geochemistry, geomechanics, ecology, and environmental sciences). This integration will involve focusing on fundamental crosscutting concerns that are common to many of these issues. A primary focus will be the characterization, imaging, and manipulation of fluids in the earth. Such capabilities are critical to many DOE applications, from environmental restoration to energy extraction and optimization. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is currently addressing many of the key technical issues described above. In this document, we present summaries of many of our current research projects. While it is not a complete accounting, it is representative of the nature and breadth of our research effort. We are proud of our scientific efforts, and we hope that you will find our research useful and exciting. Any comments on our research are appreciated and can be sent to me personally. This report is divided into five sections that correspond to the major research programs in the Earth Sciences Division: (1) Fundamental and Exploratory Research; (2) Nuclear Waste; (3) Energy Resources; (4

  13. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2002-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    Research in earth and atmospheric sciences is becoming increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than hydrocarbons and the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases (such as carbon dioxide and methane) are critical to the future energy needs and environmental safety of this planet. In addition, the cleanup of many contaminated sites in the U.S., along with the preservation and management of our water supply, remain key challenges for us as well as future generations. Addressing these energy, climate change, and environmental issues requires the timely integration of earth sciences' disciplines (such as geology, hydrology, oceanography, climatology, geophysics, geochemistry, geomechanics, ecology, and environmental sciences). This integration will involve focusing on fundamental crosscutting concerns that are common to many of these issues. A primary focus will be the characterization, imaging, and manipulation of fluids in the earth. Such capabilities are critical to many DOE applications, from environmental restoration to energy extraction and optimization. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is currently addressing many of the key technical issues described above. In this document, we present summaries of many of our current research projects. While it is not a complete accounting, it is representative of the nature and breadth of our research effort. We are proud of our scientific efforts, and we hope that you will find our research useful and exciting. Any comments on our research are appreciated and can be sent to me personally. This report is divided into five sections that correspond to the major research programs in the Earth Sciences Division: (1) Fundamental and Exploratory Research; (2) Nuclear Waste; (3) Energy Resources; (4) Environmental

  14. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division. 1994 January 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, M [ed.

    1995-09-01

    This report marks the change from biannual to annual reports recording technical developments in Physics Division. During this period, AECL has continued with its restructuring program, with Physics Division now included in an expanded Physical and Environmental Sciences Unit. The Division itself remains unchanged, with major activities on neutron scattering, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and developments and applications of accelerator technology. (author).

  15. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division. 1994 January 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, M.

    1995-09-01

    This report marks the change from biannual to annual reports recording technical developments in Physics Division. During this period, AECL has continued with its restructuring program, with Physics Division now included in an expanded Physical and Environmental Sciences Unit. The Division itself remains unchanged, with major activities on neutron scattering, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and developments and applications of accelerator technology. (author)

  16. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePaolo, Donald; DePaolo, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Research in earth and atmospheric sciences has become increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and other environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than fossil hydrocarbons, the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases, and a detailed understanding of the climatic consequences of our energy choices are all critical to meeting energy needs while ensuring environmental safety. The cleanup of underground contamination and the preservation and management of water supplies continue to provide challenges, as they will for generations into the future. To address the critical energy and environmental issues requires continuing advances in our knowledge of Earth systems and our ability to translate that knowledge into new technologies. The fundamental Earth science research common to energy and environmental issues largely involves the physics, chemistry, and biology of fluids in and on the Earth. To manage Earth fluids requires the ability to understand their properties and behavior at the most fundamental molecular level, as well as prediction, characterization, imaging, and manipulation of those fluids and their behavior in real Earth reservoirs. The broad range of disciplinary expertise, the huge range of spatial and time scales, and the need to integrate theoretical, computational, laboratory and field research, represent both the challenge and the excitement of Earth science research. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is committed to addressing the key scientific and technical challenges that are needed to secure our energy future in an environmentally responsibly way. Our staff of over 200 scientists, UC Berkeley faculty, support staff and guests perform world-acclaimed fundamental research in hydrogeology and reservoir engineering, geophysics and geomechanics, geochemistry, microbial ecology

  17. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, Donald; DePaolo, Donald

    2008-07-21

    Research in earth and atmospheric sciences has become increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and other environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than fossil hydrocarbons, the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases, and a detailed understanding of the climatic consequences of our energy choices are all critical to meeting energy needs while ensuring environmental safety. The cleanup of underground contamination and the preservation and management of water supplies continue to provide challenges, as they will for generations into the future. To address the critical energy and environmental issues requires continuing advances in our knowledge of Earth systems and our ability to translate that knowledge into new technologies. The fundamental Earth science research common to energy and environmental issues largely involves the physics, chemistry, and biology of fluids in and on the Earth. To manage Earth fluids requires the ability to understand their properties and behavior at the most fundamental molecular level, as well as prediction, characterization, imaging, and manipulation of those fluids and their behavior in real Earth reservoirs. The broad range of disciplinary expertise, the huge range of spatial and time scales, and the need to integrate theoretical, computational, laboratory and field research, represent both the challenge and the excitement of Earth science research. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is committed to addressing the key scientific and technical challenges that are needed to secure our energy future in an environmentally responsibly way. Our staff of over 200 scientists, UC Berkeley faculty, support staff and guests perform world-acclaimed fundamental research in hydrogeology and reservoir engineering, geophysics and geomechanics, geochemistry, microbial ecology

  18. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Progress for the period ending September 30, 1979 by the Environmental Sciences Division is reported. Sections reporting include terrestrial ecoloy; earth sciences; environmental resources; aquatic ecology; synthetic fuels; nuclear program; environmental impacts program; ecosystem studies; and burial ground technology

  19. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  20. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations

  1. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The major elements of the Materials Sciences Program can be grouped under the areas of (1) structural characterization, (2) high-temperature alloy studies, (3) structural ceramics, and (4) radiation effects

  2. Solvay Conference on Surface Science

    CERN Document Server

    1988-01-01

    The articles collected in this volume give a broad overview of the current state of surface science. Pioneers in the field and researchers met together at this Solvay Conference to discuss important new developments in surface science, with an emphasis on the common area between solid state physics and physical chemistry. The contributions deal with the following subjects: structure of surfaces, surface science and catalysis, two-dimensional physics and phase transitions, scanning tunneling microscopy, surface scattering and surface dynamics, chemical reactions at surfaces, solid-solid interfaces and superlattices, and surface studies with synchrotron radiation. On each of these subjects an introductory review talk and a number of short research contributions are followed by extensive discussions, which appear in full in the text. This nineteenth Solvay Conference commemorates the 75th anniversary of the Solvay Institutes.

  3. Environmental Sciences Division Toxicology Laboratory standard operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kszos, L.A.; Stewart, A.J.; Wicker, L.F.; Logsdon, G.M.

    1989-09-01

    This document was developed to provide the personnel working in the Environmental Sciences Division's Toxicology Laboratory with documented methods for conducting toxicity tests. The document consists of two parts. The first part includes the standard operating procedures (SOPs) that are used by the laboratory in conducting toxicity tests. The second part includes reference procedures from the US Environmental Protection Agency document entitled Short-Term Methods for Estimating the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater Organisms, upon which the Toxicology Laboratory's SOPs are based. Five of the SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia survival and reproduction test. These SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia food (SOP-3), maintaining Ceriodaphnia cultures (SOP-4), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-13), analyzing the test data (SOP-13), and conducting a Ceriodaphnia reference test (SOP-15). Five additional SOPs relate specifically to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larval survival and growth test: methods for preparing fathead minnow larvae food (SOP-5), maintaining fathead minnow cultures (SOP-6), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-9), analyzing the test data (SOP-12), and conducting a fathead minnow reference test (DOP-14). The six remaining SOPs describe methods that are used with either or both tests: preparation of control/dilution water (SOP-1), washing of glassware (SOP-2), collection and handling of samples (SOP-7), preparation of samples (SOP-8), performance of chemical analyses (SOP-11), and data logging and care of technical notebooks (SOP-16)

  4. Progress report - physical sciences TASCC division 1991 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    This is the second in a new series of reports of the work of the TASCC Division since the creation of the Physical Sciences Unit in 1990. Physical Sciences comprises four main sectors, namely the TASCC, Physics and Chemistry Divisions, and the National Fusion Program Management Office. Physics Division is responsible for research and development in the areas of condensed matter physics, neutron and neutrino physics, and accelerator physics, while TASCC Division deals with research performed with the Tandem and Superconducting Cyclotron accelerators, primarily in the field of Heavy Ion Nuclear Physics

  5. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, 1 January-31 December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepore, J.V.

    1980-09-01

    This annual report describes the research work carried out by the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division during 1979. The major research effort of the Division remained High Energy Particle Physics with emphasis on preparing for experiments to be carried out at PEP. The largest effort in this field was for development and construction of the Time Projection Chamber, a powerful new particle detector. This work took a large fraction of the effort of the physics staff of the Division together with the equivalent of more than a hundred staff members in the Engineering Departments and shops. Research in the Computer Science and Mathematics Department of the Division (CSAM) has been rapidly expanding during the last few years. Cross fertilization of ideas and talents resulting from the diversity of effort in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division contributed to the software design for the Time Projection Chamber, made by the Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Department

  6. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes the research performed in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar year 1983. The major activity of the Division is research in high-energy physics, both experimental and theoretical, and research and development in associated technologies. A smaller, but still significant, program is in computer science and applied mathematics. During 1983 there were approximately 160 people in the Division active in or supporting high-energy physics research, including about 40 graduate students. In computer science and mathematics, the total staff, including students and faculty, was roughly 50. Because of the creation in late 1983 of a Computing Division at LBL and the transfer of the Computer Science activities to the new Division, this annual report is the last from the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. In December 1983 the Division reverted to its historic name, the Physics Division. Its future annual reports will document high energy physics activities and also those of its Mathematics Department

  7. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes the research performed in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar year 1983. The major activity of the Division is research in high-energy physics, both experimental and theoretical, and research and development in associated technologies. A smaller, but still significant, program is in computer science and applied mathematics. During 1983 there were approximately 160 people in the Division active in or supporting high-energy physics research, including about 40 graduate students. In computer science and mathematics, the total staff, including students and faculty, was roughly 50. Because of the creation in late 1983 of a Computing Division at LBL and the transfer of the Computer Science activities to the new Division, this annual report is the last from the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. In December 1983 the Division reverted to its historic name, the Physics Division. Its future annual reports will document high energy physics activities and also those of its Mathematics Department.

  8. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described. (CBS)

  9. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described

  10. Surface science and heterogeneous catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1980-05-01

    The catalytic reactions studied include hydrocarbon conversion over platinum, the transition metal-catalyzed hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and the photocatalyzed dissociation of water over oxide surfaces. The method of combined surface science and catalytic studies is similar to those used in synthetic organic chemistry. The single-crystal models for the working catalyst are compared with real catalysts by comparing the rates of cyclopropane ring opening on platinum and the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on rhodium single crystal surface with those on practical commercial catalyst systems. Excellent agreement was obtained for these reactions. This document reviews what was learned about heterogeneous catalysis from these surface science approaches over the past 15 years and present models of the active catalyst surface

  11. Life Sciences Division progress report for CYs 1997-1998[Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, Reinhold C.

    1999-01-01

    This is the first formal progress report issued by the ORNL Life Sciences Division. It covers the period from February 1997 through December 1998, which has been critical in the formation of our new division. The legacy of 50 years of excellence in biological research at ORNL has been an important driver for everyone in the division to do their part so that this new research division can realize the potential it has to make seminal contributions to the life sciences for years to come. This reporting period is characterized by intense assessment and planning efforts. They included thorough scrutiny of our strengths and weaknesses, analyses of our situation with respect to comparative research organizations, and identification of major thrust areas leading to core research efforts that take advantage of our special facilities and expertise. Our goal is to develop significant research and development (R and D) programs in selected important areas to which we can make significant contributions by combining our distinctive expertise and resources in the biological sciences with those in the physical, engineering, and computational sciences. Significant facilities in mouse genomics, mass spectrometry, neutron science, bioanalytical technologies, and high performance computing are critical to the success of our programs. Research and development efforts in the division are organized in six sections. These cluster into two broad areas of R and D: systems biology and technology applications. The systems biology part of the division encompasses our core biological research programs. It includes the Mammalian Genetics and Development Section, the Biochemistry and Biophysics Section, and the Computational Biosciences Section. The technology applications part of the division encompasses the Assessment Technology Section, the Environmental Technology Section, and the Toxicology and Risk Analysis Section. These sections are the stewards of the division's core competencies. The

  12. Life Sciences Division progress report for CYs 1997-1998 [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Reinhold C.

    1999-06-01

    This is the first formal progress report issued by the ORNL Life Sciences Division. It covers the period from February 1997 through December 1998, which has been critical in the formation of our new division. The legacy of 50 years of excellence in biological research at ORNL has been an important driver for everyone in the division to do their part so that this new research division can realize the potential it has to make seminal contributions to the life sciences for years to come. This reporting period is characterized by intense assessment and planning efforts. They included thorough scrutiny of our strengths and weaknesses, analyses of our situation with respect to comparative research organizations, and identification of major thrust areas leading to core research efforts that take advantage of our special facilities and expertise. Our goal is to develop significant research and development (R&D) programs in selected important areas to which we can make significant contributions by combining our distinctive expertise and resources in the biological sciences with those in the physical, engineering, and computational sciences. Significant facilities in mouse genomics, mass spectrometry, neutron science, bioanalytical technologies, and high performance computing are critical to the success of our programs. Research and development efforts in the division are organized in six sections. These cluster into two broad areas of R&D: systems biology and technology applications. The systems biology part of the division encompasses our core biological research programs. It includes the Mammalian Genetics and Development Section, the Biochemistry and Biophysics Section, and the Computational Biosciences Section. The technology applications part of the division encompasses the Assessment Technology Section, the Environmental Technology Section, and the Toxicology and Risk Analysis Section. These sections are the stewards of the division's core competencies. The

  13. Progress report: Health Sciences Division, 1983 July 1 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report summarizes programs in health physics, radiation biology, environmental sciences and biomedical research. Health physics research included work on neutron dosimetry, thermoluminescent dosimetry, measurements of γ- and β-sensitivity of MOSFET detectors, tritium monitoring, a stack effluent monitor, and other radiation instruments. Environmental research included studies of heated plumes, radiotracer studies of flow through rock fractures, radionuclide cycling by plants, stable cobalt in fish, long-term radiation protection objectives for radioactive waste disposal, and tritium in surface waters in the CRNL vicinity. Radiation biology research continued to be concerned with DNA damage from radiation and carcinogenic chemicals, and enzymatic Σrepair processesΣ which help protect cells from such damage. In biomedical research the experiment to measure the fraction of HT by volunteers that is converted to HTO in vivo is progressing satisfactorily

  14. Nutritional Science Funding Opportunities | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Nutritional Science Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Nutritional Science Meetings and Events | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Active Nutritional Science Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. A Mathematical Sciences Program at an Upper-Division Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Frank J.

    1978-01-01

    The conception, objectives, contents, and limitations of a degree program in the mathematical sciences at Pennsylvania State University, Capitol Campus, are discussed. Career goals that may be pursued include: managerial, science, education, actuarial, and computer. (MP)

  19. The surface science of enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2002-01-01

    One of the largest challenges to science in the coming years is to find the relation between enzyme structure and function. Can we predict which reactions an enzyme catalyzes from knowledge of its structure-or from its amino acid sequence? Can we use that knowledge to modify enzyme function......? To solve these problems we must understand in some detail how enzymes interact with reactants from its surroundings. These interactions take place at the surface of the enzyme and the question of enzyme function can be viewed as the surface science of enzymes. In this article we discuss how to describe...... catalysis by enzymes, and in particular the analogies between enzyme catalyzed reactions and surface catalyzed reactions. We do this by discussing two concrete examples of reactions catalyzed both in nature (by enzymes) and in industrial reactors (by inorganic materials), and show that although analogies...

  20. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program

  1. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program.

  2. Modern techniques of surface science

    CERN Document Server

    Woodruff, D Phil

    2016-01-01

    This fully revised, updated and reorganised third edition provides a thorough introduction to the characterisation techniques used in surface science and nanoscience today. Each chapter brings together and compares the different techniques used to address a particular research question, including how to determine the surface composition, surface structure, surface electronic structure, surface microstructure at different length scales (down to sub-molecular), and the molecular character of adsorbates and their adsorption or reaction properties. Readers will easily understand the relative strengths and limitations of the techniques available to them and, ultimately, will be able to select the most suitable techniques for their own particular research purposes. This is an essential resource for researchers and practitioners performing materials analysis, and for senior undergraduate students looking to gain a clear understanding of the underlying principles and applications of the different characterisation tec...

  3. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K.

    1981-09-01

    Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  4. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys

  5. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys.

  6. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD`s accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  7. Program report for FY 1984 and 1985 Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division of the Physics Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, J.B.; MacCracken, M.C.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gresho, P.M.; Luther, F.M.

    1986-08-01

    This annual report for the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division (G-Division) summarizes the activities and highlights of the past three years, with emphasis on significant research findings in two major program areas: the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), with its recent involvement in assessing the effects of the Chernobyl reactor accident, and new findings on the environmental consequences of nuclear war. The technical highlights of the many other research projects are also briefly reported, along with the Division's organization, budget, and publications.

  8. Program report for FY 1984 and 1985 Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division of the Physics Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, J.B.; MacCracken, M.C.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gresho, P.M.; Luther, F.M.

    1986-08-01

    This annual report for the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division (G-Division) summarizes the activities and highlights of the past three years, with emphasis on significant research findings in two major program areas: the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), with its recent involvement in assessing the effects of the Chernobyl reactor accident, and new findings on the environmental consequences of nuclear war. The technical highlights of the many other research projects are also briefly reported, along with the Division's organization, budget, and publications

  9. Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division progress report for the period January 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poutsma, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This report provides brief summaries of progress in the Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (CASD) during 1993 and 1994. The first four chapters, which cover the research mission, are organized to mirror the major organizational units of the division and indicate the scope of the research portfolio. These divisions are the Analytical Spectroscopy Section, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Section, Organic Chemistry Section, and Physical and Materials Chemistry Section. The fifth and sixth chapters summarize the support activities within CASD that are critical for research progress. Finally, the appendices indicate the productivity and recognition of the staff in terms of various forms of external publications, professional activities, and awards.

  10. How old is surface science?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paparazzo, E.

    2004-01-01

    Philosophical and literary testimonies from the Classical World (5th century B.C. to 3rd century A.D.) involving solid surfaces are reviewed. Plato thought the surface to be a real entity, whereas Aristotle considered it to possess an unqualified existence, i.e. not to be a substance, but just an accidental entity. The Old Stoics asserted that surfaces do not possess any physical existence, although the Stoic philosopher Posidonius--apparently the only exception in his school--held them to exist both in thought and reality. While both the Atomists and the Epicureans were very little interested in them, the Sceptic philosopher Sextus Empiricus considered surfaces to be the limits of a body, although he maintained that both the view that they are corporeal or the view that they are incorporeal present unsurmountable difficulties. Among Roman authors, the testimony from Pliny the Elder is mostly concerned with metallic surfaces, chemical change occurring there, and surface treatments used in antiquity. Besides the philosophical motivations, the implications of the testimonies are discussed in the light of surface science. The purely geometrical surface of Plato is found to compare favorably to single-crystal surface, Posidonius' 'corporeal' surface is best likened to an air-oxidized, or otherwise ambient-modified surface, and ancient accounts on mixture are compared to XPS results obtained in adhesion studies of enameled steels. I argue that the long-standing dominance of Aristotle's view from antiquity onwards may have had a part in delaying theoretical speculation into solid surfaces

  11. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Medical Sciences Division report for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, F.; Poston, S.; Engle, J.

    1995-01-01

    The primary mission of the Medical Sciences Division is (1) to conduct basic and applied biomedical research on human health related to energy systems, (2) to provide technical assistance and training in occupational and environmental medicine, and (3) to make related biomedical applications available to others through technology transfer. As can be gleaned from this report, the strengths and capabilities of their staff in carrying out this mission are closely aligned with the four core competencies of ORISE: (1) occupational and environmental health, (2) environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, (3) education and training, and (4) enabling research. Brief descriptions of the various scientific and technical programs and their progress, as well as the staff responsible for the accomplishments made during 1994, are presented in this report. Research programs include the following: biochemistry; cytogenetics; Center for Epidemiologic Research; Center for Human Reliability Studies; occupational medicine; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiation Internal Dose Information Center

  12. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Medical Sciences Division report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, F.; Poston, S.; Engle, J. [eds.

    1995-08-01

    The primary mission of the Medical Sciences Division is (1) to conduct basic and applied biomedical research on human health related to energy systems, (2) to provide technical assistance and training in occupational and environmental medicine, and (3) to make related biomedical applications available to others through technology transfer. As can be gleaned from this report, the strengths and capabilities of their staff in carrying out this mission are closely aligned with the four core competencies of ORISE: (1) occupational and environmental health, (2) environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, (3) education and training, and (4) enabling research. Brief descriptions of the various scientific and technical programs and their progress, as well as the staff responsible for the accomplishments made during 1994, are presented in this report. Research programs include the following: biochemistry; cytogenetics; Center for Epidemiologic Research; Center for Human Reliability Studies; occupational medicine; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiation Internal Dose Information Center.

  13. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report

  14. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report.

  15. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD's accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  16. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, 1 January--31 December 1977. [LBL, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.V. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    This annual report of the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division describes the scientific research and other work carried out within the Division during 1977. The Division is concerned with work in experimental and theoretical physics, with computer science and applied mathematics, and with the operation of a computer center. The major physics research activity is in high-energy physics, although there is a relatively small program of medium-energy research. The High Energy Physics research program in the Physics Division is concerned with fundamental research which will enable man to comprehend the nature of the physical world. The major effort is now directed toward experiments with positron-electron colliding beam at PEP. The Medium Energy Physics program is concerned with research using mesons and nucleons to probe the properties of matter. This research is concerned with the study of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, and the interactions between nuclei and electromagnetic radiation and mesons. The Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Department engages in research in a variety of computer science and mathematics disciplines. Work in computer science and applied mathematics includes construction of data bases, computer graphics, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical analysis of differential and integral equations resulting from physical problems. The Computer Center provides large-scale computational support to LBL's scientific programs. Descriptions of the various activities are quite short; references to published results are given. 24 figures. (RWR)

  17. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, 1 January--31 December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepore, J.V.

    1977-01-01

    This annual report of the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division describes the scientific research and other work carried out within the Division during 1977. The Division is concerned with work in experimental and theoretical physics, with computer science and applied mathematics, and with the operation of a computer center. The major physics research activity is in high-energy physics, although there is a relatively small program of medium-energy research. The High Energy Physics research program in the Physics Division is concerned with fundamental research which will enable man to comprehend the nature of the physical world. The major effort is now directed toward experiments with positron-electron colliding beam at PEP. The Medium Energy Physics program is concerned with research using mesons and nucleons to probe the properties of matter. This research is concerned with the study of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, and the interactions between nuclei and electromagnetic radiation and mesons. The Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Department engages in research in a variety of computer science and mathematics disciplines. Work in computer science and applied mathematics includes construction of data bases, computer graphics, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical analysis of differential and integral equations resulting from physical problems. The Computer Center provides large-scale computational support to LBL's scientific programs. Descriptions of the various activities are quite short; references to published results are given. 24 figures

  18. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report.

  19. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report.

  20. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, January 1--December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.V. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    This annual report of the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division describes the scientific research and other work carried out within the Division during the calendar year 1976. The Division is concerned with work in experimental and theoretical physics, with computer science and applied mathematics, and with the operation of a computer center. The major physics research activity is in high-energy physics; a vigorous program is maintained in this pioneering field. The high-energy physics research program in the Division now focuses on experiments with e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams using advanced techniques and developments initiated and perfected at the Laboratory. The Division continues its work in medium energy physics, with experimental work carried out at the Bevatron and at the Los Alamos Pi-Meson Facility. Work in computer science and applied mathematics includes construction of data bases, computer graphics, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical analysis of differential and integral equations resulting from physical problems. The computer center serves the Laboratory by constantly upgrading its facility and by providing day-to-day service. This report is descriptive in nature; references to detailed publications are given. (RWR)

  1. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, January 1--December 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepore, J.V.

    1977-01-01

    This annual report of the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division describes the scientific research and other work carried out within the Division during the calendar year 1976. The Division is concerned with work in experimental and theoretical physics, with computer science and applied mathematics, and with the operation of a computer center. The major physics research activity is in high-energy physics; a vigorous program is maintained in this pioneering field. The high-energy physics research program in the Division now focuses on experiments with e + e - colliding beams using advanced techniques and developments initiated and perfected at the Laboratory. The Division continues its work in medium energy physics, with experimental work carried out at the Bevatron and at the Los Alamos Pi-Meson Facility. Work in computer science and applied mathematics includes construction of data bases, computer graphics, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical analysis of differential and integral equations resulting from physical problems. The computer center serves the Laboratory by constantly upgrading its facility and by providing day-to-day service. This report is descriptive in nature; references to detailed publications are given

  2. Social Science Libraries Section. Special Libraries Division. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Three papers on the nonconventional literature and social science libraries were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. In "Grey Material: A Scandinavian View," Birgitta Bergdahl (Sweden) outlines the etymology and meaning of the concept of "grey literature" (which can include…

  3. About the Nutritional Science Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutritional Science Research Group (NSRG) promotes and supports studies establishing a comprehensive understanding of the precise role of diet and food components in modulating cancer risk and tumor cell behavior. This focus includes approaches to characterize molecular targets and variability in individual responses to nutrients and dietary patterns. |

  4. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birge, R.W.

    1981-12-01

    Research in the physics, computer science, and mathematics division is described for the year 1980. While the division's major effort remains in high energy particle physics, there is a continually growing program in computer science and applied mathematics. Experimental programs are reported in e + e - annihilation, muon and neutrino reactions at FNAL, search for effects of a right-handed gauge boson, limits on neutrino oscillations from muon-decay neutrinos, strong interaction experiments at FNAL, strong interaction experiments at BNL, particle data center, Barrelet moment analysis of πN scattering data, astrophysics and astronomy, earth sciences, and instrument development and engineering for high energy physics. In theoretical physics research, studies included particle physics and accelerator physics. Computer science and mathematics research included analytical and numerical methods, information analysis techniques, advanced computer concepts, and environmental and epidemiological studies

  5. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birge, R.W.

    1981-12-01

    Research in the physics, computer science, and mathematics division is described for the year 1980. While the division's major effort remains in high energy particle physics, there is a continually growing program in computer science and applied mathematics. Experimental programs are reported in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, muon and neutrino reactions at FNAL, search for effects of a right-handed gauge boson, limits on neutrino oscillations from muon-decay neutrinos, strong interaction experiments at FNAL, strong interaction experiments at BNL, particle data center, Barrelet moment analysis of ..pi..N scattering data, astrophysics and astronomy, earth sciences, and instrument development and engineering for high energy physics. In theoretical physics research, studies included particle physics and accelerator physics. Computer science and mathematics research included analytical and numerical methods, information analysis techniques, advanced computer concepts, and environmental and epidemiological studies. (GHT)

  6. Progress report Health Sciences Division - 1984 July 01 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Health Physics, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, Biomedical Research and Medical. Some of the main areas of interest discussed are health and safety aspects of tritium. This includes instrumentation, environmental studies, metabolism, dosimetry and health effects

  7. Feminist Knowledge Claims, Local Knowledge, and Gender Divisions of Agricultural Labor: Constructing a Successor Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Shelley; Welsh, Rick

    1995-01-01

    Issues raised by feminist epistemic critiques of social science are used to examine local (farmer-based) knowledge of agriculture and its contribution to analyses of agricultural sustainability. Focuses on the on-farm gender division of labor as critical in constituting the family farm, and elaborates how different experiences of men and women…

  8. Progress report Physical and Environmental Sciences TASCC Division 1994 July 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The TASCC division of the Physics and Environmental Sciences releases this progress report to overview the research and instrumentation and facility development. The accelerator operation was smooth for the Tandem and rather difficult for the cyclotron. Progress has been made on all major development projects. A listing is included of all publications, reports, lectures and conference contributions. 14 tabs., 28 figs.

  9. Progress report Physical and Environmental Sciences TASCC Division 1994 July 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The TASCC division of the Physics and Environmental Sciences releases this progress report to overview the research and instrumentation and facility development. The accelerator operation was smooth for the Tandem and rather difficult for the cyclotron. Progress has been made on all major development projects. A listing is included of all publications, reports, lectures and conference contributions. 14 tabs., 28 figs

  10. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between October 1, 1982 and September 30, 1983. Experimental and theoretical investigations of heavy ion reactions are reported. In addition, the development of instrumentation for charge measurements and an on-line mass analyzer are discussed. Individual reports are cataloged separately

  11. [Funding for Division of Microbiology in 2014 by National Natural Science Foundation of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jianjun; Huang, Chenyang; Liu, Lin; Wen, Mingzhang

    2015-02-04

    In this paper, we provided an overview of proposals submitted and projects funded in 2014 at the Division of Microbiology, Department of Life Sciences, National Natural Science Foundation of China. The traits and problems in different sub-disciplines were analyzed, the background, results and analysis of internet voting before panel meetings in Microbiology discipline were also introduced. The information will provide references for Chinese researchers to apply funding in microbiology discipline in the future.

  12. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report

  13. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report

  14. Progress report, Health Sciences Division: 1982 October 1 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    Highlights of work in health physics include investigation of electrochemical etching procedures, further studies of gels saturated with superheated liquid drops, development of a beta dose rate meter using a chopper-stabilized amplifier, and operational tests of dose distributions on workers exposed in high gradient fields. Work in environmental research has included development of a model (LEEM) of one-dimensional vertical mixing of heat in lakes, further studies of the influence of sediment-water interaction on movement of contaminants in surface waters, application of nuclear techniques to an analysis of borehole waters for measurement of pipe flows, and efforts to determine the scale dependence of dispersivity. Research activity in radiation biology centres around the effects of radiation on a variety of organisms. The principal sensitive target is believed to be DNA and work continues towards understanding the nature of the damage and the response of cells as they attempt to repair the injury. Biomedical research has focussed on the study of metal ion-amino acid complexes and assembling data bases for internal dosimetry calculations. Computer codes are being developed to establish standard models and evaluate specific contamination cases

  15. Progress report, Health Sciences Division, 1 October - 31 December, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    Calculations have been made of the radiation doses received in the vicinity of a neutron source, taking into account the interactions of neutrons with concrete and the reflection of thermal neutrons from the body surface. Further calculations have been carried out on the leakage spectrum of fission neutrons through shields of polyethylene and iron. A new TLD dosimeter plaque is under development, and several models of a light-weight tritium-in-air monitor have been assembled. The design of an instrument for detecting plutonium in wastes has been completed. Studies have been initiated on the aquaculture of clams in warm fresh water. Studies on the neutralization of acid precipitation by soil minerals have been concluded. Cellulose is being separated from the wood of a tree which grew in the Inner Area of CRNL for tritium and carbon-14 analyses. Two-dimensional flow modelling has been attempted on an underground contaminant plume. Research continues into the nature of DNA damage and the repair of strand breaks; the repair process is being studied at radiation doses down to 250 rad. An experiment on the relative biological effectiveness of tritium beta rays as related to breast cancer in female rats has been started. The first details from the follow-up of past CRNL employees are available and show no major discrepancies in gross categories of causes of death. Dosimetric and metabolic models for calculating doses from internally deposited technetium have been reviewed. (L.L.)

  16. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-{Tc} systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  17. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H[sub 2], and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO[sub 2], potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-[Tc] systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  18. Progress report - physical sciences - physics division - 1993 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    After significant organizational change for the Physics Division, there are now two groups: Neutron and Condensed Matter Science, and Nuclear Physics. Theoretical Physics Branch was disbanded. A topical review of work on high power proton linacs describes the historical development of high power ion linacs and the ion source development program from initiation to its completion in 1993. RFQ1 became the first particle accelerator to be driven by a klystrode-based rf system. The accelerator operated at 1.25 MeV and accelerated more than 50 mA of high quality beam. The equipment has been sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory and will be recommissioned as the Chalk River Injection Test Stand (CRITS). The laser plasma beatwave accelerator generating accelerating field gradients of up to 1.8 GeV/m and acceleration of an injected electron beam to at least 30 meV over a 1 cm distance. The high power CO 2 laser beam was used to irradiate Zr-N6 pressure tube samples. The aim was to assess surface modifications particularly from shock hardening. Application of radiofrequency waves were used to investigate the properties of relevant materials, notably industrial ferrites. Chalk River participated in an international collaboration on measurement of dielectric properties of materials at high temperatures. A second topical review on neutron scattering and mineral physics deals with phase transitions in carbonate and in silicates. Dualspec is operating successfully. Modifications have been made to improve safety, reproducibility, angle control, calibration and sample analysis. Reviews from six programs: physics, molecular physics, material science, condensed matter theory, neutrino physics, and molecular dating and modelling are given. 1 tab., 17 figs

  19. Progress report - physical sciences - physics division - 1993 January 01 - June 30

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-11-01

    After significant organizational change for the Physics Division, there are now two groups: Neutron and Condensed Matter Science, and Nuclear Physics. Theoretical Physics Branch was disbanded. A topical review of work on high power proton linacs describes the historical development of high power ion linacs and the ion source development program from initiation to its completion in 1993. RFQ1 became the first particle accelerator to be driven by a klystrode-based rf system. The accelerator operated at 1.25 MeV and accelerated more than 50 mA of high quality beam. The equipment has been sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory and will be recommissioned as the Chalk River Injection Test Stand (CRITS). The laser plasma beatwave accelerator generating accelerating field gradients of up to 1.8 GeV/m and acceleration of an injected electron beam to at least 30 meV over a 1 cm distance. The high power CO{sub 2} laser beam was used to irradiate Zr-N6 pressure tube samples. The aim was to assess surface modifications particularly from shock hardening. Application of radiofrequency waves were used to investigate the properties of relevant materials, notably industrial ferrites. Chalk River participated in an international collaboration on measurement of dielectric properties of materials at high temperatures. A second topical review on neutron scattering and mineral physics deals with phase transitions in carbonate and in silicates. Dualspec is operating successfully. Modifications have been made to improve safety, reproducibility, angle control, calibration and sample analysis. Reviews from six programs: physics, molecular physics, material science, condensed matter theory, neutrino physics, and molecular dating and modelling are given. 1 tab., 17 figs.

  20. Progress report Health Sciences Division - 1984 January 1 to June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Health Physics, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, Biomedical Research and Medical. Some of the main areas of interest discussed are research goals, radiation levels, biological end points, assessment of carcinogenic and genetic hazards, research on radiation effects. Practical applications of research are highlighted

  1. Program report for FY 1980. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division of the Physics Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, J.B.; Orphan, R.C.

    1981-02-01

    The FY 1980 research program conducted by the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division and supporting segments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is reviewed briefly. The work is divided into five research themes: advanced modeling, regional modeling and assessments, CO 2 and climate research, stratospheric research, and special projects. Specific projects are described, and significant findings of the work are indicated. Unique numerical modeling capabilities in use and under development are described

  2. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    The energy crisis and creation of ERDA were dominant factors affecting the activities of the Environmental Sciences Division during the past year. Efforts primarily centered on coal conversion effluents, aquatic effects from power plants, terrestrial modeling of both radioactive and nonradioactive waste transport, mineral cycling, forest management, and information handling codes and techniques. A bibliography of publications, presentation, these, and other professional activities is included. (PCS)

  3. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Cadenhead, D A

    1973-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 6 covers the developments in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses the progress in surface and membrane science; the solid state chemistry of the silver halide surface; and the experimental and theoretical aspects of the double layer at the mercury-solution interface. The text also describes contact-angle hysteresis; ion binding and ion transport produced by neutral lipid-soluble molecules; and the biophysical interactions of blood proteins with polymeric and artificial surfaces. Physical chemists, biophysicists, and phys

  4. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Cadenhead, D A

    1977-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 11 covers the advances in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses the quantum theory of surface phenomena; some fundamental aspects of electrocrystallization; and exoelectric emission. The text also describes the surface of titanium dioxide; and the prospects for atomic resolution electron microscopy in membranology. Chemists, physicists, and people involved in the electrochemical power laboratory will find the book useful.

  5. Surface Science Foundations of Catalysis and Nanoscience

    CERN Document Server

    Kolasinski, Kurt K

    2012-01-01

    Surface science has evolved beyond being a sub-field of chemistry or physics and has now become an underpinning science. The Third Edition of this book incorporates extensive worked solutions, as well as details on how problem solving relevant to surface science should be performed. It contextualizes the exercises and their solutions to further explicate the methods of problem solving, application of scientific principles and to deliver a deeper understanding of the field of surface science. Solutions will be accompanied by figures and/or graphs of data, as appropriate.

  6. Progress report 1979 July 01 to September 30, Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    In September 1979, the Biology and Health Physics Division and the Medical Division were amalgamated to form the Health Sciences Division. This is the first progress report of the new division. A new TLD reader for semi-automatic handling of individual TLD chips has been commissioned. As high range radiation detectors for spent fuel monitoring, optical photo-diodes show performance similar to that of silicon rectifiers. Studies continue on the use of water-permeable plastic membranes in tritium monitoring, particularly where it is important to distinguish between 3 H in elemental form and combined as water. The first of a series of radionuclide injection experiments was made in the sand aquifer near Perch Lake. These experiments are to develop methods for studying radionuclide transport in fractured rock. Investigations of soil and groundwater in the vicinity of waste management areas have shown that tritium is the only radionuclide present in significant quantities. Radiation damage to DNA and subsequent repair is being studied by observing both somatic and genetic effcts. Rare hereditary human diseases that present clinical or laboratory features indicative of defects in the DNA repair mechanism are being studied. Work on various metabolic models that describe retention and distribution of radionuclides in humans has continued with emphasis on tritium as HT, carbon as CO2, and compounds of the alkaline earth and actinide elements. Committed effective dose equivalent conversion factors for infants and adults have been calculated for 380 classes of compounds of radionuclide and intake routes, for 65 elements. (OT)

  7. Surface Science Foundations of Catalysis and Nanoscience

    CERN Document Server

    Kolasinski, Kurt K

    2012-01-01

    Surface science has evolved from being a sub-field of chemistry or physics, and has now established itself as an interdisciplinary topic. Knowledge has developed sufficiently that we can now understand catalysis from a surface science perspective. No-where is the underpinning nature of surface science better illustrated than with nanoscience. Now in its third edition, this successful textbook aims to provide students with an understanding of chemical transformations and the formation of structures at surfaces. The chapters build from simple to more advanced principles with each featuring exerc

  8. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Cadenhead, D A

    1972-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 5 covers the developments in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses the Mössbauer effect in surface science; the surface functional groups on carbon and silica; and the wetting phenomena pertaining to adhesion. The text also describes the physical state of phospholipids and cholesterol in monolayers, bilayers, and membranes; the characteristics of heterocoagulation; and the effects of calcium on excitable membranes and neurotransmitter action. Chemists, physiologists, biophysicists, and civil engineers will find the book i

  9. Progress report - physical sciences TASCC division 1990 July 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    A completely new administrative structure of AECL Research was implemented on 1990 July 1. All of the basic physics programs, together with accelerator physics, radiation applications and most of the chemistry programs of AECL, have been placed in a new organizational unit called Physical Sciences. This unit also includes the management of the National Fusion Program. The research programs of Physical Sciences are grouped into three divisions: Chemistry, Physics and TASCC. Progress in each division will henceforth be reported on a twice-yearly basis. This report is the first of the new series to be issued by the TASCC Division. During the period covered by this report, the operation of the superconducting cyclotron has matured considerably, with over 30 accelerated ion beams more-or-less routinely available for a wide variety of nuclear physics experiments. The TASCC team, together with all the engineers, trades-people and other staff members who contributed to the design, constructed and commissioning of the Tandem Accelerator Superconducting Cyclotron facility, are to be heartily congratulated on bringing it to its present highly successful state in an unusually short period of time. In conjunction with our many outside collaborators, we are now engaged on exciting experiments in several areas of nuclear physics research, as reported in the following pages. We are well on the way to the establishment of a truly National Centre for Nuclear Physics research in Canada

  10. Progress report - physical sciences - physics division 1990 July 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    A completely new administrative structure of AECL Research was implemented on 1990 July 1. All of the basic physics programs, together with accelerator physics, radiation applications and most of the chemistry programs of AECL, have been placed in a new organizational unit called Physical Sciences. This unit also includes the management of the National Fusion Program. The research programs of Physical Sciences are grouped into three divisions: Chemistry, Physics and TASCC. Progress in each division will henceforth be reported on a twice-yearly basis. This report is the first of the new series to be issued by the Physics Division. Of special note within the period covered by this report was the successful acceleration of over 75 mA of protons to 600 keV in RFQ1 making it the highest current RFQ in the world. Our electron accelerator expertise has been recognized by the award of one of the R and D 100 awards for the IMPELA (10 MeV 50 kW) machine. Considerable activity was associated with bringing the new dual beam neutron spectrometer DUALSPEC to completion. This instrument has been jointly funded by AECL and NSERC through McMaster University and will be a central component of the national neutron scattering facility at NRU in the 1990's. A major effort was made with the writing of a Project Definition Document for installation of a cold neutron source at the most opportune time

  11. Department of Energy Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences Division: High Performance Computing and Communications Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This document is intended to serve two purposes. Its first purpose is that of a program status report of the considerable progress that the Department of Energy (DOE) has made since 1993, the time of the last such report (DOE/ER-0536, The DOE Program in HPCC), toward achieving the goals of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The second purpose is that of a summary report of the many research programs administered by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) Division of the Office of Energy Research under the auspices of the HPCC Program and to provide, wherever relevant, easy access to pertinent information about MICS-Division activities via universal resource locators (URLs) on the World Wide Web (WWW).

  12. Department of Energy: MICS (Mathematical Information, and Computational Sciences Division). High performance computing and communications program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This document is intended to serve two purposes. Its first purpose is that of a program status report of the considerable progress that the Department of Energy (DOE) has made since 1993, the time of the last such report (DOE/ER-0536, {open_quotes}The DOE Program in HPCC{close_quotes}), toward achieving the goals of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The second purpose is that of a summary report of the many research programs administered by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) Division of the Office of Energy Research under the auspices of the HPCC Program and to provide, wherever relevant, easy access to pertinent information about MICS-Division activities via universal resource locators (URLs) on the World Wide Web (WWW). The information pointed to by the URL is updated frequently, and the interested reader is urged to access the WWW for the latest information.

  13. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Cadenhead, D A

    1979-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 12 covers the advances in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses the topographical differentiation of the cell surface; the NMR studies of model biological membrane system; and an irreversible thermodynamic approach to energy coupling in mitochondria and chloroplasts. The text also describes water at surfaces; the nature of microemulsions; and the energy principle in the stability of interfaces. Biochemists, physicists, chemical engineers, and people involved in surface and coatings research will find the book invaluable.

  14. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Cadenhead, D A

    1971-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 4 covers the developments in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses waves at interfaces; recent investigations on the thickness of surface layers; and surface analysis by low-energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. The text also describes the anode electrolyte interface; the interactions of adsorbed proteins and polypeptides at interfaces; and peptide-induced ion transport in synthetic and biological membranes. The monolayer adsorption on crystalline surfaces is also considered. Chemists and metallurgi

  15. ABI domain-containing proteins contribute to surface protein display and cell division in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Matthew B; Wojcik, Brandon M; DeDent, Andrea C; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-10-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus requires cell wall anchored surface proteins to cause disease. During cell division, surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides are secreted into the cross-wall, a layer of newly synthesized peptidoglycan between separating daughter cells. The molecular determinants for the trafficking of surface proteins are, however, still unknown. We screened mutants with non-redundant transposon insertions by fluorescence-activated cell sorting for reduced deposition of protein A (SpA) into the staphylococcal envelope. Three mutants, each of which harboured transposon insertions in genes for transmembrane proteins, displayed greatly reduced envelope abundance of SpA and surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides. Characterization of the corresponding mutations identified three transmembrane proteins with abortive infectivity (ABI) domains, elements first described in lactococci for their role in phage exclusion. Mutations in genes for ABI domain proteins, designated spdA, spdB and spdC (surface protein display), diminish the expression of surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides, but not of precursor proteins with conventional signal peptides. spdA, spdB and spdC mutants display an increase in the thickness of cross-walls and in the relative abundance of staphylococci with cross-walls, suggesting that spd mutations may represent a possible link between staphylococcal cell division and protein secretion. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1995 January 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, M. (ed.)

    1996-05-01

    This document is a Progress Report for the Physical and Environmental Sciences, Physics Division, for the period 1995 January 1 to December 31, at the Chalk River nuclear Labs. The condensed matter science group continued to operate a multi-faceted program involving collaborative basic and applied research with external scientists in the fields of materials science, physics, chemistry and biology. The Applied Neutron Diffraction for Industry (And) program gained strength with ever wider applications for the nuclear, aerospace, and manufacturing programs. Steps continued towards making neutron scattering facilities at NRU reactor more user friendly. The neutrino physics group, as part of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) Institute, collaborating with scientists from Canada, USA and UK. The accelerator physics group spent considerable effort working with materials and fuels scientists to show the value of accelerators as an out-reactor source of radiation. Specific research activities have included the demonstration of laser plasma deposition of diamond coating, which has potential application for high-wear components in reactors, and the study for a Free Electron Laser upgrade for the IMPELA accelerator. As a result of funding reduction all programs of the Division were dissolved as of 1997 March 31.

  17. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1995 January 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, M.

    1996-05-01

    This document is a Progress Report for the Physical and Environmental Sciences, Physics Division, for the period 1995 January 1 to December 31, at the Chalk River nuclear Labs. The condensed matter science group continued to operate a multi-faceted program involving collaborative basic and applied research with external scientists in the fields of materials science, physics, chemistry and biology. The Applied Neutron Diffraction for Industry (And) program gained strength with ever wider applications for the nuclear, aerospace, and manufacturing programs. Steps continued towards making neutron scattering facilities at NRU reactor more user friendly. The neutrino physics group, as part of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) Institute, collaborating with scientists from Canada, USA and UK. The accelerator physics group spent considerable effort working with materials and fuels scientists to show the value of accelerators as an out-reactor source of radiation. Specific research activities have included the demonstration of laser plasma deposition of diamond coating, which has potential application for high-wear components in reactors, and the study for a Free Electron Laser upgrade for the IMPELA accelerator. As a result of funding reduction all programs of the Division were dissolved as of 1997 March 31

  18. Aliphatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from South China Sea off Kuching Division, Sarawak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafidz Yusoff; Zaini Assim; Samsur Mohamad

    2012-01-01

    Eighteen surface sediment samples collected from South China Sea off Kuching Division, Sarawak were analyzed for aliphatic hydrocarbons. These hydrocarbons were recovered from sediment by Soxhlet extraction method and then analyzed using gas chromatography equipped with mass spectrometer (GC/ MS). Total concentrations of aliphatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from South China Sea off Kuching division are ranged from 35.6 μg/ g to 1466.1 μg/ g dry weights. The sediments collected from Bako Bay, Kuching showed high concentrations of total aliphatic hydrocarbons. Several molecular indices were used to predict the predominant sources of hydrocarbons. Carbon preference index (CPI) value revealed widespread anthropogenic input in this study area (CPI= 0 to 4.1). The ratio of C 31 / C 19 and C 29 / C 31 indicated that major input of aliphatic hydrocarbon mostly transfer by lateral input to the marine environment than atmospheric movements. Generally, the concentrations of aliphatic hydrocarbons in sediment from South China Sea off Kuching division are generally higher compare to other area in the world. (author)

  19. Environmental geochemistry of surface and subsurface water from Dera Ismail Khan Division, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.T.; Alizai, A.H.; Khan, S.D.

    2012-01-01

    The Dera Ismail Khan division is situated in the southern most part of the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province in Pakistan. Majority of population in this region obtain domestic water from tube wells, dug wells, ponds, stored run off of the Indus and Gomal rivers and perennial streams. This study is aimed to determine the physio-chemical contaminants in the surface and subsurface water which could cause environmental problem. For this purpose, representative water sample were collected from tube wells, dug wells, streams and rivers. These analyses were performed using Hach DR/2000 spectrophotometer and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer. Chemically both surface and subsurface water samples of the area were classified as alkaline fresh water. The comparison of the data with standard limits set by Word Health Organization (WHO) for drinking water suggested that in certain areas of the division, the drinking water samples have high concentrations of Total Dissolved Solids, NO/sub 3//sup 2-/, SO/sub 4//sup 2-/, F-, Cl-, Fe/sup 2+/, Ca/sup 2+/, Mg/sup 2+/, Pb/sup 2+/, Ni/sup 2+/ and Cd/sup 2+/ while pH, EC, HCO/sub 3/-, PO/sub 4//sup 3-/, Na/sup +/, Mn/sup 2+/, K/sup +/, Cr/sup 3+/ and Zn/sup 2+/ were within the permissible limits. These contaminations could be attributed to the geogenic sources which might be responsible for the health related problems in certain areas of the division. (author)

  20. Materials Science Division HVEM-Tandem Facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.

    1981-10-01

    The ANL-Materials Science Division High Voltage Electron Microscope-Tandem Facility is a unique national research facility available to scientists from industry, universities, and other national laboratories, following a peer evaluation of their research proposals by the Facility Steering Committee. The principal equipment consists of a Kratos EM7 1.2-MV high voltage electron microscope, a 300-kV Texas Nuclear ion accelerator, and a National Electrostatics 2-MV Tandem accelerator. Ions from both accelerators are transmitted into the electron microscope through the ion-beam interface. Recent work at the facility is summarized

  1. Recent progress in surface science v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Riddiford, A C

    1964-01-01

    Recent Progress in Surface Science, Volume 2 is a 10-chapter text that covers the significant advances in some aspects of surface science, including in catalysis, genetic control of cell surface, and cell membrane. The opening chapter deals with the major factors affecting adsorption at the gas-solid interface. The subsequent chapters explore the advances in understanding of heterogeneous catalysis in terms of fundamental surface processes, as well as the concept of dynamic contact angles. These topics are followed by discussions on emulsions, flotation, and the extraordinary complexity of cel

  2. Current trends of surface science and catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Jeong Young

    2014-01-01

    Including detail on applying surface science in renewable energy conversion, this book covers the latest results on model catalysts including single crystals, bridging "materials and pressure gaps", and hot electron flows in heterogeneous catalysis.

  3. Report of the surface science workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somorjai, G.A.; Yates, J.T. Jr.; Clinton, W.

    1977-03-01

    A three-day workshop was held to review the various areas of energy development and technology in which surface science plays major roles and makes major contributions, and to identify the major surface-science-related problem areas in the fields with ERDA's mission in the fossil, nuclear, fusion, geothermal, and solar energy technologies and in the field of environmental control. The workshop activities are summarized

  4. Report of the surface science workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, G.A.; Yates, J.T. Jr.; Clinton, W.

    1977-03-01

    A three-day workshop was held to review the various areas of energy development and technology in which surface science plays major roles and makes major contributions, and to identify the major surface-science-related problem areas in the fields with ERDA's mission in the fossil, nuclear, fusion, geothermal, and solar energy technologies and in the field of environmental control. The workshop activities are summarized. (GHT)

  5. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Cadenhead, D A; Rosenberg, M D

    1975-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 9 covers the developments in surface and membrane science. The book discusses the physical adsorption of gases and vapors in micropores; the chemisorption theory; and the role of radioisotopes in the studies of chemisorption and catalysis. The text also describes the interaction of ions with monolayers; and the isolation and characterization of mycoplasma membranes. Chemists, physical chemists, and microbiologists will find the book useful.

  6. Surface science tools for nanomaterials characterization

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Fourth volume of a 40volume series on nano science and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Surface Science Tools for Nanomaterials Characterization. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume an essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  7. Life sciences flight experiments program, life sciences project division, procurement quality provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, G.

    1980-01-01

    Methods are defined for implementing quality assurance policy and requirements for life sciences laboratory equipment, experimental hardware, integration and test support equipment, and integrated payloads.

  8. Graduate student theses supported by DOE`s Environmental Sciences Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, Robert M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Parra, Bobbi M. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; comps.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides complete bibliographic citations, abstracts, and keywords for 212 doctoral and master`s theses supported fully or partly by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Sciences Division (and its predecessors) in the following areas: Atmospheric Sciences; Marine Transport; Terrestrial Transport; Ecosystems Function and Response; Carbon, Climate, and Vegetation; Information; Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics (CHAMMP); Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM); Oceans; National Institute for Global Environmental Change (NIGEC); Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV); Integrated Assessment; Graduate Fellowships for Global Change; and Quantitative Links. Information on the major professor, department, principal investigator, and program area is given for each abstract. Indexes are provided for major professor, university, principal investigator, program area, and keywords. This bibliography is also available in various machine-readable formats (ASCII text file, WordPerfect{reg_sign} files, and PAPYRUS{trademark} files).

  9. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K. (comps.)

    1981-09-01

    Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  10. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. As in previous years, experimental research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, during this time, preparations began for a new generation of relativistic heavy-ion experiments at CERN. The Nuclear Science Division is involved in three major experiments at CERN and several smaller ones. The report is divided into 5 sections. Part I describes the research programs and operations, and Part II contains condensations of experimental papers arranged roughly according to program and in order of increasing energy, without any further subdivisions. Part III contains condensations of theoretical papers, again ordered according to program but in order of decreasing energy. Improvements and innovations in instrumentation and in experimental or analytical techniques are presented in Part IV. Part V consists of appendices, the first listing publications by author for this period, in which the LBL report number only is given for papers that have not yet appeared in journals; the second contains abstracts of PhD theses awarded during this period; and the third gives the titles and speakers of the NSD Monday seminars, the Bevatron Research Meetings and the theory seminars that were given during the report period. The last appendix is an author index for this report

  11. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. As in previous years, experimental research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, during this time, preparations began for a new generation of relativistic heavy-ion experiments at CERN. The Nuclear Science Division is involved in three major experiments at CERN and several smaller ones. The report is divided into 5 sections. Part I describes the research programs and operations, and Part II contains condensations of experimental papers arranged roughly according to program and in order of increasing energy, without any further subdivisions. Part III contains condensations of theoretical papers, again ordered according to program but in order of decreasing energy. Improvements and innovations in instrumentation and in experimental or analytical techniques are presented in Part IV. Part V consists of appendices, the first listing publications by author for this period, in which the LBL report number only is given for papers that have not yet appeared in journals; the second contains abstracts of PhD theses awarded during this period; and the third gives the titles and speakers of the NSD Monday seminars, the Bevatron Research Meetings and the theory seminars that were given during the report period. The last appendix is an author index for this report.

  12. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Cadenhead, D A

    1976-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 10 covers the advances in surface and membrane science. The book discusses the selective changes of cellular particles influencing sedimentation properties; and the rotating disk and ring-disk electrodes in investigations of surface phenomena at the metal-electrolyte interface. The text also describes the membrane potential of phospholipid bilayer and biological membranes; the adsorption of surfactant monolayers at gas/liquid and liquid/liquid interfaces; and the enzymes immobilized on glass. Chemists and people involved in electrochemistry will

  13. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Cadenhead, D A

    1981-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 14 covers the advances in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses statistical thermodynamics of monolayer adsorption from gas and liquid mixtures on homogeneous and heterogeneous solid surfaces; and the structure of the boundary layers of liquids and its influence on the mass transfer in fine pores. The text then describes the coupling of ionic and non-electrolyte fluxes in ion selective membranes; the electrocatalytic properties of matalloporphins at the interface; and the adsorption from binary gas and liquid phases. Phas

  14. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Cadenhead, D A

    1973-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 7 covers the developments in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses the theoretical and experimental aspects of the van der Waals forces; the electric double layer on the semiconductor-electrolyte interface; and the long-range and short-range order in adsorbed films. The text also describes the hydrodynamical theory of surface shear viscosity; the structure and properties of monolayers of synthetic polypeptides at the air-water interface; and the structure and molecular dynamics of water. The role of glycoproteins in cell

  15. A Diversity of Divisions: Tracing the History of the Demarcation between the Sciences and the Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouterse, Jeroen; Karstens, Bart

    2015-06-01

    Throughout history, divides between the sciences and the humanities have been drawn in many different ways. This essay shows that the notion of a divide became more urgent and pronounced in the second half of the nineteenth century. While this shift has several causes, the essay focuses on the rise of the social sciences, which is interpreted as posing a profound challenge to the established disciplines of the study of humankind. This is demonstrated by zooming in on linguistics, one of the key traditional disciplines of the humanities. Through the assumption of a correspondence between mental and linguistic categories, psychology became of central importance in the various conceptions of linguistics that emerged in the nineteenth century. Both linguistics and psychology were very much engaged in a process of discipline formation, and opinions about the proper directions of the fields varied considerably. Debates on these issues catalyzed the construction of more radical divisions between the sciences and the humanities. Both Wilhelm Dilthey's dichotomy between understanding and explanation and Wilhelm Windelband's dichotomy between nomothetic and idiographic sciences respond to these debates. While their constructions are often lumped together, the essay shows that they actually meant very different things and have to be treated accordingly.

  16. Visceral subpleural hematoma of the left diaphragmatic surface following left upper division segmentectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Mizukami

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary visceral subpleural hematoma is rare. We report visceral subpleural hematoma of the left diaphragmatic surface following left upper division segmentectomy. This very rare case was difficult to distinguish from thoracic abscess. Case presentation A 68-year-old man with hypertension had undergone video-assisted thoracoscopic left upper division segmentectomy for suspected lung carcinoma. Deep vein thrombosis of the lower leg was identified and edoxaban, a so-called novel oral anticoagulant, was started on postoperative day 7. The chest drainage tube was removed on postoperative day 12 because of persistent air leakage, but fever appeared the same day. Computed tomography revealed a cavity with mixed air and fluid, so antibiotics were started on suspicion of abscess. Computed tomography-guided drainage was attempted, but proved unsuccessful. Fever continued and surgical investigation was therefore performed. Visceral subpleural hematoma was identified under the diaphragmatic surface of the left basal lung. We excised the pleura, then performed drainage and applied running sutures. The parenchyma and visceral pleura were covered with polyglycolic acid sheet and fibrin glue. Edoxaban was restarted on postoperative day 12 of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and no recurrence of hematoma has been revealed. Conclusions Visceral subpleural hematoma after thoracic surgery is extremely rare. Furthermore, correct diagnosis was difficult and surgery offered a good diagnostic and therapeutic procedure.

  17. Surface analysis methods in materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Sexton, Brett; Smart, Roger

    1992-01-01

    The idea for this book stemmed from a remark by Philip Jennings of Murdoch University in a discussion session following a regular meeting of the Australian Surface Science group. He observed that a text on surface analysis and applica­ tions to materials suitable for final year undergraduate and postgraduate science students was not currently available. Furthermore, the members of the Australian Surface Science group had the research experience and range of coverage of sur­ face analytical techniques and applications to provide a text for this purpose. A of techniques and applications to be included was agreed at that meeting. The list intended readership of the book has been broadened since the early discussions, particularly to encompass industrial users, but there has been no significant alter­ ation in content. The editors, in consultation with the contributors, have agreed that the book should be prepared for four major groups of readers: - senior undergraduate students in chemistry, physics, metallur...

  18. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO 2 and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program

  19. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program.

  20. Progress report, Health Sciences Division, 1 October to 31 December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This is the second quarterly progress report of the Health Sciences Division. Developments in health physics include construction of a simple monitor for measurement of tritium concentration at or above the maximum permissible level and measurements on the behaviour of Geiger counters at high temperature for monitoring activity in reactor cooling circuits. Environmental Research Branch continues to monitor groundwater in the vicinity of the glass blocks containing fission products. Work in radiation biology deals with the effects of radiation on a variety of living organisms. Emphasis continued on the study of damage to DNA and its repair. Research into certain human diseases which are believed to be caused by a deficient DNA repair mechanism is also summarized. (OT)

  1. Annual progress report - Health Sciences Division - 1990 January 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for the Dosimetric Research Branch and the Radiation Biology Branch. The major topics discussed in this report include: neutron dosimetry, photon dosimetry, beta ray dosimetry, tritium measurement and dosimetry, internal dosimetry, biological dosimetry, instrumentation and measurement techniques, bioassay and in vivo counting development, dosimetry services, external activities, dose estimation by electron spin resonance, molecular and physical approaches to the structure and genetic function of DNA that determine cellular radioresponse, carcinogenic risks of radiation, stress induced changes in DNA structure and in cell biology, assessment of variation in the responses of individuals to ionizing radiation, cytotoxicity of beryllium, RBE of tritium beta rays for causes of death other than myeloid leukemia in male CBA/H mice, animal facility operations, and the Chalk River follow-up study

  2. Progress report - Physical Sciences, Physical Division 1993 July 1 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, M.

    1994-05-01

    The progress report on the Physical Sciences, Physics Division, is split into Accelerator Physics and Neutron and Condensed Matter Science Branch. The Accelerator Physics Group in collaboration with Fuel Channel Components Branch has undertaken a unique series of experiments to prove the feasibility of using high energy electron beams for out-reactor irradiation of bulk samples of pressure-tube materials. The Neutron and Condensed Matter Branch, has among other topics, been involved with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. It is part of an international collaboration including Canada, United States, and the United Kingdom. The project involves the use of heavy water to detect particles called neutrinos that are emitted from the centre of the sun and from exploding stars. Results from the Molecular Physics program include a study of the differing structures of ice grown in an electric field. Atomic Ordering in the new intermetallics Al 3 Ti-X was extensively investigated in the Materials Science program. In the theory program a code to calculate the multiphonon expansion of the incoherent scattering function was written and it was applied in the analysis of phonon density of states for amorphous and crystalline ice. Further calculations were made to develop improved understanding of superconductivity and a theory for the conductivity of vortex cores was proposed. 3 tabs., 15 figs

  3. Progress report - Physical Sciences, Physical Division 1993 July 1 -December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, M

    1994-05-01

    The progress report on the Physical Sciences, Physics Division, is split into Accelerator Physics and Neutron and Condensed Matter Science Branch. The Accelerator Physics Group in collaboration with Fuel Channel Components Branch has undertaken a unique series of experiments to prove the feasibility of using high energy electron beams for out-reactor irradiation of bulk samples of pressure-tube materials. The Neutron and Condensed Matter Branch, has among other topics, been involved with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. It is part of an international collaboration including Canada, United States, and the United Kingdom. The project involves the use of heavy water to detect particles called neutrinos that are emitted from the centre of the sun and from exploding stars. Results from the Molecular Physics program include a study of the differing structures of ice grown in an electric field. Atomic Ordering in the new intermetallics Al{sub 3} Ti-X was extensively investigated in the Materials Science program. In the theory program a code to calculate the multiphonon expansion of the incoherent scattering function was written and it was applied in the analysis of phonon density of states for amorphous and crystalline ice. Further calculations were made to develop improved understanding of superconductivity and a theory for the conductivity of vortex cores was proposed. 3 tabs., 15 figs.

  4. Practical guide to surface science and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Yip-Wah

    2001-01-01

    Practical Guide to Surface Science and Spectroscopy provides a practical introduction to surface science as well as describes the basic analytical techniques that researchers use to understand what occurs at the surfaces of materials and at their interfaces. These techniques include auger electron spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, inelastic scattering of electrons and ions, low energy electron diffraction, scanning probe microscopy, and interfacial segregation. Understanding the behavior of materials at their surfaces is essential for materials scientists and engineers as they design and fabricate microelectronics and semiconductor devices. The book gives over 100 examples, discussion questions and problems with varying levels of difficulty. Included with this book is a CD-ROM, which not only contains the same information, but also provides many elements of animation and interaction that are not easily emulated on paper. In diverse subject matters ranging from the operation of ion pumps, computer-...

  5. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birge, R.W.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes the research performed in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar year 1981. During the year under review the Division devoted roughly half its effort to the final construction stages of the Time Projection Chamber and other equipment for the PEP-4 facility at SLAC. The year was marked by the successful passage of milestone after milestone - the two-sector test of the TPC with cosmic rays in July 1981, the full TPC test in November 1981, and the roll-in onto the PEP beam line on 6 January 1982. In other e + e - experiments, the Mark II detector continued its productive data-taking at PEP. In other areas, the final stages of data analysis, particularly for the structure functions, proceeded for the inelastic muon scattering experiment performed at Fermilab, a muon polarimeter experiment was developed and mounted at TRIUMF to probe for the presence of right-handed currents in muon decay, and the design and then construction began of fine-grained hadron calorimeters for the end caps of the Colliding Detector Facility at Fermilab. The Particle Data Group intensified its activities, despite financial constraints, as it proceeded toward production of a new edition of its authoritative Review of Particle Properties early in 1982. During 1981 the Theoretical Physics Group pursued a diverse spectrum of research in its own right and also interacted effectively with the experimental program. Research and development continued on the segmented mirror for the ten-meter telescope proposed by the University of California. Activities in the Computer Science and Mathematics Department encompassed networking, database management, software engineering, and computer graphics, as well as basic research in nonlinear phenomena in combustion and fluid flow

  6. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birge, R.W.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes the research performed in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar year 1981. During the year under review the Division devoted roughly half its effort to the final construction stages of the Time Projection Chamber and other equipment for the PEP-4 facility at SLAC. The year was marked by the successful passage of milestone after milestone - the two-sector test of the TPC with cosmic rays in July 1981, the full TPC test in November 1981, and the roll-in onto the PEP beam line on 6 January 1982. In other e/sup +/e/sup -/ experiments, the Mark II detector continued its productive data-taking at PEP. In other areas, the final stages of data analysis, particularly for the structure functions, proceeded for the inelastic muon scattering experiment performed at Fermilab, a muon polarimeter experiment was developed and mounted at TRIUMF to probe for the presence of right-handed currents in muon decay, and the design and then construction began of fine-grained hadron calorimeters for the end caps of the Colliding Detector Facility at Fermilab. The Particle Data Group intensified its activities, despite financial constraints, as it proceeded toward production of a new edition of its authoritative Review of Particle Properties early in 1982. During 1981 the Theoretical Physics Group pursued a diverse spectrum of research in its own right and also interacted effectively with the experimental program. Research and development continued on the segmented mirror for the ten-meter telescope proposed by the University of California. Activities in the Computer Science and Mathematics Department encompassed networking, database management, software engineering, and computer graphics, as well as basic research in nonlinear phenomena in combustion and fluid flow.

  7. Surface science principles and current applications

    CERN Document Server

    Taglauer, E; Wandelt, K

    1996-01-01

    Modern technologies increasingly rely on low-dimensional physics at interfaces and in thin-films and nano-structures. Surface science holds a key position in providing the experimental methods and theoretical models for a basic understanding of these effects. This book includes case studies and status reports about research topics such as: surface structure determination by tensor-LEED and surface X-ray diffraction; the preparation and detection of low-dimensional electronic surface states; quantitative surface compositional analysis; the dynamics of adsorption and reaction of adsorbates, e.g. kinetic oscillations; the characterization and control of thin-film and multilayer growth including the influence of surfactants; a critical assessment of the surface physics approach to heterogeneous catalysis.

  8. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division, Physics Department program report, FY 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, J.B.; Orphan, R.C.

    1977-12-01

    Progress is reported on the development of a number of mathematical models for the simulation and computer analysis of a variety of environmental conditions. Regional, local, and global models for the environmental transport of chemical and radioactive effluents at surface and stratospheric levels are described. A list is included of publications in the atmospheric sciences during the time covered by this report

  9. Econophysics and evolutionary economics (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 2 November 2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The scientific session 'Econophysics and evolutionary economics' of the Division of Physical Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) took place on 2 November 2010 in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences. The session agenda announced on the website www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division listed the following reports: (1) Maevsky V I (Institute of Economics, RAS, Moscow) 'The transition from simple reproduction to economic growth'; (2) Yudanov A Yu (Financial University of the Government of the Russian Federation, Moscow) 'Experimental data on the development of fast-growing innovative companies in Russia'; (3) Pospelov I G (Dorodnitsyn Computation Center, RAS, Moscow) 'Why is it sometimes possible to successfully model an economy?' (4) Chernyavskii D S (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'Theoretical economics'; (5) Romanovskii M Yu (Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, RAS, Moscow) 'Nonclassical random walks and the phenomenology of fluctuations of the yield of securities in the securities market'; (6) Dubovikov M M, Starchenko N V (INTRAST Management Company, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow) 'Fractal analysis of financial time series and the prediction problem'; Papers written on the basis of these reports are published below. The transition from simple reproduction to economic growth, V I Maevsky, S Yu Malkov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 729-733. High-growth firms in Russia: experimental data and prospects for the econophysical simulation of economic modernization, A Yu Yudanov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 733-737. Equilibrium models of economics in the period of a global financial crisis, I G Pospelov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 738-742. On econophysics and its place in modern theoretical economics, D S Chernavskii, N I Starkov, S Yu Malkov, Yu V Kosse, A V Shcherbakov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number

  10. Econophysics and evolutionary economics (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 2 November 2010)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-31

    The scientific session 'Econophysics and evolutionary economics' of the Division of Physical Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) took place on 2 November 2010 in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences. The session agenda announced on the website www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division listed the following reports: (1) Maevsky V I (Institute of Economics, RAS, Moscow) 'The transition from simple reproduction to economic growth'; (2) Yudanov A Yu (Financial University of the Government of the Russian Federation, Moscow) 'Experimental data on the development of fast-growing innovative companies in Russia'; (3) Pospelov I G (Dorodnitsyn Computation Center, RAS, Moscow) 'Why is it sometimes possible to successfully model an economy?' (4) Chernyavskii D S (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'Theoretical economics'; (5) Romanovskii M Yu (Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, RAS, Moscow) 'Nonclassical random walks and the phenomenology of fluctuations of the yield of securities in the securities market'; (6) Dubovikov M M, Starchenko N V (INTRAST Management Company, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow) 'Fractal analysis of financial time series and the prediction problem'; Papers written on the basis of these reports are published below. The transition from simple reproduction to economic growth, V I Maevsky, S Yu Malkov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 729-733. High-growth firms in Russia: experimental data and prospects for the econophysical simulation of economic modernization, A Yu Yudanov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 733-737. Equilibrium models of economics in the period of a global financial crisis, I G Pospelov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 738-742. On econophysics and its place in modern theoretical economics, D S Chernavskii, N I Starkov, S Yu Malkov

  11. Econophysics and evolutionary economics (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 2 November 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The scientific session "Econophysics and evolutionary economics" of the Division of Physical Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) took place on 2 November 2010 in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences. The session agenda announced on the website www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division listed the following reports: (1) Maevsky V I (Institute of Economics, RAS, Moscow) "The transition from simple reproduction to economic growth"; (2) Yudanov A Yu (Financial University of the Government of the Russian Federation, Moscow) "Experimental data on the development of fast-growing innovative companies in Russia"; (3) Pospelov I G (Dorodnitsyn Computation Center, RAS, Moscow) "Why is it sometimes possible to successfully model an economy? (4) Chernyavskii D S (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Theoretical economics"; (5) Romanovskii M Yu (Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, RAS, Moscow) "Nonclassical random walks and the phenomenology of fluctuations of the yield of securities in the securities market"; (6) Dubovikov M M, Starchenko N V (INTRAST Management Company, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow) "Fractal analysis of financial time series and the prediction problem"; Papers written on the basis of these reports are published below. • The transition from simple reproduction to economic growth, V I Maevsky, S Yu Malkov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 729-733 • High-growth firms in Russia: experimental data and prospects for the econophysical simulation of economic modernization, A Yu Yudanov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 733-737 • Equilibrium models of economics in the period of a global financial crisis, I G Pospelov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 738-742 • On econophysics and its place in modern theoretical economics, D S Chernavskii, N I Starkov, S Yu Malkov, Yu V Kosse, A V Shcherbakov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume

  12. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1977-09-01

    Progress is reported for research programs in the metals and ceramics division of ORNL. In structure of materials, theoretical research, x-ray diffraction studies, studies of erosion of ceramics, preparation and synthesis of high temperature and special service materials, and studies of stabilities of microphases in high-temperature structural materials. Research into deformation and mechanical properties included physical metallurgy, and grain boundary segregation and embrittlement. Physical properties and transport phenomena were studied and included mechanisms of surface and solid state reactions, and properties of superconducting materials. The radiation effects program, directed at understanding the effects of composition and microstructure on the structure and properties of materials irradiated at elevated temperatures, is also described

  13. Nuclear Science Division annual report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1981, and September 30, 1982. Heavy-ion investigations continue to dominate the experimental and theoretical research efforts. Complementary programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluation, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out. Results from Bevalac experiments employing a wide variety of heavy ion beams, along with new or upgraded detector facilities (HISS, the Plastic Ball, and the streamer chamber) are contained in this report. These relativistic experiments have shed important light on the degree of equilibration for central collisions, the time evolution of a nuclear collision, the nuclear density and compressional energy of these collisions, and strange particle production. Reaction mechanism work dominates the heavy-ion research at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the SuperHILAC. Recent experiments have contributed to our understanding of the nature of light-particle emission in deep-inelastic collisions, of peripheral reactions, incomplete fusion, fission, and evaporation. Nuclear structure investigations at these accelerators continue to be directed toward the understanding of the behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum. Research in the area of exotic nuclei has led to the observation at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the β-delayed proton decay of odd-odd T/sub z/ = -2 nuclides; β-delayed proton emitters in the rare earth region are being investigated at the SuperHILAC

  14. Nuclear Science Division annual report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1981, and September 30, 1982. Heavy-ion investigations continue to dominate the experimental and theoretical research efforts. Complementary programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluation, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out. Results from Bevalac experiments employing a wide variety of heavy ion beams, along with new or upgraded detector facilities (HISS, the Plastic Ball, and the streamer chamber) are contained in this report. These relativistic experiments have shed important light on the degree of equilibration for central collisions, the time evolution of a nuclear collision, the nuclear density and compressional energy of these collisions, and strange particle production. Reaction mechanism work dominates the heavy-ion research at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the SuperHILAC. Recent experiments have contributed to our understanding of the nature of light-particle emission in deep-inelastic collisions, of peripheral reactions, incomplete fusion, fission, and evaporation. Nuclear structure investigations at these accelerators continue to be directed toward the understanding of the behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum. Research in the area of exotic nuclei has led to the observation at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the ..beta..-delayed proton decay of odd-odd T/sub z/ = -2 nuclides; ..beta..-delayed proton emitters in the rare earth region are being investigated at the SuperHILAC.

  15. An Update on the NASA Planetary Science Division Research and Analysis Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Christina; Bernstein, Max; Rall, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: NASA's Planetary Science Division (PSD) solicits its Research and Analysis (R&A) programs each year in Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES). Beginning with the 2014 ROSES solicitation, PSD will be changing the structure of the program elements under which the majority of planetary science R&A is done. Major changes include the creation of five core research program elements aligned with PSD's strategic science questions, the introduction of several new R&A opportunities, new submission requirements, and a new timeline for proposal submissionROSES and NSPIRES: ROSES contains the research announcements for all of SMD. Submission of ROSES proposals is done electronically via NSPIRES: http://nspires.nasaprs.com. We will present further details on the proposal submission process to help guide younger scientists. Statistical trends, including the average award size within the PSD programs, selections rates, and lessons learned, will be presented. Information on new programs will also be presented, if available.Review Process and Volunteering: The SARA website (http://sara.nasa.gov) contains information on all ROSES solicitations. There is an email address (SARA@nasa.gov) for inquiries and an area for volunteer reviewers to sign up. The peer review process is based on Scientific/Technical Merit, Relevance, and Level of Effort, and will be detailed within this presentation.ROSES 2014 submission changes: All PSD programs will use a two-step proposal submission process. A Step-1 proposal is required and must be submitted electronically by the Step-1 due date. The Step-1 proposal should include a description of the science goals and objectives to be addressed by the proposal, a brief description of the methodology to be used to address the science goals and objectives, and the relevance of the proposed research to the call submitted to.Additional Information: Additional details will be provided on the Cassini Data Analysis Program, the

  16. European analytical column No. 36 from the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC) of the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences (EuCheMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlberg, Bo; Emons, Hendrik; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2008-01-01

    European analytical column no. 36 from the division of analytical chemistry (DAC) of the European association for chemical and molecular sciences (EuCheMS)......European analytical column no. 36 from the division of analytical chemistry (DAC) of the European association for chemical and molecular sciences (EuCheMS)...

  17. Progress report - physical sciences - physics division 1991 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This is the second in the new series of reports for the Physics Division since the creation of the Physical Sciences Unit in 1990. This report has been subdivided into three self-contained sections covering the activities in the branches for Accelerator Physics, Neutron and Solid State Physics and Theoretical Physics. It is noteworthy that the RFQ1 program with the original vanes has come to a successful conclusion having accelerated 79 mA of protons to 600 keV. The new vanes to achieve a high energy of 1.2 MeV have now been installed and will form the basis for the low energy end of high current proton accelerator development. The progress in the neutron scattering program has been hampered by the NRU reactor being down for repairs since January 1991. Nevertheless a very successful opening ceremony was held to mark the completion of the new DUALSPEC spectrometers and several workshops have been held to promote the understanding of neutron scattering

  18. Recent progress in surface science 3

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Rosenberg, M D

    2013-01-01

    Recent Progress in Surface Science, Volume 3 covers topics on the structure and mechanisms of the cell membranes. The book discusses the incorporation of chemisorbed species; the recent developments in the study of epitaxy; and the ""diffusion"" or ""hydride"" component of overpotential at cathodes of the ""platinum metals"". The text also describes the mechanism of hydrogen exchange in proteins; the nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lipids, lipoproteins, and cell membranes; and the monolayers of synthetic phospholipids. The formation, electrical properties, transport, and excitability cha

  19. Life Sciences Implications of Lunar Surface Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Steven P.; Norcross, Jason R.; Abercromby, Andrew F.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document preliminary, predicted, life sciences implications of expected operational concepts for lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA). Algorithms developed through simulation and testing in lunar analog environments were used to predict crew metabolic rates and ground reaction forces experienced during lunar EVA. Subsequently, the total metabolic energy consumption, the daily bone load stimulus, total oxygen needed, and other variables were calculated and provided to Human Research Program and Exploration Systems Mission Directorate stakeholders. To provide context to the modeling, the report includes an overview of some scenarios that have been considered. Concise descriptions of the analog testing and development of the algorithms are also provided. This document may be updated to remain current with evolving lunar or other planetary surface operations, assumptions and concepts, and to provide additional data and analyses collected during the ongoing analog research program.

  20. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1988-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1986 to September 30, 1987. A highlight of the experimental program during this time was the completion of the first round of heavy-ion running at CERN with ultrarelativistic oxygen and sulfur beams. Very rapid progress is being made in the analysis of these important experiments and preliminary results are presented in this report. During this period, the Bevalac also continued to produce significant new physics results, while demand for beam time remained high. An important new community of users has arrived on the scene, eager to exploit the unique low-energy heavy-beam capabilities of the Bevalac. Another major highlight of the program has been the performance of the Dilepton Spectrometer which has entered into production running. Dileptons have been observed in the p + Be and Ca + Ca reactions at several bombarding energies. New data on pion production with heavy beams measured in the streamer chamber to shed light on the question of nuclear compressibility, while posing some new questions concerning the role of Coulomb forces on the observed pion spectra. In another quite different area, the pioneering research with radioactive beams is continuing and is proving to be one of the fastest growing programs at the Bevalac. Exotic secondary beams (e.g., 8He, 11Li, and 14Be) have been produced for fundamental nuclear physics studies. In order to further enhance the scientific research program and ensure the continued vitality of the facility, the Laboratory has proposed an upgrade of the existing Bevalac. Specifically, the Upgrade would replace the Bevatron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams to continue the forefront research program. Other papers on nuclear physics research are included in this report

  1. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1988-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1986 to September 30, 1987. A highlight of the experimental program during this time was the completion of the first round of heavy-ion running at CERN with ultrarelativistic oxygen and sulfur beams. Very rapid progress is being made in the analysis of these important experiments and preliminary results are presented in this report. During this period, the Bevalac also continued to produce significant new physics results, while demand for beam time remained high. An important new community of users has arrived on the scene, eager to exploit the unique low-energy heavy-beam capabilities of the Bevalac. Another major highlight of the program has been the performance of the Dilepton Spectrometer which has entered into production running. Dileptons have been observed in the p + Be and Ca + Ca reactions at several bombarding energies. New data on pion production with heavy beams measured in the streamer chamber to shed light on the question of nuclear compressibility, while posing some new questions concerning the role of Coulomb forces on the observed pion spectra. In another quite different area, the pioneering research with radioactive beams is continuing and is proving to be one of the fastest growing programs at the Bevalac. Exotic secondary beams (e.g., 8He, 11Li, and 14Be) have been produced for fundamental nuclear physics studies. In order to further enhance the scientific research program and ensure the continued vitality of the facility, the Laboratory has proposed an upgrade of the existing Bevalac. Specifically, the Upgrade would replace the Bevatron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams to continue the forefront research program. Other papers on nuclear physics research are included in this report.

  2. Dr Hiroshi Ikukawa Director Planning and Evaluation Division Science and Technology Policy Bureau Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan and Mr Robert Aymar signed an accord for the CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    Dr Hiroshi Ikukawa Director Planning and Evaluation Division Science and Technology Policy Bureau Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan and Mr Robert Aymar signed an accord for the CERN.

  3. 100th anniversary of the discovery of cosmic rays (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 24 October 2012)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), entitled ''100th anniversary of the discovery of cosmic rays'', was held on 24 October 2012 in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The agenda of the session announced on the RAS Physical Sciences Division website www.gpad.ac.ru included the following reports: (1) Panasyuk M I (Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Lomonosov State University, Moscow) T he contribution of Russian scientists to the centennial history of the development of the physics of cosmic rays ; (2) Ryazhskaya O G (Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) O n experiments in underground physics ; (3) Krymskii G F, Berezhko E G (Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Yakutsk) T he origin of cosmic rays ; (4) Stozhkov Yu I (Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) C osmic rays in the heliosphere ; (5) Troitsky S V (Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) ''Cosmic particles of energies >10 19 eV: a short review of results''. Papers based on reports 2 and 5 are presented below. . On experiments in Underground Physics, O G Ryazhskaya Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 3, Pages 296–304 . Cosmic particles with energies above 10 19 eV: a brief summary of results, S V Troitsky Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 3, Pages 304–310 (conferences and symposia)

  4. DOE Final Report -NON-LINEAR WAVES IN CONTINUOUS MEDIA- BES- Division of Engineering and Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth J. Putterman

    2006-01-01

    FINAL REPORT ON : NON-LINEAR WAVES IN CONTINUOUS MEDIA Doe DE FG03-87ER13686 (001312-001) Submitted January 10, 2006 by Seth J. Putterman 310-8252269 Physics Department University of California Los Angeles, CA 90095 puherman at ritva.physics.ucla.edu NON-LINEAR WAVES IN CONTINUOUS MEDIA I am happy to report that this project has been a big success. For over 10 years the DOE [Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering] has funded our research program on the overarching theme of spontaneous energy focusing phenomena. These effects occur when a nonlinear macroscopic system is excited so as to drive it far from equilibrium. The subsequent relaxation to equilibrium does not occur smoothly but instead is accompanied by the formation of structured domains where the energy density is highly concentrated. A signature example is picosecond sonoluminescence [1] wherein a smooth sound wave has its energy density focused by 12 orders of magnitude to generate a clock-like string of picosecond flashes of ultraviolet light. Our earlier work on solitons [2] demonstrated how uniform surface waves break up into stable localized structures. Our experimental work on turbulence produced photos of localized structures lying many standard deviations outside the range of gaussian statistics[3]. This effect is referred to as intermittency. Our recent work on friction finds its motivation in those theories of sonoluminescence which invoke frictional electricity. In its most common form this is the generation of a spark when we touch a doorknob after walking over a carpet. Our reading of the literature on this subject indicated that frictional electricity like sonoluminescence is not understood. So to probe triboelectrification we set up a modern version of an experiment performed by Bernoulli in 1700. Here sparking is caused by the rubbing of glass against mercury. We indeed observed flashes of light which were accompanied by events of stick-slip friction at the interface between the

  5. Visualising Migration and Social Division: Insights From Social Sciences and the Visual Arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Ball

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a growing number of social scientists have taken an interest in "the visual". These scholars have utilised and developed a wide range of different visual methodologies. The number of social scientists employing visual methodologies has grown to a point where there are now critical masses of scholars working on particular topics. Alongside this a number of practitioners working in visual arts have taken an interest in the issue of migration. This FQS special issue is devoted to the use of visual methodologies to explore the particular topic of migration and social division. In this introductory article the editors provide a brief introduction to research on "the visual" and research on migration and social division. We then go on to explore what the use of visual methodologies might contribute to research on migration and social division. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1002265

  6. What's new in magnetism (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 27 May 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), "What's new in magnetism?", was held in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, on 27 May 2015.The papers collected in this issue were written based on talks given at the session: (1) Kalashnikova A M, Pisarev R V (Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg), Kimel A V (Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, The Netherlands; Moscow State Technical University of Radio Engineering, Electronics and Automation, Moscow) "Ultrafast optomagnetism"; (2) Pyatakov A P, Sergeev A S, Nikolaeva E P, Kosykh T B, Nikolaev A V (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow), Zvezdin K A (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow; Kintech Laboratory Ltd, Moscow), Zvezdin A K (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow; Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Micromagnetism and topological defects in magnetoelectric media"; (3) Mukhin A A, Kuzmenko A M, Ivanov V Yu (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow), Pimenov A V, Shuvaev A M, Dziom V E (Institute of Solid State Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria) "Dynamic magnetoelectric phenomena within electromagnons in rare-earth borate multiferroics"; (4) Nikitov S A (Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow; Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow region; Chernyshevskii Saratov State University, Saratov), Kalyabin D V, Osokin S A (Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow; Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow region), Lisenkov I V (Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow; Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow region; Oakland University, Rochester, USA), Slavin A N (Oakland University, Rochester, USA), Barabanenkov

  7. Argonne Physics Division Colloquium

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Argonne Logo] [DOE Logo] Physics Division Home News Division Information Contact PHY Org Chart Physics Division Colloquium Auditorium, Building 203, Argonne National Laboratory Fridays at 11:00 AM 2017 : Sereres Johnston 15 Sep 2017 Joint Physics and Materials Science Colloquium J. C. Séamus Davis, Cornell

  8. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - TASCC Division -1995 July 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, J C [ed.

    1996-05-01

    Included in this progress report of the TASCC division at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories is the research and development being carried out at this time and a listing of the relevant publications, reports, lectures and conference contributions. The TASCC staff is also detailed. 8 tabs.,16 figs.

  9. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - TASCC Division -1995 July 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    Included in this progress report of the TASCC division at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories is the research and development being carried out at this time and a listing of the relevant publications, reports, lectures and conference contributions. The TASCC staff is also detailed. 8 tabs.,16 figs

  10. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - TASCC Division -1995 January 1 to June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    Included in this progress report of the TASCC division at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories is the research and development being carried out at this time and a listing of the relevant publications, reports. lectures and conference contributions. 15 tabs. 19 figs

  11. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - TASCC Division -1995 January 1 to June 30

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    Included in this progress report of the TASCC division at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories is the research and development being carried out at this time and a listing of the relevant publications, reports. lectures and conference contributions. 15 tabs. 19 figs.

  12. Environmental and Medical Sciences Division progress report January-December, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainge, W.M.

    1977-05-01

    The report falls under the following headings: introduction (a general survey of the research programme of the Division); inhalation studies and radionuclide analysis; whole body counting; radiation physics (including dosimetry, fallout, environmental analysis); atmospheric pollution; medical department; chemical analysis group; publications. (U.K.)

  13. A little something from physics for medicine (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 23 April 2014)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), entitled 'A little something from physics for medicine', was held on 23 April 2014 at the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The agenda posted on the website of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS, http://www.gpad.ac.ru, included the following reports: (1) Rumyantsev S A (D Rogachev Federal Research and Clinical Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, and Immunology, Moscow) 'Translational medicine as a basis of progress in hematology/oncology'; (2) Akulinichev S V (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) 'Promising nuclear medicine research at the INR, RAS'; (3) Nikitin P P (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'Biosensorics: new possibilities provided by marker-free optical methods and magnetic nanoparticles for medical diagnostics'; (4) Alimpiev S S, Nikiforov S M, Grechnikov A A (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'New approaches in laser mass-spectrometry of organic objects'. The publication of the article based on the oral report No. 2 is presented below. • Promising nuclear medicine research in the Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, V V Akulinichev Physics-Uspekhi, 2014, Volume 57, Number 12, Pages 1239–1243 (conferences and symposia)

  14. Advances in materials science, metals and ceramics division. Triannual progress report, June-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truhan, J.J.; Hopper, R.W.; Gordon, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the magnetic fusion energy program; the laser fusion energy program; geothermal research; nuclear waste management; Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) research; diffusion in silicate minerals; chemistry research resources; and chemistry and materials science research

  15. Grounding Hypnosis in Science: The 'New' APA Division 30 definition of hypnosis as a step backwards.

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn, Stephen Jay; Green, Joseph P.; Kirsch , Irving; Capafons, Antonio; Lilienfeld, .S.OScott O; Laurence, Jean R.; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2015-01-01

    Every decade or so, the Division 30 of the American Psychological Association (APA) has seen fit to redefine hypnosis (Elkins, Barabasz, Council, & Spiegel, 2015; Green, Barabasz, Barrett, & Montgomery, 2005; Kirsch, 1994). In the latest attempt, the Hypnosis Definition Committee (HDC) defined hypnosis as a 'state of consciousness involving focused attention and reduced peripheral awareness characterized by an enhanced capacity for response to suggestion' (Elkins et al., 2015, p. 6). One migh...

  16. International Conference-Session of the Section of Nuclear Physics of the Physical Sciences Division of RAS

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    From November 17 to 21, 2014 the Section of Nuclear Physics of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI will hold in MEPhI, Moscow, the International Conference-Session of SNP PSD RAS "Physics of Fundamental Interactions". The program of the session covers basic theoretical and experimental aspects of particle physics and related problems of nuclear physics and cosmology, and will consist of 30-minute highlight and review talks as well as 10-15-minute contributed reports. All highlight talks and part of contributed reports will be presented at plenary sessions of the conference. The remaining reports will be presented at the sections which will be formed after receiving of abstracts. On the recommendation of the Organizing Committee reports and talks containing new unpublished results will be published in special issues of journals "Nuclear Physics" and "Nuclear Physics and Engineering". For the institutions belonging to the Rosatom s...

  17. THE DEVELOPMENT OF BOOK SCIENCE IN LITHUANIA: DIVISION INTO PERIODS AND CHRONOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navickiene, Ausra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It is possible to distinguish two main periods in the history of Lithuanian book science: the initial period of formation of the book science started at the beginning of the 19th century and ended by the first decades of the 20th century; the period of the independent, autonomous development of book science from the beginning of the 20th century till now. The first period is also known as a bibliographic period of book science, because the disciplines investigating a book were concentrated around bibliography, which was understood as a universal encyclopaedic science of book at that time. The border between the two periods is marked by a change in the book researchworks: the wide concept of bibliography stopped dominating the discourse; book science and bibliography were understood as two disciplines with specific objects of research, their own structures and methods. It is difficult to point out a specific date of this change but it is certain that it must have happened not later than in the 20s of the 20th century. Within these two periods, it is possible to distinguish a variety of factors that influenced the development of book science.In Lithuania, book science has emerged and was formed within the European model of development. Just after a decade since the first courses in book science delivered in France at the end of the 18th century, the subject of book science was included into the programme at Vilnius University and later the lectures were read. The most significant European (French and German book science works were known to the academic faculty at Vilnius University and collected in its library. They were used as a foundation to create the first works of book history and theory in Lithuania. These works disseminated widely popular theoretical concepts enriched by original research, which helped the formation of independent disciplines of book science, bibliography and history of literature.The development of the autonomous book

  18. Near-Earth space hazards and their detection (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 27 March 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), titled "Near-Earth space hazards and their detection", was held on 27 March 2013 at the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The agenda posted on the website of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS, http://www.gpad.ac.ru, included the following reports: (1) Emel'yanenko V V, Shustov B M (Institute of Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) "The Chelyabinsk event and the asteroid-comet hazard"; (2) Chugai N N (Institute of Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) "A physical model of the Chelyabinsk event"; (3) Lipunov V M (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow) "MASTER global network of optical monitoring"; (4) Beskin G M (Special Astrophysical Observatory, RAS, Arkhyz, Karachai-Cirkassian Republic) "Wide-field optical monitoring systems with subsecond time resolution for the detection and study of cosmic threats". The expanded papers written on the base of oral reports 1 and 4 are given below. • The Chelyabinsk event and the asteroid-comet hazard, V V Emel'yanenko, B M Shustov Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 8, Pages 833-836 • Wide-field subsecond temporal resolution optical monitoring systems for the detection and study of cosmic hazards, G M Beskin, S V Karpov, V L Plokhotnichenko, S F Bondar, A V Perkov, E A Ivanov, E V Katkova, V V Sasyuk, A Shearer Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 8, Pages 836-842

  19. A Portable Bioinformatics Course for Upper-Division Undergraduate Curriculum in Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floraino, Wely B.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the challenges that bioinformatics education is facing and describes a bioinformatics course that is successfully taught at the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, to the fourth year undergraduate students in biological sciences, chemistry, and computer science. Information on lecture and computer practice…

  20. IFLA General Conference, 1986. Special Libraries Division. Section: Science and Technology Libraries. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on science and technology libraries which were presented at the 1986 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Online Information Service of the Japan Information Center of Science and Technology" (Ryuko Igarashi, Japan); (2) "A View from the Chip--The Influence of Information…

  1. Forty years of the Institute for Nuclear Research (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 22 December 2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    On 22 December 2010, the scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), devoted to the 40th anniversary of the Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, was held at the Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS in Troitsk. The agenda of the session announced on the website www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division listed the following reports: (1) Matveev V A (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) ''Introductory word''; (2) Gavrin V N (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) ''Contribution of the SAGE results to the understanding of solar physics and neutrino physics''; (3) Domogatsky G V (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) ''Baikal neutrino experiment''; (4) Tkachev I I (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) ''Observation of the Greisen - Zatsepin - Kuz'min effect at the Telescope Array Observatory''; (5) Kudenko Yu G (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) ''Neutrino T2K experiment: the first results''; (6) Sadykov R A (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) ''Fields of study of condensed media at the neutron facility at the INR, RAS''; (7) Zhuikov B L (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) ''Production of isotopes at the INR, RAS: reality and prospects''. The papers written on the base of reports 1-5 and 7 are published below. In addition, the paper ''High-power diode-pumped alkali lasers'' by A M Shalagin is published. The paper is based on the report presented at the scientific session of the General Assembly of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS (13 December 2010) devoted to the 50th anniversary of the laser, the main materials of the session having been published in Usp. Fiz. Nauk 181 (8) 867 (2011) [Phys. Usp. 54 837 (2011)]. . Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences turns 40, V A Matveev Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 9, Pages 939-940 . The Russian-American gallium experiment SAGE, V N Gavrin Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54

  2. Thermochemical Surface Engineering: A Playground for Science and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    Surface engineering by thermochemical processing is the intentional change of the composition of a material at elevated temperature with the purpose to improve materials performance. In thermochemical processing components from the starting material are essential in the development of the phases...... at the surface. Current research and innovation activities are used to exemplify thermochemical surface engineering and the interplay of science and innovation. The examples given encompass aspects of the synthesis of extremely porous materials, low temperature surface hardening of stainless steel, surface...

  3. Spin polarized electrons in surface science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmann, H.C.

    1983-01-01

    The potentialities of spin-polarised electron beams as a probe of surface magnetic properties are outlined. Elastic as well as inelastic scattering of electrons from solid surfaces are considered. (G.Q.)

  4. Surface Science at the Solid Liquid Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-06

    prominent experimental avenue, developed originally by Hubbard et al,_ involves emersing monocrystalline elec- As for metal surfaces in ultrahigh vacuum...reliable means of both preparing and dosateizn ordered monocrystalline metal surfaces in UHV has led to ing appropriate molecular components of...surface atoms in place of bottom panel of Fig. 2, equal intensity contours are shown 23 underlying surface atoms, the compression is 24/23 - I in the

  5. Progress report: Physical Sciences - Physics Division, 1992 July 01 -December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungrin, J; Kim, S M; Sears, V F [eds.

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes operations and research activities in the Accelerator Physics, Neutron and Condensed Matter Science and Theoretical Physics branches at Chalk River Laboratories during the last half of 1992. 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Advances in materials science, Metals and Ceramics Division. Triannual progress report, October 1979-January 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-31

    Progress is summarized concerning magnetic fusion energy materials, laser fusion energy, aluminium-air battery and vehicle, geothermal research, oil-shale research, nuclear waste management, office of basic energy sciences research, and materials research notes. (FS)

  7. Progress report: Physical Sciences - Physics Division, 1992 July 01 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungrin, J.; Kim, S.M.; Sears, V.F.

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes operations and research activities in the Accelerator Physics, Neutron and Condensed Matter Science and Theoretical Physics branches at Chalk River Laboratories during the last half of 1992. 21 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Progress report - physical sciences - physics division 1991 July 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The reports from the three branches in Physics Division, Accelerator Physics, Neutron and Solid State Physics and Theoretical Physics, are each presented in separate sections. Each section features a topical review, highlighting in this report the use of high-temperature rf and microwave response of materials, magnetic excitations in hexagonal ABX 3 materials, and meson exchange currents in nuclear beta decay. Noteworthy achievements in the Accelerator Physics program include the successful operation to design energy of the re-vaned RFQ1 accelerator enabling now an energy of 1250 keV. The ECR ion source has operated for greater than 75 hours without failure and has produced the 100 mA needed for the RFQ1 accelerator. The neutron scattering program was again hampered by the NRU Reactor being down for repair. The good news is that the reactor was brought back up to full power in December thus enabling experiments to begin again. Experiments earlier in the year were carried out at Oak Ridge (US), Riso (Denmark), National Institute for Standards and Technology (US) and the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (UK). A new high capacity, portable pumping system was commissioned replacing a fixed one that had become obsolete and allowing now greater use of environment control devices on all spectrometers. An analysis of double-charge exchange reactions in nuclei has been used to provide limits on the radius of the neutron halo in 11 Li. The most up-to-date, complete and accurate tables of neutron scattering lengths and cross-sections have been completed. Continuous quality improvement (CQI) analyses were initiated for all the activities in Physics Division with the goal to enhance performance and provide better service to our many customers

  9. Workshop on surface and interface science at the ESRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, C.; Stierle, A.; Kasper, N.; Dosch, H.; Schmidt, S.; Hufner, S.; Moritz, W.; Fedley, Ch.S.; Rossi, G.; Durr Hermann, A.; Rohlsberger, R.; Dalmas, J.; Oughaddou, H.; Leandri, Ch.; Gay, J.M.; Treglia, G.; Le Lay, G.; Aufray, B.; Bunk, O.; Johnson, R.L.; Frenken, J.W.M.; Lucas, C.A.; Bauer, G.; Zhong, Z.; Springholz, G.; Lechner, R.; Stang, J.; Schulli, T.; Metzger, T.H.; Holy, V.; Woodruff, D.P.; Dellera, C.; Zegenhagen, J.; Robinson, I.; Malachias, A.; Schulli, T.U.; Magalhaes-Paniago, R.; Stoffel, M.; Schmidt, O.G.; Boragno, C.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.; Valbusa, U.; Felici, R.; Yacoby, Y.; Bedzyk, M.J.; Van der Veen, J.F

    2004-07-01

    The main aim of the workshop is to reflect the future of surface and interface research at the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source ESRF taking into account experimental facilities which are becoming available at new synchrotron radiation facilities in Europe. 6 sessions have been organized: 1) surface and interface research and synchrotron radiation - today and tomorrow -, 2) aspects of surface and interface research, 3) real surfaces and interfaces, 4) synchrotron techniques in surface and interface research, 5) new directions in surface and interface research, and 6) surface and interface science at ESRF. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations.

  10. Workshop on surface and interface science at the ESRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.; Stierle, A.; Kasper, N.; Dosch, H.; Schmidt, S.; Hufner, S.; Moritz, W.; Fedley, Ch.S.; Rossi, G.; Durr Hermann, A.; Rohlsberger, R.; Dalmas, J.; Oughaddou, H.; Leandri, Ch.; Gay, J.M.; Treglia, G.; Le Lay, G.; Aufray, B.; Bunk, O.; Johnson, R.L.; Frenken, J.W.M.; Lucas, C.A.; Bauer, G.; Zhong, Z.; Springholz, G.; Lechner, R.; Stang, J.; Schulli, T.; Metzger, T.H.; Holy, V.; Woodruff, D.P.; Dellera, C.; Zegenhagen, J.; Robinson, I.; Malachias, A.; Schulli, T.U.; Magalhaes-Paniago, R.; Stoffel, M.; Schmidt, O.G.; Boragno, C.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.; Valbusa, U.; Felici, R.; Yacoby, Y.; Bedzyk, M.J.; Van der Veen, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    The main aim of the workshop is to reflect the future of surface and interface research at the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source ESRF taking into account experimental facilities which are becoming available at new synchrotron radiation facilities in Europe. 6 sessions have been organized: 1) surface and interface research and synchrotron radiation - today and tomorrow -, 2) aspects of surface and interface research, 3) real surfaces and interfaces, 4) synchrotron techniques in surface and interface research, 5) new directions in surface and interface research, and 6) surface and interface science at ESRF. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations

  11. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    This annual report summarizes activities in the Aquatic Ecology, Earth Sciences, Environmental Analyses, and Terrestrial Ecology sections, as well as in the Fossil Energy, Biomass, Low-Level Waste Research and Management, and Global Carbon Cycle Programs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each section

  12. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    Research programs from the following sections and programs are summarized: aquatic ecology, environmental resources, earth sciences, terrestrial ecology, advanced fossil energy program, toxic substances program, environmental impacts program, biomass, low-level waste research and development program, US DOE low-level waste management program, and waste isolation program.

  13. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-04-01

    This annual report summarizes activities in the Aquatic Ecology, Earth Sciences, Environmental Analyses, and Terrestrial Ecology sections, as well as in the Fossil Energy, Biomass, Low-Level Waste Research and Management, and Global Carbon Cycle Programs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each section. (ACR)

  14. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    Research programs from the following sections and programs are summarized: aquatic ecology, environmental resources, earth sciences, terrestrial ecology, advanced fossil energy program, toxic substances program, environmental impacts program, biomass, low-level waste research and development program, US DOE low-level waste management program, and waste isolation program

  15. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Special Libraries. Section on Science and Technology Libraries. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on science and technology libraries which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "UAP (Universal Availability of Publications) and User Training for Categories of Grey Literature" (Dieter Schmidmaier, Mining Academy Freiberg, East Germany); (2) "Resource…

  16. Near-Earth space hazards and their detection (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 27 March 2013)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), titled N ear-Earth space hazards and their detection , was held on 27 March 2013 at the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The agenda posted on the website of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS, http://www.gpad.ac.ru, included the following reports: (1) Emel'yanenko V V, Shustov B M (Institute of Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) T he Chelyabinsk event and the asteroid-comet hazard ; (2) Chugai N N (Institute of Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) A physical model of the Chelyabinsk event ; (3) Lipunov V M (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow) M ASTER global network of optical monitoring ; (4) Beskin G M (Special Astrophysical Observatory, RAS, Arkhyz, Karachai-Cirkassian Republic) W ide-field optical monitoring systems with subsecond time resolution for the detection and study of cosmic threats . The expanded papers written on the base of oral reports 1 and 4 are given below. • The Chelyabinsk event and the asteroid-comet hazard, V V Emel'yanenko, B M Shustov Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 8, Pages 833–836 • Wide-field subsecond temporal resolution optical monitoring systems for the detection and study of cosmic hazards, G M Beskin, S V Karpov, V L Plokhotnichenko, S F Bondar, A V Perkov, E A Ivanov, E V Katkova, V V Sasyuk, A Shearer Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 8, Pages 836–842 (conferences and symposia)

  17. From the history of physics (Scientific session of the General Meeting of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 17 December 2012)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    A scientific session of the General Meeting of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS on 17 December 2012. The following reports were put on the session's agenda posted on the website http://www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division: (1) Dianov E M (Fiber Optics Research Center, RAS, Moscow) O n the threshold of a peta era ; (2) Zabrodskii A G (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg) S cientists' contribution to the great victory in WWII using the example of the Leningrad (now A F Ioffe) Physical Technical Institute ; (3) Ilkaev R I (Russian Federal Nuclear Center --- All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Sarov) M ajor stages of the Soviet Atomic Project ; (4) Cherepashchuk A M (Sternberg State Astronomical Institute of Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) H istory of the Astronomy history . Papers written on the basis of the reports are published below. . On the Threshold of Peta-era, E M Dianov Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 5, Pages 486–492 . Scientists' contribution to the Great Victory in WWII on the example of the Leningrad (now A F Ioffe) Physical Technical Institute, A G Zabrodskii Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 5, Pages 493–502 . Major stages of the Atomic Project, R I Ilkaev Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 5, Pages 502–509. History of the Universe History, A M Cherepashchuk Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 5, Pages 509–530 (conferences and symposia)

  18. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Sciences Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiegler, J.O. (comp.)

    1986-06-01

    The report is divided into the following: structural characterization, high-temperature alloy research, structural ceramics, radiation effects, structure and properties of surfaces and interfaces, and collaborative research centers. (DLC)

  19. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January--31 December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepore, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    This annual report describes the scientific research and other work carried out during the calendar year 1975. The report is nontechnical in nature, with almost no data. A 17-page bibliography lists the technical papers which detail the work. The contents of the report include the following: experimental physics (high-energy physics--SPEAR, PEP, SLAC, FNAL, BNL, Bevatron; particle data group; medium-energy physics; astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmic rays; instrumentation development), theoretical physics (particle theory and accelerator theory and design), computer science and applied mathematics (data management systems, socio-economic environment demographic information system, computer graphics, computer networks, management information systems, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, programing languages, applied mathematics research), real-time systems (ModComp and PDP networks), and computer center activities (systems programing, user services, hardware development, computer operations). A glossary of computer science and mathematics terms is also included. 32 figures

  20. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January--31 December 1975. [LBL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.L. (ed.)

    1975-01-01

    This annual report describes the scientific research and other work carried out during the calendar year 1975. The report is nontechnical in nature, with almost no data. A 17-page bibliography lists the technical papers which detail the work. The contents of the report include the following: experimental physics (high-energy physics--SPEAR, PEP, SLAC, FNAL, BNL, Bevatron; particle data group; medium-energy physics; astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmic rays; instrumentation development), theoretical physics (particle theory and accelerator theory and design), computer science and applied mathematics (data management systems, socio-economic environment demographic information system, computer graphics, computer networks, management information systems, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, programing languages, applied mathematics research), real-time systems (ModComp and PDP networks), and computer center activities (systems programing, user services, hardware development, computer operations). A glossary of computer science and mathematics terms is also included. 32 figures. (RWR)

  1. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1996 January 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, B.M.

    1997-04-01

    This document is the last Progress Report for the Neutron and Condensed Matter Science Branch, at Chalk River Labs of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The materials science program continued to include measurements of stress as a major component, but the determination of phase diagrams for specific alloys was also a prominent activity. Studies were made of two types of unusual magnetic materials. The magnetic properties of several oxide pyrochlore were investigated and spin waves were measured in the magnetic semiconductor, chalcopyrite. The crystal structures of the deuterated anti fluorite were determined and the reorientation of the ammonium ion was refined in detail. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements were used to investigate whether spontaneous phase separation into chiral domains occurs for mixtures of DPPC of opposite chirality. A new Neutron Velocity Selector was commissioned

  2. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1996 January 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, B.M. (ed.)

    1997-04-01

    This document is the last Progress Report for the Neutron and Condensed Matter Science Branch, at Chalk River Labs of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The materials science program continued to include measurements of stress as a major component, but the determination of phase diagrams for specific alloys was also a prominent activity. Studies were made of two types of unusual magnetic materials. The magnetic properties of several oxide pyrochlore were investigated and spin waves were measured in the magnetic semiconductor, chalcopyrite. The crystal structures of the deuterated anti fluorite were determined and the reorientation of the ammonium ion was refined in detail. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements were used to investigate whether spontaneous phase separation into chiral domains occurs for mixtures of DPPC of opposite chirality. A new Neutron Velocity Selector was commissioned.

  3. Inverting near-surface models from virtual-source gathers (SM Division Outstanding ECS Award Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruigrok, Elmer; Vossen, Caron; Paulssen, Hanneke

    2017-04-01

    The Groningen gas field is a massive natural gas accumulation in the north-east of the Netherlands. Decades of production have led to significant compaction of the reservoir rock. The (differential) compaction is thought to have reactivated existing faults and to be the main driver of induced seismicity. The potential damage at the surface is largely affected by the state of the near surface. Thin and soft sedimentary layers can lead to large amplifications. By measuring the wavefield at different depth levels, near-surface properties can directly be estimated from the recordings. Seismicity in the Groningen area is monitored primarily with an array of vertical arrays. In the nineties a network of 8 boreholes was deployed. Since 2015, this network has been expanded with 70 new boreholes. Each new borehole consists of an accelerometer at the surface and four downhole geophones with a vertical spacing of 50 m. We apply seismic interferometry to local seismicity, for each borehole individually. Doing so, we obtain the responses as if there were virtual sources at the lowest geophones and receivers at the other depth levels. From the retrieved direct waves and reflections, we invert for P- & S- velocity and Q models. We discuss different implementations of seismic interferometry and the subsequent inversion. The inverted near-surface properties are used to improve both the source location and the hazard assessment.

  4. Nuclear Science Division: Annual report for the period October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1987-07-01

    Research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, at CERN, oxygen-16 beams were accelerated to 3.2 TeV using the LBL-GSI heavy ion injector into the CERN SPS. First results obtained during the beam test period are presented in this report. Bevalac research has probed new regions of the nuclear matter equation of state. Studies of collisions between the most massive nuclei have revealed rich new phenomena such as collective flow, where the pressures generated force the emerging particles away from the beam direction. Experiments on dileptons e + e - pairs) utilizing the newly completed Dilepton Spectrometer (DLS) are being carried out to glean new insights into the hot, high-density stage of the collision. Major new results on the nuclear structure of exotic, very neutron-rich light nuclei are being obtained by exploiting the projectile fragmentation process to produce secondary radioactive beams. The Laboratory has proposed the Bevalac Upgrade Project to replace the Bevalac's weak-focusing synchrotron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams. The significant enhancement of the heavy ion capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron as a result of the recent development of the ECR source has led to a renaissance of the cyclotron as indicated by the increased demand for beam time. A variety of other scientific activities were also carried out during this period. The Isotopes Project published the first edition of a new radioactivity reference book for applied users-The Table of Radioactive Isotopes and division members organized several major scientific meetings

  5. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1981. [Leading abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G. (comps.)

    1982-10-01

    This report summarizes research and development activities of the Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's Biomedical and Environmental Research program for the calendar year 1981. Individual reports describing the current status of projects have been entered individually into the data base.

  6. Surface science models of CoMoS hydrodesulfurisation catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Veen, van J.A.R.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Froment, G.F.; Delmon, B.; Grange, P.

    1997-01-01

    Characterization of supported catalysts with surface spectroscopic techniques is often limited due to restraints imposed by the support material. The use of flat conducting substrates as a model support offers a way to apply these techniques to their full potential. Such surface science models of

  7. 120th anniversary of the birth of Sergei Ivanovich Vavilov (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 30 March 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) dedicated to the 120th anniversary of the birth of Sergei Ivanovich Vavilov was held in the Conference Hall of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, on 30 March 2011. The following reports were put on the session's agenda posted on the web site www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Masalov A V (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "S I Vavilov and nonlinear optics"; (2) Basiev T T (Laser Materials and Technology Research Center, A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Luminescent nanophotonics and high-power lasers"; (3) Vitukhnovsky A G (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Advances in luminescent light sources and displays"; (4) Aleksandrov E B (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg) "Sergei Ivanovich Vavilov and the special theory of relativity"; (5) Bolotovsky B M (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Vavilov-Cherenkov effect"; (6) Vizgin V P (S I Vavilov Institute of the History of Natural Scienses and Technology, RAS, Moscow) "Sergei Ivanovich Vavilov as a historian of science"; (7) Ginzburg A S (Knowledge Society) "Academician S I Vavilov — a devotee of the enlightenment and the first president of the Knowledge Society of the USSR". The papers written on the basis of reports 1-4 and 6 are given below. The main contents of report 5 is reflected in the paper "Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation: its discovery and application" [Usp. Fiz. Nauk 179 1161 (2009); Phys. Usp. 52 1099 (2009)] published earlier by B M Bolotovsky. • S I Vavilov and nonlinear optics, A V Masalov, Z A Chizhikova Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 12, Pages 1257-1262 • Luminescent nanophotonics, fluoride laser ceramics, and crystals, T T Basiev, I T Basieva, M E Doroshenko Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 12, Pages 1262-1268 • Advances in light sources and displays, A G Vitukhnovsky Physics

  8. Physics, computer science and mathematics division. Annual report, 1 January - 31 December 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J.D.

    1983-08-01

    Experimental physics research activities are described under the following headings: research on e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation; research at Fermilab; search for effects of a right-handed gauge boson; the particle data center; high energy astrophysics and interdisciplinary experiments; detector and other research and development; publications and reports of other research; computation and communication; and engineering, evaluation, and support operations. Theoretical particle physics research and heavy ion fusion research are described. Also, activities of the Computer Science and Mathematics Department are summarized. Publications are listed. (WHK)

  9. Physics, computer science and mathematics division. Annual report, 1 January - 31 December 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.D.

    1983-08-01

    Experimental physics research activities are described under the following headings: research on e + e - annihilation; research at Fermilab; search for effects of a right-handed gauge boson; the particle data center; high energy astrophysics and interdisciplinary experiments; detector and other research and development; publications and reports of other research; computation and communication; and engineering, evaluation, and support operations. Theoretical particle physics research and heavy ion fusion research are described. Also, activities of the Computer Science and Mathematics Department are summarized. Publications are listed

  10. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.; Peterson, S.

    1978-09-01

    Topics covered include: structure of materials, theoretical research; x-ray diffraction research; fundamental ceramics studies; preparation and synthesis of high-temperature and special service materials; physical metallurgy; grain boundary segregation and fracture; mechanisms of surface and solid-state reactions; physical properties research; superconducting materials; radiation effects; facility and technique development; nuclear microanalysis; cooperative studies with universities and other research organizations; and fundamentals of welding and joining

  11. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1981-09-01

    Information is presented concerning the theoretical studies of metals and alloys; x-ray diffraction research; structural ceramics; structure of coal; analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy; deformation and mechanical properties; mechanisms of surface and solid-state reactions; physical properties research; metastable materials; neutron radiation effects; charged particle radiation effects; theory and modeling of radiation effects; facility and advanced technique development; fundamentals of welding and joining; and studies in nondestructive evaluation.

  12. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1981-09-01

    Information is presented concerning the theoretical studies of metals and alloys; x-ray diffraction research; structural ceramics; structure of coal; analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy; deformation and mechanical properties; mechanisms of surface and solid-state reactions; physical properties research; metastable materials; neutron radiation effects; charged particle radiation effects; theory and modeling of radiation effects; facility and advanced technique development; fundamentals of welding and joining; and studies in nondestructive evaluation

  13. Environmental Sciences Division Groundwater Program Office report for fiscal years 1995-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huff, D.D.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Groundwater Program Office in fiscal years 1995--1997 and document technical results achieved. One of the first contributions of the project was development and publication of a conceptual hydrologic framework for the Oak Ridge Reservation. This framework then served to guide research to fill important gaps in knowledge and suggest the most cost-effective approaches to site characterization and remediation. Examples of major goals include: quantitative characterization of the role of matrix diffusion in slowing transport of contaminants and impacting the practicality of pump and treat options for aquifer restoration; the importance of geologic structure and preferred flow pathways in the near surface zone (including the role of stormflow); evaluation of the importance of the deep groundwater system in contaminant migration; and acquisition of three-dimensional groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulation capability for fractured porous media

  14. Progress report physical sciences - TASCC division - 1991 July 01 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The past six-month period saw completion of our program of cyclotron commissioning, with the extraction on 1992 October 14 of a 3.0 MeV/u beam of 238 U. In three years were developed the cyclotron and its subsystems to demonstrate the full range of operating parameters, and they converted what was, in effect, a prototype accelerator into a fully engineered, reliable facility. The number of available beams was increased from two, to forty-two. Currently, we are adding one or two new beams per month. In spite of the commissioning activity during the reporting period, the number of cyclotron-based experiments has increased . Reaction studies and atomic-physics experiments dominated. Perhaps the outcome of broadest interest was the production and detection of secondary (radioactive beams downstream from a gold target bombarded by 40 MeV/u 12 C from the cyclotron. . Including beam development, the cyclotron operated for 967 hours, or 32% of the total facility beam time, about the same percentage as in the previous six-month period. Between July and the end of the year, Tandem beams were used, either for experiments or development purposes, for a total of 3117 hours. This beam time was 86% of the scheduled operating time and 71% of the the total time available - a rather lower value than usual owing to an unexpected materials failure in the conductive-rim chain pulleys of the charging system. Viewed as a whole, the facility operated for 83% of its scheduled time, or 67% of the total time. Most of our eexperiments are collaborative efforts. This period, the former contributed 40% of the total laboratory research efforts and figure prominently in all nine scientific publications. The numbers and diversity of our user community continue to increase, particularly in non-nuclear areas: accelerator mass spectrometry, single event upset and materials science, etc

  15. Research results reported by OEO summer (1981) student employees of LLNL working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, M.C.; Griffith, P.J.; Kreevoy, E.P.; Turner, H.J. III; Tatman, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Significant experimental results were achieved in a number of research programs that were carried out during the summer of 1981 by students sponsored by the Office of Equal Opportunity at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These students were working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel. Accomplishments include the following: (1) preparation of post-burn stratigraphic sections for the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification project; (2) preparation of miscellaneous stratigraphic sections in the Climax granite near the Spent Fuel Test, Nevada Test Site, for the Waste Isolation Project; (3) confirmation of the applicability of a new theory relating to subsidence (solid matrix movement); (4) experimental confirmation that organic groundwater contaminants produced during an underground coal gasification experiment can be removed by appropriate bacterial treatment; (5) development of data supporting the extension of the Greenville Fault Zone into the Northern Diablo Range (Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California); (6) completion of a literature review on hazardous waste (current disposal technology, regulations, research needs); (7) preparation of a map showing levels of background seismic noise in the USSR; (8) demonstration of a correlation of explosion size with the P-wave magnitude of the seismic signal produced by the explosion; and (9) reduction of data showing the extent of ground motion resulting from subsidence in the vicinity of the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification Project

  16. Research results reported by OEO summer (1981) student employees of LLNL working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, M. C.; Griffith, P. J.; Kreevoy, E. P.; Turner, III, H. J.; Tatman, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Significant experimental results were achieved in a number of research programs that were carried out during the summer of 1981 by students sponsored by the Office of Equal Opportunity at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These students were working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel. Accomplishments include the following: (1) preparation of post-burn stratigraphic sections for the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification project; (2) preparation of miscellaneous stratigraphic sections in the Climax granite near the Spent Fuel Test, Nevada Test Site, for the Waste Isolation Project; (3) confirmation of the applicability of a new theory relating to subsidence (solid matrix movement); (4) experimental confirmation that organic groundwater contaminants produced during an underground coal gasification experiment can be removed by appropriate bacterial treatment; (5) development of data supporting the extension of the Greenville Fault Zone into the Northern Diablo Range (Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California); (6) completion of a literature review on hazardous waste (current disposal technology, regulations, research needs); (7) preparation of a map showing levels of background seismic noise in the USSR; (8) demonstration of a correlation of explosion size with the P-wave magnitude of the seismic signal produced by the explosion; and (9) reduction of data showing the extent of ground motion resulting from subsidence in the vicinity of the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification Project.

  17. In memory of V L Ginzburg (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 27 October 2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division (PSD) of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), dedicated to the memory of V L Ginzburg, took place in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS on 27 October 2010. The agenda of the session announced on the website www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division listed the following reports: (1) Mesyats G A (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'Introductory word'; (2) Rubakov V A (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) 'Cosmology and the Large Hadron Collider'; (3) Gurevich A V (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow), Zelenyi L M (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'Intense gamma bursts in Earth's atmosphere (TGE) and the mission 'Chibis''; (4) Vasiliev M A (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'Higher-spin theory'; (5) Maksimov E G (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'What is and what is not known about HTSC'; (6) Pudalov V M (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow, and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) 'V L Ginzburg and the development of experimental work on high-temperature superconductivity at LPI: 'iron superconductors'' Papers based on talks 2, 4, and 6 are published below. For several reasons, L P Pitaevskii was unable to attend the session. He presented a paper dedicated to the memory of V L Ginzburg, which is published in this issue of Physics-Uspekhi (p. 625). Cosmology and the Large Hadron Collider, V A Rubakov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 6, Pages 633-641 . V L Ginzburg and higher-spin fields, M A Vasiliev Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 6, Pages 641-648 . V L Ginzburg and the development of experimental work on high-temperature superconductivity at LPI: 'iron superconductors', V M Pudalov, O E Omel'yanovskii, E P Khlybov, A V Sadakov, Yu F El'tsev, K V Mitsen, O M Ivanenko, K S Pervakov, D R Gizatulin, A S Usol'tsev, A S Dormidontov, S Yu Gavrilkin, A Yu Tsvetkov, Ya G Ponomarev, S A Kuzmichev, M G Mikheev, S N

  18. Plenary lectures of the divisions semiconductor physics, thin films, dynamics and statistical physics, magnetism, metal physics, surface physics, low temperature physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, U.

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains a selection of plenary and invited lectures of the Solid State Division spring meeting of the DPG (Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft) 1992 in Regensburg. The constribution come mainly from five fields of the physics of condensed matter: doped fullerenes and high Tc superconductors, surfaces, time-resolved on nonlinear optics, polymer melts, and low-dimensional semiconductor systems. (orig.)

  19. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy analytical, biophysical and life science applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schlücker, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Covering everything from the basic theoretical and practical knowledge to new exciting developments in the field with a focus on analytical and life science applications, this monograph shows how to apply surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for solving real world problems. From the contents: * Theory and practice of SERS * Analytical applications * SERS combined with other analytical techniques * Biophysical applications * Life science applications including various microscopies Aimed at analytical, surface and medicinal chemists, spectroscopists, biophysicists and materials scientists. Includes a Foreword by the renowned Raman spectroscopist Professor Wolfgang Kiefer, the former Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Raman Spectroscopy.

  20. 7th International Summer Institute in Surface Science

    CERN Document Server

    Howe, Russell

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains review articles which were written by the invited speak­ ers of the seventh International Summer Institute in Surface Science (ISISS), held at the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee in July 1985. The form of ISISS is a set of tutorial review lectures presented over a one-week period by internationally recognized experts on various aspects of surface science. Each speaker is asked, in addition, to write a review article on his lecture topic. No single volume in the series Chemistry and Physics of Solid Surfaces can possibly cover the entire field of modern surface science. However, the series as a whole is intended to provide experts and students alike with a comprehensive set of reviews and literature references, particularly empha­ sizing the gas-solid interface. The collected articles from previous Summer Institutes have been published under the following titles: Surface Science: Recent Progress and Perspectives, Crit. Rev. Solid State Sci. 4, 125-559 (1974) Chemistry and Physics of ...

  1. Surface science of single-site heterogeneous olefin polymerization catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seong H.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the surface science of the heterogeneous olefin polymerization catalysts. The specific focus is on how to prepare and characterize stereochemically specific heterogeneous model catalysts for the Ziegler–Natta polymerization. Under clean, ultra-high vacuum conditions, low-energy electron irradiation during the chemical vapor deposition of model Ziegler–Natta catalysts can be used to create a “single-site” catalyst film with a surface structure that produces only isotactic ...

  2. Surface science station of the infrared beamline at SPring-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, M.; Moriwaki, T.; Kimura, H.; Nishida, S.; Nanba, T.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental station for surface science has been constructed at the infrared beamline (BL43IR) of SPring-8, Japan. The station utilizes synchrotron radiation in the energy range of 100-20000 cm -1 to perform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) of surfaces. It consists of an experimental section, a preparation chamber, gas handling equipment and a pair of focusing optics. In situ observation of vibrational spectra is possible using both IRAS and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy

  3. The development of surface science in China: Retrospect and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Xide (Fudan University, Shanghai (China))

    1994-01-01

    It is generally agreed that the year of 1977 marked the birth of surface science in China, therefore the length of its history of development is only half of that shown in the title of this volume. Since 1977 laboratories with modern facilities for surface studies have been established in various universities and research institutes. Three open laboratories better equipped than others have been set up in Beijing, Xiamen and Shanghai for surface physics, surface chemistry and applied surface physics, respectively. Five National Conferences on Physics of Surfaces and Interfaces were held in 1982, 1984, 1985, 1988 and 1991. In 1993 China is going to host the Fourth International Conference on the Structure of Surfaces in Shanghai August 16-19 which will serve as a milestone in the history of development of surface science in China. With the access to many overseas laboratories, quite a number of Chinese scientists and students have had opportunities to work and study abroad and have brought back with them experiences acquired. During the Conferences just mentioned, one could witness a number of steady progresses made over the years. In the present review, a brief description about the establishment of some major research facilities and progresses of some of the research is given with emphasis on work related to semiconductor surfaces, interfaces, superlattices, heterojunctions and quantum wells. Although the review nominally covers the development of research in surface science in China, due to the limitation of the capabilities of the author, mostly work done at Fudan University is included. For this the author would like to express her deep apology to many Chinese colleagues whose works have not been properly mentioned

  4. Molecular surface science of heterogeneous catalysis. History and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1983-08-01

    A personal account is given of how the author became involved with modern surface science and how it was employed for studies of the chemistry of surfaces and heterogeneous catalysis. New techniques were developed for studying the properties of the surface monolayers: Auger electron spectroscopy, LEED, XPS, molecular beam surface scattering, etc. An apparatus was developed and used to study hydrocarbon conversion reactions on Pt, CO hydrogenation on Rh and Fe, and NH 3 synthesis on Fe. A model has been developed for the working Pt reforming catalyst. The three molecular ingredients that control catalytic properties are atomic surface structure, an active carbonaceous deposit, and the proper oxidation state of surface atoms. 40 references, 21 figures

  5. Molecular surface science of heterogeneous catalysis. History and perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1983-08-01

    A personal account is given of how the author became involved with modern surface science and how it was employed for studies of the chemistry of surfaces and heterogeneous catalysis. New techniques were developed for studying the properties of the surface monolayers: Auger electron spectroscopy, LEED, XPS, molecular beam surface scattering, etc. An apparatus was developed and used to study hydrocarbon conversion reactions on Pt, CO hydrogenation on Rh and Fe, and NH/sub 3/ synthesis on Fe. A model has been developed for the working Pt reforming catalyst. The three molecular ingredients that control catalytic properties are atomic surface structure, an active carbonaceous deposit, and the proper oxidation state of surface atoms. 40 references, 21 figures. (DLC)

  6. A molecular surface science study of the structure of adsorbates on surfaces: Importance to lubrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mate, C.M.

    1986-09-01

    The interaction and bonding of atoms and molecules on metal surfaces is explored under ultra-high vacuum conditions using a variety of surface science techniques: high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), work function measurements, and second harmonic generation (SHG). 164 refs., 51 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Functional requirements document for NASA/MSFC Earth Science and Applications Division: Data and information system (ESAD-DIS). Interoperability, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. Briscoe; Grider, Gary W.

    1992-01-01

    These Earth Science and Applications Division-Data and Information System (ESAD-DIS) interoperability requirements are designed to quantify the Earth Science and Application Division's hardware and software requirements in terms of communications between personal and visualization workstation, and mainframe computers. The electronic mail requirements and local area network (LAN) requirements are addressed. These interoperability requirements are top-level requirements framed around defining the existing ESAD-DIS interoperability and projecting known near-term requirements for both operational support and for management planning. Detailed requirements will be submitted on a case-by-case basis. This document is also intended as an overview of ESAD-DIs interoperability for new-comers and management not familiar with these activities. It is intended as background documentation to support requests for resources and support requirements.

  8. Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. [eds.

    1997-12-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1995, through March 31, 1997. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program in support of Department of Energy science and technology missions. The report includes brief summaries of research activities in condensed matter theory, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. An addendum includes listings of division publications and professional activities.

  9. 8th International Summer Institute in Surface Science

    CERN Document Server

    Howe, Russell

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains review articles written by the invited speakers at the eighth International Summer Institute in Surface Science (ISISS 1987), held at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in August of 1987. During the course of ISISS, invited speakers, all internationally recognized experts in the various fields of surface science, present tutorial review lectures. In addition, these experts are asked to write review articles on their lecture topic. Former ISISS speakers serve as advisors concerning the selection of speakers and lecture topics. Em­ phasis is given to those areas which have not been covered in depth by recent Summer Institutes, as well as to areas which have recently gained in significance and in which important progress has been made. Because of space limitations, no individual volume of Chemistry and Physics of Solid Surfaces can possibly cover the whole area of modem surface science, or even give a complete survey of recent pro­ gress in the field. However, an attempt is made to pres...

  10. 1 March 2012 - British University of Oxford Head of the Mathematical, Physical & Life Sciences Division A. N. Halliday FRS signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    1 March 2012 - British University of Oxford Head of the Mathematical, Physical & Life Sciences Division A. N. Halliday FRS signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  11. 18 MArch 2008 - Director, Basic and Generic Research Division, Research Promotion Bureau, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Prof.Ohtake visiting ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    18 MArch 2008 - Director, Basic and Generic Research Division, Research Promotion Bureau, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Prof.Ohtake visiting ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  12. Dr. Hans Chang, Director, Physics Research Committee, Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), Dr. Joris Van Enst, Head of Science Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Culture and S cience, Dr. Jan Bezemer, NL Delegate CERN, Netherlands

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Hans Chang, Director, Physics Research Committee, Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), Dr. Joris Van Enst, Head of Science Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Culture and S cience, Dr. Jan Bezemer, NL Delegate CERN, Netherlands

  13. Revolution in Field Science: Apollo Approach to Inaccessible Surface Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.

    2010-07-01

    The extraordinary challenge mission designers, scientists, and engineers, faced in planning the first human expeditions to the surface of another solar system body led to the development of a distinctive and even revolutionary approach to field work. Not only were those involved required to deal effectively with the extreme limitation in resources available for and access to a target as remote as the lunar surface; they were required to developed a rigorous approach to science activities ranging from geological field work to deploying field instruments. Principal aspects and keys to the success of the field work are discussed here, including the highly integrated, intensive, and lengthy science planning, simulation, and astronaut training; the development of a systematic scheme for description and documentation of geological sites and samples; and a flexible yet disciplined methodology for site documentation and sample collection. The capability for constant communication with a ‘backroom’ of geological experts who make requests and weigh in on surface operations was innovative and very useful in encouraging rapid dissemination of information to the greater community in general. An extensive archive of the Apollo era science activity related documents provides evidence of the principal aspects and keys to the success of the field work. The Apollo Surface Journal allows analysis of the astronaut’s performance in terms of capability for traveling on foot, documentation and sampling of field stations, and manual operation of tools and instruments, all as a function of time. The application of these analysis as ‘lessons learned’ for planning the next generation of human or robotic field science activities on the Moon and elsewhere are considered here as well.

  14. EDITORIAL: Focus on Advances in Surface and Interface Science 2008 FOCUS ON ADVANCES IN SURFACE AND INTERFACE SCIENCE 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Matthias; Schneider, Wolf-Dieter

    2008-12-01

    Basic research in surface and interface science is highly interdisciplinary, covering the fields of physics, chemistry, biophysics, geo-, atmospheric and environmental sciences, material science, chemical engineering, and more. The various phenomena are interesting by themselves, and they are most important in nearly all modern technologies, as for example electronic, magnetic, and optical devices, sensors, catalysts, lubricants, hard and thermal-barrier coatings, protection against corrosion and crack formation under harsh environments. In fact, detailed understanding of the elementary processes at surfaces is necessary to support and to advance the high technology that very much founds the prosperity and lifestyle of our society. Current state-of-the-art experimental studies of elementary processes at surfaces, of surface properties and functions employ a variety of sophisticated tools. Some are capable of revealing the location and motion of individual atoms. Others measure excitations (electronic, magnetic and vibronic), employing, for example, special light sources such as synchrotrons, high magnetic fields, or free electron lasers. The surprising variety of intriguing physical phenomena at surfaces, interfaces, and nanostructures also pose a persistent challenge for the development of theoretical descriptions, methods, and even basic physical concepts. This second focus issue on the topic of 'Advances in Surface and Interface Science' in New Journal of Physics, following on from last year's successful collection, provides an exciting synoptic view on the latest pertinent developments in the field. Focus on Advances in Surface and Interface Science 2008 Contents Organic layers at metal/electrolyte interfaces: molecular structure and reactivity of viologen monolayers Stephan Breuer, Duc T Pham, Sascha Huemann, Knud Gentz, Caroline Zoerlein, Ralf Hunger, Klaus Wandelt and Peter Broekmann Spin polarized d surface resonance state of fcc Co/Cu(001) K Miyamoto, K

  15. The 45th anniversary of the Institute of Spectroscopy of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 23 October 2013)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    On 23 October 2013, the out-of-town scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), celebrating the 45th anniversary of the Institute of Spectroscopy, RAS (ISAN in Russ. abbr.), was held at the conference hall of the Institute's building in Troitsk. The agenda of the session, announced on the website http://www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS, listed the following reports: (1) Vinogradov E A (ISAN, Troitsk, Moscow) T he main achievements of ISAN from 2009 to 2013 ; (2) Balykin V I (ISAN, Troitsk, Moscow) A tomic and photonic nanooptics ; (3) Lozovik Yu E (ISAN, Troitsk, Moscow) E lectronic and collective properties of topological isolators ; (4) Yevdokimov Yu M (Engelgard Institute of Molecular Biology, RAS, Moscow), Kompanets O N (ISAN, Troitsk, Moscow) S tructural nanotechnology of DNA (liquid-crystal approach) and its applications ; (5) Chekalin S V (ISAN, Troitsk, Moscow) F emtosecond spectroscopy of promising materials . Papers written on the basis of oral reports 1, 2, 4, and 5 are published below. • Near field phonon-polariton spectroscopy as a method for studying the optical properties of nanofilms, E A Vinogradov, N N Novikova, V A Yakovlev Physics-Uspekhi, 2014, Volume 57, Number 6, Pages 604–607 • Quantum control of atoms and photons by optical nanofibers, V I Balykin Physics-Uspekhi, 2014, Volume 57, Number 6, Pages 607–615 • Structural nucleic acid nanotechnology: liquid-crystalline approach, Yu M Yevdokimov, O N Kompanets Physics-Uspekhi, 2014, Volume 57, Number 6, Pages 615–621 • Femtosecond spectroscopy of promising materials, S V Chekalin Physics-Uspekhi, 2014, Volume 57, Number 6, Pages 622–629 (conferences and symposia)

  16. Surface science in hernioplasty: The role of plasma treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, Roberto; Magnacca, Giuliana; Martorana, Selanna

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this review is to clarify the importance of surface modifications induced in biomaterials for hernia-repair application. Starting from the pioneering experiences involving proto-materials as ancient prosthesis, a historical excursus between the biomaterials used in hernioplasty was realized. Subsequently, after the revolutionary discovery of stereoregular polymerization followed by the PP application in the biomedical field performed by the surgeon F. Usher, a comparative study on different hernia-repair meshes available was realized in order to better understand all the outstanding problems and possible future developments. Furthermore, since many unsolved problems on prosthetic devices implantation are linked to phenomena occurring at the interface between the biomaterials surface and the body fluids, the importance of surface science in hernioplasty was highlighted and case studies of new surface-modified generations of prosthesis presented. The results discussed in the following evidence how the surface study are becoming increasingly important for a proper knowledge of issues related to the interaction between the living matter and the artificial prostheses.

  17. Reducing Motional Decoherence in Ion Traps with Surface Science Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeffner, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Many trapped ions experiments ask for low motional heating rates while trapping the ions close to trapping electrodes. However, in practice small ion-electrode distances lead to unexpected high heating rates. While the mechanisms for the heating is still unclear, it is now evident that surface contamination of the metallic electrodes is at least partially responsible for the elevated heating rates. I will discuss heating rate measurements in a microfabricated surface trap complemented with basic surface science studies. We monitor the elemental surface composition of the Cu-Al alloy trap with an Auger spectrometer. After bake-out, we find a strong Carbon and Oxygen contamination and heating rates of 200 quanta/s at 1 MHz trap frequency. After removing most of the Carbon and Oxygen with Ar-Ion sputtering, the heating rates drop to 4 quanta/s. Interestingly, we still measure the decreased heating rate even after the surface oxidized from the background gas throughout a 40-day waiting time in UHV.

  18. EDITORIAL: From reciprocal space to real space in surface science From reciprocal space to real space in surface science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Ludwig; Ernst, Karl-Heinz

    2012-09-01

    This issue is dedicated to Karl-Heinz Rieder on the occasion of his 70th birthday. It contains contributions written by his former students and colleagues from all over the world. Experimental techniques based on free electrons, such as photoelectron spectroscopy, electron microscopy and low energy electron diffraction (LEED), were foundational to surface science. While the first revealed the band structures of materials, the second provided nanometer scale imagery and the latter elucidated the atomic scale periodicity of surfaces. All required an (ultra-)high vacuum, and LEED illustrated impressively that adsorbates, such as carbon monoxide, hydrogen or oxygen, can markedly and periodically restructure surfaces from their bulk termination, even at pressures ten orders of magnitude or more below atmospheric. Yet these techniques were not generally able to reveal atomic scale surface defects, nor could they faithfully show adsorption of light atoms such as hydrogen. Although a complete atom, helium can also be regarded as a wave with a de Broglie wavelength that allows the study of surface atomic periodicities at a delicateness and sensitivity exceeding that of electrons-based techniques. In combination, these and other techniques generated insight into the periodicity of surfaces and their vibrational properties, yet were limited to simple and periodic surface setups. All that changed with the advent of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) roughly 30 years ago, allowing real space access to surface defects and individual adsorbates. Applied at low temperatures, not only can STM establish a height profile of surfaces, but can also perform spectroscopy and serve as an actuator capable of rearranging individual species at atomic scale resolution. The direct and intuitive manner in which STM provided access as a spectator and as an actor to the atomic scale was foundational to today's surface science and to the development of the concepts of nanoscience in general. The

  19. What's new in magnetism (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 27 May 2015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), 'What's new in magnetism?', was held in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, on 27 May 2015. The papers collected in this issue were written based on talks given at the session: (1) Kalashnikova A M, Pisarev R V (Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg), Kimel A V (Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, The Netherlands; Moscow State Technical University of Radio Engineering, Electronics and Automation, Moscow) 'Ultrafast optomagnetism'; (2) Pyatakov A P, Sergeev A S, Nikolaeva E P, Kosykh T B, Nikolaev A V (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow), Zvezdin K A (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow; Kintech Laboratory Ltd, Moscow), Zvezdin A K (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow; Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'Micromagnetism and topological defects in magnetoelectric media'; (3) Mukhin A A, Kuzmenko A M, Ivanov V Yu (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow), Pimenov A V, Shuvaev A M, Dziom V E (Institute of Solid State Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria) 'Dynamic magnetoelectric phenomena within electromagnons in rare-earth borate multiferroics'; (4) Nikitov S A (Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow; Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow region; Chernyshevskii Saratov State University, Saratov), Kalyabin D V, Osokin S A (Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow; Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow region), Lisenkov I V (Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow; Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow region; Oakland University, Rochester, USA

  20. Surface science models of CoMoS hydrodesulfurisation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jong, A.M.; De Beer, V.H.J.; Van Veen, J.A.R.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W. [Schuit Institute of Catalysis, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    Characterization of supported catalysts with surface spectroscopic techniques is often limited due to restraints imposed by the support material. The use of flat conducting substrates as a model support offers a way to apply these techniques to their full potential. Such surface science models of silica and alumina supported CoMoS catalysts have been made by impregnating thin SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films with a solution of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) complexes of cobalt and molybdenum. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) spectra indicate that the order in which cobalt and molybdenum transfer to the sulfided state is reversed with respect to oxidic Co and Mo systems prepared by conventional methods, implying that NTA complexation retards the sulfidation of cobalt to temperatures where MoS{sub 2} is already formed. Catalytic tests show that the CoMoS model catalysts exhibit activities for thiophene desulfurisation and product distributions similar to those of their high surface area counterparts. 25 refs.

  1. Hydrologic Science and Satellite Measurements of Surface Water (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsdorf, D. E.; Mognard, N. M.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    While significant advances continue to be made for satellite measurements of surface waters, important science and application opportunities remain. Examples include the following: (1) Our current methods of measuring floodwater dynamics are either sparsely distributed or temporally inadequate. As an example, flood depths are measured by using high water marks, which capture only the peak of the flood wave, not its temporal variability. (2) Discharge is well measured at individual points along stream networks using in-situ gauges, but these do not capture within-reach hydraulic variability such as the water surface slope changes on the rising and falling limbs of flood waves. (3) Just a 1.0 mm/day error in ET over the Congo Basin translates to a 35,000 m3/s discharge error. Knowing the discharge of the Congo River and its many tributaries should significantly improve our understanding of the water balance throughout the basin. The Congo is exemplary of many other basins around the globe. (4) Arctic hydrology is punctuated by millions of unmeasured lakes. Globally, there might be as many as 30 million lakes larger than a hectare. Storage changes in these lakes are nearly unknown, but in the Arctic such changes are likely an indication of global warming. (5) Well over 100 rivers cross international boundaries, yet the sharing of water data is poor. Overcoming this helps to better manage the entire river basin while also providing a better assessment of potential water related disasters. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT, http://swot.jpl.nasa.gov/) mission is designed to meet these needs by providing global measurements of surface water hydrodynamics. SWOT will allow estimates of discharge in rivers wider than 100m (50m goal) and storage changes in water bodies larger than 250m by 250m (and likely as small as one hectare).

  2. Life sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, L. (ed.)

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

  3. Life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, L.

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs

  4. Molecular metal catalysts on supports: organometallic chemistry meets surface science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, Pedro; Gates, Bruce C

    2014-08-19

    -support bonding and structure, which identify the supports as ligands with electron-donor properties that influence reactivity and catalysis. Each of the catalyst design variables has been varied independently, illustrated by mononuclear and tetranuclear iridium on zeolite HY and on MgO and by isostructural rhodium and iridium (diethylene or dicarbonyl) complexes on these supports. The data provide examples resolving the roles of the catalyst design variables and place the catalysis science on a firm foundation of organometallic chemistry linked with surface science. Supported molecular catalysts offer the advantages of characterization in the absence of solvents and with surface-science methods that do not require ultrahigh vacuum. Families of supported metal complexes have been made by replacement of ligands with others from the gas phase. Spectroscopically identified catalytic reaction intermediates help to elucidate catalyst performance and guide design. The methods are illustrated for supported complexes and clusters of rhodium, iridium, osmium, and gold used to catalyze reactions of small molecules that facilitate identification of the ligands present during catalysis: alkene dimerization and hydrogenation, H-D exchange in the reaction of H2 with D2, and CO oxidation. The approach is illustrated with the discovery of a highly active and selective MgO-supported rhodium carbonyl dimer catalyst for hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene to give butenes.

  5. Computing, Environment and Life Sciences | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computing, Environment and Life Sciences Research Divisions BIOBiosciences CPSComputational Science DSLData Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Biosciences Division Environmental Science Division Mathematics and Computer Science Division Facilities and Institutes Argonne Leadership Computing Facility News Events About

  6. Biological and Environmental Research: Climate and Environmental Sciences Division: U.S./European Workshop on Climate Change Challenges and Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, James [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; McCord, Raymond [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Sisterson, Doug [Argonne National Laboratory; Voyles, Jimmy [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2012-11-08

    The workshop aimed to identify outstanding climate change science questions and the observational strategies for addressing them. The scientific focus was clouds, aerosols, and precipitation, and the required ground- and aerial-based observations. The workshop findings will be useful input for setting priorities within the Department of Energy (DOE) and the participating European centers. This joint workshop was envisioned as the first step in enhancing the collaboration among these climate research activities needed to better serve the science community.

  7. Solid State Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces

  8. Solid State Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  9. Hydrogenation of nitriles on a well-characterized nickel surface: From surface science studies to liquid phase catalytic activity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardin, Denis Emmanuel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Nitrile hydrogenation is the most commonly used method for preparing diverse amines. This thesis is aimed at the mechanism and factors affecting the performance of Ni-based catalysts in nitrile hydrogenations. Surface science techniques are used to study bonding of nitriles and amines to a Ni(111) surface and to identify surface intermediates. Liquid-phase hydrogenations of cyclohexene and 1-hexene on a Pt foil were carried out successfully. Finally, knowledge about the surface structure, surface chemical bond, dynamics of surface atoms (diffusion, growth), and reactivity of metal surfaces from solid-gas interface studies, is discussed.

  10. Surface physics of materials materials science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Blakely, J M

    2013-01-01

    Surface Physics of Materials presents accounts of the physical properties of solid surfaces. The book contains selected articles that deal with research emphasizing surface properties rather than experimental techniques in the field of surface physics. Topics discussed include transport of matter at surfaces; interaction of atoms and molecules with surfaces; chemical analysis of surfaces; and adhesion and friction. Research workers, teachers and graduate students in surface physics, and materials scientist will find the book highly useful.

  11. Exposure to Sub-lethal 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Arrests Cell Division and Alters Cell Surface Properties in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Supriya V.; Kamencic, Belma; Körnig, André; Shahina, Zinnat; Dahms, Tanya E. S.

    2018-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a robust, easily adaptable and culturable bacterium in vitro, and a model bacterium for studying the impact of xenobiotics in the environment. We have used correlative atomic force – laser scanning confocal microscopy (AFM-LSCM) to characterize the mechanisms of cellular response to the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). One of the most extensively used herbicides world-wide, 2,4-D is known to cause hazardous effects in diverse non-target organisms. Sub-lethal concentrations of 2,4-D caused DNA damage in E. coli WM1074 during short exposure periods which increased significantly over time. In response to 2,4-D, FtsZ and FtsA relocalized within seconds, coinciding with the complete inhibition of cell septation and cell elongation. Exposure to 2,4-D also resulted in increased activation of the SOS response. Changes to cell division were accompanied by concomitant changes to surface roughness, elasticity and adhesion in a time-dependent manner. This is the first study describing the mechanistic details of 2,4-D at sub-lethal levels in bacteria. Our study suggests that 2,4-D arrests E. coli cell division within seconds after exposure by disrupting the divisome complex, facilitated by dissipation of membrane potential. Over longer exposures, 2,4-D causes filamentation as a result of an SOS response to oxidative stress induced DNA damage. PMID:29472899

  12. Sea Surface Height, Absolute, Aviso, 0.25 degrees, Global, Science Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviso Absolute Sea Surface Height is the Sea Surface Height Deviation plus the long term mean dynamic height. This is Science Quality data.

  13. Compilation of the Dakota Aquifer Project isotope data and publications: The Isotope Hydrology Program of the Isotope Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davisson, M.L.; Smith, D.K.; Hudson, G.B.; Niemeyer, S.; Macfarlane, P.A.; Whittemore, D.O.

    1995-01-01

    In FY92 the then Nuclear Chemistry Division embarked on a scientific collaboration with the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) to characterize with isotope techniques groundwater of the Dakota Formation of Kansas. The Dakota Formation is a Cretaceous-aged marine sandstone hosting potable groundwater in most regions of Kansas whose use will serve to partially offset the severe overdraft problems in the overlying Ogallala Formation. The isotope characterization of the Dakota groundwater has generated data that delineates sources, ages, and subsurface controls on the water quality. Initial interpretations of the data have been published in abstract volumes of (1) the 1993 Geological Society of America National Meeting, (2) the 8th International Conference on Geochronology, Cosmochronology and Isotope Geology, and (3) the 1994 Dakota Aquifer Workshop and Clinic. Copies of all abstracts are included in this brief review. One report will focus on the sources and ages of the groundwater, and the other will focus on the subsurface controls on the natural water quality

  14. An Assessment of the Effectiveness of Computer-based Training for Newly Commissioned Surface Warfare Division Officers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bowman, William R; Crawford, Alice M; Mehay, Stephen; Stoker, Carol; Paynter, Robert

    2008-01-01

    ...) on-board an officer's ship. The study relied on a variety of analytical techniques, including a literature review of CBT and OJT training, interviews and focus groups with junior and senior surface warfare officers...

  15. Application of FrontPage 98 to the Development of Web Sites for the Science Division and the Center for the Advancement of Learning and Teaching (CALT) at Anne Arundel Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Bruce

    This paper discusses the development of two World Wide Web sites at Anne Arundel Community College (Maryland). The criteria for the selection of hardware and software for Web site development that led to the decision to use Microsoft FrontPage 98 are described along with its major components and features. The discussion of the Science Division Web…

  16. An action research according to the division of labor alternately within the scope of “Science Technology and Laboratory practice II” lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Sadi Yılmaz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine their views and suggestions about conducted lecture as work division alternately to be more productive the “Science Technology and Laboratory Practice II” lecture of primary school teacher candidates. This study was used the action research. Students has been divided into groups consisting of three or four students. The distribution of task related to the topic to group members has been done. These tasks was done by each of the group members. Participants of the study have been selected according to convenience sampling (available sampling. The participants of the study comprise the researcher’s own course students. The study was conducted with 65 students studying primary school teacher candidates 2nd class. It was taken as written form students' opinions and suggestions about the application form prepared researcher by at the end of the application. Most of the students expressed the course has contributed to the development of self-confidence in basic science lecture topics. Besides most of the students expressed is extant that they learned knowledge.

  17. 3S'83 Symposium on surface science. Contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, P.; Betz, G.; Husinsky, W.; Soellner, E.; Stoeri, H.; Varga, P.

    1983-01-01

    This symposium included the topics: electronic structure; ion-surface-interaction; surface structure; adsorption and reactivity; surface analysis; 60 papers were presented, only part of which pertain to INIS. (G.Q.)

  18. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1985 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) advanced batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (3) corrosion-protective coatings for high-strength steel; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methodologies for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) nuclear technology related to waste management, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and proof of breeding in a light water breeder reactor; and (7) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL

  19. 52nd colloid and surface science symposium. Proceedings volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Corbett, H.G.

    1978-05-01

    Abstracts are presented under the headings: cell/surface interactions, surface properties and reactions of catalysts, solution chemistry of surfactants, dynamic systems, microorganism/surface interactions, gas-solid interactions, biological surfaces, solid sorbents, lung surfactant and intestinal absorption, pigments, and liquid systems. (DLC)

  20. E-Division activities report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barschall, H.H.

    1981-07-01

    This report describes some of the activities in E (Experimental Physics) Division during the past year. E-Division carries out research and development in areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Many of the activities are in pure and applied atomic and nuclear physics and in material science. In addition this report describes work on accelerators, microwaves, plasma diagnostics, determination of atmospheric oxygen and of nitrogen in tissue

  1. Role of surface studies in science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karkhanavala, M D [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Chemistry Div.

    1977-01-01

    Reactivity of solids is influenced by the surface properties such as structure, dislocations and composition. Corrosion and erosion are essentially surface phenomena. Surface studies, therefore, assume importance in prevention and minimization of corrosion and erosion. Discussion is illustrated with examples drawn from the field of nuclear power reactor technology.

  2. Progress report of Technical Physics Division: April 1980 - March 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, Ramesh; Vijendran, P.

    1983-01-01

    Activities, with an individual summary of each, of the Technical Physics Division (TPD) of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay are reported for the period April 1980 - March 1982. The major thrust of the TPD's work has been in: (i) design and fabrication of instruments, devices and equipment and (ii) development of techniques in the frontline research and technology areas like vacuum science, surface analysis, cryogenics and crystal growing. The Division also provided custombuilt electronics equipment, vacuum systems and glass components and devices to the various Divisions of BARC and other units of the DAE. Training and manpower development activities and technology transfer activities are also reported. Lists of seminars, colloquia, publications during the period of the report are given. (M.G.B.)

  3. Scientific Equipment Division - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halik, J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Scientific Equipment Division consists of the Design Group and the Mechanical Workshop. The activity of the Division includes the following: - designing of devices and equipment for experiments in physics, their mechanical construction and assembly. In particular, there are vacuum chambers and installations for HV and UHV; - maintenance and upgrading of the existing installations and equipment in our Institute; - participation of our engineers and technicians in design works, equipment assembly and maintenance for experiments in foreign laboratories. The Design Group is equipped with PC-computers and AutoCAD graphic software (release 2000 and Mechanical Desktop 4.0) and a AO plotter, what allows us to make drawings and 2- and 3-dimensional mechanical documentation to the world standards. The Mechanical Workshop can offer a wide range of machining and treatment methods with satisfactory tolerances and surface quality. It offers the following possibilities: - turning - cylindrical elements of a length up to 2000 mm and a diameter up to 400 mm, and also disc-type elements of a diameter up to 600 mm and a length not exceeding 300 mm; - milling - elements of length up to 1000 mm and gear wheels of diameter up to 300 mm; - grinding - flat surfaces of dimensions up to 300 mm x 1000 mm and cylindrical elements of a diameter up to 200 mm and a length up to 800 mm; - drilling - holes of a diameter up to 50 mm; - welding - electrical and gas welding, including TIG vacuum-tight welding; - soft and hard soldering; - mechanical works including precision engineering; - plastics treatment - machining and polishing using diamond milling, modelling, lamination of various shapes and materials, including plexiglas, scintillators and light-guides; - painting - paint spraying with possibility of using furnace-fred drier of internal dimensions of 800 mm x 800 mm x 800 mm. Our workshop posses CNC milling machine which can be used for machining of work-pieces up to 500 kg

  4. E-Division activities report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barschall, H.H.

    1984-07-01

    E (Experimental Physics) Division carries out basic and applied research in atomic and nuclear physics, in materials science, and in other areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Some of the activities are cooperative efforts with other divisions of the Laboratory, and, in a few cases, with other laboratories. Many of the experiments are directly applicable to problems in weapons and energy, some have only potential applied uses, and others are in pure physics. This report presents abstracts of papers published by E (Experimental Physics) Division staff members between July 1983 and June 1984. In addition, it lists the members of the scientific staff of the division, including visitors and students, and some of the assignments of staff members on scientific committees. A brief summary of the budget is included

  5. Pyrosequencing-based assessment of the bacteria diversity in surface and subsurface peat layers of a northern wetland, with focus on poorly studied phyla and candidate divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkebaeva, Yulia M; Kim, Yongkyu; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2013-01-01

    Northern peatlands play a key role in the global carbon and water budget, but the bacterial diversity in these ecosystems remains poorly described. Here, we compared the bacterial community composition in the surface (0-5 cm depth) and subsurface (45-50 cm) peat layers of an acidic (pH 4.0) Sphagnum-dominated wetland, using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The denoised sequences (37,229 reads, average length ∼430 bp) were affiliated with 27 bacterial phyla and corresponded to 1,269 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined at 97% sequence identity. Abundant OTUs were affiliated with the Acidobacteria (35.5±2.4% and 39.2±1.2% of all classified sequences in surface and subsurface peat, respectively), Alphaproteobacteria (15.9±1.7% and 25.8±1.4%), Actinobacteria (9.5±2.0% and 10.7±0.5%), Verrucomicrobia (8.5±1.4% and 0.6±0.2%), Planctomycetes (5.8±0.4% and 9.7±0.6%), Deltaproteobacteria (7.1±0.4% and 4.4%±0.3%), and Gammaproteobacteria (6.6±0.4% and 2.1±0.1%). The taxonomic patterns of the abundant OTUs were uniform across all the subsamples taken from each peat layer. In contrast, the taxonomic patterns of rare OTUs were different from those of the abundant OTUs and varied greatly among subsamples, in both surface and subsurface peat. In addition to the bacterial taxa listed above, rare OTUs represented the following groups: Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Chlamydia, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Elusimicrobia, Fibrobacteres, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Spirochaetes, AD3, WS1, WS4, WS5, WYO, OD1, OP3, BRC1, TM6, TM7, WPS-2, and FCPU426. OTU richness was notably higher in the surface layer (882 OTUs) than in the anoxic subsurface peat (483 OTUs), with only 96 OTUs common to both data sets. Most members of poorly studied phyla, such as the Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes and the candidate division TM6, showed a clear preference for growth in either oxic or anoxic conditions. Apparently, the bacterial communities in surface and

  6. Experimental innovations in surface science a guide to practical laboratory methods and instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, John T

    2015-01-01

    This book is a new edition of a classic text on experimental methods and instruments in surface science. It offers practical insight useful to chemists, physicists, and materials scientists working in experimental surface science. This enlarged second edition contains almost 300 descriptions of experimental methods. The more than 50 active areas with individual scientific and measurement concepts and activities relevant to each area are presented in this book. The key areas covered are: Vacuum System Technology, Mechanical Fabrication Techniques, Measurement Methods, Thermal Control, Delivery of Adsorbates to Surfaces, UHV Windows, Surface Preparation Methods, High Area Solids, Safety. The book is written for researchers and graduate students.

  7. Sea Surface Height Deviation, Aviso, 0.25 degrees, Global, Science Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviso Sea Surface Height Deviation is the deviation from the mean geoid as measured from 1993 - 1995. This is Science Quality data.

  8. Proportional Reasoning Ability and Concepts of Scale: Surface Area to Volume Relationships in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Amy; Jones, Gail

    2009-01-01

    The "National Science Education Standards" emphasise teaching unifying concepts and processes such as basic functions of living organisms, the living environment, and scale. Scale influences science processes and phenomena across the domains. One of the big ideas of scale is that of surface area to volume. This study explored whether or not there…

  9. Current programmes of Metallurgy Division (1991)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Current research and development programmes of the Metallurgy Division are listed under the headings: 1)Thrust Areas, 2)High Temperature Materials Section, 3)Chemical Metallurgy Section, 4)Metallurgical Thermochemistry Section, 5)Physical Metallurgy Section, 6)Mechanical Metallurgy Section, 7)Corrosion Metallurgy Section, 8)Electrochemical Science and Technology Section, 9)Ceramics Section, and 10)Fabrication and Maintenance Group. A list of equipment in the Division and a list of sciientific personnel of the Division are also given. (M.G.B.)

  10. Progress report, Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    A re-designed automatic TLD reader has been constructed. The thermoluminescent material MgB 4 O 7 :Dy appears to be attractive for environmental gamma monitoring. The field prototype of a simple, light weight tritium monitor is being built, and field-tests of a pocket warning dosimeter have been completed. A computer program for the calculation of beta doses from point and plane sources has been used to calculate distributions for 90 nuclides. Research into the adsorption of 134 Cs, 60 Co and 90 Sr onto soil particles and processes associated with the release of these nuclides is continuing. Studies are being carried out into the culture of algae in municipal wastewater, heat and solute transfer in lakes, and groundwater seepage flow into lakes. Radiation biology work continues to deal with radiation damage of DNA and cellular repair mechanisms. A metabolic model for the tellurium-iodine decay chain has been completed. (LL)

  11. Progress report, Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    In Health Physics Branch, work is continuing on development of neutron dosimetry techniques, new thermoluminescent dosimeters, and portable tritium-in-air monitoring instruments. Development of beneficial uses of waste heat has continued in the Environmental Research Branch. Other work includes studies in meteorology, biogeochemistry of nuclear waste management areas, and soil and groundwater studies. Research activity in the Radiation Biology Branch is dealing with the effects of radiation upon a variety of living organisms. Both genetic and mutagenic effects of damage to DNA are being studied as well as repair mechanisms and human diseases caused by repair mechanism deficiencies. In the Biomedical Research Branch, a collaborative study is being undertaken into the retention and excretion of uranium in fuel fabrication workers. (O.T.)

  12. Psychological Sciences Division 1979 Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    currently available techniques. Funding: ONR, AFHRL Molenaar , I.W. A fast solution of the Lindley equations for the M-group regression problem (Tech. Rep...late 1979. Funding: will be issued, and selected papers are scheduled ONR, NPRDC, AFOSR for publication as a book . Funding: ONR, NPRDC, AFOSR, ARI... book describing the LB phenomenon approach to performance assessment: II. An investigation of based on experiments with over a thousand sub- encoding

  13. Biological Sciences Division 1991 Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    enrichment was inferred from sequence relationships. An organism corresponding to the Desulfovibrio vulgaris -like bioreactor population (demonstrating...gene coding for a 33kd protein in the Chlorella - v-r.:s PBCV-l has shown a strong hybridization signal on Northern blots. 4e have collected throughout...and R. H. Meints (1991). Cloning of the Gene for VP54, the Major Capsid Protein of Chlorella "’irus PBCV-l. Abstract. Henry, E. C., S. K. Krueger

  14. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    culture and policies at MSD MSD0010: Integrated Safety Management: Principles and Case Studies Calendar ? Click Here! Resources for MSD Safety MSD Safety MSD's Integrated Safety Management Plan [PDF] Safety for MSD classes on Integrated Safety Management MSD0015 Handout - Waste Briefing Document [PDF] Waste

  15. Mineral Surface Reactivity in teaching of Science Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    In the last fifty years, science materials issues has required the study of air pollution, water and soil to prevent and remedy the adverse effects of waste originating from anthropogenic activity and the development of new energies and new materials. The teaching of this discipline has been marked by lectures on general lines, materials, disciplines, who explained biased objects of reality, but often forgot the task of reconstruction and integration of such visions. Moving from that model, otherwise quite static, to a dynamic relational model, would in our view, a real revolution in education. This means taking a systematic approach to complex both in interpreting reality and in favor when learning. Children relationships are as important or more than single objects, and it is to discover fundamental organizational principles of phenomena we seek to interpret or in other words, find the pattern that connects. Thus, we must work on relationships and also take into account the relation between the observer and the observed. Educate about relationships means that studies should always be considered within a framework of probabilities, not absolute certainties. This model of systemic thinking, dealing with complexity, is a possibility to bring coherence to our educational work, because the complexity is not taught, complexity is live, so that complex thinking is extended (and fed) in a form educate complex. It is the task of teaching to help people move from level to level of decision reviews. This means that systems thinking should be extended in a local action, action that engages the individual and the environment. Science Materials has emerged as a discipline of free choice for pupils attending chemical engineering which has been assigned 6.0 credits. The chemical engineer's professional profile within the current framework is defined as a professional knowledge as a specialization technical / functional, working in a learning organization and the formation of

  16. Density functional theory in surface science and heterogeneous catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Scheffler, M.; Toulhoat, H.

    2006-01-01

    Solid surfaces are used extensively as catalysts throughout the chemical industry, in the energy sector, and in environmental protection. Recently, density functional theory has started providing new insight into the atomic-scale mechanisms of heterogeneous catalysis, helping to interpret the large...

  17. Surface science studies of ethene containing model interstellar ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puletti, F.; Whelan, M.; Brown, W. A.

    2011-05-01

    The formation of saturated hydrocarbons in the interstellar medium (ISM) is difficult to explain only by taking into account gas phase reactions. This is mostly due to the fact that carbonium ions only react with H_2 to make unsaturated hydrocarbons, and hence no viable route to saturated hydrocarbons has been postulated to date. It is therefore likely that saturation processes occur via surface reactions that take place on interstellar dust grains. One of the species of interest in this family of reactions is C_2H_4 (ethene) which is an intermediate in several molecular formation routes (e.g. C_2H_2 → C_2H_6). To help to understand some of the surface processes involving ethene, a study of ethene deposited on a dust grain analogue surface (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) held under ultra-high vacuum at 20 K has been performed. The adsorption and desorption of ethene has been studied both in water-free and water-dominated model interstellar ices. A combination of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) have been used to identify the adsorbed and trapped species and to determine the kinetics of the desorption processes. In all cases, ethene is found to physisorb on the carbonaceous surface. As expected water has a very strong influence on the desorption of ethene, as previously observed for other model interstellar ice systems.

  18. The influence of lithology on surface water sources | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the temporal and spatial variability of surface water sources within a basin is vital to our ability to manage the impacts of climate variability and land cover change. Water stable isotopes can be used as a tool to determine geographic and seasonal sources of water at the basin scale. Previous studies in the Coastal Range of Oregon reported that the variation in the isotopic signatures of surface water does not conform to the commonly observed “rainout effect”, which exhibits a trend of increasing isotopic depletion with rising elevation. The primary purpose of this research is to investigate the mechanisms governing seasonal and spatial variations in the isotopic signature of surface waters within the Marys River Basin, located in the leeward side of the Oregon Coastal Range. Surface water and precipitation samples were collected every 2-3 weeks for isotopic analysis of δ18O and δ2H for one year. Results indicate a significant difference in isotopic signature between watersheds underlain by basalt and sandstone. The degree of separation was the most distinct during the summer when low flows reflect deeper groundwater sources, whereas isotopic signatures during the rainy season (fall and winter) showed a greater degree of similarity between the two lithologies. This indicates that baseflow within streams drained by sandstone versus basalt is being supplied from two distinctly separate water sources. In addition, Marys River flow at the outle

  19. Modelling episodic acidification of surface waters: the state of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshleman, K N; Wigington, P J; Davies, T D; Tranter, M

    1992-01-01

    Field studies of chemical changes in surface waters associated with rainfall and snowmelt events have provided evidence of episodic acidification of lakes and streams in Europe and North America. Modelling these chemical changes is particularly challenging because of the variability associated with hydrological transport and chemical transformation processes in catchments. This paper provides a review of mathematical models that have been applied to the problem of episodic acidification. Several empirical approaches, including regression models, mixing models and time series models, support a strong hydrological interpretation of episodic acidification. Regional application of several models has suggested that acidic episodes (in which the acid neutralizing capacity becomes negative) are relatively common in surface waters in several regions of the US that receive acid deposition. Results from physically based models have suggested a lack of understanding of hydrological flowpaths, hydraulic residence times and biogeochemical reactions, particularly those involving aluminum. The ability to better predict episodic chemical responses of surface waters is thus dependent upon elucidation of these and other physical and chemical processes.

  20. Physics division annual report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, J.

    2007-01-01

    the first time, a major milestone in an innovative search for the violation of time-reversal symmetry. New results from HERMES establish that strange quarks carry little of the spin of the proton and precise results have been obtained at JLAB on the changes in quark distributions in light nuclei. New theoretical results reveal that the nature of the surfaces of strange quark stars. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques have been extended to scattering problems and show great promise for the accurate calculation, from first principles, of important astrophysical reactions. Flame propagation in type 1A supernova has been simulated, a numerical process that requires considering length scales that vary by factors of eight to twelve orders of magnitude. Argonne continues to lead in the development and exploitation of the new technical concepts that will truly make an advanced exotic beam facility, in the words of NSAC, 'the world-leading facility for research in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics'. Our science and our technology continue to point the way to this major advance. It is a tremendously exciting time in science for these new capabilities hold the keys to unlocking important secrets of nature. The great progress that has been made in meeting the exciting intellectual challenges of modern nuclear physics reflects the talents and dedication of the Physics Division staff and the visitors, guests and students who bring so much to the research

  1. Physics division annual report 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2007-03-12

    isotopes were trapped in an atom trap for the first time, a major milestone in an innovative search for the violation of time-reversal symmetry. New results from HERMES establish that strange quarks carry little of the spin of the proton and precise results have been obtained at JLAB on the changes in quark distributions in light nuclei. New theoretical results reveal that the nature of the surfaces of strange quark stars. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques have been extended to scattering problems and show great promise for the accurate calculation, from first principles, of important astrophysical reactions. Flame propagation in type 1A supernova has been simulated, a numerical process that requires considering length scales that vary by factors of eight to twelve orders of magnitude. Argonne continues to lead in the development and exploitation of the new technical concepts that will truly make an advanced exotic beam facility, in the words of NSAC, 'the world-leading facility for research in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics'. Our science and our technology continue to point the way to this major advance. It is a tremendously exciting time in science for these new capabilities hold the keys to unlocking important secrets of nature. The great progress that has been made in meeting the exciting intellectual challenges of modern nuclear physics reflects the talents and dedication of the Physics Division staff and the visitors, guests and students who bring so much to the research.

  2. Surface science. Adhesion and friction in mesoscopic graphite contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Elad; Lörtscher, Emanuel; Rawlings, Colin; Knoll, Armin W; Duerig, Urs

    2015-05-08

    The weak interlayer binding in two-dimensional layered materials such as graphite gives rise to poorly understood low-friction characteristics. Accurate measurements of the adhesion forces governing the overall mechanical stability have also remained elusive. We report on the direct mechanical measurement of line tension and friction forces acting in sheared mesoscale graphite structures. We show that the friction is fundamentally stochastic in nature and is attributable to the interaction between the incommensurate interface lattices. We also measured an adhesion energy of 0.227 ± 0.005 joules per square meter, in excellent agreement with theoretical models. In addition, bistable all-mechanical memory cell structures and rotational bearings have been realized by exploiting position locking, which is provided solely by the adhesion energy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO/sub 2/ recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO 2 recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs

  5. Intense positron beam and its application to surface science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Y.; Hirose, M.; Kanazawa, I.; Sueoka, O.; Takamura, S.; Okada, S.

    1992-01-01

    Intense pulsed slow positron beam has been produced using the 100 MeV electron LINAC of JAERI · Tokai. In order to use the beam for surface studies such as positron diffraction and positron microscopy, it was transferred from the solenoid magnetic field to field free region and then was brightness-enhanced. The beam size was reduced from 10 mmφ (in the magnetic field) to 0.5 mmφ after two stages of re-moderation. Using the intense brightness-enhanced positron beam we have observed for the first time RHEPD (Reflection High-Energy Positron Diffraction) patterns. A design of re-emission positron microscopy is also described. (author)

  6. Building Surface Science Capacity to Serve the Automobile Industry in Southeastern Michigan, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Weidian

    2013-09-27

    This project, “Building Surface Science Capacity to Serve the Automobile Industry in Southeastern Michigan” was carried out in two phases: (1) the 2009 – 2012 renovation of space in the new EMU Science Complex, which included the Surface Science Laboratory (SSL), a very vigorous research lab at EMU that carries on a variety of research projects to serve the auto and other industries in Michigan; and (2) the 2013 purchase of several pieces of equipment to further enhance the research capability of the SSL. The funding granted by the DoE was proposed to “renovate the space in the Science Complex to include SSL and purchase equipment for tribological and electrochemical impedance measurements in the lab, thus SSL will serve the auto and other industries in Michigan better.” We believe we have fully accomplished the mission.

  7. Surface science study of selective ethylene epoxidation catalyzed by the Ag(110) surface: Structural sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, C.T.

    1984-01-01

    The selective oxidation of ethylene to ethylene epoxide (C 2 H 4 +1/2O 2 →C 2 H 4 O) over Ag is the simplest example of kinetically controlled, selective heterogeneous catalysis. We have studied the steady-state kinetics and selectivity of this reaction for the first time on a clean, well-characterized Ag(110) surface by using a special apparatus which allows rapid (approx.20 s) transfer between a high-pressure catalytic microreactor and an ultrahigh vacuum surface analysis (AES, XPS, LEED, TDS) chamber. The effects of temperature and reactant pressures upon the rate and selectivity are virtually identical on Ag(110) and supported, high surface area Ag catalysts. The absolute specific rate (per Ag surface atom) is, however, some 100-fold higher for Ag(110) than for high surface area catalysts. This is related to the well-known structural sensitivity of this reaction. It is postulated that a small percentage of (110) planes (or [110]-like sites) are responsible for most of the catalytic activity of high surface area catalysts. The high activity of the (110) plane is attributed to its high sticking probability for dissociative oxygen adsorption, since the rate of ethylene epoxidation is shown in a related work [Ref. 1: C. T. Campbell and M. T. Paffett, Surf. Sci. (in press)] to be proportional to the coverage of atomically adsorbed oxygen at constant temperature and ethylene pressure

  8. EDITORIAL: Three decades of scanning tunnelling microscopy that changed the course of surface science Three decades of scanning tunnelling microscopy that changed the course of surface science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-11-01

    Three decades ago, with a tiny tip of platinum, the scientific world saw the real space imaging of single atoms with unprecedented spatial resolution. This signalled the birth of one of the most versatile surface probes, based on the physics of quantum mechanical tunnelling: the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). Invented in 1981 by Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer of IBM, Zurich, it led to their award of the 1986 Nobel Prize. Atoms, once speculated to be abstract entities used by theoreticians for mere calculations, can be seen to exist for real with the nano-eye of an STM tip that also gives real-space images of molecules and adsorbed complexes on surfaces. From a very fundamental perspective, the STM changed the course of surface science and engineering. STM also emerged as a powerful tool to study various fundamental phenomena relevant to the properties of surfaces in technological applications such as tribology, medical implants, catalysis, sensors and biology—besides elucidating the importance of local bonding geometries and defects, non-periodic structures and the co-existence of nano-scale phases. Atom-level probing, once considered a dream, has seen the light with the evolution of STM. An important off-shoot of STM was the atomic force microscope (AFM) for surface mapping of insulating samples. Then followed the development of a flurry of techniques under the general name of scanning probe microscopy (SPM). These techniques (STM, AFM, MFM, PFM etc) designed for atomic-scale-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, have led to brand new developments in surface analysis. All of these novel methods enabled researchers in recent years to image and analyse complex surfaces on microscopic and nanoscopic scales. All of them utilize a small probe for sensing the surface. The invention of AFM by Gerd Binnig, Calvin Quate and Christopher Gerber opened up new opportunities for characterization of a variety of materials, and various industrial applications could be

  9. New Material Development for Surface Layer and Surface Technology in Tribology Science to Improve Energy Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, R.; Tauviqirrahman, M.; Jamari; Schipper, D. J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of new material and surface technology in tribology and its contribution to energy efficiency. Two examples of the economic benefits, resulted from the optimum tribology in the transportation sector and the manufacturing industry are discussed. The new materials are proposed to modify the surface property by laminating the bulk material with thin layer/coating. Under a suitable condition, the thin layer on a surface can provide a combination of good wear, a low friction and corrosion resistance for the mechanical components. The innovation in layer technology results molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), diamond like carbon (DLC), cubic boron nitride (CBN) and diamond which perform satisfactory outcome. The application of the metallic coatings to carbon fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFRP) has the capacity to provide considerable weight and power savings for many engineering components. The green material for lubricant and additives such as the use of sunflower oil which possesses good oxidation resistance and the use of mallee leaves as bio‐degradable solvent are used to answer the demand of the environmentally friendly material with good performance. The tribology research implementation for energy efficiency also touches the simple things around us such as: erasing the laser‐print in a paper with different abrasion techniques. For the technology in the engineering surface, the consideration for generating the suitable surface of the components in running‐in period has been discussed in order to prolong the components life and reduce the machine downtime. The conclusion, tribology can result in reducing manufacturing time, reducing the maintenance requirements, prolonging the service interval, improving durability, reliability and mechanical components life, and reducing harmful exhaust emission and waste. All of these advantages will increase the energy efficiency and the economic benefits.

  10. New Material Development for Surface Layer and Surface Technology in Tribology Science to Improve Energy Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, R.; Tauviqirrahman, M.; Jamari, Jamari; Schipper, D. J.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews the development of new material and surface technology in tribology and its contribution to energy efficiency. Two examples of the economic benefits, resulted from the optimum tribology in the transportation sector and the manufacturing industry are discussed. The new materials are proposed to modify the surface property by laminating the bulk material with thin layer/coating. Under a suitable condition, the thin layer on a surface can provide a combination of good wear, a low friction and corrosion resistance for the mechanical components. The innovation in layer technology results molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), diamond like carbon (DLC), cubic boron nitride (CBN) and diamond which perform satisfactory outcome. The application of the metallic coatings to carbon fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFRP) has the capacity to provide considerable weight and power savings for many engineering components. The green material for lubricant and additives such as the use of sunflower oil which possesses good oxidation resistance and the use of mallee leaves as bio-degradable solvent are used to answer the demand of the environmentally friendly material with good performance. The tribology research implementation for energy efficiency also touches the simple things around us such as: erasing the laser-print in a paper with different abrasion techniques. For the technology in the engineering surface, the consideration for generating the suitable surface of the components in running-in period has been discussed in order to prolong the components life and reduce the machine downtime. The conclusion, tribology can result in reducing manufacturing time, reducing the maintenance requirements, prolonging the service interval, improving durability, reliability and mechanical components life, and reducing harmful exhaust emission and waste. All of these advantages will increase the energy efficiency and the economic benefits.

  11. Health, Safety, and Environment Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, C [comp.

    1992-01-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Meeting these responsibilities requires expertise in many disciplines, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science and engineering, analytical chemistry, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health, safety, and environmental problems occasionally arise from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory, and research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed, to study specific problems for the Department of Energy. The results of these programs help develop better practices in occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and environmental science.

  12. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars science laboratory's curiosity rover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassler, D.M.; Zeitlin, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F.; Ehresmann, B.; Rafkin, S.; Eigenbrode, J.L.; Brinza, D.E.; Weigle, G.; Böttcher, S.; Böhm, E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Köhler, J.; Martin, C.; Reitz, G.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Kim, M.-H.; Grinspoon, D.; Bullock, M.A.; Posner, A.; Gómez-Elvira, J.; Vasavada, A.; Grotzinger, J.P.; MSL Science Team, the|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/292012217

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory’s Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose

  13. Mineral Surface-Templated Self-Assembling Systems: Case Studies from Nanoscience and Surface Science towards Origins of Life Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Gillams

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available An increasing body of evidence relates the wide range of benefits mineral surfaces offer for the development of early living systems, including adsorption of small molecules from the aqueous phase, formation of monomeric subunits and their subsequent polymerization, and supramolecular assembly of biopolymers and other biomolecules. Each of these processes was likely a necessary stage in the emergence of life on Earth. Here, we compile evidence that templating and enhancement of prebiotically-relevant self-assembling systems by mineral surfaces offers a route to increased structural, functional, and/or chemical complexity. This increase in complexity could have been achieved by early living systems before the advent of evolvable systems and would not have required the generally energetically unfavorable formation of covalent bonds such as phosphodiester or peptide bonds. In this review we will focus on various case studies of prebiotically-relevant mineral-templated self-assembling systems, including supramolecular assemblies of peptides and nucleic acids, from nanoscience and surface science. These fields contain valuable information that is not yet fully being utilized by the origins of life and astrobiology research communities. Some of the self-assemblies that we present can promote the formation of new mineral surfaces, similar to biomineralization, which can then catalyze more essential prebiotic reactions; this could have resulted in a symbiotic feedback loop by which geology and primitive pre-living systems were closely linked to one another even before life’s origin. We hope that the ideas presented herein will seed some interesting discussions and new collaborations between nanoscience/surface science researchers and origins of life/astrobiology researchers.

  14. Mineral Surface-Templated Self-Assembling Systems: Case Studies from Nanoscience and Surface Science towards Origins of Life Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillams, Richard J; Jia, Tony Z

    2018-05-08

    An increasing body of evidence relates the wide range of benefits mineral surfaces offer for the development of early living systems, including adsorption of small molecules from the aqueous phase, formation of monomeric subunits and their subsequent polymerization, and supramolecular assembly of biopolymers and other biomolecules. Each of these processes was likely a necessary stage in the emergence of life on Earth. Here, we compile evidence that templating and enhancement of prebiotically-relevant self-assembling systems by mineral surfaces offers a route to increased structural, functional, and/or chemical complexity. This increase in complexity could have been achieved by early living systems before the advent of evolvable systems and would not have required the generally energetically unfavorable formation of covalent bonds such as phosphodiester or peptide bonds. In this review we will focus on various case studies of prebiotically-relevant mineral-templated self-assembling systems, including supramolecular assemblies of peptides and nucleic acids, from nanoscience and surface science. These fields contain valuable information that is not yet fully being utilized by the origins of life and astrobiology research communities. Some of the self-assemblies that we present can promote the formation of new mineral surfaces, similar to biomineralization, which can then catalyze more essential prebiotic reactions; this could have resulted in a symbiotic feedback loop by which geology and primitive pre-living systems were closely linked to one another even before life’s origin. We hope that the ideas presented herein will seed some interesting discussions and new collaborations between nanoscience/surface science researchers and origins of life/astrobiology researchers.

  15. Earth System Science at NASA: Teleconnections Between Sea Surface Temperature and Epidemics in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeson, Blanche W.

    2000-01-01

    The research carried out in the Earth Sciences in NASA and at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center will be the focus of the presentations. In addition, one research project that links sea surface temperature to epidemics in Africa will be highlighted. At GSFC research interests span the full breath of disciplines in Earth Science. Branches and research groups focus on areas as diverse as planetary geomagnetics and atmospheric chemistry. These organizations focus on atmospheric sciences (atmospheric chemistry, climate and radiation, regional processes, atmospheric modeling), hydrological sciences (snow, ice, oceans, and seasonal-to-interannual prediction), terrestrial physics (geology, terrestrial biology, land-atmosphere interactions, geophysics), climate modeling (global warming, greenhouse gases, climate change), on sensor development especially using lidar and microwave technologies, and on information technologies, that enable support of scientific and technical research.

  16. Cell Division Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes the progress in the design and construction of automatic equipment for synchronizing cell division in culture by periodic...Concurrent experiments in hypothermic synchronization of algal cell division are reported.

  17. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 15. Liming acidic surface waters. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olem, H.; Thornelof, E.; Sandoy, S.; Schreiber, R.K.

    1990-09-01

    The document describes the science and technology of aquatic liming--a method for improving the water quality of acidic surface waters to restore or enhance fisheries. The report is a comprehensive compilation of years of research in North America and Europe by dozens of scientists. Several mitigation technologies--including those that have only been proposed--are critically evaluated along with the effects of liming on water chemistry and aquatic biota. Through these evaluations, the state of the science and technology of aquatic liming is identified for the reader. Whole-lake liming is now recognized as a valuable management tool for acidic surface waters and their fisheries. However, some liming technologies are considered experimental and will need further evaluation. Distinctions between technologies are included--as is the distinction between liming acidic surface waters and reducing acidifying emissions

  18. Division of Finance Homepage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top Department of Administration logo Alaska Department of Administration Division of Finance Search Search the Division of Finance site DOF State of Alaska Finance Home Content Area Accounting Charge Cards You are here Administration / Finance Division of Finance Updates IRIS Expenditure Object Codes

  19. Physics division. Progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.; Bacon, D.S.; Aine, C.J.; Bartsch, R.R.

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Physics Division Progress Report describes progress and achievements in Physics Division research during the period January 1, 1995-December 31, 1996. The report covers the five main areas of experimental research and development in which Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in applied and basic sciences: (1) biophysics, (2) hydrodynamic physics, (3) neutron science and technology, (4) plasma physics, and (5) subatomic physics. Included in this report are a message from the Division Director, the Physics Division mission statement, an organizational chart, descriptions of the research areas of the five groups in the Division, selected research highlights, project descriptions, the Division staffing and funding levels for FY95-FY97, and a list of publications and presentations

  20. Physics division. Progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, M.; Bacon, D.S.; Aine, C.J.; Bartsch, R.R. [eds.] [comps.] [and others

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Physics Division Progress Report describes progress and achievements in Physics Division research during the period January 1, 1995-December 31, 1996. The report covers the five main areas of experimental research and development in which Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in applied and basic sciences: (1) biophysics, (2) hydrodynamic physics, (3) neutron science and technology, (4) plasma physics, and (5) subatomic physics. Included in this report are a message from the Division Director, the Physics Division mission statement, an organizational chart, descriptions of the research areas of the five groups in the Division, selected research highlights, project descriptions, the Division staffing and funding levels for FY95-FY97, and a list of publications and presentations.

  1. Surface science and model catalysis with ionic liquid-modified materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinrück, H-P; Libuda, J; Wasserscheid, P; Cremer, T; Kolbeck, C; Laurin, M; Maier, F; Sobota, M; Schulz, P S; Stark, M

    2011-06-17

    Materials making use of thin ionic liquid (IL) films as support-modifying functional layer open up a variety of new possibilities in heterogeneous catalysis, which range from the tailoring of gas-surface interactions to the immobilization of molecularly defined reactive sites. The present report reviews recent progress towards an understanding of "supported ionic liquid phase (SILP)" and "solid catalysts with ionic liquid layer (SCILL)" materials at the microscopic level, using a surface science and model catalysis type of approach. Thin film IL systems can be prepared not only ex-situ, but also in-situ under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions using atomically well-defined surfaces as substrates, for example by physical vapor deposition (PVD). Due to their low vapor pressure, these systems can be studied in UHV using the full spectrum of surface science techniques. We discuss general strategies and considerations of this approach and exemplify the information available from complementary methods, specifically photoelectron spectroscopy and surface vibrational spectroscopy. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Beam line 4: A dedicated surface science facility at Daresbury Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhanak, V.R.; Robinson, A.W.; van der Laan, G.; Thornton, G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a beam line currently under construction at the Daresbury Laboratory which forms part of a surface science research facility for the Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Surface Science. The beam line has three branches, two of which are described here. The first branch covers the high-energy range 640 eV≤hν≤10 keV, being equipped with a double-crystal monochromator and a novel multicoated premirror system. The second branch line is optimized for the energy range 15≤hν≤250 eV, using cylindrical focusing mirrors, a spherical diffraction grating and an ellipsoidal refocusing mirror to achieve high resolution with a small spot size

  3. Results of the studies of radiation ecology and radiation biology at the Institute of Biology of Komi Science Centre, Ural Division of Russian Academy of Sciences. (On the 40th anniversary of the radiation ecology department)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taskaev, A.I.; Kudyasheva, A.G.; Popova, O.N.; Materij, L.D.; Shuktomova, I.I.; Frolova, N.P.; Kozubov, G.M.; Zajnullin, V.G.; Ermakova, O.V.; Rakin, A.O.; Bashlykova, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Materials on the history of foundation of the radiation Ecology Department at the Institute of Biology of the Komi Science Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences on the occasion of its 40-th anniversary are presented. The results of studies on radiation effects in low doses on the plant and animal populations as well as on radionuclide migration in natural biogeocenoses by increased radiation levels are analyzed. The performed complex studies were used as the basis for developing methodological approaches to the solution of a number of problems on the surface radioecology. Multiyear studies on the biogeocenoses of increased radioactivity of different origin made it possible to obtain multiple materials, indicating high diversity and specificity of reaction of living organisms in response to the background low level chronic irradiation. Attention was paid to studies on the Komi contamination by atmospheric radioactive fall-outs as well as to studies on the consequences of radioactive contamination of the Ukrainian Polesje due to the Chernobyl accident [ru

  4. Physics division annual report - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, K.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R and D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part, defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design

  5. On the 50th anniversary of the L F Vereshchagin Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS (Scientific outreach session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 23 April 2008)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stishov, S M; Khvostantsev, L G; Slesarev, V N; Popova, S V; Brazhkin, V V; Dyuzheva, T I; Dzhavadov, L N; Gromnitskaya, E L; Stepanov, G N; Timofeev, Yu A; Dizhur, E M; Venttsel, V A; Voronovskii, A N; Ryzhov, V N; Barabanov, A F; Magnitskaya, M V; Tareeva, E E

    2008-01-01

    A scientific outreach session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held on 23 April 2008 at the Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region. The session was devoted to the 50th anniversary of the Institute. The following reports were presented: (1) Stishov S M (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) 'The Institute for High Pressure Physics is now 50 (opening address)'; (2) Khvostantsev L G and Slesarev V N (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) 'Large-volume high-pressure devices for physical investigations'; (3) Popova S V, Brazhkin V V and Dyuzheva T I (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) 'Structural phase transitions in highly compressed substances and the synthesis of high-pressure phases'; (4) Dzhavadov L N, Gromnitskaya E L, Stepanov G N and Timofeev Yu A (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) 'Studies of the thermodynamic, elastic, superconducting, and magnetic properties of substances at high pressures'; (5) Dizhur E M, Venttsel V A and Voronovskii A N (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region), 'Quantum transport at high pressures'; (6) Ryzhov V N, Barabanov A F, Magnitskaya M V and Tareyeva E E (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) 'Theoretical studies of condensed matter'; (7) Bugakov V I, Antanovich A A, Konyaev Yu S and Slesarev V N (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) 'Designing new construction and superhard materials and related tools'. An abridged version of reports 1-6 is presented below. The Institute for High Pressure Physics is now 50 (opening address), Stishov S M Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 10, Pages 1055-1059 . Large-volume high-pressure devices for physical investigations, Khvostantsev L G and Slesarev V N Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 10, Pages 1059

  6. Progress report of Applied Physics Division. 1 October 1980 - 30 June 1981. Acting Division Chief - Dr. J. Parry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    In September 1980, the Commission approved a reorganization of Physics Division, Engineering Research Division and Instrumentation and Control Division to form two new research divisions to be known as Applied Physics Division and Nuclear Technology Division. The Applied Physics Division will be responsible for applied science programs, particularly those concerned with nuclear techniques. The Division is organized as four sections with the following responsibilities: (1) Nuclear Applications and Energy Studies Section. Program includes studies in nuclear physics, nuclear applications, ion implantation and neutron scattering. (2) Semiconductor and Radiation Physics Section. Studies in semiconductor radiation detectors, radiation standards and laser applications. (3) Electronic Systems Section. This includes systems analysis, digital systems, instrument design, project instrumentation and instrument maintenance. (4) Fusion Physics Section. This covers work carried out by staff currently attached to university groups (author)

  7. On infinitely divisible semimartingales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse-O'Connor, Andreas; Rosiński, Jan

    2015-01-01

    to non Gaussian infinitely divisible processes. First we show that the class of infinitely divisible semimartingales is so large that the natural analog of Stricker's theorem fails to hold. Then, as the main result, we prove that an infinitely divisible semimartingale relative to the filtration generated...... by a random measure admits a unique decomposition into an independent increment process and an infinitely divisible process of finite variation. Consequently, the natural analog of Stricker's theorem holds for all strictly representable processes (as defined in this paper). Since Gaussian processes...... are strictly representable due to Hida's multiplicity theorem, the classical Stricker's theorem follows from our result. Another consequence is that the question when an infinitely divisible process is a semimartingale can often be reduced to a path property, when a certain associated infinitely divisible...

  8. The New Horizons Radio Science Experiment: Expected Performance in Measurements of Pluto's Atmospheric Structure, Surface Pressure, and Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, D. P.; Linscott, I.; Woods, W. W.; Tyler, G. L.; Bird, M. K.; Paetzold, M.; Strobel, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    The New Horizons (NH) payload includes a Radio Science Experiment (REX) for investigating key characteristics of Pluto and Charon during the upcoming flyby in July 2015. REX flight equipment augments the NH radio transceiver used for spacecraft communications and tracking. The REX hardware implementation requires 1.6 W and 160 g. This presentation will focus on the final design and the predicted performance of two high-priority observations. First, REX will receive signals from a pair of 70-m antennas on Earth - each transmitting 20 kW at 4.2-cm wavelength - during a diametric radio occultation by Pluto. The data recorded by REX will reveal the surface pressure, the temperature structure of the lower atmosphere, and the surface radius. Second, REX will measure the thermal emission from Pluto at 4.2-cm wavelength during two linear scans across the disk at close range when both the dayside and the nightside are visible, allowing the surface temperature and its spatial variations to be determined. Both scans extend from limb to limb with a resolution of about 10 pixels; one bisects Pluto whereas the second crosses the winter pole. We will illustrate the capabilities of REX by reviewing the method of analysis and the precision achieved in a lunar occultation observed by New Horizons in May 2011. Re-analysis of radio occultation measurements by Voyager 2 at Triton is also under way. More generally, REX objectives include a radio occultation search for Pluto's ionosphere; examination of Charon through both radio occultation and radiometry; a search for a radar echo from Pluto's surface; and improved knowledge of the Pluto system mass and the Pluto-Charon mass ratio from a combination of two-way and one-way Doppler frequency measurements.

  9. Assessment of environments for Mars Science Laboratory entry, descent, and surface operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Chen, Allen; Barnes, Jeffrey R.; Burkhart, P. Daniel; Cantor, Bruce A.; Dwyer-Cianciolo, Alicia M.; Fergason, Robini L.; Hinson, David P.; Justh, Hilary L.; Kass, David M.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Mischna, Michael A.; Murphy, James R.; Rafkin, Scot C.R.; Tyler, Daniel; Withers, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory mission aims to land a car-sized rover on Mars' surface and operate it for at least one Mars year in order to assess whether its field area was ever capable of supporting microbial life. Here we describe the approach used to identify, characterize, and assess environmental risks to the landing and rover surface operations. Novel entry, descent, and landing approaches will be used to accurately deliver the 900-kg rover, including the ability to sense and "fly out" deviations from a best-estimate atmospheric state. A joint engineering and science team developed methods to estimate the range of potential atmospheric states at the time of arrival and to quantitatively assess the spacecraft's performance and risk given its particular sensitivities to atmospheric conditions. Numerical models are used to calculate the atmospheric parameters, with observations used to define model cases, tune model parameters, and validate results. This joint program has resulted in a spacecraft capable of accessing, with minimal risk, the four finalist sites chosen for their scientific merit. The capability to operate the landed rover over the latitude range of candidate landing sites, and for all seasons, was verified against an analysis of surface environmental conditions described here. These results, from orbital and model data sets, also drive engineering simulations of the rover's thermal state that are used to plan surface operations.

  10. Division of atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroell, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Division of Atomic Physics, Lund Institute of Technology (LTH), is responsible for the basic physics teaching in all subjects at LTH and for specialized teaching in Optics, Atomic Physics, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy and Laser Physics. The Division has research activities in basic and applied optical spectroscopy, to a large extent based on lasers. It is also part of the Physics Department, Lund University, where it forms one of eight divisions. Since the beginning of 1980 the research activities of our division have been centred around the use of lasers. The activities during the period 1991-1992 is described in this progress reports

  11. European analytical column No. 37 from the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC) of the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences (EuCheMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlberg, Bo; Grasserbauer, Manfred; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2009-01-01

    The European Analytical Column again has a somewhat different format. We have once more invited a guest columnist to give his views on various matters related to analytical chemistry in Europe. This year we have invited Prof. Manfred Grasserbauer of Vienna University of Technology to present some...... representing a major branch of chemistry, namely, analytical chemistry. The global financial crisis is affecting all branches of chemistry, but analytical chemistry in particular since our discipline by tradition has many close links to industry. We are already noticing a decreased industrial commitment...... with respect to new research projects and sponsoring of conferences. It is therefore important that we strengthen our efforts and that we keep our presence at analytical chemistry meetings and conferences unchanged. Recent activities of the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC) and details regarding the major...

  12. Mars' Surface Radiation Environment Measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brinza, David E.; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A.; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P.; MSL Science Team; Kemppinen, Osku; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Léveillé, Richard; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Berger, Thomas; Matthia, Daniel; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Cécile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, François; Sautter, Violaine; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agnès; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Blaney, Diana; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; DeFlores, Lauren; Ehlmann, Bethany; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Fisk, Martin; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Vaniman, David; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Leshin, Laurie; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Hamilton, Victoria; Peterson, Joseph; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Clark, Benton; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Madsen, Morten Bo; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Bridges, John C.; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Newsom, Horton; Ollila, Ann; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  13. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L; Brinza, David E; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P

    2014-01-24

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  14. Division of Scientific Equipment - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halik, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Scientific Equipment Division consists of the Design Group and the Mechanical Workshop. The activity of the Division includes the following: * designs of devices and equipment for experiments in physics; their mechanical construction and assembly. In particular, these are vacuum chambers and installations for HV and UHV;* maintenance and upgrading of the existing installations and equipment in our Institute; * participation of our engineers and technicians in design works, equipment assembly and maintenance for experiments in foreign laboratories. The Design Group is equipped with PC-computers and AutoCAD graphic software (release 2000 and Mechanical Desktop 4.0) and an A0 plotter, which allow us to make drawings and 2- and 3-dimensional mechanical documentation to the world standards. The Mechanical Workshop offers a wide range of machining and treatment methods with satisfactory tolerances and surface quality. They include: * turning - cylindrical elements of a length up to 2000 mm and a diameter up to 400 mm, and also disc type elements of a diameter up to 600 mm and a length not exceeding 300 mm, * milling - elements of length up to 1000 mm and gear wheels of diameter up to 300 mm, * grinding - flat surfaces of dimensions up to 300 mm x 1000 mm and cylindrical elements of a diameter up to 200 mm and a length up to 800 mm, * drilling - holes of a diameter up to 50 mm, * welding - electrical and gas welding, including TIG vacuum-tight welding, * soft and hard soldering, * mechanical works including precision engineering, * plastics treatment - machining and polishing using diamond milling, modelling, lamination of various shapes and materials, including plexiglas, scintillators and light-guides, * painting - paint spraying with possibility of using furnace-fired drier of internal dimensions of 800 mm x 800 mm x 800 mm. Our workshop is equipped with the CNC milling machine which can be used for machining of work pieces up to 500 kg. The machine

  15. The New Horizons Radio Science Experiment: Performance and Measurements of Pluto's Atmospheric Structure, Surface Pressure, and Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linscott, I.; Hinson, D. P.; Bird, M. K.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.

    2015-12-01

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft payload contained the Radio Science Experiment (REX) for determining key characteristics of Pluto and Charon during the July 14, 2015, flyby of the Pluto/Charon system. The REX flight equipment augments the NH X-band radio transceiver by providing a high precision, narrow band recording of high power uplink transmissions from Earth stations, as well as a record of broadband radiometric power. This presentation will review the performance and initial results of two high- priority observations. First, REX received two pair of 20-kW signals, one pair per polarization, transmitted from the DSN at 4.2-cm wavelength during a diametric radio occultation by Pluto. REX recorded these uplink signals and determined precise measurement of the surface pressure, the temperature structure of the lower atmosphere, and the surface radius of Pluto. The ingress portion of one polarization was played back from the spacecraft in July and processed to obtain the pressure and temperature structure of Pluto's atmosphere. Second, REX measured the thermal emission from Pluto at 4.2- cm wavelength during two linear scans across the disk at close range when both the dayside and the night side are visible. Both scans extend from limb to limb with a resolution of one-tenth Pluto's disk and temperature resolution of 0.1 K. Occultation and radiometric temperature results presented here will encompass additional data scheduled for playback in September.

  16. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) advanced batteries - mainly lithium alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur for electric vehicles; (2) aqueous batteries - mainly improved lead-acid and nickel/iron for electric vehicles; (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic plants and the technology for pressurized fluidized-bed combustors; (5) methodologies for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) solid and liquid desiccants that allow moisture to be removed with a minium of energy; (7) nuclear technology related to waste management, proof of breeding for a light water reactor, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission, fusion, and other energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting abundant raw materials to desired products; materials chemistry of liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; atmospheric chemistry, most notably SO 2 oxidation mechanisms; and the thermochemistry of zeolites, related silicates, and inorganic compounds

  17. Division: The Sleeping Dragon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Of the four mathematical operators, division seems to not sit easily for many learners. Division is often described as "the odd one out". Pupils develop coping strategies that enable them to "get away with it". So, problems, misunderstandings, and misconceptions go unresolved perhaps for a lifetime. Why is this? Is it a case of "out of sight out…

  18. Computational Fair Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branzei, Simina

    Fair division is a fundamental problem in economic theory and one of the oldest questions faced through the history of human society. The high level scenario is that of several participants having to divide a collection of resources such that everyone is satisfied with their allocation -- e.g. two...... heirs dividing a car, house, and piece of land inherited. The literature on fair division was developed in the 20th century in mathematics and economics, but computational work on fair division is still sparse. This thesis can be seen as an excursion in computational fair division divided in two parts....... The first part tackles the cake cutting problem, where the cake is a metaphor for a heterogeneous divisible resource such as land, time, mineral deposits, and computer memory. We study the equilibria of classical protocols and design an algorithmic framework for reasoning about their game theoretic...

  19. Diet and Cancer Prevention: Chewing on the Human Complexities | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker Johanna W. Lampe, PhD, RD Research Professor University of Washington Full Member and Associate Division Director Cancer Prevention Program Public Health Sciences Division Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Seattle, WA |

  20. Division V: Commission 42: Close Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Ignasi; Richards, Mercedes T.; Rucinski, Slavek; Bradstreet, David H.; Harmanec, Petr; Kaluzny, Janusz; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Munari, Ulisse; Niarchos, Panagiotis; Olah, Katalin; Pribulla, Theodor; Scarfe, Colin D.; Torres, Guillermo

    2015-08-01

    Commission 42 (C42) co-organized, together with Commission 27 (C27) and Division V (Div V) as a whole, a full day of science and business sessions that were held on 24 August 2012. The program included time slots for discussion of business matters related to Div V, C27 and C42, and two sessions of 2 hours each devoted to science talks of interest to both C42 and C27. In addition, we had a joint session between Div IV and Div V motivated by the proposal to reformulate the division structure of the IAU and the possible merger of the two divisions into a new Div G. The current report gives an account of the matters discussed during the business session of C42.

  1. Density functionals for surface science: Exchange-correlation model development with Bayesian error estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorff, Jess; Lundgård, Keld Troen; Møgelhøj, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    A methodology for semiempirical density functional optimization, using regularization and cross-validation methods from machine learning, is developed. We demonstrate that such methods enable well-behaved exchange-correlation approximations in very flexible model spaces, thus avoiding the overfit......A methodology for semiempirical density functional optimization, using regularization and cross-validation methods from machine learning, is developed. We demonstrate that such methods enable well-behaved exchange-correlation approximations in very flexible model spaces, thus avoiding...... the energetics of intramolecular and intermolecular, bulk solid, and surface chemical bonding, and the developed optimization method explicitly handles making the compromise based on the directions in model space favored by different materials properties. The approach is applied to designing the Bayesian error...... sets validates the applicability of BEEF-vdW to studies in chemistry and condensed matter physics. Applications of the approximation and its Bayesian ensemble error estimate to two intricate surface science problems support this....

  2. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poutsma, M.L.; Ferris, L.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    The Chemistry Division conducts basic and applied chemical research on projects important to DOE`s missions in sciences, energy technologies, advanced materials, and waste management/environmental restoration; it also conducts complementary research for other sponsors. The research are arranged according to: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, chemistry of advanced inorganic materials, structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, chemical and structural principles in solvent extraction, surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis, photolytic transformations of hazardous organics, DNA sequencing and mapping, and special topics.

  3. Divisible ℤ-modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futa Yuichi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formalize the definition of divisible ℤ-module and its properties in the Mizar system [3]. We formally prove that any non-trivial divisible ℤ-modules are not finitely-generated.We introduce a divisible ℤ-module, equivalent to a vector space of a torsion-free ℤ-module with a coefficient ring ℚ. ℤ-modules are important for lattice problems, LLL (Lenstra, Lenstra and Lovász base reduction algorithm [15], cryptographic systems with lattices [16] and coding theory [8].

  4. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; NWHI, LAY; Long: -171.74252, Lat: 25.77290 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.33m; Data Range: 20030724-20040923.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  5. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.56228, Lat: -14.28372 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.33m; Data Range: 20060218-20080223.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  6. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.76310, Lat: -14.36667 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.19m; Data Range: 20070616-20080115.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  7. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34327, Lat: 28.41817 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.19m; Data Range: 20080929-20090916.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  8. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.83339, Lat: -14.32838 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.19m; Data Range: 20050806-20060221.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  9. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34322, Lat: 28.41813 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.19m; Data Range: 20090916-20100918.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  10. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; NWHI, LAY; Long: -171.74250, Lat: 25.77240 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.33m; Data Range: 20040924-20060910.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  11. Mechanical Division of Cell-Sized Liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshpande, S.R.; Kerssemakers, J.W.J.; Dekker, C.

    2018-01-01

    Liposomes, self-assembled vesicles with a lipid-bilayer boundary similar to cell membranes, are extensively used in both fundamental and applied sciences. Manipulation of their physical properties, such as growth and division, may significantly expand their use as model systems in cellular and

  12. Towards an atomic level understanding of niobia based catalysts and catalysis by combining the science of catalysis with surface science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schmal

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The science of catalysis and surface science have developed, independently, key information for understanding catalytic processes. One might argue: is there anything fundamental to be discovered through the interplay between catalysis and surface science? Real catalysts of monometallic and bimetallic Co/Nb2O5 and Pd-Co/Nb2O5 catalysts showed interesting selectivity results on the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (Noronha et al. 1996, Rosenir et al. 1993. The presence of a noble metal increased the C+5 selectivity and decreased the methane formation depending of the reduction temperature. Model catalyst of Co-Pd supported on niobia and alumina were prepared and characterized at the atomic level, thus forming the basis for a comparison with "real" support materials. Growth, morphology and structure of both pure metal and alloy particles were studied. It is possible to support the strong metal support interaction suggested by studies on real catalysts via the investigation of model systems for niobia in comparison to alumina support in which this effect does not occur. Formation of Co2+ penetration into the niobia lattice was suggested on the basis of powder studies and can be fully supported on the basis of model studies. It is shown for both real catalysts and model systems that oxidation state of Co plays a key role in controlling the reactivity in Fischer-Tropsch reactions systems and that the addition of Pd is a determining factor for the stability of the catalyst. It is demonstrated that the interaction with unsaturated hydrocarbons depends strongly on the state of oxidation.As ciências da catálise e da superfície têm desenvolvido independentemente temas básicos para o entendimento de processos catalíticos. Pode-se até questionar se há ainda algo fundamental para ser descoberto através da interface entre catálise eciência da superfície? Catalisadores mono e bimetálicos de Co/Nb2O5 e Pd-Co/ Nb2O5 apresentaram resultados interessantes de

  13. Using Raman Spectroscopy and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to Identify Colorants in Art: An Experiment for an Upper-Division Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Hannah E.; Frano, Kristen A.; Svoboda, Shelley A.; Wustholz, Kristin L.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of art represent an attractive way to introduce undergraduate students to concepts in nanoscience, vibrational spectroscopy, and instrumental analysis. Here, we present an undergraduate analytical or physical chemistry laboratory wherein a combination of normal Raman and SERS spectroscopy is used to…

  14. Materials division facilities and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biest, O. v.d.

    1984-01-01

    The research activities of the Division at the Petten Establishment have the aims of characterising the properties of high temperature materials in industrial process environments and of understanding the structures involved in order to gain an insight into behavioural mechanisms. Metallic materials fall within the scope of the programme; the activities are, at present, almost entirely concerned with austenitic steels and nickel based alloys. Starting in 1984, advanced ceramic materials will be studied as well. The equipment available permits the study of mechanical properties in controlled gaseous environments, of the rates and mechanisms of corrosive reactions between materials and those environments, and of the surface and bulk structures by advanced physical techniques. Special preparation and treatment techniques are available. The Division has developed a Data Bank on high temperature alloys. It also operates an information Centre, the activities of which include the organisation of scientific meetings, the commissioning of ''state of the art'' studies on topics in the field of high temperature materials and their applications and the development of a inventory of current research activities in the field in Europe. This booklet is intended to present the facilities and services of the Division to the organizations which are interested in its programmes of work

  15. Theoretical physics division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Research activities of the theoretical physics division for 1979 are described. Short summaries are given of specific research work in the following fields: nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, intermediate energy physics, elementary particles [fr

  16. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struble, G.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2)

  17. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2).

  18. Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) 2010 Science Operations: Operational Approaches and Lessons Learned for Managing Science during Human Planetary Surface Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppler, Dean; Adams, Byron; Archer, Doug; Baiden, Greg; Brown, Adrian; Carey, William; Cohen, Barbara; Condit, Chris; Evans, Cindy; Fortezzo, Corey; hide

    2012-01-01

    Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is a multi-year series of hardware and operations tests carried out annually in the high desert of Arizona on the San Francisco Volcanic Field. These activities are designed to exercise planetary surface hardware and operations in conditions where long-distance, multi-day roving is achievable, and they allow NASA to evaluate different mission concepts and approaches in an environment less costly and more forgiving than space.The results from the RATS tests allows election of potential operational approaches to planetary surface exploration prior to making commitments to specific flight and mission hardware development. In previous RATS operations, the Science Support Room has operated largely in an advisory role, an approach that was driven by the need to provide a loose science mission framework that would underpin the engineering tests. However, the extensive nature of the traverse operations for 2010 expanded the role of the science operations and tested specific operational approaches. Science mission operations approaches from the Apollo and Mars-Phoenix missions were merged to become the baseline for this test. Six days of traverse operations were conducted during each week of the 2-week test, with three traverse days each week conducted with voice and data communications continuously available, and three traverse days conducted with only two 1-hour communications periods per day. Within this framework, the team evaluated integrated science operations management using real-time, tactical science operations to oversee daily crew activities, and strategic level evaluations of science data and daily traverse results during a post-traverse planning shift. During continuous communications, both tactical and strategic teams were employed. On days when communications were reduced to only two communications periods per day, only a strategic team was employed. The Science Operations Team found that, if

  19. Mars in Motion: An online Citizen Science platform looking for changes on the surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinks, James Christopher; Wardlaw, Jessica; Houghton, Robert; Bamford, Steven; Marsh, Stuart

    2016-10-01

    The European FP7 iMars project has developed tools and 3D models of the Martian surface through the co-registration of NASA and ESA mission data dating from the Viking missions of the 1970s to the present day, for a much more comprehensive interpretation of the geomorphological and climatic processes that have taken and do take place. We present the Citizen Science component of the project, 'Mars in Motion', created through the Zooniverse's Panoptes framework to allow volunteers to look for and identify changes on the surface of Mars over time. 'Mars in Motion', as with many other current citizen science platforms of a planetary or other disciplinary focus, has been developed to compliment the results of automated data mining analysis software, both by validation through the creation of training data and by adding context - gathering more in-depth data on the type and metrics of change initially detected.Through the analysis of initial volunteer results collected in the second half of 2016, the accuracy and ability of untrained participants to identify geomorphological changes is considered, as well as the impact of their position in the system. Volunteer contribution, either as a filter for poor quality imagery pre-algorithm, validation of algorithmic analysis, or adding context to pre-detected change, and their awareness and interpretation of its importance, can directly influence engagement with the platform and therefore ultimately its success. Understanding the effect of the volunteer and software's role in the system on both the results of and engagement with planetary science citizen science platforms will be an important lesson for the future, especially as the next generation of planetary missions will likely collect data orders of magnitude greater in volume. To deal with the data overload, it is likely that human or software solutions alone will not be sufficient, and that a combination of the two working together in a complimentary system that combines

  20. An assessment of the effectiveness of computer-based training for newly commissioned Surface Warfare Division officers. / by William R. Bowman, Crawford, Alice M., Stephen Mehay.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, William R.; Crawford, Alice M.; Mehay, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. The goal of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of the new SWOS-at-Sea training for newly commissioned surface warfare officers that was introduced in 2003. The new regime combined self-paced computer-based training (CBT) with on-the-job training (OJT) on-board an officer's ship. The study relied on a variety of analytical techniques, including a literature review of CBT and OJT training, interviews and focus groups with junior a...

  1. APDAS : Applied Physics Division analytical services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Applied Physics Division Analytical Services (APDAS) is a new initiative within the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization. Because of its background and achievements in high-tech research, APDAS can provide solutions to many of the problems that arise in Australian industries. One of the facilities available to APDAS is a positive ion particle accelerator. This enables any positive ion in a gaseous medium to be accelerated to energies ranging from a few hundred thousand to three million electron volts for single charge states. Ion beams can be stead-state or pulsed with pulse durations as low as three nanoseconds. Target preparation and fully automated data recording are also available. Accelerator-based services, presently available are outlined in 7 separate leaflets, briefly describing the techniques, particular applications, typical costs and availability. These include : surface analysis and depth profiling using ion beams; standard neutron irradiation facility (SNIF); soil-moisture determination; hydrogen analysis neutron radiography; adsorbed dose calibration standards; gas phase enrichment monitor; 18 O analysis. 26 figs

  2. Fermilab | Particle Physics Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diversity Education Safety Sustainability and Environment Contact Science Science Particle Physics Neutrinos Scientific Computing Research & Development Key Discoveries Benefits of Particle Physics Particle Superconducting Test Accelerator LHC and Future Accelerators Accelerators for Science and Society Particle Physics

  3. Theoretical Division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, N.G.

    1979-04-01

    This report presents highlights of activities in the Theoretical (T) Division from October 1976-January 1979. The report is divided into three parts. Part I presents an overview of the Division: its unique function at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) and within the scientific community as a whole; the organization of personnel; the main areas of research; and a survey of recent T-Division initiatives. This overview is followed by a survey of the 13 groups within the Division, their main responsibilities, interests, and expertise, consulting activities, and recent scientific accomplisments. The remainder of the report, Parts II and III, is devoted to articles on selected research activities. Recent efforts on topics of immediate interest to energy and weapons programs at LASL and elsewhere are described in Part II, Major National Programs. Separate articles present T-Divison contributions to weapons research, reactor safety and reactor physics research, fusion research, laser isotope separation, and other energy research. Each article is a compilation of independent projects within T Division, all related to but addressing different aspects of the major program. Part III is organized by subject discipline, and describes recent scientific advances of fundamental interest. An introduction, defining the scope and general nature of T-Division efforts within a given discipline, is followed by articles on the research topics selected. The reporting is done by the scientists involved in the research, and an attempt is made to communicate to a general audience. Some data are given incidentally; more technical presentations of the research accomplished may be found among the 47 pages of references. 110 figures, 5 tables

  4. Adhesion, friction, wear, and lubrication research by modern surface science techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, D. V., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The field of surface science has undergone intense revitalization with the introduction of low-energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and other surface analytical techniques which have been sophisticated within the last decade. These developments have permitted submono- and monolayer structure analysis as well as chemical identification and quantitative analysis. The application of a number of these techniques to the solution of problems in the fields of friction, lubrication, and wear are examined in detail for the particular case of iron; and in general to illustrate how the accumulation of pure data will contribute toward the establishment of physiochemical concepts which are required to understand the mechanisms that are operational in friction systems. In the case of iron, LEED, Auger and microcontact studies have established that hydrogen and light-saturated organic vapors do not establish interfaces which prevent iron from welding, whereas oxygen and some oxygen and sulfur compounds do reduce welding as well as the coefficient of friction. Interpretation of these data suggests a mechanism of sulfur interaction in lubricating systems.

  5. Surface and interface sciences of Li-ion batteries. -Research progress in electrode-electrolyte interface-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Abe, Takeshi

    2017-12-01

    The application potential of Li-ion batteries is growing as demand increases in different fields at various stages in energy systems, in addition to their conventional role as power sources for portable devices. In particular, applications in electric vehicles and renewable energy storage are increasing for Li-ion batteries. For these applications, improvements in battery performance are necessary. The Li-ion battery produces and stores electric power from the electrochemical redox reactions between the electrode materials. The interface between the electrodes and electrolyte strongly affects the battery performance because the charge transfer causing the electrode redox reaction begins at this interface. Understanding of the surface structure, electronic structure, and chemical reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface is necessary to improve battery performance. However, the interface is located between the electrode and electrolyte materials, hindering the experimental analysis of the interface; thus, the physical properties and chemical processes have remained poorly understood until recently. Investigations of the physical properties and chemical processes at the interface have been performed using advanced surface science techniques. In this review, current knowledge and future research prospects regarding the electrode-electrolyte interface are described for the further development of Li-ion batteries.

  6. Innovations from the “ivory tower”: Wilhelm Barthlott and the paradigm shift in surface science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Neinhuis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is mainly about borders that have tremendous influence on our daily life, although many of them exist and act mostly unrecognized. In this article the first objective will be to address more generally the relation between university and society or industry, borders within universities, borders in thinking and the huge amount of misunderstandings and losses resulting from these obvious or hidden borders. In the second part and in more detail, the article will highlight the impact of the research conducted by Wilhelm Barthlott throughout his scientific career during which not only one border was removed, shifted or became more penetrable. Among the various fields of interest not mentioned here (e.g., systematics of Cactaceae, diversity and evolution of epiphytes, the unique natural history of isolated rocky outcrops called inselbergs, or the global distribution of biodiversity, plant surfaces and especially the tremendous diversity of minute structures on leaves, fruits, seeds and other parts of plants represent a common thread through 40 years of scientific career of Wilhelm Barthlott. Based on research that was regarded already old-fashioned in the 1970s and 1980s, systematic botany, results and knowledge were accumulated that, some 20 years later, initiated a fundamental turnover in how surfaces were recognized not only in biology, but even more evident in materials science.

  7. Surface science approach to Pt/carbon model catalysts: XPS, STM and microreactor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motin, Abdul Md.; Haunold, Thomas; Bukhtiyarov, Andrey V.; Bera, Abhijit; Rameshan, Christoph; Rupprechter, Günther

    2018-05-01

    Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon are an important technological catalyst. A corresponding model catalyst was prepared by physical vapor deposition (PVD) of Pt on sputtered HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite). The carbon substrate before and after sputtering as well as the Pt/HOPG system before and after Pt deposition and annealing were examined by XPS and STM. This yielded information on the surface density of defects, which serve as nucleation centres for Pt, and on the size distribution (mean size/height) of the Pt nanoparticles. Two different model catalysts were prepared with mean sizes of 2.0 and 3.6 nm, both turned out to be stable upon UHV-annealing to 300 °C. After transfer into a UHV-compatible flow microreactor and subsequent cleaning in UHV and under mbar pressure, the catalytic activity of the Pt/HOPG model system for ethylene hydrogenation was examined under atmospheric pressure flow conditions. This enabled to determine temperature-dependent conversion rates, turnover frequencies (TOFs) and activation energies. The catalytic results obtained are in line with the characteristics of technological Pt/C, demonstrating the validity of the current surface science based model catalyst approach.

  8. Power Dissipation in Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    A few classes of algorithms to implement division in hardware have been used over the years: division by digit-recurrence, by reciprocal approximation by iterative methods and by polynomial approximation. Due to the differences in the algorithms, a comparison among their implementation in terms o...... of performance and precision is sometimes hard to make. In this work, we use power dissipation and energy consumption as metrics to compare among those different classes of algorithms. There are no previous works in the literature presenting such a comparison....

  9. Digital Arithmetic: Division Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montuschi, Paolo; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Division is one of the basic arithmetic operations supported by every computer system. The operation can be performed and implemented by either hardware or software, or by a combination of the two. Although division is not as frequent as addition and multiplication, nowadays, most processors impl...... significant hardware resources and is more suitable for software implementation on the existing multiply units. The purpose of this entry is to provide an introductory survey using a presentation style suitable for the interested non-specialist readers as well....

  10. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Commemoration of the centenary of the birth of Academician L A Artsimovich(Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 18 February 2009; Joint session of the Research Council of the Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and the Rosatom State Corporation, 18 March 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalatnikov, Isaak M.; Fortov, Vladimir E.; Makarov, Aleksandr A.; Fridman, Aleksei M.; Martynenko, Yurii V.

    2009-12-01

    The scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) devoted to the centenary of the birth of Academician L A Artsimovich was held on 18 February 2009 in the conference hall of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The following reports were presented at the session: (1) Khalatnikov I M (L D Landau Institute of Theoretical Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow region) "Nonaccidental coincidences (Lev Andreevich Artsimovich)"; (2) Pashinin P P (A M Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, RAS, Moscow) "L A Artsimovich and inertial thermonuclear fusion"; (3) Fortov V E (Institute of Thermophysics of Extreme States of the Joint Institute for High Temperatures, RAS, Moscow) "High-power shock waves and extreme states of plasma"; (4) Fridman A M (Institute of Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) "Prediction and discovery of ultrastrong hydrodynamic instabilities caused by a velocity jump: theory and experiment"; (5) Smirnov V P (Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow) "Retracing Artsimovich's path to the thermonuclear source of energy". On 18 March 2009, a joint session of the Learned Council of the Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute' (RNTsKI in Russ. abbr.), the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and the Rosatom State Corporation took place at RNTsKI; the session was devoted to the 100th anniversary of the birth of Academician L A Artsimovich. The following talks were presented at the session: (1) Velikhov E P (Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow) "Academician L A Artsimovich—the founder of our field of science and industry"; (2) Smirnov V P (Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow) "Retracing Artsimovich's path to the thermonuclear source of energy"; (3) Boyarchuk A A (Division of General Physics and Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) "L A Artsimovich and astronomy"; (4) Martynenko Yu V (Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow

  11. Energy Technology Division research summary - 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-31

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization, or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book.

  12. Division of Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Natural Resources logo, color scheme Department of Natural Resources Division of Agriculture Search Search DNR's site DNR State of Alaska Toggle main menu visibility Agriculture Home Programs Asset Disposals Alaska Caps Progam Board of Agriculture & Conservation Farm To School Program Grants

  13. Order Division Automated System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniemeyer, Justin M.; And Others

    This publication was prepared by the Order Division Automation Project staff to fulfill the Library of Congress' requirement to document all automation efforts. The report was originally intended for internal use only and not for distribution outside the Library. It is now felt that the library community at-large may have an interest in the…

  14. Theoretical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a survey of the studies done in the Theoretical Physics Division of the Nuclear Physics Institute; the subjects studied in theoretical nuclear physics were the few-nucleon problem, nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, weak interactions, intermediate energy and high energy physics. In this last field, the subjects studied were field theory, group theory, symmetry and strong interactions [fr

  15. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sincovec, R.F.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides a record of the research activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division for the period January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1994. This report is the final archival record of the EPM Division. On October 1, 1994, ORELA was transferred to Physics Division and on January 1, 1995, the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division and the Computer Applications Division reorganized to form the Computer Science and Mathematics Division and the Computational Physics and Engineering Division. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL's research in the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division

  16. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sincovec, R.F.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides a record of the research activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division for the period January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1994. This report is the final archival record of the EPM Division. On October 1, 1994, ORELA was transferred to Physics Division and on January 1, 1995, the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division and the Computer Applications Division reorganized to form the Computer Science and Mathematics Division and the Computational Physics and Engineering Division. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL`s research in the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division.

  17. Influence of polymer additive molecular weight on surface and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2, April 2011, pp. 347–356. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Influence of polymer additive molecular weight on surface and microstructural characteristics of electrodeposited copper. R MANU. ∗ and SOBHA JAYAKRISHNAN. Electroplating and Metal Finishing Technology Division, Central Electrochemical Research Institute,.

  18. Inorganic Materials Division annual report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duba, A.; Hornady, B.

    1976-01-01

    This compilation lists abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1975 at national and international meetings by members of the Geoscience and Engineering Section, Inorganic Materials Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Department, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Titles of talks at university and local meetings are also listed when available. The subjects range from the in situ retorting of coal to the temperature profile of the moon. A subject classification is included

  19. On-Orbit Planetary Science Laboratories for Simulating Surface Conditions of Planets and Small Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavelautham, J.; Asphaug, E.; Schwartz, S.

    2017-02-01

    Our work has identified the use of on-orbit centrifuge science laboratories as a key enabler towards low-cost, fast-track physical simulation of off-world environments for future planetary science missions.

  20. Water Adsorption on Clean and Defective Anatase TiO2 (001) Nanotube Surfaces: A Surface Science Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmoe, Stephane; Lisovski, Oleg; Piskunov, Sergei; Bocharov, Dmitry; Zhukovskii, Yuri F; Spohr, Eckhard

    2018-04-11

    We use ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to study the adsorption of thin water films with 1 and 2 ML coverage on anatase TiO 2 (001) nanotubes. The nanotubes are modeled as 2D slabs, which consist of partially constrained and partially relaxed structural motifs from nanotubes. The effect of anion doping on the adsorption is investigated by substituting O atoms with N and S impurities on the nanotube slab surface. Due to strain-induced curvature effects, water adsorbs molecularly on defect-free surfaces via weak bonds on Ti sites and H bonds to surface oxygens. While the introduction of an S atom weakens the interaction of the surface with water, which adsorbs molecularly, the presence of an N impurity renders the surface more reactive to water, with a proton transfer from the water film and the formation of an NH group at the N site. At 2 ML coverage, a further surface-assisted proton transfer takes place in the water film, resulting in the formation of an OH - group and an NH 2 + cationic site on the surface.

  1. Two sides of the coin. Part 2. Colloid and surface science meets real biointerfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninham, Barry W; Larsson, Kåre; Lo Nostro, Pierandrea

    2017-11-01

    Part 1 revisited developments in lipid and surfactant self assembly over the past 40 years [1]. New concepts emerged. Here we explore how these developments can be used to make sense of and bring order to a range of complex biological phenomena. Together with Part 1, this contribution is a fundamental revision of intuition at the boundaries of Colloid Science and Biological interfaces from a perspective of nearly 50 years. We offer new insights on a unified treatment of self assembly of lipids, surfactants and proteins in the light of developments presented in Part 1. These were in the enabling disciplines in molecular forces, hydration, oil and electrolyte specificity; and in the role of non Euclidean geometries-across the whole gammut of physical, colloid and surface chemistry, biophysics and membrane biology and medicine. It is where the early founders of the cell theory of biology and the physiologists expected advances to occur as D'Arcy Thompson predicted us 100 years ago. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The New Horizons Bistatic Radio Science Experiment to Measure Pluto's Surface Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linscott, I.; Hinson, D. P.; Tyler, G. L.; Vincent, M.

    2014-12-01

    The New Horizons (NH) payload includes a Radio Science Experiment (REX) for principally occultation and radiometric measurement of Pluto and Charon during the flyby in July 2015. The REX subsystem is contained, together with the NH X-Band radio, in the Integrated Electronics Module (IEM) in the New Horizons spacecraft. REX samples and records in two polarizations both total RF power in a 4.5 MHz bandwidth, and radio signal waveforms in a narrow, 1.25 kHz band. During the encounter, and at closest approach to Pluto, the spacecraft's high gain antenna (HGA) will scan Pluto's equatorial latitudes, intercepting the specular zone, a region near Pluto's limb that geometrically favors reflection from the earth's direction. At the same time, a powerful 80 kW uplink beacon will have been transmitted from earth by the DSN to arrive at Pluto during spacecraft closest approach. Reflection from the specular zone is expected to be sufficiently strong to observe the bistatic uplink in the REX narrowband record. Measurements in both polarizations will then be combined to yield surface reflectivity, roughness and limits on the dielectric constant in the specular zone.

  3. Podcast: The Electronic Crimes Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sept 26, 2016. Chris Lukas, the Special Agent in Charge of the Electronic Crimes Division within the OIG's Office of Investigations talks about computer forensics, cybercrime in the EPA and his division's role in criminal investigations.

  4. Division of Integrity and Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdarek, J.

    1995-01-01

    The organization structure is described of the Division of Integrity and Materials, Institute of Nuclear Research plc, Rez, and the main fields of their activities given. Listed are the major research projects of the Division in 1994. (Z.S.)

  5. 2016 T Division Lightning Talks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Marilyn Leann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Adams, Luke Clyde [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Ferre, Gregoire Robing [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Grantcharov, Vesselin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Iaroshenko, Oleksandr [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Krishnapriyan, Aditi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Kurtakoti, Prajvala Kishore [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Le Thien, Minh Quan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Lim, Jonathan Ng [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Low, Thaddeus Song En [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Lystrom, Levi Aaron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Ma, Xiaoyu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Nguyen, Hong T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Pogue, Sabine Silvia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Orandle, Zoe Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Reisner, Andrew Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Revard, Benjamin Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Roy, Julien [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Sandor, Csanad [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Slavkova, Kalina Polet [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Weichman, Kathleen Joy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Wu, Fei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Yang, Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division

    2016-11-29

    These are the slides for all of the 2016 T Division lightning talks. There are 350 pages worth of slides from different presentations, all of which cover different topics within the theoretical division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  6. 2017 T Division Lightning Talks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Marilyn Leann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Abeywardhana, Jayalath AMM [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Adams, Colin Mackenzie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Adams, Luke Clyde [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carter, Austin Lewis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ducru, Pablo Philippe [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Duignan, Thomas John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gifford, Brendan Joel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hills, Benjamin Hale [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hoffman, Kentaro Jack [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Khair, Adnan Ibne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kochanski, Kelly Anne Pribble [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ledwith, Patrick John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leveillee, Joshua Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewis, Sina Genevieve [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ma, Xiaoyu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Merians, Hugh Drake [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, Bryan Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nijjar, Parmeet Kaur [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Oles, Vladyslav [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Olszewski, Maciej W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Philipbar, Brad Montgomery [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reisner, Andrew Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Roberts, David Benjamin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rufa, Dominic Antonio [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sifain, Andrew E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Justin Steven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Lauren Taylor Wisbey [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Svolos, Lampros [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Thibault, Joshua Ryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ushijima-Mwesigwa, Hayato Montezuma [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weaver, Claire Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Witzen, Wyatt Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zentgraf, Sabine Silvia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Alred, John Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-06

    All members of the T Division Community, students, staff members, group leaders, division management, and other interested individuals are invited to come and support the following student(s) as they present their Lightning Talks.

  7. Division of Labor

    KAUST Repository

    Oke, Muse; Zaher, Manal S.; Hamdan, Samir

    2014-01-01

    The first assignment of DNA polymerases at the eukaryotic replication fork was possible after the in vitro reconstitution of the simian virus 40 (SV40) replication system. In this system, DNA polymerase α (Pol α) provides both leading and lagging strands with RNA-DNA primers that are extended by DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ). Extrapolating the architecture of the replication fork from the SV40 model system to an actual eukaryotic cell has been challenged by the discovery of a third DNA polymerase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε). A division of labor has been proposed for the eukaryotic replication fork whereby Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand. However, an alternative model of unequal division of labor in which Pol δ can still participate in leading-strand synthesis is plausible.

  8. Division of Labor

    KAUST Repository

    Oke, Muse

    2014-09-12

    The first assignment of DNA polymerases at the eukaryotic replication fork was possible after the in vitro reconstitution of the simian virus 40 (SV40) replication system. In this system, DNA polymerase α (Pol α) provides both leading and lagging strands with RNA-DNA primers that are extended by DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ). Extrapolating the architecture of the replication fork from the SV40 model system to an actual eukaryotic cell has been challenged by the discovery of a third DNA polymerase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε). A division of labor has been proposed for the eukaryotic replication fork whereby Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand. However, an alternative model of unequal division of labor in which Pol δ can still participate in leading-strand synthesis is plausible.

  9. 3. Theoretical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the period September 1980 - Aug 1981, the studies in theoretical physics divisions have been compiled under the following headings: in nuclear physics, nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and intermediate energies; in particle physics, NN and NantiN interactions, dual topological unitarization, quark model and quantum chromodynamics, classical and quantum field theories, non linear integrable equations and topological preons and Grand unified theories. A list of publications, lectures and meetings is included [fr

  10. Division Quilts: A Measurement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Sarah S.; Lupton, Tina M.; Richardson, Kerri

    2015-01-01

    As teachers seek activities to assist students in understanding division as more than just the algorithm, they find many examples of division as fair sharing. However, teachers have few activities to engage students in a quotative (measurement) model of division. Efraim Fischbein and his colleagues (1985) defined two types of whole-number…

  11. Mapping Urban Social Divisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Ball

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of increased levels of interest in space and images beyond the field of geography, this article (re- introduces earlier work on the semiotics of maps undertaken by geographers in the 1960s. The data limitations, purpose and cultural context in which a user interprets a map's codes and conventions are highlighted in this work, which remains relevant to the interpretation of maps—new and old—forty years later. By means of drawing on geography's contribution to the semiotics of maps, the article goes on to examine the concept of urban social divisions as represented in map images. Using a small number of map images, including two of the most widely known maps of urban social division in Europe and North America, the roles of context, data and purpose in the production and interpretation of maps are discussed. By presenting the examples chronologically the article shows that although advances in data collection and manipulation have allowed researchers to combine different social variables in maps of social division, and to interact with map images, work by geographers on the semiotics of maps is no less relevant today than when it was first proposed forty years ago. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1002372

  12. Management Sciences Division Annual Report (9th)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    41 Actuarial Process Consolidation and Review ....................................... 43 How M alfunction Code Reduction...47 Sun W ork Stations ............................................................................... 48 Actuarial Process Consolidation and...Information System (WSMIS). Dyna-METRIC is used for wartime supply support capability assessments. The Aircraft Sustainability Model ( ASM ) is the

  13. Nutritional Science | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This group promotes and supports studies establishing a comprehensive understanding of the precise role of diet and fo | Establishing a comprehensive understanding of diet and food components in cancer risk and tumor cell behavior.

  14. Nuclear Science Division annual report for 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.

    1992-04-01

    This paper discusses research being conducted under the following programs: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation program; and 88-inch cyclotron operations

  15. Division of Materials Science (DMS) meeting presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, C.F.; Weber, M.J.

    1982-11-08

    Materials preparation techniques are listed. Materials preparation capabilities are discussed for making BeF/sub 2/ glasses and other materials. Materials characterization techniques are listed. (DLC)

  16. Nuclear Science Division 1992 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains short papers from research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in Nuclear Physics. The categories of these papers are: Low-Energy Research Program; Bevalac Research Program; Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Program; Nuclear Theory Program; Nuclear Data Evaluation Program; and 88-Inch Cyclotron Operations

  17. Nuclear Science Division 1992 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W. D. [ed.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains short papers from research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in Nuclear Physics. The categories of these papers are: Low-Energy Research Program; Bevalac Research Program; Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Program; Nuclear Theory Program; Nuclear Data Evaluation Program; and 88-Inch Cyclotron Operations.

  18. A surface science compatible epifluorescence microscope for inspection of samples under ultra high vacuum and cryogenic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Christian; Paulheim, Alexander; Rohbohm, Nils; Merkel, Rudolf; Sokolowski, Moritz

    2017-08-01

    We modified an epi-illumination light microscope and mounted it on an ultra high vacuum chamber for investigating samples used in a surface science experiment. For easy access and bake out, all optical components are placed outside the vacuum and the sample is imaged through a glass window. The microscope can be operated in reflection brightfield or epifluorescence mode to image the sample surface or fluorescent dye molecules adsorbed on it. The homemade sample mounting was made compatible for the use under the microscope; sample temperatures as low as 6 K can be achieved. The performance of the microscope is demonstrated on two model samples: Brightfield-images of a well-prepared Ag(100) surface show a macroscopic corrugation of the surface, although low energy electron diffraction data indicate a highly ordered crystalline surface. The surface shows macroscopic protrusions with flat regions, about 20-200 μm in diameter, in between. Fluorescence images of diluted 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylicacid dianhydride (PTCDA) molecules adsorbed on an ultrathin epitaxial KCl film on the Ag(100) surface show a shading effect at surface protrusions due to an inclined angle of incidence of the PTCDA beam during deposition. For some preparations, the distribution of the fluorescence intensity is inhomogeneous and shows a dense network of bright patches about 5 μm in diameter related to the macroscopic corrugation of the surface. We propose that such a light microscope can aid many surface science experiments, especially those dealing with epitaxial growth or fluorescent materials.

  19. Season Spotter: Using Citizen Science to Validate and Scale Plant Phenology from Near-Surface Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Kosmala

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of a rapidly changing climate on the biosphere is an urgent area of research for mitigation policy and management. Plant phenology is a sensitive indicator of climate change and regulates the seasonality of carbon, water, and energy fluxes between the land surface and the climate system, making it an important tool for studying biosphere–atmosphere interactions. To monitor plant phenology at regional and continental scales, automated near-surface cameras are being increasingly used to supplement phenology data derived from satellite imagery and data from ground-based human observers. We used imagery from a network of phenology cameras in a citizen science project called Season Spotter to investigate whether information could be derived from these images beyond standard, color-based vegetation indices. We found that engaging citizen science volunteers resulted in useful science knowledge in three ways: first, volunteers were able to detect some, but not all, reproductive phenology events, connecting landscape-level measures with field-based measures. Second, volunteers successfully demarcated individual trees in landscape imagery, facilitating scaling of vegetation indices from organism to ecosystem. And third, volunteers’ data were used to validate phenology transition dates calculated from vegetation indices and to identify potential improvements to existing algorithms to enable better biological interpretation. As a result, the use of citizen science in combination with near-surface remote sensing of phenology can be used to link ground-based phenology observations to satellite sensor data for scaling and validation. Well-designed citizen science projects targeting improved data processing and validation of remote sensing imagery hold promise for providing the data needed to address grand challenges in environmental science and Earth observation.

  20. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1989-03-01

    The mission of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) is to provide a sound scientific basis for the measurement and assessment of human health impacts of radiological and chemical substances. Our approach to fulfilling this mission is to conduct a broad program of experimental, theoretical, and field research based on a strong foundation of fundamental physical studies that blend into well-established programs in life sciences. Topics include biomedical screening techniques, biological and chemical sensors, risk assessment, health hazards, dosimetry, nuclear medicine, environmental pollution monitoring, electron-molecule interactions, interphase physics, surface physics, data base management, environmental mutagens, carcinogens, and tetratogens

  1. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1989-03-01

    The mission of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) is to provide a sound scientific basis for the measurement and assessment of human health impacts of radiological and chemical substances. Our approach to fulfilling this mission is to conduct a broad program of experimental, theoretical, and field research based on a strong foundation of fundamental physical studies that blend into well-established programs in life sciences. Topics include biomedical screening techniques, biological and chemical sensors, risk assessment, health hazards, dosimetry, nuclear medicine, environmental pollution monitoring, electron-molecule interactions, interphase physics, surface physics, data base management, environmental mutagens, carcinogens, and tetratogens.

  2. Biennial report [for] 1978 and 1979, Electronics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Electronics Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during the calendar years 1978-1979 are reported. The Division designed and fabricated electronic equipment and instruments for use in the fields of nuclear science, nuclear reactors, microcomputer hardware and software, health and safety, medicine, chemical analysis and industry. Many of these are described in brief mentioning their special features and in many cases block diagrams are given. (M.G.B.)

  3. Physics Division annual report 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.

    2006-04-06

    This report highlights the research performed in 2004 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The intellectual challenges of this research represent some of the most fundamental challenges in modern science, shaping our understanding of both tiny objects at the center of the atom and some of the largest structures in the universe. A great strength of these efforts is the critical interplay of theory and experiment. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the charge radius of He-6 in an atom trap and its explanation in ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure. Precise mass measurements on critical waiting point nuclei in the rapid-proton-capture process set the time scale for this important path in nucleosynthesis. An abrupt fall-off was identified in the subbarrier fusion of several heavy-ion systems. ATLAS operated for 5559 hours of research in FY2004 while achieving 96% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium Energy Physics, substantial progress was made on a long-term experiment to search for the violation of time-reversal invariance using trapped Ra atoms. New results from HERMES reveal the influence of quark angular momentum. Experiments at JLAB search for evidence of color transparency in rho-meson production and study the EMC effect in helium isotopes. New theoretical results include a Poincare covariant description of baryons as composites of confined quarks and non-point-like diquarks. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques give accurate descriptions of the excited states of light nuclei and these techniques been extended to scattering states for astrophysics studies. A theoretical description of the phenomena of proton radioactivity has been extended to triaxial nuclei. Argonne

  4. Physics Division annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, J.

    2006-01-01

    This report highlights the research performed in 2004 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The intellectual challenges of this research represent some of the most fundamental challenges in modern science, shaping our understanding of both tiny objects at the center of the atom and some of the largest structures in the universe. A great strength of these efforts is the critical interplay of theory and experiment. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the charge radius of He-6 in an atom trap and its explanation in ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure. Precise mass measurements on critical waiting point nuclei in the rapid-proton-capture process set the time scale for this important path in nucleosynthesis. An abrupt fall-off was identified in the subbarrier fusion of several heavy-ion systems. ATLAS operated for 5559 hours of research in FY2004 while achieving 96% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium Energy Physics, substantial progress was made on a long-term experiment to search for the violation of time-reversal invariance using trapped Ra atoms. New results from HERMES reveal the influence of quark angular momentum. Experiments at JLAB search for evidence of color transparency in rho-meson production and study the EMC effect in helium isotopes. New theoretical results include a Poincare covariant description of baryons as composites of confined quarks and non-point-like diquarks. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques give accurate descriptions of the excited states of light nuclei and these techniques been extended to scattering states for astrophysics studies. A theoretical description of the phenomena of proton radioactivity has been extended to triaxial nuclei. Argonne continues to

  5. Ethers on Si(001): A prime example for the common ground between surface science and molecular organic chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Pecher, Lisa

    2017-09-15

    Using computational chemistry, we show that the adsorption of ether molecules on Si(001) under ultra-high vacuum conditions can be understood with textbook organic chemistry. The two-step reaction mechanism of (1) dative bond formation between the ether oxygen and a Lewis acidic surface atom and (2) a nucleophilic attack of a nearby Lewis basic surface atom is analysed in detail and found to mirror the acid-catalysed ether cleavage in solution. The O-Si dative bond is found to be the strongest of its kind and reactivity from this state defies the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle. Electron rearrangement during the C-O bond cleavage is visualized using a newly developed bonding analysis method, which shows that the mechanism of nucleophilic substitutions on semiconductor surfaces is identical to molecular chemistry SN2 reactions. Our findings thus illustrate how the fields of surface science and molecular chemistry can mutually benefit and unexpected insight can be gained.

  6. Ethers on Si(001): A prime example for the common ground between surface science and molecular organic chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Pecher, Lisa; Laref, Slimane; Raupach, Marc; Tonner, Ralf Ewald

    2017-01-01

    Using computational chemistry, we show that the adsorption of ether molecules on Si(001) under ultra-high vacuum conditions can be understood with textbook organic chemistry. The two-step reaction mechanism of (1) dative bond formation between the ether oxygen and a Lewis acidic surface atom and (2) a nucleophilic attack of a nearby Lewis basic surface atom is analysed in detail and found to mirror the acid-catalysed ether cleavage in solution. The O-Si dative bond is found to be the strongest of its kind and reactivity from this state defies the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle. Electron rearrangement during the C-O bond cleavage is visualized using a newly developed bonding analysis method, which shows that the mechanism of nucleophilic substitutions on semiconductor surfaces is identical to molecular chemistry SN2 reactions. Our findings thus illustrate how the fields of surface science and molecular chemistry can mutually benefit and unexpected insight can be gained.

  7. BNFL Springfields Fuel Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarkiainen, S.; Plit, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Fuel Division of British Nuclear Fuels Ltd (BNFL) manufactures nuclear fuel elements for British Magnox and AGR power plants as well as for LWR plants. The new fuel factory - Oxide Fuel Complex (OFC), located in Springfields, is equipped with modern technology and the automation level of the factory is very high. With their quality products, BNFL aims for the new business areas. A recent example of this expansion was shown, when BNFL signed a contract to design and license new VVER-440 fuel for Finnish Loviisa and Hungarian Paks power plants. (author)

  8. Applied Physics Division 1998 Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchini, M.; Crescentini, L; Ghezzi, L.; Kent, C.; Bottomei, M.

    2001-01-01

    This report outlines the 1998 research activities carried out by the Applied Physics Division of the Innovation Department of ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment). The fields addressed and discussed include: optical and electro-optical technologies (chaps. 1 and 2); accelerator technologies (chap. 3); diagnostic systems for science and engineering (chaps. 4 and 5); theory, modelling and computational methods (chaps. 6 and 7). The aim of the Applied Physics Division is to develop technologies and systems that can be directly applied by internal (ENEA) and external users in research (high-resolution spectroscopy, laser-generated soft-x-ray sources), production processes (laser material photoproduction, structural analysis), social, cultural and environmental sciences (laser remote sensing, modelling of ecosystems and population dynamics) and medicine (particle accelerator for radiotherapy). Most of the work in 1998 was performed by the division's laboratories at the Frascati, Casaccia and Bologna Research Centres of ENEA; some was done elsewhere in collaboration with other ENEA units, external laboratories and industries. A good share of the activities was carried out for international projects; in particular, the IV European Union Framework Program

  9. Applied Physics Division 1998 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchini, M.; Crescentini, L; Ghezzi, L.; Kent, C.; Bottomei, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy). Applied physics Division

    1999-07-01

    This report outlines the 1998 research activities carried out by the Applied Physics Division of the Innovation Department of ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment). The fields addressed and discussed include: optical and electro-optical technologies (chaps. 1 and 2); accelerator technologies (chap. 3); diagnostic systems for science and engineering (chaps. 4 and 5); theory, modelling and computational methods (chaps. 6 and 7). The aim of the Applied Physics Division is to develop technologies and systems that can be directly applied by internal (ENEA) and external users in research (high-resolution spectroscopy, laser-generated soft-x-ray sources), production processes (laser material photoproduction, structural analysis), social, cultural and environmental sciences (laser remote sensing, modelling of ecosystems and population dynamics) and medicine (particle accelerator for radiotherapy). Most of the work in 1998 was performed by the division's laboratories at the Frascati, Casaccia and Bologna Research Centres of ENEA; some was done elsewhere in collaboration with other ENEA units, external laboratories and industries. A good share of the activities was carried out for international projects; in particular, the IV European Union Framework Program.

  10. Nuclear Power Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The 1981-85 research program planned by the Nuclear Power Division of EPRI places major emphasis on the assurance of safety and realiability of light water reactors (LWRs). Of high priority is a better knowledge of LWR-system behavior undeer abnormal conditions and the behavior of structural materials used for pressure vessels, piping, and large nuclear-plant components. Strong emphasis is also placed on achieving the most-effective performance and utilization of nuclear fuels and improving the corrosion resistance of pressurized-water-reactor steam generators. Efforts are underway to reduce radiation exposure and outage duration and to investigate the human factors involved in plant operation and maintenance. Substantial emphasis is placed on short-range goals designed to achieve useful results in the next two to seven years. The Division's mid- and long-range goal is to improve the use of fissionable and fertile materials and aid in the realization of other reactor systems. A series of general goals, categorized into three time frames and planned expenditures shows the trend of work to be undertaken. 53 figures

  11. Wavefront division digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenhui; Cao, Liangcai; Li, Rujia; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Hao; Jiang, Qiang; Jin, Guofan

    2018-05-01

    Digital holography (DH), mostly Mach-Zehnder configuration based, belongs to non-common path amplitude splitting interference imaging whose stability and fringe contrast are environmental sensitive. This paper presents a wavefront division DH configuration with both high stability and high-contrast fringes benefitting from quasi common path wavefront-splitting interference. In our proposal, two spherical waves with similar curvature coming from the same wavefront are used, which makes full use of the physical sampling capacity of the detectors. The interference fringe spacing can be adjusted flexibly for both in-line and off-axis mode due to the independent modulation to these two waves. Only a few optical elements, including the mirror-beam splitter interference component, are used without strict alignments, which makes it robust and easy-to-implement. The proposed wavefront division DH promotes interference imaging physics into the practical and miniaturized a step forward. The feasibility of this method is proved by the imaging of a resolution target and a water flea.

  12. Materials sciences programs, Fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in materials science topics important to the mission of the Department of Energy. The programmatic divisions under the Office of Basic Energy Sciences are Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geosciences, and Energy Biosciences. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship among synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences subfields include: physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 517 research programs including 255 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 262 research grants (233 of which are at universities), and 29 Small Business Innovation Research Grants. Five cross-cutting indices located at the rear of this book identify all 517 programs according to principal investigator(s), materials, techniques, phenomena, and environment.

  13. Physics division annual report - October 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K. [ed.

    2000-10-16

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part, defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design.

  14. Seventh BES [Basic Energy Sciences] catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  15. Seventh BES (Basic Energy Sciences) catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  16. Constraining the JULES land-surface model for different land-use types using citizen-science generated hydrological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, H. K.; Ochoa-Tocachi, B. F.; Buytaert, W.

    2017-12-01

    Community land surface models such as JULES are increasingly used for hydrological assessment because of their state-of-the-art representation of land-surface processes. However, a major weakness of JULES and other land surface models is the limited number of land surface parameterizations that is available. Therefore, this study explores the use of data from a network of catchments under homogeneous land-use to generate parameter "libraries" to extent the land surface parameterizations of JULES. The network (called iMHEA) is part of a grassroots initiative to characterise the hydrological response of different Andean ecosystems, and collects data on streamflow, precipitation, and several weather variables at a high temporal resolution. The tropical Andes are a useful case study because of the complexity of meteorological and geographical conditions combined with extremely heterogeneous land-use that result in a wide range of hydrological responses. We then calibrated JULES for each land-use represented in the iMHEA dataset. For the individual land-use types, the results show improved simulations of streamflow when using the calibrated parameters with respect to default values. In particular, the partitioning between surface and subsurface flows can be improved. But also, on a regional scale, hydrological modelling was greatly benefitted from constraining parameters using such distributed citizen-science generated streamflow data. This study demonstrates the modelling and prediction on regional hydrology by integrating citizen science and land surface model. In the context of hydrological study, the limitation of data scarcity could be solved indeed by using this framework. Improved predictions of such impacts could be leveraged by catchment managers to guide watershed interventions, to evaluate their effectiveness, and to minimize risks.

  17. Nuclear size and cell division delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation-induced division delay has been linked to damage at the nuclear envelope. Further, cells in G 2 phase are drastically arrested by high LET radiation such that single particles traversing cell nuclei may produce measurable division delay. A modest effort was initiated using two related cell lines of different size, near-diploid cells and near-tetraploid cells of Chinese hamster origin, to compare their sensitivity for radiation-induced division delay. If the nuclear surface is the critical target, then a larger nuclear cross-section presented to an alpha-particle beam should exhibit delay induced by a lesser particle fluence. Preliminary estimates of the extent of delay in asynchronous cultures following low doses of gamma-irradiation or of alpha-irradiation were made by in-situ observation of the time of onset of mitosis and by fixation and staining of cultures to determine the mitotic index as a function of time after irradiation. The basic approach to evaluating division delay will be to use Colecemid to accumulate mitotic cells over a period of time

  18. Physics division annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example

  19. Energy Technology Division research summary 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water nuclear

  20. Energy Technology Division research summary 1997.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-21

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water

  1. Security and Emergency Management Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Security and Emergency Management Division identifies vulnerabilities, risks, and opportunities to improve the security of transportation systems, critical...

  2. Situational Awareness and Logistics Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Situational Awareness and Logistics Division researches, develops, implements, and analyzes advanced systems to protect, enhance, and ensure resilienceof the...

  3. Systems Safety and Engineering Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Systems Safety and Engineering Division conducts engineering, research, and analysis to improve transportation safety, capacity, and resiliency. We provide...

  4. Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division advances transportation innovation by being leaders in infrastructure technology, including vehicles and...

  5. 2003 Chemical Engineering Division annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.; Graziano, D.; Miller, J. F.; Vandegrift, G.

    2004-01-01

    The Chemical Engineering Division is one of six divisions within the Engineering Research Directorate at Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, to promote national security, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. The Division is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which provides a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training in chemistry; physics; materials science; and electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineering. They are specialists in electrochemistry, ceramics, metallurgy, catalysis, materials characterization, nuclear magnetic resonance, repository science, and the nuclear fuel cycle. Our staff have experience working in and collaborating with university, industry and government research and development laboratories throughout the world. Our wide-ranging expertise finds ready application in solving energy, national security, and environmental problems. Division personnel are frequently called on by governmental and industrial organizations for advice and contributions to problem solving in areas that intersect present and past Division programs and activities. Currently, we are engaged in the development of several technologies of

  6. CSIR Division of Mining Technology annual review 1993/94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The Division of Mining Technology of the CSIR (Council for Scientific and Industrial Research) works in partnership with the mining industry to solve problems threatening the health, safety and well-being of the workforce, and the productivity of mining operations through the development and implementation of knowledge and technology. The annual review describes the Division's research projects in the following field: rock engineering (for gold, platinum and coal mining); mining environment; occupational hygiene; surface environment; and mining equipment and systems (systems and equipment, orebody information, coal mining and causes of accidents). Details are also given of the Division's publications, research and consultancy services and information centre.

  7. Science and engineering of nanodiamond particle surfaces for biological applications (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenderova, Olga A; McGuire, Gary E

    2015-09-05

    Diamond has outstanding bulk properties such as super hardness, chemical inertness, biocompatibility, luminescence, to name just a few. In the nanoworld, in order to exploit these outstanding bulk properties, the surfaces of nanodiamond (ND) particles must be accordingly engineered for specific applications. Modification of functional groups on the ND's surface and the corresponding electrostatic properties determine their colloidal stability in solvents, formation of photonic crystals, controlled adsorption and release of cargo molecules, conjugation with biomolecules and polymers, and cellular uptake. The optical activity of the luminescent color centers in NDs depends on their proximity to the ND's surface and surface termination. In order to engineer the ND surface, a fundamental understanding of the specific structural features and sp(3)-sp(2) phase transformations on the surface of ND particles is required. In the case of ND particles produced by detonation of carbon containing explosives (detonation ND), it should also be taken into account that its structure depends on the synthesis parameters and subsequent processing. Thus, for development of a strategy of surface modification of detonation ND, it is imperative to know details of its production. In this review, the authors discuss ND particles structure, strategies for surface modification, electrokinetic properties of NDs in suspensions, and conclude with a brief overview of the relevant bioapplications.

  8. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy: A review of recent applications in forensic science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikiet, Marisia A.; Khandasammy, Shelby R.; Mistek, Ewelina; Ahmed, Yasmine; Halámková, Lenka; Bueno, Justin; Lednev, Igor K.

    2018-05-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy has many advantages over its parent technique of Raman spectroscopy. Some of these advantages such as increased sensitivity and selectivity and therefore the possibility of small sample sizes and detection of small concentrations are invaluable in the field of forensics. A variety of new SERS surfaces and novel approaches are presented here on a wide range of forensically relevant topics.

  9. Investigation of Anti-Relaxation Coatings for Alkali-Metal Vapor Cells using Surface Science Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    addition to the inside surface of the cells. In order to avoid exposure to air, the cells were broken open inside a glovebag containing an argon ...unsaturated bonds increase the polar- izability of the surface, and effective coatings have long been assumed to require low polarizability to enable

  10. Division of Analytical Chemistry, 1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1999-01-01

    The article recounts the 1998 activities of the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC- formerly the Working Party on Analytical Chemistry, WPAC), which body is a division of the Federation of European Chemical Societies (FECS). Elo Harald Hansen is the Danish delegate, representing The Danish...... Chemical Society/The Society for Analytical Chemistry....

  11. Lightning Talks 2015: Theoretical Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlachter, Jack S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    This document is a compilation of slides from a number of student presentations given to LANL Theoretical Division members. The subjects cover the range of activities of the Division, including plasma physics, environmental issues, materials research, bacterial resistance to antibiotics, and computational methods.

  12. Important projects of the Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter important projects of the Division for Radiation Safety, NPP Decommissioning and Radwaste Management of the VUJE, a. s. are presented. Division for Radiation Safety, NPP Decommissioning and Radwaste Management has successfully carried out variety of significant projects. The most significant projects that were realised, are implemented and possible future projects are introduced in the following part of presentation.

  13. E-Division activities report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barschall, H.H.

    1979-07-01

    This report describes some of the activities in E (Experimental Physics) Division during the past year. E-Division carries out research and development in areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Many of the activities are in pure and applied atomic and nuclear physics. In addition, this report describes work on accelerators, radiation damage, microwaves, and plasma diagnostics

  14. Developmental control of cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxem, M. (Mike)

    2002-01-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, cell divisions need to be coordinated with the developmental program of the entire organism. Although the mechanisms that drive cells through the division cycle are well understood, very little is known about the pathways that link extracellular signals

  15. Physics Division progress report, January 1, 1990--December 31, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shera, E.B.; Hollen, G.Y.

    1991-07-01

    This report provides selected accounts of significant progress in research and development achieved by Physics Division personnel during the period January 1, 1990, through December 31, 1990. It also provides a general description of the goals and interests of the Division, very brief descriptions of projects in the Division, and a list of publications produced during this period. The report represents the three main areas of experimental research and development in which the Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in defense and basic sciences: (1) fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics, condensed-matter physics, and biophysics; (2) laser physics and applications, especially to high-density plasmas; and (3) defense physics, including the development of diagnostic methods for weapons tests, weapons-related high energy-density physics, and programs supporting the Strategic Defense Initiative

  16. Physics Division progress report, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shera, E.B.; Hollen, G.Y.

    1992-06-01

    This report provides selected accounts of significant progress in research and development achieved by Physics Division personnel during the period January 1, 1991, through December 31, 1991. It also provides a general description of the goals and interests of the Division, very brief descriptions of projects in the Division, and a list of publications produced during this period. The report represents the three main areas of experimental research and development in which the Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in defense and basic sciences: (1) fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics, condensed-matter physics, and biophysics; (2) laser physics and applications, especially to high-density plasmas; (3) defense physics, including the development of diagnostic methods for weapons tests, weapons-related high energy-density physics, and other programs

  17. Environmental Chemistry Division annual report, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, L.

    1990-01-01

    The research activities making up the programs in the Environmental Chemistry Division of the Department of Applied Science are presented. Some of the more significant accomplishments during 1989 are described and plans for 1990 are discussed briefly. Publications for the period are listed and abstracts are provided. Research objectives and principal investigators are given for each of the active programs. A list of personnel and collaborators during the past year is presented. The support distribution of FY 1989 is approximately 85% from the Department of Energy (65% Office of Health and Environmental Research), and 15% other agencies (principally from the Electric Power Research Institute)

  18. Chemistry Division : Annual progress report of 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    Research and development activities (during 1974) of the Chemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, are described. Some of the activities of particular interest to nuclear science and technology are: (1) chemistry-based problems of the operating power reactors such as development of a decontaminating solution for power reactors, correlation of iodine-131 levels in the primary heat transport system of a reactor with its operation (2) release of fission gases like xenon from ceramic fuels and (3) radiation chemistry of nitrate solutions (M.G.B.)

  19. On the implications of the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission for hydrologic science and applications (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    The SWOT mission will provide surface water elevation and extent information with unprecedented accuracy and spatial resolution globally. All of the implications of thedata that SWOT will produce for the hydrologic science and applications communities are not yet apparent. The SWOT data will, however, certainly offer groundbreaking opportunities for estimation of two key terms in the land surface water budget: surface water storage (in almost all water bodies with surface area exceeding about 1 km2) and derived discharge for many of the world’s large rivers (widths greater than roughly 100-250 m). Among just a few of the science questions that the observations should allow us to address are a) what are the dynamics of floods and overbank flows in large rivers? b) what is the contribution of long-term, seasonal, and interannual storage in reservoirs, lakes, and wetlands to sea level? c) what is the magnitude of surface water storage changes at seasonal to decadal time scales and continental spatial scales relative to soil moisture and groundwater? d) what will be the implications of SWOT-based estimates of reservoir storage and storage change to the management of transboundary rivers? These quite likely are among just a few of the questions that SWOT will help elucidate. Others no doubt will arise from creative analyses of SWOT data in combination with data from other missions I conclude with a discussion of mechanisms that will help foster a community to investigate these and other questions, and the implications of a SWOT data policy.

  20. Chemical Engineering Division annual technical report, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.; Webster, D.S.; Barney, D.L.; Cafasso, F.A.; Steindler, M.J.

    1981-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Engineering (CEN) Division's activities during 1980 are presented. In this period, CEN conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) rechargeable lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide batteries for electric vehicles and other applications; (2) ambient-temperature batteries - improved lead-acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron - for electric vehicles; (3) energy-efficient industrial electrochemical processes; (4) molten carbonate fuel cells for use by electric utilities; (5) coal technology, mainly fluidized-bed combustion of coal in the presence of SO 2 sorbent of limestone; (6) heat- and seed-recovery technology for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic systems; (7) solar energy collectors and thermal energy storage; (8) fast breeder reactor chemistry research - chemical support of reactor safety studies, chemistry of irradiated fuels, and sodium technology; (9) fuel cycle technology - management of nuclear wastes, reprocessing of nuclear fuels, and proof-of-breeding studies for the Light Water Breeder Reactor; and (10) magnetic fusion research - systems analysis and engineering experimentation, materials research, and neutron dosimetry and damage analysis. The CEN Division also has a basic energy sciences program, which includes experimental and theoretical research on (1) the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide and methanol homologation, (2) the thermodynamic properties of a wide variety of inorganic and organic materials, (3) significant mechanisms for the formation of atmospheric sulfate and nitrogen-bearing aerosols, (4) processes occurring at electrodes and in electrolytes, and (5) the physical properties of salt vapors. In addition, the Division operated the Central Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

  1. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  2. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing 99 Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  3. Spectral Feature Analysis of Minerals and Planetary Surfaces in an Introductory Planetary Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Using an ALTA II reflectance spectrometer, the USGS digital spectral library, graphs of planetary spectra, and a few mineral hand samples, one can teach how light can be used to study planets and moons. The author created the hands-on, inquiry-based activity for an undergraduate planetary science course consisting of freshman to senior level…

  4. science

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    David Spurgeon

    Give us the tools: science and technology for development. Ottawa, ...... altered technical rela- tionships among the factors used in the process of production, and the en- .... to ourselves only the rights of audit and periodic substantive review." If a ...... and destroying scarce water reserves, recreational areas and a generally.

  5. 59th Medical Wing Clinical Research Division Clinical Investigations Program Pathology Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-28

    59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 1. Your paper, entitled 59th Medical Wing Clinical Research Division Clinical Investigations...Program Pathology Poster presented at/published to For hanging in a hallway of the 591h Medical Wing Clinical Research Division, Bldg 4430 in...Graduate Health Sciences Education student and your department has told you they cannot fund your publication, the 59th Clinical Research Division may

  6. Progress report, Physics and Health Sciences: Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report reviews the activities of the Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, and Radiation Biology Branches of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. The Reactor Stack Effluent Monitor, which is designed to cover the full range of releases for the main reactor stack at Chalk River, is the subject of a topical review. The GENMOD software has been improved to include a better method of calculating the distribution of particulates in respiratory organs. Development continues on methods of monitoring 147 Pm in urine. Attempts are being made to determine whether the saline waters discharging at 'moose licks' in the Nipigon region come from deep brines characteristic of the Precambrian shield. Trace metals and 90 Sr are being measured in mussel shells to determine whether the shells are suitable recorders of environmental changes. Work continues on the grow-back assay of lymphoblastoid cells to screen for inherited variations in response to genotoxic agents

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sediment dynamics like deposition, erosion and dispersion are explained with the simulated tidal currents and OCM derived sediment concentrations. ... Geosciences Division, Marine, Geo and Planetary Sciences Group, Earth, Ocean, Atmosphere, Planetary Sciences and Applications Area, Space Applications Centre ...

  8. Application of surface science to the study of the corrosion of PWR primary circuit materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, S.J.

    1989-04-01

    This thesis describes a study of the corrosion and oxidation of PWR primary circuit materials using surface sensitive spectroscopic techniques. An X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) study of a number of mixed oxides of known composition is described and the information obtained is related to XPS measurements made on the surface of iron and nickel based alloys oxidised under controlled conditions. A secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMA) study on these mixed transition metal oxides is also described. The gaseous oxidation of stainless steel 3041 and Inconel-690 is examined. Both alloys were oxidised at 600K in air with the composition of the oxide films formed studied by a range of surface spectroscopic methods. Further experimental work was performed on Inconel-690 to examine the effects of surface pretreatment and the effects of low oxygen partial pressures on the formation of oxide films at 600 K. The incorporation of the radionuclide, cobalt-60, into the oxide films formed on structural components of a PWR, result in the build up of radiation fields. A method of pretreating the surface of the alloy stainless steel 3041, in order to reduce the level of cobalt adsorbed into the oxide film formed under simulated primary coolant conditions is examined and contrasts with treatments which have been developed to release cobalt adsorbed in existing oxide layers under reactor conditions are discussed. (author)

  9. 77 FR 40586 - Coastal Programs Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Programs Division AGENCY: Coastal Programs Division, Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, National Ocean.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kerry Kehoe, Coastal Programs Division (NORM/3), Office of Ocean and...

  10. Physics division annual report 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2008-02-28

    This report highlights the activities of the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory in 2006. The Division's programs include the operation as a national user facility of ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System, research in nuclear structure and reactions, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, investigations in medium-energy nuclear physics as well as research and development in accelerator technology. The mission of nuclear physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the core of matter, the fuel of stars, and the basic constituent of life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission.

  11. Nutrition and Cancer Prevention Research Practicum | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutritional Science Research Group in the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health and the Department of Nutrition at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health are offering a one week educational opportunity in "Nutrition and Cancer Prevention Research" for individuals with a sustained commitment to nutrition

  12. Nutrition Frontiers E-Newsletter | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention at NCI issues a quarterly electronic newsletter, Nutrition Frontiers, that highlights emerging evidence linking diet to cancer prevention and showcases recent findings about who will likely benefit most from dietary change. |

  13. Ethers on Si(001): A Prime Example for the Common Ground between Surface Science and Molecular Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecher, Lisa; Laref, Slimane; Raupach, Marc; Tonner, Ralf

    2017-11-20

    By using computational chemistry it has been shown that the adsorption of ether molecules on Si(001) under ultrahigh vacuum conditions can be understood with classical concepts of organic chemistry. Detailed analysis of the two-step reaction mechanism-1) formation of a dative bond between the ether oxygen atom and a Lewis acidic surface atom and 2) nucleophilic attack of a nearby Lewis basic surface atom-shows that it mirrors acid-catalyzed ether cleavage in solution. The O-Si dative bond is the strongest of its kind, and the reactivity in step 2 defies the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle. Electron rearrangement during C-O bond cleavage has been visualized with a newly developed method for analyzing bonding, which shows that the mechanism of nucleophilic substitutions on semiconductor surfaces is identical to molecular S N 2 reactions. Our findings illustrate how surface science and molecular chemistry can mutually benefit from each other and unexpected insight can be gained. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. [Progress in the application of laser ablation ICP-MS to surface microanalysis in material science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Jia, Yun-hai; Chen, Ji-wen; Shen, Xue-jing; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Leiz; Li, Dong-ling; Hang, Peng-cheng; Zhao, Zhen; Fan, Wan-lun; Wang, Hai-zhou

    2014-08-01

    In the present paper, apparatus and theory of surface analysis is introduced, and the progress in the application of laser ablation ICP-MS to microanalysis in ferrous, nonferrous and semiconductor field is reviewed in detail. Compared with traditional surface analytical tools, such as SEM/EDS (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrum), EPMA (electron probe microanalysis analysis), AES (auger energy spectrum), etc. the advantage is little or no sample preparation, adjustable spatial resolution according to analytical demand, multi-element analysis and high sensitivity. It is now a powerful complementary method to traditional surface analytical tool. With the development of LA-ICP-MS technology maturing, more and more analytical workers will use this powerful tool in the future, and LA-ICP-MS will be a super star in elemental analysis field just like LIBS (Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy).

  15. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of The AAS (LAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  16. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of the AAS (LAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  17. Surface science analysis of GaAs photocathodes following sustained electron beam delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shutthanandan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power free electron lasers (FEL. Photocathode quantum efficiency degradation is due to residual gases in the electron source vacuum system being ionized and accelerated back to the photocathode. These investigations are a first attempt to characterize the nature of the photocathode degradation, and employ multiple surface and bulk analysis techniques to investigate damage mechanisms including sputtering of the Cs-oxidant surface monolayer, other surface chemistry effects, and ion implantation. Surface and bulk analysis studies were conducted on two GaAs photocathodes, which were removed from the JLab FEL DC photoemission gun after delivering electron beam, and two control samples. The analysis techniques include helium ion microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS, atomic force microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS. In addition, two high-polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathode samples, one removed from the continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF photoinjector and one unused, were also analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and SIMS. It was found that heat cleaning the FEL GaAs wafer introduces surface roughness, which seems to be reduced by prolonged use. The bulk GaAs samples retained a fairly well organized crystalline structure after delivering beam but show evidence of Cs depletion on the surface. Within the precision of the SIMS and RBS measurements, the data showed no indication of hydrogen implantation or lattice damage from ion back bombardment in the bulk GaAs wafers. In contrast, SIMS and TEM measurements of the strained superlattice photocathode show clear crystal damage in the wafer from ion back bombardment.

  18. Lunar and planetary surface conditions advances in space science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Weil, Nicholas A

    1965-01-01

    Lunar and Planetary Surface Conditions considers the inferential knowledge concerning the surfaces of the Moon and the planetary companions in the Solar System. The information presented in this four-chapter book is based on remote observations and measurements from the vantage point of Earth and on the results obtained from accelerated space program of the United States and U.S.S.R. Chapter 1 presents the prevalent hypotheses on the origin and age of the Solar System, followed by a brief description of the methods and feasibility of information acquisition concerning lunar and planetary data,

  19. Progress report [of] Technical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijendran, P.; Deshpande, R.Y.

    1975-01-01

    Activities of the Technical Physics Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, over the last few years are reported. This division is engaged in developing various technologies supporting the development of nuclear technology. The various fields in which development is actively being carried out are : (i) vacuum technology, (ii) mass spectrometry, (iii) crystal technology, (iv) cryogenics, and (v) magnet technology. For surface studies, the field emission microscope and the Auger electron spectrometer and other types of spectrometers have been devised and perfected. Electromagnets of requisite strength to be used in MHD programme and NMR instruments are being fabricated. Various crystals such as NaI(Tl), Ge, Fluorides, etc. required as windows and prisms in X and gamma-ray spectroscopy, have been grown. In the cryogenics field, expansion engines required for air liquefaction plants, vacuum insulated dewars, helium gas thermometers etc. have been constructed. In addition to the above, the Division provides consultancy and training to personnel from various institutions and laboratories. Equipment and systems perfected are transferred to commercial organizations for regular production. (A.K.)

  20. Electron paramagnetic resonance and dynamic nuclear polarization of char suspensions: surface science and oximetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarkson, R B; Odintsov, B M; Ceroke, P J

    1998-01-01

    ; they can be calibrated and used for oximetry. Biological stability and low toxicity make chars good sensors for in vivo measurements. Scalar and dipolar interactions of water protons at the surfaces of chars may be utilized to produce dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of the nuclear spin population...

  1. The application of surface science in the solution of aircraft materials problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: There is now a tendency for both commercial and military aircraft to be maintained and operated for several decades. Indeed some of our front-line defence aircraft have programme withdrawal lives approaching half a century. This places significant demands on the materials used in engines and airframes. The properties and performance of the materials can degrade with time leading to an increase in the importance of repair and maintenance technologies. As most materials problems start at a surface or an interface, it is not surprising that surface sensitive tools are used to resolve many degradation problems. In some cases, the resolution of problems can lead to life-enhancing improvements for the aircraft. This paper will examine some of the practical issues in the use of surface analytical tools for the examination and resolution of practical aircraft problems. Illustrations will be drawn from the application of surface analysis in the areas of corrosion, fracture and adhesive bonding. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  2. Computers in Nuclear Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, M.; Tarasiuk, J.; Srebrny, J.

    1997-01-01

    Improving of the computer equipment in Nuclear Physics Division is described. It include: new computer equipment and hardware upgrading, software developing, new programs for computer booting and modernization of data acquisition systems

  3. Division 1137 property control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastor, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    An automated data processing property control system was developed by Mobile and Remote Range Division 1137. This report describes the operation of the system and examines ways of using it in operational planning and control.

  4. Teeth and bones: applications of surface science to dental materials and related biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, F. H.

    2001-05-01

    Recent years have seen a considerable upsurge in publications concerning the surface structure and chemistry of materials with biological or biomedical applications. Within the body, gas-solid interactions become relatively less significant and solid-liquid or solid-solid interfaces dominate, providing new challenges for the surface scientist. The current paper aims to provide a timely review of the use of surface analysis and modification techniques within the biomaterials field. A broad overview of applications in a number of related areas is given with particular attention focusing on those materials commonly encountered in dentistry and oral or maxillofacial implantology. Several specific issues of current interest are discussed. The interaction between synthetic and natural solids, both in the oral environment and elsewhere in the body is important in terms of adhesion, related stresses and strains and ultimately the longevity of a dental restoration, biomedical implant, or indeed the surrounding tissue. Exposure to body fluids, of course, can also affect stability, leading to the degradation or corrosion of materials within the body. Whilst this could potentially be harmful, e.g., if cytotoxic elements are released, it may alternatively provide a route to the preferential release of beneficial substances. Furthermore, in some cases, the controlled disintegration of a biomaterial is desirable, allowing the removal of an implant, e.g., without the need for further surgery. The presence of cells in the immediate bioenvironment additionally complicates the situation. A considerable amount of current research activity is targeted at the development of coatings or surface treatments to encourage tissue growth. If this is to be achieved by stimulating enhanced cell productivity, determination of the relationship between cell function and surface composition is essential.

  5. The ACS-NUCL Division 50th Anniversary: Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobart, David E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-10

    The ACS Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology was initiated in 1955 as a subdivision of the Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry. Probationary divisional status was lifted in 1965. The Division’s first symposium was held in Denver in 1964 and it is fitting that we kicked-off the 50th Anniversary in Denver in the spring of 2015. Listed as a small ACS Division with only about 1,000 members, NUCL’s impact over the past fifty years has been remarkable. National ACS meetings have had many symposia sponsored or cosponsored by NUCL that included Nobel Laureates, U.S. Senators, other high-ranking officials and many students as speakers. The range of subjects has been exceptional as are the various prestigious awards established by the Division. Of major impact has been the past 30 years of the NUCL Nuclear Chemistry Summer Schools to help fill the void of qualified nuclear scientists and technicians. In celebrating the 50th Anniversary we honor the past, celebrate the present and shape the future of the Division and nuclear science and technology. To celebrate this auspicious occasion a commemorative lapel pin has been designed for distribution to NUCL Division members.

  6. Monitoring surface water quality using social media in the context of citizen science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hang; Hong, Yang; Long, Di; Jing, Hua

    2017-02-01

    Surface water quality monitoring (SWQM) provides essential information for water environmental protection. However, SWQM is costly and limited in terms of equipment and sites. The global popularity of social media and intelligent mobile devices with GPS and photography functions allows citizens to monitor surface water quality. This study aims to propose a method for SWQM using social media platforms. Specifically, a WeChat-based application platform is built to collect water quality reports from volunteers, which have been proven valuable for water quality monitoring. The methods for data screening and volunteer recruitment are discussed based on the collected reports. The proposed methods provide a framework for collecting water quality data from citizens and offer a primary foundation for big data analysis in future research.

  7. Microplastic distribution in global marine surface waters: results of an extensive citizen science study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, A.; Petersen, C.

    2017-12-01

    Plastic is a major pollutant throughout the world. The majority of the 322 million tons produced annually is used for single-use packaging. What makes plastic an attractive packaging material: cheap, light-weight and durable are also the features that help make it a common and persistent pollutant. There is a growing body of research on microplastic, particles less than 5 mm in size. Microfibers are the most common microplastic in the marine environment. Global estimates of marine microplastic surface concentrations are based on relatively small sample sizes when compared to the vast geographic scale of the ocean. Microplastic residence time and movement along the coast and sea surface outside of the gyres is still not well researched. This five-year project utilized global citizen scientists to collect 1,628 1-liter surface grab samples in every major ocean. The Artic and Southern oceans contained highest average of particles per liter of surface water. Open ocean samples (further than 12 nm from land, n = 686) contained a higher particle average (17 pieces L-1) than coastal samples (n = 723) 6 pieces L-1. Particles were predominantly 100 µm- 1.5 mm in length (77%), smaller than what has been captured in the majority of surface studies. Utilization of citizen scientists to collect data both in fairly accessible regions of the world as well as from areas hard to reach and therefore under sampled, provides us with a wider perspective of global microplastics occurrence. Our findings confirm global microplastic accumulation zone model predictions. The open ocean and poles have sequestered and trapped plastic for over half a century, and show that not only plastics, but anthropogenic fibers are polluting the environment. Continuing to fill knowledge gaps on microplastic shape, size and color in remote ocean areas will drive more accurate oceanographic models of plastic accumulation zones. Incorporation of smaller-sized particles in these models, which has previously

  8. Rover exploration on the lunar surface; a science proposal for SELENE-B mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Kubota, T.; Akiyama, H.; Hirata, N.; Kunii, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Okada, T.; Otake, M.; Saiki, K.; Sugihara, T.

    LUNARSURFACE:ASCIENCES. Sasaki (1), T. Kubota (2) , H. Akiyama (1) , N. Hirata (3), Y. Kunii (4), K. Matsumoto (5), T. Okada (2), M. Otake (3), K. Saiki (6), T. Sugihara (3) (1) Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Univ. Tokyo, (2) Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences, (3) National Space Development Agency of Japan, (4) Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Chuo Univ., (5) National Aerospace Laboratory of Japan, (6) Research Institute of Materials and Resources, Akita Univ. sho@eps.s.u -tokyo.ac.jp/Fax:+81-3-5841-4569 A new lunar landing mission (SELENE-B) is now in consideration in Japan. Scientific investigation plans using a rover are proposed. To clarify the origin and evolution of the moon, the early crustal formation and later mare volcanic processes are still unveiled. We proposed two geological investigation plans: exploration of a crater central peak to discover subsurface materials and exploration of dome-cone structures on young mare region. We propose multi-band macro/micro camera using AOTF, X-ray spectrometer/diffractometer and gamma ray spectrometer. Since observation of rock fragments in brecciaed rocks is necessary, the rover should have cutting or scraping mechanism of rocks. In our current scenario, landing should be performed about 500m from the main target (foot of a crater central peak or a cone/dome). After the spectral survey by multi-band camera on the lander, the rover should be deployed for geological investigation. The rover should make a short (a few tens meter) round trip at first, then it should perform traverse observation toward the main target. Some technological investigations on SELENE-B project will be also presented.

  9. Surface Science in an MOCVD Environment: Arsenic on Vicinal Ge(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, J.M.; McMahon, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images of arsine-exposed vicinal Ge(100) surfaces show that most As/Ge steps are reconstructed, and that a variety of different step structures exist. The entire family of reconstructed As/Ge steps can be divided into two types, which we have chosen to call ''single-row'' steps and ''double-row'' steps. In this paper we propose a model for a double-row step created by annealing a vicinal Ge(100) substrate under an arsine flux in a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) chamber

  10. Martian Surface Boundary Layer Characterization: Enabling Environmental Data for Science, Engineering and Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, C.

    2000-01-01

    For human or large robotic exploration of Mars, engineering devices such as power sources will be utilized that interact closely with the Martian environment. Heat sources for power production, for example, will use the low ambient temperature for efficient heat rejection. The Martian ambient, however, is highly variable, and will have a first order influence on the efficiency and operation of all large-scale equipment. Diurnal changes in temperature, for example, can vary the theoretical efficiency of power production by 15% and affect the choice of equipment, working fluids, and operating parameters. As part of the Mars Exploration program, missions must acquire the environmental data needed for design, operation and maintenance of engineering equipment including the transportation devices. The information should focus on the variability of the environment, and on the differences among locations including latitudes, altitudes, and seasons. This paper outlines some of the WHY's, WHAT's and WHERE's of the needed data, as well as some examples of how this data will be used. Environmental data for engineering design should be considered a priority in Mars Exploration planning. The Mars Thermal Environment Radiator Characterization (MTERC), and Dust Accumulation and Removal Technology (DART) experiments planned for early Mars landers are examples of information needed for even small robotic missions. Large missions will require proportionately more accurate data that encompass larger samples of the Martian surface conditions. In achieving this goal, the Mars Exploration program will also acquire primary data needed for understanding Martian weather, surface evolution, and ground-atmosphere interrelationships.

  11. Metal/metal-oxide interfaces: A surface science approach to the study of adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peden, C.H.F.; Kidd, K.B.; Shinn, N.D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-5800 (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Metal-oxide/metal interfaces play an important role, for example, in the joining of an oxide ceramic to a metal for sealing applications. In order to probe the chemical and physical properties of such an interface, we have performed Auger electron spectroscopic (AES) and temperature programed desorption (TPD) experiments on a model system composed of very thin films of Cr, Fe, Ni, or Cu evaporated onto a very thin thermally grown oxide on a W single crystal. Monolayer films of Fe and Cr were found (by AES) to completely wet the oxide surface upon deposition, and were stable up to temperatures at which the films desorbed ({approx}1300 K). In contrast, monolayer Ni and Cu films formed three-dimensional islands exposing the oxidized W surface either upon annealing (Ni) or even upon room-temperature deposition (Cu). The relative interfacial interaction between the overlayer metal and the oxide, as assessed by TPD, increases in the series Cu{lt}Ni{lt}Fe{lt}Cr. This trend follows the heats of formation of the various oxides of these metals.

  12. Investigation of anti-Relaxation coatings for alkali-metal vapor cells using surface science techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seltzer, S. J.; Michalak, D. J.; Donaldson, M. H.; Balabas, M. V.; Barber, S. K.; Bernasek, S. L.; Bouchiat, M.-A.; Hexemer, A.; Hibberd, A. M.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Jaye, C.; Karaulanov, T.; Narducci, F. A.; Rangwala, S. A.; Robinson, H. G.; Shmakov, A. K.; Voronov, D. L.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Pines, A.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-11

    Many technologies based on cells containing alkali-metal atomic vapor benefit from the use of antirelaxation surface coatings in order to preserve atomic spin polarization. In particular, paraffin has been used for this purpose for several decades and has been demonstrated to allow an atom to experience up to 10?000 collisions with the walls of its container without depolarizing, but the details of its operation remain poorly understood. We apply modern surface and bulk techniques to the study of paraffin coatings in order to characterize the properties that enable the effective preservation of alkali spin polarization. These methods include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also compare the light-induced atomic desorption yields of several different paraffin materials. Experimental results include the determination that crystallinity of the coating material is unnecessary, and the detection of C=C double bonds present within a particular class of effective paraffin coatings. Further study should lead to the development of more robust paraffin antirelaxation coatings, as well as the design and synthesis of new classes of coating materials.

  13. Electron/positron measurements obtained with the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector on the surface of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F.; Appel, J. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Experimental and Applied Physics; and others

    2016-04-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures the energetic charged and neutral particles and the radiation dose rate on the surface of Mars. Although charged and neutral particle spectra have been investigated in detail, the electron and positron spectra have not been investigated yet. The reason for that is that they are difficult to separate from each other and because of the technical challenges involved in extracting energy spectra from the raw data. We use GEANT4 to model the behavior of the RAD instrument for electron/positron measurements.We compare Planetocosmics predictions for different atmospheric pressures and different modulation parameters Φ with the obtained RAD electron/positron measurements.We find that the RAD electron/positron measurements agree well with the spectra predicted by Planetocosmics. Both RAD measurements and Planetocosmics simulation show a dependence of the electron/positron fluxes on both atmospheric pressure and solar modulation potential.

  14. 77 FR 12086 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science... following topics: --Earth Science Division Update --Committee on Earth Observations Satellites and Other...

  15. 75 FR 65673 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announces a meeting of the Earth Science... following topics: --Earth Science Division Update. --Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice...

  16. Biomimetics Bioinspired Hierarchical-Structured Surfaces for Green Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the general field of biomimetics - lessons from nature. It presents various examples of biomimetics, including roughness-induced superomniphobic surfaces which provide functionality of commercial interest. The major focus in the book is on lotus effect, rose petal effect, shark skin effect, and gecko adhesion.  For each example, the book first presents characterization of an object to understand how a natural object provides functionality, followed by modeling and then fabrication of structures in the lab using nature’s route to verify one’s understanding of nature and provide guidance for development of optimum structures. Once it is understood how nature does it, examples of fabrication of optimum structures using smart materials and fabrication techniques, are presented. Examples of nature inspired objects are also presented throughout.

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance and dynamic nuclear polarization of char suspensions: surface science and oximetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarkson, R.B.; Odintsov, B.M.; Ceroke, P.J.; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, J.H.; Fruianu, M.; Belford, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon chars have been synthesized in our laboratory from a variety of starting materials, by means of a highly controlled pyrolysis technique. These chars exhibit electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line shapes which change with the local oxygen concentration in a reproducible and stable fashion; they can be calibrated and used for oximetry. Biological stability and low toxicity make chars good sensors for in vivo measurements. Scalar and dipolar interactions of water protons at the surfaces of chars may be utilized to produce dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of the 1 H nuclear spin population in conjunction with electron Zeeman pumping. Low-frequency EPR, DNP and DNP-enhanced MRI all show promise as oximetry methods when used with carbon chars. (author)

  18. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to provide an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period September 1, 1989 through March 31, 1991. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL's research on the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the division. As in previous reports, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations. Summary lists of publications and presentations, staff additions and departures, scientific and professional activities of division staff, and technical conferences organized and sponsored by the division are included as appendices. The report is organized following the division of our research among four sections and information centers. These research areas are: Mathematical Sciences; Nuclear Data Measurement and Evaluations; Intelligent Systems; Nuclear Analysis and Shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center.

  19. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to provide an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period September 1, 1989 through March 31, 1991. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL's research on the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the division. As in previous reports, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations. Summary lists of publications and presentations, staff additions and departures, scientific and professional activities of division staff, and technical conferences organized and sponsored by the division are included as appendices. The report is organized following the division of our research among four sections and information centers. These research areas are: Mathematical Sciences; Nuclear Data Measurement and Evaluations; Intelligent Systems; Nuclear Analysis and Shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center

  20. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).