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Sample records for surface scanning electron

  1. Phosphogypsum surface characterisation using scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of application of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to examinations of the samples of natural gypsum and phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum has a well developed crystalline structure, and appear in two polymorphous forms, of rombic and hexagonal shape crystals. Natural gypsum has a poorly crystalline structure. The differences in crystalline structure influence the chemical behavior of these row materials.

  2. Surface properties and microporosity of polyhydroxybutyrate under scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raouf, A.A.; Samsudin, A.R.; Samian, R.; Akool, K.; Abdullah, N.

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the surface properties especially surface porosity of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) using scanning electron microscopy. PHB granules were sprinkled on the double-sided sticky tape attached on a SEM aluminium stub and sputtered with gold (10nm thickness) in a Polaron SC515 Coater, following which the samples were placed into the SEM specimen chamber for viewing and recording. Scanning electron micrographs with different magnification of PHB surface revealed multiple pores with different sizes. (Author)

  3. Assessment of root surfaces of apicected teeth: A scanning electron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the apical surface characteristics and presence of dental cracks in single‑rooted premolars, resected 3.0 mm from the root apex, using the Er: YAG laser, tungsten carbide bur, and diamond‑coated tip, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental design: Thirty ...

  4. Stereoscopic and photometric surface reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, S.

    2000-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is one of the most important devices to examine microscopic structures as it offers images of a high contrast range with a large depth of focus. Nevertheless, three-dimensional measurements, as desired in fracture mechanics, have previously not been accomplished. This work presents a system for automatic, robust and dense surface reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy combining new approaches in shape from stereo and shape from photometric stereo. The basic theoretical assumption for a known adaptive window algorithm is shown not to hold in scanning electron microscopy. A constraint derived from this observation yields a new, simplified, hence faster calculation of the adaptive window. The correlation measure itself is obtained by a new ordinal measure coefficient. Shape from photometric stereo in the SEM is formulated by relating the image formation process with conventional photography. An iterative photometric ratio reconstruction is invented based on photometric ratios of backscatter electron images. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated using ground truth data obtained by three alternative shape recovery devices. Most experiments showed relative height accuracy within the tolerances of the alternative devices. (author)

  5. Surface sensitivity effects with local probe scanning Auger-scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Agterveld, DTL; Palasantzas, G; De Hosson, JTM; Bentley, J; Allen, C; Dahmen, U; Petrov,

    2001-01-01

    Ultra-high-vacuum segregation studies on in-situ fractured Cu-Sb alloys were performed in terms of nanometer scale scanning Auger/Electron microscopy. S contamination leads to the formation Of Cu2S precipitates which, upon removal due to fracture, expose pits with morphology that depends on the

  6. Pollen grain surface in Vaccinium myrtillus as seen in scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Kocoń

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollen grain surface of Vaccinium myrtillus L. was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Pollen grains remain in tetrahedral tetrads. Grain surface is verrucose, consisting of thick, irregularly shaped muri, surrounding small, round or oval lumina. The surface of the muri is fissured, and minute papillae can also be noted.

  7. A scanning electron microscope study of olivine crystal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, E. J.; Grossman, L.

    1974-01-01

    SEM photographs were taken of euhedral olivine grains from the Murchison C2 chondrite and several terrestrial and lunar occurrences. In general, the crystal faces of the meteorite grains are rough and uneven, with irregular growth patterns. They are very similar to crystal faces on terrestrial olivine grains that formed by sublimation from a vapor phase. They are very different from the relatively smooth and featureless surfaces of magmatic olivine crystals that precipitated from igneous melts. Qualitatively, the surface morphology of the crystal supports the contention that many euhedral crystals of olivine in C2 meteorites condensed from a gas phase.

  8. Surface morphology of the endolymphatic duct in the rat. A scanning electron microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K; Rostgaard, Jørgen; Bretlau, P

    1995-01-01

    were identified with the scanning electron microscope. A polygonal and oblong epithelial cell was observed in the largest number throughout the duct, and in the juxtasaccular half of the duct, two additional types of epithelial cells were observed. The scanning electron microscopic observations...... microscopy was attained by coating of the specimens with osmium tetroxide and thiocarbohydrazide followed by a continuous dehydration procedure. This technique permitted, for the first time, an investigation of the surface morphology of the epithelial cells in the endolymphatic duct. Three types of cells...... are compared and discussed with reference to previous transmission electron microscopic studies of the endolymphatic duct....

  9. Effect of Autoclave Cycles on Surface Characteristics of S-File Evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Razavian, Hamid; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Mojtahedi, Hamid; Nazeri, Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Presence of surface defects in endodontic instruments can lead to unwanted complications such as instrument fracture and incomplete preparation of the canal. The current study was conducted to evaluate the effect of autoclave cycles on surface characteristics of S-File by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods and Materials: In this experimental study, 17 brand new S-Files (#30) were used. The surface characteristics of the files were examined in four steps (without autocla...

  10. Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Xu, Chunkai; Zhang, Panke; Li, Zhean; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-08-01

    We report a novel scanning probe electron energy spectrometer (SPEES) which combines a double toroidal analyzer with a scanning tunneling microscope to achieve both topography imaging and electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface in situ. The spatial resolution of spectroscopy mapping is determined to be better than 0.7 ± 0.2 μm at a tip sample distance of 7 μm. Meanwhile, the size of the field emission electron beam spot on the surface is also measured, and is about 3.6 ± 0.8 μm in diameter. This unambiguously demonstrates that the spatial resolution of SPEES technique can be much better than the size of the incident electron beam.

  11. Scanning electron microscopy study of protein immobilized on SIO2 Sol-gel surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assis O.B.G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniform attachment of enzymes to solid surfaces is essential in the development of bio and optical sensor devices. Immobilization by adsorption according to hydrophilic or hydrophobic nature is dependent on the charges and defects of the support surfaces. Sol-gel SiO2 densified glass surfaces, frequently used as supports for protein immobilization, are evaluated via scanning electron microscopy. The model protein is globular enzyme lysozyme, deposited by adsorption on functionalized surfaces. Formation of a protein layer is confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy, and the SEM images suggest discontinuous adsorption in areas where cracks predominate on the glass surface.

  12. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  13. [Scanning electron microscopy (S.E.M.) aspects of intestinal mucosal surface in childhood coeliac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, R; Bottaro, G; Ricca, O; Galasso, S

    1982-01-01

    Intestinal mucosal surface in 5 children suffered with Coeliac Disease was observed at Scanning Electron Microscopy. The comparison between two techniques of dehydration demonstrated that the Alcool-Amile Acetate dehydration reduces the technical errors to the minimum. Therefore, a better visualization allows us to recognize the surface coat, the microvillous and some mucosal functional aspects (scale off), which were previously undistinguished. There are no differences between the mucosal aspects in adult coeliac disease and childhood coelia disease.

  14. RGB color coded images in scanning electron microscopy of biological surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kofroňová, Olga; Benada, Oldřich

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2017), s. 349-352 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20229S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Biological surfaces * Color image s * Scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 0.673, year: 2016

  15. Electron-beam induced current characterization of back-surface field solar cells using a chopped scanning electron microscope beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, K. L.; Cheng, L.-J.

    1984-01-01

    A chopped electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique for the chacterization of back-surface field (BSF) solar cells is presented. It is shown that the effective recombination velocity of the low-high junction forming the back-surface field of BSF cells, in addition to the diffusion length and the surface recombination velocity of the surface perpendicular to both the p-n and low-high junctions, can be determined from the data provided by a single EBIC scan. The method for doing so is described and illustrated. Certain experimental considerations taken to enhance the quality of the EBIC data are also discussed.

  16. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2016-02-25

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  17. The surface morphology of retinal breaks and lattice retinal degeneration. A scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M R; Streeten, B W

    1986-02-01

    In 14 of 110 eye bank eyes, lesions characteristic of peripheral retinal surface pathology were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These included operculated and flap tears, trophic round holes, lattice degeneration with holes, and paravascular retinal "pitting" degeneration. By SEM, the edges of the retinal breaks were covered by smooth cellular membranes, merging peripherally with a meshwork of vitreous fibrils. The membrane cells had poorly defined borders, a pitted surface, and variable numbers of microvilli consistent with glia. Lattice surfaces and foci of paravascular retinal degeneration were covered by similar membrane, but showed characteristic differences. It appears that breaks in the internal limiting membrane always stimulate proliferation of preretinal glial membranes. Similar cellular morphology of the membranes associated with breaks is consistent with a common cell of origin. Limited proliferation of these membranes suggests that surface gliosis is normally inhibited when the cells contact either intact basement membrane or vitreous.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy of the tegumental surface of adult Schistosoma spindale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruatrachue, M; Riengrojpitak, S; Upatham, E S; Sahaphong, S

    1983-09-01

    The tegumental surfaces of adult male and female of Schistosoma spindale were studied by scanning electron microscopy. In general, the body surface of the male appears to be fairly uniform from anterior end to posterior end. It is characterized by the presence of transverse ridges and papillae of various types. These papillae are distributed fairly regularly over the whole body surface of the worm. The tegument lining the gynecophoral canal of the male worm is covered with numerous spines interspersed with papillae, some without cilia and some with crater-like holes in the centres and apical cilia. The tegument of the female worm is covered with smooth and perforated ridges and sensory bulbs with apical nodules.

  19. Scanning transmission electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a scanning transmission electron microscope comprising an electron source, an electron accelerator and deflection means for directing electrons emitted by the electron source at an object to be examined, and in addition a detector for detecting electrons coming from the

  20. The ultrastructure of pollen grain surface in allotetraploid petunia (Petunia hybrida hort. superbissima as revealed by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Muszyński

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of pollen grain surface in allotetraploid petunias was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The pollen grain wall is developed into characteristic pattern of convulations.

  1. Application of Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope-Nanomanipulation System on Spheroplast Yeast Cells Surface Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Maryam Alsadat; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    The preparation and observations of spheroplast W303 cells are described with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM). The spheroplasting conversion was successfully confirmed qualitatively, by the evaluation of the morphological change between the normal W303 cells and the spheroplast W303 cells, and quantitatively, by determining the spheroplast conversion percentage based on the OD 800 absorbance data. From the optical microscope observations as expected, the normal cells had an oval shape whereas spheroplast cells resemble a spherical shape. This was also confirmed under four different mediums, that is, yeast peptone-dextrose (YPD), sterile water, sorbitol-EDTA-sodium citrate buffer (SCE), and sorbitol-Tris-Hcl-CaCl 2 (CaS). It was also observed that the SCE and CaS mediums had a higher number of spheroplast cells as compared to the YPD and sterile water mediums. The OD 800 absorbance data also showed that the whole W303 cells were fully converted to the spheroplast cells after about 15 minutes. The observations of the normal and the spheroplast W303 cells were then performed under an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). The normal cells showed a smooth cell surface whereas the spheroplast cells had a bleb-like surface after the loss of its integrity when removing the cell wall.

  2. Effect of Autoclave Cycles on Surface Characteristics of S-File Evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavian, Hamid; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Mojtahedi, Hamid; Nazeri, Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Presence of surface defects in endodontic instruments can lead to unwanted complications such as instrument fracture and incomplete preparation of the canal. The current study was conducted to evaluate the effect of autoclave cycles on surface characteristics of S-File by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this experimental study, 17 brand new S-Files (#30) were used. The surface characteristics of the files were examined in four steps (without autoclave, 1 autoclave cycle, 5 autoclave cycles and 10 autoclave cycles) by SEM under 200× and 1000× magnifications. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software and the paired sample t-test, independent sample t-test and multifactorial repeated measures ANOVA. The level of significance was set at 0.05. New files had debris and pitting on their surfaces. When the autoclave cycles were increased, the mean of surface roughness also increased at both magnifications (Pautoclave increased the surface roughness of the files and this had was directly related to the number of autoclave cycles.

  3. Evaluation of Fibrin Clot Attachment on Titanium Laser-Conditioned Surface Using Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinjari, Bruna; Traini, Tonino; Caputi, Sergio; Mortellaro, Carmen; Scarano, Antonio

    2018-03-22

    The study aimed to evaluate the effects of different titanium surface treatments on blood clot extension (bce). A total of 54 titanium disks with machined surface (M), laser-conditioned surface (L), and grit-blasted surface (S) were used in the present study. The surface characteristics such as contact angles and the microroughness were determined on each group (n = 4). To evaluate the bce, 0.1 mL of human blood was dropped onto the surface of each specimen and left for 7 minutes at room temperature. After fixation, dehydration, and gold sputtering treatments, the specimens were observed under scanning electron microscope. The bce values were expressed as percentage of specimen surface covered by blood clot. The surface roughness (Ra ± standard deviation [SD]) was 0.75 ± 0.02 μm for M, 0.25 ± 0.02 μm for L, and 1.30 ± 0.03 μm for S. The contact angles measured in static conditions (WCA ± SD) were 71 ± 5.4° for M, 107 ± 6.6° for L, and 91 ± 7.2° for S. Regarding the bce (bce ± SD) of M samples (65.5 ± 4.3%) was statistically lower compared with both L (83.4 ± 5.1%) and S samples (72.4 ± 4.7%) (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the L group showed the higher bce value. The present results suggest that the laser-conditioned surface may increase the wettability and bce.

  4. Sample preparation for scanning electron microscopy of plant surfaces--horses for courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathan, A K; Bond, J; Gaskin, R E

    2008-12-01

    Plant tissues must be dehydrated for observation in most electron microscopes. Although a number of sample processing techniques have been developed for preserving plant tissues in their original form and structure, none of them are guaranteed artefact-free. The current paper reviews common scanning electron microscopy techniques and the sample preparation methods employed for visualisation of leaves under specific types of electron microscopes. Common artefacts introduced by specific techniques on different leaf types are discussed. Comparative examples are depicted from our lab using similar techniques; the pros and cons for specific techniques are discussed. New promising techniques and microscopes, which can alleviate some of the problems encountered in conventional methods of leaf sample processing and visualisation, are also discussed. It is concluded that the choice of technique for a specific leaf sample is dictated by the surface features that need to be preserved (such as trichomes, epidermal cells or wax microstructure), the resolution to be achieved, availability of the appropriate processing equipment and the technical capabilities of the available electron microscope.

  5. The surface topography of the choroid plexus. Environmental, low and high vacuum scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, Pedro; Pütz, Norbert; Garcia Gómez de Las Heras, Soledad; García Poblete, Eduardo; Morguet, Andrea; Laue, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) allows the examination of hydrated and dried specimens without a conductive metal coating which could be advantageous in the imaging of biological and medical objects. The aim of this study was to assess the performance and benefits of wet-mode and low vacuum ESEM in comparison to high vacuum scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using the choroid plexus of chicken embryos as a model, an organ of the brain involved in the formation of cerebrospinal fluid in vertebrates. Specimens were fixed with or without heavy metals and examined directly or after critical point drying with or without metal coating. For wet mode ESEM freshly excised specimens without any pre-treatment were also examined. Conventional high vacuum SEM revealed the characteristic morphology of the choroid plexus cells at a high resolution and served as reference. With low vacuum ESEM of dried but uncoated samples the structure appeared well preserved but charging was a problem. It could be reduced by a short beam dwell time and averaging of images or by using the backscattered electron detector instead of the gaseous secondary electron detector. However, resolution was lower than with conventional SEM. Wet mode imaging was only possible with tissue that had been stabilized by fixation. Not all surface details (e.g. microvilli) could be visualized and other structures, like the cilia, were deformed. In summary, ESEM is an additional option for the imaging of bio-medical samples but it is problematic with regard to resolution and sample stability during imaging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultra-morphology of root surface subsequent to periodontal instrumentation: A scanning electron microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to compare root surface characteristic following root planing with various hand and power driven instruments. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 single rooted teeth were used in this study, of which two specimens were used as control (no instrumentation done and remaining 18 specimens were equally divided into three groups. Specimens from each group were then subjected to root planing by one of the following instruments: (1 a Gracey curette (2 Ultrasonic tip and (3 a Rotary bur. In each case, the time required for scaling and root planing was measured. After treatment, the specimens were observed under scanning electron microscope and surface roughness was measured by using Roughness and loss of tooth substance index (RLTSI. Results: The mean RLTSI scores for Gracey curette, ultrasonic and rotary instrument group were 2.5, 2.0 and 0.667 respectively. The mean scores of time spent for scaling and root planing by Gracey curette, ultrasonic and rotary instrument group in seconds were 42.50, 35.83 and 54.50. Conclusion: All the three instruments namely Gracey curette, Ultrasonic tip and Rotary bur were effective in mechanical debridement of root surface. The results favoured the use of rotary instruments for root planing to achieve smooth clean root surface; however, the use of rotary instrument was more time consuming which might limit its use in clinical practice.

  7. Surface textures of quartz grains from Goa coast - An application of the scanning electron microscope

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ambre, N.V.; Gujar, A.R.; Mislankar, P.G.

    The scanning electron microscopy of quartz grains along the Goa beaches reveals 10 microfeatures. Three types of process response environments viz. Beach (Littoral), subaqueous and low to high-energy chemical environments appears to be active...

  8. In situ scanning electron microscope peeling to quantify surface energy between multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roenbeck, Michael R; Wei, Xiaoding; Beese, Allison M; Naraghi, Mohammad; Furmanchuk, Al'ona; Paci, Jeffrey T; Schatz, George C; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2014-01-28

    Understanding atomic interactions between constituents is critical to the design of high-performance nanocomposites. Here, we report an experimental-computational approach to investigate the adhesion energy between as-produced arc discharge multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphene. An in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) experiment is used to peel MWCNTs from graphene grown on copper foils. The force during peeling is obtained by monitoring the deflection of a cantilever. Finite element and molecular mechanics simulations are performed to assist the data analysis and interpretation of the results. A finite element analysis of the experimental configuration is employed to confirm the applicability of Kendall's peeling model to obtain the adhesion energy. Molecular mechanics simulations are used to estimate the effective contact width at the MWCNT-graphene interface. The measured surface energy is γ = 0.20 ± 0.09 J·m(-2) or γ = 0.36 ± 0.16 J·m(-2), depending on the assumed conformation of the tube cross section during peeling. The scatter in the data is believed to result from an amorphous carbon coating on the MWCNTs, observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the surface roughness of graphene as characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  9. Micro-four-point probes in a UHV scanning electron microscope for in-situ surface-conductivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraki, I.; Nagao, T.; Hasegawa, S.

    2000-01-01

    For in-situ measurements of surface conductivity in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), we have installed micro-four-point probes (probe spacings down to 4 mum) in a UHV scanning electron microscope (SEM) combined with scanning reflection-high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). With the aid of piezoactuators...... for precise positioning of the probes, local conductivity of selected surface domains of well-defined superstructures could be measured during SEM and RHEED observations. It was found that the surface sensitivity of the conductivity measurements was enhanced by reducing the probe spacing, enabling...

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of the surfaces of ion implanted SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malherbe, Johan B.; van der Berg, N. G.; Kuhudzai, R. J.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; Thabethe, T. T.; Odutemowo, O. S.; Theron, C. C.; Friedland, E.; Botha, A. J.; Wendler, E.

    2015-07-01

    This paper gives a brief review of radiation damage caused by particle (ions and neutrons) bombardment in SiC at different temperatures, and its annealing, with an expanded discussion on the effects occurring on the surface. The surface effects were observed using SEM (scanning electron microscopy) with an in-lens detector and EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction). Two substrates were used, viz. single crystalline 6H-SiC wafers and polycrystalline SiC, where the majority of the crystallites were 3C-SiC. The surface modification of the SiC samples by 360 keV ion bombardment was studied at temperatures below (i.e. room temperature), just at (i.e. 350 °C), or above (i.e. 600 °C) the critical temperature for amorphization of SiC. For bombardment at a temperature at about the critical temperature an extra step, viz. post-bombardment annealing, was needed to ascertain the microstructure of bombarded layer. Another aspect investigated was the effect of annealing of samples with an ion bombardment-induced amorphous layer on a 6H-SiC substrate. SEM could detect that this layer started to crystalize at 900 °C. The resulting topography exhibited a dependence on the ion species. EBSD showed that the crystallites forming in the amorphized layer were 3C-SiC and not 6H-SiC as the substrate. The investigations also pointed out the behaviour of the epitaxial regrowth of the amorphous layer from the 6H-SiC interface.

  11. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope.Specifications / Capabilities:Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  12. Measurement of surface recombination velocity for silicon solar cells using a scanning electron microscope with pulsed beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, T.; Cheng, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The role of surface recombination velocity in the design and fabrication of silicon solar cells is discussed. A scanning electron microscope with pulsed electron beam was used to measure this parameter of silicon surfaces. It is shown that the surface recombination velocity, s, increases by an order of magnitude when an etched surface degrades, probably as a result of environmental reaction. A textured front-surface-field cell with a high-low junction near the surface shows the effect of minority carrier reflection and an apparent reduction of s, whereas a tandem-junction cell shows an increasing s value. Electric fields at junction interfaces in front-surface-field and tandem-junction cells acting as minority carrier reflectors or sinks tend to alter the value of effective surface recombination velocity for different beam penetration depths. A range of values of s was calculated for different surfaces.

  13. Studies of the small bowel surface by scanning electron microscopy in infants with persistent diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Fagundes-Neto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the ultrastructural abnormalities of the small bowel surface in 16 infants with persistent diarrhea. The age range of the patients was 2 to 10 months, mean 4.8 months. All patients had diarrhea lasting 14 or more days. Bacterial overgrowth of the colonic microflora in the jejunal secretion, at concentrations above 10(4 colonies/ml, was present in 11 (68.7% patients. The stool culture was positive for an enteropathogenic agent in 8 (50.0% patients: for EPEC O111 in 2, EPEC O119 in 1, EAEC in 1, and Shigella flexneri in 1; mixed infections due to EPEC O111 and EAEC in 1 patient, EPEC O119 and EAEC in 1 and EPEC O55, EPEC O111, EAEC and Shigella sonnei in 1. Morphological abnormalities in the small bowel mucosa were observed in all 16 patients, varying in intensity from moderate 9 (56.3% to severe 7 (43.7%. The scanning electron microscopic study of small bowel biopsies from these subjects showed several surface abnormalities. At low magnification (100X most of the villi showed mild to moderate stunting, but on several occasions there was subtotal villus atrophy. At higher magnification (7,500X photomicrographs showed derangement of the enterocytes; on several occasions the cell borders were not clearly defined and very often microvilli were decreased in number and height; in some areas there was a total disappearance of the microvilli. In half of the patients a mucus-fibrinoid pseudomembrane was seen partially coating the enterocytes, a finding that provides additional information on the pathophysiology of persistent diarrhea.

  14. Scanning electron microscopy of surface features of hamster embryo cells transformed in vitro by x-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borek, C.; Fenoglio, C.M.

    1976-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope studies were carried out on Syrian hamster embryo cells transformed in vitro by x-irradiation (300 rads) (x-ray transformed) and on normal nonirradiated and irradiated nontransformed controls. Transformed cells appeared in scanning electron microscopy as pleomorphic, thick cells piling up over each other and exhibiting extensive surface features consisting of microvilli, blebs, and ruffles. These surface structures were seen on single as well as on densely cultured transformed cells during both interphase and mitosis. The complex surface was observed shortly after transformation (on cells of a 20-day-old clone) and seems a permanent feature of the x-ray transformed cells (present after 8 years in culture). All controls appeared by scanning electron microscopy as regular, flat, and smooth cells which grew in high-density cultures to seemingly contact-inhibited monolayers. During mitosis the normal cells (control, nontransformed) displayed surface excrescences similar to those of the transformed cells making the mitotic normal cells indistinguishable from transformed cells. The complex surface features in the normal cells were temporary and reversed back to characteristic smoothness upon reentrance into interphase

  15. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  16. Cryopreserved semilunar heart valve allografts: leaflet surface damage in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert, J; Krs, O; Vojácek, J; Mokrácek, A; Slízová, D; Hlubocký, J; Kobylka, P; Spatenka, J

    2008-08-01

    Allograft heart valves (AHV), biological valves of human origin, offer potential advantages over conventional xenografts in terms of superior hemodynamics and, perhaps, better durability. The most important factors for long-term AHV clinical performance are the processing and cryopreservation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of current processing protocol on valve tissue morphology, mainly to address the effect of successive processing steps on the leaflet surface structure. For the detection of fine changes in endothelial covering and underlying layers, our own modification of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique was utilized. The study was based on an investigation of 20 AHV (40 specimens). Fourteen valves came from heart-beating donors (multiorgan harvesting) when the heart could not be transplanted for any reason (donor criteria, availability of recipient and/or logistics). Six were obtained at the time of routine postmortems--non heart-beating donors (NHBD). All specimens were initially fixed in Baker's solution. Tissue samples were dissected, dried with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), gold-coated, studied and photographed by SEM (Tesla BS 301). In order to define the integrity of the endothelium, subendothelial layers and the quality of the surface under SEM, a special six-level score system was introduced: 1-intact endothelium, 2-confluent endothelium with structural inhomogeneity, 3-disruption of intercellular contacts, 4-separation of endothelial cells, 5-complete loss of endothelium, 6-damage of subendothelial layers). AHV samples were divided into 4 groups for comparison. One aortic AHV "fresh" control sample obtained from a heart-beating donor was evaluated without any processing and was compared with (i) tissue from AHV obtained from NHBD with warm ischemia of 12 and 48 hours, (ii) samples stored at +4 degrees C in saline for 24 h, (iii) antibiotic-treated tissue for 24 h at 37 degrees C and finally with (iv

  17. Analysis of hydrogen distribution on Mg-Ni alloy surface by scanning electron-stimulated desorption ion microscope (SESDIM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaga, Atsushi; Hibino, Kiyohide; Suzuki, Masanori; Yamada, Masaaki; Tanaka, Kazuhide; Ueda, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen distribution and behavior on a Mg-Ni alloy surface are studied by using a time-of-flight electron-stimulated desorption (TOF-ESD) microscopy and a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). The desorbed hydrogen ions are energy-discriminated and distinguished into two characters in the adsorbed states, which belong to Mg 2 Ni grains and the other to oxygen-contaminated Mg phase at the grain boundaries. Adsorbed hydrogen is found to be stable up to 150 deg. C, but becomes thermally unstable around at 200 deg. C

  18. Scanning Electron Microscope Mapping System Developed for Detecting Surface Defects in Fatigue Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kantzos, Peter T.

    2002-01-01

    An automated two-degree-of-freedom specimen positioning stage has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to map and monitor defects in fatigue specimens. This system expedites the examination of the entire gauge section of fatigue specimens so that defects can be found using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Translation and rotation stages are driven by microprocessor-based controllers that are, in turn, interfaced to a computer running custom-designed software. This system is currently being used to find and record the location of ceramic inclusions in powder metallurgy materials. The mapped inclusions are periodically examined during interrupted fatigue experiments. The number of cycles to initiate cracks from these inclusions and the rate of growth of initiated cracks can then be quantified. This information is necessary to quantify the effect of this type of defect on the durability of powder metallurgy materials. This system was developed with support of the Ultra Safe program.

  19. A scanning electron microscopic study of the surface morphology of nuptial pads in male amphibians (Genus: Bombina, Pelophylax, Rana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualina Kyriakopoulou-Sklavounou

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The fine structure of nuptial pad surface of the anuran amphibians Bombina variegata, Pelophylax epeiroticus, Pelophylax ridibundus and Rana dalmatina, was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Nuptial pads are cutaneous secondary sexual characters of males that appear during the breeding season and disappear afterwards following an annual cycle. In males of P. epeiroticus, P. ridibundus and R. dalmatina, nuptial pads were observed on the ventrolateral aspect of the first digit (the thumb as darkish and remarkably keratinized papillae. In males of B. variegata nuptial pads were almost black and very visible on the thumb, the second and the third digit of the front legs. They also extended on the ventral surface of the forearms. Under scanning electron microscope numerous small papillae were observed rising above pad’s surface. In P. epeiroticus, P. ridibundus and R. dalmatina, these papillae were almost rounded at the base while at the dome shaped top they had many microprocesses organised in groups, thus assuming the shape of a “flower” which differed slightly among these three ranid species. In B. variegata the protuberances were conical with heavily keratinized hooks without microprocesses. Our results show that surface morphology of nuptial pads is unique for each species and could be considered as a species-specific character.

  20. Immobilization, hybridization, and oxidation of synthetic DNA on gold surface: Electron transfer investigated by electrochemistry and scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, Gerald D.; Chen Fan [Biological Engineering Program, Department of Biological and Irrigation Engineering, Utah State University, 4105 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-4105 (United States); Zhou Anhong, E-mail: Anhong.Zhou@usu.edu [Biological Engineering Program, Department of Biological and Irrigation Engineering, Utah State University, 4105 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-4105 (United States)

    2009-06-08

    Fundamental understanding of interfacial electron transfer (ET) among electrolyte/DNA/solid-surface will facilitate the design for electrical detection of DNA molecules. In this report, the electron transfer characteristics of synthetic DNA (sequence from pathogenic Cryptosporidium parvum) self-assembled on a gold surface was electrochemically studied. The effects of immobilization order on the interface ET related parameters such as diffusion coefficient (D{sub 0}), surface coverage ({theta}{sub R}), and monolayer thickness (d{sub i}) were determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). DNA surface density ({Gamma}{sub DNA}) was determined by the integration of the charge of the electro-oxidation current peaks during the initial cyclic voltammetry scans. It was found that the DNA surface densities at different modifications followed the order: {Gamma}{sub DNA} (dsS-DNA/Au) > {Gamma}{sub DNA} (MCH/dsS-DNA/Au) > {Gamma}{sub DNA} (dsS-DNA/MCH/Au). It was also revealed that the electro-oxidation of the DNA modified gold surface would involve the oxidation of nucleotides (guanine and adenine) with a 5.51 electron transfer mechanism and the oxidative desorption of DNA and MCH molecules by a 3 electron transfer mechanism. STM topography and current image analysis indicated that the surface conductivity after each surface modification followed the order: dsS-DNA/Au < MCH/dsS-DNA/Au < oxidized MCH/dsS-DNA/Au < Hoechst/oxidized MCH/dsS-DNA/Au. The results from this study suggested a combination of variations in immobilization order may provide an alternative approach for the optimization of DNA hybridization and the further development for electrical detection of DNA.

  1. Resistivity of thin gold films on mica induced by electron-surface scattering: Application of quantitative scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Marcelo E.; Gonzalez-Fuentes, Claudio A.; Henriquez, Ricardo; Kremer, German; Moraga, Luis; Oyarzun, Simón; Suarez, Marco Antonio; Flores, Marcos; Munoz, Raul C.

    2012-01-01

    We report a comparison between the resistivity measured on thin gold films deposited on mica, with predictions based upon classical theories of size effects (Drude's, Sondheimer's and Calecki's), as well as predictions based upon quantum theories of electron-surface scattering (the modified theory of Sheng, Xing and Wang, the theory of Tesanovic, Jaric and Maekawa, and that of Trivedi and Aschroft). From topographic images of the surface recorded with a Scanning Tunneling Microscope, we determined the rms roughness amplitude, δ and the lateral correlation length, ξ corresponding to a Gaussian representation of the average height-height autocorrelation function, describing the roughness of each sample in the scale of length set by the Fermi wave length. Using (δ, ξ) as input data, we present a rigorous comparison between resistivity data and predictions based upon the theory of Calecki as well as quantum theoretical predictions without adjustable parameters. The resistivity was measured on gold films of different thickness evaporated onto mica substrates, between 4 K and 300 K. The resistivity data covers the range 0.1 < x(T) < 6.8, for 4 K < T < 300 K, where x(T) is the ratio between film thickness and electron mean free path in the bulk at temperature T. We experimentally identify electron-surface and electron-phonon scattering as the microscopic electron scattering mechanisms giving rise to the macroscopic resistivity. The different theories are all capable of estimating the thin film resistivity to an accuracy better than 10%; however the mean free path and the resistivity characterizing the bulk turn out to depend on film thickness. Surprisingly, only the Sondheimer theory and its quantum version, the modified theory of Sheng, Xing and Wang, predict and increase in resistivity induced by size effects that seems consistent with published galvanomagnetic phenomena also arising from electron-surface scattering measured at low temperatures.

  2. Ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy reveals surface-connected tubular conduits in HIV-infected macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam E Bennett

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1-containing internal compartments are readily detected in images of thin sections from infected cells using conventional transmission electron microscopy, but the origin, connectivity, and 3D distribution of these compartments has remained controversial. Here, we report the 3D distribution of viruses in HIV-1-infected primary human macrophages using cryo-electron tomography and ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy (IA-SEM, a recently developed approach for nanoscale 3D imaging of whole cells. Using IA-SEM, we show the presence of an extensive network of HIV-1-containing tubular compartments in infected macrophages, with diameters of approximately 150-200 nm, and lengths of up to approximately 5 microm that extend to the cell surface from vesicular compartments that contain assembling HIV-1 virions. These types of surface-connected tubular compartments are not observed in T cells infected with the 29/31 KE Gag-matrix mutant where the virus is targeted to multi-vesicular bodies and released into the extracellular medium. IA-SEM imaging also allows visualization of large sheet-like structures that extend outward from the surfaces of macrophages, which may bend and fold back to allow continual creation of viral compartments and virion-lined channels. This potential mechanism for efficient virus trafficking between the cell surface and interior may represent a subversion of pre-existing vesicular machinery for antigen capture, processing, sequestration, and presentation.

  3. Evaluation of enamel surfaces following interproximal reduction and polishing with different methods: A scanning electron microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eenal Bhambri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interproximal reduction was introduced as an alternative to tooth extraction in patients with mild-to-moderate crowding, the beneficial outcomes of interdental reduction have been well documented, but nevertheless, possible detrimental effects on enamel have also been an issue of debate. Interproximal reduction generates the formation of grooves and valleys creating plaque retentive areas, predisposing teeth to caries, and periodontal disease. Various proximal stripping techniques, it is postulated, produce varying grades of roughness of the enamel surface; it is in this area that the research in this paper was focused. Aim: The aim is to evaluate enamel surface roughness after various interproximal reduction and polishing methods. Materials and Methods: 16-blade tungsten carbide bur, diamond disc, diamond-coated metal strip, fine Sof-Lex disc, and fine diamond bur were used for interproximal reduction and polishing on extracted human premolars. The specimens were then evaluated under scanning electron microscope (SEM and surface plots of images were made using Image J software. Statistical Analysis: The data obtained were subjected to ANOVA and posthoc multiple tests. Results: Under the SEM, all interproximal reduction protocols resulted in roughened and grooved enamel surfaces. The use of diamond-coated metal strip followed by polishing with fine Sof-Lex disc created surfaces that were reasonably smooth. Conclusions: The enamel surfaces after reduction with diamond-coated metal strip and polishing by fine Sof-Lex disc (group F were the smoothest.

  4. Environmental scanning electron microscopy of the surface of normal and vitrified leaves of Gypsophila paniculata (Babies Breath) cultured in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, K; Sarafis, V; Nailon, J; Holford, P; Uwins, P

    1996-06-01

    Leaf surfaces of non-tissue-cultured, vitrified and non-vitrified plantlets of Gypsophila paniculata (Babies Breath) were examined using an environmental scanning electron microscope. Non-tissue-cultured plants had a complete epidermal surface, recessed stomata and wax present on the leaf surface. The surface of tissue-cultured plantlets appeared similar to non-tissue-cultured plants excepting stomata were slightly protruding and less wax appeared to be present. In both non-tissue-cultured and tissue-cultured plants stomata were found both opened and closed and were observed closing. In contrast vitrified plantlets had abnormal, malformed stomata which appeared non-functional. The ventral surfaces of leaves seemed more normal than the dorsal, this may be due to the former receiving more light. Additionally, discontinuities were found in the epidermis. Often epidermal holes were found in association with stomatal apertures. It is suggested that the main cause of desiccation of vitrified G. paniculata plantlets ex vitro is due to loss of water from the discontinuity in epidermis and not because of non-functional stomata. Liquid water could be seen through the epidermal holes indicating that at least some of the extra water in vitrified plantlets is contained in the intercellular spaces.

  5. In-situ investigation of laser surface modifications of WC-Co hard metals inside a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, H.; Wetzig, K.; Schultrich, B.; Pompe, Wolfgang; Chapliev, N. I.; Konov, Vitaly I.; Pimenov, S. M.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.

    1989-05-01

    The investigation of laser interaction with solid surfaces and of the resulting mechanism of surface modification are of technical interest to optimize technological processes, and they are also of fundamental scientific importance. Most instructive indormation is available with the ail of the in-situ techniques. For instance, measuring of the photon emission of the irradiated surface ane the plasma torch (if it is produced) simultaneously to laser action, makes it possible to gain a global characterization of the laser-solid interaction. In order to obtain additional information about surface and structure modifications in microscopic detail , a laser and scanning electron microscope were combined in to a tandem equipment (LASEM). Inside this eqiipment the microscopic observation is carried out directly at the laser irradiated area without any displacement of the sample. In this way, the stepwise development of surface modification during multipulse irradiation is visible in microscopic details and much more reliable information about the surface modification process is obtainable in comparison to an external laser irradiation. Such kind of equipments were realized simultaneously and independently in the Institut of General Physics (Moscow) and the Central Institute of Solid State Physics and Material Research (Dresden) using a CO2 and a LTd-glass-laser, respectively. In the following the advantages and possibilities of a LASEM shall be demonstrated by some selected investigations of WC-CO hardmeta. The results were obtained in collaboration by both groups with the aid of the pulsed CO2-laser. The TEA CO2 laser was transmitted through a ZnSe-window into the sample chamber of the SEM and focused ofAo tfte sample surface. It was operated in TEM - oo mode with a repetition rate of about 1 pulse per second. A peak power density of about 160 MW/cm2 was achieved in front of the sample surface.

  6. Surface morphology and dislocation characteristics near the surface of 4H-SiC wafer using multi-directional scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takahiro; Orai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Yuya; Ito, Hiroyuki; Isshiki, Toshiyuki; Fukui, Munetoshi; Nakamura, Kuniyasu; Schamp, C T

    2017-10-01

    To improve the reliability of silicon carbide (SiC) electronic power devices, the characteristics of various kinds of crystal defects should be precisely understood. Of particular importance is understanding the correlation between the surface morphology and the near surface dislocations. In order to analyze the dislocations near the surface of 4H-SiC wafers, a dislocation analysis protocol has been developed. This protocol consists of the following process: (1) inspection of surface defects using low energy scanning electron microscopy (LESEM), (2) identification of small and shallow etch pits using KOH low temperature etching, (3) classification of etch pits using LESEM, (4) specimen preparation of several hundred nanometer thick sample using the in-situ focused ion beam micro-sampling® technique, (5) crystallographic analysis using the selected diffraction mode of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), and (6) determination of the Burgers vector using multi-directional STEM (MD-STEM). The results show a correlation between the triangular terrace shaped surface defects and an hexagonal etch pit arising from threading dislocations, linear shaped surface defects and elliptical shaped etch pits arising from basal plane dislocations. Through the observation of the sample from two orthogonal directions via the MD-STEM technique, a basal plane dislocation is found to dissociate into an extended dislocation bound by two partial dislocations. A protocol developed and presented in this paper enables one to correlate near surface defects of a 4H-SiC wafer with the root cause dislocations giving rise to those surface defects. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Scanning electron microscopic study of the tegumental surface of adult Schistosoma sinensium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruatrachue, M; Upatham, E S; Sahaphong, S; Tongthong, T; Khunborivan, V

    1983-12-01

    The SEM study of tegumental surface of adult Schistosoma sinensium reveals that the male tegument lacks tubercles or bosses; instead it is corrugated with small pits or perforated ridges. On the dorsal surface, spines are present whose number and size progressively increase towards the posterior end of the body. In addition, there are three types of papillae interspersed among the ridges and spines. The first type of papillae has crater-like holes surrounded by a circular doughnut-shaped elevation; some are ciliated and others are non-ciliated. They are generally found on the dorsal and ventral surfaces. The second is sensory papillae which are hemispherical in shape bearing apical cilia. They are found to be concentrated around the oral sucker and on the posterior end of the worm. The third is fungiform papillae without cilia which are found on the posterior end. There are short spines present on the tegument lining the gynecophoral canal of the male worm. The tegument of the female S. sinensium is corrugated with ridges on the ventral surface. Small spines are present on the anterior portion of the dorsal surface. They become larger and increased in number towards the posterior end of the worm. The three types of papillae are present but they are much fewer and less developed than those in the male worm.

  8. Scanning electron microscopic imaging of surface effects in desorption and nano-desorption electrospray ionization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaftan, Filip; Kofroňová, Olga; Benada, Oldřich; Lemr, Karel; Havlíček, Vladimír; Cvačka, Josef; Volný, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 3 (2011), s. 256-261 ISSN 1076-5174 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP206/10/P018; GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : ionization * DESI * nano-DESI * electron microscopy * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.268, year: 2011

  9. A Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for In-Situ Mars Surface Sample Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunson, J.; Gaskin, J. A.; Jerman, G. A.; Harvey, R. P.; Doloboff, I. J.; Neidholdt, E. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) project, funded by the NASA Planetary Instrument Concepts for the Advancement of Solar System Observations (PICASSO) Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES), will build upon previous miniaturized SEM designs and recent advancements in variable pressure SEM's to design and build a SEM to complete analyses of samples on the surface of Mars using the atmosphere as an imaging medium. This project is a collaboration between NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), electron gun and optics manufacturer Applied Physics Technologies, and small vacuum system manufacturer Creare. Dr. Ralph Harvery and environmental SEM (ESEM) inventor Dr. Gerry Danilatos serve as advisors to the team. Variable pressure SEMs allow for fine (nm-scale) resolution imaging and micron-scale chemical study of materials without sample preparation (e.g., carbon or gold coating). Charging of a sample is reduced or eliminated by the gas surrounding the sample. It is this property of ESEMs that make them ideal for locations where sample preparation is not yet feasible, such as the surface of Mars. In addition, the lack of sample preparation needed here will simplify the sample acquisition process and allow caching of the samples for future complementary payload use.

  10. Fibrin clot adhesion to root surface treated with tetracycline hydrochloride and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid: A scanning electron microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandran Preeja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Connective tissue attachment following periodontal regenerative surgery is directly related to the attachment of fibrin clot on to the root surface during early wound healing events.The adhesion of fibrin clot to the root surface affected by periodontal disease depends on the biologic acceptance of the root surface which can be accomplished by various root conditioning procedures during periodontal therapy. The present in vitro study has been designed to evaluate and compare the degree of fibrin clot adhesion to root surfaces treated with root conditioning agents tetracycline hydrochloride and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 dentin blocks are divided into three groups and treated with tetracycline hydrochloride, EDTA and phosphate buffered saline and a drop of blood is added to each dentin block. The dentin blocks are then prepared for scanning electron microscopic analysis and examined for the degree of fibrin network frmation and entrapped erythrocytes. Results: The degree of fibrin clot adhesion was highest with tetracycline hydrochloride group, then with control group and least with EDTA treated group. Conclusion: According to the results of the present study, root conditioning with tetracycline hydrochloride produces a biologically acceptable root surface with enhanced fibrin clot adhesion, which is a critical step in early wound healing process. EDTA gel appears less effective in producing a root surface necessary for the adhesion of fibrin clot. The control without any root conditioning procedure showed poor fibrin clot adhesion when compared to tetracycline treated group, but when compared to EDTA treated group the fibrin clot adhesion was slightly better.

  11. Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation of Root Canal Surfaces Prepared with LightSpeed & Endowave Rotary System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    B S, Hema; Chandu, G S; Shiraguppi, Vijayakumar L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the cleaning efficiency on root canal surfaces prepared with LightSpeed and Endowave rotary instruments. A total of 30 freshly extracted human mandibular premolars were subjected for the study. They were divided into two groups, each group consisting of 15 teeth. Group 1: The canals were prepared with LightSpeed system. Group 2: Endowave rotary system. All the groups were prepared according to manufacturer's recommendation, using 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and 17% EDTA (dent wash, prime dent) alternately as an irrigants. Crowns of each tooth were removed with diamond disks at the level of cement enamel junction. Canal length was determined by placing a size 10 K-file. The working length was 0.5 mm short of canal length. Two longitudinal grooves were prepared on the lingual and buccal surfaces of each root to facilitate vertical splitting with a chisel after canal instrumentation. The sections were then observed under SEM for presence or absence of debris and smear layer and the photographs were taken at coronal, middle and apical 1/3 with a magnification of 200 X and 1000X respectively. The scores recorded were statistically analysed using one-way-ANOVA and Mann- Whitney test. There was statistically significant difference between two groups. All groups resulted in significantly more debris and smear layer in the apical 1/3 of the canal, compared to coronal and middle 1/3 (p, <0.01). The study demonstrated that, LightSpeed instrumentation removed debris and smear layer more effectively on root canal surface than compared to Endowave instrument.

  12. Topographic assessment of human enamel surface treated with different topical sodium fluoride agents: Scanning electron microscope consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurlal Singh Brar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Continuous balanced demineralization and remineralization are natural dynamic processes in enamel. If the balance is interrupted and demineralization process dominates, it may eventually lead to the development of carious lesions in enamel and dentine. Fluoride helps control decay by enhancing remineralization and altering the structure of the tooth, making the surface less soluble. Methodology: One hundred and twenty sound human permanent incisors randomly and equally distributed into six groups as follows: Group I - Control, II - Sodium fluoride solution, III - Sodium fluoride gel, IV - Sodium fluoride varnish, V - Clinpro Tooth Crème (3M ESPE, and VI-GC Tooth Mousse Plus or MI Paste Plus. The samples were kept in artificial saliva for 12 months, and the topical fluoride agents were applied to the respective sample groups as per the manufacturer instructions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM evaluation of all the samples after 6 and 12 months was made. Results: Morphological changes on the enamel surface after application of fluoride in SEM revealed the presence of globular precipitate in all treated samples. Amorphous, globular, and crystalline structures were seen on the enamel surface of the treated samples. Clear differences were observed between the treated and untreated samples. Conclusion: Globular structures consisting of amorphous CaF2precipitates, which acted as a fluoride reservoir, were observed on the enamel surface after action of different sodium fluoride agents. CPP-ACPF (Tooth Mousse and Tricalcium phosphate with fluoride (Clinpro tooth crème are excellent delivery vehicles available in a slow release amorphous form to localize fluoride at the tooth surface.

  13. Dentin Morphology of Root Canal Surface: A Quantitative Evaluation Based on a Scanning Electronic Microscopy Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lo Giudice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentin is a vital, hydrated composite tissue with structural components and properties that vary in the different topographic portions of the teeth. These variations have a significant implication for biomechanical teeth properties and for the adhesive systems utilized in conservative dentistry. The aim of this study is to analyse the root canal dentin going from coronal to apical zone to find the ratio between the intertubular dentin area and the surface occupied by dentin tubules varies. Observations were conducted on 30 healthy premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons in patients aged between 10 and 14. A SEM analysis of the data obtained in different canal portions showed that, in the coronal zone, dentinal tubules had a greater diameter (4.32 μm than the middle zone (3.74 μm and the apical zone (1.73 μm. The average number of dentinal tubules (in an area of 1 mm2 was similar in coronal zone (46,798±10,644 and apical zone (45,192±10,888, while in the middle zone they were lower in number (30,940±7,651. However, intertubular dentin area was bigger going from apical to coronal portion. The differences between the analysed areas must be considered for the choice of the adhesive system.

  14. Effects of surface roughness and dimorphism on the adhesion of Candida albicans to the surface of resins: scanning electron microscope analyses of mode and number of adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayahara, Mitsuori; Kataoka, Ryuta; Arimoto, Takafumi; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Yamaguchi, Nobuaki; Watanabe, Yuki; Yamasaki, Yoshizumi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Candida albicans is a common oral fungus but can cause serious conditions such as Candida stomatitis. We investigated C. albicans adhesion to the surface of denture-base resins at two growth phases. Fungal suspensions of logarithmic (9 h) and stationary phase (24 h) C. albicans (JCM2085) were used. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed that yeast and mycelial forms were predominant in 9-h and 24-h cultures, respectively. Resin strips were polished to three surface roughness levels (Ra 3.2 μm, Ra 0.48 μm and Ra 0.06 μm) and were then immersed in C. albicans suspensions for both phases. The SEM images were taken at five sites on each strip. Adhesion of mycelial-form C. albicans on rough surfaces (Ra = 3.2) was 2.2 times higher than on smooth surfaces (Ra = 0.06; 7030 vs 3580 adhesions/mm(2), P < 0.01). The hyphae of these mycelial forms fully penetrated the surface cracks. Fewer adhesions occurred for yeast-form C. albicans, regardless of surface type (440-620 adhesions/mm(2), P = n.s.). Adhesion of yeast-form C. albicans was indifferent to surface roughness. In contrast, mycelial adhesion increased with surface roughness of the resin because mycelia infiltrated the minute protuberances on rough surfaces. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Dynamic Flaps Electronic Scan Antenna

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonzalez, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    A dynamic FLAPS(TM) electronic scan antenna was the focus of this research. The novelty S of this SBIR resides in the use of plasma as the main component of this dynamic X-Band phased S array antenna...

  16. SCANNING ELECTRON-MICROSCOPIC EVALUATION OF THE FRACTURED SURFACES OF CANINE CALCULI FROM SUBSTRATA WITH DIFFERENT SURFACE FREE-ENERGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    UYEN, HMW; JONGEBLOED, WL; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1991-01-01

    The strength of adhesion between dental calculus and enamel or dentin surfaces determines the ease with which the calculus can be removed by brushing or professional dental treatment. In this study, we examined the adhesion of canine calculi formed on substrata with different surface free energies

  17. Labeling surface epitopes to identify Cryptosporidium life stages using a scanning electron microscopy-based immunogold approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Hanna; Thompson, R C Andrew; Koh, Wan H; Clode, Peta L

    2012-02-01

    The Apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum is responsible for the widespread disease cryptosporidiosis, in both humans and livestock. The nature of C. parvum infection is far from understood and many questions remain in regard to host-parasite interactions, limiting successful treatment of the disease. To definitively identify a range of C. parvum stages in cell culture and to begin to investigate host cell interactions in some of the lesser known life stages, we have utilized a combined scanning electron microscopy and immunolabeling approach, correlating high resolution microstructural information with definitive immunogold labeling of Cryptosporidium stages. Several life cycle stages, including oocysts, merozoites I, trophozoites, gamonts and microgametocytes, were successfully immunolabeled in an in vitro model system. Developing oocysts were clearly immunolabeled, but this did not persist once excystation had occurred. Immunolabeling visualized on the host cell surface adjacent to invasive merozoites is likely to be indicative of receptor shedding, with merozoites also initiating host responses that manifested as abnormal microvilli on the host cell surface. Small sub-micron stages such as microgametocytes, which were impossible to identify as single entities without immunolabeling, were readily visualized and observed to attach to host cells via novel membranous projections. Epicellular parasites also expressed Cryptosporidium-derived epitopes within their encapsulating membrane. These data have allowed us to confidently identify a variety of C. parvum stages in cell culture at high resolution. With this, we provide new insight into C. parvum - host cell interactions and highlight future opportunities for investigating and targeting receptor-mediated interactions between Cryptosporidium life cycle stages and host cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Surface micromachined scanning mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Kent Erik

    1992-01-01

    Both aluminum cantilever and torsional scanning mirrors have been fabricated and their static and dynamic properties are studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments showed resonance frequencies in the range of 163 k-Hz - 632 kHz for cantilever beams with Q values between 5 and 11....... Torsional mirrors showed resonance frequencies in the range of 410 kHz - 667 kHz with Q values of 10 - 17. All measurements performed at atmospheric pressure. Both types of mechanical structures were deflected electrostatically at large angles (± 5°) more than 1011 times without breaking and without any...

  19. Combining low-energy electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy techniques for surface science: development of a novel sample-holder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheynis, F; Leroy, F; Ranguis, A; Detailleur, B; Bindzi, P; Veit, C; Bon, W; Müller, P

    2014-04-01

    We introduce an experimental facility dedicated to surface science that combines Low-Energy Electron Microscopy/Photo-Electron Emission Microscopy (LEEM/PEEM) and variable-temperature Scanning Probe Microscopy techniques. A technical challenge has been to design a sample-holder that allows to exploit the complementary specifications of both microscopes and to preserve their optimal functionality. Experimental demonstration is reported by characterizing under ultrahigh vacuum with both techniques: Au(111) surface reconstruction and a two-layer thick graphene on 6H-SiC(0001). A set of macros to analyze LEEM/PEEM data extends the capabilities of the setup.

  20. Surface modification of Sylgard 184 polydimethylsiloxane by 254 nm excimer radiation and characterization by contact angle goniometry, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddell, Emanuel A. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL (United States)], E-mail: ewaddell@chemistry.uah.edu; Shreeves, Stephen [University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL (United States); Carrell, Holly; Perry, Christopher [Oakwood College, Huntsville, AL (United States); Reid, Branden A. [Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD (United States); McKee, James [University of Alabama in Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2008-06-30

    The modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) by narrow band 254 nm excimer radiation under a nitrogen atmosphere was characterized by contact angle goniometry, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. UV irradiation results in the formation of the carboxylic acids that influences the wettability of the surface. Continued exposure results in the formation of an inorganic surface (SiO{sub x} (1 < x < 2)) which hinders the ability to continually increase the wettability. The continuity of this inorganic layer is disrupted by the formation of surface cracks. These results have implications in the fabrication and chemical modification of microfluidic or micro-electro-mechanical systems.

  1. Surface modification of Sylgard 184 polydimethylsiloxane by 254 nm excimer radiation and characterization by contact angle goniometry, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Emanuel A.; Shreeves, Stephen; Carrell, Holly; Perry, Christopher; Reid, Branden A.; McKee, James

    2008-06-01

    The modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) by narrow band 254 nm excimer radiation under a nitrogen atmosphere was characterized by contact angle goniometry, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. UV irradiation results in the formation of the carboxylic acids that influences the wettability of the surface. Continued exposure results in the formation of an inorganic surface (SiO x (1 < x < 2)) which hinders the ability to continually increase the wettability. The continuity of this inorganic layer is disrupted by the formation of surface cracks. These results have implications in the fabrication and chemical modification of microfluidic or micro-electro-mechanical systems.

  2. Real-Space Imaging of Carrier Dynamics of Materials Surfaces by Second-Generation Four-Dimensional Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2015-09-14

    In the fields of photocatalysis and photovoltaics, ultrafast dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination on material surfaces, are among the key factors that determine the overall energy conversion efficiency. A precise knowledge of these dynamical events on the nanometer (nm) and femtosecond (fs) scales was not accessible until recently. The only way to access such fundamental processes fully is to map the surface dynamics selectively in real space and time. In this study, we establish a second generation of four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM) and demonstrate the ability to record time-resolved images (snapshots) of material surfaces with 650 fs and ∼5 nm temporal and spatial resolutions, respectively. In this method, the surface of a specimen is excited by a clocking optical pulse and imaged using a pulsed primary electron beam as a probe pulse, generating secondary electrons (SEs), which are emitted from the surface of the specimen in a manner that is sensitive to the local electron/hole density. This method provides direct and controllable information regarding surface dynamics. We clearly demonstrate how the surface morphology, grains, defects, and nanostructured features can significantly impact the overall dynamical processes on the surface of photoactive-materials. In addition, the ability to access two regimes of dynamical probing in a single experiment and the energy loss of SEs in semiconductor-nanoscale materials will also be discussed.

  3. Study of non stoichiometric pure and Zr-Doped yttria surfaces by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, M.; Duraud, J.P.; Jollet, F.; Thromat, N.; Maire, P.; Le Gressus, C.

    1988-01-01

    Surfaces of oxygen-deficient yttrium oxide, pure or Zr-doped, have been studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The bulk local geometric structure of these non-stoichiometric compounds was previously determined around the Y atom by an EXAFS (Extended X-ray absorption fine structure) study. The local electronic structure around both Y and O, at the surface, was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The partial transfer of the electronic distribution between the anion and the cation was probed using the Auger parameter. Coupling of these experiments with microscopic observations show that: - In the pure oxygen-deficient sample, the concentration of oxygen vacancies appears to be increased at the grain boundaries. - The Auger parameter shows upon reduction an evolution of the Y-O bond towards a more covalent one, this evolution being modulated with the presence of Zr0 2

  4. Microbial colonization of irradiated pathogenic yeast to catheter surfaces: Relationship between adherence, cell surface hydrophobicity, biofilm formation and antifungal susceptibility. A scanning electron microscope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrag, Hala Abdallah; A-Karam El-Din, Alzahraa; Mohamed El-Sayed, Zeinab Galal; Abdel-Latifissa, Soheir; Kamal, Mona Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    Technological advances such as long-term indwelling catheters have created milieu in which infections are a major complication. Thus it is essential to be able to recognize, diagnose, and treat infections occurring in immunocompromised patients. Adherence assay and quantitation of biofilms was performed by a spectrophotometric method, hydrophobicity was evaluated by adhesion to p-xylene. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Nystatin was carried out by a well dilution method. Out of 100 bladder cancer patients, 23 pathogenic yeast isolates were identified. The samples were taken from urinary catheters and urine collected from their attached drainage bags. Pathogenic yeast identified were species of Candida, Cryptococcus, Saccharomyces, Blastoschizomyces, Trichosporn, Hansenula, Prototheca and Rhodotorula. With the exception of Rhodotorula minuta, the yeast were sensitive to the antimycotic agent (Nystatin) used before and after in vitro gamma irradiation at 24.41 Gy as measured by a disc diffusion method. All tested yeast strains were slime producers and showed positive adherence reactions. There were considerable differences in adherence measurements after irradiation. An increase in adherence measurement values (using a spectrophotometric method) after irradiation were detected in four strains whereas eight other strains showed a reduction in their adherence reaction. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) was evaluated by adhesion to p-xylene. Candida tropicalis showed a hydrophobic reaction with an increase in the cell surface hydrophobicity after irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy of irradiated C. tropicalis showed marked abnormalities in cell shape and size with significant reduction in adherence ability at the MIC level of Nystatin (4 μg/ml). More basic research at the level of pathogenesis and catheter substance is needed to design novel strategies to prevent fungal adherence and to inhibit biofilm formation.

  5. A SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDY OF HYPERCEMENTOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Beth?nia Camargo; Pinheiro, Tiago Novaes; Capelozza, Ana L?cia Alvarez; Consolaro, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate morphological characteristics of teeth with hypercementosis that are relevant to endodontic practice. Twenty-eight extracted teeth with hypercementosis had their root apexes analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The teeth were divided according to tooth groups and type of hypercementosis. The following aspects were examined under SEM: the contour and regularity of the root surface; presence of resorption; presence and number of apical forami...

  6. Immunogold Labeling for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Martin W; Fišerová, Jindřiška

    2016-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopes are useful biological tools that can be used to image the surface of whole organisms, tissues, cells, cellular components, and macromolecules. Processes and structures that exist at surfaces can be imaged in pseudo, or real 3D at magnifications ranging from about 10× to 1,000,000×. Therefore a whole multicellular organism, such as a fly, or a single protein embedded in one of its cell membranes can be visualized. In order to identify that protein at high resolution, or to see and quantify its distribution at lower magnifications, samples can be labeled with antibodies. Any surface that can be exposed can potentially be studied in this way. Presented here is a generic method for immunogold labeling for scanning electron microscopy, using two examples of specimens: isolated nuclear envelopes and the cytoskeleton of mammalian culture cells. Various parameters for sample preparation, fixation, immunogold labeling, drying, metal coating, and imaging are discussed so that the best immunogold scanning electron microscopy results can be obtained from different types of specimens.

  7. A Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for the Surface of Mars: An Instrument for the Planetary Science Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunson, J.; Gaskin, J. A.; Danilatos, G.; Doloboff, I. J.; Effinger, M. R.; Harvey, R. P.; Jerman, G. A.; Klein-Schoder, R.; Mackie, W.; Magera, B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope(MVP-SEM) project, funded by the NASA Planetary Instrument Concepts for the Advancement of Solar System Observations (PICASSO) Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Science (ROSES), will build upon previous miniaturized SEM designs for lunar and International Space Station (ISS) applications and recent advancements in variable pressure SEM's to design and build a SEM to complete analyses of samples on the surface of Mars using the atmosphere as an imaging medium. By the end of the PICASSO work, a prototype of the primary proof-of-concept components (i.e., the electron gun, focusing optics and scanning system)will be assembled and preliminary testing in a Mars analog chamber at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory will be completed to partially fulfill Technology Readiness Level to 5 requirements for those components. The team plans to have Secondary Electron Imaging(SEI), Backscattered Electron (BSE) detection, and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) capabilities through the MVP-SEM.

  8. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) Evaluation of the Interface between a Nanostructured Calcium-Incorporated Dental Implant Surface and the Human Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Francesco; Raspanti, Mario; Maghaireh, Hassan; Mangano, Carlo

    2017-12-17

    Purpose . The aim of this scanning electron microscope (SEM) study was to investigate the interface between the bone and a novel nanostructured calcium-incorporated dental implant surface in humans. Methods . A dental implant (Anyridge ® , Megagen Implant Co., Gyeongbuk, South Korea) with a nanostructured calcium-incorporated surface (Xpeed ® , Megagen Implant Co., Gyeongbuk, South Korea), which had been placed a month earlier in a fully healed site of the posterior maxilla (#14) of a 48-year-old female patient, and which had been subjected to immediate functional loading, was removed after a traumatic injury. Despite the violent trauma that caused mobilization of the fixture, its surface appeared to be covered by a firmly attached, intact tissue; therefore, it was subjected to SEM examination. The implant surface of an unused nanostructured calcium-incorporated implant was also observed under SEM, as control. Results . The surface of the unused implant showed a highly-structured texture, carved by irregular, multi-scale hollows reminiscent of a fractal structure. It appeared perfectly clean and devoid of any contamination. The human specimen showed trabecular bone firmly anchored to the implant surface, bridging the screw threads and filling the spaces among them. Conclusions . Within the limits of this human histological report, the sample analyzed showed that the nanostructured calcium-incorporated surface was covered by new bone, one month after placement in the posterior maxilla, under an immediate functional loading protocol.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the growth of dental plaque on the surfaces of removable orthodontic aligners after the use of different cleaning methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levrini L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Luca Levrini, Francesca Novara, Silvia Margherini, Camilla Tenconi, Mario Raspanti Department of Surgical and Morphological Sciences, Dental Hygiene School, Research Centre Cranio Facial Disease and Medicine, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy Background: Advances in orthodontics are leading to the use of minimally invasive technologies, such as transparent removable aligners, and are able to meet high demands in terms of performance and esthetics. However, the most correct method of cleaning these appliances, in order to minimize the effects of microbial colonization, remains to be determined. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to identify the most effective method of cleaning removable orthodontic aligners, analyzing the growth of dental plaque as observed under scanning electron microscopy. Methods: Twelve subjects were selected for the study. All were free from caries and periodontal disease and were candidates for orthodontic therapy with invisible orthodontic aligners. The trial had a duration of 6 weeks, divided into three 2-week stages, during which three sets of aligners were used. In each stage, the subjects were asked to use a different method of cleaning their aligners: 1 running water (control condition; 2 effervescent tablets containing sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals followed by brushing with a toothbrush; and 3 brushing alone (with a toothbrush and toothpaste. At the end of each 2-week stage, the surfaces of the aligners were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. Results: The best results were obtained with brushing combined with the use of sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals; brushing alone gave slightly inferior results. Conclusion: On the basis of previous literature results relating to devices in resin, studies evaluating the reliability of domestic ultrasonic baths for domestic use should be encouraged. At present, pending the availability of experimental evidence, it can be suggested that dental

  10. On the Progress of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) Imaging in a Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Müller, Erich; Meffert, Matthias; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2018-03-28

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with low-energy electrons has been recognized as an important addition to the family of electron microscopies as it may avoid knock-on damage and increase the contrast of weakly scattering objects. Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) are well suited for low-energy electron microscopy with maximum electron energies of 30 keV, but they are mainly used for topography imaging of bulk samples. Implementation of a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detector and a charge-coupled-device camera for the acquisition of on-axis transmission electron diffraction (TED) patterns, in combination with recent resolution improvements, make SEMs highly interesting for structure analysis of some electron-transparent specimens which are traditionally investigated by TEM. A new aspect is correlative SEM, STEM, and TED imaging from the same specimen region in a SEM which leads to a wealth of information. Simultaneous image acquisition gives information on surface topography, inner structure including crystal defects and qualitative material contrast. Lattice-fringe resolution is obtained in bright-field STEM imaging. The benefits of correlative SEM/STEM/TED imaging in a SEM are exemplified by structure analyses from representative sample classes such as nanoparticulates and bulk materials.

  11. Multibeam scanning electron microscope : Experimental results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2010-01-01

    The authors present the first results obtained with their multibeam scanning electron microscope. For the first time, they were able to image 196 (array of 14×14) focused beams of a multielectron beam source on a specimen using single beam scanning electron microscope (SEM) optics. The system

  12. Scanning Electron Microscope Analysis System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides the capability to examine surfaces microscopically with high resolution (5 nanometers), perform micro chemical analyses of these surfaces, and...

  13. Observation of a Brine Layer on an Ice Surface with an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope at Higher Pressures and Temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krausko, J.; Runštuk, Jiří; Neděla, Vilém; Klán, P.; Heger, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 19 (2014), s. 5441-5447 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Keywords : microstructural characterization * chemical-properties * organic-molecules * SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 4.457, year: 2014

  14. Stenostomum cf. leucops (Platyhelminthes in Thailand: a surface observation using scanning electron microscopy and phylogenetic analysis based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arin Ngamniyom

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The genus Stenostomum contains small turbellaria that are widely distributed in freshwater environments worldwide. However, there are only rare reports or studies of this genus from Thailand. Therefore, the objective of this study was to report S. cf. leucops in Thailand collected from Pathum Thani Province. The worm morphology and surface topography using scanning electron microscopy were determined. Moreover, the phylogenetic tree of S. cf. leucops was analysed with 17 flatworms based on the 18S ribosomal DNA sequences. The phylogenetic relationship shared a common ancestry of Catenulida species, and S. cf. leucops displayed a monophyletic pattern within Stenostomum spp. The results of the morphological and molecular data are discussed. These results may increase the knowledge of freshwater microturbellarians in Thailand.

  15. Morphological evaluation of cavity preparation surface after duraphat and Er:YAG laser treatment by scanning electronic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Luciane Borelli

    2002-01-01

    The treatment of dental surface using different lasers to prevent dental caries has been studied for several on last years. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the morphological changes on dentin surface from pulpal wall of cavity preparations performed by high-speed drill, treated with 2,26% fluoride varnish (Duraphat) and Er:YAG laser, and then submitted after receiving or not to EDTA 15% treatment. Twenty Class V cavities were performed on ten humans molars. The specimens were randomly divided in to 4 groups: group 1- treatment with Duraphat followed by Er:YAG laser irradiation (120 mJ/ 4 Hz); group 2: Er:YAG laser irradiation, same parameters, followed by Duraphat treatment; group 3- same group 1 followed by immersion in EDTA (5 min); group 4 - same as group 2 followed by immersion in EDTA (5 min). The specimens were processed for SEM analysis. The micrographs showed that Duraphat treatment promoted morphological changes on dentin, closing dentinal tubules; the specimens treated by Duraphat and Er:YAG laser and immersed in EDTA (group 3) showed homogeneous surface, closed and protected dentinal tubules, maintenance of the fluoride varnish on the dentin surface and around the dentinal tubules, showing feasible and efficiency of these therapies the feasibility.(author)

  16. Comparative evaluation of hand and power-driven instruments on root surface characteristics: A scanning electron microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to compare root surface characteristics following root planing with various hand- and power-driven instruments. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 single, rooted teeth were used in this study; two specimens were used as control (no instrumentation done and the remaining 18 specimens were equally divided into three groups. Specimens from each group were then subjected to root planing by one of the following instruments: (1 a Gracey curette, (2 ultrasonic tip and (3 a Rotary bur. In each case, the time required for scaling and root planing and surface roughness using the Roughness and Loss of Tooth Substance Index (RLTSI was measured. Result: The mean RLTSI scores for the Gracey curette, ultrasonic and rotary instrument groups were 2.5, 2.0 and 0.667, respectively. The mean scores of time spent for scaling and root planing by the Gracey curette, ultrasonic and rotary instrument groups in seconds were 42.50, 35.83 and 54.50, respectively. Conclusions: All the three instruments, namely Gracey curette, ultrasonic tip and rotary bur, were effective in mechanical debridement of the root surface. The results favored the use of rotary instruments for root planing to achieve a smooth, clean root surface; however, the use of rotary instrument was more time consuming, which might limit its use in clinical practice.

  17. Scanning electron microscopic studies on bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Motoya

    1978-01-01

    Surface morphological observations of benign and malinant bone tumors were made by the use of scanning electron microscopy. Tumor materials were obtained directly from patients of osteogenic sarcomas, chondrosarcomas, enchondromas, giant cell tumors and Paget's sarcoma. To compare with these human tumors, the following experimental materials were also observed: P 32 -induced rat osteogenic sarcomas with their pulmonary metastatic lesions, Sr 89 -induced transplantable mouse osteogenic sarcomas and osteoid tissues arising after artificial fractures in mice. One of the most outstanding findings was a lot of granular substances seen on cell surfaces and their intercellular spaces in osteoid or chondroid forming tissues. These substances were considered to do some parts in collaborating extracellular matrix formation. Protrusions on cell surface, such as mucrovilli were more or less fashioned by these granular substances. Additional experiments revealed these substances to be soluble in sodium cloride solution. Benign osteoid forming cells, such as osteoblasts and osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells had granular substances on their surfaces and their intercellular spaces. On the other hand, undifferentiated transplantable osteosarcoma which formed on osteoid or chondroid matrix had none of these granular substances. Consequently, the difference of surface morphology between osteosarcoma cells and osteoblasts was yet to be especially concluded. (author)

  18. Scanning electron microscopy and micro-analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisset, F.; Repoux, L.; Ruste, J.; Grillon, F.; Robaut, F.

    2008-01-01

    materials; 18b - metallation; 19 - biological samples - overview of preparation techniques; 20 - 3-D reconstruction of rough surfaces; 20a - 3-D imaging; 21 - SEM images: from numerical processing to quantitative analysis; 22 - STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy); 23 - in-situ mechanical tests; 24 - SEM and X-ray microanalysis maintenance and control; 25 - quality assurance and standardization; 26 - SEM share in experimental techniques; 27 - introduction to FIB; 28 - introduction to TEM (transmission electron microscopy); 29 - X-ray microanalysis on thin samples; 30 - introduction to cathodoluminescence; 31 - introduction to Raman spectroscopy. (J.S.)

  19. A qualitative analysis to compare the effects of surface machining of conventional denture base resin and two soft liners: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Santoshi V; Taruna, M; Chittaranjan, B; Reddy, Sushendhar M; Reddy, Kranti Kiran E; Kulkarni, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    The denture base acrylic resins require adjustments for various reasons. During this process there is an alteration in the surface characteristics of the denture base. Rough surfaces promote the bacterial adhesion and plaque accumulation; therefore it is important to know the character of the surface left by instrumentation on denture base materials. This study evaluated the surface characteristics of the machined surfaces of heat-cured acrylic denture base resin, GC supersoft and Permasoft softliners. Thirty 15×15×1.5mm acrylic resin specimens were fabricated with each of three acrylic resins: Lucitone 199 denture base resin (Group I), GC supersoft (Group II) and Permasoft (Group III) softliners. They were further divided into three sub Groups A, B and C, in which Sub Group A was control group that is smooth produced against the glass. Sub Group B was produced by machining with the tungsten carbide bur and Sub group C is machined with the stone bur. Each surface was evaluated by a Scanning electron microscope and data were analyzed by analysis of variance followed by Tukey's HSD test. Stone bur produced smoother surface (Ra 3.6681μm± 0.254) on Lucitone199 than the tungsten carbide bur (Ra 5.3881μm ± 0.3373). Carbide bur produced a smoother surface on the GC super soft (Ra 1.617097μm ± 0.191767) and Permasoft softliners (Ra 2.237419μm ± 0.354259). Whereas stone bur produced rougher surface on GC supersoft(Ra 2.6μm) and Permasoft (Ra 4.184839μm ± 0.409869) softliners. The present study shows each type of rotary instrument produces its own characteristic surface on each type of denture base materials and that care is needed when selecting the most appropriate instrument to adjust denture base materials. These results can have a significant clinical implication. While using Lucitone 199 stone bur can be used for chair side adjustments. Tungsten carbide bur can be used for GC supersoft and Permasoft softliners to achieve smoother surface.

  20. Surface characterization of 7S and 11S globulin powders from soy protein examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Qingjun; Du, Fangling; Ao, Qiang; Liu, Jie

    2011-09-01

    In this study the surface composition of 7S and 11S globulin powders from soybean proteins by aqueous buffer and reverse micelle extractions had been examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis by XPS revealed that the O and N atomic percentage of 7S and 11S globulin surfaces from bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelle was higher than from aqueous buffer, but the C atomic percentage was lower. The O/C ratio of the 7S globulin powder from aqueous buffer and reverse micelle was similar while significant differences were obtained in the O/C ratio of the 11S globulin powder, N/C atom ratios of the 7S and 11S globulin powders and high-resolution XPS C 1s, N 1s, O 1s spectra. Powder microstructure after reverse micelle treatment showed the presence of small pores, indicating the effect of reverse micelle on the 7S and 11S globulin structure. The obtained results indicated that the reverse micelle could affect the C, O and N components on the surface of soybean proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Surface and bulk 3D analysis of natural and processed ruby using electron probe micro analyzer and X-ray micro CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Singh, Saroj K.; Mishra, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Firm linking between two advance techniques: Micro-CT and EPMA for mineral analysis. • Attempt to identify and differentiate the treated gem stone from natural counterpart. • 3D structural and surface elemental analysis of the natural gem stone. - Abstract: The change in surface compositional and bulk structural characteristics of the natural ruby stone, before and after heat treatment with lead oxide has been analyzed using two advance characterization techniques like: X-ray micro CT scan (μ-CT) and electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA). The analytical correlation between these two techniques in identification as well as in depth study of the ores and minerals before and after processing has been presented. Also, we describe the aesthetic enhancement of a low quality defective ruby stone by lead oxide filling and the sequential analysis of this ruby stone before and after treatment using these two advanced techniques to identify and to confirm the change in its aesthetic value. The cracks healing and pores filling by the metal oxide on the surface of the ruby have been analyzed using μ-CT and EPMA. Moreover, in this work we describe the advance characterization of the repaired gem stones especially ruby stones. This work will light up the path for in-depth understanding of diffusion mechanism and abstract information of impurity particles inside the minerals. Based on these observations, EPMA and micro CT are shown to be powerful tools for the identification as well as research in gem stones.

  2. The Scanning Electron Microscope and the Archaeologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponting, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Images from scanning electron microscopy are now quite common and they can be of great value in archaeology. Techniques such as secondary electron imaging, backscattered electron imaging and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis can reveal information such as the presence of weevils in grain in Roman Britain, the composition of Roman coins and the…

  3. Very low energy scanning electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Hovorka, Miloš; Konvalina, Ivo; Mikmeková, Šárka; Müllerová, Ilona

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 645, č. 1 (2011), s. 46-54 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE08012 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * low energy electrons * cathode lens * very low energy STEM * grain contrast Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011

  4. Evaluating the Surface Characteristics of Stainless Steel, TMA, Timolium, and Titanium-niobium Wires: An in vivo Scanning Electron Microscope Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, K Pradeep; Keerthi, V Naga; Madathody, Deepika; Prasanna, A Laxmi; Gopinath, Vidhya; Kumar, M Senthil; Kumar, A Nanda

    2016-05-01

    Recent metallurgical research and advancement in material science has benefited orthodontists in the selection of an appropriate wire size and alloy type, which is necessary to provide an optimum and predictable treatment results. The purpose of the study was to clinically evaluate and compare the surface characteristics of 16 x 22 stainless steel, Titanium molybdenum alloy, timolium, and titanium-niobium before and after placing them in a patient's mouth for 3 months using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The total sample size was 40, which were divided into four groups (group 1 - stainless steel wires, 10 samples, group 2 - TMA wires, 10 samples, group 3 - timolium wires, 10 samples, and group 4 - titanium-niobium wires, 10 samples), and these were further subdivided into 5 each. The first subgroup of five samples was placed in the patient's mouth and was evaluated under SEM, and another subgroup of five samples was directly subjected to the SEM. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of surface characteristics of unused 16 x 22 rectangular stainless steel wire under 500 x magnification showed an overall smooth surface. Stainless steel wire samples placed in the patient's mouth showed black hazy patches, which may be interoperated as areas of stress. TMA unused wires showed multiple small voids of areas and small craters with fewer elevated regions. The TMA wire samples placed in the patient's mouth showed black hazy patches and prominent ridges, making the wire rougher. Timolium unused archwires showed heavy roughness and voids, whereas wires tested in the patient's mouth showed homogeneous distribution of deep cracks and craters. Unused titanium-niobium archwires showed uniform prominent striations and ridges with occasional voids, whereas wires used in the patient's mouth showed prominent huge voids that could be interpreted as maximum stress areas. Stainless steel (group 1) used and unused wires showed smooth surface characteristics when compared with

  5. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the growth of dental plaque on the surfaces of removable orthodontic aligners after the use of different cleaning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrini, Luca; Novara, Francesca; Margherini, Silvia; Tenconi, Camilla; Raspanti, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Advances in orthodontics are leading to the use of minimally invasive technologies, such as transparent removable aligners, and are able to meet high demands in terms of performance and esthetics. However, the most correct method of cleaning these appliances, in order to minimize the effects of microbial colonization, remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to identify the most effective method of cleaning removable orthodontic aligners, analyzing the growth of dental plaque as observed under scanning electron microscopy. Twelve subjects were selected for the study. All were free from caries and periodontal disease and were candidates for orthodontic therapy with invisible orthodontic aligners. The trial had a duration of 6 weeks, divided into three 2-week stages, during which three sets of aligners were used. In each stage, the subjects were asked to use a different method of cleaning their aligners: 1) running water (control condition); 2) effervescent tablets containing sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals followed by brushing with a toothbrush; and 3) brushing alone (with a toothbrush and toothpaste). At the end of each 2-week stage, the surfaces of the aligners were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. The best results were obtained with brushing combined with the use of sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals; brushing alone gave slightly inferior results. On the basis of previous literature results relating to devices in resin, studies evaluating the reliability of domestic ultrasonic baths for domestic use should be encouraged. At present, pending the availability of experimental evidence, it can be suggested that dental hygienists should strongly advise patients wearing orthodontic aligners to clean them using a combination of brushing and commercially available tablets for cleaning oral appliances.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy of molluscum contagiosum*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr, Hiram Larangeira; Abuchaim, Martha Oliveira; Schneider, Maiko Abel; Marques, Leandra; de Castro, Luis Antônio Suíta

    2013-01-01

    Molluscum contagiosum is a disease caused by a poxvirus. It is more prevalent in children up to 5 years of age. There is a second peak of incidence in young adults. In order to examine its ultrastructure, three lesions were curetted without disruption, cut transversely with a scalpel, and routinely processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The oval structure of molluscum contagiosum could be easily identified. In its core, there was a central umbilication and just below this depression, there was a keratinized tunnel. Under higher magnification, a proliferation similar to the epidermis was seen. Moreover, there were areas of cells disposed like a mosaic. Under higher magnification, rounded structures measuring 0.4 micron could be observed at the end of the keratinized tunnel and on the surface of the lesion. PMID:23539009

  7. Proximity Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy/Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-01-01

    Here a new microscopic method is proposed to image and characterize very thin samples like few-layer materials, organic molecules, and nanostructures with nanometer or sub-nanometer resolution using electron beams of energies lower than 20 eV. The microscopic technique achieves high resolution through the proximity (or near-field) effect, as in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), while it also allows detection of transmitted electrons for imaging and spectroscopy, as in scanning transmission...

  8. Scanning Electron Microscopy in modern dentistry research

    OpenAIRE

    Paradella, Thaís Cachuté; Unesp-FOSJC; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Unesp-FOSJC

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the usage of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in dentistry research nowadays, through a careful and updated literature review. By using the key-words Scanning Electron Microscopy and one of the following areas of research in dentistry (Endodontics, Periodontics and Implant), in international database (PubMed), in the year of 2012 (from January to September), a total of 112 articles were found. This data was tabled and the articles were classified ac...

  9. A comparative scanning electron microscopy study between hand instrument, ultrasonic scaling and erbium doped:Yttirum aluminum garnet laser on root surface: A morphological and thermal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitul Kumar Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Scaling and root planing is one of the most commonly used procedures for the treatment of periodontal diseases. Removal of calculus using conventional hand instruments is incomplete and rather time consuming. In search of more efficient and less difficult instrumentation, investigators have proposed lasers as an alternative or as adjuncts to scaling and root planing. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of erbium doped: Yttirum aluminum garnet (Er:YAG laser scaling and root planing alone or as an adjunct to hand and ultrasonic instrumentation. Subjects and Methods: A total of 75 freshly extracted periodontally involved single rooted teeth were collected. Teeth were randomly divided into five treatment groups having 15 teeth each: Hand scaling only, ultrasonic scaling only, Er:YAG laser scaling only, hand scaling + Er:YAG laser scaling and ultrasonic scaling + Er:YAG laser scaling. Specimens were subjected to scanning electron microscopy and photographs were evaluated by three examiners who were blinded to the study. Parameters included were remaining calculus index, loss of tooth substance index, roughness loss of tooth substance index, presence or absence of smear layer, thermal damage and any other morphological damage. Results: Er:YAG laser treated specimens showed similar effectiveness in calculus removal to the other test groups whereas tooth substance loss and tooth surface roughness was more on comparison with other groups. Ultrasonic treated specimens showed better results as compared to other groups with different parameters. However, smear layer presence was seen more with hand and ultrasonic groups. Very few laser treated specimens showed thermal damage and morphological change. Interpretation and Conclusion: In our study, ultrasonic scaling specimen have shown root surface clean and practically unaltered. On the other hand, hand instrument have produced a plane surface

  10. Effects of erbium-and chromium-doped yttrium scandium gallium garnet and diode lasers on the surfaces of restorative dental materials: a scanning electron microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, M; Barutcigil, C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential effects of laser irradiation, which is commonly performed in periodontal surgery, on the surfaces of restorative materials. Five different restorative dental materials were used in this study, as follows: (1) Resin composite, (2) poly acid-modified resin composite (compomer), (3) conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC), (4) resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), and (5) amalgam. Four cylindrical samples (8 mm diameter, 2 mm height) were prepared for each restorative material. In addition, four freshly extracted, sound human incisors teeth were selected. Two different laser systems commonly used in periodontal surgery were examined in this study: A 810 nm diode laser at a setting of 1 W with continuous-phase laser irradiation for 10 s, and an erbium-and chromium-doped yttrium scandium gallium garnet (Er, Cr: YSGG) laser at settings of 2.5 W, 3.25 W, and 4 W with 25 Hz laser irradiation for 10 s. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed to evaluate the morphology and surface deformation of the restorative materials and tooth surfaces. According to the SEM images, the Er, Cr: YSGG laser causes irradiation markings that appear as demineralized surfaces on tooth samples. The Er, Cr: YSGG laser also caused deep defects on composite, compomer, and RMGIC surfaces because of its high power, and the ablation was deeper for these samples. High-magnification SEM images of GIC samples showed the melting and combustion effects of the Er, Cr: YSGG laser, which increased as the laser power was increased. In amalgam samples, neither laser left significant harmful effects at the lowest power setting. The diode laser did cause irradiation markings, but they were insignificant compared with those left by the Er, Cr: YSGG laser on the surfaces of the different materials and teeth. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that Er, Cr: YSGG laser irradiation could cause distortions of the surfaces

  11. Scanning Electron Microscopy Sample Preparation and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jenny Ngoc Tran; Harbison, Amanda M

    2017-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopes allow us to reach magnifications of 20-130,000× and resolve compositional and topographical images with intense detail. These images are created by bombarding a sample with electrons in a focused manner to generate a black and white image from the electrons that bounce off of the sample. The electrons are detected using positively charged detectors. Scanning electron microscopy permits three-dimensional imaging of desiccated specimens or wet cells and tissues by using variable pressure chambers. SEM ultrastructural analysis and intracellular imaging supplement light microscopy for molecular profiling of prokaryotes, plants, and mammals. This chapter demonstrates how to prepare and image samples that are (a) desiccated and conductive, (b) desiccated and nonconductive but coated with an electron conductive film using a gold sputter coater, and (c) wet and maintained in a hydrated state using a Deben Coolstage.

  12. Mixed nano/micro-sized calcium phosphate composite and EDTA root surface etching improve availability of graft material in intrabony defects: an in vivo scanning electron microscopy evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Ahmed Y; Iacono, Vincent J

    2013-12-01

    The use of nanoparticles of graft materials may lead to breakthrough applications for periodontal regeneration. However, due to their small particle size, nanoparticles may be eliminated from periodontal defects by phagocytosis. In an attempt to improve nanoparticle retention in periodontal defects, the present in vivo study uses scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to evaluate the potential of micrograft particles of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) to enhance the binding and retention of nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite (nHA) on EDTA-treated and non-treated root surfaces in periodontal defects after 14 days of healing. Sixty patients having at least two hopeless periodontally affected teeth designated for extraction were randomly divided into four treatment groups (15 patients per group). Patients in group 1 had selected periodontal intrabony defects grafted with nHA of particle size 10 to 100 nm. Patients in group 2 were treated in a similar manner but had the affected roots etched for 2 minutes with a neutral 24% EDTA gel before grafting of the associated vertical defects with nHA. Patients in group 3 had the selected intrabony defects grafted with a composite graft consisting of equal volumes of nHA and β-TCP (particle size 63 to 150 nm). Patients in group 4 were treated as in group 3 but the affected roots were etched with neutral 24% EDTA as in group 2. For each of the four groups, one tooth was extracted immediately, and the second tooth was extracted after 14 days of healing for SEM evaluation. Fourteen days after surgery, all group 1 samples were devoid of any nanoparticles adherent to the root surfaces. Group 2 showed root surface areas 44.7% covered by a single layer of clot-blended grafted particles 14 days following graft application. After 14 days, group 3 samples appeared to retain fibrin strands devoid of grafted particles. Immediately extracted root samples of group 4 had adherent graft particles that covered a considerable area of the root surfaces

  13. Nitrogen implantation with a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, S; Raatz, N; Jankuhn, St; John, R; Meijer, J

    2018-01-08

    Established techniques for ion implantation rely on technically advanced and costly machines like particle accelerators that only few research groups possess. We report here about a new and surprisingly simple ion implantation method that is based upon a widespread laboratory instrument: The scanning electron microscope. We show that it can be utilized to ionize atoms and molecules from the restgas by collisions with electrons of the beam and subsequently accelerate and implant them into an insulating sample by the effect of a potential building up at the sample surface. Our method is demonstrated by the implantation of nitrogen ions into diamond and their subsequent conversion to nitrogen vacancy centres which can be easily measured by fluorescence confocal microscopy. To provide evidence that the observed centres are truly generated in the way we describe, we supplied a 98% isotopically enriched 15 N gas to the chamber, whose natural abundance is very low. By employing the method of optically detected magnetic resonance, we were thus able to verify that the investigated centres are actually created from the 15 N isotopes. We also show that this method is compatible with lithography techniques using e-beam resist, as demonstrated by the implantation of lines using PMMA.

  14. Lateral ordering of PTCDA on the clean and the oxygen pre-covered Cu(100) surface investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Stefan; Fiedler, Benjamin; Bauer, Oliver; Marele, Antonela; Sokolowski, Moritz M

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the adsorption of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on the clean and on the oxygen pre-covered Cu(100) surface [referred to as (√2 × 2√2)R45° - 2O/Cu(100)] by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Our results confirm the (4√2 × 5√2)R45° superstructure of PTCDA/Cu(100) reported by A. Schmidt et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 1995, 99,11770-11779]. However, contrary to Schmidt et al., we have no indication for a dissociation of the PTCDA upon adsorption, and we propose a detailed structure model with two intact PTCDA molecules within the unit cell. Domains of high lateral order are obtained, if the deposition is performed at 400 K. For deposition at room temperature, a significant density of nucleation defects is found pointing to a strong interaction of PTCDA with Cu(100). Quite differently, after preadsorption of oxygen and formation of the (√2 × 2√2)R45° - 2O/Cu(100) superstructure on Cu(100), PTCDA forms an incommensurate monolayer with a structure that corresponds well to that of PTCDA bulk lattice planes.

  15. [Scanning electron microscopy of Paragonimus proliferus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ben-jiang

    2005-10-30

    To identify the species of Paragonimus proliferus with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) based on the surface structure of excysted metacercariae, adult worms and eggs. Crabs were collected from the endemic area of P. proliferus and excysted metacercariae were separated. Adult worms at different ages and eggs were obtained from the experimentally infected rats. After being fixed by 2.5% glutardialdehyde and 1% osmic acid, alcohol dehydration, gilded by ion spatter, the specimens were observed under SEM by STEREOSCAN-100. The cuticular spines of excysted metacercariae distributed in single pattern, bayonet-shaped or scale-shaped. There were 6 dome-shape papillae around the rim of the ventral sucker symmetrically arranged. The cuticular spines of different age adult worms distributed in group pattern, relatively denser and more regularly arranged in the anterior part than the posterior part of the worm body. The shape and arrangement of the cuticular spines on adult worms at different ages were basically uniform. The surface of eggshell including the operculum was generally smooth. The shell rim joining the operculum was thick and prominent. A knot-like prominence was observed at the aboperculum end. The cuticular spines of both excysted metacercariae and adult worms of P. proliferus show its own characteristics, but the size and shape of the cuticular spines among individuals or different parts of the same specimen show certain differences.

  16. A scanning electron microscopic study of hypercementosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethânia Camargo Pinheiro

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate morphological characteristics of teeth with hypercementosis that are relevant to endodontic practice. Twenty-eight extracted teeth with hypercementosis had their root apexes analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The teeth were divided according to tooth groups and type of hypercementosis. The following aspects were examined under SEM: the contour and regularity of the root surface; presence of resorption; presence and number of apical foramina, and the diameter of the main foramen. The progression of club shape hypercementosis was directly associated with the presence of foramina and apical foramen obstruction. Cases of focal hypercementosis presented foramina on the surface, even when sidelong located in the root. Circular cementum hyperplasia form was present in 2 out of 3 residual roots, which was the highest proportion among the tooth types. The detection of a large number of foramina in the apical third of teeth with hypercementosis or even the possible existence of apical foramen obliteration contributes to understand the difficulties faced during endodontic treatment of these cases.

  17. A scanning electron microscopic study of hypercementosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Bethânia Camargo; Pinheiro, Tiago Novaes; Capelozza, Ana Lúcia Alvarez; Consolaro, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate morphological characteristics of teeth with hypercementosis that are relevant to endodontic practice. Twenty-eight extracted teeth with hypercementosis had their root apexes analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The teeth were divided according to tooth groups and type of hypercementosis. The following aspects were examined under SEM: the contour and regularity of the root surface; presence of resorption; presence and number of apical foramina, and the diameter of the main foramen. The progression of club shape hypercementosis was directly associated with the presence of foramina and apical foramen obstruction. Cases of focal hypercementosis presented foramina on the surface, even when sidelong located in the root. Circular cementum hyperplasia form was present in 2 out of 3 residual roots, which was the highest proportion among the tooth types. The detection of a large number of foramina in the apical third of teeth with hypercementosis or even the possible existence of apical foramen obliteration contributes to understand the difficulties faced during endodontic treatment of these cases.

  18. Cryo scanning electron microscopy of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper

    2017-01-01

    on the erythrocyte surface, called knobs. Current methods for studying these knobs include atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy. Standard electron microscopy methods rely on chemical fixation and dehydration modifying cell size. Here, a novel method is presented using rapid freezing and scanning electron...... microscopy under cryogenic conditions allowing for high resolution and magnification of erythrocytes. This novel technique can be used for precise estimates of knob density and for studies on cytoadhesion....

  19. Electron Beam Scanning in Industrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Yves; Herer, Arnold

    1996-05-01

    Scanned electron beams are used within many industries for applications such as sterilization of medical disposables, crosslinking of wire and cables insulating jackets, polymerization and degradation of resins and biomaterials, modification of semiconductors, coloration of gemstones and glasses, removal of oxides from coal plant flue gasses, and the curing of advanced composites and other molded forms. X-rays generated from scanned electron beams make yet other applications, such as food irradiation, viable. Typical accelerators for these applications range in beam energy from 0.5MeV to 10 MeV, with beam powers between 5 to 500kW and scanning widths between 20 and 300 cm. Since precise control of dose delivery is required in many of these applications, the integration of beam characteristics, product conveyance, and beam scanning mechanisms must be well understood and optimized. Fundamental issues and some case examples are presented.

  20. Stereo and scanning electron microscopy of in-shell Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K.): part two-surface sound nut fungi spoilage susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scussel, Vildes M; Manfio, Daniel; Savi, Geovana D; Moecke, Elisa H S

    2014-11-01

    This work reports the in-shell Brazil nut spoilage susceptible morpho-histological characteristics and fungi infection (shell, edible part, and brown skin) through stereo and scanning electron microscopies (SEM). The following characteristics related to shell (a) morphology-that allow fungi and insects' entrance to inner nut, and (b) histology-that allow humidity absorption, improving environment conditions for living organisms development, were identified. (a.1) locule in testae-the nut navel, which is a cavity formed during nut detaching from pods (located at 1.0 to 2.0/4th of the shell B&C nut faces linkage). It allows the nut brown skin (between shell and edible part) first contact to the external environment, through the (a.2) nut channel-the locule prolongation path, which has the water/nutrients cambium function for their transport and distribution to the inner seed (while still on the tree/pod). Both, locule followed by the channel, are the main natural entrance of living organisms (fungi and insects), including moisture to the inner seed structures. In addition, the (a.3) nut shell surface-which has a crinkled and uneven surface morphology-allows water absorption, thus adding to the deterioration processes too. The main shell histological characteristic, which also allows water absorption (thus improving environment conditions for fungi proliferation), is the (b.1) cell wall porosity-the multilayered wall and porous rich cells that compose the shell faces double tissue layers and the (b.2) soft tissue-the mix of tissues 2 faces corner/linkage. This work also shows in details the SEM nut spoilage susceptible features highly fungi infected with hyphae and reproductive structures distribution. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Simulation study of secondary electron images in scanning ion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2003-01-01

    The target atomic number, Z sub 2 , dependence of secondary electron yield is simulated by applying a Monte Carlo code for 17 species of metals bombarded by Ga ions and electrons in order to study the contrast difference between scanning ion microscopes (SIM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In addition to the remarkable reversal of the Z sub 2 dependence between the Ga ion and electron bombardment, a fine structure, which is correlated to the density of the conduction band electrons in the metal, is calculated for both. The brightness changes of the secondary electron images in SIM and SEM are simulated using Au and Al surfaces adjacent to each other. The results indicate that the image contrast in SIM is much more sensitive to the material species and is clearer than that for SEM. The origin of the difference between SIM and SEM comes from the difference in the lateral distribution of secondary electrons excited within the escape depth.

  2. 3D Micro-topography of Transferred Laboratory and Natural Ice Crystal Surfaces Imaged by Cryo and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, N. B.; Boaggio, K.; Bancroft, L.; Bandamede, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has highlighted micro-scale roughness on the surfaces of ice crystals grown and imaged in-situ within the chambers of environmental scanning electron microscopes (ESEM). These observations appear to align with theoretical and satellite observations that suggest a prevalence of rough ice in cirrus clouds. However, the atmospheric application of the lab observations are indeterminate because the observations have been based only on crystals grown on substrates and in pure-water vapor environments. In this work, we present details and results from the development of a transfer technique which allows natural and lab-grown ice and snow crystals to be captured, preserved, and transferred into the ESEM for 3D imaging. Ice crystals were gathered from 1) natural snow, 2) a balloon-borne cirrus particle capture device, and 3) lab-grown ice crystals from a diffusion chamber. Ice crystals were captured in a pre-conditioned small-volume (~1 cm3) cryo-containment cell. The cell was then sealed closed and transferred to a specially-designed cryogenic dewer (filled with liquid nitrogen or crushed dry ice) for transport to a new Hitachi Field Emission, Variable Pressure SEM (SU-5000). The cryo-cell was then removed from the dewer and quickly placed onto the pre-conditioned cryo transfer stage attached to the ESEM (Quorum 3010T). Quantitative 3D topographical digital elevation models of ice surfaces are reported from SEM for the first time, including a variety of objective measures of statistical surface roughness. The surfaces of the transported crystals clearly exhibit signatures of mesoscopic roughening that are similar to examples of roughness seen in ESEM-grown crystals. For most transported crystals, the habits and crystal edges are more intricate that those observed for ice grown directly on substrates within the ESEM chamber. Portions of some crystals do appear smooth even at magnification greater than 1000x, a rare observation in our ESEM-grown crystals. The

  3. Development of Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscope Capability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Kimberlee Chiyoko [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Talin, Albert Alec [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Chandler, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Michael, Joseph R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Modern semiconductor devices rely on the transport of minority charge carriers. Direct examination of minority carrier lifetimes in real devices with nanometer-scale features requires a measurement method with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolutions. Achieving nanometer spatial resolutions at sub-nanosecond temporal resolution is possible with pump-probe methods that utilize electrons as probes. Recently, a stroboscopic scanning electron microscope was developed at Caltech, and used to study carrier transport across a Si p-n junction [ 1 , 2 , 3 ] . In this report, we detail our development of a prototype scanning ultrafast electron microscope system at Sandia National Laboratories based on the original Caltech design. This effort represents Sandia's first exploration into ultrafast electron microscopy.

  4. Electron microscopy of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venables, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Electron beam techniques used to study clean surfaces and surface processes on a microscopic scale are reviewed. Recent experimental examples and possible future developments are discussed. Special emphasis is given to (i) transmission diffraction and microscopy techniques, including atomic imaging; (ii) Auger microscopy on bulk and thin film samples; (iii) secondary electron microscopy, especially low energy secondaries for work-function imaging and photoelectron imaging; and (iv) reflection electron microscopy and diffraction. (orig.)

  5. Scanning electron microscopy study of Trichomonas gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Tiana; De Carli, Geraldo A

    2003-12-01

    A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of Trichomonas gallinae (Rivolta, 1878), provided more information about the morphology of this flagellated protozoan. SEM showed the morphological features of the trophozoites; the emergence of the anterior flagella, the structure of the undulating membrane, the position and shape of the pelta, axostyle and posterior flagellum. Of special interest were the pseudocyst forms.

  6. Energetic materials research using scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshout, J.J.M.H. van den; Duvalois, W.; Benedetto, G.L. Di; Bouma, R.H.B.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der

    2016-01-01

    A key-technique for the research of energetic materials is scanning electron microscopy. In this paper several examples are given of characterization studies on energetic materials, including a solid composite propellant formulation. Results of the characterization of energetic materials using

  7. [Scanning electron microscope study of chemically disinfected endodontic files].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, G; Mateos, M; Navarro, J L; Canalda, C

    1991-01-01

    Forty stainless steel endodontic files were observed at scanning electron microscopy after being subjected to ten disinfection cycles of 10 minutes each one, immersed in different chemical disinfectants. Corrosion was not observed on the surface of the files in circumstances that this study was made.

  8. New Scanning Electron Microscope Used for Cryogenic Tensile Testing

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    At CERN engineering department's installation for cryogenic tensile testing, the new scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows for detailed optical observations to be carried out. Using the SEM, surface coatings and tensile properties of materials can investigated in order to better understand how they behave under different conditions.

  9. MORPH-II, a software package for the analysis of scanning-electron-micrograph images for the assessment of the fractal dimension of exposed stone surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossotti, Victor G.; Eldeeb, A. Raouf

    2000-01-01

    Turcotte, 1997, and Barton and La Pointe, 1995, have identified many potential uses for the fractal dimension in physicochemical models of surface properties. The image-analysis program described in this report is an extension of the program set MORPH-I (Mossotti and others, 1998), which provided the fractal analysis of electron-microscope images of pore profiles (Mossotti and Eldeeb, 1992). MORPH-II, an integration of the modified kernel of the program MORPH-I with image calibration and editing facilities, was designed to measure the fractal dimension of the exposed surfaces of stone specimens as imaged in cross section in an electron microscope.

  10. A new clustering algorithm for scanning electron microscope images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Amr; Duraisamy, Prakash; Karim, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a type of electron microscope that produces images of a sample by scanning it with a focused beam of electrons. The electrons interact with the sample atoms, producing various signals that are collected by detectors. The gathered signals contain information about the sample's surface topography and composition. The electron beam is generally scanned in a raster scan pattern, and the beam's position is combined with the detected signal to produce an image. The most common configuration for an SEM produces a single value per pixel, with the results usually rendered as grayscale images. The captured images may be produced with insufficient brightness, anomalous contrast, jagged edges, and poor quality due to low signal-to-noise ratio, grained topography and poor surface details. The segmentation of the SEM images is a tackling problems in the presence of the previously mentioned distortions. In this paper, we are stressing on the clustering of these type of images. In that sense, we evaluate the performance of the well-known unsupervised clustering and classification techniques such as connectivity based clustering (hierarchical clustering), centroid-based clustering, distribution-based clustering and density-based clustering. Furthermore, we propose a new spatial fuzzy clustering technique that works efficiently on this type of images and compare its results against these regular techniques in terms of clustering validation metrics.

  11. Scanning electron microscopy of semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresse, J.F.; Dupuy, M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of scanning electron microscopy in semiconductors opens up a large field of use. The operating modes lending themselves to the study of semiconductors are the induced current, cathodoluminescence and the use of the potential contrast which can also be applied very effectively to the study of the devices (planar in particular). However, a thorough knowledge of the mechanisms of the penetration of electrons, generation and recombination of generated carriers in a semiconductor is necessary in order to attain a better understanding of the operating modes peculiar to semiconductors [fr

  12. Scanning electron microscope view of iron crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope photograph of iron crystals which grow in a small vug or cavity in a recrystallized breccia (fragmented rock) from the Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennino lunar landing site. The largest crystal is three microns across. Perfectly developed crystals such as these indicate slow formation from a hot vapor as the rock was cooling. The crystals are resting on an interlocking lattice of pyroxene (calsium-magnesium-iron silicate).

  13. Dinosaur eggshell study using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Frankie D; Schweitzer, Mary H; Schmitt, James G

    2002-01-01

    Visualization and analysis of structural features in fossil dinosaur eggs by scanning electron microscopy augment information from traditional petrographic light microscopy. Comparison of characteristics in fossil and modern eggshells allows inferences to be made regarding dinosaur reproductive biology, physiology, and evolutionary relationships. Assessment of diagenetic alteration of primary eggshell calcite structure that occurs during fossilization provides important information necessary for taxonomic identification and paleoenvironmental interpretations.

  14. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces prepared with three rotary endodontic systems: Lightspeed, ProTaper and EndoWave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hema, B S; Chandu, G S; Shiraguppi, V L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the cleaning efficiency, preparation time, instrument deformation and fracture with LightSpeed (LS), ProTaper (PT) and EndoWave (Ew) rotary instruments. A total of 45 freshly extracted human mandibular premolars were subjected for the study. They were divided into three groups, each group consisting of 15 teeth. Group 1: The canals were prepared with LS system; Group 2: PT rotary system, Group 3: Ew rotary system. All the groups were prepared according to manufacturer's recommendation, using 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (dent wash, prime dent) alternately as an irrigants. Crowns of each tooth were removed with diamond disks at the level of cemento enamel junction. Canal length was determined by placing a size 10 K-file. The working length was 0.5 mm short of canal length. Two longitudinal grooves were prepared on the lingual and buccal surfaces of each root to facilitate vertical splitting with a chisel after canal instrumentation. The sections were then observed under scanning electron microscope for presence or absence of debris and smear layer and the photographs were taken at coronal, middle and apical 1/3 with a magnification of × 200 and × 1000 respectively. The time taken to enlarge each canal was recorded in minutes and seconds. The instruments were examined after every use for deformation. The scores recorded were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Mann-Whitney test. There was statistically significant difference with regard to removal of debris and smear layer at coronal, middle and apical third for LS versus PT and LS versus Ew (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference between PT and Ew. The mean preparation time for LS, PT and Ew was 1.76, 2.50 and 2.75 respectively. The study demonstrated that, LS instrumentation removed debris and smear layer effectively with shorter preparation time and Ew instrument showed

  15. Scanner for ultrasonic scanning of surfaces.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, A.J.; Van Hoorn, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    Abstract of EP 0453014 (A1) Scanner for scanning surfaces with ultrasonic signals, in particular surfaces of parts of the body, provided with a scanner head (5) for the transmission of ultrasonic signals and the reception of the echoes hereof. The time passed between the emission of the signal and

  16. Synthesis and characterization of Ni0.4Co2.6O4 spinel mixed oxides powder: study of its surface properties by voltammetry, x-ray, ftir, UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makhtar Guene

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical studies were carried out on Ni0.4Co2.6O4 powders prepared by sol-gel via propionic acid method using cyclic and steady state voltammetries. The oxide surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis-NIR and FTIR spectroscopies. The results showed that the formation of homogeneous oxide with a single spinel phase occurred at 350°C. The surface redox couple NiOOH/Ni(OH2 is confined on the surface material l.

  17. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kociak, M; Zagonel, L F

    2017-05-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kociak, M., E-mail: mathieu.kociak@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris-SudParis-Sud, CNRS-UMR 8502, Orsay 91405 (France); Zagonel, L.F. [“Gleb Wataghin” Institute of Physics University of Campinas - UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. - Highlights: • Reviews the field of STEM-CL. • Introduces the technical requirements and challenges for STEM-CL. • Introduces the different types of excitations probed by STEM-CL. • Gives comprehensive overview of the last fifteenth years in the field.

  19. Dopant profiling with the scanning electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, S L

    2001-01-01

    This dissertation is a detailed study of dopant profiling with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) using secondary electrons. The technique has been applied to a wide variety of doped silicon, gallium arsenide and gallium nitride semiconductor test structures as well as a metal-oxide field effect transistor and several light emitting diodes. A concise set of guide-lines are provided for users of this technique, including the optimum SEM operating conditions that should be used for maximum contrast, an image manipulation procedure, and the resolution and sensitivity limits that can be expected. Dopant contrast observed with the SEM has been studied over the past few years by a number of researchers, and a theory for the contrast has evolved. This theory considers the patch fields outside the specimen to be the dominant factor determining the secondary electron intensity. In this dissertation the contrast mechanism has been further investigated by examining the contrast at different temperatures and after su...

  20. Scanning tunneling microscope stimulated oxidation of silicon (100) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, P.; Brockenbrough, R. T.; Abeln, G.; Scott, P.; Agarwala, S.; Adesida, I.; Lyding, J. W.

    1994-06-01

    The chemical modification of n- and p-type hydrogen-passivated Si(100) surfaces by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is reported. The modified areas have been examined with STM, Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Comparison of these characterization techniques indicates the features are both chemical and topographic in nature and are the result of local oxidation of the substrate. In addition, pattern transfer for the defined regions has been demonstrated with both thermal oxidation and HBr reactive-ion etching.

  1. Surface morphology of sound deciduous tooth enamel after application of a photo-absorbing cream and infrared low-level laser irradiation: an in vitro scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sant'Anna, Giselle Rodrigues; Paleari, Giovanna Souza Leão; Duarte, Danilo Antônio; Brugnera, Aldo; Soares, Cristina Pacheco

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this descriptive scanning electron microscopic study was to characterize surface alterations in deciduous tooth enamel after in vitro infrared diode laser irradiation, using a photo-absorbing agent alone and also combined with fluoride, before and after laser irradiation. Previous investigations have demonstrated increased enamel caries resistance after laser irradiation. Seven extracted or exfoliated primary molar teeth underwent soft tissue débridement and fluoride-free prophylaxis. Buccal surfaces were determined to be caries free by macroscopic examination. Sample groups were divided into: (1) control (no treatment); (2) infrared diode laser irradiation (lambda = 810 nm, 68 nm, 60 mW/mm(2), 30 W) using the photo-absorbing agent alone (IRDL + PA; 500 J/cm(2)); and (3) infrared diode laser irradiation using a photo-absorbing agent combined with 2% fluoride (IRDL + PFA; 500 J/cm(2)). Buccal surfaces were evaluated following standard scanning electron microscopy preparation techniques. Control samples of enamel surfaces were relatively smooth but presented occasional enamel prism ends. There were no areas with cavitations or surface defects. After the IRDL + PA treatment, irradiated surfaces became rough and mildly to moderately irregular with scarce enamel cavitations and without exposure of enamel prism ends. The surfaces had adherent granules and only occasional fine cracks and porosities in surface coatings were noted. After the IRDL + PFA treatment, there was a homogenous confluent surface that masked typical enamel surface markings. The surfaces had well-defined globules resulting from the IRDL + PFA treatment, that were not seen after IRDL + PA treatment. Treatment of deciduous tooth enamel with infrared diode laser irradiation using a photo-absorbing agent and a photo-absorbing agent combined with 2% fluoride created surface coatings that may act as reservoirs for mineral phases during cariogenic activity on enamel, and also provide a

  2. Miniaturized Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope for In Situ Planetary Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Abbott, Terry; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Thaisen, Kevin; Taylor , Lawrence; Ramsey, Brian; Jerman, Gregory; Sampson, Allen; Harvey, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of remote planetary surfaces calls for the advancement of low power, highly-miniaturized instrumentation. Instruments of this nature that are capable of multiple types of analyses will prove to be particularly useful as we prepare for human return to the moon, and as we continue to explore increasingly remote locations in our Solar System. To this end, our group has been developing a miniaturized Environmental-Scanning Electron Microscope (mESEM) capable of remote investigations of mineralogical samples through in-situ topographical and chemical analysis on a fine scale. The functioning of an SEM is well known: an electron beam is focused to nanometer-scale onto a given sample where resulting emissions such as backscattered and secondary electrons, X-rays, and visible light are registered. Raster scanning the primary electron beam across the sample then gives a fine-scale image of the surface topography (texture), crystalline structure and orientation, with accompanying elemental composition. The flexibility in the types of measurements the mESEM is capable of, makes it ideally suited for a variety of applications. The mESEM is appropriate for use on multiple planetary surfaces, and for a variety of mission goals (from science to non-destructive analysis to ISRU). We will identify potential applications and range of potential uses related to planetary exploration. Over the past few of years we have initiated fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept assembly, consisting of a cold-field-emission electron gun and custom high-voltage power supply, electrostatic electron-beam focusing column, and scanning-imaging electronics plus backscatter detector. Current project status will be discussed. This effort is funded through the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences - Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program.

  3. Transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with scintillation gaseous detection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilatos, Gerasimos; Kollia, Mary; Dracopoulos, Vassileios

    2015-03-01

    A transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with use of a scintillation gaseous detection device has been implemented. This corresponds to a transmission scanning electron microscope but with addition of a gaseous environment acting both as environmental and detection medium. A commercial type of low vacuum machine has been employed together with appropriate modifications to the detection configuration. This involves controlled screening of various emitted signals in conjunction with a scintillation gaseous detection device already provided with the machine for regular surface imaging. Dark field and bright field imaging has been obtained along with other detection conditions. With a progressive series of modifications and tests, the theory and practice of a novel type of microscopy is briefly shown now ushering further significant improvements and developments in electron microscopy as a whole. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A fast iterative technique for restoring scanning electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahira, Kenji, E-mail: kenji.nakahira.kp@hitachi.com; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Honda, Toshifumi

    2014-12-21

    This paper proposes a fast new technique for restoring scanning electron microscope images to improve their sharpness. The images with our approach are sharpened by deconvolution with the point spread function modeled as the intensity distribution of the electron beam at the specimen's surface. We propose an iterative technique that employs a modified cost function based on the Richardson–Lucy method to achieve faster processing. The empirical results indicate significant improvements in image quality. The proposed approach speeds up deconvolution by about 10–50 times faster than that with the conventional Richardson–Lucy method.

  5. Collection of secondary electrons in scanning electron microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllerová, I; Konvalina, I

    2009-12-01

    Collection of the secondary electrons in the scanning electron microscope was simulated and the results have been experimentally verified for two types of the objective lens and three detection systems. The aberration coefficients of both objective lenses as well as maximum axial magnetic fields in the specimen region are presented. Compared are a standard side-attached secondary electron detector, in which only weak electrostatic and nearly no magnetic field influence the signal trajectories in the specimen vicinity, and the side-attached (lower) and upper detectors in an immersion system with weak electrostatic but strong magnetic field penetrating towards the specimen. The collection efficiency was calculated for all three detection systems and several working distances. The ability of detectors to attract secondary electron trajectories for various initial azimuthal and polar angles was calculated, too. According to expectations, the lower detector of an immersion system collects no secondary electrons I and II emitted from the specimen and only backscattered electrons and secondary electrons III form the final image. The upper detector of the immersion system exhibits nearly 100% collection efficiency decreasing, however, with the working distance, but the topographical contrast is regrettably suppressed in its image. The collection efficiency of the standard detector is low for short working distances but increases with the same, preserving strong topographical contrast.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1998-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy provides a description of the physics of electron-probe formation and of electron-specimen interations The different imaging and analytical modes using secondary and backscattered electrons, electron-beam-induced currents, X-ray and Auger electrons, electron channelling effects, and cathodoluminescence are discussed to evaluate specific contrasts and to obtain quantitative information

  7. Role of scanning electron microscope )SEM) in metal failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaiful Rizam Shamsudin; Hafizal Yazid; Mohd Harun; Siti Selina Abd Hamid; Nadira Kamarudin; Zaiton Selamat; Mohd Shariff Sattar; Muhamad Jalil

    2005-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a scientific instrument that uses a beam of highly energetic electrons to examine the surface and phase distribution of specimens on a micro scale through the live imaging of secondary electrons (SE) and back-scattered electrons (BSE) images. One of the main activities of SEM Laboratory at MINT is for failure analysis on metal part and components. The capability of SEM is excellent for determining the root cause of metal failures such as ductility or brittleness, stress corrosion, fatigue and other types of failures. Most of our customers that request for failure analysis are from local petrochemical plants, manufacturers of automotive components, pipeline maintenance personnel and engineers who involved in the development of metal parts and component. This paper intends to discuss some of the technical concepts in failure analysis associated with SEM. (Author)

  8. Electronic structure and scanning tunnelling microscope images of missing-atom defects on MoS{sub 2} and MoTe{sub 2} surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulfield, J.C.; Fisher, A.J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    1997-05-05

    Missing-atom defects on the transition metal dichalcogenides MoS{sub 2} and MoTe{sub 2} have been studied using the projector augmented-wave method, based on ab initio density functional theory. The presence of the vacancies results in localized electronic states in the surface band gap which can affect the STM image, and on the basis of our results we believe that the hole and trimer defects such as those observed by Fuchs et al could be explained by single-missing-chalcogen and single-missing-metal-atom defects respectively. It is found that the chalcogen vacancy systems behave in a similar way for both MoS{sub 2} and MoTe{sub 2}; however, the system of MoTe{sub 2} with a metal vacancy is discovered to be a Jahn-Teller system, while the equivalent MoS{sub 2} system is not. The effects that this has on the atomic and electronic structure and the STM images are discussed. (author)

  9. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Samples in an Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Ludĕk; Hovorka, Miloš; Mikmeková, Šárka; Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona; Pokorná, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    The high negative bias of a sample in a scanning electron microscope constitutes the “cathode lens” with a strong electric field just above the sample surface. This mode offers a convenient tool for controlling the landing energy of electrons down to units or even fractions of electronvolts with only slight readjustments of the column. Moreover, the field accelerates and collimates the signal electrons to earthed detectors above and below the sample, thereby assuring high collection efficiency and high amplification of the image signal. One important feature is the ability to acquire the complete emission of the backscattered electrons, including those emitted at high angles with respect to the surface normal. The cathode lens aberrations are proportional to the landing energy of electrons so the spot size becomes nearly constant throughout the full energy scale. At low energies and with their complete angular distribution acquired, the backscattered electron images offer enhanced information about crystalline and electronic structures thanks to contrast mechanisms that are otherwise unavailable. Examples from various areas of materials science are presented.

  10. Simplifying Electron Beam Channeling in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ryan J; Mittal, Anudha; Odlyzko, Michael L; Mkhoyan, K Andre

    2017-08-01

    Sub-angstrom scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows quantitative column-by-column analysis of crystalline specimens via annular dark-field images. The intensity of electrons scattered from a particular location in an atomic column depends on the intensity of the electron probe at that location. Electron beam channeling causes oscillations in the STEM probe intensity during specimen propagation, which leads to differences in the beam intensity incident at different depths. Understanding the parameters that control this complex behavior is critical for interpreting experimental STEM results. In this work, theoretical analysis of the STEM probe intensity reveals that intensity oscillations during specimen propagation are regulated by changes in the beam's angular distribution. Three distinct regimes of channeling behavior are observed: the high-atomic-number (Z) regime, in which atomic scattering leads to significant angular redistribution of the beam; the low-Z regime, in which the probe's initial angular distribution controls intensity oscillations; and the intermediate-Z regime, in which the behavior is mixed. These contrasting regimes are shown to exist for a wide range of probe parameters. These results provide a new understanding of the occurrence and consequences of channeling phenomena and conditions under which their influence is strengthened or weakened by characteristics of the electron probe and sample.

  11. Antibacterial effects of ellagitannins from Acalypha wilkesiana var. macafeana hort.: surface morphology analysis with environmental scanning electron microscopy and synergy with antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Wardah Mustafa; Jin, Khoo Teng; Ramli, Ramliza; Khaithir, Tzar Mohd Nizam; Wiart, Christophe

    2013-09-01

    The present study served to gain further insight into the bactericidal effects of ellagitannins from Acalypha wilkesiana var. macafeana hort. against pathogenic bacteria. Ellagitannins from the aerial parts of A. wilkesiana var. macafeana hort. (EAW) inhibited the growth of Bacillus cereus (ATCC 11778), Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 11632) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clinical strain with inhibition zones equal to 11.01 ± 1.53 mm, 16.63 ± 0.11 mm, 11.40 ± 1.10 mm and 8.22 ± 0.19 mm, respectively. The minimal inhibition concentration and the minimal bactericidal concentration of ellagitannins from A. wilkesiana var. macafeana hort. (EAW) against MRSA were 750 µg/mL and 3000 µg/mL, respectively. We then examined the synergistic effect of EAW with three antibiotics, i.e. ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline, via the checkerboard assay and time-kill assay and observed that EAW is synergistic with ampicillin against S. aureus (ATCC 11632). Environmental electron scanning microscopy analysis showed cell lysis against S. aureus (ATCC 11632) upon treatment with the ellagitannin fraction. The ellagitannin fraction from A. wilkesiana var. macafeana hort. is bactericidal against gram-positive bacteria tested and works synergistically with ampicillin against S. aureus. Morphology analysis of the cell suggests that the bactericidal property of the ellagitannin fraction mechanism involves lysis of the cell wall. In summary, our studies demonstrate that A. wilkesiana var. macafeana hort. produces bactericidal ellagitannins of clinical and/or cosmetological value. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The trajectories of secondary electrons in the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konvalina, Ivo; Müllerová, Ilona

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of the trajectories of secondary electrons (SE) in the scanning electron microscope have been performed for plenty of real configurations of the specimen chamber, including all its basic components. The primary purpose was to evaluate the collection efficiency of the Everhart-Thornley detector of SE and to reveal fundamental rules for tailoring the set-ups in which efficient signal acquisition can be expected. Intuitive realizations about the easiness of attracting the SEs towards the biased front grid of the detector have shown themselves likely as false, and all grounded objects in the chamber have been proven to influence the spatial distribution of the signal-extracting field. The role of the magnetic field penetrating from inside the objective lens is shown to play an ambiguous role regarding possible support for the signal collection.

  13. A scanning electron microscopic investigation of ceramic orthodontic brackets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, F.; Toms, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Ceramic brackets were introduced to overcome the esthetic disadvantages of stainless steel brackets. The clinical impression of these brackets is very favorable. However, the sliding mechanics used in the Straightwire (A Company, San Diego, CA, USA) system appear to produce slower tooth movements with ceramic compared to stainless steel brackets. To determine whether this was due to any obvious mechanical problem in the bracket slot, Transcend (Unitek Corporation/3M, Monrovia, CA, USA) ceramic brackets were examined by a scanning electron microscope and compared to stainless steel brackets.Consistently, large surface defects were found in the ceramic bracket slots that were not present in the metal bracket slots. These irregularities could obviously hinder the sliding mechanics of the bracket slot-archwire system and create a greater demand on anchorage. Conversely, the fitting surface of the Transcend ceramic bracket showed extremely smooth surface characteristics, and it would seem advisable for the manufacturers to incorporate this surface within the bracket slot. (author)

  14. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Levrini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp, to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders. It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction.

  15. Microcircuit failure analysis using the SEM. [Scanning Electron Microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope adds a new dimension to the knowledge that can be obtained from a failed microcircuit. When used with conventional techniques, SEM assists and clarifies the analysis, but it does not replace light microscopy. The most advantageous features for microcircuit analysis are long working distances and great depth of field. Manufacturer related failure modes of microcircuits are metallization defects, poor bonding, surface and particle contamination, and design and fabrication faults. User related failure modes are caused by abuse, such as overstress. The Physics of Failure Procedure followed by the Astrionics Laboratory in failure analysis is described, which is designed to obtain maximum information available from each step.

  16. Use of a scanning electron microscope for characterizing semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borel, J.; Bresse, J.F.; Carme, H.; Monnier, J.

    1974-01-01

    The electron beam from the scanning microscope had three different uses: 1) in induced mode for characterizing the substrate of a P + N junction by measuring the diffusion length and in controlling surface recombination velocities; 2) for controlling Si/SiO 2 interface degradation by measuring very low frequency capacitance and for evaluating the oxide quality by measuring μ/tau: application to the fast control of any device, in this case the evolution of the current of an avalanche photodiode; 3) in using the beam as a Castaing probe for determining features of the generation volume, Si thickness on Al 2 O 3 , or Si thickness [fr

  17. Scanning electron microscopic study of apical and intracanal resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzangles, B

    1989-07-01

    Apical radicular and intracanal surfaces of extracted teeth with apical lesions were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy. The distribution of apical and intracanal resorption areas varied with the presence of a granuloma or a cyst. Teeth bearing granulomas showed an apical resorption centered on the main foramina whereas the hard tissue underlying a cyst showed little or no resorption. Intracanal resorption was always marked in the apical third and more scattered in the middle and cervical third. The resorption disrupted the anatomical structures.

  18. Efficiency of a concentric matrix track detector surface scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bek-Uzarov, Dj.; Nikezic, D.; Kostic, D.; Krstic, D.; Cuknic, O.

    1995-01-01

    Heavy particle ionizing radiation track counting on the surface of a solid state round surface detector is made using the microscope and scanning step by step by a round field of vision. The whole solid state detector surface could not be fully or completely covered by round fields of visions. Therefore detector surface could be divided on the two parts, the larger surface, being under fields of vision, really scanned and no scanned missed or omitted surface. The ratio between omitted and scanned surfaces is so called track scanning efficiency. The knowledge of really counted, or scanned surface is a important value for evaluating the real surface track density an exposed solid state track detector. In the paper a matrix of a concentric field of vision made around the first microscope field of vision placed in center of the round disc of the scanned track detector is proposed. In a such scanning matrix the real scanned surface could be easy calculated and by the microscope scanning made as well. By this way scanned surface is very precisely obtained as well. Precise knowledge of scanned and omitted surface allows to obtain more precise scanning efficiency factor as well as real surface track density, the main parameter in solid state track detection measurements. (author)

  19. Simulation and Characterization of a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory A.; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Abbott, Terry O.; Sampson, Allen R.

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (mSEM) for in-situ lunar investigations is being developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center with colleagues from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), Advanced Research Systems (ARS), the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (UTK) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). This effort focuses on the characterization of individual components of the mSEM and simulation of the complete system. SEMs can provide information on the size, shape, morphology and chemical composition of lunar regolith. Understanding these basic properties will allow us to better estimate the challenges associated with In-Situ Resource Utilization and to improve our basic science knowledge of the lunar surface (either precluding the need for sample return or allowing differentiation of unique samples to be returned to Earth.) The main components of the mSEM prototype includes: a cold field emission electron gun (CFEG), focusing lens, deflection/scanning system and backscatter electron detector. Of these, the electron gun development is of particular importance as it dictates much of the design of the remaining components. A CFEG was chosen for use with the lunar mSEM as its emission does not depend on heating of the tungsten emitter (lower power), it offers a long operation lifetime, is orders of magnitude brighter than tungsten hairpin guns, has a small source size and exhibits low beam energy spread.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, N.; Watanabe, G.; Harada, A.; Suzuki, T.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of postmortem pink teeth were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Fracture surfaces of the dentin in pink teeth were noticeably rough and revealed many more smaller dentinal tubules than those of the control white teeth. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis showed that the pink teeth contained iron which seemed to be derived from blood hemoglobin. The present study confirms that under the same circumstance red coloration of teeth may occur more easily in the teeth in which the dentin is less compact and contains more dentinal tubules

  1. Surface scanning: an application to mammary surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigotti, Camilla; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Aliverti, Andrea; Pedotti, Antonio

    1998-04-01

    The possibility of mathematically describing the body surface represents a useful tool for several medical sectors, such as prosthetics or plastic surgery, and could improve diagnosis and objective evaluation of deformities and the follow-up of progressive diseases. The approach presented is based on the acquisition of a surface scanned by a laser beam. The 3D coordinates of the spot generated on the surface by the laser beam are computed by an automatic image analyzer. Using at least two different views of the subject, the 3D coordinates are obtained by stereophotogrammetry. A software package for graphic representation and extraction of linear superficial and volumetric features from the acquired surface has been developed and some preliminary results with mammary reconstruction are presented. A good mammary reconstruction after mastectomy must achieve two results. First, the reconstruction should follow the patients' wishes and second, the reconstructed breast should be as similar as possible to the contralateral one. To achieve these goals, a knowledge of breast volume, area, and shape features are essential for the surgeon. In such a context, this system could be a valuable tool in improving breast reconstructive surgery.

  2. Applications of orientation mapping by scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.

    1997-01-01

    The potentials of orientation mapping techniques (in the following referred to as OIM) for studies of thermomechanical processes are analysed. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) based OIM techniques are considered. Among the thermomechanical processes...

  3. Accurate virus quantitation using a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) detector in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancett, Candace D; Fetterer, David P; Koistinen, Keith A; Morazzani, Elaine M; Monninger, Mitchell K; Piper, Ashley E; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Kearney, Brian J; Norris, Sarah L; Rossi, Cynthia A; Glass, Pamela J; Sun, Mei G

    2017-10-01

    A method for accurate quantitation of virus particles has long been sought, but a perfect method still eludes the scientific community. Electron Microscopy (EM) quantitation is a valuable technique because it provides direct morphology information and counts of all viral particles, whether or not they are infectious. In the past, EM negative stain quantitation methods have been cited as inaccurate, non-reproducible, and with detection limits that were too high to be useful. To improve accuracy and reproducibility, we have developed a method termed Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy - Virus Quantitation (STEM-VQ), which simplifies sample preparation and uses a high throughput STEM detector in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with commercially available software. In this paper, we demonstrate STEM-VQ with an alphavirus stock preparation to present the method's accuracy and reproducibility, including a comparison of STEM-VQ to viral plaque assay and the ViroCyt Virus Counter. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Physical methods for studying minerals and solid materials: X-ray, electron and neutron diffraction; scanning and transmission electron microscopy; X-ray, electron and ion spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhart, J.-P.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: theoretical aspects of radiation-matter interactions; production and measurement of radiations (X rays, electrons, neutrons); applications of radiation interactions to the study of crystalline materials. The following techniques are presented: X-ray and neutron diffraction, electron microscopy, electron diffraction, X-ray fluorescence analysis, electron probe microanalysis, surface analysis by electron emission spectrometry (ESCA and Auger electrons), scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion emission analysis [fr

  5. A dynamic scanning method based on signal-statistics for scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timischl, F

    2014-01-01

    A novel dynamic scanning method for noise reduction in scanning electron microscopy and related applications is presented. The scanning method dynamically adjusts the scanning speed of the electron beam depending on the statistical behavior of the detector signal and gives SEM images with uniform and predefined standard deviation, independent of the signal value itself. In the case of partially saturated images, the proposed method decreases image acquisition time without sacrificing image quality. The effectiveness of the proposed method is shown and compared to the conventional scanning method and median filtering using numerical simulations. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Resizing metal-coated nanopores using a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chansin, Guillaume A T; Hong, Jongin; Dusting, Jonathan; deMello, Andrew J; Albrecht, Tim; Edel, Joshua B

    2011-10-04

    Electron beam-induced shrinkage provides a convenient way of resizing solid-state nanopores in Si(3) N(4) membranes. Here, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) has been used to resize a range of different focussed ion beam-milled nanopores in Al-coated Si(3) N(4) membranes. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectra and SEM images acquired during resizing highlight that a time-variant carbon deposition process is the dominant mechanism of pore shrinkage, although granular structures on the membrane surface in the vicinity of the pores suggest that competing processes may occur. Shrinkage is observed on the Al side of the pore as well as on the Si(3) N(4) side, while the shrinkage rate is observed to be dependent on a variety of factors. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. System and method for compressive scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W

    2015-01-13

    A scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) system is disclosed. The system may make use of an electron beam scanning system configured to generate a plurality of electron beam scans over substantially an entire sample, with each scan varying in electron-illumination intensity over a course of the scan. A signal acquisition system may be used for obtaining at least one of an image, a diffraction pattern, or a spectrum from the scans, the image, diffraction pattern, or spectrum representing only information from at least one of a select subplurality or linear combination of all pixel locations comprising the image. A dataset may be produced from the information. A subsystem may be used for mathematically analyzing the dataset to predict actual information that would have been produced by each pixel location of the image.

  8. Time-Resolved Scanning Electron Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weber, Peter M

    2006-01-01

    .... The pulsed electron beam is obtained by rapidly switching the electron emission of a field emission tip using the AC electric field arising from exposure to the intense electromagnetic radiation...

  9. Effects of Root Debridement With Hand Curettes and Er:YAG Laser on Chemical Properties and Ultrastructure of Periodontally-Diseased Root Surfaces Using Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amid, Reza; Gholami, Gholam Ali; Mojahedi, Masoud; Aghalou, Maryam; Gholami, Mohsen; Mirakhori, Mahdieh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The efficacy of erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser for root debridement in comparison with curettes has been the subject of many recent investigations. Considering the possibility of chemical and ultra-structural changes in root surfaces following laser irradiation, this study sought to assess the effects of scaling and root planing (SRP) with curettes and Er:YAG laser on chemical properties and ultrastructure of root surfaces using spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods: In this in vitro experimental study, extracted sound human single-rooted teeth (n = 50) were randomly scaled using manual curettes alone or in conjunction with Er:YAG laser at 100 and 150 mJ/pulse output energies. The weight percentages of carbon, oxygen, phosphorous and calcium remaining on the root surfaces were calculated using spectroscopy and the surface morphology of specimens was assessed under SEM. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: No significant differences ( P > 0.05) were noted in the mean carbon, oxygen, phosphorous and calcium weight percentages on root surfaces following SRP using manual curettes with and without laser irradiation at both output energies. Laser irradiation after SRP with curettes yielded rougher surfaces compared to the use of curettes alone. Conclusion: Although laser irradiation yielded rougher surfaces, root surfaces were not significantly different in terms of chemical composition following SRP using manual curettes with and without Er:YAG laser irradiation. Er:YAG laser can be safely used as an adjunct to curettes for SRP.

  10. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  11. Scanning Electron Microscopy Coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectrometric Analysis Reveals for the First Time Weddellite and Sylvite Crystals on the Surface of Involucral Bracts and Petals of two Xeranthemum L. (Compositae) Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilović, Milan; Erić, Suzana; Marin, Petar D; Garcia-Jacas, Núria; Susanna, Alfonso; Janaćković, Pedja

    2017-06-01

    In this work, weddellite and sylvite crystals are identified for the first time on the involucral bracts and petals of Xeranthemum annuum and Xeranthemum cylindraceum using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometric (SEM-EDS) analysis. Well-developed crystals of weddellite (CaC2O4·2H2O) occur in the form of a tetragonal bipyramid (hhl), rarely in combination of a bipyramid and tetragonal prism (h00). Indumentum of involucral bracts of X. cylindraceum consists of nonglandular and glandular trichomes. Sylvite (KCl) crystals are observed only on the petal surface of X. cylindraceum. The crystals of sylvite occur in the form of perfect cubes (hexahedrons), but some crystals are deformed, i.e., partially elongated. Taxonomic significance of investigated microcharacters as well as the use of SEM-EDS analysis in taxonomic studies of plants are discussed.

  12. Scanning Surface Potential Microscopy of Spore Adhesion on Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ida [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chung, Eunhyea [Georgia Institute of Technology; Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of spores of Bacillus anthracis - the cause of anthrax and a likely biological threat - to solid surfaces is an important consideration in cleanup after an accidental or deliberate release. However, because of safety concerns, directly studying B. anthracis spores with advanced instrumentation is problematic. As a first step, we are examining the electrostatic potential of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which is a closely related species that is often used as a simulant to study B. anthracis. Scanning surface potential microscopy (SSPM), also known as Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), was used to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on the surface electrostatic potential of Bt that had adhered to silica, mica, or gold substrates. AFM/SSPM side-by-side images were obtained separately in air, at various values of RH, after an aqueous droplet with spores was applied on each surface and allowed to dry before measurements. In the SSPM images, a negative potential on the surface of the spores was observed compared with that of the substrates. The surface potential decreased as the humidity increased. Spores were unable to adhere to a surface with an extremely negative potential, such as mica.

  13. Scanning surface potential microscopy of spore adhesion on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I; Chung, E; Kweon, H; Yiacoumi, S; Tsouris, C

    2012-04-01

    The adhesion of spores of Bacillus anthracis - the cause of anthrax and a likely biological threat - to solid surfaces is an important consideration in cleanup after an accidental or deliberate release. However, because of safety concerns, directly studying B. anthracis spores with advanced instrumentation is problematic. As a first step, we are examining the electrostatic potential of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which is a closely related species that is often used as a simulant to study B. anthracis. Scanning surface potential microscopy (SSPM), also known as Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), was used to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on the surface electrostatic potential of Bt that had adhered to silica, mica, or gold substrates. AFM/SSPM side-by-side images were obtained separately in air, at various values of RH, after an aqueous droplet with spores was applied on each surface and allowed to dry before measurements. In the SSPM images, a negative potential on the surface of the spores was observed compared with that of the substrates. The surface potential decreased as the humidity increased. Spores were unable to adhere to a surface with an extremely negative potential, such as mica. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Surface roughness average and scanning electron microscopic observations of resin luting agents Alteração de rugosidade superficial e observações em microscopia eletrônica de varredura de cimentos resinosos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Francisco Lia Mondelli

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the surface roughness changes of three current resin cements after tooth brushing simulation, as well as discuss its relation with scanning electron microscopic observations. The materials employed were Enforce Sure Cure (Dentsply, Rely X (3M-ESPE and Variolink II (Vivadent. They were subjected to brushing abrasion (100,000 strokes for each specimen and the surface roughness alterations (before and after strokes were detected. For each roughness test condition, specimens were coated with gold-palladium and observed on a DSM 900 Zeiss scanning electron microscope. Roughness changes values (Ra were statistically increased after brushing strokes. Based on the microscopic observations and roughness changes analysis, all cements studied became rougher after brushing strokes.O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar a alteração de rugosidade superficial de três cimentos resinosos após submetê-los a ciclos de escovação simulada e analisar qualitativamente a sua superfície através de observações microscópicas. Os materiais empregados neste estudo foram Enforce Sure Cure (Dentsply, Rely X (3M-ESPE e Variolink II (Vivadent. Estes foram submetidos à ciclos de escovação simulada (100.000 ciclos para cada espécime e a alteração de sua rugosidade superficial (antes e após escovação foi avaliada. Para cada material e condição de rugosidade, espécimes foram selecionados, metalizados e observados em microscopia eletrônica de varredura (DSM 900 Zeiss. Baseado nas observações microscópicas e nos valores de alteração de rugosidade, todos os materiais apresentaram aumento de rugosidade aritmética (Ra após ciclos de escovação simulada.

  15. Electron beam detection of a Nanotube Scanning Force Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, Alessandro; Niguès, Antoine

    2017-09-14

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows to probe matter at atomic scale by measuring the perturbation of a nanomechanical oscillator induced by near-field interaction forces. The quest to improve sensitivity and resolution of AFM forced the introduction of a new class of resonators with dimensions at the nanometer scale. In this context, nanotubes are the ultimate mechanical oscillators because of their one dimensional nature, small mass and almost perfect crystallinity. Coupled to the possibility of functionalisation, these properties make them the perfect candidates as ultra sensitive, on-demand force sensors. However their dimensions make the measurement of the mechanical properties a challenging task in particular when working in cavity free geometry at ambient temperature. By using a focused electron beam, we show that the mechanical response of nanotubes can be quantitatively measured while approaching to a surface sample. By coupling electron beam detection of individual nanotubes with a custom AFM we image the surface topography of a sample by continuously measuring the mechanical properties of the nanoresonators. The combination of very small size and mass together with the high resolution of the electron beam detection method offers unprecedented opportunities for the development of a new class of nanotube-based scanning force microscopy.

  16. [Scanning electron microscope study of dentin treated with sodium N-monochloro-DL2-aminobutyrate (NMAB)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Bahillo, J; Segade, L A; Gándara Rey, J; Macedo de Carvalho Capelas, M

    1989-02-01

    This paper report a scanning electron microscope study of the dentinal surface after treatment with sodium N-monochloro-DL2-aminobutyrate (NMAB). The carious cavity shows a rugous and irregular surface. There are detaching plates of the dentin dissolved by the NMAB. At high magnification the compact dentin and the detaching plates show a acid-etched surface.

  17. Simulations and measurements in scanning electron microscopes at low electron energy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Walker, C.; Frank, Luděk; Müllerová, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 6 (2016), s. 802-818 ISSN 0161-0457 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 606988 - SIMDALEE2 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Monte Carlo modeling * scanned probe * computer simulation * electron-solid interactions * surface analysis Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.345, year: 2016

  18. Technology scan for electronic toll collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this project was to identify and assess available technologies and methodologies for electronic toll collection (ETC) and to develop recommendations for the best way(s) to implement toll collection in the Louisville metropolitan area. ...

  19. Trypanosoma (megatrypanum) melophagium in the sheep ked, Melophagus ovinus. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) study of the parasites and the insect gut wall surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, D H; Selkirk, M; Lavin, D

    1978-12-01

    A description of the different stages of Trypanosoma (M.) melophagium in different regions of the gut of the sheep ked (Melophagus ovinus) as observed by the SEM is presented. The extensive pile carpet or palisade colonization of the midgut and pylorus is described. The method of attachment and the relationship of the parasites to the microvilli in the midgut and the cuticle of the pylorus and ileum observed by other methods are confirmed. The micro-structure of the surfaces themselves in the regions of the gut to which parasites attach are described. The use of the technique for the study of other similar systems is discussed.

  20. The mechanism of PTFE and PE friction deposition: a combined scanning electron and scanning force microscopy study on highly oriented polymeric sliders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönherr, Holger; Schaeben, H.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of friction deposition of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyethylene (PE) was studied by scanning electron (SEM) and scanning force microscopy (SFM) on the worn surfaces of PTFE and PE sliders that were used in friction deposition on glass substrates. These surfaces exhibited a

  1. Facial recognition and laser surface scan: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Kristoffersen, Agnethe May

    2009-01-01

    that the discriminatory value was 86.7%. We also tested the surface scanner in terms of reliability in establishing point measures on skulls, and compared with physical measurements performed by calipers. The variation was on average 1 mm for five cranial measures. We suggest how surface scanning might be applied...... software (MIMICS and Photoshop) the surface scans were matched with the photographs in blind trials. The matches were graded as: a good fit; possible fit; and no fit. All the surface scans and photos were matched correctly, although one surface scan could be matched with two angled photographs, meaning...

  2. Comparative study of smear layer removal by different etching modalities and Er:YAG laser irradiation on the root surface: a scanning electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodoro, Leticia Helena

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of citric acid, EDTA, citric acid with tetracycline, and Er:YAG laser to smear layer removal on the root surface after scaling with manual instruments by SEM. Thirty specimens (n=30) of root surface before scaling were divided into 6 groups (n=5). The Control Group (G1) was not treated; Group 2 (G2) was conditioned with citric acid gel 24%, pH1, during 2 minutes; Group 3 (G3) was conditioned with EDTA gel 24%, pH 7, during 2 minutes; Group 4 (G4) was conditioned with citric acid and tetracycline gel 50%, pH1 during 2 minutes; Group 5 (G5) was irradiated with Er:YAG laser (2.94 μm), 47 mJ/10 Hz, focused, under water spray during 15 seconds and fluence of 0.58 J/cm 2 ; Group 6 (G6) was irradiated with Er:YAG laser (2.94μm), 83 mJ/10 Hz, focused, under water spray during 15 seconds and fluence of 1.03 J/cm 2 . The micrographic were analyzed by scores and following the statistical analysis with Kruskal Wallis (p<0.05) H=20,31. The G1 was significantly different of all groups (28.0); the G2 (13.4), G3 (11.7), and G4 (13.6) showed no difference in relation to G5 (20.3) and G6 (6.0), but the G6 was significantly different from G5. From the results, it can be conclude that: 1) there was intensity smear layer after scaling and root planing; 2) all treatments were effective to smear layer remove with significantly difference to G2, G3, G4, G5 and G6; G2, G3 and G4 were not statistically different from G5 and G6; 3) G6 was more effective in the smear layer remotion in relation to G5 and both presented irregular root surface. (author)

  3. Analysis of leaf surfaces using scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Shaun C; Allen, Stephanie; Bell, Gordon; Roberts, Clive J

    2015-05-01

    Leaf surfaces are highly complex functional systems with well defined chemistry and structure dictating the barrier and transport properties of the leaf cuticle. It is a significant imaging challenge to analyse the very thin and often complex wax-like leaf cuticle morphology in their natural state. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and to a lesser extent Atomic force microscopy are techniques that have been used to study the leaf surface but their remains information that is difficult to obtain via these approaches. SEM is able to produce highly detailed and high-resolution images needed to study leaf structures at the submicron level. It typically operates in a vacuum or low pressure environment and as a consequence is generally unable to deal with the in situ analysis of dynamic surface events at submicron scales. Atomic force microscopy also possess the high-resolution imaging required and can follow dynamic events in ambient and liquid environments, but can over exaggerate small features and cannot image most leaf surfaces due to their inherent roughness at the micron scale. Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), which operates in a liquid environment, provides a potential complementary analytical approach able to address these issues and which is yet to be explored for studying leaf surfaces. Here we illustrate the potential of SICM on various leaf surfaces and compare the data to SEM and atomic force microscopy images on the same samples. In achieving successful imaging we also show that SICM can be used to study the wetting of hydrophobic surfaces in situ. This has potentially wider implications than the study of leaves alone as surface wetting phenomena are important in a range of fundamental and applied studies. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Scanning transmission low-energy electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Konvalina, Ivo; Unčovský, M.; Frank, Luděk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2011), 2:1-6 ISSN 0018-8646 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : TEM * STEM * SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2011

  5. From the physics of secondary electron emission to image contrasts in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazaux, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Image formation in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a combination of physical processes, electron emissions from the sample, and of a technical process related to the detection of a fraction of these electrons. For the present survey of image contrasts in SEM, simplified considerations in the physics of the secondary electron emission yield, δ, are combined with the effects of a partial collection of the emitted secondary electrons. Although some consideration is initially given to the architecture of modern SEM, the main attention is devoted to the material contrasts with the respective roles of the sub-surface and surface compositions of the sample, as well as with the roles of the field effects in the vacuum gap. The recent trends of energy filtering in normal SEM and the reduction of the incident energy to a few electron volts in very low-energy electron microscopy are also considered. For an understanding by the SEM community, the mathematical expressions are explained with simple physical arguments.

  6. Dopant profiling based on scanning electron and helium ion microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chee, Augustus K.W., E-mail: kwac2@cam.ac.uk [Centre for Advanced Photonics and Electronics, Electrical Engineering Division, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Boden, Stuart A. [University of Southampton, Electronics and Computer Science, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, we evaluate and compare doping contrast generated inside the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and scanning helium ion microscope (SHIM). Specialised energy-filtering techniques are often required to produce strong doping contrast to map donor distributions using the secondary electron (SE) signal in the SEM. However, strong doping contrast can be obtained from n-type regions in the SHIM, even without energy-filtering. This SHIM technique is more sensitive than the SEM to donor density changes above its sensitivity threshold, i.e. of the order of 10{sup 16} or 10{sup 17} donors cm{sup −3} respectively on specimens with or without a p–n junction; its sensitivity limit is well above 2×10{sup 17} acceptors cm{sup −3} on specimens with or without a p–n junction. Good correlation is found between the widths and slopes of experimentally measured doping contrast profiles of thin p-layers and the calculated widths and slopes of the potential energy distributions across these layers, at a depth of 1 to 3 nm and 5 to 10 nm below the surface in the SHIM and the SEM respectively. This is consistent with the mean escape depth of SEs in silicon being about 1.8 nm and 7 nm in the SHIM and SEM respectively, and we conclude that short escape depth, low energy SE signals are most suitable for donor profiling. - Highlights: • Strong doping contrast from n-type regions in the SHIM without energy-filtering. • Sensitivity limits are established of the SHIM and SEM techniques. • We discuss the impact of SHIM imaging conditions on quantitative dopant profiling. • Doping contrast stems from different surface layer thicknesses in the SHIM and SEM.

  7. A Scanning Electron Microscope Examination of Heligmosomum costellatum

    OpenAIRE

    YILDIZ, Kader

    2014-01-01

    The morphology of Heligmosomum costellatum, a nematode of field mice (Microtus epiraticus), was described by scanning electron microscope. The scanning electron microscopic view of this nematode revealed that the anterior end was surrounded by 2 cephalic vesicles. The 2 copulatory spicules of the male were enveloped in membrane and the male bursa was large. The female posterior end was characterized by a caudal spine. The body of this parasite had transverse ridges.

  8. Electron tomography of HEK293T cells using scanning electron microscope-based scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yun-Wen; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Liao, Hua-Yang; Kao, Wei-Lun; Yen, Guo-Ji; Chang, Chi-Jen; Tsai, Meng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2012-10-01

    Based on a scanning electron microscope operated at 30 kV with a homemade specimen holder and a multiangle solid-state detector behind the sample, low-kV scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is presented with subsequent electron tomography for three-dimensional (3D) volume structure. Because of the low acceleration voltage, the stronger electron-atom scattering leads to a stronger contrast in the resulting image than standard TEM, especially for light elements. Furthermore, the low-kV STEM yields less radiation damage to the specimen, hence the structure can be preserved. In this work, two-dimensional STEM images of a 1-μm-thick cell section with projection angles between ±50° were collected, and the 3D volume structure was reconstructed using the simultaneous iterative reconstructive technique algorithm with the TomoJ plugin for ImageJ, which are both public domain software. Furthermore, the cross-sectional structure was obtained with the Volume Viewer plugin in ImageJ. Although the tilting angle is constrained and limits the resulting structural resolution, slicing the reconstructed volume generated the depth profile of the thick specimen with sufficient resolution to examine cellular uptake of Au nanoparticles, and the final position of these nanoparticles inside the cell was imaged.

  9. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This program uses ab-initio and multiple scattering to study surface dynamical processes; high-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy is used in particular. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50--300 eV). The analyses have been extended to surfaces of ordered alloys. Phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross section calculations. Work on low-energy electron and positron holography is mentioned

  10. Collection of secondary electrons in scanning electron microscopes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Konvalina, Ivo

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 236, č. 3 (2009), s. 203-210 ISSN 0022-2720 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE08012; GA AV ČR IAA100650803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : detection of electrons * magnetic lenses * secondary electrons * SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.612, year: 2009

  11. Observation of Magnetic Induction Distribution by Scanning Interference Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Yajima, Yusuke; Ichikawa, Masakazu; Kuroda, Katsuhiro

    1994-09-01

    A scanning interference electron microscope (SIEM) capable of observing magnetic induction distribution with high sensitivity and spatial resolution has been developed. The SIEM uses a pair of fine coherent scanning probes and detects their relative phase change by magnetic induction, giving raster images of microscopic magnetic distributions. Its performance has been demonstrated by observing magnetic induction distributed near the edge of a recorded magnetic storage medium. Obtained images are compared with corresponding images taken in the scanning Lorentz electron microscope mode using the same microscope, and the differences between them are discussed.

  12. Mechanisms of biliary stent clogging: confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkel, A M; van Marle, J; Groen, A K; Bruno, M J

    2005-08-01

    Endoscopic insertion of plastic biliary endoprostheses is a well-established treatment for obstructive jaundice. The major limitation of this technique is late stent occlusion. In order to compare events involved in biliary stent clogging and identify the distribution of bacteria in unblocked stents, confocal laser scanning (CLS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were carried out on two different stent materials - polyethylene (PE) and hydrophilic polymer-coated polyurethane (HCPC). Ten consecutive patients with postoperative benign biliary strictures were included in the study. Two 10-Fr stents 9 cm in length, one made of PE and the other of HCPC, were inserted. The stents were electively exchanged after 3 months and examined using CLS and SEM. No differences were seen between the two types of stent. The inner stent surface was covered with a uniform amorphous layer. On top of this layer, a biofilm of living and dead bacteria was found, which in most cases was unstructured. The lumen was filled with free-floating colonies of bacteria and crystals, surrounded by mobile laminar structures of mucus. An open network of large dietary fibers was seen in all of the stents. The same clogging events occurred in both PE and HCPC stents. The most remarkable observation was the identification of networks of large dietary fibers, resulting from duodenal reflux, acting as a filter. The build-up of this intraluminal framework of dietary fibers appears to be a major factor contributing to the multifactorial process of stent clogging.

  13. Scanning and transmission electron microscope study of pellicle morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, T

    1977-05-01

    The morphology of pellicle formation was studied using correlated transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Pellicle developed on hydroxyapatite/epoxy resin splints attached to the buccal surfaces of molars and premolars in six young individuals. Splint segments were removed at intervals of 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h. Measurements of pellicle thickness revealed that during the first 12 h considerably more material formed on the apatite surfaces than on the epoxy resin areas of the splints. This difference was equalized in 24- and 48-h specimens. Three types of pellicles could be distinguished on the basis of morphologic criteria. A globular pellicle, characterized by a consistent presence of globules of varying size and configuration, seemed to predominate in most subjects. These globules could not be mistaken for bacteria due to their dimensions, contour, and lack of cell walls. A fibrillar pellicle consisted of 3- to 7-nm-wide fibrils and frequently included some finely globular particles. A granular pellicle displayed a relatively even surface contour and did not exhibit globular or fibrillar structures. In contrast to the two other types, the granular pellicle contained distinct laminations. Apparently, the varying morphology of the early pellicle is a reflection of its complex chemical composition.

  14. Software electron counting for low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelberger, Andreas; Kramberger, Christian; Meyer, Jannik C

    2018-02-17

    The performance of the detector is of key importance for low-dose imaging in transmission electron microscopy, and counting every single electron can be considered as the ultimate goal. In scanning transmission electron microscopy, low-dose imaging can be realized by very fast scanning, however, this also introduces artifacts and a loss of resolution in the scan direction. We have developed a software approach to correct for artifacts introduced by fast scans, making use of a scintillator and photomultiplier response that extends over several pixels. The parameters for this correction can be directly extracted from the raw image. Finally, the images can be converted into electron counts. This approach enables low-dose imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope via high scan speeds while retaining the image quality of artifact-free slower scans. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Species determination of eggs of opisthorchiid and heterophyid flukes using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditrich, O; Giboda, M; Stĕrba, J

    1990-02-01

    Eggs of opisthorchiid flukes have very characteristic muskmelon-like surface structure of their shells and can be differentiated using this mark from eggs of heterophyid flukes. Surface structure and morphological details in operculum and abopercular end can be observed using scanning electron microscopy. Eggs recorded very often in stool of Laotians belong mostly to Opisthorchis viverrini and sporadically to Metagonimus yokogawai.

  16. Characterization of Polycaprolactone Films Biodeterioration by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrubanová, Kamila; Voberková, S.; Hermanová, S.; Krzyžánek, Vladislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, S3 (2014), s. 1950-1951 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : polycaprolactone films * biodeterioration * scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.877, year: 2014

  17. Study of Hydrated Lime in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tihlaříková, Eva; Neděla, Vilém; Rovnaníková, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, S2 (2013), s. 1644-1645 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/1410; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Hydrated Lime * Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.757, year: 2013

  18. Scanning tunneling microscopy study of GaAs(001) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qi-Kun; Hashizume, T.; Sakurai, T.

    1999-03-01

    While GaAs(001) is the most commonly used substrate in fabrication of wireless and opto-electronic devices based on III-V compound semiconductors by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and related techniques, its surface structure have been disputed since the beginning of development of the techniques. Invention of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has revolutionized the approach of surface/interface investigation, contributing greatly in the atomistic understanding of the GaAs surface phases. This paper reviews the STM studies of principal reconstructions, from As-rich c(4×4), 2×4, 2×6 to Ga-rich 4×2 and 4×6, found on the GaAs (001) surface. These studies, together with advanced theoretical efforts, have helped us to establish a unified structural model for various reconstructions, with which we can now explain most of the observations and long-standing controversies in atomic structures and surface stoichiometries.

  19. The Trajectories of Secondary Electrons in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvalina, Ivo; Müllerová, Ilona

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 5 (2006), s. 245-256 ISSN 0161-0457 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/05/2327 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : ET detector * secondary electrons * collection efficiency Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.462, year: 2006

  20. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Samples in an Electric Field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Hovorka, Miloš; Mikmeková, Šárka; Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona; Pokorná, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 12 (2012), s. 2731-2756 ISSN 1996-1944 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/11/2270; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * slow electrons * low energy SEM * low energy STEM * cathode lens Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.247, year: 2012

  1. Method for Surface Scanning in Medical Imaging and Related Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for surface scanning in medical imaging is provided. The surface scanning apparatus comprises an image source, a first optical fiber bundle comprising first optical fibers having proximal ends and distal ends, and a first optical coupler for coupling an image from the image...

  2. An in-vitro evaluation of the effect of 980 nm diode laser irradiation on intra-canal dentin surface and dentinal tubule openings after biomechanical preparation: Scanning electron microscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhingan, Pulkit; Sandhu, Meera; Jindal, Garima; Goel, Deepti; Sachdev, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Context: Very recently, diode laser has been used for disinfecting the root canals in endodontic treatment and increasing its success rate and longevity utilizing the thermal effect of laser on surrounding tissues. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of 980 nm laser irradiation on intra-canal dentin surfacescanning electron microscopic (SEM) - in-vitro study. Methods: A total of 40 single-rooted freshly extracted permanent teeth were collected. Teeth were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction using diamond disc. Root canals of all samples were prepared using hand ProTaper, which were randomly assigned into two groups (n = 20 each). Group 1: Receiving no treatment after biomechanical preparation; Group 2: 980 nm diode laser-treated root canals. Teeth were prepared for SEM analysis to check the size of intra-canal dentinal tubule openings. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using SPSS V.16 software and compared using Levene's and independent t-test. Results: On statistical analysis, width of intracanal dentinal tubule openings in Group 1 (control) was significantly higher than those observed in Group 2 (diode laser-treated) (P diode laser on intra-radicular dentin resulted in ultrastructural alterations resulting in melting of dentin. PMID:26097338

  3. An AES Study of the Room Temperature Surface Conditioning of Technological Metal Surfaces by Electron Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Taborelli, M; Brown, A; Baker, M A

    2002-01-01

    The modifications to technological copper and niobium surfaces induced by 2.5 keV electron irradiation have been investigated in the context of the conditioning process occurring in particle accelerator ultra high vacuum systems. Changes in the elemental surface composition have been found using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) by monitoring the carbon, oxygen and metal Auger peak intensities as a function of electron irradiation in the dose range 10-6 to 10-2 C mm-2. The surface analysis results are compared with electron dose dependent secondary electron and electron stimulated desorption yield measurements. Initially the electron irradiation causes a surface cleaning through electron stimulated desorption, in particular of hydrogen. During this period both the electron stimulated desorption and secondary electron yield decrease as a function of electron dose. When the electron dose exceeds 10-4 C mm-2 electron stimulated desorption yields are reduced by several orders of magnitude and the electron beam indu...

  4. A comparative microleakage evaluation of three different base materials in Class I cavity in deciduous molars in sandwich technique using dye penetration and dentin surface interface by scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A major objective in restorative dentistry is the control of marginal leakage, which may occur because of dimensional changes or lack of adaptation of restorative material to the cavity preparation. Numerous techniques have been advocated to overcome polymerization shrinkage in composite restorations. Aim and Objectives: This study investigated microleakage of three different bases under composite resin in sandwich technique using dye penetration and dentin surface interface using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted deciduous molars were stored in distilled water and Class I cavities with a width of about one-fourth of intercuspal distance and a depth of 0.5-1 mm below the dentino-enamel junction was prepared without bevels. In Group 1 - glass ionomer cement (GIC; Group 2 - mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA; Group 3 - Biodentine™ was placed as a base under composite. Teeth were longitudinally sectioned in two halves, through the centers of the restoration, immersed in 2% methylene blue and microleakage was evaluated under stereomicroscope and surface interface between base and dentin was evaluated under SEM. Results:Under the condition of in vitro study, less microleakage and less internal gaps were seen in Biodentine™ (0.00 ± 0.00 and 4.00 ± 1.59 group than MTA (0.00 ± 0.00 and 6.08 ± 1.82 and GIC (25.25 ± 6.57 and 14.73 ± 3.72, respectively and showed very strong positive correlation between microleakage and internal gaps. Conclusion: Biodentine™ exhibits superior marginal sealing ability as well as marginal adaptation under composite resin as compared to MTA and GIC.

  5. Development of a fountain detector for spectroscopy of secondary electrons in scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agemura, Toshihide; Kimura, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    The low-pass secondary electron (SE) detector, the so-called “fountain detector (FD)”, for scanning electron microscopy has high potential for application to the imaging of low-energy SEs. Low-energy SE imaging may be used for detecting the surface potential variations of a specimen. However, the detected SEs include a certain fraction of tertiary electrons (SE3s) because some of the high-energy backscattered electrons hit the grid to yield SE3s. We have overcome this difficulty by increasing the aperture ratio of the bias and ground grids and using the lock-in technique, in which the AC field with the DC offset was applied on the bias grid. The energy-filtered SE images of a 4H-SiC p–n junction show complex behavior according to the grid bias. These observations are clearly explained by the variations of Auger spectra across the p–n junction. The filtered SE images taken with the FD can be applied to observing the surface potential variation of specimens.

  6. Transmission electron imaging in the Delft multibeam scanning electron microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.; Kruit, P.

    2016-01-01

    Our group is developing a multibeam scanning electron microscope (SEM) with 196 beams in order to increase the throughput of SEM. Three imaging systems using, respectively, transmission electron detection, secondary electron detection, and backscatter electron detection are designed in order to

  7. Scanning or treating device for smooth curved surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemma, A.

    1988-01-01

    This robot for scanning or treating a smooth curved surface is made by a vehicle moving predeterminately on the surface, this vehicle having mobil grips. A support arm is attached to the vehicle by a swivel and fixed at the center of the curvature. It is orientable parralel to the axes of legs of the vehicle near the center. Scanning or treatment systems for the surface are fixed on the vehicle. Drives and control systems for the vehicle and treatment or scanning system are provided [fr

  8. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues in LDEF tray clamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed optical scanning of tray clamps is being conducted in the Facility for the Optical Inspection of Large Surfaces at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns in diameter. Residues from selected impacts are then being characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis at CNES. Results from this analysis will be the initial step to classifying projectile residues into specific sources.

  9. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on electron-boson interactions in superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Schackert, Michael Peter

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the experimental study of electron-boson interactions in superconductors by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at temperatures below 1 K. This new approach allows the direct measurement of the Eliashberg function of conventional superconductors as demonstrated on lead (Pb) and niobium (Nb). Preparative experiments on unconventional iron-pnictides are presented in the end.

  10. A scanning electron microscopic study of the dysplastic epithelia adjacent to oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worawongvasu, Ratthapong

    2007-01-01

    By light microscopy, the dysplastic oral epithelia due to the neoplastic processes are similar to epithelial changes due to the inflammatory processes. Scanning electron microscopy may elucidate the different surface changes between the two. The aim of this study was to examine the surface appearances of the dysplastic oral epithelia adjacent to oral squamous cell carcinoma to see if there are any surface changes. A total of 2 specimens, one specimen from each patient with oral squamous cell carcinoma, were used for this study. Each specimen was divided in two. One half was prepared for light microscopy and the other half was prepared for scanning electron microscopy. Light microscopically, the epithelia showed mild dysplasia. By scanning electron microscopy, the keratinized cells showed irregular microridges surrounding pits, which were variable and irregular in size and shape, and the nonkeratinized cells showed parallel microridges with irregularly widened intervals between each microridge. Irregular, broad, and partly swollen microridges and irregular short, stubby surface projections were also seen. The oral epithelia adjacent to oral squamous cell carcinoma showed mild dysplasia light microscopically but appeared abnormal by scanning electron microscopy. The abnormal epithelial cells showed pleomorphism, irregular and disoriented microridges, and abnormal surface microstructures.

  11. Imaging by Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Deconvolution Resolving More Details of Surfaces Nanomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    Upon imaging, electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ESTM), scanning electrochemical micro-scopy (SECM) and in situ STM resolve information on electronic structures and on surface topography. At very high resolution, imaging processing is required, as to obtain information that relates...... to crystallographic-surface structures. Within the wide range of new technologies, those images surface features, the electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM) provides means of atomic resolution where the tip participates actively in the process of imaging. Two metallic surfaces influence ions trapped...... of the characteristic details of the images. A large proportion of the observed noise may be explained by the scanning actions of the feedback circuitry while a minor fraction of the image details may be explained by surface drift phenomena. As opposed to the method of deconvolution, conventional methods of filtering...

  12. Contact detection for nanomanipulation in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Changhai; To, Steve

    2012-07-01

    Nanomanipulation systems require accurate knowledge of the end-effector position in all three spatial coordinates, XYZ, for reliable manipulation of nanostructures. Although the images acquired by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) provide high resolution XY information, the lack of depth information in the Z-direction makes 3D nanomanipulation time-consuming. Existing approaches for contact detection of end-effectors inside SEM typically utilize fragile touch sensors that are difficult to integrate into a nanomanipulation system. This paper presents a method for determining the contact between an end-effector and a target surface during nanomanipulation inside SEM, purely based on the processing of SEM images. A depth-from-focus method is used in the fast approach of the end-effector to the substrate, followed by fine contact detection. Experimental results demonstrate that the contact detection approach is capable of achieving an accuracy of 21.5 nm at 50,000× magnification while inducing little end-effector damage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An overview on bioaerosols viewed by scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittmaack, K. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany)]. E-mail: wittmaack@gsf.de; Wehnes, H. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Heinzmann, U. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Agerer, R. [Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Department Biology, Biodiversity Research: Mycology, Menzinger Stasse 67, 80638 Munich (Germany)

    2005-06-15

    Bioaerosols suspended in ambient air were collected with single-stage impactors at a semiurban site in southern Germany during late summer and early autumn. Sampling was mostly carried out at a nozzle velocity of 35 m/s, corresponding to a minimum aerodynamic diameter (cut-off diameter) of aerosol particles of 0.8 {mu}m. The collected particles, sampled for short periods ({approx}15 min) to avoid pile-up, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed bioaerosols include brochosomes, fungal spores, hyphae, insect scales, hairs of plants and, less commonly, bacteria and epicuticular wax. Brochosomes, which serve as a highly water repellent body coating of leafhoppers, are hollow spheroids with diameters around 400 nm, resembling C{sub 60} or footballs (soccer balls). They are usually airborne not as individuals but in the form of large clusters containing up to 10,000 individual species or even more. Various types of spores and scales were observed, but assignment turned out be difficult due to the large number of fungi and insects from which they may have originated. Pollens were observed only once. The absence these presumably elastic particles suggests that they are frequently lost, at the comparatively high velocities, due to bounce-off from the nonadhesive impaction surfaces.

  14. Scanning electron microscopy investigations regarding Adonis vernalis L. flower morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Neta GOSTIN

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The floral morphology of Adonis vernalis L. was observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM. The investigations are important to clarify some taxonomical problems and also could provide useful diagnostic elements for the identification of this medicinal plant in powdered materials. All floral organs are initiated spirally and centripetally and develop centripetally. The petals (8-12 are shorter than the sepals (5-6 in early developmental stages. The petals are disposed on spiral (with 3-4 whorls. The stamens (numerous are unbranched and reach maturity centripetally; they are free of the perianth. The anther walls consisting of a single layer epidermis in the anther wall surrounding the sporagenous tissue, one row of endothecium, two to four rows of middle layer and one row of tapetum layer. In the anther walls, the tapetal cells, by glandular type, persist later in ontogenesis. Pollen grains are tricolpate with echinate surface. The gynoecium is multiple, apocarpous with distinct carpels. The carpels are ascidiate from the beginning. At the base of each carpel, numerousness short, unicellular, trichomes are present. The stigma differentiates as two crests along the ventral slit of the ovary. Each carpel contains a single ovule inside the ovary cavity. The mature ovule is anatropous, with two integuments. It is almost parallel to the funicle.

  15. An overview on bioaerosols viewed by scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmaack, K.; Wehnes, H.; Heinzmann, U.; Agerer, R.

    2005-01-01

    Bioaerosols suspended in ambient air were collected with single-stage impactors at a semiurban site in southern Germany during late summer and early autumn. Sampling was mostly carried out at a nozzle velocity of 35 m/s, corresponding to a minimum aerodynamic diameter (cut-off diameter) of aerosol particles of 0.8 μm. The collected particles, sampled for short periods (∼15 min) to avoid pile-up, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed bioaerosols include brochosomes, fungal spores, hyphae, insect scales, hairs of plants and, less commonly, bacteria and epicuticular wax. Brochosomes, which serve as a highly water repellent body coating of leafhoppers, are hollow spheroids with diameters around 400 nm, resembling C 60 or footballs (soccer balls). They are usually airborne not as individuals but in the form of large clusters containing up to 10,000 individual species or even more. Various types of spores and scales were observed, but assignment turned out be difficult due to the large number of fungi and insects from which they may have originated. Pollens were observed only once. The absence these presumably elastic particles suggests that they are frequently lost, at the comparatively high velocities, due to bounce-off from the nonadhesive impaction surfaces

  16. Surface chemical reactions probed with scanning force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werts, M.P L; van der Vegte, E.W.; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    In this letter we report the study of surface chemical reactions with scanning force microscopy (SFM) with chemical specificity. Using chemically modified SFM probes, we can determine the local surface reaction conversion during a chemical surface modification. The adhesion forces between a

  17. Scanning electron microscopy image representativeness: morphological data on nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odziomek, Katarzyna; Ushizima, Daniela; Oberbek, Przemyslaw; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof Jan; Puzyn, Tomasz; Haranczyk, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    A sample of a nanomaterial contains a distribution of nanoparticles of various shapes and/or sizes. A scanning electron microscopy image of such a sample often captures only a fragment of the morphological variety present in the sample. In order to quantitatively analyse the sample using scanning electron microscope digital images, and, in particular, to derive numerical representations of the sample morphology, image content has to be assessed. In this work, we present a framework for extracting morphological information contained in scanning electron microscopy images using computer vision algorithms, and for converting them into numerical particle descriptors. We explore the concept of image representativeness and provide a set of protocols for selecting optimal scanning electron microscopy images as well as determining the smallest representative image set for each of the morphological features. We demonstrate the practical aspects of our methodology by investigating tricalcium phosphate, Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 , and calcium hydroxyphosphate, Ca 5 (PO 4 ) 3 (OH), both naturally occurring minerals with a wide range of biomedical applications. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Usage of scanning electron microscopy for particulate matter sources identification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ličbinský, R.; Frýbort, O.; Huzlík, J.; Adamec, V.; Effenberger, K.; Mikuška, Pavel; Vojtěšek, Martin; Křůmal, Kamil

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2010), s. 137-144 ISSN 1802-971X R&D Projects: GA MŽP SP/1A3/55/08 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : morphology * scanning electron microscopy * sources Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  19. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results suggest that the SEM-EDX is one of the potential tools for rapid detection of metals, namely, As and Cd in himematsutake. Key words: Arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX), coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), himematsutake.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of Dermatobia hominis reveals cutaneous anchoring features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhrenschlager, Matthias; Mempel, Martin; Weichenmeier, Ingrid; Engst, Reinhard; Ring, Johannnes; Behrendt, Heidrun

    2007-10-01

    We report the case of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman suffering from cutaneous myiasis. With the use of scanning electron microscopy, we placed special focus on the mechanisms by which Dermatobia hominis can fasten securely within the human skin.

  1. A Comparative Scanning Electron Microscopy Evaluation of Smear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of chitosan and MTAD for the smear layer removal from the root canal through a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Thirty teeth were randomly divided into three groups according to the final irrigants: 0.2% chitosan, MTAD, saline (control group).

  2. A Comparative Scanning Electron Microscopy Evaluation of Smear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of chitosan and MTAD for the smear layer removal from the root canal through a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Thirty teeth were randomly divided into three groups according to the final irrigants: 0.2% chitosan, MTAD, saline (control group). After the ...

  3. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  4. Very low energy scanning electron microscopy in nanotechnology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Mika, Filip; Mikmeková, Eliška; Mikmeková, Šárka; Pokorná, Zuzana; Frank, Luděk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, 8/9 (2012), s. 695-716 ISSN 1475-7435 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE08012; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * very low energy electrons * cathode lens * grain contrast * strain contrast * imaging of participates * dopant contrast * very low energy STEM * graphene Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.087, year: 2012

  5. MORPH-I (Ver 1.0) a software package for the analysis of scanning electron micrograph (binary formatted) images for the assessment of the fractal dimension of enclosed pore surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossotti, Victor G.; Eldeeb, A. Raouf; Oscarson, Robert

    1998-01-01

    MORPH-I is a set of C-language computer programs for the IBM PC and compatible minicomputers. The programs in MORPH-I are used for the fractal analysis of scanning electron microscope and electron microprobe images of pore profiles exposed in cross-section. The program isolates and traces the cross-sectional profiles of exposed pores and computes the Richardson fractal dimension for each pore. Other programs in the set provide for image calibration, display, and statistical analysis of the computed dimensions for highly complex porous materials. Requirements: IBM PC or compatible; minimum 640 K RAM; mathcoprocessor; SVGA graphics board providing mode 103 display.

  6. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) study on surface modified CVD diamond/Si(111) film post implanted Fe-B and NiFe-B related to GMR properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purwanto, Setyo, E-mail: setyo-p@batan.go.id, E-mail: purwantosetyo@yahoo.com; Dimyati, A., E-mail: arbi-dimyati@hotmail.com [Center for Advanced Material Science and Technology-BATAN (Indonesia); Iskandar, R. [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2016-04-19

    Nanostructure investigation on the post implantation by Fe-B and NiFe-B on CVD diamond/Si(111) film have been studied by means of STEM related to their GMR phenomena. Two samples were investigated carefully, firstly sample is post NiFe-B at E=70keV and dose= 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} (denoted as A-E3D1). Secondly, is post FeB at E=20 keV and dose= 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} (denoted as B-E1D1). Based on FPP measurement at room temperature (RT) and H{sub applied} = 8 kOe, A-E3D1 sample has MR ratio almost 80% and MR ratio in B-E1D1 sample is 45%. Based on STEM-EDX investigation, there are two aspects of how MR ratio of A-E3D1 more higher than those of B-E1D1. Firstly, surface nanostructure on the top of A-E3D1 film is more grazing than on the top of B-E1D1. Analysis with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) equipped with Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) the growth of amorphous carbon layer on top of the implanted diamond film with thickness around 100 nm and only 20 nm on the no implanted sample have observed. Boron atoms were found inside the carbon amorphous layer distributed homogenously. Secondly, oxygen content at the interface between diamond film and silicon substrate in sample A-E3D1 was lower than those in B-E1D1 sample. This condition gives the resistance value in A-E3D1 lower than value in B-E1D1. This result is close to the Raman Spectroscopy data measurement which obviously suggests changes on the Raman spectrum due to implantation related to Oxygen excitation from B-E1D1 sample.

  7. Investigation on traceability of 3D Scanning Electron Microscopy based on the Stereo Pair Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) has a big potential as a metrology instrument for micro and nanotechnology due to its unique combination of three imaging properties: • Lateral ultimate resolution down to 2nm • Large range of possible magnification levels ranging from a few hundred times...... that addresses the performance of 3D topography calculation based on surface topography imaging using secondary electrons and the Stereo Pair Technique....

  8. Cathodoluminescence studies of phosphors in a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Paul; Den Engelsen, Daniel; Ireland, Terry; Fern, George; Silver, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence studies are reported of phosphors in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). A number of phosphor materials have been studied and exhibited a pronounced comet-like structure at high scan rates, because the particle continued to emit light after the beam had moved onto subsequent pixels. Image analysis has been used to study the loss of brightness along the tail and hence to determine the decay time of the materials. This technique provides a simple and convenient way to study the decay times of individual particles. (paper)

  9. Closed-Loop Autofocus Scheme for Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Le

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a full scale autofocus approach for scanning electron microscope (SEM. The optimal focus (in-focus position of the microscope is achieved by maximizing the image sharpness using a vision-based closed-loop control scheme. An iterative optimization algorithm has been designed using the sharpness score derived from image gradient information. The proposed method has been implemented and validated using a tungsten gun SEM at various experimental conditions like varying raster scan speed, magnification at real-time. We demonstrate that the proposed autofocus technique is accurate, robust and fast.

  10. Parallel electron-beam-induced deposition using a multi-beam scanning electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, P.C.; Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2011-01-01

    Lithography techniques based on electron-beam-induced processes are inherently slow compared to light lithography techniques. The authors demonstrate here that the throughput can be enhanced by a factor of 196 by using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a multibeam electron source. Using

  11. Transmission scanning electron microscopy: Defect observations and image simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Patrick G; Stinville, Jean-Charles; Yao, Eric R; Echlin, McLean P; Titus, Michael S; De Graef, Marc; Gianola, Daniel S; Pollock, Tresa M

    2018-03-01

    The new capabilities of a FEG scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detector for defect characterization have been studied in parallel with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging. Stacking faults and dislocations have been characterized in strontium titanate, a polycrystalline nickel-base superalloy and a single crystal cobalt-base material. Imaging modes that are similar to conventional TEM (CTEM) bright field (BF) and dark field (DF) and STEM are explored, and some of the differences due to the different accelerating voltages highlighted. Defect images have been simulated for the transmission scanning electron microscopy (TSEM) configuration using a scattering matrix formulation, and diffraction contrast in the SEM is discussed in comparison to TEM. Interference effects associated with conventional TEM, such as thickness fringes and bending contours are significantly reduced in TSEM by using a convergent probe, similar to a STEM imaging modality, enabling individual defects to be imaged clearly even in high dislocation density regions. Beyond this, TSEM provides significant advantages for high throughput and dynamic in-situ characterization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Composition quantification of electron-transparent samples by backscattered electron imaging in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, E; Gerthsen, D

    2017-02-01

    The contrast of backscattered electron (BSE) images in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) depends on material parameters which can be exploited for composition quantification if some information on the material system is available. As an example, the In-concentration in thin In x Ga 1-x As layers embedded in a GaAs matrix is analyzed in this work. The spatial resolution of the technique is improved by using thin electron-transparent specimens instead of bulk samples. Although the BSEs are detected in a comparably small angular range by an annular semiconductor detector, the image intensity can be evaluated to determine the composition and local thickness of the specimen. The measured intensities are calibrated within one single image to eliminate the influence of the detection and amplification system. Quantification is performed by comparison of experimental and calculated data. Instead of using time-consuming Monte-Carlo simulations, an analytical model is applied for BSE-intensity calculations which considers single electron scattering and electron diffusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This program is aimed at the quantitative study of surface dynamical processes (vibrational, magnetic excitations) in crystalline slabs, ultrathin-layered materials, and chemisorbed systems on substrates, and of the geometric structure connected to these dynamical excitations. High-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful probe. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50-300 eV). The analyses has been used to study surfaces of ordered alloys (NiAl). Ab-initio surface lattice dynamical results were combined with phonon-loss cross sections to achieve a more accurate microscopic description. First-principles phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross-section calculations. The combined microscopic approach was used to analyze EELS data of Cu(0001) and Ag(001) at two points. Positron diffraction is discussed as a structural and imaging tool. The relation between geometric structure of a film and its local magnetic properties will be studied in the future, along with other things

  14. Optical depth sectioning in the aberration-corrected scanning transmission and scanning confocal electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behan, G; Nellist, P D

    2008-01-01

    The use of spherical aberration correctors in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has the effect of reducing the depth of field of the microscope, making three-dimensional imaging of a specimen possible by optical sectioning. Depth resolution can be improved further by placing aberration correctors and lenses pre and post specimen to achieve an imaging mode known as scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM). We present the calculated incoherent point spread functions (PSF) and optical transfer functions (OTF) of a STEM and SCEM. The OTF for a STEM is shown to have a missing cone region which results in severe blurring along the optic axis, which can be especially severe for extended objects. We also present strategies for reconstruction of experimental data, such as three-dimensional deconvolution of the point spread function.

  15. Influence of mechanical noise inside a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, Marcelo Gaudenzi; Haddab, Yassine; Le Gorrec, Yann; Lutz, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The scanning electron microscope is becoming a popular tool to perform tasks that require positioning, manipulation, characterization, and assembly of micro-components. However, some of these applications require a higher level of performance with respect to dynamics and precision of positioning. One limiting factor is the presence of unidentified noises and disturbances. This work aims to study the influence of mechanical disturbances generated by the environment and by the microscope, identifying how these can affect elements in the vacuum chamber. To achieve this objective, a dedicated setup, including a high-resolution vibrometer, was built inside the microscope. This work led to the identification and quantification of main disturbances and noise sources acting on a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, the effects of external acoustic excitations were analysed. Potential applications of these results include noise compensation and real-time control for high accuracy tasks.

  16. Examination of living fungal spores by scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, N.D.; Lord, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    Ascospores of Sordaria macrospora germinated and produced hyphae exhibiting normal growth and differentiation after examination by scanning electron microscopy and following numerous, different preparative protocols. Seventy-nine to ninety-nine percent of the ascospores retained normal viability after being observed in the fully frozen-hydrated, partially freeze-dried, and vacuum-dried states at accelerating voltages of 5 and 40 keV. Hyphae did not survive these treatments. From these observations it is concluded that ascospores of S. macrospora can remain in a state of suspended animation while being observed in the scanning electron microscope. The ascospores also survived, but with reduced viability: 6 h in glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde, 6 h in OsO4, or 2 h in glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde followed by 2 h in OsO 4 . However, the ascospores did not germinate after dehydration in ethanol. (author)

  17. Influence of mechanical noise inside a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudenzi de Faria, Marcelo; Haddab, Yassine; Le Gorrec, Yann; Lutz, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope is becoming a popular tool to perform tasks that require positioning, manipulation, characterization, and assembly of micro-components. However, some of these applications require a higher level of performance with respect to dynamics and precision of positioning. One limiting factor is the presence of unidentified noises and disturbances. This work aims to study the influence of mechanical disturbances generated by the environment and by the microscope, identifying how these can affect elements in the vacuum chamber. To achieve this objective, a dedicated setup, including a high-resolution vibrometer, was built inside the microscope. This work led to the identification and quantification of main disturbances and noise sources acting on a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, the effects of external acoustic excitations were analysed. Potential applications of these results include noise compensation and real-time control for high accuracy tasks

  18. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Murfitt, Matthew F; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-12-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions, imaging modes, the interpretation of micrographs and the use of quantitative modes "in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). lt forms a counterpart to Transmission Electron Microscopy (Vol. 36 of this Springer Series in Optical Sciences) . The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Münster and from a German text entitled Raster-Elektronenmikroskopie (Springer-Verlag), published in collaboration with my colleague Gerhard Pfefferkorn. In the introductory chapter, the principles of the SEM and of electron­ specimen interactions are described, the most important imaging modes and their associated contrast are summarized, and general aspects of eiemental analysis by x-ray and Auger electron emission are discussed. The electron gun and electron optics are discussed in Chap. 2 in order to show how an electron probe of small diameter can be formed, how the elec­ tron beam can be blanked at high fre...

  1. Practical Use of Scanning Low Energy Electron Microscope (SLEEM)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Mikmeková, Eliška; Mikmeková, Šárka; Konvalina, Ivo; Frank, Luděk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, S3 (2016), s. 1650-1651 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : scanning low energy * SLEEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  2. Response function and optimum configuration of semiconductor backscattered-electron detectors for scanning electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, E. I.; Orlikovskiy, N. A.; Ivanova, E. S.

    2012-01-01

    A new highly efficient design for semiconductor detectors of intermediate-energy electrons (1–50 keV) for application in scanning electron microscopes is proposed. Calculations of the response function of advanced detectors and control experiments show that the efficiency of the developed devices increases on average twofold, which is a significant positive factor in the operation of modern electron microscopes in the mode of low currents and at low primary electron energies.

  3. Advanced radiographic scanning, enhancement and electronic data storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoie, C.; Rivest, D.

    2003-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that radiographs deteriorate with time. Substantial cost is attributed to cataloguing and storage. To eliminate deterioration issues and save time retrieving radiographs, laser scanning techniques were developed in conjunction with viewing and enhancement software. This will allow radiographs to be successfully scanned and stored electronically for future reference. Todays radiographic laser scanners are capable Qf capturing images with an optical density of up to 4.1 at 256 grey levels and resolutions up to 4096 pixels per line. An industrial software interface was developed for the nondestructive testing industry so that, certain parameters such as scan resolution, number of scans, file format and location to be saved could be adjusted as needed. Once the radiographs have been scanned, the tiff images are stored, or retrieved into Radiance software (developed by Rivest Technologies Inc.), which will help to properly interpret the radiographs. Radiance was developed to allow the user to quickly view the radiographs correctness or enhance its defects for comparison and future evaluation. Radiance also allows the user to zoom, measure and annotate areas of interest. Physical cost associated with cataloguing, storing and retrieving radiographs can be eliminated. You can now successfully retrieve and view your radiographs from CD media or dedicated hard drive at will. For continuous searches and/or field access, dedicated hard drives controlled by a server would be the media of choice. All scanned radiographs will be archived to CD media (CD-R). Laser scanning with a proper acquisition interface and easy to use viewing software will permit a qualified user to identify areas of interest and share this information with his/her colleagues via e-mail or web data access. (author)

  4. Applying Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Soil Surface Roughness Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milutin Milenković

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning can provide high-resolution, two-dimensional sampling of soil surface roughness. While previous studies demonstrated the usefulness of these roughness measurements in geophysical applications, questions about the number of required scans and their resolution were not investigated thoroughly. Here, we suggest a method to generate digital elevation models, while preserving the surface’s stochastic properties at high frequencies and additionally providing an estimate of their spatial resolution. We also study the impact of the number and positions of scans on roughness indices’ estimates. An experiment over a smooth and isotropic soil plot accompanies the analysis, where scanning results are compared to results from active triangulation. The roughness measurement conditions for ideal sampling are revisited and updated for diffraction-limited sampling valid for close-range laser scanning over smooth and isotropic soil roughness. Our results show that terrestrial laser scanning can be readily used for roughness assessment on scales larger than 5 cm, while for smaller scales, special processing is required to mitigate the effect of the laser beam footprint. Interestingly, classical roughness parametrization (correlation length, root mean square height (RMSh was not sensitive to these effects. Furthermore, comparing the classical roughness parametrization between one- and four-scan setups shows that the one-scan data can replace the four-scan setup with a relative loss of accuracy below 1% for ranges up to 3 m and incidence angles no larger than 50°, while two opposite scans can replace it over the whole plot. The incidence angle limit for the spectral slope is even stronger and is 40°. These findings are valid for scanning over smooth and isotropic soil roughness.

  5. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    This thesis is concerned with fundamental research into electronic and magnetic interaction on the nanoscale. From small metallic and magnetic islands and layers to single atoms. The research revolves around magnetic interaction probed through the spectroscopic capabilities of the scanning....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...... coverage the silver preferably nucleates on top of the bilayer high cobalt islands compared to directly on the Cu(111) substrate. Furthermore, the silver forms a combination of a reconstruction and a Moire pattern which is investigated with low-energy electron diraction and spectroscopic STM mapping at 6...

  6. A surface refractive index scanning system and method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The invention relates to a surface refractive index scanning system for characterization of a sample. The system comprises a grating device for holding or receiving the sample, the device comprising at least a first grating region having a first grating width along a transverse direction, and a s......The invention relates to a surface refractive index scanning system for characterization of a sample. The system comprises a grating device for holding or receiving the sample, the device comprising at least a first grating region having a first grating width along a transverse direction...

  7. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of glucose oxidase on gold surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losic, D.; Shapter, J.G.; Gooding, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Three immobilization methods have been used for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies of glucose oxidase (GOD) on gold. They are based on a) physical adsorption from solution, b) microcontact printing and c) covalent bonding onto self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). The STM images are used to provide information about the organization of individual GOD molecules and more densely packed monolayers of GOD on electrode surfaces, thus providing information of the role of interfacial structure on biosensor performance. The use of atomically flat gold substrates enables easy distinction of deposited enzyme features from the flat gold substrate. Microcontact printing is found to be a more reliable method than adsorption from solution for preparing individual GOD molecules on the gold surface STM images of printed samples reveal two different shapes of native GOD molecules. One is a butterfly shape with dimensions of 10 ± 1 nm x 6 ± 1 nm, assigned to the lying position of molecule while the second is an approximately spherical shape with dimensions of 6.5 ± 1 nm x 5 ± 1nm assigned to a standing position. Isolated clusters of 5 to 6 GOD molecules are also observed. With monolayer coverage, GOD molecules exhibit a tendency to organize themselves into a two dimensional array with adequate sample stability to obtain high-resolution STM images. Within these two-dimensional arrays are clearly seen repeating clusters of five to six enzyme molecules in a unit STM imaging of GOD monolayers covalently immobilized onto SAM (MPA) are considerably more difficult than when the enzyme is adsorbed directly onto the metal. Cluster structures are observed both high and low coverage despite the fact that native GOD is a negatively charged molecule. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  8. Imaging by Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Deconvolution Resolving More Details of Surfaces Nanomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    Upon imaging, electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ESTM), scanning electrochemical micro-scopy (SECM) and in situ STM resolve information on electronic structures and on surface topography. At very high resolution, imaging processing is required, as to obtain information that relates...... to crystallographic-surface structures. Within the wide range of new technologies, those images surface features, the electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM) provides means of atomic resolution where the tip participates actively in the process of imaging. Two metallic surfaces influence ions trapped.......g., nanoelectronics and single-molecule probing. In principle, the ESTM is capable of sub-atomic resolution but many details at this level of magnification need further treatment of recorded data before real information is obtained. Deconvolution of the data according to the instrument response may explain some...

  9. A new apparatus for electron tomography in the scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morandi, V., E-mail: morandi@bo.imm.cnr.it; Maccagnani, P.; Masini, L.; Migliori, A.; Ortolani, L.; Pezza, A. [CNR-IMM Sezione di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Del Marro, M.; Pallocca, G.; Vinciguerra, P. [ASSING S.P.A., via E. Amaldi 14, 00016 Monterotondo (Rome) (Italy); Rossi, M.; Ferroni, M. [Dip.to di Scienze di Base e Applicate per l’Ingegneria and Centro di Ricerca per le Nanotecnologie Applicate all’Ingegneria (CNIS), Università degli Studi di Roma “Sapienza”, Via A. Scarpa, 00161 Rome (Italy); Sberveglieri, G. [SENSOR Lab, Dip.to di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, Università degli Studi di Brescia and CNR-INO, Via Valotti 9, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Vittori-Antisari, M. [Unità Tecnica Tecnologie dei Materiali, ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 S. Maria di Galeria (Rome) (Italy)

    2015-06-23

    The three-dimensional reconstruction of a microscopic specimen has been obtained by applying the tomographic algorithm to a set of images acquired in a Scanning Electron Microscope. This result was achieved starting from a series of projections obtained by stepwise rotating the sample under the beam raster. The Scanning Electron Microscope was operated in the scanning-transmission imaging mode, where the intensity of the transmitted electron beam is a monotonic function of the local mass-density and thickness of the specimen. The detection strategy has been implemented and tailored in order to maintain the projection requirement over the large tilt range, as required by the tomographic workflow. A Si-based electron detector and an eucentric-rotation specimen holder have been specifically developed for the purpose.

  10. Simulation of multicomponent losses in electron beam melting and refining at varying scan frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J.; Van Den Avyle, J.; Damkroger, B.

    1995-01-01

    A two-stage model is presented to describe alloy element evaporation rates from molten metal due to transient local heating by an electron beam. The first stage is a simulation of transient phenomena near the melt surface due to periodic heating by a scanning beam, the output of which is the relationship between operating parameters, surface temperature, and evaporation rate. At high scan rates, this can be done using a simple one-dimensional heat transfer model of the surface layer; at lower scan rates, a more complex three-dimensional model with fluid flow and periodic boundary conditions is necessary. The second stage couples this evaporation-surface temperature relationship with a larger steady state heat transfer and fluid flow model of an entire melting hearth or mold, in order to calculate local and total evaporation rates. Predictions are compared with experimental results from Sandia's 310-kW electron beam melting furnace, in which evaporation rates and vapor compositions were studied in pure titanium and Ti-6%Al-4%V alloy. Evaporation rates were estimated from rate of condensation on a substrate held over the hearth, and were characterized as a function of beam power (150 and 225 kW), scan frequency (30, 115 and 450 Hz) and background pressure (10 -3 , 10 -4 and 10 -5 torr)

  11. Scanning electron microscopy of the nail plate in onychomycosis patients with negative fungal culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xueping; Li, Qing; Wang, Hongwei; Sun, Yilin; Wang, Aiping; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Cuiping

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a common dermatological problem and can be identified by direct microscopic examination and fungal culture. However, the positive rate of fungal culture is low. This study investigated the application of scanning electron microscopy in the diagnosis of onychomycosis in 20 patients with negative fungal culture. In this study, a routine glutaraldehyde fixation method was used to prepare specimens for electron microscope examination. Results showed that under the scanning electron microscope, significant structural damage was observed in the nail plate in all patients. Hyphaes were seen in 70% of cases. A mixture of scattered hyphaes, pseudohyphaes, and spores was observed in 30% of cases. A mixture of spores and bacteria was observed in 10% of cases. A mixture of hyphaes and bacteria was observed in 20% of cases. The typical hyphae pierced a thin layer or single layer of corneocytes. Hyphaes could be smooth, sleek, and straight with visible separation, or dry, bent, and folded with a smooth surface. The diameter of hyphaes was 1-2 µm. The scattered spores were the main form of spore growth, and the growth of budding spores can be seen attached to the surface of layered armor. Most of the bacteria were gathered in clumps on the ventral surface, especially in grooves. In conclusion, scanning electron microscopy can be used to preliminarily identify the pathogen involved and the degree of damage in cases where onychomycosis is clinically diagnosed, but fungal culture is negative. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Standard practice for scanning electron microscope beam Size characterization

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides a reproducible means by which one aspect of the performance of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) may be characterized. The resolution of an SEM depends on many factors, some of which are electron beam voltage and current, lens aberrations, contrast in the specimen, and operator-instrument-material interaction. However, the resolution for any set of conditions is limited by the size of the electron beam. This size can be quantified through the measurement of an effective apparent edge sharpness for a number of materials, two of which are suggested. This practice requires an SEM with the capability to perform line-scan traces, for example, Y-deflection waveform generation, for the suggested materials. The range of SEM magnification at which this practice is of utility is from 1000 to 50 000 × . Higher magnifications may be attempted, but difficulty in making precise measurements can be expected. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ass...

  13. Adaptive noise Wiener filter for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K S; Teh, V; Nia, M E

    2016-01-01

    Noise on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is studied. Gaussian noise is the most common type of noise in SEM image. We developed a new noise reduction filter based on the Wiener filter. We compared the performance of this new filter namely adaptive noise Wiener (ANW) filter, with four common existing filters as well as average filter, median filter, Gaussian smoothing filter and the Wiener filter. Based on the experiments results the proposed new filter has better performance on different noise variance comparing to the other existing noise removal filters in the experiments. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Local dynamic range compensation for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K S; Huang, Y H

    2015-01-01

    This is the extended project by introducing the modified dynamic range histogram modification (MDRHM) and is presented in this paper. This technique is used to enhance the scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging system. By comparing with the conventional histogram modification compensators, this technique utilizes histogram profiling by extending the dynamic range of each tile of an image to the limit of 0-255 range while retains its histogram shape. The proposed technique yields better image compensation compared to conventional methods. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Dynamic-scanning-electron-microscope study of friction and wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    A friction and wear apparatus was built into a real time scanning electron microscope (SEM). The apparatus and SEM comprise a system which provides the capability of performing dynamic friction and wear experiments in situ. When the system is used in conjunction with dispersive X-ray analysis, a wide range of information on the wearing process can be obtained. The type of wear and variation with speed, load, and time can be investigated. The source, size, and distribution of wear particles can be determined and metallic transferal observed. Some typical results obtained with aluminum, copper, and iron specimens are given.

  16. Characterization of catalysts by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targos, W.M.; Bradley, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    The dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is an integral tool for characterizing catalysts because of its unique ability to image and analyze nanosized volumes. This information is valuable in optimizing catalyst formulations and determining causes for reduced catalyst performance. For many commercial catalysts direct correlations between structural features of metal crystallites and catalytic performance are not attainable. When these instances occur, determination of elemental distribution may be the only information available. In this paper the authors discuss some of the techniques employed and limitations associated with characterizing commercial catalysts

  17. Analysis of archaeological materials through Scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, A.; Tenorio C, D.; Elizalde, S.; Mandujano, C.; Cassiano, G.

    2005-01-01

    With the purpose to know the uses and the chemical composition of some cultural objects in the pre hispanic epoch this work presents several types of analysis for identifying them by means of the Scanning electron microscopy and its techniques as the Functional analysis of artifacts based on the 'tracks of use' analysis, also the X-ray spectroscopy and the X-ray dispersive energy (EDS) are mentioned, all of them allowing a major approach to the pre hispanic culture in Mexico. (Author)

  18. Calculation of longitudinal dose non-uniformity with simultaneous product movement and beam scanning in industrial electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, R.

    1984-01-01

    For steady-current type electron accelerators with single-beam scanning, a fundamental formula is obtained for the relation between the longitudinal dose non-uniformity with simultaneous product movement and beam scanning and with several irradiation parameters. Based on the relation, the critical velocity of the product necessary for the dose uniformity is given by the product of scan frequency, the distance from beam window to product surface, and the square root of the total mean squared scattering angle. (author)

  19. Diffusion length measurement using the scanning electron microscope. [for silicon solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizer, V. G.

    1975-01-01

    The present work describes a measuring technique employing the scanning electron microscope in which values of the true bulk diffusion length are obtained. It is shown that surface recombination effects can be eliminated through application of highly doped surface field layers. The effects of high injection level and low-high junction current generation are investigated. Results obtained with this technique are compared to those obtained by a penetrating radiation (X-ray) method, and a close agreement is found. The SEM technique is limited to cells that contain a back surface field layer.

  20. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning...... analysis performing gold sputter coating under vacuum and were examined using 15kV at 500x and 2000x magnification. Results: Morphological alterations on the enamel surface were similarly detected after bleaching with either 35% carbamide peroxide or 35% hydrogen peroxide. Surface porosities were...... characteristic of an erosive process that took place on human enamel. Depression areas, including the formation of craters, and exposure of enamel rods could also be detected. Conclusion: Bleaching effects on enamel morphology were randomly distributed throughout enamel surface and various degrees of enamel...

  1. Zinc deficiency in the 11 day rat embryo: a scanning and transmission electron microscope study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, A.J.; Dreosti, I.E.; Tulsi, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Zinc deficient rat embryos were obtained on the 11th day of pregnancy and examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an increase in the number of deformed embryos, as well as embryonic growth retardation. In addition, the epithelium of zinc deficient embryos displayed a marked increase in surface microvilli, as well as the presence of blebbing. Transmission electron microscopy indicated extensive cell death in the neural epithelium which was apparently more severely damaged by zinc deficiency than were mesenchymal cells. Mitochondrial cristae were affected to a greater degree than any other membrane of the cell and cristael disintegration appeared to represent the principal cellular lesion preceding necrosis of neural cells and neural tube teratology. 29 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  2. Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation of Root Canal Irrigation with Saline, Sodium Hypochlorite, and Citric Acid,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    endodontic techniques; citric acid for root canal irrigation 4410,ABSTACgmf --,-,m- ,-rms n roc"---’This Study used a scanning electron microscope and a...wall is instrumented during canal preparation and that the smeared layer seems to be found only where endodontic instruments have scraped the surface...between the extremes. It was also decided to use a magnification of 75X to evaluate the superficial debris and 800X to evaluate the smeared layer

  3. Clinical and scanning electron microscopic assessments of porcelain and ceromer resin veneers.

    OpenAIRE

    Dhawan P; Prakash H; Shah N

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recently available Ceromer resin materials are promising for fabrication of esthetic anterior laminates and provices an alternative, cost effective treament modality to porcelain laminates for discolored anterior anterior teeth. It was proposed to study the esthetic quality and surface finish of veneers fbricated from ceromer resin and compare it with the standard porcelain veneers, both clinically as well as by scanning electron microscope (SEM) at baseline and at 12 months. If foun...

  4. Corneal endothelium of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigatto, João A T; Laus, José L; Santos, Jaime M; Cerva, Cristine; Cunha, Luciana S; Ruoppolo, Valéria; Barros, Paulo S M

    2005-12-01

    The corneal endothelium is essential for the maintenance of the corneal transparency. The aim of this study was to examine the morphology of the endothelial surface and perform morphometric analysis of the normal corneal endothelial cells of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) using scanning electron microscopy. The present work demonstrates that the corneal endothelium of the Magellanic penguin is similar to those described in other vertebrates.

  5. Simultaneous Correlative Scanning Electron and High-NA Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Effting, Andries P. J.; Voorneveld, Philip W.; Lucas, Miriam S.; Hardwick, James C.; Wepf, Roger A.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a novel approach to correlative microscopy, in which a high numerical aperture epi-fluorescence microscope and a scanning electron microscope illuminate the same area of a sample at the same time. This removes the need for retrieval of regions of interest leading to a drastic reduction of inspection times and the possibility for quantitative investigations of large areas and datasets with correlative microscopy. We demonstrate Simultaneous CLEM (SCLEM) analyzing cell-cell connections and membrane protrusions in whole uncoated colon adenocarcinoma cell line cells stained for actin and cortactin with AlexaFluor488. SCLEM imaging of coverglass-mounted tissue sections with both electron-dense and fluorescence staining is also shown. PMID:23409024

  6. Atomic-Scale Visualization of Quantum Interference on a Weyl Semimetal Surface by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hao; Xu, Su-Yang; Bian, Guang; Guo, Cheng; Chang, Guoqing; Sanchez, Daniel S; Belopolski, Ilya; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shin-Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Sankar, Raman; Alidoust, Nasser; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wu, Fan; Neupert, Titus; Chou, Fangcheng; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Yao, Nan; Bansil, Arun; Jia, Shuang; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M Zahid

    2016-01-26

    Weyl semimetals may open a new era in condensed matter physics, materials science, and nanotechnology after graphene and topological insulators. We report the first atomic scale view of the surface states of a Weyl semimetal (NbP) using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy. We observe coherent quantum interference patterns that arise from the scattering of quasiparticles near point defects on the surface. The measurements reveal the surface electronic structure both below and above the chemical potential in both real and reciprocal spaces. Moreover, the interference maps uncover the scattering processes of NbP's exotic surface states. Through comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations, we further discover that the orbital and/or spin texture of the surface bands may suppress certain scattering channels on NbP. These results provide a comprehensive understanding of electronic properties on Weyl semimetal surfaces.

  7. Image formation mechanisms in scanning electron microscopy of carbon nanotubes, and retrieval of their intrinsic dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, H; Krakhmalev, P; Svensson, K

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the image formation mechanisms that are involved in the imaging of carbon nanotubes with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We show how SEM images can be modelled by accounting for surface enhancement effects together with the absorption coefficient for secondary electrons, and the electron-probe shape. Images can then be deconvoluted, enabling retrieval of the intrinsic nanotube dimensions. Accurate estimates of their dimensions can thereby be obtained even for structures that are comparable to the electron-probe size (on the order of 2 nm). We also present a simple and robust model for obtaining the outer diameter of nanotubes without any detailed knowledge about the electron-probe shape. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Simulations and measurements in scanning electron microscopes at low electron energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christopher G H; Frank, Luděk; Müllerová, Ilona

    2016-11-01

    The advent of new imaging technologies in Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) using low energy (0-2 keV) electrons has brought about new ways to study materials at the nanoscale. It also brings new challenges in terms of understanding electron transport at these energies. In addition, reduction in energy has brought new contrast mechanisms producing images that are sometimes difficult to interpret. This is increasing the push for simulation tools, in particular for low impact energies of electrons. The use of Monte Carlo calculations to simulate the transport of electrons in materials has been undertaken by many authors for several decades. However, inaccuracies associated with the Monte Carlo technique start to grow as the energy is reduced. This is not simply associated with inaccuracies in the knowledge of the scattering cross-sections, but is fundamental to the Monte Carlo technique itself. This is because effects due to the wave nature of the electron and the energy band structure of the target above the vacuum energy level become important and these are properties which are difficult to handle using the Monte Carlo method. In this review we briefly describe the new techniques of scanning low energy electron microscopy and then outline the problems and challenges of trying to understand and quantify the signals that are obtained. The effects of charging and spin polarised measurement are also briefly explored. SCANNING 38:802-818, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Electron transparent graphene windows for environmental scanning electron microscopy in liquids and dense gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Joshua D; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2012-12-21

    Due to its ultrahigh electron transmissivity in a wide electron energy range, molecular impermeability, high electrical conductivity and excellent mechanical stiffness, suspended graphene membranes appear to be a nearly ideal window material for in situ (in vivo) environmental electron microscopy of nano- and mesoscopic objects (including bio-medical samples) immersed in liquids and/or in dense gaseous media. In this paper, taking advantage of a small modification of the graphene transfer protocol onto metallic and SiN supporting orifices, reusable environmental cells with exchangeable graphene windows have been designed. Using colloidal gold nanoparticles (50 nm) dispersed in water as model objects for scanning electron microscopy in liquids as proof of concept, different conditions for imaging through the graphene membrane were tested. Limiting factors for electron microscopy in liquids, such as electron beam induced water radiolysis and damage of the graphene membrane at high electron doses, are discussed.

  10. Electron transparent graphene windows for environmental scanning electron microscopy in liquids and dense gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, Joshua D; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Due to its ultrahigh electron transmissivity in a wide electron energy range, molecular impermeability, high electrical conductivity and excellent mechanical stiffness, suspended graphene membranes appear to be a nearly ideal window material for in situ (in vivo) environmental electron microscopy of nano- and mesoscopic objects (including bio-medical samples) immersed in liquids and/or in dense gaseous media. In this paper, taking advantage of a small modification of the graphene transfer protocol onto metallic and SiN supporting orifices, reusable environmental cells with exchangeable graphene windows have been designed. Using colloidal gold nanoparticles (50 nm) dispersed in water as model objects for scanning electron microscopy in liquids as proof of concept, different conditions for imaging through the graphene membrane were tested. Limiting factors for electron microscopy in liquids, such as electron beam induced water radiolysis and damage of the graphene membrane at high electron doses, are discussed. (paper)

  11. Advances in imaging and electron physics the scanning transmission electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. This series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains.  This particular volume presents several timely articles on the scanning transmission electron microscope. Updated with contributions from leading international scholars and industry experts Discusses hot topic areas and presents current and future research trends Provides an invaluable reference and guide for physicists, engineers and mathematicians.

  12. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Electron Microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Twenty intact human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons were randomly divided into four groups (n=5) treated as follows: G1- storage in artificial saliva (control group); G2- four 30-minute applications of 35% carbamide peroxide (total exposure...... analysis performing gold sputter coating under vacuum and were examined using 15kV at 500x and 2000x magnification. Results: Morphological alterations on the enamel surface were similarly detected after bleaching with either 35% carbamide peroxide or 35% hydrogen peroxide. Surface porosities were...

  13. Scanning tunneling microscopy of monoatomic gold chains on vicinal Si(335) surface: experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawiec, M.; Kwapinski, T.; Jalochowski, M. [Institute of Physics and Nanotechnology Center, M. Curie-Sklodowska University, pl. M. Curie-Sklodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2005-02-01

    We study electronic and topographic properties of the Si(335) surface, containing Au wires parallel to the steps. We use scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) supplemented by reflection of high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) technique. The STM data show the space and voltage dependent oscillations of the distance between STM tip and the surface which can be explained within one band tight binding Hubbard model. We calculate the STM current using nonequilibrium Keldysh Green function formalism. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Destructive effects induced by the electron beam in scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M. C.; Bita, B. I.; Banu, M. A.; Tomescu, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Scanning Electron Microscopy has been validated by its impressive imaging and reliable measuring as an essential characterization tool for a variety of applications and research fields. This paper is a comprehensive study dedicated to the undesirable influence of the accelerated electron beam associated with the dielectric materials, sensitive structures or inappropriate sample manipulation. Depending on the scanning conditions, the electron beam may deteriorate the investigated sample due to the extended focusing or excessive high voltage and probe current applied on vulnerable configurations. Our aim is to elaborate an instructive material for improved SEM visualization capabilities by overcoming the specific limitations of the technique. Particular examination and measuring methods are depicted along with essential preparation and manipulation procedures in order to protect the integrity of the sample. Various examples are mentioned and practical solutions are described in respect to the general use of the electron microscope.

  15. Design of Pixellated CMOS Photon Detector for Secondary Electron Detection in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Joon Huang Chuah; David Holburn

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method of detecting secondary electrons generated in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The method suggests that the photomultiplier tube (PMT), traditionally used in the Everhart-Thornley (ET) detector, is to be replaced with a configurable multipixel solid-state photon detector offering the advantages of smaller dimension, lower supply voltage and power requirements, and potentially cheaper product cost. The design of the proposed detector has been implement...

  16. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-18

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. © 2010 Microscopy Society of America.

  17. Visualizing Morphological Changes of Abscission Zone Cells in Arabidopsis by Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chun-Lin; Butenko, Melinka A

    2018-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a type of electron microscope which produces detailed images of surface structures. It has been widely used in plants and animals to study cellular structures. Here, we describe a detailed protocol to prepare samples of floral abscission zones (AZs) for SEM, as well as further image analysis. We show that it is a powerful tool to detect morphologic changes at the cellular level during the course of abscission in wild-type plants and to establish the details of phenotypic alteration in abscission mutants.

  18. Three-dimensional surface scanning for accurate patient positioning and monitoring during breast cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaisberger, C.; Mitterlechner, B.; Huber, S.; Weichenberger, H.; Sedlmayer, F.; Deutschmann, H. [Paracelsus Medical Univ. Clinics, Salzburg (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology; Paracelsus Medical Univ., Salzburg (Austria). Inst. for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART); Steininger, P. [Paracelsus Medical Univ., Salzburg (Austria). Inst. for Research and Development of Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Clinical evaluation of an optical three-dimensional surface scanning (3D-SS) system for patient positioning and monitoring during radiotherapy (RT) for breast cancer. Materials and methods: A ceiling-mounted scanner was developed to acquire multiple 3D body surface images and tested in 14 conservatively operated breast cancer patients. A reference skin surface was derived from the planning computed tomography (CT) scan as basis for rigid registration with the surface scans. In addition to electronic portal images (EPIs), optical scans were acquired at three defined time points before and during daily RT. Patient setup was guided by laser alignments and corrected according to EPI findings. The accuracy of the 3D-SS system was validated by comparison of the optical scans to EPIs generated in parallel. Interfraction shifts were investigated by comparison of the first 3D-SS image with the reference body outline. Intrafractional motions were analysed by comparing the three daily surface scans with the first EPI. Results: Comparison of EPIs and 3D-SS images revealed good accordance (- 0.05 {+-} 0.94 mm). Analysis of daily patient positions revealed average deviations of 0.4 {+-} 2.4 mm laterally, 0.3 {+-} 1.9 mm longitudinally and 0.2 {+-} 3.3 mm vertically. After 2 weeks, a systematic interfraction shift in patient positioning was noted, particularly in the vertical direction (4.9 {+-} 0.56 mm), which was attributed to patients progressively relaxing. 3D-SS images showed intrafractional shifts of 1.2 {+-} 0.7 mm over a time course of 2 min. Conclusion: Optical surface scanning is a simple, fast and reproducible method for breast cancer patient alignment. Particularly for more sophisticated irradiation techniques, it helps to improve accuracy in patient positioning during radiotherapy without the exposure to additional ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  19. Contained scanning electron microscope facility for examining radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.W.

    1986-03-01

    At the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) radioactive solids are characterized with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) contained in a glove box. The system includes a research-grade Cambridge S-250 SEM, a Tracor Northern TN-5500 x-ray and image analyzer, and a Microspec wavelength-dispersive x-ray analyzer. The containment facility has a glove box train for mounting and coating samples, and for housing the SEM column, x-ray detectors, and vacuum pumps. The control consoles of the instruments are located outside the glove boxes. This facility has been actively used since October 1983 for high alpha-activity materials such as plutonium metal and plutonium oxide powders. Radioactive defense waste glasses and contaminated equipment have also been examined. During this period the facility had no safety-related incidents, and personnel radiation exposures were maintained at less than 100 mrems

  20. Conditioning of mealybug (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma-Jimenez, Melissa; Blanco-Meneses, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The cleaning and correct observation of the mealybug specimens was determined by the conditioning methodology. The research was done in the Laboratorio del Centro de Investigacion en Estructuras Microscopicas (CIEMIC) of the Universidad de Costa Rica during the year 2012. A gradual improvement for the observation of the ultrastructures through the Scanning Electron Microscope was evidenced by the implementation of four types of methodologies. Each process was described in detail. The incorporation of 10% xylene (in some cases have been viable using ethanol at 95-100% ) was allowed to remove the wax from the body of the insect, to avoid this the collapse and to observe specific ultrastructures of the individual, they were the best results. The methodology used has reduced the time and costs in future taxonomic research of mealybug. (author) [es

  1. Identification of sandstone core damage using scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Abdul Razak; Jaafar, Mohd Zaidi; Sulaiman, Wan Rosli Wan; Ismail, Issham; Shiunn, Ng Yinn

    2017-12-01

    Particles and fluids invasion into the pore spaces causes serious damage to the formation, resulting reduction in petroleum production. In order to prevent permeability damage for a well effectively, the damage mechanisms should be identified. In this study, water-based drilling fluid was compared to oil-based drilling fluids based on microscopic observation. The cores were damaged by several drilling fluid systems. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe the damage mechanism caused by the drilling fluids. Results showed that the ester based drilling fluid system caused the most serious damage followed by synthetic oil based system and KCI-polymer system. Fine solids and filtrate migration and emulsion blockage are believed to be the major mechanisms controlling the changes in flow properties for the sandstone samples.

  2. In situ ion etching in a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhariwal, R.S.; Fitch, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    A facility for ion etching in a scanning electron microscope is described which incorporates a new type of electrostatic ion source and viewing of the specimen is possible within about 30 sec after terminating the ion bombardment. Artefacts produced during etching have been studied and cone formation has been followed during its growth. The instrument has provided useful structural information on metals, alloys, and sinters. However, although insulating materials, such as plastics, glass and resins, have been successfully etched, interpretation of the resultant micrographs is more difficult. Ion etching of soft biological tissues, such as the rat duodenum was found to be of considerable interest. The observed structural features arise from the selective intake of the heavy fixation elements by different parts of the tissue. Hard biological materials, such as dental tissues and restorative materials, have also been studied and the prismatic structure of the enamel and the form and distribution of the dentinal tubules have been revealed. (author)

  3. Automated rapid particle investigation using scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Jerod Laurence

    The chemical composition of fly ash particles has been known to vary significantly depending on a number of factors. Current bulk methods of investigation including X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Diffraction are thought to be inadequate in determining the performance of fly ash in concrete. It is the goal of this research to develop a method of Automated Rapid Particle Investigation that will not look at fly ash as a bulk material but as individual particles. By examining each particle individually scientists and engineers will have the ability to study the variation in chemical composition by comparing the chemistry present in each particle. The method of investigation developed by this research provides a practical technique that will allow the automated chemical analysis of hundreds, or even thousands, of fly ash particles in a matter of minutes upon completion of sample preparation and automated scanning electron microscope (ASEM) scanning. This research does not examine the significance of the chemical compounds discovered; rather, only the investigation methodology is discussed. Further research will be done to examine the importance of the chemistry discovered with this automated rapid particle investigation technique.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of Strongylus spp. in zebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Els, H J; Malan, F S; Scialdo-Krecek, R C

    1983-12-01

    The external ultrastructure of the anterior and posterior extremities of the nematodes, Strongylus asini , Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus equinus and Strongylus edentatus, was studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fresh specimens of S. asini were collected from the caecum, ventral colon and vena portae of Equus burchelli and Equus zebra hartmannae ; S. vulgaris from the caecum, colon and arteria ileocolica of E. burchelli ; S. equinus from the ventral colon of E. z. hartmannae and S. edentatus from the caecum and ventral colon of both zebras , during surveys of parasites in zebras in the Etosha Game Reserve, South West Africa/Namibia, and the Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa. The worms were cleaned, fixed and mounted by standard methods and photographed in a JEOL JSM - 35C scanning electron microscope (SEM) operating at 12kV . The SEM showed the following differences: the tips of the external leaf-crowns varied and were fine and delicate in S. asini , coarse and broad in S. vulgaris and, in S. equinus and S. edentatus, closely adherent, separating into single elements for half their length. The excretory pores showed only slight variation, and the morphology of the copulatory bursae did not differ from those seen with light microscopy. The genital cones differed markedly: S. asini had a ventral triangular projection and laterally 2 finger-like projections: in S. vulgaris there were numerous bosses on the lateral and ventral aspects of the cone; in S. equinus 2 finger-like processes projected laterocaudally ; and in S. edentatus 2 pairs of papilla-like processes projected laterally on the ventral aspects, and a pair of rounded projections and a pair of hair-like structures adorned the dorsal aspects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Interpretation of scanning electron microscope measurements of minority carrier diffusion lengths in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flat, A.; Milnes, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    In scanning electron microscope (SEM) injection measurements of minority carrier diffusion lengths some uncertainties of interpretation exist when the response current is nonlinear with distance. This is significant in epitaxial layers where the layer thickness is not large in relation to the diffusion length, and where there are large surface recombination velocities on the incident and contact surfaces. An image method of analysis is presented for such specimens. A method of using the results to correct the observed response in a simple convenient way is presented. The technique is illustrated with reference to measurements in epitaxial layers of GaAs. Average beam penetration depth may also be estimated from the curve shape.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy of the collodion membrane from a self-healing collodion baby*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Isaacsson, Henrique; Guarenti, Isabelle Maffei; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antônio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Self-healing collodion baby is a well-established subtype of this condition. We examined a male newborn, who was covered by a collodion membrane. The shed membrane was examined with scanning electron microscopy. The outer surface showed a very compact keratin without the normal elimination of corneocytes. The lateral view of the specimen revealed a very thick, horny layer. The inner surface showed the structure of lower corneocytes with polygonal contour. With higher magnifications villous projections were seen in the cell membrane. PMID:26375232

  7. Experimental Route to Scanning Probe Hot Electron Nanoscopy (HENs) Applied to 2D Material

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2017-06-09

    This paper presents details on a new experimental apparatus implementing the hot electron nanoscopy (HENs) technique introduced for advanced spectroscopies on structure and chemistry in few molecules and interface problems. A detailed description of the architecture used for the laser excitation of surface plasmons at an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is provided. The photogenerated current from the tip to the sample is detected during the AFM scan. The technique is applied to innovative semiconductors for applications in electronics: 2D MoS2 single crystal and a p-type SnO layer. Results are supported by complementary scanning Kelvin probe microscopy, traditional conductive AFM, and Raman measurements. New features highlighted by HEN technique reveal details of local complexity in MoS2 and polycrystalline structure of SnO at nanometric scale otherwise undetected. The technique set in this paper is promising for future studies in nanojunctions and innovative multilayered materials, with new insight on interfaces.

  8. Observation of live ticks (Haemaphysalis flava by scanning electron microscopy under high vacuum pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito Ishigaki

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopes (SEM, which image sample surfaces by scanning with an electron beam, are widely used for steric observations of resting samples in basic and applied biology. Various conventional methods exist for SEM sample preparation. However, conventional SEM is not a good tool to observe living organisms because of the associated exposure to high vacuum pressure and electron beam radiation. Here we attempted SEM observations of live ticks. During 1.5×10(-3 Pa vacuum pressure and electron beam irradiation with accelerated voltages (2-5 kV, many ticks remained alive and moved their legs. After 30-min observation, we removed the ticks from the SEM stage; they could walk actively under atmospheric pressure. When we tested 20 ticks (8 female adults and 12 nymphs, they survived for two days after SEM observation. These results indicate the resistance of ticks against SEM observation. Our second survival test showed that the electron beam, not vacuum conditions, results in tick death. Moreover, we describe the reaction of their legs to electron beam exposure. These findings open the new possibility of SEM observation of living organisms and showed the resistance of living ticks to vacuum condition in SEM. These data also indicate, for the first time, the usefulness of tick as a model system for biology under extreme condition.

  9. Observation of Live Ticks (Haemaphysalis flava) by Scanning Electron Microscopy under High Vacuum Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Nakamura, Yuka; Oikawa, Yosaburo; Yano, Yasuhiro; Kuwabata, Susumu; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Takegami, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopes (SEM), which image sample surfaces by scanning with an electron beam, are widely used for steric observations of resting samples in basic and applied biology. Various conventional methods exist for SEM sample preparation. However, conventional SEM is not a good tool to observe living organisms because of the associated exposure to high vacuum pressure and electron beam radiation. Here we attempted SEM observations of live ticks. During 1.5×10−3 Pa vacuum pressure and electron beam irradiation with accelerated voltages (2–5 kV), many ticks remained alive and moved their legs. After 30-min observation, we removed the ticks from the SEM stage; they could walk actively under atmospheric pressure. When we tested 20 ticks (8 female adults and 12 nymphs), they survived for two days after SEM observation. These results indicate the resistance of ticks against SEM observation. Our second survival test showed that the electron beam, not vacuum conditions, results in tick death. Moreover, we describe the reaction of their legs to electron beam exposure. These findings open the new possibility of SEM observation of living organisms and showed the resistance of living ticks to vacuum condition in SEM. These data also indicate, for the first time, the usefulness of tick as a model system for biology under extreme condition. PMID:22431980

  10. Subsurface examination of a foliar biofilm using scanning electron- and focused-ion-beam microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Patricia Kay; Arey, Bruce; Mahaffee, Walter F

    2011-08-01

    The dual beam scanning electron microscope, equipped with both a focused ion- and scanning electron-beam (FIB SEM) is a novel tool for the exploration of the subsurface structure of biological tissues. The FIB can remove a predetermined amount of material from a selected site to allow for subsurface exploration and when coupled with SEM or scanning ion-beam microscopy (SIM) could be suitable to examine the subsurface structure of bacterial biofilms on the leaf surface. The suitability of chemical and cryofixation was examined for use with the FIB SEM to examine bacterial biofilms on leaf surfaces. The biological control agent, Burkholderia pyroccinia FP62, that rapidly colonizes the leaf surface and forms biofilms, was inoculated onto geranium leaves and incubated in a greenhouse for 7 or 14 days. Cryofixation was not suitable for examination of leaf biofilms because it created a frozen layer over the leaf surface that cracked when exposed to the electron beam and the protective cap required for FIB milling could not be accurately deposited. With chemically fixed samples, it was possible to precisely FIB mill a single cross section (5μm) or sequential cross sections from a single site without any damage to the surrounding surface. Biofilms, 7 days post-inoculation (DPI), were composed of 2-5 bacterial cell layers while biofilms 14 DPI ranged from 5 to greater than 30 cell layers. Empty spaces between bacteria cells in the subsurface structure were observed in biofilms 7- and 14-DPI. Sequential cross sections inferred that the empty spaces were often continuous between FP62 cells and could possibly make up a network of channels throughout the biofilm. FIB SEM was a useful tool to observe the subsurface composition of a foliar biofilm. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. High-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Jesson, D.E.

    1992-03-01

    The high-resolution imaging of crystalline materials in the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is reviewed with particular emphasis on the conditions under which an incoherent image can be obtained. It is shown that a high-angle annular detector can be used to break the coherence of the imaging process, in the transverse plane through the geometry of the detector, or in three dimensions if multiphonon diffuse scattering is detected. In the latter case, each atom can be treated as a highly independent source of high-angle scattering. The most effective fast electron states are therefore tightly bound s-type Bloch states. Furthermore, they add constructively for each incident angle in the coherent STEM probe, so that s states are responsible for practically the entire image contrast. Dynamical effects are largely removed, and almost perfect incoherent imaging is achieved. s states are relatively insensitive to neighboring strings, so that incoherent imaging is maintained for superlattice and interfaces, and supercell calculations are unnecessary. With an optimum probe profile, the incoherent image represents a direct image of the crystal projection, with compositional sensitivity built in through the strong dependence of the scattering cross sections on atomic number Z

  12. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  13. Volume scanning electron microscopy for imaging biological ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titze, Benjamin; Genoud, Christel

    2016-11-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) has been a key imaging method to investigate biological ultrastructure for over six decades. In recent years, novel volume EM techniques have significantly advanced nanometre-scale imaging of cells and tissues in three dimensions. Previously, this had depended on the slow and error-prone manual tasks of cutting and handling large numbers of sections, and imaging them one-by-one with transmission EM. Now, automated volume imaging methods mostly based on scanning EM (SEM) allow faster and more reliable acquisition of serial images through tissue volumes and achieve higher z-resolution. Various software tools have been developed to manipulate the acquired image stacks and facilitate quantitative analysis. Here, we introduce three volume SEM methods: serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM), focused ion beam SEM (FIB-SEM) and automated tape-collecting ultramicrotome SEM (ATUM-SEM). We discuss and compare their capabilities, provide an overview of the full volume SEM workflow for obtaining 3D datasets and showcase different applications for biological research. © 2016 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Spinning Carbon Nanotube Nanothread under a Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Schulz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanothread with a diameter as small as one hundred nanometers was manufactured under a scanning electron microscope. Made directly from carbon nanotubes, and inheriting their superior electrical and mechanical properties, nanothread may be the world’s smallest man-made fiber. The smallest thread that can be spun using a bench-top spinning machine is about 5 microns in diameter. Nanothread is a new material building block that can be used at the nanoscale or plied to form yarn for applications at the micro and macro scales. Preliminary electrical and mechanical properties of nanothread were measured. The resistivity of nanothread is less than 10−5 Ω∙m. The strength of nanothread is greater than 0.5 GPa. This strength was obtained from measurements using special glue that cures in an electron microscope. The glue weakened the thread, thus further work is needed to obtain more accurate measurements. Nanothread will have broad applications in enabling electrical components, circuits, sensors, and tiny machines. Yarn can be used for various macroscale applications including lightweight antennas, composites, and cables.

  15. Method for surface treatment by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzer, S.; Doehler, H.; Bartel, R.; Ardenne, T. von.

    1985-01-01

    The invention has been aimed at simplifying the technology and saving energy in modifying surfaces with the aid of electron beams. The described beam-object geometry allows to abandon additional heat treatments. It can be used for surface hardening

  16. Hot-electron nanoscopy using adiabatic compression of surface plasmons

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2013-10-20

    Surface plasmon polaritons are a central concept in nanoplasmonics and have been exploited to develop ultrasensitive chemical detection platforms, as well as imaging and spectroscopic techniques at the nanoscale. Surface plasmons can decay to form highly energetic (or hot) electrons in a process that is usually thought to be parasitic for applications, because it limits the lifetime and propagation length of surface plasmons and therefore has an adverse influence on the functionality of nanoplasmonic devices. Recently, however, it has been shown that hot electrons produced by surface plasmon decay can be harnessed to produce useful work in photodetection, catalysis and solar energy conversion. Nevertheless, the surface-plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency has been below 1% in all cases. Here we show that adiabatic focusing of surface plasmons on a Schottky diode-terminated tapered tip of nanoscale dimensions allows for a plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency of ∼30%. We further demonstrate that, with such high efficiency, hot electrons can be used for a new nanoscopy technique based on an atomic force microscopy set-up. We show that this hot-electron nanoscopy preserves the chemical sensitivity of the scanned surface and has a spatial resolution below 50 nm, with margins for improvement.

  17. Atomic species recognition on oxide surfaces using low temperature scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zong Min, E-mail: mzmncit@163.com [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Shi, Yun Bo; Mu, Ji Liang; Qu, Zhang; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Qin, Li [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Liu, Jun, E-mail: liuj@nuc.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • The coexisted phase of p(2 × 1)and c(6 × 2) on Cu(110)-O surface using AFM under UHV at low temperature. • Two different c(6 × 2) phase depending on the status of the tip apex. • Electronic state of tip seriously effect the resolution and stability of the sample surface. - Abstract: In scanning probe microscopy (SPM), the chemical properties and sharpness of the tips of the cantilever greatly influence the scanning of a sample surface. Variation in the chemical properties of the sharp tip apex can induce transformation of the SPM images. In this research, we explore the relationship between the tip and the structure of a sample surface using dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) on a Cu(110)-O surface under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperature (78 K). We observed two different c(6 × 2) phase types in which super-Cu atoms show as a bright spot when the tip apex is of O atoms and O atoms show as a bright spot when the tip apex is of Cu atoms. We also found that the electronic state of the tip has a serious effect on the resolution and stability of the sample surface, and provide an explanation for these phenomena. This technique can be used to identify atom species on sample surfaces, and represents an important development in the SPM technique.

  18. Surface measurement errors using commercial scanning white light interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, F; Petzing, J; Coupland, J M; Leach, R K

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the performance of commercial scanning white light interferometers in a range of measurement tasks. A step height artefact is used to investigate the response of the instruments at a discontinuity, while gratings with sinusoidal and rectangular profiles are used to investigate the effects of surface gradient and spatial frequency. Results are compared with measurements made with tapping mode atomic force microscopy and discrepancies are discussed with reference to error mechanisms put forward in the published literature. As expected, it is found that most instruments report errors when used in regions close to a discontinuity or those with a surface gradient that is large compared to the acceptance angle of the objective lens. Amongst other findings, however, we report systematic errors that are observed when the surface gradient is considerably smaller. Although these errors are typically less than the mean wavelength, they are significant compared to the vertical resolution of the instrument and indicate that current scanning white light interferometers should be used with some caution if sub-wavelength accuracy is required

  19. Surface measurement errors using commercial scanning white light interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, F.; Leach, R. K.; Petzing, J.; Coupland, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the performance of commercial scanning white light interferometers in a range of measurement tasks. A step height artefact is used to investigate the response of the instruments at a discontinuity, while gratings with sinusoidal and rectangular profiles are used to investigate the effects of surface gradient and spatial frequency. Results are compared with measurements made with tapping mode atomic force microscopy and discrepancies are discussed with reference to error mechanisms put forward in the published literature. As expected, it is found that most instruments report errors when used in regions close to a discontinuity or those with a surface gradient that is large compared to the acceptance angle of the objective lens. Amongst other findings, however, we report systematic errors that are observed when the surface gradient is considerably smaller. Although these errors are typically less than the mean wavelength, they are significant compared to the vertical resolution of the instrument and indicate that current scanning white light interferometers should be used with some caution if sub-wavelength accuracy is required.

  20. Scanning electron microscope investigation of the structural growth in thick sputtered coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1975-01-01

    Sputtered S-Monel, silver, and 304 stainless steel coatings and molybdenum disulfide coatings were deposited on mica and metal substrates with various surface finishes to investigate the structural growth of the coating by scanning electron microscopy. The geometry and the surface morphology of the nodules are characterized. Compositional changes within the coating were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Defects in the surface finish act as preferential nucleation sites and form isolated overlapping and complex nodules and various unusual surface overgrowths on the coating. The nodule boundaries are very vulnerable to chemical etching and these nodules do not disappear after full annealing. Further, they have undesirable effects on mechanical properties; cracks are initiated at the nodules when the coating is stressed by mechanical forces.

  1. In-situ environmental (scanning) transmission electron microscopy of catalysts at the atomic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, P L; Boyes, E D

    2014-01-01

    Observing reacting single atoms on the solid catalyst surfaces under controlled reaction conditions is a key goal in understanding and controlling heterogeneous catalytic reactions. In-situ real time aberration corrected environmental (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (E(S)TEM permit the direct imaging of dynamic surface and sub-surface structures of reacting catalysts. In this paper in-situ AC ETEM and AC ESTEM studies under controlled reaction environments of oxide catalysts and supported metal nanocatalysts important in chemical industry are presented. They provide the direct evidence of dynamic processes at the oxide catalyst surface at the atomic scale and single atom dynamics in catalytic reactions. The ESTEM studies of single atom dynamics in controlled reaction environments show that nanoparticles act as reservoirs of ad-atoms. The results have important implications in catalysis and nanoparticle studies

  2. Charge dynamics in aluminum oxide thin film studied by ultrafast scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zani, Maurizio; Sala, Vittorio; Irde, Gabriele; Pietralunga, Silvia Maria; Manzoni, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Tagliaferri, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    The excitation dynamics of defects in insulators plays a central role in a variety of fields from Electronics and Photonics to Quantum computing. We report here a time-resolved measurement of electron dynamics in 100 nm film of aluminum oxide on silicon by Ultrafast Scanning Electron Microscopy (USEM). In our pump-probe setup, an UV femtosecond laser excitation pulse and a delayed picosecond electron probe pulse are spatially overlapped on the sample, triggering Secondary Electrons (SE) emission to the detector. The zero of the pump-probe delay and the time resolution were determined by measuring the dynamics of laser-induced SE contrast on silicon. We observed fast dynamics with components ranging from tens of picoseconds to few nanoseconds, that fits within the timescales typical of the UV color center evolution. The surface sensitivity of SE detection gives to the USEM the potential of applying pump-probe investigations to charge dynamics at surfaces and interfaces of current nano-devices. The present work demonstrates this approach on large gap insulator surfaces. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Geodetic Imaging of Marsh Surface Elevation with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C. T.; Starek, M. J.; Gibeaut, J. C.; Lord, A.

    2015-12-01

    The resilience of marshes to a rising sea is dependent on their elevation response. Given the level of precision required to measure minute changes in marsh elevation over time, survey methods have to be adapted to minimize impacts to the sediment surface. Current approaches include Surface Elevation Tables (SETs), which are used to monitor wetland surface change with respect to an in situ vertical benchmark. Although SETs have been proven as an effective technique to track subtle sedimentation rates (RTK GPS for comparison. Grand Bay in Mississippi USA is one of the most biologically productive estuarine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. The study region is covered by dense and tall saw-grass that makes it a challenging environment for bare-earth mapping. For this survey, a Riegl VZ-400 TLS (1550 nm wavelength) was utilized. The system is capable of recording multiple returns per a transmitted pulse (up to 15) and provides full-waveform output for signal post-processing to extract returns. The objectives of the study are twofold: 1) examine impacts of TLS survey design, scan angle and scan density on marsh elevation mapping; 2) assess the capabilities of multiple-echo and full-waveform TLS data to extract the bare-earth surface below the dense vegetation. This presentation will present results of the study including the developed TLS survey protocol and data processing workflow, details on waveform and multi-echo approaches for ground point detection, and a discussion on error analysis and challenges for measuring marsh surface elevation with TLS.

  4. Secondary electron emission from textured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, C. E.; Patino, M. I.; Wirz, R. E.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a Monte Carlo model is used to investigate electron induced secondary electron emission for varying effects of complex surfaces by using simple geometric constructs. Geometries used in the model include: vertical fibers for velvet-like surfaces, tapered pillars for carpet-like surfaces, and a cage-like configuration of interlaced horizontal and vertical fibers for nano-structured fuzz. The model accurately captures the secondary electron emission yield dependence on incidence angle. The model shows that unlike other structured surfaces previously studied, tungsten fuzz exhibits secondary electron emission yield that is independent of primary electron incidence angle, due to the prevalence of horizontally-oriented fibers in the fuzz geometry. This is confirmed with new data presented herein of the secondary electron emission yield of tungsten fuzz at incidence angles from 0-60°.

  5. Surfaces and interfaces of electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Brillson, Leonard J

    2012-01-01

    An advanced level textbook covering geometric, chemical, and electronic structure of electronic materials, and their applications to devices based on semiconductor surfaces, metal-semiconductor interfaces, and semiconductor heterojunctions. Starting with the fundamentals of electrical measurements on semiconductor interfaces, it then describes the importance of controlling macroscopic electrical properties by atomic-scale techniques. Subsequent chapters present the wide range of surface and interface techniques available to characterize electronic, optical, chemical, and structural propertie

  6. In situ fatigue loading stage inside scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter; Brewer, David

    1988-01-01

    A fatigue loading stage inside a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was developed. The stage allows dynamic and static high-magnification and high-resolution viewing of the fatigue crack initiation and crack propagation processes. The loading stage is controlled by a closed-loop servohydraulic system. Maximum load is 1000 lb (4450 N) with test frequencies ranging up to 30 Hz. The stage accommodates specimens up to 2 inches (50 mm) in length and tolerates substantial specimen translation to view the propagating crack. At room temperature, acceptable working resolution is obtainable for magnifications ranging up to 10,000X. The system is equipped with a high-temperature setup designed for temperatures up to 2000 F (1100 C). The signal can be videotaped for further analysis of the pertinent fatigue damage mechanisms. The design allows for quick and easy interchange and conversion of the SEM from a loading stage configuration to its normal operational configuration and vice versa. Tests are performed entirely in the in-situ mode. In contrast to other designs, the NASA design has greatly extended the life of the loading stage by not exposing the bellows to cyclic loading. The loading stage was used to investigate the fatigue crack growth mechanisms in the (100)-oriented PWA 1480 single-crystal, nickel-based supperalloy. The high-magnification observations revealed the details of the crack growth processes.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of corrosion casting in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konerding, M A

    1991-09-01

    The aims of this review are: 1. to provide a bibliography of the publications that have used the corrosion casting technique; 2. to describe the advantages and limitations of the methodology; 3. to illustrate possible applications in the field of medicine, and 4. to highlight the significance of this method in the teaching of medical students. Thus, this paper is primarily focused on the scanning electron microscopical examination of vascular corrosion casts. The unsurpassed three-dimensionality of the corrosion casting technique compared to any other means stands out in particular. This can be especially useful when complex vascular-anatomical relationships are present. This applies not only to the portrayal of the modes of branching and varying vascular densities but also to regulatory arrangements, such as sphincters and arteriovenous anastomoses. Between 1966 and 1990, a total of 549 publications were found in the Medline literature data bank, containing the key words "corrosion casting", "microvascular cast", or "vascular cast" (as of August, 1990). Of those publications, most dealt with applications to experimental animals. By contrast, only 142 reports were mainly or partially concerned with human investigational material. The normal vascular system of nearly all organs, insofar as this is of direct medical relevance, has been largely resolved. In our opinion, one of the most important potential applications of the corrosion casting technique lies in the investigation of gastrointestinal, renal or hepatic ailments, which coincide with the reconstruction or rarefication of the vascular bed, e.g., in ulcers, ileitis terminalis, colitis ulcerosa, cirrhosis or glomerulonephritis.

  8. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Jäger, A.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.; Dejneka, A.

    2015-02-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin-stained rat skin sections from plasma-treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  10. Somatic Embryos in Catharanthus roseus: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid ASLAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don is an important medicinal plant as it contains several anti-cancerous compounds, like vinblastine and vincristine. Plant tissue culture technology (organogenesis and embryogenesis has currently been used in fast mass propagating raw materials for secondary metabolite synthesis. In this present communication, scanning electron microscopic (SEM study of somatic embryos was conducted and discussed. The embryogenic callus was first induced from hypocotyls of in vitro germinated seeds on which somatic embryos, differentiated in numbers, particularly on 2,4-D (1.0 mg/L Murashige and Skoog (MS was medium. To understand more about the regeneration method and in vitro formed embryos SEM was performed. The SEM study revealed normal somatic embryo origin and development from globular to heart-, torpedo- and then into cotyledonary-stage of embryos. At early stage, the embryos were clustered together in a callus mass and could not easily be detached from the parental tissue. The embryos were often long cylindrical structure with or without typical notch at the tip. Secondary embryos were also formed on primary embryo structure. The advanced cotyledonary embryos showed prominent roots and shoot axis, which germinated into plantlets. The morphology, structure and other details of somatic embryos at various stages were presented.

  11. Note: Microelectrode-shielding tip for scanning probe electron energy spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Zhean; Xu, Chunkai; Liu, Jian; Xu, Chunye; Chen, Xiangjun

    2018-04-01

    We report a novel microelectrode-shielding tip (ME tip) for scanning probe electron energy spectroscopy (SPEES). The shielding effect of this tip is studied through comparing the detection efficiency with the normal tip by both experiment and simulation. The results show that the backscattering count rate detected by the SPEES instrument using the normal tip begins to decrease as the tip approaches to the sample surface within 21 μm, while that using the ME tip only starts to drop off within 1 μm. This indicates that the electron energy spectra can be measured with the ME tip at a much closer tip-sample distance. Furthermore, it is also demonstrated that the ME tip can be used to obtain topography of the sample surface in situ simultaneously.

  12. Direct imaging of defect formation in strained organic flexible electronics by Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Tobias; Travaglini, Lorenzo; Lai, Stefano; Patruno, Luca; de Miranda, Stefano; Bonfiglio, Annalisa; Cosseddu, Piero; Fraboni, Beatrice

    2016-12-02

    The development of new materials and devices for flexible electronics depends crucially on the understanding of how strain affects electronic material properties at the nano-scale. Scanning Kelvin-Probe Microscopy (SKPM) is a unique technique for nanoelectronic investigations as it combines non-invasive measurement of surface topography and surface electrical potential. Here we show that SKPM in non-contact mode is feasible on deformed flexible samples and allows to identify strain induced electronic defects. As an example we apply the technique to investigate the strain response of organic thin film transistors containing TIPS-pentacene patterned on polymer foils. Controlled surface strain is induced in the semiconducting layer by bending the transistor substrate. The amount of local strain is quantified by a mathematical model describing the bending mechanics. We find that the step-wise reduction of device performance at critical bending radii is caused by the formation of nano-cracks in the microcrystal morphology of the TIPS-pentacene film. The cracks are easily identified due to the abrupt variation in SKPM surface potential caused by a local increase in resistance. Importantly, the strong surface adhesion of microcrystals to the elastic dielectric allows to maintain a conductive path also after fracture thus providing the opportunity to attenuate strain effects.

  13. An AES Study of the Room Temperature Surface Conditioning of Technological Metal Surfaces by Electron Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuerlein, C; Hilleret, Noël; Taborelli, M; Brown, A; Baker, M A

    2002-01-01

    The modifications to technological copper and niobium surfaces induced by 2.5 keV electron irradiation have been investigated in the context of the conditioning process occurring in particle accelerator ultra high vacuum systems. Changes in the elemental surface composition have been found using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) by monitoring the carbon, oxygen and metal Auger peak intensities as a function of electron irradiation in the dose range 10-6 to 10-2 C mm-2. The surface analysis resu...

  14. Correction of surface aberration in strain scanning method with analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shobu, Takahisa; Mizuki, Junichiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Keisuke

    2006-01-01

    When a gauge volume sank below a specimen surface, the diffraction angle shifts. Thus, it is required to correct the surface aberration. For the annealed specimen of S45C, the shift in the diffraction angle was investigated using a strain scanning method with Ge (111) analyzer. This phenomenon was caused by the difference in the centroid between the geometric and the instrumental gauge volumes. This difference is explained by the following factors; 1) the change in the gauge volume by the divergence of the analyzer, 2) the X-ray penetration depth, 3) the gap of the centre line between the double receiving slits due to mis-setting the analyzer. As a result, the correcting method considered into these factors was proposed. For the shot-peened specimens of S45C, the diffraction angles were measured and corrected by our method. The distribution of the residual stress agreed with that obtained by the removal method. (author)

  15. Fault detection by surface seismic scanning tunneling macroscope: Field test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2014-08-05

    The seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) is proposed for detecting the presence of near-surface impedance anomalies and faults. Results with synthetic data are consistent with theory in that scatterers closer to the surface provide brighter SSTM profiles than those that are deeper. The SSTM profiles show superresolution detection if the scatterers are in the near-field region of the recording line. The field data tests near Gulf of Aqaba, Haql, KSA clearly show the presence of the observable fault scarp, and identify the subsurface presence of the hidden faults indicated in the tomograms. Superresolution detection of the fault is achieved, even when the 35 Hz data are lowpass filtered to the 5-10 Hz band.

  16. Electron spectroscopy of nanodiamond surface states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belobrov, P.I.; Bursill, L.A.; Maslakov, K.I.; Dementjev, A.P

    2003-06-15

    Electronic states of nanodiamond (ND) were investigated by PEELS, XPS and CKVV Auger spectra. Parallel electron energy loss spectra (PEELS) show that the electrons inside of ND particles are sp{sup 3} hybridized but there is a surface layer containing distinct hybridized states. The CKVV Auger spectra imply that the HOMO of the ND surface has a shift of 2.5 eV from natural diamond levels of {sigma}{sub p} up to the Fermi level. Hydrogen (H) treatment of natural diamond surface produces a chemical state indistinguishable from that of ND surfaces using CKVV. The ND electronic structure forms {sigma}{sub s}{sup 1}{sigma}{sub p}{sup 2}{pi}{sup 1} surface states without overlapping of {pi}-levels. Surface electronic states, including surface plasmons, as well as phonon-related electronic states of the ND surface are also interesting and may also be important for field emission mechanisms from the nanostructured diamond surface.

  17. Electron-beam broadening in amorphous carbon films in low-energy scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drees, H; Müller, E; Dries, M; Gerthsen, D

    2018-02-01

    Resolution in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is ultimately limited by the diameter of the electron beam. The electron beam diameter is not only determined by the properties of the condenser lens system but also by electron scattering in the specimen which leads to electron-beam broadening and degradation of the resolution with increasing specimen thickness. In this work we introduce a new method to measure electron-beam broadening which is based on STEM imaging with a multi-segmented STEM detector. We focus on STEM at low electron energies between 10 and 30 keV and use an amorphous carbon film with known thickness as test object. The experimental results are compared with calculated beam diameters using different analytical models and Monte-Carlo simulations. We find excellent agreement of the experimental data with the recently published model by Gauvin and Rudinsky [1] for small t/λ el (thickness to elastic mean free path) values which are considered in our study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Special raster scanning for reduction of charging effects in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Oho, Eisaku

    2014-01-01

    A special raster scanning (SRS) method for reduction of charging effects is developed for the field of SEM. Both a conventional fast scan (horizontal direction) and an unusual scan (vertical direction) are adopted for acquiring raw data consisting of many sub-images. These data are converted to a proper SEM image using digital image processing techniques. About sharpness of the image and reduction of charging effects, the SRS is compared with the conventional fast scan (with frame-averaging) and the conventional slow scan. Experimental results show the effectiveness of SRS images. By a successful combination of the proposed scanning method and low accelerating voltage (LV)-SEMs, it is expected that higher-quality SEM images can be more easily acquired by the considerable reduction of charging effects, while maintaining the resolution. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Unveiling the Mysteries of Mars with a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunson, J.; Gaskin, J. A.; Doloboff, I. J.; Jerman, G.

    2017-01-01

    Development of a miniaturized scanning electron microscope that will utilize the martian atmosphere to dissipate charge during analysis continues. This instrument is expected to be used on a future rover or lander to answer fundamental Mars science questions. To identify the most important questions, a survey was taken at the 47th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC). From the gathered information initial topics were identified for a SEM on the martian surface. These priorities are identified and discussed below. Additionally, a concept of operations is provided with the goal of maximizing the science obtained with the minimum amount of communication with the instrument.

  20. Scanning-electron-microscope study of normal-impingement erosion of ductile metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Salik, J.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the erosion of annealed copper and aluminum surfaces produced by both single- and multiple-particle impacts. Macroscopic 3.2 mm diameter steel balls and microscopic, brittle erodant particles were projected by a gas gun system so as to impact at normal incidence at speeds up to 140 m/sec. During the impacts by the brittle erodant particles, at lower speeds the erosion behavior was similar to that observed for the larger steel balls. At higher velocities, particle fragmentation and the subsequent cutting by the radial wash of debris created a marked change in the erosion mechanism.

  1. Reducing scanning electron microscope charging by using exponential contrast stretching technique on post-processing images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K S; Tan, Y Y; Lai, M A; Tso, C P; Lim, W K

    2010-04-01

    An exponential contrast stretching (ECS) technique is developed to reduce the charging effects on scanning electron microscope images. Compared to some of the conventional histogram equalization methods, such as bi-histogram equalization and recursive mean-separate histogram equalization, the proposed ECS method yields better image compensation. Diode sample chips with insulating and conductive surfaces are used as test samples to evaluate the efficiency of the developed algorithm. The algorithm is implemented in software with a frame grabber card, forming the front-end video capture element.

  2. Morphologic differences observed by scanning electron microscopy according to the reason for pseudophakic IOL explantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Buenaga, Roberto; Alio, Jorge L.; Ramirez, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare variations in surface morphology, as studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), of explanted intraocular lenses (IOLs) concerning the cause leading to the explantation surgery. Methods In this prospective multicenter study, explanted IOLs were analyzed by SEM and energy......-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The IOLs were explanted in the centers of the research group from 2006 to 2012. The primary procedure was phacoemulsification in all cases. Results The study evaluated 40 IOLs. The main causes for explantation were IOL dislocation, refractive error, and IOL opacification. Those...

  3. Scanning tunneling microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and electrochemical characterization of 2-naphthalenethiol self-assembled monolayers on the Au surface: a study of bridge-mediated electron transfer in Ru(NH3)6(2+)/Ru(NH3)6(3+) redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, V; Lakshminarayanan, V

    2005-09-01

    We have studied the structure, adsorption kinetics, and barrier properties of self-assembled monolayers of 2-naphthalenethiol on Au using electrochemical techniques, grazing-angle Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The results of cyclic voltammetric and impedance measurements using redox probes show that 2-naphthalenethiol on Au forms a stable and reproducible, but moderately blocking, monolayer. Annealing of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-modified surface at 72 +/- 2 degrees C remarkably improves the blocking property of the monolayer of 2-naphthalenethiol on Au. From the study of kinetics of SAM formation, we find that the self-assembly follows Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Our STM and FTIR results show that the molecules are adsorbed with the naphthalene ring tilted from the surface normal by forming a square root 3 x 3 R30 degrees overlayer structure. From our studies, we conclude that the electron-transfer reaction of ferro/ferricyanide in the freshly formed monolayer occurs predominantly through the pinholes and defects present in the monolayer. However, in the case of thermally annealed specimen, although the ferro/ferricyanide reaction is almost completely blocked, the electron-transfer reaction of hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride is not significantly inhibited. It is proposed that the electron-transfer reaction in the case of the ruthenium redox couple takes place by a tunneling mechanism through the high-electron-density aromatic naphthalene ring acting as a bridge between the monolayer-modified electrode and the ruthenium complex.

  4. A simple way to obtain backscattered electron images in a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Hiroki; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Tanji, Takayoshi; Morita, Chiaki

    2014-08-01

    We have fabricated a simple detector for backscattered electrons (BSEs) and incorporated the detector into a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) sample holder. Our detector was made from a 4-mm(2) Si chip. The fabrication procedure was easy, and similar to a standard transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample thinning process based on ion milling. A TEM grid containing particle objects was fixed to the detector with a silver paste. Observations were carried out using samples of Au and latex particles at 75 and 200 kV. Such a detector provides an easy way to obtain BSE images in an STEM. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Towards quantitative scanning electron microscopy: Applications to nano-scale analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gomati, M.M., E-mail: mmg@ohm.york.ac.uk [Department of Electronics, University of York (United Kingdom); Walker, C.G.H.; Zha, X. [Department of Electronics, University of York (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-21

    Although the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) has been in existence for many decades, it cannot be yet regarded as a true quantitative instrument-certainly when applied at the nanoscale. This is due to the presence of carbonaceous deposits at the surface and a poor understanding of the emission of secondary electrons from materials. In this paper, a short review is given of some of the progress made in the efforts to improve quantification in the SEM at York. We present results which strongly suggest that the currently accepted theory, which explains why there is a correlation between the secondary electron yield and the work function of a metal, is incorrect. In addition, we show that the backscattering coefficient from materials can be strongly influenced by surface layers at low primary electron energy. Finally, we present Auger electron spectra, which have been acquired at high speed at high vacuum (10{sup -7} mbar) and thus represent a new way to determine the composition of nanostructures in the SEM.

  6. Visualization of Microbial Biomarkers by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Norman R.; Allen, Carlton C.; Child, Alice

    2001-01-01

    . Fortunately, many antimicrobial defense systems of higher organisms require sensitive detection to combat microbial pathogens. We employ here the primitive immune system of the evolutionarily ancient horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. This species relies on multi-enzyme signal amplification detection of cell wall molecules and they can be applied to the development of useful detectors of life. An extension of this work includes the visualization of microbial signatures by labeling LAL components with chromogenic or electron dense markers. The protein Limulus Anti-LPS Factor (LALF) has an extremely high affinity for LPS. By coupling LALF binding with colloidal gold labels we demonstrate a correlation of the structures visible by electron microscopy with biochemical evidence of microbial cell wall materials. Pure silica particles were mixed with cultures of E. coli (10(exp 6) cfu/mL). Samples were washed sequentially with buffered saline, LALF, antibody to LALF and finally colloidal gold-labeled Protein A. Negative controls were not exposed to E. coli but received identical treatment otherwise. Samples were coated with carbon and imaged on a JEOL JSM-840 scanning electron microscope with LaB6 source in the back scatter mode with the JEOL annular back scatter detector. 20 nm-scale black spots in this contrast-reversed image originate from electrons back-scattered by gold atoms. Negative controls did not give any signal. Future work will expand application of this technique to soil simulants and mineralized rock samples.

  7. [Evaluation of the corrosion resistance of orthodontic wires by electrochemical measures and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, André El; Klein, Lorena; Frateur, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the corrosion resistance of orthodontic wires made of different alloys (stainless steel, chrome-cobalt, nickel-titanium and β-titanium) and for the same alloy from different vendors (GAC(®), RMO(®), 3M(®) and ORMCO(®)). Different electrochemical techniques (corrosion potential monitoring as a function of immersion time, current-potential curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)) were used. The wires' resistance to corrosion was measured and compared with the surface condition, assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Using the recorded data, a rating system based on the corrosion resistance of orthodontic wires was developed. The comparison of these data with the results of SEM shows that the surface chemical composition plays a primary role in the electrochemical behavior of the orthodontic wires and, unlike surface defects, is a key parameter for the corrosion resistance of the alloy. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2013.

  8. Autofocus on moving object in scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Andrey V; Dembélé, Sounkalo; Piat, Nadine

    2017-11-01

    The sharpness of the images coming from a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is a very important property for many computer vision applications at micro- and nanoscale. It represents how much object details are distinctive in the images: the object may be perceived sharp or blurred. Image sharpness highly depends on the value of focal distance, or working distance in the case of the SEM. Autofocus is the technique allowing to automatically adjust the working distance to maximize the sharpness. Most of the existing algorithms allows working only with a static object which is enough for the tasks of visualization, manual microanalysis or microcharacterization. These applications work with a low frame rate, less than 1 Hz, that guarantees a low level of noise. However, static autofocus can not be used for samples performing continuous 3D motion, which is the case of robotic applications where it is required to carry out a continuous 3D position measurement, e.g., nano-assembly or nanomanipulation. Moreover, in addition to constantly keeping object in focus while it is moving, it is required to perform the operation at high frame rate. The approach offering both these possibilities is presented in this paper and is referred as dynamic autofocus. The presented solution is based on stochastic optimization techniques. It allows tracking the maximum of the sharpness of the images without sweep and without training. It works under uncertainty conditions: presence of noise in images, unknown maximal sharpness and unknown 3D motion of the specimen. The experiments, that were performed with noisy images at high frame rate (5 Hz), were conducted on a Carl Zeiss Auriga 60 FE-SEM. They prove the robustness of the algorithm with respect to the variation of optimization parameters, object speed and magnification. Moreover, it is invariant to the object structure and its variation in time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid imaging of mycoplasma in solution using Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy (ASEM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Manaka, Sachie [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Nakane, Daisuke [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo [Advanced Technology Division, JEOL Ltd., Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Nishizaka, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Miyata, Makoto [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Maruyama, Yuusuke [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mycoplasma mobile was observed in buffer with the Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M. mobile attached to sialic acid on the SiN film surface within minutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells were observed at low concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASEM should promote study and early-stage diagnosis of mycoplasma. -- Abstract: Mycoplasma is a genus of bacterial pathogen that causes disease in vertebrates. In humans, the species Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes 15% or more of community-acquired pneumonia. Because this bacterium is tiny, corresponding in size to a large virus, diagnosis using optical microscopy is not easy. In current methods, chest X-rays are usually the first action, followed by serology, PCR amplification, and/or culture, but all of these are particularly difficult at an early stage of the disease. Using Mycoplasma mobile as a model species, we directly observed mycoplasma in buffer with the newly developed Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM). This microscope features an open sample dish with a pressure-resistant thin film window in its base, through which the SEM beam scans samples in solution, from below. Because of its 2-3 {mu}m-deep scanning capability, it can observe the whole internal structure of mycoplasma cells stained with metal solutions. Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Cells were observed at low concentrations, because suspended cells concentrate in the observable zone by attaching to sialic acid on the silicon nitride (SiN) film surface within minutes. These results suggest the applicability of the ASEM for the study of mycoplasmas as well as for early-stage mycoplasma infection diagnosis.

  10. The sinusoidal lining cells in "normal" human liver. A scanning electron microscopic investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Christoffersen, P

    1986-01-01

    The scanning electron microscopic was used to study the fenestrations of human liver sinusoids. Thirteen biopsies, where light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed normal sinusoidal architecture, were investigated. The number of fenestrae was calculated in acinar zone 3...

  11. Techniques for characterization of particulate matter: neutron activation analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulett, L.D.; Dale, J.M.; Emery, J.F.; Lyon, W.S. Jr.; Fulkerson, W.

    1975-01-01

    Three techniques for particulate matter analysis are discussed: (1) neutron activation, which is a method that samples the entire specimen, both surface and bulk; (2) electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), which samples particle surfaces only; and (3) scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which reveals particle size and morphology, and can be used to determine composition differences in individual particles. These three techniques can be combined to construct highly detailed characterizations of particulate matter specimens. It is shown that multielement analysis can be quickly done by neutron activation and that surface analysis and individual particle analysis obtained by ESCA and SEM, are very important supplementary information

  12. Sparse sampling and reconstruction for electron and scanning probe microscope imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Hyrum; Helms, Jovana; Wheeler, Jason W.; Larson, Kurt W.; Rohrer, Brandon R.

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy are provided herein. In a general embodiment, the systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy with an undersampled data set include: driving an electron beam or probe to scan across a sample and visit a subset of pixel locations of the sample that are randomly or pseudo-randomly designated; determining actual pixel locations on the sample that are visited by the electron beam or probe; and processing data collected by detectors from the visits of the electron beam or probe at the actual pixel locations and recovering a reconstructed image of the sample.

  13. Varifocal mirror display of organ surfaces from CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizer, S.M.; Fuchs, H.; Bloomberg, S.H.; Li Ching Tsai; Heinz, E.R.

    1982-01-01

    A means will be presented of constructing a powerful varifocal mirror 3D display system with limited cost based on an ordinary color video digital display system. The importance of dynamic interactive control of the display of these images will be discussed; in particular, the design and usefulness of a method allowing real-time user-controlled motion of the 3D object being displayed will be discussed. Also, an effective method will be described of presenting images made of surfaces by the straightforward, automatic calculation of 3D edge strength, the ordering of the resulting voxels by edge strength, and the 3D grey-scale display of the top voxels on this ordered list. The application of these ideas to the 3D display of the intimal wall of the region of bifurcation of the carotid artery from 12-24 CT scans of the neck will be discussed

  14. ANALYSIS OF SURFACE DEFECTS OF ALUMINUM AND ITS ALLOYS WITH A SCANNING KELVIN PROBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Tyavlovsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the use of probe electrometry in non-destructive testing is constrained by the complexity of measurement results interpretation. An output signal of electrometric probe depends on a number of physical and chemical parameters of surface including chemical composition variations, stresses, dislocations, crystallographic orientation of a surface, etc. The study aims to the use of probe electrometry methods for nondestructive testing and analysis of precision metal surfaces’ defects after different treatment or processing.Control of surface defects of aluminum and its alloys was performed with a scanning Kelvin probe technique. The results of scanning were plotted in a form of contact potential difference (CPD distribution map. Additionally, a histogram of CPD values distribution and statistical characteristics including the expectation of CPD mean value and histogram half-width were calculated either for the whole distribution or for each individual mode in a case of multimodal distribution.The spatial CPD distribution of A99 aluminum and AMG-2 alloy surfaces after electrochemical polishing and diamond finishing was studied. An additional study was held for AMG-2 surface after the formation of 30 microns thick specific nanostructured alumina oxide surface layer. Higher quality surfaces have characterized as more homogeneous distribution of the physical properties (at half-width distribution histogram. Surfaces with higher mechanical strength and overall better mechanical properties found to have lower CPD values that correspond to higher electron work function and surface energy. The presence of the second mode in the CPD distribution histogram indicates the significant proportion of defect areas on the sample surface.Analysis of visualized CPD distribution maps using defined criteria allows detecting and characterizing such defects as residual stress areas, areas with reduced microhardness, surface contamination spots, corrosion

  15. Mapping the Local Density of States by Very-Low-Energy Scanning Electron Microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Zuzana; Frank, Luděk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2010), s. 214-218 ISSN 1345-9678 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : density of states * scanning low energy electron microscopy * aluminum * very-low-energy scanning electron microscopy * electron band structure Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.779, year: 2010 http://www.jim.or.jp/journal/e/51/02/214.html

  16. An optimized methodology to analyze biopolymer capsules by environmental scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conforto, Egle, E-mail: egle.conforto@univ-lr.fr [LaSIE UMR 7356 CNRS-ULR, Université de La Rochelle, UFR Sciences, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle (France); Joguet, Nicolas [Equipe Approches Moléculaires Environnement-Santé, LIENSs, UMR 7266 CNRS-ULR, Université de La Rochelle, UFR Sciences, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle (France); Buisson, Pierre [INNOV' IA, 4 rue Samuel Champlain, Z.I. Chef de Baie, 17000 La Rochelle (France); Vendeville, Jean-Eudes; Chaigneau, Carine [IDCAPS, filiale R and D INNOV' IA, 4 rue Samuel Champlain, Z.I. Chef de Baie, 17000 La Rochelle (France); Maugard, Thierry [Equipe Approches Moléculaires Environnement-Santé, LIENSs, UMR 7266 CNRS-ULR, Université de La Rochelle, UFR Sciences, Avenue Michel Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle (France)

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe an optimized methodology to study the surface characteristics and internal structure of biopolymer capsules using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in environmental mode. The main advantage of this methodology is that no preparation is required and, significantly, no metallic coverage is deposited on the surface of the specimen, thus preserving the original capsule shape and its surface morphology. This avoids introducing preparation artefacts which could modify the capsule surface and mask information concerning important feature like porosities or roughness. Using this method gelatin and mainly fatty coatings, difficult to be analyzed by standard SEM technique, unambiguously show fine details of their surface morphology without damage. Furthermore, chemical contrast is preserved in backscattered electron images of unprepared samples, allowing visualizing the internal organization of the capsule, the quality of the envelope, etc.… This study provides pointers on how to obtain optimal conditions for the analysis of biological or sensitive material, as this is not always studied using appropriate techniques. A reliable evaluation of the parameters used in capsule elaboration for research and industrial applications, as well as that of capsule functionality is provided by this methodology, which is essential for the technological progress in this domain. - Highlights: • We optimized a methodology using ESEM to analyze biopolymer capsules. • This methodology allows analyzing original surface samples without any preparation. • No preparation artefact are introduced which would mask important surface details. • Morphological details and chemical contrast from the original surface are preserved. • Capsule shape, volume, surface roughness and coating quality were reliably evaluated.

  17. Energy-weighted dynamical scattering simulations of electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Elena; Singh, Saransh; Callahan, Patrick G; Hourahine, Ben; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Graef, Marc De

    2018-04-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) has been gaining momentum as a high resolution alternative to electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), adding to the existing electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The image simulation of any of these measurement techniques requires an energy dependent diffraction model for which, in turn, knowledge of electron energies and diffraction distances distributions is required. We identify the sample-detector geometry and the effect of inelastic events on the diffracting electron beam as the important factors to be considered when predicting these distributions. However, tractable models taking into account inelastic scattering explicitly are lacking. In this study, we expand the Monte Carlo (MC) energy-weighting dynamical simulations models used for EBSD [1] and ECP [2] to the TKD case. We show that the foil thickness in TKD can be used as a means of energy filtering and compare band sharpness in the different modalities. The current model is shown to correctly predict TKD patterns and, through the dictionary indexing approach, to produce higher quality indexed TKD maps than conventional Hough transform approach, especially close to grain boundaries. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ultrafast dark-field surface inspection with hybrid-dispersion laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Akio; Kim, Chanju; Chan, Jacky; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Goda, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Jalali, Bahram

    2014-06-01

    High-speed surface inspection plays an important role in industrial manufacturing, safety monitoring, and quality control. It is desirable to go beyond the speed limitation of current technologies for reducing manufacturing costs and opening a new window onto a class of applications that require high-throughput sensing. Here, we report a high-speed dark-field surface inspector for detection of micrometer-sized surface defects that can travel at a record high speed as high as a few kilometers per second. This method is based on a modified time-stretch microscope that illuminates temporally and spatially dispersed laser pulses on the surface of a fast-moving object and detects scattered light from defects on the surface with a sensitive photodetector in a dark-field configuration. The inspector's ability to perform ultrafast dark-field surface inspection enables real-time identification of difficult-to-detect features on weakly reflecting surfaces and hence renders the method much more practical than in the previously demonstrated bright-field configuration. Consequently, our inspector provides nearly 1000 times higher scanning speed than conventional inspectors. To show our method's broad utility, we demonstrate real-time inspection of the surface of various objects (a non-reflective black film, transparent flexible film, and reflective hard disk) for detection of 10 μm or smaller defects on a moving target at 20 m/s within a scan width of 25 mm at a scan rate of 90.9 MHz. Our method holds promise for improving the cost and performance of organic light-emitting diode displays for next-generation smart phones, lithium-ion batteries for green electronics, and high-efficiency solar cells.

  19. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  20. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodighiero, Simona; Torre, Bruno; Sogne, Elisa; Ruffilli, Roberta; Cagnoli, Cinzia; Francolini, Maura; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Falqui, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Rodighiero, Simona

    2015-03-22

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Oxides Surfaces and Novel Electronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koirala, Pratik

    The scope of this thesis extends to the study of surface structures and electronic properties in a number of complex oxides. The c(6x2) surface reconstruction on SrTiO3 (001) was solved using a combination of plan view transmission electron microscopy imaging, atomic resolution secondary electron imaging, and density functional theory calculations. This work provided fundamental insights on the effects of dielectric screening in secondary electron generation. A thorough analysis on the limitation and functionality of transmission plan view imaging showed that the kinematical approximations used in the separation of top and bottom surfaces is only valid in thin samples (˜5 nm or less for SrTiO3). The presence of an inversion center in the surface structure also made separation of the top and bottom surfaces more robust. Surface studies of two other oxides, KTaO3 and NdGaO3, provided understanding on the mechanism of surface heterogeneity and segregation. In the case of KTaO3, selective ion sputtering and the loss of K resulted in large stoichiometric variations at the surface. Annealing of such samples led to the formation of a potassium deficient tetragonal phase (K 6Ta10.8O30) on the surface. A similar phenomenon was also observed in NdGaO3. Exploratory surface studies of the rare earth scandates (ReScO3 , Re = Gd, Tb, Dy) led to the observation of large flexoelectric bending inside an electron microscope. Thin rods of these scandates bent by up to 90 degree under a focused electron beam; the bending was fully reversible. Ex-situ measurements of flexoelectric coe cient performed by an- other graduate student, Christopher Mizzi, confirmed that the scandates have a large flexocoupling voltage (˜42 V). Electronic structure of the lanthanide scandates was studied using temperature depen- dent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and hybrid density functional theory calculations. The amount of charging under X-ray illumination was greatly reduced with increasing

  3. New Insights on Subsurface Imaging of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymer Composites via Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minhua; Ming, Bin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke J.; Gu, Xiaohong; Nguyen, Tinh; Park, Cheol; Lillehei, Peter T.; Villarrubia, J. S.; Vladar, Andras E.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Despite many studies of subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), significant controversy exists concerning the imaging depth and contrast mechanisms. We studied CNT-polyimide composites and, by threedimensional reconstructions of captured stereo-pair images, determined that the maximum SEM imaging depth was typically hundreds of nanometers. The contrast mechanisms were investigated over a broad range of beam accelerating voltages from 0.3 to 30 kV, and ascribed to modulation by embedded CNTs of the effective secondary electron (SE) emission yield at the polymer surface. This modulation of the SE yield is due to non-uniform surface potential distribution resulting from current flows due to leakage and electron beam induced current. The importance of an external electric field on SEM subsurface imaging was also demonstrated. The insights gained from this study can be generally applied to SEM nondestructive subsurface imaging of conducting nanostructures embedded in dielectric matrices such as graphene-polymer composites, silicon-based single electron transistors, high resolution SEM overlay metrology or e-beam lithography, and have significant implications in nanotechnology.

  4. Ecology and thermal inactivation of microbes in and on interplanetary space vehicle components. [examined with a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    The uses of scanning electron microscopy in assessing changes that occur in spores exposed to wet and dry heat cycles at elevated temperatures were examined. Several species of Bacillus and other nonspore-forming species of organisms were used for the experiment. Surface morphology of viable and nonviable organisms was clearly detectable by this method, making it a potentially useful technique for investigating microbial inactivation on space vehicle surfaces and components. Micrographs of the spores and bacterial cells are provided.

  5. Assessment of resin-dentin interfacial morphology of two ethanol-based universal adhesives: A scanning electron microscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Awad, Mohamed Moustafa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the resin-dentin interfacial morphology created by two universal adhesives using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: The occlusal surfaces of ten (n = 5) molars were reduced to expose a flat surface of dentin. Two universal adhesives, Scotchbond Universal Adhesive and Tetric N-Bond Universal, were independently applied to air-dried dentin. Light-cured resin-based composite restorative materials were used to incrementa...

  6. Specimen-thickness effects on transmission Kikuchi patterns in the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, K P; Keller, R R; Stoykovich, M P

    2014-06-01

    We report the effects of varying specimen thickness on the generation of transmission Kikuchi patterns in the scanning electron microscope. Diffraction patterns sufficient for automated indexing were observed from films spanning nearly three orders of magnitude in thickness in several materials, from 5 nm of hafnium dioxide to 3 μm of aluminum, corresponding to a mass-thickness range of ~5 to 810 μg cm(-2) . The scattering events that are most likely to be detected in transmission are shown to be very near the exit surface of the films. The energies, spatial distribution and trajectories of the electrons that are transmitted through the film and are collected by the detector are predicted using Monte Carlo simulations. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  8. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Rev. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Joshi, Vineet V.; Rhodes, Mark A.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  9. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  10. Sparsity based noise removal from low dose scanning electron microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, A.; Fodor, P. S.

    2015-03-01

    Scanning electron microscopes are some of the most versatile tools for imaging materials with nanometer resolution. However, images collected at high scan rates to increase throughput and avoid sample damage, suffer from low signalto- noise ratio (SNR) as a result of the Poisson distributed shot noise associated with the electron production and interaction with the surface imaged. The signal is further degraded by additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) from the detection electronics. In this work, denoising frameworks are applied to this type of images, taking advantage of their sparsity character, along with a methodology for determining the AWGN. A variance stabilization technique is applied to the raw data followed by a patch-based denoising algorithm. Results are presented both for images with known levels of mixed Poisson-Gaussian noise, and for raw images. The quality of the image reconstruction is assessed based both on the PSNR as well as on measures specific to the application of the data collected. These include accurate identification of objects of interest and structural similarity. High-quality results are recovered from noisy observations collected at short dwell times that avoid sample damage.

  11. The propagation of high power CW scanning electron beam in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, Sergey; Korenev, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    The question of propagation of high power electron beam in air presents the scientific and applied interests. The high power (80 kW) CW electron accelerator 'Rhodotron' with kinetic energy of electrons 5 and 10 MeV was used in the experiments. The experimental results for propagation of scanning electron beams in air are presented and discussed

  12. Cement paste surface roughness analysis using coherence scanning interferometry and confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apedo, K.L.; Munzer, C.; He, H.; Montgomery, P.; Serres, N.; Fond, C.; Feugeas, F.

    2015-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy have been used for several decades to better understand the microstructure of cementitious materials. Very limited work has been performed to date to study the roughness of cementitious materials by optical microscopy such as coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) and chromatic confocal sensing (CCS). The objective of this paper is to better understand how CSI can be used as a tool to analyze surface roughness and topography of cement pastes. Observations from a series of images acquired using this technique on both polished and unpolished samples are described. The results from CSI are compared with those from a STIL confocal microscopy technique (SCM). Comparison between both optical techniques demonstrates the ability of CSI to measure both polished and unpolished cement pastes. - Highlights: • Coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) was used to analyze cement paste surfaces. • The results from the CSI were compared with those from a confocal microscopy. • 3D roughness parameters were obtained using the window resizing method. • Polished and unpolished cement pastes were studied

  13. Correlative Fluorescence and Electron Microscopy in 3D-Scanning Electron Microscope Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Jonathan; Wallace, Callen T; Shibata, Masateru; Suga, Mitsuo; Erdman, Natasha; Stolz, Donna B; Watkins, Simon C

    2017-04-03

    The ability to correlate fluorescence microscopy (FM) and electron microscopy (EM) data obtained on biological (cell and tissue) specimens is essential to bridge the resolution gap between the data obtained by these different imaging techniques. In the past such correlations were limited to either EM navigation in two dimensions to the locations previously highlighted by fluorescence markers, or subsequent high-resolution acquisition of tomographic information using a TEM. We present a novel approach whereby a sample previously investigated by FM is embedded and subjected to sequential mechanical polishing and backscatter imaging by scanning electron microscope. The resulting three dimensional EM tomogram of the sample can be directly correlated to the FM data. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Expansion of Shockley stacking fault observed by scanning electron microscope and partial dislocation motion in 4H-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Yoshifumi; Nakata, Ryu; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Hada, Masaki; Hayashi, Yasuhiko

    2018-04-01

    We studied the dynamics of the expansion of a Shockley-type stacking fault (SSF) with 30° Si(g) partial dislocations (PDs) using a scanning electron microscope. We observed SSFs as dark lines (DLs), which formed the contrast at the intersection between the surface and the SSF on the (0001) face inclined by 8° from the surface. We performed experiments at different electron-beam scanning speeds, observing magnifications, and irradiation areas. The results indicated that the elongation of a DL during one-frame scanning depended on the time for which the electron beam irradiated the PD segment in the frame of view. From these results, we derived a formula to express the velocity of the PD using the elongation rate of the corresponding DL during one-frame scanning. We also obtained the result that the elongation velocity of the DL was not influenced by changing the direction in which the electron beam irradiates the PD. From this result, we deduced that the geometrical kink motion of the PD was enhanced by diffusing carriers that were generated by the electron-beam irradiation.

  16. Confocal laser scanning, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy investigation of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm degradation using passive and active sodium hypochlorite irrigation within a simulated root canal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohmmed, Saifalarab A; Vianna, Morgana E; Penny, Matthew R; Hilton, Stephen T; Mordan, Nicola; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2017-08-01

    Root canal irrigation is an important adjunct to control microbial infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 2.5% (wt/vol) sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) agitation on the removal, killing, and degradation of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm. A total of 45 root canal models were manufactured using 3D printing with each model comprising an 18 mm length simulated root canal of apical size 30 and taper 0.06. E. faecalis biofilms were grown on the apical 3 mm of the models for 10 days. A total of 60 s of 9 ml of 2.5% NaOCl irrigation using syringe and needle was performed, the irrigant was either left stagnant in the canal or agitated using manual (Gutta-percha), sonic, and ultrasonic methods for 30 s. Following irrigation, the residual biofilms were observed using confocal laser scanning, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA with Dunnett post hoc tests at a level of significance p ≤ .05. Consequence of root canal irrigation indicate that the reduction in the amount of biofilm achieved with the active irrigation groups (manual, sonic, and ultrasonic) was significantly greater when compared with the passive and untreated groups (p irrigation exhibited more residual biofilm on the model surface than irrigant agitated by manual or automated (sonic, ultrasonic) methods. Total biofilm degradation and nonviable cells were associated with the ultrasonic group. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Scanning electron microscopic characteristics of commercially available 1- and 3-piece intraocular lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Tobias; Brockmann, Claudia; Nietzsche, Sandor; Bertelmann, Eckart; Strobel, Juergen; Dawczynski, Jens

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate commercially available 1- and 3-piece intraocular lenses (IOLs) with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Department of Ophthalmology and Electron Microscopy Center, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany. Experimental study. Seven +23.0 diopter IOLs of different design and material and from different manufacturers were chosen for a detailed assessment. Scanning electron microscopy was used at standardized magnifications to assess typical IOL characteristics. The particular focus was the optic edge, the optic surface, the haptic–optic junction, and the haptic. All square-edged IOLs had a curvature radius of less than 10 μm, while the mean optic edge thickness ranged between 216 μm and 382 μm. A 360-degree square-edged boundary was present in all 3-piece IOLs and in a single 1-piece model. Relevant production remnants on the optic edge were observed in 1 case. Regarding the haptic, 3-piece IOLs had uniformly shaped fibers with a mean thickness of 177 μm ± 51 (SD) (range 116 to 220 μm). Chemical adhesives were used to attach the haptic in 1 case, where alterations of the IOL material were observed. In another case, the haptic fiber was press-fitted into the optic, which resulted in bulging of the optic profile. Inspection of surface characteristics showed wavelike patterns in 2 IOLs. Taking clinical relevance into account, all IOLs were of high manufacturing quality. Certain attention was paid in creating a sharp optic edge. Surface irregularities of 2 IOLs were attributed to the manufacturing technique. Methods for implementing the haptic–optic junction were diverse.

  18. Unoccupied surface electronic structure of Gd(0001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Dowben, P.A.; Ortega, J.E.; Himpsel, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    The unoccupied surface electronic structure of Gd(0001) was investigated with high-resolution inverse-photoemission spectroscopy. An empty surface state near E F is observed at bar Γ. Two other surface-sensitive features are also revealed at 1.2 and 3.1 eV above the Fermi level. Hydrogen adsorption on Gd surfaces was used to distinguish the surface-sensitive features from the bulk features. The unoccupied bulk-band critical points are determined to be Γ 3 + at 1.9 eV and A 1 at 0.8 eV

  19. Surface-Plasmon-Driven Hot Electron Photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchao; He, Shuai; Guo, Wenxiao; Hu, Yue; Huang, Jiawei; Mulcahy, Justin R; Wei, Wei David

    2017-11-30

    Visible-light-driven photochemistry has continued to attract heightened interest due to its capacity to efficiently harvest solar energy and its potential to solve the global energy crisis. Plasmonic nanostructures boast broadly tunable optical properties coupled with catalytically active surfaces that offer a unique opportunity for solar photochemistry. Resonant optical excitation of surface plasmons produces energetic hot electrons that can be collected to facilitate chemical reactions. This review sums up recent theoretical and experimental approaches for understanding the underlying photophysical processes in hot electron generation and discusses various electron-transfer models on both plasmonic metal nanostructures and plasmonic metal/semiconductor heterostructures. Following that are highlights of recent examples of plasmon-driven hot electron photochemical reactions within the context of both cases. The review concludes with a discussion about the remaining challenges in the field and future opportunities for addressing the low reaction efficiencies in hot-electron-induced photochemistry.

  20. Comparative evaluation of enamel abrasivity by toothbrush and velcro: An in vitro scanning electron microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Saroj Kumar; Javdekar, Sadashiv Bhaskar; Dhir, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Plaque control has been shown to be pivotal in maintaining the optimal periodontal health. Mechanical plaque control is the most popular option for establishing the optimal oral health. Toothbrushes have been the novel tool for mechanical cleansing. However, the abrasive potential of the toothbrushes on the enamel surface is an area in gray. The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the abrasivity of the toothbrush versus the velcro fasteners. The mounted teeth of both the groups were subjected to abrasion test, and the tooth surfaces were observed for the possible abrasions from the oscillating strokes (toothbrush) and frictional contacts (hook and loop velcro) and examined under the scanning electron microscope. Comparative assessment of both velcro (hook and loop) and toothbrush bristles did not reveal any evidence of abrasion on the tooth specimens. Veclro fasteners are safe and qualitatively at par to the manual toothbrush for their efficacy and efficiency in teeth cleansing.

  1. Scanning Electron Microscopic Studies of Microwave Sintered Al-SiC Nanocomposites and Their Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Himyan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Al-metal matrix composites (AMMCs reinforced with diverse volume fraction of SiC nanoparticles were synthesized using microwave sintering process. The effects of the reinforcing SiC particles on physical, microstructure, mechanical, and electrical properties were studied. The phase, microstructural, and surface analyses of the composites were systematically conducted using X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and surface profilometer techniques, respectively. The microstructural examination revealed the homogeneous distribution of SiC particles in the Al matrix. Microhardness and compressive strength of nanocomposites were found to be increasing with the increasing volume fraction of SiC particles. Electrical conductivity of the nanocomposites decreases with increasing the SiC content.

  2. IN-SITU EXPERIMENTS OF VACUUM DISCHARGE USING SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPES

    CERN Document Server

    Muranaka, T; Leifer, K; Ziemann, V

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental understanding of vacuum discharge mechanisms and induced surface damage is indispensable for the CLIC feasibility study. We have been conducting dc sparc experiments inside a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at Uppsala university in order to investigate localized breakdown phenomena. By using a SEM, we achieve the resolution of the electron probe in the few-nm range, which is of great advantage as the surface roughness of the polished accelerating structures is in the same scale. The high accelerating field of 1 GV/m is realized by biasing an electrode with 1 kV set above the sample with a gap of sub μm. Furthermore, a second SEM equipped with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) is used to modify the topography of sample surfaces thus the geometrical dependence of field emissions and vacuum discharges can be studied. The FIB can be used for the surface damage analysis as well. We have demonstrated subsurface damage observations by using FIB to sputter a rectangular recess into the sample in the breakd...

  3. A proton microbeam deflection system to scan target surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, D.

    1978-12-01

    A system to deflect the proton beam within the Karlsruhe microbeam setup is described. The deflection is achieved whithin a transverse electrical field generated between parallel electrodes. Their tension is controlled by a pattern generator, thus enabling areal and line scans with a variable number of scan points at variable scan speed. The application is demonstrated at two different examples. (orig.) [de

  4. Reflection of Slow Electrons from Solid Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaev, Alexander; Ainov, Matsak; Kaganovich, Igor; Demidov, Vladimir

    2013-09-01

    Given that progress of future plasma technologies depends on control of electron coefficient reflection r0, the development of methods of measurement and control of r0 is of great importance. Published experimental data on r0 for slow electrons are inconsistent and sometime give large values up to r0 ~ 0 , 8 and even higher. This talk presents a technique for r0 measurements in low pressure plasmas in the presence of transverse magnetic field. It is found that for poly-crystal surface, effective reflection coefficient can really reach value of 0.8. It is demonstrated that it is connected to additional reflection from potential barrier near the surfaces. The contribution of electron reflection from the barrier and the surface has been divided and studied. The data have been confirmed at different mono-crystal surfaces. This work was supported by DoE Fusion Energy Sciences contract DE-SC0001939 and Education Ministry of the RF.

  5. Visualization of carrier dynamics in p(n)-type GaAs by scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jongweon; Hwang, Taek Yong; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2014-02-11

    Four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy is used to investigate doping- and carrier-concentration-dependent ultrafast carrier dynamics of the in situ cleaved single-crystalline GaAs(110) substrates. We observed marked changes in the measured time-resolved secondary electrons depending on the induced alterations in the electronic structure. The enhancement of secondary electrons at positive times, when the electron pulse follows the optical pulse, is primarily due to an energy gain involving the photoexcited charge carriers that are transiently populated in the conduction band and further promoted by the electron pulse, consistent with a band structure that is dependent on chemical doping and carrier concentration. When electrons undergo sufficient energy loss on their journey to the surface, dark contrast becomes dominant in the image. At negative times, however, when the electron pulse precedes the optical pulse (electron impact), the dynamical behavior of carriers manifests itself in a dark contrast which indicates the suppression of secondary electrons upon the arrival of the optical pulse. In this case, the loss of energy of material's electrons is by collisions with the excited carriers. These results for carrier dynamics in GaAs(110) suggest strong carrier-carrier scatterings which are mirrored in the energy of material's secondary electrons during their migration to the surface. The approach presented here provides a fundamental understanding of materials probed by four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy, and offers possibilities for use of this imaging technique in the study of ultrafast charge carrier dynamics in heterogeneously patterned micro- and nanostructured material surfaces and interfaces.

  6. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on GaN and InGaN surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, David

    2009-01-01

    Optelectronic devices based on gallium nitride (GaN) and indium gallium nitride (InGaN) are in the focus of research since more than 20 years and still have great potential for optical applications. In the first part of this work non-polar surfaces of GaN are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In SEM and AFM, the (1 anti 100)- and especially the (anti 2110)-plane are quite corrugated. For the first time, the (anti 2110)-plane of GaN is atomically resolved in STM. In the second part InGaN quantum dot layers are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and STM. The STMmeasurements show the dependency of surface morphology on growth conditions in the metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Nucleation, a new MOVPE-strategy, is based on phase separations on surfaces. It is shown that locally varying density of states and bandgaps can be detected by STS, that means bandgap histograms and 2D-bandgap-mapping. (orig.)

  7. A Two-stage Improvement Method for Robot Based 3D Surface Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, F. B.; Liang, Y. D.; Wang, R. F.; Lin, Y. S.

    2018-03-01

    As known that the surface of unknown object was difficult to measure or recognize precisely, hence the 3D laser scanning technology was introduced and used properly in surface reconstruction. Usually, the surface scanning speed was slower and the scanning quality would be better, while the speed was faster and the quality would be worse. In this case, the paper presented a new two-stage scanning method in order to pursuit the quality of surface scanning in a faster speed. The first stage was rough scanning to get general point cloud data of object’s surface, and then the second stage was specific scanning to repair missing regions which were determined by chord length discrete method. Meanwhile, a system containing a robotic manipulator and a handy scanner was also developed to implement the two-stage scanning method, and relevant paths were planned according to minimum enclosing ball and regional coverage theories.

  8. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, L., E-mail: ludek@isibrno.cz [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Mikmeková, E. [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lejeune, M. [LPMC – Faculte des Sciences d’Amiens, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex 2 (France)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Using proper irradiation parameters, adsorbed hydrocarbons are released from surfaces. • Slow electrons remove hydrocarbons instead of depositing carbon. • Prolonged irradiation with very slow electrons does not create defects in graphene. - Abstract: Electron-beam-induced deposition of various materials from suitable precursors has represented an established branch of nanotechnology for more than a decade. A specific alternative is carbon deposition on the basis of hydrocarbons as precursors that has been applied to grow various nanostructures including masks for subsequent technological steps. Our area of study was unintentional electron-beam-induced carbon deposition from spontaneously adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. This process traditionally constitutes a challenge for scanning electron microscopy practice preventing one from performing any true surface studies outside an ultrahigh vacuum and without in-situ cleaning of samples, and also jeopardising other electron-optical devices such as electron beam lithographs. Here we show that when reducing the energy of irradiating electrons sufficiently, the e-beam-induced deposition can be converted to e-beam-induced release causing desorption of hydrocarbons and ultimate cleaning of surfaces in both an ultrahigh and a standard high vacuum. Using series of experiments with graphene samples, we demonstrate fundamental features of e-beam-induced desorption and present results of checks for possible radiation damage using Raman spectroscopy that led to optimisation of the electron energy for damage-free cleaning. The method of preventing carbon contamination described here paves the way for greatly enhanced surface sensitivity of imaging and substantially reduced demands on vacuum systems for nanotechnological applications.

  9. Fine structure of the endolymphatic duct in the rat. A scanning and transmission electron microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K; Rostgaard, Jørgen; Bretlau, P

    1995-01-01

    and thiocarbohydrazide followed by a continuous dehydration procedure. Three types of cells were identified with the scanning electron microscope: A polygonal and oblong epithelial cell was observed in the largest number throughout the duct, whereas in the juxta-saccular half of the duct two additional types...... of epithelial cells were observed. The scanning electron microscopical observations are compared and discussed with reference to transmission electron microscopical observations of the endolymphatic duct....

  10. Practical spatial resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A B; Ramasse, Q M; Wen, J G; Bhattacharya, A; Zuo, J M

    2011-08-01

    The resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is limited by delocalization of inelastic electron scattering rather than probe size in an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). In this study, we present an experimental quantification of EELS spatial resolution using chemically modulated 2×(LaMnO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) and 2×(SrVO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) superlattices by measuring the full width at half maxima (FWHM) of integrated Ti M(2,3), Ti L(2,3), V L(2,3), Mn L(2,3), La N(4,5), La N(2,3) La M(4,5) and Sr L(3) edges over the superlattices. The EELS signals recorded using large collection angles are peaked at atomic columns. The FWHM of the EELS profile, obtained by curve-fitting, reveals a systematic trend with the energy loss for the Ti, V, and Mn edges. However, the experimental FWHM of the Sr and La edges deviates significantly from the observed experimental tendency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Electron emission at the rail surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornhill, L.; Battech, J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors examine the processes by which current is transferred from the cathode rail to the plasma armature in an arc-driven railgun. Three electron emission mechanisms are considered, namely thermionic emission, field-enhanced thermionic emission (or Schottky emission), and photoemission. The author's calculations show that the dominant electron emission mechanism depends, to a great extent, on the work function of the rail surface, the rail surface temperature, the electric field at the rail surface, and the effective radiation temperature of the plasma. For conditions that are considered to be typical of a railgun armature, Schottky emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism, providing current densities on the order of 10 9 A/m 2

  12. Analysis of GaSb and AlSb reconstructions on GaSb(111) A- and B-oriented surfaces by azimuthal-scan reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Proessdorf, A.; Grosse, F.; Braun, W.; Katmis, F.; Riechert, H.; Romanyuk, Olexandr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 15 (2011), "155317-1"-"155317-11" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP204/10/P028 Grant - others:GermanResearchFoundation(DE) GZ:436TSE113/62/0-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : III-V semiconductor surfaces * RHEED * surface reconstruction * MBE Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.691, year: 2011 http://prb.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v83/i15/e155317

  13. High-resolution, high-throughput imaging with a multibeam scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, A L; Mikula, S; Schalek, R; Lichtman, J; Knothe Tate, M L; Zeidler, D

    2015-08-01

    Electron-electron interactions and detector bandwidth limit the maximal imaging speed of single-beam scanning electron microscopes. We use multiple electron beams in a single column and detect secondary electrons in parallel to increase the imaging speed by close to two orders of magnitude and demonstrate imaging for a variety of samples ranging from biological brain tissue to semiconductor wafers. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  14. Instrumental Developments for In-situ Breakdown Experiments inside a Scanning Electron Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Muranaka, T; Leifer, K; Ziemann, V

    2011-01-01

    Electrical discharges in accelerating structures are one of the key issues limiting the performance of future high energy accelerators such as the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Fundamental understanding of breakdown phenomena is an indispensable part of the CLIC feasibility study. The present work concerns the experimental study of breakdown using Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEMs). A SEM gives us the opportunity to achieve high electrical gradients of 1\\,kV/$\\mu$m which corresponds to 1\\,GV/m by exciting a probe needle with a high voltage power supply and controlling the positioning of the needle with a linear piezo motor. The gap between the needle tip and the surface is controlled with sub-micron precision. A second electron microscope equipped with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) is used to create surface corrugations and to sharpen the probe needle to a tip radius of about 50\\,nm. Moreover it is used to prepare cross sections of a voltage breakdown area in order to study the geometrical surface damages as w...

  15. Scanning electron microscope studies of anesthetized Tricula aperta, vector of mekong Schistosoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitikoon, V; Rivera, E R

    1982-12-01

    Nembutal, menthol, Ketaset, and Curarine were used to anesthetize beta race of Tricula aperta snails in preparation for study by scanning electron microscopy. The snails remained sensitive to the glutaraldehyde fixative in low level anesthesia of nembutal, menthol and Ketaset. Snails were also sensitive to Curarine and retracted into their shells. The best relaxations were obtained by initial anesthesia with nembutal or menthol followed by curarine. Snails relaxed by this procedure showed relatively little reaction to the fixative solution and remained extended outside their shells. The surface ultrastructure of the snails was well preserved, showing microvillate, secretory, and ciliated sensory cells. The mucoid secretions remained on the surface of cilia on the body and foot of the snails as spherical granules. There were two types of ciliated cells: (1) Those with few short cilia showing 1-3 microns above the microvilli of surrounding cells and (2) Those with numerous cilia up to 10 microns long. Results of transmission electron microscopic studies of these snails show no disruption of the ultrastructure of the surface cells.

  16. Polarized light and scanning electron microscopic investigation of enamel hypoplasia in primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Nina; Klingberg, Gunilla; Dietz, Wolfram; Nietzsche, Sandor; Norén, Jörgen G

    2010-01-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is a developmental disturbance during enamel formation, defined as a macroscopic defect in the enamel, with a reduction of the enamel thickness with rounded, smooth borders. Information on the microstructural level is still limited, therefore further studies are of importance to better understand the mechanisms behind enamel hypoplasia. To study enamel hypoplasia in primary teeth by means of polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Nineteen primary teeth with enamel hypoplasia were examined in a polarized light microscope and in a scanning electron microscope. The cervical and incisal borders of the enamel hypoplasia had a rounded appearance, as the prisms in the rounded cervical area of the hypoplasia were bent. The rounded borders had a normal surface structure whereas the base of the defects appeared rough and porous. Morphological findings in this study indicate that the aetiological factor has a short duration and affects only certain ameloblasts. The bottom of the enamel hypoplasia is porous and constitutes possible pathways for bacteria into the dentin.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy and micro-analyses; Microscopie electronique a balayage et microanalyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisset, F.; Repoux, L.; Ruste, J.; Grillon, F.; Robaut, F

    2008-07-01

    - insulating materials; 18b - metallation; 19 - biological samples - overview of preparation techniques; 20 - 3-D reconstruction of rough surfaces; 20a - 3-D imaging; 21 - SEM images: from numerical processing to quantitative analysis; 22 - STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy); 23 - in-situ mechanical tests; 24 - SEM and X-ray microanalysis maintenance and control; 25 - quality assurance and standardization; 26 - SEM share in experimental techniques; 27 - introduction to FIB; 28 - introduction to TEM (transmission electron microscopy); 29 - X-ray microanalysis on thin samples; 30 - introduction to cathodoluminescence; 31 - introduction to Raman spectroscopy. (J.S.)

  18. Investigating the use of in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguy, Amanda [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Engineering nanoparticles with desired shape-dependent properties is the key to many applications in nanotechnology. Although many synthetic procedures exist to produce anisotropic gold nanoparticles, the dynamics of growth are typically unknown or hypothetical. In the case of seed-mediated growth in the presence of DNA into anisotropic nanoparticles, it is not known exactly how DNA directs growth into specific morphologies. A series of preliminary experiments were carried out to contribute to the investigation of the possible mechanism of DNA-mediated growth of gold nanoprisms into gold nanostars using liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Imaging in the liquid phase was achieved through the use of a liquid cell platform and liquid cell holder that allow the sample to be contained within a “chip sandwich” between two electron transparent windows. Ex situ growth experiments were performed using Au-T30 NPrisms (30-base thymine oligonucleotide-coated gold nanoprisms) that are expected to grow into gold nanostars. Growth to form these nanostars were imaged using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and liquid cell STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy). An attempt to perform in situ growth experiments with the same Au-T30 nanoprisms revealed challenges in obtaining desired morphology results due to the environmental differences within the liquid cell compared to the ex situ environment. Different parameters in the experimental method were explored including fluid line set up, simultaneous and alternating reagent addition, and the effect of different liquid cell volumes to ensure adequate flow of reagents into the liquid cell. Lastly, the binding affinities were compared for T30 and A30 DNA incubated with gold nanoparticles using zeta potential measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was previously reported thymine bases have a lower binding affinity to gold surfaces than adenine

  19. Imaging systems in the Delft Multi-Beam Scanning Electron Microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this Ph.D. research is to develop imaging systems for the multiple beam scanning electron microscope (MBSEM) built in Delft University of Technology. This thesis includes two imaging systems, transmission electron (TE) imaging system, and secondary electron (SE) imaging system. The major

  20. Comparative study of electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy in photosynthetic research

    OpenAIRE

    MATĚNOVÁ, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the ability of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to visualize individual protein complexes. The principle of electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy is explained. For comparision of these methods well characterized photosynthetic complexes LH1, LH2, PSI and PSII were selected.

  1. Surface study of liquid 3He using surface state electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirahama, K.; Ito, S.; Suto, H.; Kono, K.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the mobility of surface state electrons (SSE) on liquid 3 He, μ 3 , aiming to study the elementary surface excitations of the Fermi liquid. A gradual increase of μ 3 below 300 mK is attributed to the scattering of electrons by ripplons. Ripplons do exist in 3 He down to 100 mK. We observe an abrupt decrease of μ 3 , due to the transition to the Wigner solid (WS). The dependences of the WS conductivity and mobility on temperature and magnetic field differ from the SSE behavior on liquid 4 He

  2. Examination of Scanning Electron Microscope and Computed Tomography Images of PICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Shklover, Valery

    2010-01-01

    Micrographs of PICA (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator) taken using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and 3D images taken with a Computed Tomography (CT) system are examined. PICA is a carbon fiber based composite (Fiberform ) with a phenolic polymer matrix. The micrographs are taken at different surface depths and at different magnifications in a sample after arc jet testing and show different levels of oxidative removal of the charred matrix (Figs 1 though 13). CT scans, courtesy of Xradia, Inc. of Concord CA, were captured for samples of virgin PICA, charred PICA and raw Fiberform (Fig. 14). We use these images to calculate the thermal conductivity (TC) of these materials using correlation function (CF) methods. CF methods give a mathematical description of how one material is embedded in another and is thus ideally suited for modeling composites like PICA. We will evaluate how the TC of the materials changes as a function of surface depth. This work is in collaboration with ETH-Zurich, which has expertise in high temperature materials and TC modeling (including CF methods).

  3. An enhanced method for registration of dental surfaces partially scanned by a 3D dental laser scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongjin; Kang, Ho Chul; Lee, Jeongjin; Shin, Juneseuk; Shin, Yeong Gil

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the fast and accurate registration method of partially scanned dental surfaces in a 3D dental laser scanning. To overcome the multiple point correspondence problems of conventional surface registration methods, we propose the novel depth map-based registration method to register 3D surface models. First, we convert a partially scanned 3D dental surface into a 2D image by generating the 2D depth map image of the surface model by applying a 3D rigid transformation into this model. Then, the image-based registration method using 2D depth map images accurately estimates the initial transformation between two consequently acquired surface models. To further increase the computational efficiency, we decompose the 3D rigid transformation into out-of-plane (i.e. x-, y-rotation, and z-translation) and in-plane (i.e. x-, y-translation, and z-rotation) transformations. For the in-plane transformation, we accelerate the transformation process by transforming the 2D depth map image instead of transforming the 3D surface model. For the more accurate registration of 3D surface models, we enhance iterative closest point (ICP) method for the subsequent fine registration. Our initial depth map-based registration well aligns each surface model. Therefore, our subsequent ICP method can accurately register two surface models since it is highly probable that the closest point pairs are the exact corresponding point pairs. The experimental results demonstrated that our method accurately registered partially scanned dental surfaces. Regarding the computational performance, our method delivered about 1.5 times faster registration than the conventional method. Our method can be successfully applied to the accurate reconstruction of 3D dental objects for orthodontic and prosthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: experimental observations and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, H; Su, D; Egerton, R F; Konno, M; Wu, L; Ciston, J; Wall, J; Zhu, Y

    2011-06-01

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Single atom image observation by means of scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoda, Tsutomu; Todokoro, Hideo; Nomura, Setsuo

    1977-01-01

    In a scanning transmission electron microscope, electrons emitted from the ion source are finely focused to a spot on a specimen, and scanned with the deflection coil. The electrons transmitted through the specimen are detected by the scintillate, and converted to image signals with the photomultiplier, and the image is obtained on the cathode ray tube. The Hitachi scanning transmission electron microscope employs a field emission type electron gun, thus it can focus the electron beam to 0.3 nm diameter. In the microscope, elastically scattered electrons are captured by a doughnut shaped detector, while the electrons transmitted through the specimen without colliding with atoms and the non-elastically scattered electrons which has lost a part of their energy due to the ionization or excitation of atoms are detected by the energy analyzer installed at the bottom of the microscope. Though single atom image observation requires the fixation of the atoms to be marked on a support, the problem is how to discriminate the aimed atoms from the atoms of the support. The most sensitive method is the dark-field method which uses the difference of elastically scattered electron intensity as the signal. Thorium and iodine atom images have been successfully observed as the trials to prove the feasibility of observation of heavy atoms with the scanning transmission electron microscope. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  7. 3D correlative light and electron microscopy of cultured cells using serial blockface scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Burden, Jemima J.; Nkwe, David O.; Pelchen-Matthews, Annegret; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Durgan, Joanne; Weston, Anne; Jones, Martin L.; Peddie, Christopher J.; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Florey, Oliver; Marsh, Mark; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The processes of life take place in multiple dimensions, but imaging these processes in even three dimensions is challenging. Here, we describe a workflow for 3D correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) of cell monolayers using fluorescence microscopy to identify and follow biological events, combined with serial blockface scanning electron microscopy to analyse the underlying ultrastructure. The workflow encompasses all steps from cell culture to sample processing, imaging strategy, and 3D image processing and analysis. We demonstrate successful application of the workflow to three studies, each aiming to better understand complex and dynamic biological processes, including bacterial and viral infections of cultured cells and formation of entotic cell-in-cell structures commonly observed in tumours. Our workflow revealed new insight into the replicative niche of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in primary human lymphatic endothelial cells, HIV-1 in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and the composition of the entotic vacuole. The broad application of this 3D CLEM technique will make it a useful addition to the correlative imaging toolbox for biomedical research. PMID:27445312

  8. Design of Pixellated CMOS Photon Detector for Secondary Electron Detection in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Huang Chuah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method of detecting secondary electrons generated in the scanning electron microscope (SEM. The method suggests that the photomultiplier tube (PMT, traditionally used in the Everhart-Thornley (ET detector, is to be replaced with a configurable multipixel solid-state photon detector offering the advantages of smaller dimension, lower supply voltage and power requirements, and potentially cheaper product cost. The design of the proposed detector has been implemented using a standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology with optical enhancement. This microchip comprises main circuit constituents of an array of photodiodes connecting to respective noise-optimised transimpedance amplifiers (TIAs, a selector-combiner (SC circuit, and a postamplifier (PA. The design possesses the capability of detecting photons with low input optical power in the range of 1 nW with 100 μm × 100 μm sized photodiodes and achieves a total amplification of 180 dBΩ at the output.

  9. Functional anatomy of the footpad vasculature of dogs: scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Hiroyoshi; Akiyama, Emi; Simazaki, Kanae; Oguri, Atsuko; Jitsumoto, Momoko; Fukuyama, Takaaki

    2011-12-01

    Dogs are well adapted to cold climates and they can stand, walk and run on snow and ice for long periods of time. In contrast to the body trunk, which has, dense fur, the paws are more exposed to the cold due to the lack of fur insulation. The extremities have a high surface area-to-volume ratio, so they lose heat very easily. We offer anatomical evidence for a heat-conserving structure associated with dog footpad vasculature. Methylmethacrylate vascular corrosion casts for scanning electron microscopy, Indian ink-injected whole-mount and histological specimens were each prepared, in a series of 16 limbs from four adult dogs. Vascular casts and Indian ink studies showed that abundant venules were arranged around the arteries supplying the pad surface and formed a vein-artery-vein triad, with the peri-arterial venous network intimately related to the arteries. In addition, numerous arteriovenous anastomoses and well-developed venous plexuses were found throughout the dermal vasculature. The triad forms a counter-current heat exchanger. When the footpad is exposed to a cold environment, the counter-current heat exchanger serves to prevent heat loss by recirculating heat back to the body core. Furthermore, the arteriovenous anastomoses shift blood flow, draining blood to the skin surface, and the venous plexuses retain warm blood in the pad surface. Hence, the appropriate temperature for the footpad can be maintained in cold environments. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology. © 2011 ESVD and ACVD.

  10. Scanning electron microscopic and X-ray micro analysis on tooth enamel exposed to alkaline agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubee, Fabian; Steiniger, Frank; Nietzsche, Sandor; Norén, Jörgen G

    2010-01-01

    The background of this study comprises two clinical cases, where patients exposed to aerosols of an alkaline and surface active cleaning agent developed loss of enamel substance on their teeth, further resulting in loss of teeth and partially destroyed soft tissues. The alkaline cleaning agent consisted of potassium hydroxide and various surfactants. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible changes in morphology and composition in human teeth enamel exposed to alkaline solutions, by means of X-ray micro analysis (XRMA), FTIR-spectroscopic analyses and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Extracted premolars, exposed to potassium hydroxide solutions and alkaline cleaning solution,were analyzed by means of XRMA and SEM. Enamel powder, exposed to cleaning solution, was analyzed by means of FTIR. The SEM analysis revealed an increased porosity of the enamel surface and partially loss of enamel substance after exposure to alkaline solutions. The XRMA analyses revealed a decrease in carbon concentration while phosphorous and calcium showed no marked changes. The FTIR analyses showed no significant changes in peak heights or peak positions for phosphate, carbonate or hydroxide. It was concluded that human teeth enamel exposed to alkaline solutions showed loss of organic substance, marked pores in enamel surface and loss of substance in the enamel surface.

  11. Morphology of the Lingual and Buccal Papillae in Alpaca (Vicugna pacos) - Light and Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goździewska-Harłajczuk, K; Klećkowska-Nawrot, J; Janeczek, M; Zawadzki, M

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was the description of the lingual and buccal papillae in adult alpaca (Vicugna pacos) by light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The tongue consisted of apex, body and root. Four types of lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform, conical and circumvallate) in addition to two types of buccal papillae were observed. The filiform papillae, some with secondary papillae, were distributed on both the corpus and apex of the tongue, with stratified epithelium, and layer of keratin coat were recognized. The short (small) cone papillae had pointed top, while bunoform papillae were wide with smooth apex. The much less numerous circumvallate papillae with pseudopapillae on the each rim of the caudal lingual body were present with weak layer of keratin and intra-epithelial taste buds. The small fungiform papillae were found on the dorsal lingual surface, while the large fungiform papillae were situated on the ventral surface of the tongue, especially, in rostral part and were round in shape with numerous gustatory pores and very thin keratin coat. Pseudopapillae were present on the buccal conical 'bunoform' papillae surface, while 'elongate' buccal papillae surface was rather softly folded with thin coat of keratin. Microridges were observed in the less keratinized parts of each type of papillae. The orientation of either lingual or buccal papillae into the throat side facilitates the emptying of oral cavity from nutrient and swallowing of food. In conclusion, the anatomical features of the alpaca tongue are an adaptation to the feeding habits. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy characterizations of fission track method datable zircon grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Rosana Silveira; Sáenz, Carlos Alberto Tello; Curvo, Eduardo Augusto Campos; Constantino, Carlos José Leopoldo; Aroca, Ricardo F; Nakasuga, Wagner Massayuki

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic and morphological studies, designed to improve our understanding of the physicochemical phenomena that occur during zircon crystallization, are presented. The zircon fission track method (ZFTM) is used routinely in various laboratories around the world; however, there are some methodological difficulties needing attention. Depending on the surface fission track density observed under an optical microscope, the zircon grain surfaces are classified as homogeneous, heterogeneous, hybrid, or anomalous. In this study, zircon grain surfaces are characterized using complementary techniques such as optical microscopy (OM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), both before and after chemical etching. Our results suggest that anomalous grains have subfamilies and that etching anisotropy related to heterogeneous grains is due to different crystallographic faces within the same polished surface that cannot be observed under an optical microscope. The improved methodology was used to determine the zircon fission track ages of samples collected from the Bauru Group located in the north of Paraná Basin, Brazil. A total of 514 zircon grains were analyzed, consisting of 10% homogeneous, about 10% heterogeneous, about 20% hybrid, and 60% anomalous grains. These results show that the age distributions obtained for homogeneous, heterogeneous, and hybrid grains are both statistically and geologically compatible.

  13. Effect of praziquantel on adult Echinococcus granulosus in vitro: scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conder, G A; Marchiondo, A A; Andersen, F L

    1981-01-01

    The effect of praziquantel in vitro at concentrations of 5, 50 and 500 ppm for 1 h resulted in the progressive breakdown of the tegument and in morphologic distortion of adult Echinococcus granulosus when compared to controls. Scanning electron microscopy of all specimens treated in the various concentrations of praziquantel showed loss of most, if not all of the rostellar hooks and changes in the structure of the suckers. Many of the tapeworms immediately detached from the host's gut upon being placed in the drug, and all treated cestodes exhibited contraction or swelling, particularly in the penultimate proglottid. Intense contraction was apparent in the worms exposed to the higher drug concentrations. Characteristic conical microtriches on the terminal proglottid, as observed in the control specimens, became fused and matted when exposed to 5 ppm of praziquantel. At a drug concentration of 50 ppm, the tegumental surface developed grooves or furrows between clumps of fused microtriches, while 500 ppm caused production of holes within the denuded tegument of the parasite. Ovoid bodies, presumed to be eggs, were observed on the outer surfaces and just below the tegument of tapeworms treated with concentrations of 50 ppm. These structures also appeared to adhere to the outer surfaces of specimens exposed to 500 ppm. In view of the foregoing, special care should be taken in handling and disposing of feces from infected or suspect dogs after praziquantel treatment, since the breakdown in the tegumental surface of E. granulosus presumably results in the release of potentially infective eggs.

  14. Bacterial biofilm on successful and failed orthodontic mini-implants--a scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Nayra Oliveira; Andrucioli, Marcela Cristina Damião; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Zanella, Eduardo Pereira; Consolaro, Alberto; Romano, Fábio Lourenço; Matsumoto, Mírian Aiko Nakane

    2015-12-01

    Mini-implants have been extensively used in Orthodontics as temporary bone anchorage devices. However, early failure of mini-implants due to mobility might occur and the colonization of their surfaces by pathogenic bacteria has been referred to as one of the contributing factors. In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to assess the presence of microorganisms adhered to the surface of mini-implants that failed due to loss of stability. Twelve self-drilling titanium mini-implants (1.6 mm diameter × 9.0 mm long) were collected from 12 patients undergoing orthodontic treatment-7 successful and 5 failed mini-implants. The mean time of permanence in the mouth was 15.8 and 2.4 months for successful and failed mini-implants, respectively. The devices were placed in the maxilla and/or mandible and removed by the same surgeon and were processed for SEM analysis of the presence of microorganisms on their surfaces (head, transmucosal profile, and body). Extensive bacterial colonization on mini-implant head and transmucosal profile was observed in all successful and failed mini-implants. None of the failed mini-implants exhibited bacteria on its body and only one mini-implant belonging to the successful (stable) group exhibited bacteria on its body. The results did not suggest a relationship between failure and presence of bacterial colonies on mini-implant surfaces. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY (ESEM OF Morinda citrifolia L. (Rubiaceae COLLETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergimar Kennedy de Paiva PINHEIRO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the colleters of Morinda citrifolia L. (Rubiaceae by using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Two different developmental stages were characterized as well as the chemical composition of secretion. Colleters are secretory structures that produce mucilage protecting the meristems and leaf primordia against desiccation and/or pathogens. Although these secretory structures are common on Rubiaceae, the results reported here is to the best of our knowledge the first record of colleters on Morinda genus. Colleters are present at the stipule adaxial surface, distributed in lines. These secretory structures are standard type and have no base constriction, differently from all studied species until now. In order to better understand the colleters structure and secretion, two phases were distinguished: a secretory phase and a senescence one. On secretory phase standard type colleters were visualized between leaf primordia and stipule, emerge on secretion. They present smooth surface, however was also possible to observe the contours of secretory cells anticlinal walls. In senescent phase colleters morphology was alternated exhibiting rough surface and blunt to point tips. The surface was rough and on stipule sections was possible to observe idioblasts with raphides bundles. The secretion process of M. citrifolia colleters occurs with the disruption of cuticle and the chemical elements are mostly dominated by carbon and oxygen.

  16. The effect of different chemical agents on human enamel: an atomic force and scanning electron microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominu, Roxana O.; Rominu, Mihai; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Pop, Daniela; Petrescu, Emanuela

    2010-12-01

    PURPOSE: The goal of our study was to investigate the changes in enamel surface roughess induced by the application of different chemical substances by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. METHOD: Five sound human first upper premolar teeth were chosen for the study. The buccal surface of each tooth was treated with a different chemical agent as follows: Sample 1 - 38% phosphoric acid etching (30s) , sample 2 - no surface treatment (control sample), 3 - bleaching with 37.5 % hydrogen peroxide (according to the manufacturer's instructions), 4 - conditioning with a self-etching primer (15 s), 5 - 9.6 % hydrofluoric acid etching (30s). All samples were investigated by atomic force microscopy in a non-contact mode and by scanning electron microscopy. Several images were obtained for each sample, showing evident differences regarding enamel surface morphology. The mean surface roughness and the mean square roughness were calculated and compared. RESULTS: All chemical substances led to an increased surface roughness. Phosphoric acid led to the highest roughness while the control sample showed the lowest. Hydrofluoric acid also led to an increase in surface roughness but its effects have yet to be investigated due to its potential toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: By treating the human enamel with the above mentioned chemical compounds a negative microretentive surface is obtained, with a morphology depending on the applied substance.

  17. A versatile atomic force microscope integrated with a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreith, J; Strunz, T; Fantner, E J; Fantner, G E; Cordill, M J

    2017-05-01

    A versatile atomic force microscope (AFM), which can be installed in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), is introduced. The flexible design of the instrument enables correlated analysis for different experimental configurations, such as AFM imaging directly after nanoindentation in vacuum. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the specially designed AFM installed inside a SEM, slip steps emanating around nanoindents in single crystalline brass were examined. This example showcases how the combination of AFM and SEM imaging can be utilized for quantitative dislocation analysis through the measurement of the slip step heights without the hindrance of oxide formation. Finally, an in situ nanoindentation technique is introduced, illustrating the use of AFM imaging during indentation experiments to examine plastic deformation occurring under the indenter tip. The mechanical indentation data are correlated to the SEM and AFM images to estimate the number of dislocations emitted to the surface.

  18. A morphological study of molecularly imprinted polymers using the scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paniagua Gonzalez, Gema [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: gpaniagua@pas.uned.es; Fernandez Hernando, Pilar [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), 28040 Madrid (Spain); Durand Alegria, J.S. [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-01-31

    Molecular imprinting is an emerging technique for producing polymers with applications in affinity-based separation, in biomimetic sensors, in catalysis, etc. This variety of uses relies upon the production of polymers with different affinities, specificities, sensitivities and loading capacities. Research into the development of molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) with new or improved morphologies - which involves modification of the polymerisation process - is therefore underway. This paper reports a comparative study of non-covalent MIPs synthesised by 'bulk' polymerisation using digoxin as template. These were synthesised under different conditions, i.e., changing the functional monomers employed (methacrylic acid or 2-vinylpyridine), the porogens (acetonitrile or dichloromethane) used, and by altering the volume of the latter. The polymerisation process was allowed to proceed either under UV light or in a thermostat-controlled waterbath. The surface morphology (was determined by scanning electron microscopy) and the ability of the different polymers to selectively rebind the template was then evaluated.

  19. A novel and compact nanoindentation device for in situ nanoindentation tests inside the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Huang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In situ nanomechanical tests provide a unique insight into mechanical behaviors of materials, such as fracture onset and crack propagation, shear band formation and so on. This paper presents a novel in situ nanoindentation device with dimensions of 103mm×74mm×60mm. Integrating the stepper motor, the piezoelectric actuator and the flexure hinge, the device can realize coarse adjustment of the specimen and precision loading and unloading of the indenter automatically. A novel indenter holder was designed to guarantee that the indenter penetrates into and withdraws from the specimen surface vertically. Closed-loop control of the indentation process was established to solve the problem of nonlinearity of the piezoelectric actuator and to enrich the loading modes. The in situ indentation test of Indium Phosphide (InP inside the scanning electron microscope (SEM was carried out and the experimental result indicates the feasibility of the developed device.

  20. Study of environmental biodegradation of LDPE films in soil using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, Tabassum; Khan, M R; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2010-07-01

    An outdoor soil burial test was carried out to evaluate the degradation of commercially available LDPE carrier bags in natural soil for up to 2 years. Biodegradability of low density polyethylene films in soil was monitored using both optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After 7-9 months of soil exposure, microbial colonization was evident on the film surface. Exposed LDPE samples exhibit progressive changes towards degradation after 17-22 months. SEM images reveal signs of degradation such as exfoliation and formation of cracks on film leading to disintegration. The possible degradation mode and consequences on the use and disposal of LDPE films is discussed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of mercury on the fish (Alburnus alburnus) chemoreceptor taste buds. A scanning electron microscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pevzner, R.A.; Hernadi, L.; Salanki, J.

    1986-01-01

    Taste buds (TBS) were investigated by scanning electron microscopy on various parts of the oral cavity of the bleak. (Alburnus alburnus) after differently long exposures to mercury (300 ..mu..g/1 Hg/sup + +/). This low concentration of mercury did not result in lethal effect on the bleak even after 19 days long exposure, but produced morphological changes on the TBs, which showed duration dependency. The first sign of the morphological alteration on the TBs was observed after three days long exposure, when the microridge system of the epithelial cells became damaged and the mucus secretion increased on the apical surfaces of the TBs. On the TBs exposed for 10 days swollen microvilliar tips of the sensory cells could be observed besides the damage of the epithelial microridge system. On the TBs exposed for 19 days degenerative changes were detected on the microvilliar system of both the supporting and receptor cells. By this time completely degenerated TBs were frequently observed.

  2. A morphological study of molecularly imprinted polymers using the scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paniagua Gonzalez, Gema; Fernandez Hernando, Pilar; Durand Alegria, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is an emerging technique for producing polymers with applications in affinity-based separation, in biomimetic sensors, in catalysis, etc. This variety of uses relies upon the production of polymers with different affinities, specificities, sensitivities and loading capacities. Research into the development of molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) with new or improved morphologies - which involves modification of the polymerisation process - is therefore underway. This paper reports a comparative study of non-covalent MIPs synthesised by 'bulk' polymerisation using digoxin as template. These were synthesised under different conditions, i.e., changing the functional monomers employed (methacrylic acid or 2-vinylpyridine), the porogens (acetonitrile or dichloromethane) used, and by altering the volume of the latter. The polymerisation process was allowed to proceed either under UV light or in a thermostat-controlled waterbath. The surface morphology (was determined by scanning electron microscopy) and the ability of the different polymers to selectively rebind the template was then evaluated

  3. Characterization of Emulsions of Fish Oil and Water by Cryo Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    Addition of fish oil to industrially prepared food products is attractive to the food industry because of the well-documented health effects of the omega 3 fatty acids in the fish oil [1]. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids including omega 3 fatty acids are highly susceptible to lipid oxidation due...... to the many double bonds. Emulsions of fish oil in water are potential candidates for a delivery system of fish oil to food products. It has been suggested that oxidation of oil-in-water emulsions is initiated at the interface between oil and water. It has also been proposed that oxidation is to some extent...... is to characterize fish oil in water emulsions with respect to oil droplet size, distribution, and ultimately to view the structure and thickness of the interface layer. A freeze-fractured surface viewed at low temperatures under the scanning electron microscope is a promising strategy to reveal variations...

  4. Examination of Graphene in a Scanning Low Energy Electron Microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Mikmeková, Eliška; Frank, Luděk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, S3 (2015), s. 29-30 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : graphene * LEEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  5. New Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy and Observation of Live Nature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém; Tihlaříková, Eva; Shiojiri, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, 1-2 (2013), s. 1-5 ISSN 2228-9038 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/1410; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ESEM * detection systems * methodology * live samples Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  6. Investigation on the traceability of three dimensional scanning electron microscope measurements based on the stereo-pair technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2005-01-01

    -dimensional topography of the type C roughness standards showed good agreement with the nominal profile wavelength values. An investigation was carried out concerning the traceability of dimensional measurements performed with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) using reconstruction of surface topography through......An investigation was carried out concerning the traceability of dimensional measurements performed with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) using reconstruction of surface topography through stereo-photogrammetry. A theoretical description of the effects that the main instrumental variables...... in the vertical plane using two ISO 5436 type C roughness standards. Results from magnification calibration and tilt angle measurement were used for calculating the theoretical uncertainty on the vertical elevation. Experimental deviations measured on gauge-block steps showed slightly bigger values than those...

  7. Mapping of valence energy losses via energy-filtered annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lin; Sigle, Wilfried; Koch, Christoph T; Nelayah, Jaysen; Srot, Vesna; van Aken, Peter A

    2009-08-01

    The advent of electron monochromators has opened new perspectives on electron energy-loss spectroscopy at low energy losses, including phenomena such as surface plasmon resonances or electron transitions from the valence to the conduction band. In this paper, we report first results making use of the combination of an energy filter and a post-filter annular dark-field detector. This instrumental design allows us to obtain energy-filtered (i.e. inelastic) annular dark-field images in scanning transmission electron microscopy of the 2-dimensional semiconductor band-gap distribution of a GaN/Al(45)Ga(55)N structure and of surface plasmon resonances of silver nanoprisms. In comparison to other approaches, the technique is less prone to inelastic delocalization and relativistic artefacts. The mixed contribution of elastic and inelastic contrast is discussed.

  8. Scanning-electron-microscope used in real-time study of friction and wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Small friction and wear apparatus built directly into scanning-electron-microscope provides both dynamic observation and microscopic view of wear process. Friction and wear tests conducted using this system have indicated that considerable information can readily be gained.

  9. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; van Es, Peter; Petersen, Wilhelmina; van Leeuwen, Ton; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  10. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, L.; van Es, P.; Petersen, W.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Terstappen, L. W. M. M.; Otto, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  11. [Bacterial localization in apical cementum at the epithelial insertion using scanning electron microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Núñez, J A; Herrera, I; Cerezo Lapiedra, R; Santa María, I

    1989-02-01

    Extracted teeth due to consequence of chronic periodontitis of adult are fractured and the apical cementum to junction epithelium is examined under S.E.M. (scanning electron microscopy) being found bacterias forms inside niches of the apical cementum.

  12. A Low Cost, Electronically Scanned Array (ESA) Antenna Technology for Aviation Hazard Detection and Avoidance Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will investigate the feasibility of utilizing ThinKom's low cost electronically scanned array (ESA) antenna concepts to enable affordable...

  13. Seasonal variation in an annually-banded coral Porites: A scanning electron microscopy investigation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.A.S.

    Seasonal bands of the hard coral @iPorites@@ sp. collected from three different islands of Lakshadweep (Northwest Indian Ocean) are examined under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM photographs reveal the presence of detrital inclusions...

  14. Using the scanning electron microscope on the production line to assure quality semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolphsen, J. W.; Anstead, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    The use of the scanning electron microscope to detect metallization defects introduced during batch processing of semiconductor devices is discussed. A method of determining metallization integrity was developed which culminates in a procurement specification using the scanning microscope on the production line as a quality control tool. Batch process control of the metallization operation is monitored early in the manufacturing cycle.

  15. An electron beam linear scanning mode for industrial limited-angle nano-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengxiang; Zeng, Li; Yu, Wei; Zhang, Lingli; Guo, Yumeng; Gong, Changcheng

    2018-01-01

    Nano-computed tomography (nano-CT), which utilizes X-rays to research the inner structure of some small objects and has been widely utilized in biomedical research, electronic technology, geology, material sciences, etc., is a high spatial resolution and non-destructive research technique. A traditional nano-CT scanning model with a very high mechanical precision and stability of object manipulator, which is difficult to reach when the scanned object is continuously rotated, is required for high resolution imaging. To reduce the scanning time and attain a stable and high resolution imaging in industrial non-destructive testing, we study an electron beam linear scanning mode of nano-CT system that can avoid mechanical vibration and object movement caused by the continuously rotated object. Furthermore, to further save the scanning time and study how small the scanning range could be considered with acceptable spatial resolution, an alternating iterative algorithm based on ℓ0 minimization is utilized to limited-angle nano-CT reconstruction problem with the electron beam linear scanning mode. The experimental results confirm the feasibility of the electron beam linear scanning mode of nano-CT system.

  16. Interstitial cells of Cajal and Auerbach's plexus. A scanning electron microscopical study of guinea-pig small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Harry; Thuneberg, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy......Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy...

  17. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Procedure for HE Powders on a Zeiss Sigma HD VP SEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    This method describes the characterization of inert and HE materials by the Zeiss Sigma HD VP field emission Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The SEM uses an accelerated electron beam to generate high-magnification images of explosives and other materials. It is fitted with five detectors (SE, Inlens, STEM, VPSE, HDBSD) to enable imaging of the sample via different secondary electron signatures, angles, and energies. In addition to imaging through electron detection, the microscope is also fitted with two Oxford Instrument Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) 80 mm detectors to generate elemental constituent spectra and two-dimensional maps of the material being scanned.

  18. Rapid three-dimensional analysis of renal biopsy sections by low vacuum scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaga, Sumire; Kato, Masako; Hirashima, Sayuri; Munemura, Chishio; Okada, Sinichi; Kameie, Toshio; Katsumoto, Tetsuo; Nakane, Hironobu; Tanaka, Keiichi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Naguro, Tomonori

    2010-01-01

    Renal biopsy paraffin sections were examined by low vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) in the backscattered electron (BSE) mode, a novel method for rapid pathological analysis which allowed detailed and efficient three-dimensional observations of glomeruli. Renal samples that had been already diagnosed by light microscopy (LM) as exhibiting IgA nephropathy, minor glomerular abnormalities, and membranous glomerulonephritis (GN) were rapidly processed in the present study. Unstained paraffin sections of biopsy samples on glass slides were deparaffinized, stained with platinum blue (Pt-blue) or periodic acid silver-methenamine (PAM), and directly observed with a LVSEM. Overviews of whole sections and detailed observations of individual glomeruli were immediately performed at arbitrary magnifications between ×50 to ×18,000. Cut surface views and surface views of glomeruli were demonstrated at the same time. On Pt-blue-stained sections, podocytes, endothelia, mesangium, and glomerular basement membranes (GBMs) could be distinguished due to the different yields of BSE signals, and pathological features were investigated in every sample. The abnormal surface appearances of podocytes with foot processes and the varying thicknesses of GBM were revealed three-dimensionally, features difficult to observe under LM and transmission electron microscopy. PAM-positive GBM alterations in membranous GN were distinctly visualized through overlying cells without cell removal under LVSEM at high magnification. Not only prominent spike formation but also slight protrusions were clearly revealed in the side views of GBM. Crater-like or hole-like structures were shown in the en face views of GBM. Accordingly, LVSEM is expected to provide a novel approach to the pathological diagnosis of human glomerular diseases using conventional renal biopsy sections.

  19. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope observes cells and tissues in open medium through silicon nitride film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Ogura, Toshihiko; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Mio, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Shinichi; Sato, Chikara

    2010-03-01

    Direct observation of subcellular structures and their characterization is essential for understanding their physiological functions. To observe them in open environment, we have developed an inverted scanning electron microscope with a detachable, open-culture dish, capable of 8 nm resolution, and combined with a fluorescence microscope quasi-simultaneously observing the same area from the top. For scanning electron microscopy from the bottom, a silicon nitride film window in the base of the dish maintains a vacuum between electron gun and open sample dish while allowing electrons to pass through. Electrons are backscattered from the sample and captured by a detector under the dish. Cells cultured on the open dish can be externally manipulated under optical microscopy, fixed, and observed using scanning electron microscopy. Once fine structures have been revealed by scanning electron microscopy, their component proteins may be identified by comparison with separately prepared fluorescence-labeled optical microscopic images of the candidate proteins, with their heavy-metal-labeled or stained ASEM images. Furthermore, cell nuclei in a tissue block stained with platinum-blue were successfully observed without thin-sectioning, which suggests the applicability of this inverted scanning electron microscope to cancer diagnosis. This microscope visualizes mesoscopic-scale structures, and is also applicable to non-bioscience fields including polymer chemistry. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Large area fabrication of plasmonic nanoparticle grating structure by conventional scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudheer,; Tiwari, P.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Mukharjee, C.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticle grating (PNG) structure of different periods has been fabricated by electron beam lithography using silver halide based transmission electron microscope film as a substrate. Conventional scanning electron microscope is used as a fabrication tool for electron beam lithography. Optical microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) have been used for its morphological and elemental characterization. Optical characterization is performed by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopic technique

  1. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy study of chromium on a Cr(001) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagoute, J; Kawahara, S L; Chacon, C; Repain, V; Girard, Y; Rousset, S

    2011-02-02

    Several tens of chromium layers were deposited at 250 °C on a Cr(001) surface and investigated by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Chromium is found to grow with a mound-like morphology resulting from the stacking of several monolayers which do not uniformly cover the whole surface of the substrate. The terminal plane consists of an irregular array of Cr islands with lateral sizes smaller than 20 × 20 nm(2). Combined AES and STS measurements reveal the presence of a significant amount of segregants prior to and after deposition. A detailed investigation of the surface shows that it consists of two types of patches. Thanks to STS measurements, the two types of area have been identified as being either chromium pure or segregant rich. SP-STM experiments have evidenced that the antiferromagnetic layer coupling remains in the chromium mounds after deposition and is not significantly affected by the presence of the segregants.

  2. Differential scanning calorimetry and surface morphology studies on coated pellets using aqueous dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar-ur-Rahman; K H, Yuen; Jia Woei, Wong; Khan, Nurzalina A k

    2005-04-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the physicochemical changes during passage of drug through polymeric membranes and observe the surface morphology features of the coated pellets using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Drug solution was first sprayed around inert pellets to form drug-layered pellets that were coated with two commercial aqueous dispersions namely, Eudragit NE30 and Kollicoat SR30 using bottom-spray fluidized bed technique. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) confirmed that no interactions existed between drug and polymers. Small peak of drug was observed in the DSC thermograms of Eudragit NE30 coated pellets indicating that small amount of drug was still present in the polymeric membrane after dissolution. Views of SEM revealed as the coating levels of two types of aqueous dispersions were increased the surface of the pellets become more uniform and compact. Therefore, the diffusion length for dissolution medium to enter the drug layer and dissolved drug to diffuse out would be increased at higher coating levels. The polymer surface of coated pellets after 12 hours dissolution testing seemed to be shrunk and size of the pellets were also reduced indicating the depletion of reservoir layer.

  3. Rough surface mitigates electron and gas emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy-ion beams impinging on surfaces near grazing incidence (to simulate the loss of halo ions) generate copious amounts of electrons and gas that can degrade the beam. We measured emission coefficients of η e (le) 130 and η 0 ∼ 10 4 respectively, with 1 MeV K + incident on stainless steel. Electron emission scales as η e ∝ 1/cos(θ), where θ is the ion angle of incidence relative to normal. If we were to roughen a surface by blasting it with glass beads, then ions that were near grazing incidence (90 o ) on smooth surface would strike the rims of the micro-craters at angles closer to normal incidence. This should reduce the electron emission: the factor of 10 reduction, Fig. 1(a), implies an average angle of incidence of 62 o . Gas desorption varies more slowly with θ (Fig. 1(b)) decreasing a factor of ∼2, and along with the electron emission is independent of the angle of incidence on a rough surface. In a quadrupole magnet, electrons emitted by lost primary ions are trapped near the wall by the magnetic field, but grazing incidence ions can backscatter and strike the wall a second time at an azimuth where magnetic field lines intercept the beam. Then, electrons can exist throughout the beam (see the simulations of Cohen, HIF News 1-2/04). The SRIM (TRIM) Monte Carlo code predicts that 60-70% of 1 MeV K + ions backscatter when incident at 88-89 o from normal on a smooth surface. The scattered ions are mostly within ∼10 o of the initial direction but a few scatter by up to 90 o . Ion scattering decreases rapidly away from grazing incidence, Fig. 1(c ). At 62 deg. the predicted ion backscattering (from a rough surface) is 3%, down a factor of 20 from the peak, which should significantly reduce electrons in the beam from lost halo ions. These results are published in Phys. Rev. ST - Accelerators and Beams

  4. Impulse excitation scanning acoustic microscopy for local quantification of Rayleigh surface wave velocity using B-scan analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M; Dierken, J; Boehnlein, T; Pilchak, A; Sathish, S; Grandhi, R

    2018-01-01

    A new technique for performing quantitative scanning acoustic microscopy imaging of Rayleigh surface wave (RSW) velocity was developed based on b-scan processing. In this technique, the focused acoustic beam is moved through many defocus distances over the sample and excited with an impulse excitation, and advanced algorithms based on frequency filtering and the Hilbert transform are used to post-process the b-scans to estimate the Rayleigh surface wave velocity. The new method was used to estimate the RSW velocity on an optically flat E6 glass sample, and the velocity was measured at ±2 m/s and the scanning time per point was on the order of 1.0 s, which are both improvement from the previous two-point defocus method. The new method was also applied to the analysis of two titanium samples, and the velocity was estimated with very low standard deviation in certain large grains on the sample. A new behavior was observed with the b-scan analysis technique where the amplitude of the surface wave decayed dramatically on certain crystallographic orientations. The new technique was also compared with previous results, and the new technique has been found to be much more reliable and to have higher contrast than previously possible with impulse excitation.

  5. Impulse excitation scanning acoustic microscopy for local quantification of Rayleigh surface wave velocity using B-scan analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M.; Dierken, J.; Boehnlein, T.; Pilchak, A.; Sathish, S.; Grandhi, R.

    2018-01-01

    A new technique for performing quantitative scanning acoustic microscopy imaging of Rayleigh surface wave (RSW) velocity was developed based on b-scan processing. In this technique, the focused acoustic beam is moved through many defocus distances over the sample and excited with an impulse excitation, and advanced algorithms based on frequency filtering and the Hilbert transform are used to post-process the b-scans to estimate the Rayleigh surface wave velocity. The new method was used to estimate the RSW velocity on an optically flat E6 glass sample, and the velocity was measured at ±2 m/s and the scanning time per point was on the order of 1.0 s, which are both improvement from the previous two-point defocus method. The new method was also applied to the analysis of two titanium samples, and the velocity was estimated with very low standard deviation in certain large grains on the sample. A new behavior was observed with the b-scan analysis technique where the amplitude of the surface wave decayed dramatically on certain crystallographic orientations. The new technique was also compared with previous results, and the new technique has been found to be much more reliable and to have higher contrast than previously possible with impulse excitation.

  6. In situ manipulation and characterizations using nanomanipulators inside a field emission-scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keun Soo; Lim, Seong Chu; Lee, Im Bok; An, Key Heyok; Bae, Dong Jae; Choi, Shinje; Yoo, Jae-Eun; Lee, Young Hee

    2003-01-01

    We have used two piezoelectric nanomanipulators to manage the multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) within the field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). For an easy access of a tungsten tip to MWCNTs, we prepared the tungsten tip in sharp and long tip geometry using different electrochemical etching parameters. In addition, the sample stage was tilted by 45 deg. from the normal direction of the surface to allow a better incident angle to the approaching tungsten tip. For manipulations, a nanotube or the bundles were attached at the tungsten tip using an electron beam-induced deposition (EBID). Using two manipulators, we have then fabricated a CNT-based transistor, a cross-junction of MWCNTs, and a CNT-attached atomic force microscopy tip. After these fabrications, the field emission properties of the MWCNT and junction properties of the MWCNT and the tungsten tip have been investigated. We found that the EBID approach was very useful to weld the nanostructured materials on the tungsten tip by simply irradiating the electron beam, although this sometimes increased the contact resistance by depositing hydrocarbon materials

  7. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    OpenAIRE

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called ?big-data? methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient ima...

  8. Traceability of Dimensional Measurements using the Scanning Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Bariani, Paolo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2004-01-01

    its unique combination of three imaging properties: • Lateral ultimate resolution down to 2 nm • Large range of possible magnification levels ranging from a few hundred times to hundred thousand times magnification • Large depth of field Topography reconstruction with this instrument and photogra...... investigation is presented that addresses the performance of 3D topography calculation based on secondary electron imaging and the stereo-pair technique....

  9. Photoemission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum’s magnetosome chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keutner, Christoph [Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmung (Germany); von Bohlen, Alex [Leibniz-Institut fur Analytische Wissenschaften, Dortmund (Germany); Berges, Ulf [Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmung (Germany); Espeter, Philipp [Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmung (Germany); Schneider, Claus M. [Peter Grunberg Institut, Julich (Germany); Westphal, Carsten [Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmung (Germany)

    2014-10-07

    Magnetotactic bacteria are of great interdisciplinary interest, since a vast field of applications from magnetic recording media to medical nanorobots is conceivable. A key feature for a further understanding is the detailed knowledge about the magnetosome chain within the bacteria. We report on two preparation procedures suitable for UHV experiments in reflective geometry. Further, we present the results of scanning electron microscopy, as well as the first photoemission electron microscopy experiments, both accessing the magnetosomes within intact magnetotactic bacteria and compare these to scanning electron microscopy data from the literature. From the images, we can clearly identify individual magnetosomes within their chains.

  10. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses work done to assess the design of a focusing column in a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for use in-situ on the Moon-in particular for mineralogical analysis. The MSFC beam column design uses purely electrostatic fields for focusing, because of the severe constraints on mass and electrical power consumption imposed by the goals of lunar exploration and of spaceflight in general. The resolution of an SEM ultimately depends on the size of the focused spot of the scanning beam probe, for which the stated goal here is a diameter of 10 nanometers. Optical aberrations are the main challenge to this performance goal, because they blur the ideal geometrical optical image of the electron source, effectively widening the ideal spot size of the beam probe. In the present work the optical aberrations of the mini SEM focusing column were assessed using direct tracing of non-paraxial rays, as opposed to mathematical estimates of aberrations based on paraxial ray-traces. The geometrical ray-tracing employed here is completely analogous to ray-tracing as conventionally understood in the realm of photon optics, with the major difference being that in electron optics the lens is simply a smoothly varying electric field in vacuum, formed by precisely machined electrodes. Ray-tracing in this context, therefore, relies upon a model of the electrostatic field inside the focusing column to provide the mathematical description of the "lens" being traced. This work relied fundamentally on the boundary element method (BEM) for this electric field model. In carrying out this research the authors discovered that higher accuracy in the field model was essential if aberrations were to be reliably assessed using direct ray-tracing. This led to some work in testing alternative techniques for modeling the electrostatic field. Ultimately, the necessary accuracy was attained using a BEM

  11. Circular mode: a new scanning probe microscopy method for investigating surface properties at constant and continuous scanning velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrallah, Hussein; Mazeran, Pierre-Emmanuel; Noël, Olivier

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel scanning probe microscopy mode, called the circular mode, which offers expanded capabilities for surface investigations especially for measuring physical properties that require high scanning velocities and/or continuous displacement with no rest periods. To achieve these specific conditions, we have implemented a circular horizontal displacement of the probe relative to the sample plane. Thus the relative probe displacement follows a circular path rather than the conventional back and forth linear one. The circular mode offers advantages such as high and constant scanning velocities, the possibility to be combined with other classical operating modes, and a simpler calibration method of the actuators generating the relative displacement. As application examples of this mode, we report its ability to (1) investigate the influence of scanning velocity on adhesion forces, (2) measure easily and instantly the friction coefficient, and (3) generate wear tracks very rapidly for tribological investigations. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  12. Contact lens surface by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jung Hyuck; Lee, Suk Ju; Hwang, Kwang Ha; Jeon Jin

    2011-01-01

    Contact lens materials needs good biocompatibility, high refractive index, high optical transparency, high water content etc. Surface treat method by using plasma and radiation can modify the physical and/or chemical properties of the contact lens surface. Radiation technology such as electron beam irradiation can apply to polymerization reaction and enhance the functionality of the polymer.The purpose of this study is to modify of contact lens surface by using Eb irradiation technology. Electron beam was irradiated to the contact lens surface which was synthesized thermal polymerization method and commercial contact lens to modify physical and chemical properties. Ft-IR, XP, UV-vis spectrophotometer, water content, oxygen trans-metastability were used to characterize the surface state, physicochemical, and optical property of the contact lens treated with Eb. The water content and oxygen transmissibility of the contact lens treated with Eb were increased due to increase in the hydrophilic group such as O-C=O and OH group on the contact lens surface which could be produced by possible reaction between carbon and oxygen during the Eb irradiation. All of the lenses showed the high optical transmittance above 90%. In this case of B/Es, TES, Ti contact lens, the optical transmittance decreased about 5% with increasing Eb dose in the wavelength of UV-B region. The contact lens modified by Eb irradiation could improve the physical properties of the contact lens such as water content and oxygen transmissibility

  13. A scanning electron microscopic study of biliary stent materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkel, A. M.; van Marle, J.; van Veen, H.; Groen, A. K.; Huibregtse, K.

    2000-01-01

    Clogging of biliary stents remains an important problem. In vitro studies have shown less sludge formation in Teflon stents. Recently, clinical studies with Teflon stents have produced contradictory results. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the surface properties of the

  14. Epithelial maturation pattern of dysplastic epithelium and normal oral epithelium exposed to tobacco and alcohol: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Nithya; Ramani, Pratibha; Premkumar, Priya; Natesan, Anuja; Sherlin, Herald J

    2013-05-01

    The detection of oral cancer at an early stage is an optimal strategy and is the most effective approach for preventing further progression. The rationale of the study was to evaluate the epithelial maturation pattern in oral mucosa exposed to tobacco/alcohol and on dysplastic oral mucosa using the scanning electron microscope. Fifteen subjects were selected based on clinical examination and divided into three groups: group 1-patients with apparently normal oral mucosa; group 2-patients with oral mucosa exposed to tobacco/alcohol; group 3-patients with clinical diagnosis of leukoplakia. An incisional biopsy was performed from the buccal mucosa. One part of the specimen was prepared for light microscopy and the other part was prepared for scanning electron microscopy. Light microscopy revealed nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium in group 1, while group 2 demonstrated hyperparakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium with mild cytological atypia, and group 3 showed architectural and cytological changes. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated flat-surfaced cells with equidistant parallel microridges in group 1, while group 2 showed irregular and widened microridges with numerous pits and absence of honeycomb pattern. Group 3 showed irregularly arranged broad and swollen cells with numerous pits and irregular microvilli projecting over the surface. The present study establishes the relationship of the surface abnormalities to the tendency of the cells to become malignant and thus serves as a tool in early detection of squamous cell carcinoma. It also emphasizes the need of routine follow-up in these high-risk patients for progression of carcinoma.

  15. Comprehensive Characterization of Extended Defects in Semiconductor Materials by a Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieckmann, Ellen; Nacke, Markus; Allardt, Matthias; Bodrov, Yury; Chekhonin, Paul; Skrotzki, Werner; Weber, Jörg

    2016-05-28

    Extended defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries have a strong influence on the performance of microelectronic devices and on other applications of semiconductor materials. However, it is still under debate how the defect structure determines the band structure, and therefore, the recombination behavior of electron-hole pairs responsible for the optical and electrical properties of the extended defects. The present paper is a survey of procedures for the spatially resolved investigation of structural and of physical properties of extended defects in semiconductor materials with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Representative examples are given for crystalline silicon. The luminescence behavior of extended defects can be investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. They are particularly valuable because spectrally and spatially resolved information can be obtained simultaneously. For silicon, with an indirect electronic band structure, CL measurements should be carried out at low temperatures down to 5 K due to the low fraction of radiative recombination processes in comparison to non-radiative transitions at room temperature. For the study of the electrical properties of extended defects, the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique can be applied. The EBIC image reflects the local distribution of defects due to the increased charge-carrier recombination in their vicinity. The procedure for EBIC investigations is described for measurements at room temperature and at low temperatures. Internal strain fields arising from extended defects can be determined quantitatively by cross-correlation electron backscatter diffraction (ccEBSD). This method is challenging because of the necessary preparation of the sample surface and because of the quality of the diffraction patterns which are recorded during the mapping of the sample. The spatial resolution of the three experimental techniques is compared.

  16. Design for an aberration corrected scanning electron microscope using miniature electron mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohi, Hideto; Kruit, Pieter

    2018-03-07

    Resolution of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) is determined by aberrations of the objective lens. It is well known that both spherical and chromatic aberrations can be compensated by placing a 90-degree bending magnet and an electron mirror in the beam path before the objective lens. Nevertheless, this approach has not led to wide use of these aberration correctors, partly because aberrations of the bending magnet can be a serious problem. A mirror corrector with two mirrors placed perpendicularly to the optic axis of an SEM and facing each other is proposed. As a result, only small-angle magnetic deflection is necessary to guide the electron beam around the top mirror to the bottom mirror and around the bottom mirror to the objective lens. The deflection angle, in the order of 50 mrad, is sufficiently small to avoid deflection aberrations. In addition, lateral dispersion at the sample plane can be avoided by making the deflection fields symmetric. Such a corrector system is only possible if the incoming beam can pass the top mirror at a distance in the order of millimeters, without being disturbed by the electric fields of electrodes of the mirror. It is proposed that condition can be satisfied with micro-scale electron optical elements fabricated by using MEMS technology. In the proposed corrector system, the micro-mirrors have to provide the exact negative spherical and chromatic aberrations for correcting the aberration of the objective lens. This exact tuning is accomplished by variable magnification between the micro-mirrors and the objective lens using an additional transfer lens. Extensive optical calculations are reported. Aberrations of the micro-mirrors were analyzed by numerical calculation. Dispersion and aberrations of the deflectors were calculated by using an analytical field model. Combination aberrations caused by the off-axis position of dispersive rays in the mirrors and objective lens were also analyzed. It is concluded that the proposed

  17. Electronically controllable spoof localized surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong Jin; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Liu; Xun Xiao, Qian

    2017-10-01

    Electronically controllable multipolar spoof localized surface plasmons (LSPs) are experimentally demonstrated in the microwave frequencies. It has been shown that half integer order LSPs modes exist on the corrugated ring loaded with a slit, which actually arise from the Fabry-Perot-like resonances. By mounting active components across the slit in the corrugated rings, electronic switchability and tunability of spoof LSPs modes have been accomplished. Both simulated and measured results demonstrate efficient dynamic control of the spoof LSPs. These elements may form the basis of highly integrated programmable plasmonic circuits in microwave and terahertz regimes.

  18. Efficiency of three different polishing methods on enamel and cementum: A scanning electron microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Zoya; Mohan, Ranjana

    2018-01-01

    Tooth polishing is an integral part of clinical dentistry. The main purpose of polishing is to smoothen the surface of the tooth and minimize the deposition of plaque to allow a healthy periodontal maintenance postscaling. Today, polishing by different methods is available to a clinician. Traditional bristle brush and rubber-cup polishing are being widely practiced and gradually getting replaced by novel air polisher. Pros and cons of each method should be weighed before its clinical applications. To evaluate and compare the efficiency of three different polishing systems on enamel as well as on cementum surfaces by scanning electron microscope (SEM). A total of 120 samples were divided into three groups randomly - Group 1 (bristle brush), Group 2 (rubber cup), and Group 3 (air polisher) - with 20 samples each of enamel and cementum, which were subdivided into 10 control and 10 test group (subjected to polishing). The samples were analyzed by SEM at ×1000 magnification, and the data obtained were compiled and subjected to statistical analysis. Polishing with bristle brush demonstrated less surface roughness and debris when compared to air polisher at P = 0.58, P = 0.03 for enamel surface and P = 0.003, P = 0.21 for cementum, respectively. The surface roughness was reduced considerably by rubber cup at P = 0.03 for enamel and P = 0.003 for cementum, compared to air polisher at P = 0.99 and P = 0.21 for enamel and cementum, respectively. The results indicate that polishing with rubber cup was more effective and statistically significant when compared to bristle brush polishing and air polisher for the crown and root surface smoothening and debris removal.

  19. Evaluation of Human Corneal Lenticule Quality After SMILE With Different Cap Thicknesses Using Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Shengbei; Liu, Manli; Yang, Xiaonan; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Yugui; Lin, Haiqin; Liu, Quan

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the surface characteristics of lenticules created by small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) with different cap thicknesses. This prospective study included 20 consecutive patients who underwent bilateral SMILE. Surface regularity of the extracted corneal lenticule was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with 2 methods: qualitative and quantitative regularity. Qualitative regularity of SEM images was graded by masked observers using an established scoring system. Quantitative regularity of SEM images was assessed by counting the total number and areas of tissue bridges using Image-Pro Plus software. Four different cap thickness of 120, 130, 140, and 150 μm were compared. Refractive outcomes of patients were measured at baseline and 1 month after surgery. As 10 specimens were not analyzable, only 30 eyes were included. Postoperatively, all eyes had postoperative uncorrected distance visual acuity of 20/20 or better; 43% had an unchanged corrected distance visual acuity; 43% gained 1 line; 10% lost 1 line. Ultrastructurally, surface irregularity was primarily caused by tissue bridges. The average surface regularity score obtained was 10.87 ± 2.40 for 120 μm, 10.78 ± 2.60 for 130 μm, 8.76 ± 2.16 for 140 μm, and 8.70 ± 2.66 for 150 μm (P < 0.001). The total number and areas of tissue bridges of 120 to 130 μm were significantly less than 140 to 150 μm (P < 0.05). Surface regularity decreased as cap thickness increased (P < 0.05). There is smoother appearance of the lenticular surface as seen through SEM when a thin cap is created compared with a thick cap qualitatively and quantitatively.

  20. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, S; Chi, M; Belianinov, A; Beekman, C; Kalinin, S V; Borisevich, A Y; Lupini, A R

    2016-05-23

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called "big-data" methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  1. Enamel deproteinization before acid etching--a scanning electron microscopic observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Bhoomika; Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Baliga, Sudhindra; Munshi, A K

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the topographical features of enamel surface deproteinized with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and etched with phosphoric acid (H3PO4) compared to phosphoric acid alone using Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) Analysis. 30 enamel blocks of 1 mm2 from ten human sound extracted permanent molars were obtained and treated as under: Group 1 (10 blocks): Enamel surface was etched with 37% H3PO4 gel for 15 seconds. Group 2 (10 blocks): Enamel surface was treated with 5.25% NaOCl for 60 seconds and then etched with 37% H3PO4 gel for 15 seconds. 10 enamel blocks were included in the control group where no treatment was carried out. The samples were subjected to SEM analysis and 5 microphotographs of each sample were obtained at 500X magnification and evaluated for the quality of etching pattern of the enamel in percentage (%) using Auto-CAD 2007 software. Mean values of etching pattern in Group 1 being 55.76% and Group 2 being 53.58%. No significant difference was observed between the two groups. The use of 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds still remains the best method for pretreatment of enamel.

  2. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA. Al-Salihi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (acrylic appliance were worn by five participants for three days without any disturbance. The formed plaques were assessed using CLSM combined with vital fluorescence technique and SEM.Results: In this study accumulated dental plaque revealed varied plaque microflora vitality and thickness according to participant’s oral hygiene. The thickness of plaque smears ranged from 40.32 to 140.72 μm and 65.00 to 128.88 μm for live (vital and dead accumulated microorganisms, respectively. Meanwhile, the thickness of plaque on the appliance ranged from 101 μm to 653 μm. CLSM revealed both dead and vital bacteria on the surface of the dental plaque. In addition, SEM revealed layers of various bacterial aggregations in all dental plaques.Conclusion: This study offers a potent non-invasive tool to evaluate and assess the dental plaque biofilm, which is a very important factor in the development of dental caries.

  3. Defects in oxide surfaces studied by atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas König

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfaces of thin oxide films were investigated by means of a dual mode NC-AFM/STM. Apart from imaging the surface termination by NC-AFM with atomic resolution, point defects in magnesium oxide on Ag(001 and line defects in aluminum oxide on NiAl(110, respectively, were thoroughly studied. The contact potential was determined by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM and the electronic structure by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS. On magnesium oxide, different color centers, i.e., F0, F+, F2+ and divacancies, have different effects on the contact potential. These differences enabled classification and unambiguous differentiation by KPFM. True atomic resolution shows the topography at line defects in aluminum oxide. At these domain boundaries, STS and KPFM verify F2+-like centers, which have been predicted by density functional theory calculations. Thus, by determining the contact potential and the electronic structure with a spatial resolution in the nanometer range, NC-AFM and STM can be successfully applied on thin oxide films beyond imaging the topography of the surface atoms.

  4. Topographic and electronic contrast of the graphene moir´e on Ir(111) probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.; Hämäläinen, K.; Sainio, K.; Lahtinen, J.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.A.M.; Liljeroth, P.

    2011-01-01

    Epitaxial graphene grown on transition-metal surfaces typically exhibits a moir´e pattern due to the lattice mismatch between graphene and the underlying metal surface. We use both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the electronic and topographic contrast

  5. Thin-film thickness measurement using x-ray peak ratioing in the scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, N.E.; Anderson, W.E.; Archuleta, T.A.; Stupin, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    The procedure used to measure laser target film thickness using a scanning electron microscope is summarized. This method is generally applicable to any coating on any substrate as long as the electron energy is sufficient to penetrate the coating and the substrate produces an x-ray signal which can pass back through the coating and be detected

  6. Morphology and ultrastructure of Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii) spermatozoa using scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pšenička, M.; Hadi Alavi, S.M.; Rodina, M.; Gela, D.; Nebesářová, Jana; Linhart, O.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 2 (2007), s. 103-115 ISSN 0248-4900 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/06/0817 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : acrosome * flagellum * scanning electron microscopy * Siberian sturgeon * Acipenser baerii * spermatozoon , * transmission electron microscopy Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.752, year: 2007

  7. Wave Optical Calculation of Probe Size in Low Energy Scanning Electron Microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Radlička, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, S4 (2015), s. 212-217 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : scanning electron microscope * optical calculation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  8. Revealing the 1 nm/s Extensibility of Nanoscale Amorphous Carbon in a Scanning Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    In an ultra-high vacuum scanning electron microscope, the edged branches of amorphous carbon film (∼10 nm thickness) can be continuously extended with an eye-identifying speed (on the order of ∼1 nm/s) under electron beam. Such unusual mobility of amorphous carbon may be associated with deformation...

  9. Use of scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis to determine chloride content of concrete and raw materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Standard sample sets of cement and mortar formulations with known levels of Cl as well as concrete samples subject to Cl diffusion were all prepared for and analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron microprobe (EPMA). Using x-ray ...

  10. Electron transfer in gas surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunnik, J.N.M. van.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis electron transfer between atoms and metal surfaces in general is discussed and the negative ionization of hydrogen by scattering protons at a cesiated crystalline tungsten (110) surface in particular. Experimental results and a novel theoretical analysis are presented. In Chapter I a theoretical overview of resonant electron transitions between atoms and metals is given. In the first part of chapter II atom-metal electron transitions at a fixed atom-metal distance are described on the basis of a model developed by Gadzuk. In the second part the influence of the motion of the atom on the atomic charge state is incorporated. Measurements presented in chapter III show a strong dependence of the fraction of negatively charged H atoms scattered at cesiated tungsten, on the normal as well as the parallel velocity component. In chapter IV the proposed mechanism for the parallel velocity effect is incorporated in the amplitude method. The scattering process of protons incident under grazing angles on a cesium covered surface is studied in chapter V. (Auth.)

  11. Scanning Electron Microscopic study of Piper betle L. leaves extract effect against Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubaidah Haji Abdul Rahim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have shown that Piper betle L. leaves extract inhibits the adherence of Streptococcus mutans to glass surface, suggesting its potential role in controlling dental plaque development. OBJECTIVES: In this study, the effect of the Piper betle L. extract towards S. mutans (with/without sucrose using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and on partially purifed cell-associated glucosyltransferase activity were determined. MATERIAL AND METHODS: S. mutans were allowed to adhere to glass beads suspended in 6 different Brain Heart Infusion broths [without sucrose; with sucrose; without sucrose containing the extract (2 mg mL-1 and 4 mg mL-1; with sucrose containing the extract (2 mg mL-1 and 4 mg mL-1]. Positive control was 0.12% chlorhexidine. The glass beads were later processed for SEM viewing. Cell surface area and appearance and, cell population of S. mutans adhering to the glass beads were determined upon viewing using the SEM. The glucosyltransferase activity (with/without extract was also determined. One- and two-way ANOVA were used accordingly. RESULTS: It was found that sucrose increased adherence and cell surface area of S. mutans (p<0.001. S. mutans adhering to 100 µm² glass surfaces (with/without sucrose exhibited reduced cell surface area, fuffy extracellular appearance and cell population in the presence of the Piper betle L. leaves extract. It was also found that the extract inhibited glucosyltransferase activity and its inhibition at 2.5 mg mL-1 corresponded to that of 0.12% chlorhexidine. At 4 mg mL-1 of the extract, the glucosyltransferase activity was undetectable and despite that, bacterial cells still demonstrated adherence capacity. CONCLUSION: The SEM analysis confrmed the inhibitory effects of the Piper betle L. leaves extract towards cell adherence, cell growth and extracellular polysaccharide formation of S. mutans visually. In bacterial cell adherence, other factors besides glucosyltransferase are

  12. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agudo Jácome, L.; Eggeler, G.; Dlouhý, A.

    2012-01-01

    Stereo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides a 3D impression of the microstructure in a thin TEM foil. It allows to perform depth and TEM foil thickness measurements and to decide whether a microstructural feature lies inside of a thin foil or on its surface. It allows appreciating the true three-dimensional nature of dislocation configurations. In the present study we first review some basic elements of classical stereo TEM. We then show how the method can be extended by working in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode of a modern analytical 200 kV TEM equipped with a field emission gun (FEG TEM) and a high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector. We combine two micrographs of a stereo pair into one anaglyph. When viewed with special colored glasses the anaglyph provides a direct and realistic 3D impression of the microstructure. Three examples are provided which demonstrate the potential of this extended stereo TEM technique: a single crystal Ni-base superalloy, a 9% Chromium tempered martensite ferritic steel and a NiTi shape memory alloy. We consider the effect of camera length, show how foil thicknesses can be measured, and discuss the depth of focus and surface effects. -- Highlights: ► The advanced STEM/HAADF diffraction contrast is extended to 3D stereo-imaging. ► The advantages of the new technique over stereo-imaging in CTEM are demonstrated. ► The new method allows foil thickness measurements in a broad range of conditions. ► We show that features associated with ion milling surface damage can be beneficial for appreciating 3D features of the microstructure.

  13. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy of High Temperature Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Software and hardware updates to further extend the capability of the electron microscope were carried out. A range of materials such as intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, ceramic-matrix composites, ceramics and intermetallic compounds, based on refractory elements were examined under this research. Crystal structure, size, shape and volume fraction distribution of various phases which constitute the microstructures were examined. Deformed materials were studied to understand the effect of interfacial microstructure on the deformation and fracture behavior of these materials. Specimens tested for a range of mechanical property requirements, such as stress rupture, creep, low cycle fatigue, high cycle fatigue, thermomechanical fatigue, etc. were examined. Microstructural and microchemical stability of these materials exposed to simulated operating environments were investigated. The EOIM Shuttle post-flight samples were also examined to understand the influence of low gravity processing on microstructure. In addition, fractographic analyses of Nb-Zr-W, titanium aluminide, molybdenum silicide and silicon carbide samples were carried out. Extensive characterization of sapphire fibers in the fiber-reinforced composites made by powder cloth processing was made. Finally, pressure infiltration casting of metal-matrix composites was carried out.

  14. Scanning electron microscopy applied to impression cytology for conjunctival damage from glaucoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cennamo, Gilda; Forte, Raimondo; Del Prete, Salvatore; Cardone, Domenico

    2013-09-01

    To apply scanning electron microscopy to impression cytology (IC) to evaluate conjunctival damage in patients undergoing topical glaucoma therapy. All patients undergoing glaucoma therapy and without ocular surface disorders between September 2012 and January 2013 were enrolled. An age- and gender-matched group without glaucoma served as the control group. Conjunctival epithelium was evaluated with the ferning test (FT), impression cytology with light optic microscopy (ICOM), and impression cytology with scanning electron microscopy (ICSEM). Twenty patients (40 eyes; 11 men and 9 women, mean age 59.9 ± 11 years) constituted the treated group. The mean duration of glaucoma therapy was 25.5 ± 13.8 months (range, 6-48 months). The mean FT, ICOM, and ICSEM grades were 2.52 ± 0.5, 2.52 ± 0.6, and 2.55 ± 0.7, respectively. Treatment duration was not significantly correlated with FT/IC grade (P = 0.1), whereas it was significantly correlated with microvilli count at ICSEM (P = 0.01). The mean FT, ICOM, and ICSEM grades were significantly lower in the control group (40 eyes; 11 men and 9 women, mean age 61.1 ± 7.12 years) than in the treated group (1.22 ± 0.4, 1.25 ± 0.4 and 1.15 ± 0.3, respectively, P ICOM, and ICSEM grades were lower in eyes undergoing glaucoma therapy than in control eyes. Treatment duration was significantly associated with a reduced microvilli count at ICSEM, but not with FT or ICOM grades. Reduction of microvilli could be the first sign of cellular damage during chronic glaucoma therapy.

  15. Brachylaima cribbi (Digenea: Brachylaimidae): scanning electron microscopical observations of the life-cycle stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, A R; Brealey, J K; Grove, D I; Dymock, R B

    2002-09-01

    Brachylaima cribbi is a recently described species of terrestrial trematode that infects mammals and birds with helicid land snails as its first and second intermediate hosts. The adult worm is 2.5-6.0 mm long by 0.5-0.8 mm wide being a long slender cylindrical worm with oral and ventral suckers in the anterior quarter and genital pore in the posterior quarter. Scanning electron microscopy shows that there is a dense covering of tegumental spines at the anterior end which diminishes towards the posterior extremities of the worm. Development of spines was observed in juvenile and mature adult worms. In young worms 1-3 weeks post infection (wpi) spines appear as buds with a serrated edge each having 1-4 spikes per spine. As the worm ages the spines broaden and by 5 wpi the number of spikes per spine increases to an average of 8.1. The serial development of oral sucker papillae in the cercaria, metacercaria and adult worm was observed with the finding of an elongated papilla with a bifurcated tip on the cercaria becoming a shorter and thicker elongated papilla with a large central stoma on the metacercaria. In the adult worm, this papilla becomes dome-shaped with a small central stoma. For some of these papillae a cilium could be seen extended from the central stoma. Other life-cycle stages illustrated were the hatched egg with an extruded egg membrane minus an operculum and a portion of the branched sporocyst dissected from the digestive gland of the land snail Theba pisana showing a terminal birth pore. Scanning electron microscopy morphological features of the adult worm observed for the first time in a Brachylaima were the unarmed cirrus extended from the genital pore with released sperm present and the Laurer's canal opening visible in tegumental folds on the dorsal surface approximately 300 microm posterior to the genital pore.

  16. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-07-15

    Jul 15, 2014 ... Hema, et al.: SEM Evaluation of root canal. 131. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Jan-Feb 2015 • Vol 18 • Issue 1 curvature during enlargement are the main objectives of root canal ... developed from nickel‑titanium (Ni‑Ti) alloys has brought ..... Glossen CR, Haller RH, Dove SB, del Rio CE.

  17. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the cleaning efficiency, preparation time, instrument deformation and fracture with LightSpeed (LS), ProTaper (PT) and EndoWave (Ew) rotary instruments. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 freshly extracted human mandibular ...

  18. Very Low Energy Scanning Electron Microscopy of Free-Standing Ultrathin Films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Hanzlíková, Renáta; Frank, Luděk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2010), s. 265-270 ISSN 1345-9678 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : low energy scanning electron microscopy * thin foils * transmission of very slow electrons Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.779, year: 2010 http://www.jim.or.jp/journal/e/51/02/265.html

  19. Scanning electron microscopy of pulp cavity dentin in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Sabás Z; Negro, Viviana B; Paulero, Rodrigo H; Toriggia, Paula G; Saccomanno, Daniela M

    2010-01-01

    Dentin morphology and tubule diameter and density of peripulpal dentin were evaluated in 36 teeth from 12 adult dogs, aged between 2.5 and 13-years. The right maxillary canine and third premolar and right mandibular first molar teeth were extracted from euthanized dogs. The teeth were prepared and photomicrographs (n=108) were taken of the radicular and coronal dentin. Dentinal tubule density (tubules/mm2) was determined and tubular diameter and luminal area were measured in 3240 randomly chosen tubules using measurement software. Results from group 1 dogs (dogs (> 7-years-old). The majority of dentinal tubules were round or oval in shape and had uniform distribution at the radicular coronal third, and coronal levels. Dentin surfaces showed morphological differences at different levels of the tooth. Group 1 dentinal tubule diameter (1.87 +/- 0.44 microm) and area (1.91 +/- 0.83 microm2) were significantly different compared with Group 2 dentinal tubule diameter (1.53 +/- 0.39 microm) and area (1.22 +/- 0.50 microm2). There was no significant difference in tubular density between groups 1 (74,692 +/- 25,991 tubules/mm2) and 2 (72,938 +/- 24,646 tubules/mm2). Site-specific differences were observed in the pulp cavity dentin in the same tooth. These results provide a reference for future research in dogs or where dogs are used as a model for investigations in human dentistry.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy in characterizing seeds of some leguminous trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Nabarun; Chatterjee, Amiyanghshu; Smith, Don W.

    2009-05-01

    SEM has greatly increased our knowledge of the microstructure of seeds. Mature seed coats are rather thick walled and stable in a vacuum: this allows quick preparation for SEM examination, without the need of complicated dehydration techniques. The low level of technical expenditure required, in combination with the high structural diversity exhibited and the intuitive ability to understand the "three dimensional", often aesthetically appealing micro-structures visualized, has turned seed-coat studies into a favorite tool of many taxonomists. We used dry mature seeds of 26 species of 4 Leguminous genera, Acacia, Albizia, Cassia and Dalbergia to standardize a procedure for identifying the seeds through SEM on the seed surface and seed sections. We cut transverse and longitudinal sections of the seeds and observed the sections from different regions of seeds: midseed, near the hilum and two distal ends. Light microscopy showed the color, texture, pleurograms, fissures and hilum at lower magnification. The anatomical study with SEM on the seed sections revealed the size, shape, and number of tiers and cellular organization of the epidermis, hypodermis, endosperm and internal structural details. We found the ornamentation pattern of the seeds including undulations, reticulations and rugae that were species specific. Species of Dalbergia (assamica, latifolia and sissoo), Albizia (odoratissima and procera), Acaia (arabica and catechu) and Cassia (glauca, siamia and spectabilis) are difficult to distinguish externally, but SEM studies provided enough characteristic features to distinguish from the other. This technique could be valuable in identifying seeds of important plant species for conservation and trading.

  1. Thermally processed titanium oxides film on Si(0 0 1) surface studied with scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, T.; Shudo, K.; Sato, K.; Ohno, S.; Tanaka, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal structural changes of TiO x films built on a Si(0 0 1) surface were investigated at the nanometer scale with scanning tunneling microscopy. Electronic properties of individual clusters were classified by means of scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The differential conductance (dI/dV) near the Fermi energy showed that nano-clusters were transformed from semiconducting Ti-silicates into metallic Ti-silicides after heating to 970 K. Peaks of normalized differential conductance (dI/dV/(I/V)) of the clusters shifted after heating to about 1070 K, indicating exclusion of oxygen from the clusters.

  2. Field modeling and ray-tracing of a miniature scanning electron microscope beam column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Jody S; Gregory, Don A; Gaskin, Jessica A

    2017-08-01

    A miniature scanning electron microscope (SEM) focusing column design is introduced and its potential performance assessed through an estimation of parameters that affect the probe radius, to include source size, spherical and chromatic aberration, diffraction and space charge broadening. The focusing column, a critical component of any SEM capable of operating on the lunar surface, was developed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and Advanced Research Systems. The ray-trace analysis presented uses a model of the electrostatic field (within the focusing column) that is first calculated using the boundary element method (BEM). This method provides flexibility in modeling the complex electrode shapes of practical electron lens systems. A Fourier series solution of the lens field is then derived within a cylindrical domain whose boundary potential is provided by the BEM. Used in this way, the Fourier series solution is an accuracy enhancement to the BEM solution, allowing sufficient precision to assess geometric aberrations through direct ray-tracing. Two modes of operation with distinct lens field solutions are described. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Probing the electronic transport on the reconstructed Au/Ge(001 surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciszek Krok

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available By using scanning tunnelling potentiometry we characterized the lateral variation of the electrochemical potential µec on the gold-induced Ge(001-c(8 × 2-Au surface reconstruction while a lateral current flows through the sample. On the reconstruction and across domain boundaries we find that µec shows a constant gradient as a function of the position between the contacts. In addition, nanoscale Au clusters on the surface do not show an electronic coupling to the gold-induced surface reconstruction. In combination with high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we conclude that an additional transport channel buried about 2 nm underneath the surface represents a major transport channel for electrons.

  4. Environmental scanning electron microscopy study of the interaction of carbon nanotubes with fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Maria Pia

    The behavior of fluids at the nanoscale is currently of interest, as nanotechnology promises tools for the precise delivery and analysis of minute volumes of liquids. Because of their reported properties, ease of manipulation and hollow cavity, carbon nanotubes have attracted attention for fluidic delivery. Thus far, experimental studies on wetting of carbon nanotubes have been limited, and other work revolves around theoretical modeling. Consequently, there is a considerable lack of experimental data on the subject. In this work, environmental scanning electron microscopy was employed for visualization of the interaction of carbon nanotubes with fluids such as water, liquid crystals, and biological solutions. Carbon nanotubes of diverse surface structure and chemistry were evaluated, and hydrophobic and hydrophilic behavior was observed. Nanotubes made by catalytic chemical vapor deposition showed highly hydrophobic behavior by the formation of spherical water droplets on nanotube agglomerates. This behavior was caused by roughness of the agglomerates as well as pinning of the droplets on defects and functional groups along the walls of the nanotubes. On highly graphitic carbon nanotube agglomerates, no droplet formation was observed due to the lack of defects and terminations on the surface. Formation of "barrel" and "clam-shell" shaped droplets on individual nanotubes was also observed. Capillary condensation inside carbon nanotubes made by non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition was also observed in the environmental scanning electron microscope. Condensation was marked by the formation of a thin film of water on the inner walls of the nanotubes, followed by growth of a meniscus of low contact angle, indicating the hydrophilic nature of the nanotubes. Spontaneous elastic deformation of the nanotubes was observed upon the formation of the film due to surface tension effects. By annealing, the carbon nanotubes were graphitized, and highly hydrophobic behavior was

  5. A study of internal oxidation in carburized steels by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    An, X; Rainforth, W M; Chen, L

    2003-01-01

    The internal oxidation of Cr-Mn carburizing steel was studied. Internal oxidation was induced using a commercial carburizing process. Sputter erosion coupled with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) was used to determine the depth profile elemental distribution within the internal oxidation layer (<10 mu m). In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) studies were carried out on selected sputter eroded surfaces. Oxide type was identified primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The carburized surface was found to consist of a continuous oxide layer, followed by a complex internal oxidation layer, where Cr and Mn oxides were found to populate grain boundaries in a globular form in the near surface region. At greater depths (5-10 mu m), Si oxides formed as a grain boundary network. The internal oxides (mainly complex oxides) grew quickly during the initial stages of the carburizing process (2 h, 800 deg. C+3 h, 930 deg. C). G...

  6. Surface dynamics using pulsed electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ally S. Y.; Jones, Robert G.

    2000-04-01

    Line of sight time of flight has been used to measure the translational energy of ethene formed by dissociative electron attachment of adsorbed dihalocarbons (XCH 2CH 2Y) on Cu(111) at 100 K. A pulsed electron beam was used to generate low energy secondary electrons at the surface, which were the active agents in initiating the decomposition, XCH 2CH 2Y(ads)+e -→XCH 2CH 2rad (ads)+Y(chem)+e -, XCH 2CH 2rad (ads)→C 2H 4(g)+X(chem). For 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) adsorbed with a spacer layer of chemisorbed chlorine between it and the Cu(111)surface, the TOF data could be fitted using three Maxwell distributions with fast (960 K), slow (180 K) and diffusion ('20 K') components. For a single monolayer of DCE adsorbed directly on the clean Cu(111) surface the fast (1230 K) and slow (225 K) components increased in temperature, indicating that the copper surface was affecting the reaction. For 1-bromo-2-chloroethane the results were the same, consistent with both molecules dissociating via a common intermediate, ClC 2H 4rad (ads). For 1,2-dibromoethane the intermediate is different, BrC 2H 4rad , and decomposition of a monolayer of this molecule on clean Cu(111) exhibited fast (1850 K) and slow (270 K) components, both higher than the corresponding temperatures for DCE. The dynamics of these reactions and the origin of the two Maxwell distributions are discussed in terms of the energy available within the radical, and from the formation of the chemisorbed halogen when the radical dissociates.

  7. Three-Dimensional (3D) Nanometrology Based on Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) Stereophotogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondare, Vipin N; Villarrubia, John S; Vlada R, András E

    2017-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of a sample surface from scanning electron microscope (SEM) images taken at two perspectives has been known for decades. Nowadays, there exist several commercially available stereophotogrammetry software packages. For testing these software packages, in this study we used Monte Carlo simulated SEM images of virtual samples. A virtual sample is a model in a computer, and its true dimensions are known exactly, which is impossible for real SEM samples due to measurement uncertainty. The simulated SEM images can be used for algorithm testing, development, and validation. We tested two stereophotogrammetry software packages and compared their reconstructed 3D models with the known geometry of the virtual samples used to create the simulated SEM images. Both packages performed relatively well with simulated SEM images of a sample with a rough surface. However, in a sample containing nearly uniform and therefore low-contrast zones, the height reconstruction error was ≈46%. The present stereophotogrammetry software packages need further improvement before they can be used reliably with SEM images with uniform zones.

  8. Comparative evaluation of enamel abrasivity by toothbrush and velcro: An in vitro scanning electron microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Kumar Ojha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Plaque control has been shown to be pivotal in maintaining the optimal periodontal health. Mechanical plaque control is the most popular option for establishing the optimal oral health. Toothbrushes have been the novel tool for mechanical cleansing. However, the abrasive potential of the toothbrushes on the enamel surface is an area in gray. Aims: The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the abrasivity of the toothbrush versus the velcro fasteners. Settings and Design: Forty extracted clinically healthy premolars were grouped in two groups. Group A comprising of teeth that were subjected to toothbrush bristles and group B to velcro fasteners (hook and loop. Materials and Methods: The mounted teeth of both the groups were subjected to abrasion test, and the tooth surfaces were observed for the possible abrasions from the oscillating strokes (toothbrush and frictional contacts (hook and loop velcro and examined under the scanning electron microscope. Results: Comparative assessment of both velcro (hook and loop and toothbrush bristles did not reveal any evidence of abrasion on the tooth specimens. Conclusions: Veclro fasteners are safe and qualitatively at par to the manual toothbrush for their efficacy and efficiency in teeth cleansing

  9. Closing of dentinal tubules by glutardialdehyde treatment, a scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkman, G E; Jongebloed, W L; de Vries, J; Ogaard, B; Arends, J

    1994-06-01

    The properties of dentin are strongly influenced by the so-called smear layer. This layer is always present on the dentin surface after cutting, drilling, sawing, etc. The smear layer can be removed by various chemical treatments, such as those of acid etching or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). These treatments remove the smear layer and open the tubules. In this paper, the effect on the smear layer of human dentin of treatment with a 2% glutardialdehyde (GDA) solution at pH 3.5 for 2 min and a 0.5-M EDTA solution at pH 7.4 for 4 min was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The dentin samples were dried by air or critical-point drying before SEM photography was employed. The number of open dentin tubules was quantified on micrographs of EDTA- and GDA+EDTA-treated dentin. The results show that the GDA treatment fixed part of the smear layer and the superficial dentin surface in such a way that at least 50% of the tubules remained closed after EDTA treatment. By closing the dentinal tubules, the GDA-fixed layer might have a positive effect on dentin hypersensitivity, root caries, and bonding of composite to dentin.

  10. Titanium alloy orthodontic mini-implants: scanning electron microscopic and metallographic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmann, Paola F P; Ruschel, Henrique C; Vargas, Ivana A; de Verney, José C K; Kramer, Paulo F

    2015-04-01

    Anchorage control is one of the determining factors of successful orthodontic mechanics. In mini-implants, fractures due to placement and removal have been related to implant design and titanium alloy quality. This study assessed the topography and microstructure of five brands of mini-implants (Neodent, SIN, Morelli, Conexao, Foresta Dent). Scanning electron microscopic analyses of the head, transmucosal neck, threaded body, and tip were performed to assess implant design and manufacturing defects (n=3/group). Metallographic analysis of longitudinal sections (n=15) and cross-sections (n=15) was performed under conventional light microscopy according to international standards of "American Society for Testing and Materials". The results showed significant differences in miniimplant design. Surface irregularities in the threaded body and tip were observed. Microstructural analyses revealed an alpha/beta-phase grain structure, in compliance with the ETTC-2 ("Technical Committee of European Titanium Producers" -2nd edition). No structural defects were detected. We conclude that differences in mini-implant design and the presence of surface irregularities may influence the effectiveness of orthodontic anchorage.

  11. Comparative evaluation of enamel abrasivity by toothbrush and velcro: An in vitro scanning electron microscope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Saroj Kumar; Javdekar, Sadashiv Bhaskar; Dhir, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Context: Plaque control has been shown to be pivotal in maintaining the optimal periodontal health. Mechanical plaque control is the most popular option for establishing the optimal oral health. Toothbrushes have been the novel tool for mechanical cleansing. However, the abrasive potential of the toothbrushes on the enamel surface is an area in gray. Aims: The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the abrasivity of the toothbrush versus the velcro fasteners. Materials and Methods: The mounted teeth of both the groups were subjected to abrasion test, and the tooth surfaces were observed for the possible abrasions from the oscillating strokes (toothbrush) and frictional contacts (hook and loop velcro) and examined under the scanning electron microscope. Results: Comparative assessment of both velcro (hook and loop) and toothbrush bristles did not reveal any evidence of abrasion on the tooth specimens. Conclusions: Veclro fasteners are safe and qualitatively at par to the manual toothbrush for their efficacy and efficiency in teeth cleansing PMID:26229264

  12. Homogenization mechanism of the residual surface potential of insulating specimens under electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingjing; Zhang Haibo; Feng Renjian

    2007-01-01

    A homogenized surface potential is desirable for the observation of a pre-irradiated insulating specimen using a scanning electron microscope because the residual surface potential may affect the imaging properties of the specimen. To homogenize the residual surface potential, the specimen should be subjected to the irradiation of an electron beam with the total electron yield greater than one. The expression of the equilibrium potential is derived based on the charge balance condition in the equilibrium state and the potential value is found to increase mainly with the secondary electron (SE) yield and the most probable emission energy of SEs. Further numerical calculations of SE trajectories show that affected by different surface potentials, SEs leave or return to the specimen surface to change the net charge flux into the specimen. This thereby increases the surface potential below the equilibrium potential and decreases that above the equilibrium potential, homogenizing the surface potential

  13. Surface topography acquisition method for double-sided near-right-angle structured surfaces based on dual-probe wavelength scanning interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2017-10-02

    This paper proposes an approach to measure double-sided near-right-angle structured surfaces based on dual-probe wavelength scanning interferometry (DPWSI). The principle and mathematical model is discussed and the measurement system is calibrated with a combination of standard step-height samples for both probes vertical calibrations and a specially designed calibration artefact for building up the space coordinate relationship of the dual-probe measurement system. The topography of the specially designed artefact is acquired by combining the measurement results with white light scanning interferometer (WLSI) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) for reference. The relative location of the two probes is then determined with 3D registration algorithm. Experimental validation of the approach is provided and the results show that the method is able to measure double-sided near-right-angle structured surfaces with nanometer vertical resolution and micrometer lateral resolution.

  14. Direct Visualization of Local Electromagnetic Field Structures by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Findlay, Scott D; Matsumoto, Takao; Kohno, Yuji; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-07-18

    The functional properties of materials and devices are critically determined by the electromagnetic field structures formed inside them, especially at nanointerface and surface regions, because such structures are strongly associated with the dynamics of electrons, holes and ions. To understand the fundamental origin of many exotic properties in modern materials and devices, it is essential to directly characterize local electromagnetic field structures at such defect regions, even down to atomic dimensions. In recent years, rapid progress in the development of high-speed area detectors for aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with sub-angstrom spatial resolution has opened new possibilities to directly image such electromagnetic field structures at very high-resolution. In this Account, we give an overview of our recent development of differential phase contrast (DPC) microscopy for aberration-corrected STEM and its application to many materials problems. In recent years, we have developed segmented-type STEM detectors which divide the detector plane into 16 segments and enable simultaneous imaging of 16 STEM images which are sensitive to the positions and angles of transmitted/scattered electrons on the detector plane. These detectors also have atomic-resolution imaging capability. Using these segmented-type STEM detectors, we show DPC STEM imaging to be a very powerful tool for directly imaging local electromagnetic field structures in materials and devices in real space. For example, DPC STEM can clearly visualize the local electric field variation due to the abrupt potential change across a p-n junction in a GaAs semiconductor, which cannot be observed by normal in-focus bright-field or annular type dark-field STEM imaging modes. DPC STEM is also very effective for imaging magnetic field structures in magnetic materials, such as magnetic domains and skyrmions. Moreover, real-time imaging of electromagnetic field structures can

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of drug-eluting coronary artery stent devices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Robinson, K. A.; Otsuka, Y.; Zablocki, J.; Rypáček, František; Chronos, N.; Apkarian, R. P.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 24 (2006), s. 114-114 ISSN 0161-0457. [Nanotechnology Conference Scanning 2006. Washington, 25.04.2006-27.04.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * polymer layer * stent Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.462, year: 2006 http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/113509466/PDFSTART

  16. Examination of mycological samples by means of the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1973-04-01

    Full Text Available Three species of Siphomycetes: Rhizopus arhizus, Rhizopus equinus and Rhizopus nigricans, as well as a Septomycete: Emericella nidulans, have been examined by means of a scanning electron microscope. Among the difjerent Rhizopus, this technique showed differences in the appearance of the sporangia. In Emericella nidulans, scanning microscopy enábled one to ascertain that the "Hull cells" were completely hollow and also demonstrated the ornemented aspect of the ascospores.

  17. Characterization and Properties of Oligothiophenes Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy for Possible Use in Organic Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishara, E.M.El.

    2009-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscopy study has been made on a group of alkyl-substituted oligothiophenes. The self-assembled monolayers of this type of semi-conducting oligomers on graphite were observed and characterized. To control the self-assembly, it is important to first understand the forces that drive the spontaneous ordering of molecules at interfaces. For the identification of the forces, several substituted oligothiophenes were examined: carboxylic acid groups, methyl ester carboxylic acid, and iodine atoms at one end and benzyl esters at the other end of the oligomers this is in addition to the non-functionalized oligothiophehens, Self-assembled monolayers of these molecules were then examined by STM. A detailed analysis of the driving forces and parameters controlling the formation of the self-assembled 2- D crystal monolayers was carried out by performing modeling of the experimental observations. The theoretical calculations gave us a conclusive insight into the intermolecular interactions, which lead to the observed conformation of molecules on the surface. An attempt to react two iodinated oligomers on the surface after the formation of the monolayer has been done; a topochemical reaction studies using UV/Vis light irradiation has been preceded. The targeted reaction was achieved. This can be considered as a great step towards the formation of nano-wires and other organic electronic devices. The applicability of the above method of force-driven self organisation in different patterns was examined as template for building donor-nano structures for electronic devices. It was necessary to examine the stability of the formed templates in air. The monolayers were left to dry and STM images were taken; C60 was then added to the monolayer, and the complexation of the C60 (as acceptor) with the formed monolayer template was examined.

  18. Comparative study of image contrast in scanning electron microscope and helium ion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Fox, D; Maguire, P; Wang, J J; Rodenburg, C

    2017-12-01

    Images of Ga + -implanted amorphous silicon layers in a 110 n-type silicon substrate have been collected by a range of detectors in a scanning electron microscope and a helium ion microscope. The effects of the implantation dose and imaging parameters (beam energy, dwell time, etc.) on the image contrast were investigated. We demonstrate a similar relationship for both the helium ion microscope Everhart-Thornley and scanning electron microscope Inlens detectors between the contrast of the images and the Ga + density and imaging parameters. These results also show that dynamic charging effects have a significant impact on the quantification of the helium ion microscope and scanning electron microscope contrast. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Análise em microscopia eletrônica de varredura de superfícies radiculares antes e após raspagem e condicionamento com ácido cítrico e EDTA: um estudo "in vitro" Scanning electron microscopy analysis on root surfaces before and after scalling and citric acid and EDTA conditioning: an "in vitro" study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Valverde Rodrigues Bastos Neto

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A superfície radicular mais benéfica para a regeneração do periodonto ainda não está estabelecida. Visando uma busca por esta superfície este trabalho utilizou 14 dentes de humanos recém extraídos, seccionados em corpos de prova e tratados com raspagem e condicionamentos com ácido cítrico e EDTA e analisados em microscopia eletrônica de varredura. As superfícies hígidas apresentavam grânulos regulares provenientes de fibras do ligamento periodontal rompidas na exodontia. As superfícies contaminadas apresentavam massas de cálculo aderidas e áreas de reabsorção cementária. Quando raspadas com curetas manuais as superfícies foram cobertas por "smear layer". O condicionamento com ácido cítrico foi eficiente na remoção total do "smear layer", assim como o condicionamento com EDTA gel, e o condicionamento com EDTA líquido não teve efetividade total na sua remoção. Tomando como padrão as superfícies hígidas, conclui-se que os tratamentos que mais se aproximam do ideal são a raspagem e condicionamento com ácido cítrico e EDTA gel sem diferenças entre si.The most benefic root surface for periodontal regeneration has not been known. Looking for this surface this study used 14 human teeth prepared as testing corpus and treated with scaling and conditioning with citric acid and EDTA, and analysed in scanning electron microscopy. The health teeth surfaces showed regular grains representing broken periodontal ligament fibers by exodontics. The contaminated surfaces showed calculus masses, very porous, and resorption areas. When scalled with hand curettes the surfaces was covered by smear layer. The citric acid conditioning was efficient on smear layer removal, as well as the EDTA gel, and the EDTA liquid solution was not efficient on smear removal.

  20. Molecules on vicinal Au surfaces studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, J; Neel, N; Jensen, H; Berndt, R; Rurali, R; Lorente, N

    2006-01-01

    Using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy we investigated the adsorption characteristics of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-dianhydride and fullerenes on Au(788), Au(433), and Au(778). On Au(788) and Au(778), 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-dianhydride exhibits three coexisting superstructures, which do not reflect the periodicity of the hosting substrate. The adsorption on Au(433) leads to the formation of molecule chains along the step edges after annealing the sample. Fullerene molecules on Au(788) arrange in a mesh of islands, which extends over several hundreds of nanometres with an extraordinarily high periodicity. A combination of fullerene adsorption and annealing leads to facetting of Au(433) and the formation of extraordinarily long fullerene stripes

  1. Photogrammetry of the three-dimensional shape and texture of a nanoscale particle using scanning electron microscopy and free software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontard, Lionel C; Schierholz, Roland; Yu, Shicheng; Cintas, Jesús; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E

    2016-10-01

    We apply photogrammetry in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to study the three-dimensional shape and surface texture of a nanoscale LiTi2(PO4)3 particle. We highlight the fact that the technique can be applied non-invasively in any SEM using free software (freeware) and does not require special sample preparation. Three-dimensional information is obtained in the form of a surface mesh, with the texture of the sample stored as a separate two-dimensional image (referred to as a UV Map). The mesh can be used to measure parameters such as surface area, volume, moment of inertia and center of mass, while the UV map can be used to study the surface texture using conventional image processing techniques. We also illustrate the use of 3D printing to visualize the reconstructed model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Semi-empirical model for the generation of dose distributions produced by a scanning electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, R.; Gignac, C.E.; Agostinelli, A.G.; Rothberg, S.; Schulz, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    There are linear accelerators (Sagittaire and Saturne accelerators produced by Compagnie Generale de Radiologie (CGR/MeV) Corporation) which produce broad, flat electron fields by magnetically scanning the relatively narrow electron beam as it emerges from the accelerator vacuum system. A semi-empirical model, which mimics the scanning action of this type of accelerator, was developed for the generation of dose distributions in homogeneous media. The model employs the dose distributions of the scanning electron beams. These were measured with photographic film in a polystyrene phantom by turning off the magnetic scanning system. The mean deviation calculated from measured dose distributions is about 0.2%; a few points have deviations as large as 2 to 4% inside of the 50% isodose curve, but less than 8% outside of the 50% isodose curve. The model has been used to generate the electron beam library required by a modified version of a commercially-available computerized treatment-planning system. (The RAD-8 treatment planning system was purchased from the Digital Equipment Corporation. It is currently available from Electronic Music Industries

  3. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Surface patterned dielectrics by direct writing of anodic oxides using scanning droplet cell microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siket, Christian M.; Mardare, Andrei Ionut; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Bauer, Siegfried; Hassel, Achim Walter

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Scanning droplet cell microscopy was applied for local gate oxide writing. • Sharp lines are obtained at the highest writing speed of 1 mm min −1 . • 13.4 kC cm −3 was found as charge per volume for aluminium oxide. • High field constant of 24 nm V −1 and dielectric constant of 12 were determined for Al 2 O 3 by CV and EIS. -- Abstract: Scanning droplet cell microscopy was used for patterning of anodic oxide lines on the surface of Al thin films by direct writing. The structural modifications of the written oxide lines as a function of the writing speed were studied by analyzing the relative error of the line widths. Sharper lines were obtained for writing speeds faster than 1 mm min −1 . An increase in sharpness was observed for higher writing speeds. A theoretical model based on the Faraday law is proposed to explain the constant anodisation current measured during the writing process and yielded a charge per volume of 13.4 kC cm −3 for Al 2 O 3 . From calculated oxide film thicknesses the high field constant was found to be 24 nm V −1 . Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed an increase of the electrical permittivity up to ε = 12 with the decrease of the writing speed of the oxide line. Writing of anodic oxide lines was proven to be an important step in preparing capacitors and gate dielectrics in plastic electronics

  5. Performance assessment of methods for estimation of fractal dimension from scanning electron microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risović, Dubravko; Pavlović, Zivko

    2013-01-01

    Processing of gray scale images in order to determine the corresponding fractal dimension is very important due to widespread use of imaging technologies and application of fractal analysis in many areas of science, technology, and medicine. To this end, many methods for estimation of fractal dimension from gray scale images have been developed and routinely used. Unfortunately different methods (dimension estimators) often yield significantly different results in a manner that makes interpretation difficult. Here, we report results of comparative assessment of performance of several most frequently used algorithms/methods for estimation of fractal dimension. To that purpose, we have used scanning electron microscope images of aluminum oxide surfaces with different fractal dimensions. The performance of algorithms/methods was evaluated using the statistical Z-score approach. The differences between performances of six various methods are discussed and further compared with results obtained by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on the same samples. The analysis of results shows that the performance of investigated algorithms varies considerably and that systematically erroneous fractal dimensions could be estimated using certain methods. The differential cube counting, triangulation, and box counting algorithms showed satisfactory performance in the whole investigated range of fractal dimensions. Difference statistic is proved to be less reliable generating 4% of unsatisfactory results. The performances of the Power spectrum, Partitioning and EIS were unsatisfactory in 29%, 38%, and 75% of estimations, respectively. The results of this study should be useful and provide guidelines to researchers using/attempting fractal analysis of images obtained by scanning microscopy or atomic force microscopy. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Photoelectron spectroscopy bulk and surface electronic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Suga, Shigemasa

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is now becoming more and more required to investigate electronic structures of various solid materials in the bulk, on surfaces as well as at buried interfaces. The energy resolution was much improved in the last decade down to 1 meV in the low photon energy region. Now this technique is available from a few eV up to 10 keV by use of lasers, electron cyclotron resonance lamps in addition to synchrotron radiation and X-ray tubes. High resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is now widely applied to band mapping of materials. It attracts a wide attention from both fundamental science and material engineering. Studies of the dynamics of excited states are feasible by time of flight spectroscopy with fully utilizing the pulse structures of synchrotron radiation as well as lasers including the free electron lasers (FEL). Spin resolved studies also made dramatic progress by using higher efficiency spin detectors and two dimensional spin detectors. Polarization depend...

  7. Evolution of MEMS scanning mirrors for laser projection in compact consumer electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauscher, Jason; Davis, Wyatt O.; Brown, Dean; Ellis, Matt; Ma, Yunfei; Sherwood, Michael E.; Bowman, David; Helsel, Mark P.; Lee, Sung; Coy, John Wyatt

    2010-02-01

    The applicability of MOEMS scanning mirrors towards the creation of "flying spot" scanned laser displays is well established. The extension of this concept towards compact embedded pico-projectors has required an evolution of scanners and packaging to accommodate the needs of the consumer electronics space. This paper describes the progression of the biaxial MOEMS scanning mirrors developed by Microvision over recent years. Various aspects of the individual designs are compared. Early devices used a combination of magnetic quasistatic actuation and resonant electrostatic operation in an evacuated atmosphere to create a projection engine for retinal scanned displays. Subsequent designs realized the elimination of both the high voltage electrostatic drive and the vacuum package, and a simplification of the actuation scheme through proprietary technical advances. Additional advances have doubled the scan angle capability and greatly miniaturized the MOEMS component while not incurring significant increase in power consumption, making it an excellent fit for the consumer pico-projector application. The simplicity of the scanned laser-based pico-projector optical design enables high resolution and a large effective image size in a thin projection engine, all of which become critical both to the viability of the technology and adoption by consumers. Microvision's first scanned laser pico-projector is built around a MOEMS scanning mirror capable of projecting 16:9 aspect ratio, WVGA display within a 6.6 mm high package. Further evolution on this path promises continued improvement in resolution, size, and power.

  8. Surface x-ray scattering and scanning tunneling microscopy studies at the Au(111) electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocko, B.M.; Magnussen, O.M.; Wang, J.X.; Adzic, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter reviews Surface X-ray Scattering and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy results carried out at the Au(111) surface under electrochemical conditions. Results are presented for the reconstructed surface, and for bromide and thallium monolayers. These examples are used to illustrate the complementary nature of the techniques

  9. Low Energy Scanned Electron-Beam Dose Distribution in Thin Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Hjortenberg, P. E.; Pedersen, Walther Batsberg

    1975-01-01

    Thin radiochromic dye film dosimeters, calibrated by means of calorimetry, make possible the determination of absorbed-dose distributions due to low-energy scanned electron beam penetrations in moderately thin coatings and laminar media. For electrons of a few hundred keV, calibrated dosimeters...... of about 30–60 μm thickness may be used in stacks or interleaved between layers of materials of interest and supply a sufficient number of experimental data points throughout the depth of penetration of electrons to provide a depth-dose curve. Depth doses may be resolved in various polymer layers...... on different backings (wood, aluminum, and iron) for scanned electron beams (Emax = 400 keV) having a broad energy spectrum and diffuse incidence, such as those used in radiation curing of coatings, textiles, plastics, etc. Theoretical calculations of such distributions of energy depositions are relatively...

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts and histologic examination of pulmonary microvasculature in dogs with dirofilariosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Hiroyoshi; Wakao, Yoshito

    2002-11-01

    To characterize structural changes in pulmonary vessels of dogs with dirofilariosis. 8 dogs with dirofilariosis and 2 unaffected control dogs. Pulmonary artery pressure was measured in affected dogs, and dogs then were euthanatized. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine vascular corrosion casts of pulmonary vasculature. Tissue sections of pulmonary vasculature were evaluated by use of histologic examination. Pulmonary artery pressure was higher in dogs with severely affected pulmonary vessels. In tissue sections, dilatation, as well as lesions in the tunica intima and proliferative lesions resulting in constriction or obstruction, were frequently observed in branches of the pulmonary artery. Numerous dilated bronchial arteries were observed around affected pulmonary arteries. Hyperplastic venous sphincters were observed in small pulmonary veins and venules. In corrosion casts, affected pulmonary lobar arteries had dilatation, pruning, abnormal tapering, constriction, and obstruction. In small arteries and arterioles, surface structures representing aneurisms and edema were seen. Bronchial arteries were well developed and extremely dilated, and they formed numerous anastomoses with pulmonary arteries at all levels, from the pulmonary trunk to peripheral vessels. Capillaries in the lungs were dilated with little structural change. Small pulmonary veins and venules had irregular annular constrictions that were caused by hyperplastic smooth muscle cells of venous sphincters. Scanning electron microscopy of microvascular casts delineated links between the bronchial and pulmonary circulations in dogs with dirofilariosis. Results of scanning electron microscopy provided a structural explanation for the development of pulmonary circulatory disturbances and pulmonary hypertension in dogs affected by dirofilariosis.

  11. Quantification of glacial and ground surface velocities from repeat terrestrial LiDAR scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, F.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    Repeat terrestrial LiDAR scans of moving surfaces (e.g. around faults, glaciers, mass movements, etc.) collected at different times offer the opportunity to quantify surface velocities in high resolution. This study presents a new approach for quantifying surface velocities from remote sensing data. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of terrestrial LiDAR grid point cloud (GPC) data, but the technique presented is also applicable to other (RASTER) remote sensing datasets. The method used consists of investigating two or more temporally variable GPCs referred as a raw and displaced/deformed scans. A user-defined grid is defined on the raw and deformed scans and the center point of each grid is identified. A search window size is determined for comparison between the two scans. Elevations in both scans are then converted to a reference elevation and a normalized cross correlation is applied between the images for pattern recognition. The focal points of the raw image and correlated deformed location are used to prepare an affine transformation for that grid. This procedure is applied on all the grids to prepare the spatial distribution of the affine transformation. Finally, the affine transformation is extended to calculate the horizontal components of surface deformation. These components are used to prepare the spatial distribution of the displacement distance and angle between each grid on each scan. The routine was applied to a series of synthetic (test) datasets and to repeat LiDAR scans (ILRIS-LR) of the Rhone glacier, Switzerland collected in August 2011. Results from the synthetic tests indicate the approach provides a robust reconstruction of spatially non-uniform velocity fields on scans with different surface characteristics. For the Rhone glacier data both temporal and spatial variations in surface velocities were recovered across a large portion of the glacier at centimeter scale. Temporal variations in the glacier surface velocity were resolved

  12. Scanning Electron Microscopy of Nonconductive Specimens at Critical Energies in a Cathode Lens System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Zadražil, Martin; Müllerová, Ilona

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 1 (2001), s. 36-50 ISSN 0161-0457 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/96/0961; GA ČR GA202/99/0008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * specimen charging * nonconductive specimens Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.389, year: 2001

  13. Corrections of Magnification and Focusing in a Cathode Lens-Equipped Scanning Electron Microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zobačová, Jitka; Zobač, Martin; Oral, Martin; Müllerová, Ilona; Frank, Luděk

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 3 (2006), s. 155-163 ISSN 0161-0457 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB2065301 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : low-energy scanning electron microscopy (SEM) * cathode lens * critical dimension measurement in SEM * automatic corrections Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.462, year: 2006

  14. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope As A Tool For Imaging Of Native State Somatic Embryogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém; Hřib, J.; Svidenská, S.; Vooková, B.; Runštuk, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, Suppl. 2 (2012), s. 1270-1271 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/1410; GA MPO FR-TI1/305; GA MPO FR-TI1/118; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : environmental scanning electron microscopy * somatic embryogenesis Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.495, year: 2012

  15. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Yongpeng; Li Changming; Liang Feng; Chen Jianmin; Zhang Hong; Liu Guoqing; Sun Huibin; Luong, John H.T.

    2008-01-01

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 ) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl 2 ) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  16. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Yongpeng [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China)], E-mail: yongpengt@yahoo.com.cn; Li Changming [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Liang Feng [Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen Jianmin [Shenzhen Municipal Hospital for Chronic Disease Control and Prevention, Guangdong 518020 (China); Zhang Hong; Liu Guoqing; Sun Huibin [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Luong, John H.T. [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council Canada, Montreal, Quebec, H4P 2R2 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl{sub 2}) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  17. Two-photon-induced hot-electron transfer to a single molecule in a scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S. W.; Ho, W.

    2010-01-01

    The junction of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in the tunneling regime was irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. A photoexcited hot electron in the STM tip resonantly tunnels into an excited state of a single molecule on the surface, converting it from the neutral to the anion. The electron-transfer rate depends quadratically on the incident laser power, suggesting a two-photon excitation process. This nonlinear optical process is further confirmed by the polarization measurement. Spatial dependence of the electron-transfer rate exhibits atomic-scale variations. A two-pulse correlation experiment reveals the ultrafast dynamic nature of photoinduced charging process in the STM junction. Results from these experiments are important for understanding photoinduced interfacial charge transfer in many nanoscale inorganic-organic structures.

  18. Virtual rough samples to test 3D nanometer-scale scanning electron microscopy stereo photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarrubia, J S; Tondare, V N; Vladár, A E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of scanning electron microscopy for high spatial resolution, images from multiple angles to provide 3D information, and commercially available stereo photogrammetry software for 3D reconstruction offers promise for nanometer-scale dimensional metrology in 3D. A method is described to test 3D photogrammetry software by the use of virtual samples-mathematical samples from which simulated images are made for use as inputs to the software under test. The virtual sample is constructed by wrapping a rough skin with any desired power spectral density around a smooth near-trapezoidal line with rounded top corners. Reconstruction is performed with images simulated from different angular viewpoints. The software's reconstructed 3D model is then compared to the known geometry of the virtual sample. Three commercial photogrammetry software packages were tested. Two of them produced results for line height and width that were within close to 1 nm of the correct values. All of the packages exhibited some difficulty in reconstructing details of the surface roughness.

  19. Impression cytology with scanning electron microscopy: a new method in the study of conjunctival microvilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cennamo, G L; Del Prete, A; Forte, R; Cafiero, G; Del Prete, S; Marasco, D

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies used impression cytology with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study the conjunctival surface of bovine eyes and normal human eyes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use impression cytology and SEM (ICSEM) in patients affected by tear film abnormalities. Forty-five patients were divided into three groups according to mild, moderate or severe subjective sensation of dry eye. Fifteen asymptomatic subjects served as control group. In all patients the tear film was evaluated with break-up time (BUT), Schirmer's, and Ferning test, whereas conjunctival epithelium was evaluated with impression cytology and optic microscopy (ICOM), and ICSEM. The Spearman rank correlation test was used to compare the outcome of these examinations with the subjective sensation of dry eye in each group, and to identify correlations among the five tests. ICSEM findings highly correlated with subjective dry eye sensation (Spearman correlation coefficient, 796; P<0.01). ICSEM revealed incipient epithelial damage (reduction or absence of microvilli) before the appearance of alterations of nucleus and cytoplasm of epithelial cells revealed by optic microscopy. The number of microvilli was correlated with the degree of tear film abnormalities and subjective sensation of dry eye (Spearman correlation coefficient, 796; P<0.01). ICSEM was very effective in detecting the reduction in the number of microvilli. Therefore, it could represent an effective method to detect alterations in the conjunctival epithelium resulting from tear film damage even before the epithelial damage occurs and is detected by optic microscopy.

  20. Forensic applications of scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analyser in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Y S

    1982-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy - Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (SEM/EDX) has been applied in casework for more than a year in the Forensic Division, Government Laboratory of Hong Kong. The types of samples being analysed are summarised and three cases of scientific interest are described. The first case applies SEM/EDX to characterize microscopic gold particles recovered from clothing of suspects involved in goldsmith robberies. Both elemental and morphological results obtained were used as supporting evidence. The second case describes the three types of beaded ends on fibres found in a single cloth sample. These beaded ends are different in shape and surface features and can be used as an additional parameter in fibre identification. The final case shows the application of vacuum evaporation of graphite on a document sample to reveal the area of paper which has been skillfully mechanically erased. Both the image intensity and the composition of the ink are used to differentiate between original and altered characters on the document.

  1. Scanning electron microscopical study of the lingual epithelium of green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, F; Latella, G; Montalbano, G; Guerrera, M C; Levanti, M B; Ciriaco, E

    2008-08-01

    During the last few years, green iguanas (Iguana iguana) have turned out to be one of the most popular pets. They are omnivorous. In their way of feeding, this crucial function is performed by capturing of the preys and mostly, this is carried out by the tongue. The role of the tongue is also fundamental during the intra-oral transport and during the swallowing of food. This has been reported in several studies about chameleons, agamids and iguanids, nevertheless published data about the mechanisms of capturing and swallowing the prey, and the morphological descriptions about the tongue epithelium, are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this present study was to analyse the morphology of the lingual epithelium in green iguanas by scanning electron microscopy. Three different areas were demonstrated on the tongue surface: the tongue tip, characterized by a smooth epithelium without papillae, a foretongue, completely covered by numerous closely packed cylindriform papillae, and a hindtongue with conical-like papillae. Some taste buds were recognized on the middle and the posterior parts of the tongue. Different functional roles could be hypothesized for the three tongue areas: the tongue tip could have a role related to the movements of the prey immediately after the capturing, while the middle papillae and the hindtongue could have an important role concerning the swallowing phase.

  2. Bootstrapping de-shadowing and self-calibration for scanning electron microscope photometric stereo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Atsushi; Chen, Deshan; Kaneko, Shun’ichi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach that addresses the blind reconstruction problem in scanning electron microscope (SEM) photometric stereo. Using only two observed images that suffer from shadowing effects, our method automatically calibrates the parameter and resolves shadowing errors for estimating an accurate three-dimensional (3D) shape and underlying shadowless images. We introduce a novel shadowing compensation model using image intensities for both cases of presence and absence of shadowing. With this model, the proposed de-shadowing algorithm iteratively compensates for image intensities and modifies the corresponding 3D surface. Besides de-shadowing, we introduce a practically useful self-calibration criterion by enforcing a good reconstruction. We show that incorrect parameters will engender significant distortions of 3D reconstructions in shadowed regions during the de-shadowing procedure. This motivated us to design the self-calibration criterion by utilizing shadowing to pursue the proper parameter that produces the best reconstruction with least distortions. As a result, we develop a bootstrapping approach for simultaneous de-shadowing and self-calibration in SEM photometric stereo. Extensive experiments on real image data demonstrate the effectiveness of our method. (paper)

  3. Allograft semilunar cardiac valves processing and cryopreservation - morphology in scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krs, O; Burkert, J; Slízová, D; Kobylka, P; Spatenka, J

    2006-01-01

    The most important factors of long term clinical performance of biological heart valve prostheses are methods of processing and cryopreservation. That is why we decided to evaluate the impact of current Allograft Heart Valves (AHV) Bank protocol on valve tissue morphology. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a valuable tool for investigation of biological surfaces. In case of cardiac valves it is especially suitable for detection of fine changes in endothelial covering and underlying layers. "Fresh" aortic and pulmonary AHV samples, harvested from "heart-beating" cadaveric donors, were compared with (1) tissue from AHV obtained from non heart-beating donors, (2) samples stored in 4 degrees C saline for 24 h, (3) antibiotic treated tissue for 24 h at 37 degrees C and finally (4) cryopreserved valves, stored in liquid nitrogen (-196 degrees C) for 6-38 months. All samples were dissected, dried with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), gold coated, studied and photographed by SEM (Tesla BS 301). Our alternative method of drying samples by the HMDS method proved to be suitable for thin membranes of human semilunar valves. We were able to detect early changes in the endothelium after harvesting, and denudation of the endothelial covering during preservation with and without freezing. SEM (using HMDS drying) along with other methods may be helpful for the morphological control of processing, cryopreservation and liquid nitrogen storage of AHV. According to the current findings we have to avoid washing of AHV in saline after harvesting.

  4. A preparation technique for examination of wet-spun polymer fibers in a scanning electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenhen, D.M.; de Jongh, M.A.; Smolders, C.A.; Yucesoy, N.

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the technique is discussed of sample preparation for freshly wet-spun polymer fibers, to be examined by scanning electron microscopy. It makes use of cryogenic breaking of the samples, followed by freeze drying or freeze-etching of the specimen and coating it with a charge conducting

  5. Alcoholic liver injury: defenestration in noncirrhotic livers--a scanning electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Christoffersen, P; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1987-01-01

    The fenestration of hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells in 15 needle biopsies obtained from chronic alcoholics without cirrhosis was studied by scanning electron microscopy. As compared to nonalcoholics, a significant reduction in the number of fenestrae and porosity of the sinusoidal lining wall...

  6. Scanning electron microscope view of iron crystal growing on pyroxene crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope photograph of a four-micron size iron crystal growing on a pyroxene crystal (calcium-magnesium-iron silicate) from the Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennino lunar landing site. The well developed crystal faces indicate that the crystal was formed from a hot vapor as the rock was cooling.

  7. Practical application of HgI2 detectors to a space-flight scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.; Albee, A. L.; Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Mercuric iodide X-ray detectors have been undergoing tests in a prototype scanning electron microscope system being developed for unmanned space flight. The detector program addresses the issues of geometric configuration in the SEM, compact packaging that includes separate thermoelectric coolers for the detector and FET, X-ray transparent hermetic encapsulation and electrical contacts, and a clean vacuum environment.

  8. Correlation of live-cell imaging with volume scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Miriam S; Günthert, Maja; Bittermann, Anne Greet; de Marco, Alex; Wepf, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Live-cell imaging is one of the most widely applied methods in live science. Here we describe two setups for live-cell imaging, which can easily be combined with volume SEM for correlative studies. The first procedure applies cell culture dishes with a gridded glass support, which can be used for any light microscopy modality. The second approach is a flow-chamber setup based on Ibidi μ-slides. Both live-cell imaging strategies can be followed up with serial blockface- or focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. Two types of resin embedding after heavy metal staining and dehydration are presented making best use of the particular advantages of each imaging modality: classical en-bloc embedding and thin-layer plastification. The latter can be used only for focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy, but is advantageous for studying cell-interactions with specific substrates, or when the substrate cannot be removed. En-bloc embedding has diverse applications and can be applied for both described volume scanning electron microscopy techniques. Finally, strategies for relocating the cell of interest are discussed for both embedding approaches and in respect to the applied light and scanning electron microscopy methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Carbon-fiber tips for scanning probe microscopes and molecular electronics experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio-Bollinger, G.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Bilan, S.; Zotti, L.A.; Arroyo, C.R.; Agraït, N.; Cuevas, J.

    2012-01-01

    We fabricate and characterize carbon-fiber tips for their use in combined scanning tunneling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is used to yield reproducible sub-100-nm apex. We also study electron

  10. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy applied to mycelial phase of sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1975-04-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy applied to the mycelial phase of Sporothrix schenckii shows a matted mycelium with conidia of a regular pattern. X-Ray microanalysis applied in energy dispersive spectroscopy and also in wavelength dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of several elements of Mendeleef's classification.

  11. A simple methodology for obtaining X-ray color images in scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, M.M. da; Pietroluongo, L.R.V.

    1985-01-01

    A simple methodology for obtaining at least 3 elements X-ray images in only one photography is described. The fluorescent X-ray image is obtained from scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion analysis system. The change of detector analytic channels, color cellophane foils and color films are used sequentially. (M.C.K.) [pt

  12. EVALUATION OF COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY APPLIED TO AN AMBIENT URBAN AEROSOL SAMPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent interest in monitoring and speciation of particulate matter has led to increased application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) to individual particle analysis. SEM/EDX provides information on the size, shape, co...

  13. Determination of line edge roughness in low-dose top-down scanning electron microscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verduin, T.; Kruit, P.; Hagen, C.W.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the off-line metrology for line edge roughness (LER) determination by using the discrete power spectral density (PSD). The study specifically addresses low-dose scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images in order to reduce the acquisition time and the risk of resist shrinkage. The

  14. A scanning electron microscopy study of the epiprocts of Western North American Sweltsa (Plecoptera: Chloroperlidae):

    OpenAIRE

    Nye, Kelly C.; Stark, Bill P.

    2010-01-01

    Three Sweltsa species with generally similar, wide epiprocts, known to occur in California and the Pacific Northwest are redescribed based on scanning electron microscopy data. The epiproct tips for Sweltsa oregonensis (Frison), S. pacifica (Banks) and S. resima Surdick are redescribed and compared with that of S. townesi (Ricker).

  15. Cold-induced imbibition damage of lettuce embryos: A study using cryo-scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, J.; Walther, P.; Hoekstra, F.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of rehydration on a multicellular organism was studied in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) embryos, using cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). Naked embryos were sensitive to imbibitional stress, whereas embryos with an intact, thick-walled endosperm were not. Imbibitional injury to

  16. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy to study the freezing behavior of plant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Seizo; Endoh, Keita

    2014-01-01

    A cryo-scanning electron microscope (cryo-SEM) is a valuable tool for observing bulk frozen samples to monitor freezing responses of plant tissues and cells. Here, essential processes of a cryo-SEM to observe freezing behaviors of plant tissue cells are described.

  17. Enhanced contrast separation in scanning electron microscopes via a suspended-thin sample approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuan; Wang, Li; Guo, Zhenxi; Wei, Bin; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yinqi; Sui, Manling; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-11-01

    A suspended-thin-sample (STS) approach for signal selection and contrast separation is developed in scanning electron microscopes with commonly used primary beam energies and traditional detectors. Topography contrast, electron channeling contrast and composition contrast are separated and largely enhanced from suspended thin samples of several hundred nanometers in thickness, which is less than the escape depth of backscattered electrons. This imaging technique enables to detect relatively pure secondary electron and elastic backscattered electron singles, whereas suppress multiple inelastic scattering effects. The provided contrast features are different from those of bulk samples, which are largely mixed with inelastic scattering effects. The STS imaging concept and method could be expected to have more applications in distinguishing materials of nanostructures, multilayers, compounds and composites, as well as in SEM-based electron backscatter diffraction, cathodoluminesence, and x-ray microanalysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Optical illusions in scanning electron micrographs: the case of the eggshell of Acrosternum (Chinavia) marginatum (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Klaus W; Reid, Walton; Schrauf, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy revealed that-as is common in this family of the Hemiptera-the eggs of the green stink bug Acrosternum (Chinavia) marginatum are roughly barrel-shaped and possess at their apical pole a row of slender extensions, the aero-micropylar processes. The outer surface of the eggshell carries hexagonally arranged pits. The analysis of cross-fractured eggshells showed that the pits have slender basal extensions with transverse diaphragms. When scanning electron micrographs of the egg surface of A. marginatum are viewed upside down, the perception flips and the pits appear as elevations to all observers addressed. Thus, we are dealing with an optical illusion, which is known as the 'shape-from-shading effect'. The perceived dents remain robust to changes in the angle of recording (zero to ca. 60 degrees tilt), the magnification (ca. x100 to x1400), and the number of pits included in the micrograph (one to several hundred). When through appropriate positioning of the specimen under the electron beam, contrast is significantly reduced and the distinct shadows at the slope of the pits are eliminated, the optical illusion does not appear. It is inferred that shades provide the decisive clue that determines whether bumps or dents will be perceived. Owing to the low resolution of their compound eyes, the shape-from-shading effect on the eggshell of the bug is in all likelihood not perceived by insects.

  19. Theoretical analysis of moiré fringe multiplication under a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yanjie; Xie, Huimin; Chen, Pengwan; Zhang, Qingming

    2011-01-01

    In this study, theoretical analysis and experimental verification of fringe multiplication under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) are presented. Fringe multiplication can be realized by enhancing the magnification or the number of scanning lines under the SEM. A universal expression of the pitch of moiré fringes is deduced. To apply this method to deformation measurement, the calculation formulas of strain and displacement are derived. Compared to natural moiré, the displacement sensitivity is increased by fringe multiplication while the strain sensitivity may be retained or enhanced depending on the number of scanning lines used. The moiré patterns are formed by the interference of a 2000 lines mm −1 grating with the scanning lines of SEM, and the measured parameters of moiré fringes from experimental results agree well with theoretical analysis

  20. Histology and scanning electron microscopy of the tubal tonsil of goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Indu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To observe the light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM of the caprine tubal tonsil. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on six crossbred male goats of 6 months of age. From the median sections of the head, tissue pieces from the nasopharynx around the auditory tube were collected and fixed for histology and SEM. Results: Tonsillar lymphoid tissue was located in the nasopharynx ventral to the auditory tube opening in the lateral wall of the pharynx. The height of the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsil measured 80.17±1.08 μm and was a pseudostratified ciliated columnar type with basal, supporting, and goblet cells. Above the dome of lymphoid nodules, the epithelium was modified into a follicle associated epithelium (FAE, also called lympho-epithelium or reticular epithelium and was characterized by the absence of goblet cells and cilia, reduced number of cell layers, and a large number of lymphoid cells due to interrupted basement membrane. The height of FAE was smaller than that of the surface epithelium and measured 34.33±0.92 μm. The surface of tubal tonsil showed folds and invaginations, which formed crypts. The lamina propria-submucosa underneath the epithelium was formed by the meshwork of reticular and, thin and loose collagen fibers with dome-like accumulation of lymphoid nodules. In the secondary lymphoid nodules, a corona, parafollicular area, and interfnodular area were observed. The average number of lymphoid nodules counted per field under low power magnification of microscope was 1.17±0.17, and the internodular distance was 34.00±4.37 μm. The mean diameter of lymphoid nodules was 566.67±11.45 μm and the lymphocyte count per nodule was 14741.67±174.36. The number of plasma cells counted per field under low power was 44.38±2.90 below the surface epithelium. The tubal tonsil was not encapsulated. In SEM, the surface epithelium of the tubal tonsils presented ciliated cells, microvillus (MV cells, and