WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface salinity sss

  1. Sea Surface Salinity : Research Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, David; Lagerloef, Gary; Font, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) can be important in regulating sea surface temperature (SST). Two technological breakthrough satellite SSS missions, Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), are currently producing high-quality SSS data. This paper provides an overview of the importance of SSS for weather and climate applications and describes the Aquarius and SMOS missions. The newness of adequately sampled SSS data prompted a first-time at-sea field campaign devoted to improved understanding of SSS variations.

  2. Eddy-induced Sea Surface Salinity changes in the tropical Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcroix, T. C.; Chaigneau, A.; Soviadan, D.; Boutin, J.

    2017-12-01

    We analyse the Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) signature of westward propagating mesoscale eddies in the tropical Pacific by collocating 5 years (2010-2015) of SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) SSS and altimetry-derived sea level anomalies. The main characteristics of mesoscale eddies are first identified in SLA maps. Composite analyses in the Central and Eastern ITCZ regions then reveal regionally dependent impacts with opposite SSS anomalies for the cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies. In the Central region (where we have the largest meridional SSS gradient), we found dipole-like SSS changes with maximum anomalies on the leading edge of the eddy. In the Eastern region (where we have the largest near-surface vertical salinity gradient) we found monopole-like SSS changes with maximum anomalies in the eddy centre. These dipole/monopole patterns and the rotational sense of eddies suggest the dominant role of horizontal and vertical advection in the Central and Eastern ITCZ regions, respectively.

  3. Aquarius L3 Polar-Gridded Weekly Sea Surface Salinity V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of weekly gridded Level-3 products of Aquarius L-band radiometer Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) retrievals from the Aquarius/Satélite de...

  4. Aquarius L3 Polar-Gridded Weekly Brightness Temperature and Sea Surface Salinity V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The data set consists of weekly gridded Level-3 products of Aquarius L-band radiometer brightness temperature (TB) observations and Sea Surface Salinity (SSS)...

  5. Quality assessment of spaceborne sea surface salinity observations over the northern North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Julia; Sena Martins, Meike; Serra, Nuno; Stammer, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Spaceborne sea surface salinity (SSS) measurements provided by the European Space Agency's (ESA) "Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity" (SMOS) and the National Aeronautical Space Agency's (NASA) "Aquarius/SAC-D" missions, covering the period from May 2012 to April 2013, are compared against in situ salinity measurements obtained in the northern North Atlantic between 20°N and 80°N. In cold water, SMOS SSS fields show a temperature-dependent negative SSS bias of up to -2 g/kg for temperatures associated sampling errors there.

  6. Monthly Sea Surface Salinity and Freshwater Flux Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, L.; Xie, P.; Wu, S.

    2017-12-01

    Taking advantages of the complementary nature of the Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) measurements from the in-situ (CTDs, shipboard, Argo floats, etc.) and satellite retrievals from Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite of the European Space Agency (ESA), the Aquarius of a joint venture between US and Argentina, and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) of national Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), a technique is developed at NOAA/NCEP/CPC to construct an analysis of monthly SSS, called the NOAA Blended Analysis of Sea-Surface Salinity (BASS). The algorithm is a two-steps approach, i.e. to remove the bias in the satellite data through Probability Density Function (PDF) matching against co-located in situ measurements; and then to combine the bias-corrected satellite data with the in situ measurements through the Optimal Interpolation (OI) method. The BASS SSS product is on a 1° by 1° grid over the global ocean for a 7-year period from 2010. Combined with the NOAA/NCEP/CPC CMORPH satellite precipitation (P) estimates and the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) evaporation (E) fields, a suite of monthly package of the SSS and oceanic freshwater flux (E and P) was developed to monitor the global oceanic water cycle and SSS on a monthly basis. The SSS in BASS product is a suite of long-term SSS and fresh water flux data sets with temporal homogeneity and inter-component consistency better suited for the examination of the long-term changes and monitoring. It presents complete spatial coverage and improved resolution and accuracy, which facilitates the diagnostic analysis of the relationship and co-variability among SSS, freshwater flux, mixed layer processes, oceanic circulation, and assimilation of SSS into global models. At the AGU meeting, we will provide more details on the CPC salinity and fresh water flux data package and its applications in the monitoring and analysis of SSS variations in association with the ENSO and other major climate

  7. Quality-controlled sea surface temperature, salinity and other measurements from the NCEI Global Thermosalinographs Database (NCEI-TSG)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection contains global in-situ sea surface temperature (SST), salinity (SSS) and other measurements from the NOAA NCEI Global Thermosalinographs Database...

  8. The Impact of the Assimilation of Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity Data in the GEOS Ocean Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernieres, Guillaume Rene Jean; Kovach, Robin M.; Keppenne, Christian L.; Akella, Santharam; Brucker, Ludovic; Dinnat, Emmanuel Phillippe

    2014-01-01

    Ocean salinity and temperature differences drive thermohaline circulations. These properties also play a key role in the ocean-atmosphere coupling. With the availability of L-band space-borne observations, it becomes possible to provide global scale sea surface salinity (SSS) distribution. This study analyzes globally the along-track (Level 2) Aquarius SSS retrievals obtained using both passive and active L-band observations. Aquarius alongtrack retrieved SSS are assimilated into the ocean data assimilation component of Version 5 of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) assimilation and forecast model. We present a methodology to correct the large biases and errors apparent in Version 2.0 of the Aquarius SSS retrieval algorithm and map the observed Aquarius SSS retrieval into the ocean models bulk salinity in the topmost layer. The impact of the assimilation of the corrected SSS on the salinity analysis is evaluated by comparisons with insitu salinity observations from Argo. The results show a significant reduction of the global biases and RMS of observations-minus-forecast differences at in-situ locations. The most striking results are found in the tropics and southern latitudes. Our results highlight the complementary role and problems that arise during the assimilation of salinity information from in-situ (Argo) and space-borne surface (SSS) observations

  9. Impacts of sea-surface salinity in an eddy-resolving semi-global OGCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furue, Ryo; Takatama, Kohei; Sasaki, Hideharu; Schneider, Niklas; Nonaka, Masami; Taguchi, Bunmei

    2018-02-01

    To explore the impacts of sea-surface salinity (SSS) on the interannual variability of upper-ocean state, we compare two 10-year runs of an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model (OGCM): in one, SSS is strongly restored toward a monthly climatology (World Ocean Atlas '98) and in the other, toward the SSS of a monthly gridded Argo product. The inclusion of the Argo SSS generally improves the interannual variability of the mixed layer depth; particularly so in the western tropical Pacific, where so-called "barrier layers" are reproduced when the Argo SSS is included. The upper-ocean subsurface salinity variability is also improved in the tropics and subtropics even below the mixed layer. To understand the reason for the latter improvement, we separate the salinity difference between the two runs into its "dynamical" and "spiciness" components. The dynamical component is dominated by small-scale noise due to the chaotic nature of mesoscale eddies. The spiciness difference indicates that as expected from the upper-ocean general circulation, SSS variability in the mixed layer is subducted into the thermocline in subtropics; this signal is generally advected downward, equatorward, and westward in the equator-side of the subtropical gyre. The SSS signal subducted in the subtropical North Pacific appears to enter the Indian Ocean through the Indonesian Throughflow, although this signal is weak and probably insignificant in our model.

  10. Improving SMOS Sea Surface Salinity in the Western Mediterranean Sea through Multivariate and Multifractal Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrella Olmedo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology using a combination of debiased non-Bayesian retrieval, DINEOF (Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions and multifractal fusion has been used to obtain Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS Sea Surface Salinity (SSS fields over the North Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. The debiased non-Bayesian retrieval mitigates the systematic errors produced by the contamination of the land over the sea. In addition, this retrieval improves the coverage by means of multiyear statistical filtering criteria. This methodology allows obtaining SMOS SSS fields in the Mediterranean Sea. However, the resulting SSS suffers from a seasonal (and other time-dependent bias. This time-dependent bias has been characterized by means of specific Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOFs. Finally, high resolution Sea Surface Temperature (OSTIA SST maps have been used for improving the spatial and temporal resolution of the SMOS SSS maps. The presented methodology practically reduces the error of the SMOS SSS in the Mediterranean Sea by half. As a result, the SSS dynamics described by the new SMOS maps in the Algerian Basin and the Balearic Front agrees with the one described by in situ SSS, and the mesoscale structures described by SMOS in the Alboran Sea and in the Gulf of Lion coincide with the ones described by the high resolution remotely-sensed SST images (AVHRR.

  11. Binned level-3 Sea Surface Salinity from the European Space Agency Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) in support of the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) data quality monitoring system (DQMS) from 2010-06-01 to 2016-05-31 (NCEI Accession 0151732)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data quality monitoring system (DQMS) for the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites level-2 sea surface salinity (SSS) swath data was developed by the...

  12. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL ANALYSIS OF SEA SURFACE SALINITY USING SATELLITE IMAGERY IN GULF OF MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rajabi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of satellite sea surface salinity (SSS observations has enabled us to analyse SSS variations with high spatiotemporal resolution. In this regards, The Level3-version4 data observed by Aquarius are used to examine the variability of SSS in Gulf of Mexico for the 2012-2014 time periods. The highest SSS value occurred in April 2013 with the value of 36.72 psu while the lowest value (35.91 psu was observed in July 2014. Based on the monthly distribution maps which will be demonstrated in the literature, it was observed that east part of the region has lower salinity values than the west part for all months mainly because of the currents which originate from low saline waters of the Caribbean Sea and furthermore the eastward currents like loop current. Also the minimum amounts of salinity occur in coastal waters where the river runoffs make fresh the high saline waters. Our next goal here is to study the patterns of sea surface temperature (SST, chlorophyll-a (CHLa and fresh water flux (FWF and examine the contributions of them to SSS variations. So by computing correlation coefficients, the values obtained for SST, FWF and CHLa are 0.7, 0.22 and 0.01 respectively which indicated high correlation of SST on SSS variations. Also by considering the spatial distribution based on the annual means, it found that there is a relationship between the SSS, SST, CHLa and the latitude in the study region which can be interpreted by developing a mathematical model.

  13. Wind induced errors on retrieving SSS with SMOS brightness temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, X.; Boutin, J.; Martin, N.; Vergely, J.; Spurgeon, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite, launched in November 2009, carries the first interferometric radiometer at L-band (1.4GHz) in orbit. The global distribution of SMOS SSS is very encouraging [Font et al., 2011]. In particular, the latitudinal variation of SSS is well captured by SMOS [Yin et al., 2012] and SSS anomalies in tropical regions seen by ARGO floats also appear on SMOS SSS [Boutin et al., 2011]. However, large discrepancies between SMOS SSS and Argo are noticed when there are large differences between SSMI wind and ECMWF wind, which is used for initializing iterations of SSS retrieval. SMOS does not carry microwave scatterometer or microwave radiometer at high frequency to simultaneously measure roughness, although it's proved in this paper that SMOS retrieved wind speed in the center of the swath (± 300 km) is partly (but not entirely) corrected for inconsistencies between ECMWF wind speeds and true wind speeds, whereas it's not possible to correct wind speed in the border of the swath. Two main aspects of wind induced errors on retrieving SSS with SMOS are: 1) The difference between and ECMWF forecast model wind and neutral equivalent wind which is defined for microwave remote sensing 2) The difference between wind used as prior and the truth. When the discrepancies between ECMWF wind and SSMI wind is out of SMOS's capability of wind correction, the retrieved SSS is biases. In this paper, we show some examples of large discrepancies between SMOS SSS and Argo when there are large differences between SSMI wind and ECMWF wind: 1) The SMOS is systematically to high in the equatorial area in the Eastern Pacific in Summer of 2010, where there is a strong westward current. 2) A case with strong wind front in the southern Pacific ocean. In this paper, we study the precision on SMOS SSS when SSMI wind speed is used as prior and compare it with SSS when ECMWF wind speed is used as prior. We also present the result of SMOS SSS when ECMWF wind

  14. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Sea Surface Salinity in Coastal Waters of China Based on Aquarius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ying; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiuying; Jin, Jiaxin

    2014-01-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) is a fundamental parameter for the study of global ocean dynamics, water cycle, and climate variability. Aquarius launched by NASA and the Space Agency of Argentina is a breakthrough which could achieve the remote sensing data of SSS. The present paper takes the coastal of China as study area, which is a representative area of ocean boundary and influenced by continental rivers (Yangtze River and Pearl River). After analyze the temporal and spatial variation of SSS in the coastal of China, the estuary area has obvious low salinity because the injected of freshwater from continent. Take the East China Sea (ECS) and South China Sea (SCS) as representative region to discuss the effect of freshwater to SSS. The salinity is almost equal in winter when the diluted water is inadequate in both rivers. However, an obvious decrease appeared in summer especial July in Yangtze River for abundance discharge inflow the ECS. This is a reasonable expression of Yangtze River discharge is remarkable influence the SSS in coastal area then Pearl River. Survey the distribution range of Yangtze River diluted water (SSS<31psu). The range is small in winter and expands to peak value in summer

  15. Sea Surface Salinity and Ocean Color Observations in the Northern Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, J. C.; Burrage, D. M.; Wang, D. W.; Howden, S. D.

    2012-04-01

    Airborne mapping of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) has been performed using L-Band radiometers for over 15 years, and has been operationally practical for over a decade. Ocean scale L-band observations of SSS are now obtained by satellite. ESA's SMOS has been operational for over two years and NASA's Aquarius satellite, launched in Jun, 2011, for over 6 months. Aircraft SSS complements satellite measurements by measuring nearer to coasts and with finer (˜1 km) spatial resolution. Due to the large effective pixel size of the satellite L-Band SSS measurements(˜35-80km), SMOS measurements do not reach the coast. Land microwave brightness signal in a given pixel contaminates the measurement of sea surface brightness temperature. However, the high signal to noise ratio (salinity contrast of 7-15 psu over 10km in some cases) of the coastal salinity signal, due to large freshwater sources, may dominate land contamination effects, to allow closer than usual SMOS SSS observations of strong coastal salinity patterns. An additional method to estimate SSS near coasts is using ocean color. Very near to coasts, freshwater sources such as rivers are relatively rich in Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM). As freshwater mixes with saltwater, salinity increases and CDOM concentrations fall. For conservative mixing, there is an inverse linear relation between CDOM and salinity, allowing estimates of SSS based on CDOM. The airborne sensors we use during STARRS flights include 2 SeaWifs airborne simulator sensors, one upward looking and one downward looking, as well as digital cameras, which we have used to identify color fronts. These provide ocean color measurements in addition to the STARRS microwave SSS measurements. We present results from an airborne campaign in the northern Gulf of Mexico, June 2-13, 2011. We made four types of flights. 1) Underflights of SMOS tracks at times coincident with SMOS passes. 2) Zig-zag flights along the coast, between Texas and Mississippi. 3

  16. A modeling study of the processes of surface salinity seasonal cycle in the Bay of Bengal.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Akhil, V.P.; Durand, F.; Lengaigne, M.; Vialard, J.; Keerthi, M.G.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Deltel, C.; Papa, F.; Montegut, C.deB.

    of Science, Bangalore, India, 5LOS, IFREMER, Plouzan�e, France Abstract In response to the Indian Monsoon freshwater forcing, the Bay of Bengal exhibits a very strong seasonal cycle in sea surface salinity (SSS), especially near the mouths of the Ganges...

  17. Comparison of the Retrieval of Sea Surface Salinity Using Different Instrument Configurations of MICAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanjie Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Microwave Imager Combined Active/Passive (MICAP has been designed to simultaneously retrieve sea surface salinity (SSS, sea surface temperature (SST and wind speed (WS, and its performance has also been preliminarily analyzed. To determine the influence of the first guess values uncertainties on the retrieved parameters of MICAP, the retrieval accuracies of SSS, SST, and WS are estimated at various noise levels. The results suggest that the errors on the retrieved SSS have not increased dues poorly known initial values of SST and WS, since the MICAP can simultaneously acquire SST information and correct ocean surface roughness. The main objective of this paper is to obtain the simplified instrument configuration of MICAP without loss of the SSS, SST, and WS retrieval accuracies. Comparisons are conducted between three different instrument configurations in retrieval mode, based on the simulation measurements of MICAP. The retrieval results tend to prove that, without the 23.8 GHz channel, the errors on the retrieved SSS, SST, and WS for MICAP could also satisfy the accuracy requirements well globally during only one satellite pass. By contrast, without the 1.26 GHz scatterometer, there are relatively large increases in the SSS, SST, and WS errors at middle/low latitudes.

  18. Toward Improved Application of SMOS and Aquarius Level-2 Sea-surface Salinity Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Bayler, E. J.; Baker-Yeboah, S.

    2016-02-01

    A large numbers of quality flags and descriptors are associated with the various geophysical, retrieval and geometrical filters provided with Level-2 (swath) sea-surface salinity (SSS) data from the European Space Agency's (ESA) Soil Moisture - Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Aquarius mission. The best application of the SSS data relies on completely understanding the impact on data quality from choices for the thresholds of the different filters available for the Level-2 products. Quick-look Level-3 (gridded) datasets generated directly from SMOS and Aquarius Level-2 products will improve the use of satellite SSS products in NOAA's data applications and in situ data comparisons, as well as for near-real-time data quality monitoring of Level-2 products. Consequently, NCEI generated 1×1 degree binned Level-3 SSS products from SMOS and Aquarius Level-2 data, minimizing latency to within 24 hours of Level-2 data availability. These satellite SSS products include SMOS monthly and 3-day (global coverage) means and Aquarius monthly and 7-day (global coverage) means. In this study, we compare the NCEI satellite binned Level-3 products to the JPL PODAAC official Aquarius and SMOS Barcelona Expert Center (BEC) Level-3 SSS products. Also, we present a comparison of the NCEI Level-3 SSS product with the NOAA/NCEI World Ocean Atlas (WOA) in situ gridded data. Results indicate consistency and a good match of NCEI-binned Level-3 SSS data with other datasets for open ocean areas, with some bias apparent in coastal and high-latitude regions.

  19. Satellite observations of rainfall effect on sea surface salinity in the waters adjacent to Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chung-Ru; Hsu, Po-Chun; Lin, Chen-Chih; Huang, Shih-Jen

    2017-10-01

    Changes of oceanic salinity are highly related to the variations of evaporation and precipitation. To understand the influence of rainfall on the sea surface salinity (SSS) in the waters adjacent to Taiwan, satellite remote sensing data from the year of 2012 to 2014 are employed in this study. The daily rain rate data obtained from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I), Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's Microwave Imager (TRMM/TMI), Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR), and WindSat Polarimetric Radiometer. The SSS data was derived from the measurements of radiometer instruments onboard the Aquarius satellite. The results show the average values of SSS in east of Taiwan, east of Luzon and South China Sea are 33.83 psu, 34.05 psu, and 32.84 psu, respectively, in the condition of daily rain rate higher than 1 mm/hr. In contrast to the rainfall condition, the average values of SSS are 34.07 psu, 34.26 psu, and 33.09 psu in the three areas, respectively at no rain condition (rain rate less than 1 mm/hr). During the cases of heavy rainfall caused by spiral rain bands of typhoon, the SSS is diluted with an average value of -0.78 psu when the average rain rate is higher than 4 mm/hr. However, the SSS was increased after temporarily decreased during the typhoon cases. A possible reason to explain this phenomenon is that the heavy rainfall caused by the spiral rain bands of typhoon may dilute the sea surface water, but the strong winds can uplift the higher salinity of subsurface water to the sea surface.

  20. Sea surface freshening inferred from SMOS and ARGO salinity: impact of rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Boutin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The sea surface salinity (SSS measured from space by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission has recently been revisited by the European Space Agency first campaign reprocessing. We show that, with respect to the previous version, biases close to land and ice greatly decrease. The accuracy of SMOS SSS averaged over 10 days, 100 × 100 km2 in the open ocean and estimated by comparison to ARGO (Array for Real-Time Geostrophic Oceanography SSS is on the order of 0.3–0.4 in tropical and subtropical regions and 0.5 in a cold region. The averaged negative SSS bias (−0.1 observed in the tropical Pacific Ocean between 5° N and 15° N, relatively to other regions, is suppressed when SMOS observations concomitant with rain events, as detected from SSM/Is (Special Sensor Microwave Imager rain rates, are removed from the SMOS–ARGO comparisons. The SMOS freshening is linearly correlated to SSM/Is rain rate with a slope estimated to −0.14 mm−1 h, after correction for rain atmospheric contribution. This tendency is the signature of the temporal SSS variability between the time of SMOS and ARGO measurements linked to rain variability and of the vertical salinity stratification between the first centimeter of the sea surface layer sampled by SMOS and the 5 m depth sampled by ARGO. However, given that the whole set of collocations includes situations with ARGO measurements concomitant with rain events collocated with SMOS measurements under no rain, the mean −0.1 bias and the negative skewness of the statistical distribution of SMOS minus ARGO SSS difference are very likely the mean signature of the vertical salinity stratification. In the future, the analysis of ongoing in situ salinity measurements in the top 50 cm of the sea surface and of Aquarius satellite SSS are expected to provide complementary information about the sea surface salinity stratification.

  1. Comparison of coral δ18O with pseudocorals derived from in situ sea surface salinity and temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, K. L.; Chaichi, N.; Maupin, C. R.; Richey, J. N.; Quinn, T. M.; Poore, R. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Paleoclimatologists use pseudocorals and forward modeling of coral oxygen isotopes (δ18O) to assess δ18O variations for comparison with climate model output in order to understand past tropical oceanic-atmospheric variability. Oxygen isotopic (δ18Ocoral) variability in shallow water coral skeletons is dependent on sea surface temperature (SST) and δ18O of seawater (δ18Osw), which varies with sea surface salinity (SSS). However, measurements of δ18Osw and SSS are sparse; therefore, simulated SSS (e.g., SODA) is typically used in pseudocoral investigations. Our study site is the Dry Tortugas National Park (DRTO; 24º42'N, 82º48'W) in the southeastern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) where hourly SST and SSS measurements are available from NOAA buoys (1992-2002) and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS; 2011-2014). Here we use bivariate forward modeling of monthly average buoy SSS and SST to develop a time series of pseudocoral δ18O (δ18Op = -0.22(‰/ºC)SST + 0.11(‰/psu)SSS) for DRTO that are compared with δ18Ocoral variations from three Siderastrea siderea coral colonies growing in close proximity within the park. We use the relationship for δ18Osw and SSS determined for Flower Garden Banks coral reef in the northern GOM (27º52'N, 93º49'W) since no measurements of δ18Osw are currently available for DRTO. δ18Op co-varies with δ18Ocoral (r2 = 0.59) with a root mean square error (RMSE = 0.32‰) greater than the intercolony δ18Ocoral variability (r2 = 0.80; RSME = 0.07‰). Discrepancies between δ18Op and δ18Ocoral may be related to the lack of a local SSS-δ18Osw relationship for DRTO or uncertainties in subannual time assignment for δ18Ocoral. A new source of SSS is the NASA satellite Aquarius (2012-2014), which may be useful in future pseudocoral studies, that is evaluated along with high resolution simulated SSS (Global Ocean Physics Reanalysis GLORYS2V3; 1993-2012). We find similar correlation between Aquarius-derived SSS and FKNMS SSS (r2

  2. 22-year surface salinity changes in the Seasonal Ice Zone near 140°E off Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Rosemary; Kestenare, Elodie

    2017-11-01

    Seasonal and interannual variations in sea surface salinity (SSS) are analyzed in the Sea Ice Zone south of 60°S, from a 22-year time series of observations near 140°E. In the northern sea-ice zone during the warming, melting cycle from October to March, waters warm by an average of 3.5 °C and become fresher by 0.1 to 0.25. In the southern sea-ice zone, the surface temperatures vary from - 1 to 1 °C over summer, and the maximal SSS range occurs in December, with a minimum SSS of 33.65 near the Southern Boundary of the ACC, reaching 34.4 in the shelf waters close to the coast. The main fronts, normally defined at subsurface, are shown to have more distinct seasonal characteristics in SSS than in SST. The interannual variations in SSS are more closely linked to variations in upstream sea-ice cover than surface forcing. SSS and sea-ice variations show distinct phases, with large biannual variations in the early 1990s, weaker variations in the 2000s and larger variations again from 2009 onwards. The calving of the Mertz Glacier Tongue in February 2010 leads to increased sea-ice cover and widespread freshening of the surface layers from 2011 onwards. Summer freshening in the northern sea-ice zone is 0.05-0.07 per decade, increasing to 0.08 per decade in the southern sea-ice zone, largely influenced by the Mertz Glacier calving event at the end of our time series. The summer time series of SSS on the shelf at 140°E is in phase but less variable than the SSS observed upstream in the Adélie Depression, and thus represents a spatially integrated index of the wider SSS variations.

  3. Sea surface salinity reconstruction as seen with foraminifera shells: Methods and cases studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaizé B.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of past salinities in surface oceans (SSS can be done by measuring the isotopic composition of foraminifera shells found in the deep sea sediments. The proportion of heavy oxygen isotopes (18O in the calcite of these shells depend on the temperature and the isotopic oxygen composition of the surrounded waters (δ18 Osw, this latter parameter depending on the water salinity. Mainly two equations allows to reconstructed past SSS, one estimating past temperature variations and the other one changes in the δ18 Osw through time. Uncertainties linked with these calculation can be important, and therefore quantitative reconstructions need to be taken with cautions. For some specific cases, uncertainties on temperature and δ18 Osw estimations can be reduced. For such cases, salinity reconstructions showing amplitude changes higher than 1 per mil can be considered as significative.

  4. In Situ Global Sea Surface Salinity and Variability from the NCEI Global Thermosalinograph Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Boyer, T.; Zhang, H. M.

    2017-12-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) plays an important role in the global ocean circulations. The variations of sea surface salinity are key indicators of changes in air-sea water fluxes. Using nearly 30 years of in situ measurements of sea surface salinity from thermosalinographs, we will evaluate the variations of the sea surface salinity in the global ocean. The sea surface salinity data used are from our newly-developed NCEI Global Thermosalinograph Database - NCEI-TSG. This database provides a comprehensive set of quality-controlled in-situ sea-surface salinity and temperature measurements collected from over 340 vessels during the period 1989 to the present. The NCEI-TSG is the world's most complete TSG dataset, containing all data from the different TSG data assembly centers, e.g. COAPS (SAMOS), IODE (GOSUD) and AOML, with more historical data from NCEI's archive to be added. Using this unique dataset, we will investigate the spatial variations of the global SSS and its variability. Annual and interannual variability will also be studied at selected regions.

  5. Sea-surface salinity variations in the northern Caribbean Sea across the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Sepulcre, S.; Vidal, L.; Tachikawa, K.; Rostek, F.; Bard, E.

    2011-01-01

    By reconstructing past hydrologic variations in the Northern Caribbean Sea and their influence on the stability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during the last 940 ka, we seek to document climate changes in this tropical area in response to the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT). Using core MD03-2628, we estimated past changes in sea surface salinity (SSS) using Δδ18O, the difference between the modern, and the past &delta...

  6. Correlations Between Sea-Surface Salinity Tendencies and Freshwater Fluxes in the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Adamec, David

    2007-01-01

    Temporal changes in sea-surface salinity (SSS) from 21 years of a high resolution model integration of the Pacific Ocean are correlated with the freshwater flux that was used to force the integration. The correlations are calculated on a 1 x10 grid, and on a monthly scale to assess the possibility of deducing evaporation minus precipitation (E-P) fields from the salinity measurements to be taken by the upcoming Aquarius/SAC-D mission. Correlations between the monthly mean E-P fields and monthly mean SSS temporal tendencies are mainly zonally-oriented, and are highest where the local precipitation is relatively high. Nonseasonal (deviations from the monthly mean) correlations are highest along mid-latitude storm tracks and are relatively small in the tropics. The response of the model's surface salinity to surface forcing is very complex, and retrievals of freshwater fluxes from SSS measurements alone will require consideration of other processes, including horizontal advection and vertical mixing, rather than a simple balance between the two.

  7. SSS* = AB+TT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Plaat (Aske); J. Schaeffer; W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); A. de Bruin (Arie)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn 1979 Stockman introduced the SSS* minimax search algorithm that dominates alpha-beta in the number of leaf nodes expanded. Further investigation of the algorithm showed that it had three serious drawbacks, which prevented its use by practitioners: it is difficult to understand, it has

  8. Mechanisms for Seasonal and Interannual Sea Surface Salinity Variability in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, J.; Stammer, D.; Serra, N.; Bryan, F.

    2016-12-01

    Space-borne salinity data in the Indian Ocean are analyzed over the period 2000-2015 based on data from the European Space Agency's (ESA) "Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity" (SMOS) and the National Aeronautical Space Agency's (NASA) "Aquarius/SAC-D" missions. The seasonal variability is the dominant mode of sea surface salinity (SSS) variability in the Indian Ocean, accounting for more than 50% of salinity variance. Through a combined analysis of the satellite and ARGO data, dominant forcing terms for seasonal salinity changes are identified. It is found, that E-P controls seasonal salinity tendency in the western Indian Ocean, where the ITCZ has a strong seasonal cycle. In contrast, Ekman advection is the dominant term in the northern and eastern equatorial Indian Ocean. The influence of vertical processes on the salinity tendency is enhanced in coastal upwelling regions and south of the equator due to mid-ocean upwelling. Jointly those processes can explain most of the observed seasonal cycle with a correlation of 0.85 and an RMS difference of 0.07/month. However, the detailed composition of driving terms depends on underlying data products. In general, our study confirms previous results from Lisan Yu (2011); however, in the eastern Indian Ocean contrasting results indicate the leading role of meridional Ekman advection to the seasonal salinity tendency instead of surface external forces due to precipitation. The inferred dominant salinity budget terms are confirmed by results obtained from a high resolution NCAR Core model run driven by NCEP forcing fields. From an EOF analysis of the salinity fields after substracting the annual and semiannual cycle we found that the first EOF mode explains more than 20% of salinity variance. The first principal component of SSS EOF is correlated with the Indian Ocean Dipole Mode Index. Nevertheless the EOF pattern shows a meridional tripole structure, while the IOD describes a zonal SST dipole (Saji et al, 1999).

  9. The French Contribution to the Voluntary Observing Ships Network of Sea Surface Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcroix, T. C.; Alory, G.; Téchiné, P.; Diverrès, D.; Varillon, D.; Cravatte, S. E.; Gouriou, Y.; Grelet, J.; Jacquin, S.; Kestenare, E.; Maes, C.; Morrow, R.; Perrier, J.; Reverdin, G. P.; Roubaud, F.

    2016-02-01

    Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) is an essential climate variable that requires long term in situ observation. The French SSS Observation Service (SSS-OS) manages a network of Voluntary Observing Ships equipped with thermosalinographs (TSG). The network is global though more concentrated in the tropical Pacific and North Atlantic oceanic basins. The acquisition system is autonomous with real time transmission and is regularly serviced at harbor calls. There are distinct real time and delayed time processing chains. Real time processing includes automatic alerts to detect potential instrument problems, in case raw data are outside of climatic limits, and graphical monitoring tools. Delayed time processing relies on a dedicated software for attribution of data quality flags by visual inspection, and correction of TSG time series by comparison with daily water samples and collocated Argo data. A method for optimizing the automatic attribution of quality flags in real time, based on testing different thresholds for data deviation from climatology and retroactively comparing the resulting flags to delayed time flags, is presented. The SSS-OS real time data feed the Coriolis operational oceanography database, while the research-quality delayed time data can be extracted for selected time and geographical ranges through a graphical web interface. Delayed time data have been also combined with other SSS data sources to produce gridded files for the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. A short review of the research activities conducted with such data is given. It includes observation-based process-oriented and climate studies from regional to global scale as well as studies where in situ SSS is used for calibration/validation of models, coral proxies or satellite data.

  10. Far Eastern Pacific Fresh Pool surface salinity variability observed by SMOS and Aquarius sensors over the period 2010-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reul, Nicolas; Alory, Gael; Maes, Christophe; Illig, Serena; Chapron, Bertrand

    2013-04-01

    The seasonal and interannual variability of the Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) deduced from SMOS and Aquarius/SAC-D satellite missions are analyzed over the period 2010-2012 in the Far Eastern Pacific Fresh Pool. The lowest values of salinity in surface layers (migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) over Central America (Alory et al., 2012). During the boreal winter, as the ITCZ moves southward, the north-easterly Panama gap wind creates a south-westward jet-like current in its path with a dipole of Ekman pumping/eddies on its flanks. As a result, upwelling in the Panama Bight brings cold and salty waters to the surface which erode the fresh pool on its eastern side while surface currents stretch the pool westward. The present study focuses on the fresh pool patterns ranging from the seasonal and interannual variability over the last 3 year period. Each year, satellite SSS products reveal the erosion of the fresh pool by the Panama upwelling. Compared to the SSS climatology from the World Ocean Atlas, satellite SSS data systematically exhibit fresher surface water (by ~0.5 to 1 unit in SSS) just after the occurrence of the maximum SSS reached in the region during the Panama upwelling events (April-May). Using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data, we found that these fresh anomalies coincide with local excess precipitation. Moreover, except during the boreal winter 2011, saltier surface waters than in the climatology were observed during the intensification phase of the Panama upwelling events (Fev-March). Using ASCAT sensor surface winds, TRMM data, surface current deduced from altimeter data combined with the satellite SSS, the study will analyze how these observed SSS anomalies could be related to the interannual variability in the dominant physical mechanisms involved in the freshpool dynamics. A particular focus will be set on the consistency between SMOS and Aquarius observations and on the potential role of the surface freshwater

  11. Satellite surface salinity maps to determine fresh water fluxes in the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Estrella, Olmedo; Emelianov, Mikhail; Ballabrera, Joaquim; Turiel, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Salinity and temperature gradients drive the thermohaline circulation of the oceans, and play a key role in the ocean-atmosphere coupling. The strong and direct interactions between the ocean and the cryosphere (primarily through sea ice and ice shelves) are also a key ingredient of the thermohaline circulation. Recent observational studies have documented changes in upper Arctic Ocean hydrography [1, 2]. The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, launched in 2009, have the objective to measure soil moisture over the continents and sea surface salinity over the oceans [3]. However, SMOS is also making inroads in Cryospheric science, as the measurements of thin ice thickness and sea ice concentration. SMOS carries an innovative L-band (1.4 GHz, or 21-cm wavelength), passive interferometric radiometer (the so-called MIRAS) that measures the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the Earth's surface, at about 50 km spatial resolution wide swath (1200-km), and with a 3-day revisit time at the equator, but more frequently at the poles. Although the SMOS radiometer operating frequency offers almost the maximum sensitivity of the brightness temperature (TB) to sea surface salinity (SSS) variations, such sensitivity is rather low, even lower at cold waters [4]: 90% of ocean SSS values span a range of brightness temperatures of just 5K. This implies that the SMOS SSS retrieval requires a high performance of the MIRAS interferometric radiometer [5]. New algorithms, recently developed at the Barcelona Expert Center (BEC) to improve the quality of SMOS measurements [6], allow for the first time to derive cold-water SSS maps from SMOS data, and to observe the variability of the SSS in the higher north Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean. In this work, we will provide an assessment of the quality of these new SSS Arctic maps, and we will illustrate their potential to monitor the impact on ocean state of the discharges from the main rivers to the Arctic Ocean. Moreover

  12. El Niño-Southern Oscillation-time scale covariation of sea surface salinity and freshwater flux in the western tropical and northern subtropical Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Akira; Hasegawa, Takuya; Ueki, Iwao; Ando, Kentaro

    2017-07-01

    We examined the covariation of sea surface salinity (SSS) and freshwater flux in the western tropical and northern subtropical Pacific on the El Niño-Southern Oscillation time scale, using a canonical correlation analysis of monthly data between 2001 and 2013. The dominant covariation, i.e., the first canonical mode, has large positive and negative amplitudes in regions east of the Philippines and New Guinea, respectively, and reaches peaks in autumn to winter of El Niño years. The positive SSS anomaly east of the Philippines is advected to the Kuroshio Extension region. We found that the second canonical mode is another coupled variation with localized amplitudes of SSS under the atmospheric convergence zones in winter to spring of La Niña years. However, the negative SSS anomaly is annihilated possibly by the evaporation in the subtropical region.

  13. The new CMEMS optimally interpolated sea surface salinity and density reprocessed dataset (1993-2015): validation and preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droghei, Riccardo; Buongiorno Nardelli, Bruno; Santoleri, Rosalia

    2017-04-01

    Monitoring Sea Surface Density (SSD), Salinity (SSS) and Temperature (SST) allows investigating important aspects of the Earth system dynamics, ranging from global hydrological cycle to ocean thermohaline circulation, with relevant implications on both local/regional, short scale processes, and global climate. Different approaches have been recently proposed to combine in situ measurements and satellite data and provide gap-free SSS at regular spatial and temporal resolution, aiming to resolve also ocean mesoscale. Here, we present a new global dataset of optimally interpolated SSS and SSD maps, based on the multidimensional covariance model proposed by Droghei et al. (2016). The dataset covers the whole period from 1993 to 2015 at ¼°x¼° spatial resolution and weekly sampling, and is presently distributed by the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitorning Service (CMEMS). The technique allows to interpolate in situ salinity and in situ density measurements using satellite sea surface temperature differences as an additional parameter in the optimal estimate. The validation with independent TSG measurements and the analysis of spatial wavenumber spectra show that the multidimensional optimum interpolation (OI) method significantly increases the L4 effective resolution while reducing the errors with respect to more classical aprroaches. A preliminary analysis of global SSS/SSD variability and trends is presented.

  14. Assessment of seasonal and year-to-year surface salinity signals retrieved from SMOS and Aquarius missions in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Akhil, V.P.; Lengaigne, M.; Durand, F.; Vialard, J.; Chaitanya, A.V.S.; Keerthi, M.G.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Boutin, J.; de Boyer, M.C.

    The Bay of Bengal (BoB) exhibits a wide range of sea surface salinity (SSS), with very fresh water induced by heavy monsoonal precipitation and river run-offs to the north, and saltier water to the south. This is a particularly challenging region...

  15. Seasonal dynamics of sea surface salinity off Panama: The far Eastern Pacific Fresh Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alory, GaëL.; Maes, Christophe; Delcroix, Thierry; Reul, Nicolas; Illig, Serena

    2012-04-01

    The freshest surface waters in the tropical Pacific are found at its eastern boundary. Using in situ observations, we depict the quasi-permanent presence of a far eastern Pacific fresh pool with sea surface salinity (SSS) lower than 33, which is confined between Panama's west coast and 85°W in December and extends westward to 95°W in April. Strong SSS fronts are found at the outer edge of this fresh pool. We investigate the seasonal dynamics of the fresh pool using complementary satellite wind, rain, sea level and in situ oceanic current data at the surface, along with hydrographic profiles. The fresh pool appears off Panama due to the strong summer rains associated with the northward migration of the ITCZ over Central America in June. During the second half of the year, the eastward-flowing North Equatorial Counter-Current keeps it trapped to the coast and strengthens the SSS front on its western edge. During winter, as the ITCZ moves southward, the northeasterly Panama gap wind creates a southwestward jet-like current in its path with a dipole of Ekman pumping/eddies on its flanks. As a result, upwelling in the Panama Bight brings to the surface cold and salty waters which erode the fresh pool on its eastern side while both the jet current and the enhanced South Equatorial Current stretch the fresh pool westward until it nearly disappears in May. New SMOS satellite SSS data proves able to capture the main seasonal features of the fresh pool and monitor its spatial extent.

  16. Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) salinity data validation over Malaysia coastal water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reba, M N M; Rosli, A Z; Rahim, N A

    2014-01-01

    The study of sea surface salinity (SSS) plays an important role in the marine ecosystem, estimation of global ocean circulation and observation of fisheries, aquaculture, coral reef and sea grass habitats. The new challenge of SSS estimation is to exploit the ocean surface brightness temperature (Tb) observed by the Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) onboard the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite that is specifically designed to provide the best retrieval of ocean salinity and soil moisture using the L band of 1.4 GHz radiometer. Tb observed by radiometer is basically a function of the dielectric constant, sea surface temperature (SST), wind speed (U), incidence angle, polarization and SSS. Though, the SSS estimation is an ill-posed inversion problem as the relationship between the Tb and SSS is non-linear function. Objective of this study is to validate the SMOS SSS estimates with the ground-truth over the Malaysia coastal water. The LM iteratively determines the SSS of SMOS by the reduction of the sum of squared errors between Tb SMOS and Tb simulation (using in-situ) based on the updated geophysical triplet in the direction of the minimum of the cost function. The minimum cost function is compared to the desired threshold at each iteration and this recursive least square process updates the SST, U and SSS until the cost function converged. The designed LM's non-linear inversion algorithm simultaneously estimates SST, U and SSS and thus, map of SSS over Malaysia coastal water is produced from the regression model and accuracy assessment between the SMOS and in-situ retrieved SSS. This study found a good agreement in the validation with R square of 0.9 and the RMSE of 0.4. It is concluded that the non-linear inversion method is effective and practical to extract SMOS SSS, U and SST simultaneously

  17. A comparison of sea surface salinity in the equatorial Pacific Ocean during the 1997-1998, 2012-2013, and 2014-2015 ENSO events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Caroline M.; Subrahmanyam, Bulusu; Giese, Benjamin S.

    2017-11-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) variability during the 1997-1998 El Niño event and the failed 2012-2013 and 2014-2015 El Niño events is explored using a combination of observations and ocean reanalyses. Previously, studies have mainly focused on the sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH) variability. This analysis utilizes salinity data from Argo and the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) reanalysis to examine the SSS variability. Advective processes and evaporation minus precipitation (E-P) variability is understood to influence SSS variability. Using surface wind, surface current, evaporation, and precipitation data, we analyze the causes for the observed SSS variability during each event. Barrier layer thickness and upper level salt content are also examined in connection to subsurface salinity variability. Both advective processes and E-P variability are important during the generation and onset of a successful El Niño, while a lack of one or both of these processes leads to a failed ENSO event.

  18. An in situ-satellite blended analysis of global sea surface salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, P.; Boyer, T.; Bayler, E.; Xue, Y.; Byrne, D.; Reagan, J.; Locarnini, R.; Sun, F.; Joyce, R.; Kumar, A.

    2014-09-01

    The blended monthly sea surface salinity (SSS) analysis, called the NOAA "Blended Analysis of Surface Salinity" (BASS), is constructed for the 4 year period from 2010 to 2013. Three data sets are employed as inputs to the blended analysis: in situ SSS measurements aggregated and quality controlled by NOAA/NODC, and passive microwave (PMW) retrievals from both the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Aquarius/SAC-D and the European Space Agency's (ESA) Soil Moisture-Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites. The blended analysis comprises two steps. First, the biases in the satellite retrievals are removed through probability distribution function (PDF) matching against temporally spatially colocated in situ measurements. The blended analysis is then achieved through optimal interpolation (OI), where the analysis for the previous time step is used as the first guess while the in situ measurements and bias-corrected satellite retrievals are employed as the observations to update the first guess. Cross validations illustrate improved quality of the blended analysis, with reduction in bias and random errors over most of the global oceans as compared to the individual inputs. Large uncertainty, however, remains in high-latitude oceans and coastal regions where the in situ networks are sparse and current-generation satellite retrievals have limitations. Our blended SSS analysis shows good agreements with the NODC in situ-based analysis over most of the tropical and subtropical oceans, but large differences are observed for high-latitude oceans and along coasts. In the tropical oceans, the BASS is shown to have coherent variability with precipitation and evaporation associated with the evolution of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  19. Sea-surface salinity variations in the northern Caribbean Sea across the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sepulcre

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available By reconstructing past hydrologic variations in the Northern Caribbean Sea and their influence on the stability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC during the last 940 ka, we seek to document climate changes in this tropical area in response to the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT. Using core MD03-2628, we estimated past changes in sea surface salinity (SSS using Δδ18O, the difference between the modern, and the past δ18O of seawater (obtained by combining alkenone thermometer data with the δ18O of the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides rube (white and corrected for ice-sheet volume effects. Today, the lowest SSS values in the area studied are associated with the northernmost location of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ. The Δδ18O record obtained from core MD03-2628 exhibits glacial/interglacial cyclicity with higher values during all glacial periods spanning the last 940 ka, indicating increased SSS. A long-term trend was also observed in the Δδ18O values that exhibited a shift toward lower values for interglacial periods during the last 450 ka, as compared to interglacial stages older than 650 ka. A rise in SSS during glacial stages may be related to the southernmost location of the ITCZ, which is induced by a steeper cross-equator temperature gradient and associated with reduced northward cross-equatorial oceanic transport. Therefore, the results suggest a permanent link between the tropical salinity budget and the AMOC during the last 940 ka. Following the MPT, lower salinities during the last five interglacial stages indicated a northernmost ITCZ location that was forced by changes in the cross-equator temperature gradient and that was associated with the poleward position of Southern Oceanic Fronts that amplify the transport of heat and moisture to the North Atlantic. These processes may have contributed to the amplification of the

  20. Sensitivity of Global Sea-Air CO2 Flux to Gas Transfer Algorithms, Climatological Wind Speeds, and Variability of Sea Surface Temperature and Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Charles R.; Signorini, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Sensitivity analyses of sea-air CO2 flux to gas transfer algorithms, climatological wind speeds, sea surface temperatures (SST) and salinity (SSS) were conducted for the global oceans and selected regional domains. Large uncertainties in the global sea-air flux estimates are identified due to different gas transfer algorithms, global climatological wind speeds, and seasonal SST and SSS data. The global sea-air flux ranges from -0.57 to -2.27 Gt/yr, depending on the combination of gas transfer algorithms and global climatological wind speeds used. Different combinations of SST and SSS global fields resulted in changes as large as 35% on the oceans global sea-air flux. An error as small as plus or minus 0.2 in SSS translates into a plus or minus 43% deviation on the mean global CO2 flux. This result emphasizes the need for highly accurate satellite SSS observations for the development of remote sensing sea-air flux algorithms.

  1. The effect of precipitation on measuring sea surface salinity from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xuchen; Pan, Delu; He, Xianqiang; Wang, Difeng; Zhu, Qiankun; Gong, Fang

    2017-10-01

    The sea surface salinity (SSS) can be measured from space by using L-band (1.4 GHz) microwave radiometers. The L-band has been chosen for its sensitivity of brightness temperature to the change of salinity. However, SSS remote sensing is still challenging due to the low sensitivity of brightness temperature to SSS variation: for the vertical polarization, the sensitivity is about 0.4 to 0.8 K/psu with different incident angles and sea surface temperature; for horizontal polarization, the sensitivity is about 0.2 to 0.6 K/psu. It means that we have to make radiometric measurements with accuracy better than 1K even for the best sensitivity of brightness temperature to SSS. Therefore, in order to retrieve SSS, the measured brightness temperature at the top of atmosphere (TOA) needs to be corrected for many sources of error. One main geophysical source of error comes from atmosphere. Currently, the atmospheric effect at L-band is usually corrected by absorption and emission model, which estimate the radiation absorbed and emitted by atmosphere. However, the radiation scattered by precipitation is neglected in absorption and emission models, which might be significant under heavy precipitation. In this paper, a vector radiative transfer model for coupled atmosphere and ocean systems with a rough surface is developed to simulate the brightness temperature at the TOA under different precipitations. The model is based on the adding-doubling method, which includes oceanic emission and reflection, atmospheric absorption and scattering. For the ocean system with a rough surface, an empirical emission model established by Gabarro and the isotropic Cox-Munk wave model considering shadowing effect are used to simulate the emission and reflection of sea surface. For the atmospheric attenuation, it is divided into two parts: For the rain layer, a Marshall-Palmer distribution is used and the scattering properties of the hydrometeors are calculated by Mie theory (the scattering

  2. Twentieth century sea surface temperature and salinity variations at Timor inferred from paired coral δ18O and Sr/Ca measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyarini, Sri Yudawati; Pfeiffer, Miriam; Nurhati, Intan Suci; Aldrian, Edvin; Dullo, Wolf-Christian; Hetzinger, Steffen

    2014-07-01

    The Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), which represents the global ocean circulation connecting the Pacific Warm Pool to the Indian Ocean, strongly influences the Indo-Pacific climate. ITF monitoring since the late 1990s using mooring buoys have provided insights on seasonal and interannual time scales. However, the absence of longer records limits our perspective on its evolution over the past century. Here, we present sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity (SSS) proxy records from Timor Island located at the ITF exit passage via paired coral δ18O and Sr/Ca measurements spanning the period 1914-2004. These high-resolution proxy based climate data of the last century highlights improvements and cautions when interpreting paleoclimate records of the Indonesian region. If the seasonality of SST and SSS is not perfectly in phase, the application of coral Sr/Ca thermometry improves SST reconstructions compared to estimates based on coral δ18O only. Our records also underline the importance of ocean advection besides rainfall on local SSS in the region. Although the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) causes larger anomalies relative to the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), Timor coral-based SST and SSS records robustly correlate with IOD on interannual time scales, whereas ENSO only modifies Timor SST. Similarly, Timor SST and SSS are strongly linked to Indian Ocean decadal-scale variations that appear to lead Timor oceanographic conditions by about 1.6-2 years. Our study sheds new light on the complex signatures of Indo-Pacific climate modes on SST and SSS dynamics of the ITF. This article was corrected on 8 AUG 2014. See the end of the full text for details.

  3. Causes for the recent increase in sea surface salinity in the north ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... salinity budget was used to identify the mechanisms responsible for the increase. When comparing the period 2002–2009 with the period 1993–2001, significant changes in the salt budget were identified. The increase in SSS in the more recent period appeared to be driven by changes in the atmospheric freshwater flux, ...

  4. Detecting the influence of ocean process on the moisture supply for India summer monsoon from Satellite Sea Surface Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, W.; Yueh, S. H.; Liu, W. T.; Fore, A.; Hayashi, A.

    2016-02-01

    A strong contrast in the onset of Indian summer monsoon was observed by independent satellites: average rain rate over India subcontinent (IS) in June was more than doubled in 2013 than 2012 (TRMM); also observed are larger area of wet soil (Aquarius) and high water storage (GRACE). The difference in IS rainfall was contributed to the moisture inputs through west coast of India, estimated from ocean wind (OSCAT2) and water vapor (TMI). This is an interesting testbed for studying the role of ocean on terrestrial water cycle, in particular the Indian monsoon, which has tremendous social-economical impact. What is the source of extra moisture in 2013 or deficit in 2012 for the monsoon onset? Is it possible to quantify the contribution of ocean process that maybe responsible for redistributing the freshwater in favor of the summer monsoon moisture supply? This study aims to identify the influence of ocean processes on the freshwater exchange between air-sea interfaces, using Aquarius sea surface salinity (SSS). We found two areas in Indian Ocean with high correlation between IS rain rate and Aquarius SSS: one area is in the Arabian Sea adjacent to IS, another area is a horizontal patch from 60°E to 100°E centered around 10°S. On the other hand, E-P (OAflux, TRMM) shows no similar correlation patterns with IS rain. Based on the governing equation of the salt budget in the upper ocean, we define the freshwater flux, F, from the oceanic branch of the water cycle, including contributions from salinity tendency, advection, and subsurface process. The tendency and advection terms are estimated using Aquarius SSS and OSCAR ocean current. We will present results of analyzing the spatial and temporal variability of F and evidence of and hypothesis on how the oceanic processes may enhance the moisture supply for summer Indian monsoon onset in 2013 comparing with 2012. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) has been producing the global soil moisture (SM) every 2-3 days

  5. Assessing the Potential to Derive Air-Sea Freshwater Fluxes from Aquarius-Like Observations of Surface Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Li; Adamec, David

    2009-01-01

    A state-of-the-art numerical model is used to investigate the possibility of determining freshwater flux fields from temporal changes io sea-surface salinity (SSS), a goal of the satellite salinity-measuring mission, Aquarius/SAC-D. Because the estimated advective temporal scale is usually longer than the Aquarius/SAC-D revisit time, the possibility of producing freshwater flux estimates from temporal salinity changes is first examined by using a correlation analysis. For the mean seasonal cycle, the patterns of the correlations between the freshwater fluxes and surface salinity temporal tendencies are mainly zonally oriented, and are highest where the local precipitation is also relatively high. Nonseasonal (deviations from the monthly mean) correlations are highest along mid-latitude moon tracks and are relatively small in the tropics. The complex correlation patterns presented here suggest that a global retrieval of the difference between evaporation and precipitation (E-P) from salinity changes requires more complex techniques than a simple consideration of local balance with surface forcing.

  6. Binned level-3 Sea Surface Salinity from Aquarius/Satélite de Aplicaciones Científicas (SAC)-D mission in support of the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) data quality monitoring system (DQMS) from 2011-08-28 to 2015-06-10 (NCEI Accession 0151631)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data quality monitoring system (DQMS) for the Aquarius/Satélite de Aplicaciones Científicas (SAC)-D satellites level-2 sea-surface salinity (SSS) swath data...

  7. Aquarius and Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, David M.; Lagerloef, G. S. E.; Torrusio, S.

    2012-01-01

    Aquarius is an L-band radiometer and scatterometer instrument combination designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The instrument is designed to provide global salinity maps on a monthly basis with a spatial resolution of 150 km and an accuracy of 0.2 psu. The science objective is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. This data will promote understanding of ocean circulation and its role in the global water cycle and climate.

  8. North Atlantic salinity as a predictor of Sahel rainfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Laifang; Schmitt, Raymond W; Ummenhofer, Caroline C; Karnauskas, Kristopher B

    2016-05-01

    Water evaporating from the ocean sustains precipitation on land. This ocean-to-land moisture transport leaves an imprint on sea surface salinity (SSS). Thus, the question arises of whether variations in SSS can provide insight into terrestrial precipitation. This study provides evidence that springtime SSS in the subtropical North Atlantic ocean can be used as a predictor of terrestrial precipitation during the subsequent summer monsoon in Africa. Specifically, increased springtime SSS in the central to eastern subtropical North Atlantic tends to be followed by above-normal monsoon-season precipitation in the African Sahel. In the spring, high SSS is associated with enhanced moisture flux divergence from the subtropical oceans, which converges over the African Sahel and helps to elevate local soil moisture content. From spring to the summer monsoon season, the initial water cycling signal is preserved, amplified, and manifested in excessive precipitation. According to our analysis of currently available soil moisture data sets, this 3-month delay is attributable to a positive coupling between soil moisture, moisture flux convergence, and precipitation in the Sahel. Because of the physical connection between salinity, ocean-to-land moisture transport, and local soil moisture feedback, seasonal forecasts of Sahel precipitation can be improved by incorporating SSS into prediction models. Thus, expanded monitoring of ocean salinity should contribute to more skillful predictions of precipitation in vulnerable subtropical regions, such as the Sahel.

  9. Linkage between seasonal insolation gradient in the tropical northern hemisphere and the sea surface salinity of the equatorial Indian Ocean during the last glacial period

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.; Mackensen, A.; Weldeab, S.

    oxygen isotopic composition to estimate the local seawater oxygen isotopic composition (δ18Osw-ivc). The change in δ18Osw-ivc relative to the present day value (∆δ18Osw-ivc) was then calculated by subtracting the modern surface seawater oxygen isotopic... the modern measurement (Fig. 5), match very well with the Levitus 7 annual SSS over the core site, showing values of 34.7 and 34.8, respectively. Delaygue et al (2001) also developed a seawater oxygen isotope/salinity relationship for the Bay of Bengal...

  10. Usage of satellite data SMOS in order to characterize Sea Surface Salinity in the western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Anna; Robins, Lotem; Olmedo Casal, Estrella

    2017-04-01

    Measuring the level of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) is a principle component in order to understand climate processes that occur today and for better understanding of climate change in the future; Different processes create different salt concentration in different places in the oceans. This different salinity level had a role in determining the vertical and horizontal water fluxes. As the first three meters of the ocean surface contain more heat than that in the whole atmosphere, the influence of the salinity level on the layering of the different water levels and the different fluxes, thus, it is an important factor determining air sea interaction. An existing problem in predicting the oceans is the lack of salinity samples in the oceans. While Sea surface Temperature (SST) could be evaluated easier from remote sensed devices, analyzing data at the Near Infra-Red and Visual wavelength. Measuring and locating salinity spectral signature was an obstacle. This lack of data caused problems running different models that describe different parameters of the ocean, both in depth and surface. One of the main goals of a program called: Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), is to deliver data on a global scale concerning the sea surface salinity (SSS). The main idea of the SMOS technology is based on the differences between the electro-magnetic properties (spectral signatures) of distilled water and salted water. High concentration of salt revealed by analyzing the energy emitted from the ocean's surface, using detectors that are sensitive for the wavelength at the range of 21 cm (L-band: 1.4 GHz). One of the main problems, measuring this wavelength, is that it requires very large antennas. In order to solve this problem, a Y shaped satellite was built, on each of its arms, 69 antennas were attached, with equal distances between each antenna. Each antenna is 165 mm on the diameter and their height is 19 mm. This antenna transmits all the information they receive to a

  11. The salinity signature of the cross-shelf exchanges in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean: Satellite observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Raul A; Piola, Alberto R; Fenco, Harold; Matano, Ricardo P; Combes, Vincent; Chao, Yi; James, Corinne; Palma, Elbio D; Saraceno, Martin; Strub, P Ted

    2014-11-01

    Satellite-derived sea surface salinity (SSS) data from Aquarius and SMOS are used to study the shelf-open ocean exchanges in the western South Atlantic near 35°S. Away from the tropics, these exchanges cause the largest SSS variability throughout the South Atlantic. The data reveal a well-defined seasonal pattern of SSS during the analyzed period and of the location of the export of low-salinity shelf waters. In spring and summer, low-salinity waters over the shelf expand offshore and are transferred to the open ocean primarily southeast of the river mouth (from 36°S to 37°30'S). In contrast, in fall and winter, low-salinity waters extend along a coastal plume and the export path to the open ocean distributes along the offshore edge of the plume. The strong seasonal SSS pattern is modulated by the seasonality of the along-shelf component of the wind stress over the shelf. However, the combined analysis of SSS, satellite-derived sea surface elevation and surface velocity data suggest that the precise location of the export of shelf waters depends on offshore circulation patterns, such as the location of the Brazil Malvinas Confluence and mesoscale eddies and meanders of the Brazil Current. The satellite data indicate that in summer, mixtures of low-salinity shelf waters are swiftly driven toward the ocean interior along the axis of the Brazil/Malvinas Confluence. In winter, episodic wind reversals force the low-salinity coastal plume offshore where they mix with tropical waters within the Brazil Current and create a warmer variety of low-salinity waters in the open ocean. Satellite salinity sensors capture low-salinity detrainment events from shelves SW Atlantic low-salinity detrainments cause highest basin-scale variability In summer low-salinity detrainments cause extended low-salinity anomalies.

  12. Reconstructing Holocene sea surface salinity changes in the Northern Aegean Sea: evidence from morphological variations of Emiliania huxleyi-coccoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrle, Jens O.; Gebühr, Christina; Bollmann, Jörg; Giesenberg, Annika; Kranzdorf, Philip

    2013-04-01

    The Aegean Sea is a key area for our understanding of the impact of changes in the hydrological cycle on ocean circulation in the Mediterranean Sea. The Aegean Sea appears to be very sensitive to climate changes in Europe because of its small volume and the position between high- and low-latitude climate regimes. Therefore, it is assumed to record environmental change, especially changes in sea surface water salinity (SSS) without a significant time lag with respect to the forcing process (Rohling et al., 2002). However, up to date, SSS cannot be easily reconstructed from geological archives because several assumptions need to be made that lead to a significant error of the salinity estimates (e.g. Rohling, 2000). Here, we present the first high resolution SSS reconstruction from a Holocene sediment core based on a recently developed transfer function using the morphological variation of Emiliania huxleyi coccoliths (Bollmann & Herrle 2007, Bollmann et al., 2009). The core is located in the northern Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean Basin) and covers the time period 3 -11ka ago. Sea surface water salinity in the Aegean Sea has varied in concert with temperature oscillations as recorded in Greenland ice cores (iGISP2 ice core δ18O record) with a periodicity of about 900 years (Schulz & Paull, 2002). Four major SSS events can be identified at about 3.9, 4.7, 6.4, 7.4, and 8.2 ka in the northern Aegean Sea that correlate with increases in GISP2 δ18O (Schulz & Paull, 2002) as well as decreasing percentages of tree pollen studied at the same core expect for 3.9 ka (Kotthoff et al., 2008). The most prominent salinity increase occurred during the short-lived 8.2 kyr cold event (e.g., Rohling & Pälike, 2005), which was most likely triggered by a melt-water related perturbation of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning and associated decrease of ocean heat transport to the North Atlantic. We suggest that the salinity fluctuations in the northern Aegean Sea are related to

  13. Sea surface salinity variability in the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, B.; Murty, V.S.N.; Heffner, D.M.

    . Thompson et al. (2006) reported the Indian Ocean circulation and SSS variability during IODZM events, using different OGCM (Ocean General Circulation Model) simulations and assimilated data sets of SODA (Simple Ocean Data Assimilation) and ECCO...

  14. Amazon Plume Salinity Response to Ocean Teleconnections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Tyaquiçã

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST variability strongly influences rainfall changes in the Amazon River basin, which impacts on the river discharge and consequently the sea surface salinity (SSS in the Amazon plume. An Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF analysis was performed using 46 years of SST, rainfall, and SSS datasets, in order to establish the relationship between these variables. The first three modes of SST/rainfall explained 87.83% of the total covariance. Pacific and Atlantic SSTs led Amazon basin rainfall events by 4 months. The resultant SSS in the western tropical North Atlantic (WTNA lagged behind basin rainfall by 3 months, with 75.04% of the total covariance corresponding to the first four EOF modes. The first EOF mode indicated a strong SSS pattern along the coast that was connected to negative rainfall anomalies covering the Amazon basin, linked to El Niño events. A second pattern also presented positive SSS anomalies, when the rainfall was predominantly over the northwestern part of the Amazon basin, with low rainfall around the Amazon River mouth. The pattern with negative SSS anomalies in the WTNA was associated with the fourth mode, when positive rainfall anomalies were concentrated in the northwest part of South America. The spatial rainfall structure of this fourth mode was associated with the spatial rainfall distribution found in the third EOF mode of SST vs. rainfall, which was a response to La Niña Modoki events. A statistical analysis for the 46 year period and monthly anomaly composites for 2008 and 2009 indicated that La Niña Modoki events can be used for the prediction of low SSS patterns in the WNTA.

  15. Salinization and arsenic contamination of surface water in southwest Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, John C; George, Gregory; Fry, David; Benneyworth, Laura; Wilson, Carol; Auerbach, Leslie; Roy, Kushal; Karim, Md Rezaul; Akter, Farjana; Goodbred, Steven

    2017-09-11

    To identify the causes of salinization and arsenic contamination of surface water on an embanked island (i.e., polder) in the tidal delta plain of SW Bangladesh we collected and analyzed water samples in the dry (May) and wet (October) seasons in 2012-2013. Samples were collected from rice paddies (wet season), saltwater ponds used for brine shrimp aquaculture (dry season), freshwater ponds and tidal channels (both wet and dry season), and rainwater collectors. Continuous measurements of salinity from March 2012 to February 2013 show that tidal channel water increases from ~0.15 ppt in the wet season up to ~20 ppt in the dry season. On the polder, surface water exceeds the World Health Organization drinking water guideline of 10 μg As/L in 78% of shrimp ponds and 27% of rice paddies, raising concerns that produced shrimp and rice could have unsafe levels of As. Drinking water sources also often have unsafe As levels, with 83% of tubewell and 43% of freshwater pond samples having >10 μg As/L. Water compositions and field observations are consistent with shrimp pond water being sourced from tidal channels during the dry season, rather than the locally saline groundwater from tubewells. Irrigation water for rice paddies is also obtained from the tidal channels, but during the wet season when surface waters are fresh. Salts become concentrated in irrigation water through evaporation, with average salinity increasing from 0.43 ppt in the tidal channel source to 0.91 ppt in the rice paddies. Our observations suggest that the practice of seasonally alternating rice and shrimp farming in a field has a negligible effect on rice paddy water salinity. Also, shrimp ponds do not significantly affect the salinity of adjacent surface water bodies or subjacent groundwater because impermeable shallow surface deposits of silt and clay mostly isolate surface water bodies from each other and from the shallow groundwater aquifer. Bivariate plots of conservative element

  16. Remote Sensing of Salinity and Overview of Results from Aquarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Dinnat, E. P.; Meissner, T.; Wentz, F.; Yueh, S. H.; Lagerloef, G. S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Aquarius is a combined active/passive microwave (L-band) instrument designed to map the salinity of global oceans from space. The specific goal of Aquarius is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the sea surface salinity (SSS) field of the open ocean (i.e. away from land). The instrumentation has been designed to provide monthly maps with a spatial resolution of 150 km and an accuracy of 0.2 psu

  17. ENSO signals on sea-surface salinity in the eastern tropical pacific ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1998-01-01

    types collected in the tropical Pacific are analyzed to assess the regional impacts of past (1972-1996 El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO events. Focus is made on the regional changes in sea-surface temperature and salinity. Commercial vessels were recently equipped with automated thermosalinographs which allows to monitor the location of salinity front along the Panama-Tahiti line, separating the Panama Gulf from the South Pacific water masses. The latitudinal change of the salinity front is well correlated with the latitudinal change of the ITCZ. Salinity distribution gives additional information on El-Niño development. How future real time SSS data might provide interesting information on the development of ENSO phenomenon in the eastern tropical Pacific area will be discussed.

  18. Precipitation of salt in saline water drop on superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Bongsu; Moon, Myoung-Woon; Kim, Ho-Young

    2012-11-01

    In the membrane distillation process, water vapor of heated, pressurized saline water is transported across the membrane to be collected as pure water. While the water-repellency of the membrane surface has been considered an important parameter affecting the distillation efficiency, the resistance of the membrane to the contamination due to salt has gathered little scientific interest thus far. Here we experimentally investigate the precipitation of salt in sessile saline water drops, to find drastic differences in salt crystallization behavior depending on the water-repellency of solid surface. On a moderately hydrophobic surface with a static contact angle with water being about 150 degrees, salt crystals are aligned and stacked along the initial contact line, forming an interesting structure resembling an igloo. On a superhydrophobic surface with about 164 degrees of static contact angle with water, salt crystallizes only at the center of the drop-solid contact area, forming a pebble-shaped structure. We explain this difference by comparing the evaporation modes (constant contact radius versus constant contact angle) of the sessile drops on those surfaces. We also visualize the liquid flow within drops undergoing evaporation and precipitation at the same time using PIV.

  19. Reconstruction from EOF analysis of SMOS salinity data in Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parard, Gaelle; Alvera-Azcárate, Aida; Barth, Alexander; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Becker, Jean-Marie

    2017-04-01

    Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) data from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is reconstructed in the North Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea using DINEOF (Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions). We used the satellite data Level 2 from SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre between 2011 and 2015. DINEOF is a technique that reconstructs missing data and removes noise by retaining only an optimal set of EOFs. DINEOF analysis is used to detect and remove outliers from the SMOS SSS daily field. The gain obtained with DINEOF method and L2 SMOS data give a higher spatial and temporal resolution between 2011 and 2015, allow to study the SSS variability from daily to seasonal resolution. In order to improve the SMOS salinity data reconstruction we combine with other parameters measured from satellite such chlorophyll, sea surface temperature, precipitation and CDOM variability. After a validation of the SMOS satellite data reconstruction with in situ data (CTD, Argo float salinity measurement) in the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea, the main SSS processes and their variability are studied. The gain obtained with the higher spatial and temporal resolution with SMOS salinity data give assess to study the characteristics of oceanic structures in North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea.

  20. Microwave Remote Sensing Modeling of Ocean Surface Salinity and Winds Using an Empirical Sea Surface Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon H.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive microwave remote sensing techniques have been investigated for the remote sensing of ocean surface wind and salinity. We revised an ocean surface spectrum using the CMOD-5 geophysical model function (GMF) for the European Remote Sensing (ERS) C-band scatterometer and the Ku-band GMF for the NASA SeaWinds scatterometer. The predictions of microwave brightness temperatures from this model agree well with satellite, aircraft and tower-based microwave radiometer data. This suggests that the impact of surface roughness on microwave brightness temperatures and radar scattering coefficients of sea surfaces can be consistently characterized by a roughness spectrum, providing physical basis for using combined active and passive remote sensing techniques for ocean surface wind and salinity remote sensing.

  1. Estimation of sea surface salinity in the Bay of Bengal using Outgoing Longwave Radiation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Subrahmanyam, B.; Sarma, M.S.S.; Tilvi, V.; RameshBabu, V.

    -induced precipitation. This study augments the in situ SSS measurements. A preliminary assessment of deriving SSS from OLR is presented for the Bay of Bengal. It is envisaged that the SSS estimated in this way may be useful in improving the existing climatologies...

  2. U.S. Geoid Heights, Scientific Model (G96SSS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' geoid height grid for the conterminous United States is the G96SSS model. The computation used about 1.8 million terrestrial and marine gravity data held in...

  3. Improved anchoring of SSS with vacuum barrier to avoid displacement

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Foreste, A; Parma, V; Renaglia, T; Quesnel, J

    2009-01-01

    As presented in the previous speech, the incident in sector 3-4 of the LHC caused a high pressure build-up inside the cryostat insulation vacuum resulting in high longitudinal forces acting on the insulation vacuum barriers. This resulted in braking floor and floor fixations of the SSS with vacuum barrier. The strategy of improving anchoring of SSS with vacuum barrier to avoid displacement is presented and discussed.

  4. Surface energy balance of fresh and saline waters : AquaSEBS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdelrady, A.R.; Timmermans, J.; Vekerdy, Z.; Salama, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Current earth observation models do not take into account the influence of water salinity on the evaporation rate, even though the salinity influences the evaporation rate by affecting the density and latent heat of vaporization. In this paper, we adapt the SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System) model

  5. Sea surface temperature and salinity from French research vessels, 2001-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Fabienne; Diverres, Denis; Jacquin, Stéphane; Gouriou, Yves; Grelet, Jacques; Le Menn, Marc; Tassel, Joelle; Reverdin, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    French Research vessels have been collecting thermo-salinometer (TSG) data since 1999 to contribute to the Global Ocean Surface Underway Data (GOSUD) programme. The instruments are regularly calibrated and continuously monitored. Water samples are taken on a daily basis by the crew and later analysed in the laboratory. We present here the delayed mode processing of the 2001-2013 dataset and an overview of the resulting quality. Salinity measurement error was a few hundredths of a unit or less on the practical salinity scale (PSS), due to careful calibration and instrument maintenance, complemented with a rigorous adjustment on water samples. In a global comparison, these data show excellent agreement with an ARGO-based salinity gridded product. The Sea Surface Salinity and Temperature from French REsearch SHips (SSST-FRESH) dataset is very valuable for the ‘calibration and validation’ of the new satellite observations delivered by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and Aquarius missions.

  6. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Monthly, 1992-present, Sea Surface Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has monthly Sea Surface Salinity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/gtmba/ ), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  7. Impact of the Sun on Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Le Vine, David M; Abraham, Saji; Wentz, F; Lagerloef, G. S

    2005-01-01

    ... to monitor soil moisture and sea surface salinity. Radiation from the sun can impact passive remote sensing systems in several ways, including line-of-sight radiation that comes directly from the sun and enters through antenna side lobes...

  8. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, 5-Day, 1992-present, Sea Surface Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has 5-day Sea Surface Salinity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/gtmba/ ), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  9. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Daily, 1992-present, Sea Surface Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has daily Sea Surface Salinity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/gtmba/ ), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  10. Salinity-Dependent Adhesion Response Properties of Aluminosilicate (K-Feldspar) Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Bärbel; Ceccato, Marcel; Andersson, Martin Peter

    2017-01-01

    Flooding sandstone oil reservoirs with low salinity water can lead to a significant increase in oil recovery, a phenomenon called "the low salinity effect". Although there are many factors that contribute to this response, the surface tension on the pore walls is an important one. Sandstone...... is composed predominantly of quartz with some clay, but feldspar grains are often also present. While the wettability of quartz and clay surfaces has been thoroughly investigated, little is known about the adhesion properties of feldspar. We explored the interaction of model oil compounds, molecules...... in well sorted sandstone. Adhesion forces, measured with the chemical force mapping (CFM) mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM), showed a low salinity effect on the fresh feldspar surfaces. Adhesion force, measured with -COO(H)-functionalized tips, was 60% lower in artificial low salinity seawater (LS...

  11. Relationship between the Bering Strait Throughflow and Salinity in the Bering Sea in an Atmosphere-Ocean-Ice Coupled Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Y.; Osafune, S.; Masuda, S.; Komuro, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between the volumetric transport of the Bering Strait throughflow (BTF) and sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Bering Sea was investigated using an atmosphere-ocean-ice coupled model, MIROC4h, which includes an eddy-permitting ocean model. The MIROC4h simulated well the seasonal cycle of BTF transport, although it overestimated the transport compared with previous studies. The interannual variations of SSS in the Bering Sea were correlated with those of BTF transport: SSS in the northwestern Bering Sea was high when BTF transport was large. The SSS anomaly associated with the BTF anomaly became evident from late autumn to spring, and SSS lagged behind the BTF by a few months. The BTF transport was strongly correlated with the SSH in the eastern Bering Sea, the southwestern Chukchi Sea, and the East Siberian Sea. The low SSH along the Russian coast in the Arctic Ocean was uncorrelated with the high SSH in the Bering Sea. The Arctic SSH affected BTF transport and the SSS in the northwestern Bering Sea independently of the SSH in the Bering Sea. We evaluated the salt budget in the northwestern Bering Sea, including Anadyr Bay. When the BTF transport in October-March was large, the horizontal convergence of salt increased and sea-ice melting decreased; both changes contributed to the increase of salinity. In contrast, evaporation-minus-precipitation and the residual component had the opposite effect. The sea-ice retreat was closely related to meridional wind anomalies that also raised the SSH in the eastern Bering Sea. Changes in upper-layer currents caused by the southerly wind anomalies in the Bering Sea contributed to the increase of the horizontal convergence of salt. In addition, the SSH anomalies in the Arctic Ocean independently affected the currents in the Bering Strait and the northwestern Bering Sea, perhaps through the propagation of shelf waves, which also led to salinization.

  12. Effect of concentration and temperature on surface tension of sodium hyaluronate saline solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Walkiria; Mata, José Luis; Saramago, Benilde

    2007-06-19

    The effect of concentration and temperature on the surface tension of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) saline solutions was investigated using the technique of the shape of pendant drops. The decay rate of the surface tension with the increase of NaHA concentration was well-described by the empirical Hua-Rosen equation. Adsorption at the air-liquid interface was estimated using the Gibbs equation. The temperature dependence of a dilute solution and a semidilute entangled solution was numerically fitted with a second-order polynomial equation. The surface behavior of the NaHA saline solutions was interpreted in terms of their known viscoelastic properties.

  13. Quantifying saline groundwater seepage to surface waters in the Athabasca oil sands region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasechko, Scott; Gibson, John J.; Jean Birks, S.; Yi, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Western Canadian oil sands contain over 170 billion barrels of proven unconventional petroleum reserves currently extracted at 1.8 million barrels per day by either surface mining, or by in situ techniques that require subsurface injection of steam and hydrocarbon solvents. Natural high-salinity springs are known to add water and entrained inorganic and organic constituents to the Athabasca River and its tributaries in the region of ongoing bitumen production. However, the magnitude and synoptic distribution of these saline inputs has remained unquantified. Here, a chloride mass balance is used to estimate saline groundwater discharge to the Athabasca River from 1987 to 2010. Results show that the highest saline water discharge rate to the Athabasca River occurs between Ft. McMurray and the Peace-Athabasca Delta, supported by subcrop exposure of lower Cretaceous- and Devonian-aged formations bearing saline waters. Further, the input of saline groundwater is found to be an important control on the chemistry of the lower Athabasca River, despite comprising 10 −1 to 3% of the Athabasca River’s discharge. The flux of natural saline groundwater entering the Athabasca does not appear to have increased or decreased from 1987 to 2010. The origin of seep salinity is interpreted as relict subglacial meltwater that has dissolved Devonian-aged evaporites, supported by saline Na-Cl type waters with low 18 O/ 16 O and 2 H/ 1 H ratios relative to modern precipitation. The magnitude of groundwater discharge and its impact on the Athabasca River’s chemistry in the area of ongoing bitumen development warrants the incorporation of natural groundwater seepages into surface water quality monitoring networks.

  14. Surface Energy Balance of Fresh and Saline Waters: AquaSEBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdelrady

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Current earth observation models do not take into account the influence of water salinity on the evaporation rate, even though the salinity influences the evaporation rate by affecting the density and latent heat of vaporization. In this paper, we adapt the SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System model for large water bodies and add the effect of water salinity to the evaporation rate. Firstly, SEBS is modified for fresh-water whereby new parameterizations of the water heat flux and sensible heat flux are suggested. This is achieved by adapting the roughness heights for momentum and heat transfer. Secondly, a salinity correction factor is integrated into the adapted model. Eddy covariance measurements over Lake IJsselmeer (The Netherlands are carried out and used to estimate the roughness heights for momentum (~0.0002 m and heat transfer (~0.0001 m. Application of these values over the Victoria and Tana lakes (freshwater in Africa showed that the calculated latent heat fluxes agree well with the measurements. The root mean-square of relative-errors (rRMSE is about 4.1% for Lake Victoria and 4.7%, for Lake Tana. Verification with ECMWF data showed that the salinity reduced the evaporation at varying levels by up to 27% in the Great Salt Lake and by 1% for open ocean. Our results show the importance of salinity to the evaporation rate and the suitability of the adapted-SEBS model (AquaSEBS for fresh and saline waters.

  15. The salinity signature of the cross-shelf exchanges in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean: Numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matano, Ricardo P; Combes, Vincent; Piola, Alberto R; Guerrero, Raul; Palma, Elbio D; Ted Strub, P; James, Corinne; Fenco, Harold; Chao, Yi; Saraceno, Martin

    2014-11-01

    A high-resolution model is used to characterize the dominant patterns of sea surface salinity (SSS) variability generated by the freshwater discharges of the Rio de la Plata (RdlP) and the Patos/Mirim Lagoon in the southwestern Atlantic region. We identify three dominant modes of SSS variability. The first two, which have been discussed in previous studies, represent the seasonal and the interannual variations of the freshwater plumes over the continental shelf. The third mode of SSS variability, which has not been discussed hitherto, represents the salinity exchanges between the shelf and the deep ocean. A diagnostic study using floats and passive tracers identifies the pathways taken by the freshwater plumes. During the austral winter (JJA) , the plumes leave the shelf region north of the BMC. During the austral summer (DJF), the plumes are entrained more directly into the BMC. A sensitivity study indicates that the high - frequency component of the wind stress forcing controls the vertical structure of the plumes while the low-frequency component of the wind stress forcing and the interannual variations of the RdlP discharge controls the horizontal structure of the plumes. Dynamical analysis reveals that the cross-shelf flow has a dominant barotropic structure and, therefore, the SSS anomalies detected by Aquarius represent net mass exchanges between the shelf and the deep ocean. The net cross-shelf volume flux is 1.21 Sv. This outflow is largely compensated by an inflow from the Patagonian shelf.

  16. Submesoscale-selective compensation of fronts in a salinity-stratified ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro Jaeger, Gualtiero; Mahadevan, Amala

    2018-02-01

    Salinity, rather than temperature, is the leading influence on density in some regions of the world's upper oceans. In the Bay of Bengal, heavy monsoonal rains and runoff generate strong salinity gradients that define density fronts and stratification in the upper ~50 m. Ship-based observations made in winter reveal that fronts exist over a wide range of length scales, but at O(1)-km scales, horizontal salinity gradients are compensated by temperature to alleviate about half the cross-front density gradient. Using a process study ocean model, we show that scale-selective compensation occurs because of surface cooling. Submesoscale instabilities cause density fronts to slump, enhancing stratification along-front. Specifically for salinity fronts, the surface mixed layer (SML) shoals on the less saline side, correlating sea surface salinity (SSS) with SML depth at O(1)-km scales. When losing heat to the atmosphere, the shallower and less saline SML experiences a larger drop in temperature compared to the adjacent deeper SML on the salty side of the front, thus correlating sea surface temperature (SST) with SSS at the submesoscale. This compensation of submesoscale fronts can diminish their strength and thwart the forward cascade of energy to smaller scales. During winter, salinity fronts that are dynamically submesoscale experience larger temperature drops, appearing in satellite-derived SST as cold filaments. In freshwater-influenced regions, cold filaments can mark surface-trapped layers insulated from deeper nutrient-rich waters, unlike in other regions, where they indicate upwelling of nutrient-rich water and enhanced surface biological productivity.

  17. Effect of riverine freshwater discharge in salinity simulations over the northern Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathupurath Kuttan, Sandeep; Pant, Vimlesh; Devendra Rao, Ambarukhana

    2017-04-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) in the north Indian Ocean (NIO) exhibits contrasting spatial distribution, particularly in the two semi-enclosed basins namely the Arabian sea (AS) and Bay of Bengal (BoB). BoB experiences excess amount of freshwater inflow from rivers as well as from the surplus of precipitation over evaporation (E-P) and thus maintains a fresher surface water throughout the year as compared to AS. Major rivers such as Ganges, Brahmaputra, Mahanadi, Godavari, Krishna, and Irrawaddy discharge large amount of freshwater volume to the BoB. The input of relatively less saline waters by the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) makes the eastern equatorial IO fresher. Substantial change in salinity and temperature due to river runoff results in a change in ambient sea-water density near river mouths in coastal regions. In the present study, we simulate the circulation features of the NIO using a free-surface primitive equation ocean general circulation model 'Regional Ocean Modeling System' (ROMS). The model domain extends from 30°S-30°N, 30°E-120°E with 1/4 x 1/4 degree resolution in the horizontal and 40 vertical terrain following sigma levels. The model is initialized with annual mean climatology of temperature and salinity from World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA09) and forced with daily climatological winds from Quikscat and ASCAT and other atmospheric forcing fields from TropFlux. Different numerical experiments were carried out to understand the impact of freshwater forcing on the sea surface salinity (SSS) simulations. Model simulations and available in-situ and satellite observations utilized to understand processes, particularly the contribution of freshwater forcing, controlling the SSS spatial and seasonal variations in various sectors of the Indian Ocean.

  18. MASTER prediscovery observations of SSS130101:122222-311525

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levato, H.; Saffe, C.; Mallamaci, C.; Lopez, C.; Podest, F.; Denisenko, D.; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Balanutsa, P.; Yecheistov, V.; Tiurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Belinski, A.; Shatskiy, N.; Chazov, V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Zimnukhov, D.; Krushinsky, V.; Zalozhnih, I.; Popov, A.; Bourdanov, A.; Punanova, A.; Ivanov, K.; Yazev, S.; Budnev, N.; Konstantinov, E.; Chuvalaev, O.; Poleshchuk, V.; Gress, O.; Parkhomenko, A.; Tlatov, A.; Dormidontov, D.; Senik, V.; Yurkov, V.; Sergienko, Y.; Varda, D.; Sinyakov, E.; Shumkov, V.; Shurpakov, S.; Podvorotny, P.

    2013-01-01

    Following the announcement of a bright transient SSS130101:122222-311525 detected by CRTS (Drake et al., ATel #4699) we have checked the archival observations of this field by MASTER-ICATE very wide field camera (72-mm f/1.2 lens + 11 Mpx CCD, FOV=24x16 sq. deg.) located at OAFA near San Juan, Argentina. The object is present on two combined images obtained on 2012 Dec. 16.357 UT (total exposure time 122 sec) and 2012 Dec.

  19. Near-Surface Circulation and Fate of Upper Layer Fresh Water from Rivers Runoff and Rain in the Bay of Bengal near Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    and variability over the experiment area and to infer the surface freshwater export pathways from direct measurements. The salinity drifters were...GOALS Improve the knowledge of the near-surface circulation in the BoB and of the pathways through which the freshwater fluxes occur. OBJECTIVES...drifters was deployed 2015 when an additional fleet of 36 salinity drifters was used in conjunction of other IOP activities to map the SSS distribution

  20. Decadal changes in salinity in the oceanic subtropical gyres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, Bryce A.; Subrahmanyam, Bulusu

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed spatial and temporal salinity trends in five subtropical gyre regions over the past six decades using Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) reanalysis with a focus on the subsurface salinity of the upper 1000 m of the ocean. Our results indicate an overall salinity increase within the mixed layer, and a salinity decrease at depths greater than 200 m in the global subtropical gyres over 61 years, of which each individual gyre was analyzed in further detail. We determine that freshwater fluxes at the air-sea interface are the primary drivers of the sea surface salinity (SSS) signature over these open ocean regions by quantifying the advective contribution within the surface layer. This was demonstrated through a mixed layer salinity budget in each subtropical gyre based on the vertically integrated advection and entrainment of salt. Our analysis of decadal variability of fluxes into and out of the gyres reveals little change in the strength of the mean currents through this region despite an increase in the annual export of salt in all subtropical gyres, with the meridional component dominating the zonal. This study reveals that the salt content of E-P maximum waters advected into the subtropical gyres is increasing over time. A combination of increasing direct evaporation over the regions with increasing remote evaporation over nearby E-P maxima is believed to be the main driver in increasing salinity of the subtropical oceans, suggesting an intensification of the global water cycle over decadal time scales.

  1. Application of SMAP Data for Ocean Surface Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fore, A.; Yueh, S. H.; Tang, W.; Stiles, B. W.; Hayashi, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched January 31st, 2015. It is designed to measure the soil moisture over land using a combined active / passive L-band system. Due to the Aquarius mission, L-band model functions for ocean winds and salinity are mature and are directly applicable to the SMAP mission. In contrast to Aquarius, the higher resolution and scanning geometry of SMAP allow for wide-swath ocean winds and salinities to be retrieved. In this talk we present the SMAP Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) and extreme winds dataset and its performance. First we discuss the heritage of SMAP SSS algorithms, showing that SMAP and Aquarius show excellent agreement in the ocean surface roughness correction. Then, we give an overview of some newly developed algorithms that are only relevant to the SMAP system; a new galaxy correction and land correction enabling SSS retrievals up to 40 km from coast. We discuss recent improvements to the SMAP data processing for version 4.0. Next we compare the performance of the SMAP SSS to in-situ salinity measurements obtained from ARGO floats, tropical moored buoys, and ship-based data. SMAP SSS has accuracy of 0.2 PSU on a monthly basis compared to ARGO gridded data in tropics and mid-latitudes. In tropical oceans, time series comparison of salinity measured at 1 m depth by moored buoys indicates SMAP can track large salinity changes within a month. Synergetic analysis of SMAP, SMOS, and Argo data allows us to identify and exclude erroneous buoy data from assessment of SMAP SSS. The resulting SMAP-buoy matchup analysis gives a mean standard deviation (STD) of 0.22 PSU and correlation of 0.73 on weekly scale; at monthly scale the mean STD decreased to 0.17 PSU and the correlation increased to 0.8. In addition to SSS, SMAP provides a view into tropical cyclones having much higher sensitivity than traditional scatterometers. We validate the high-winds using collocations with SFMR during tropical cyclones as well as

  2. Five Year Mean Sea-surface Salinity in the Northern Gulf of Mexico for 2005 through 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These images were created by combining the mean sea-surface salinity values to produce seasonal representations for winter, spring, summer and fall. Winter includes...

  3. Decadal trends of the upper ocean salinity in the tropical Indo-Pacific since mid-1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yan; Zhang, Yuhong; Feng, Ming; Wang, Tianyu; Zhang, Ningning; Wijffels, Susan

    2015-11-02

    A contrasting trend pattern of sea surface salinity (SSS) between the western tropical Pacific (WTP) and the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean (SETIO) is observed during 2004-2013, with significant salinity increase in the WTP and freshening in the SETIO. In this study, we show that increased precipitation around the Maritime Continent (MC), decreased precipitation in the western-central tropical Pacific, and ocean advection processes contribute to the salinity trends in the region. From a longer historical record, these salinity trends started in the mid-1990s, a few years before the Global Warming Hiatus from 1998 to present. The salinity trends are associated a strengthening trend of the Walker Circulation over the tropical Indo-Pacific, which have reversed the long-term salinity changes in the tropical Indo-Pacific as a consequence of global warming. Understanding decadal variations of SSS in the tropical Indo-Pacific will better inform on how the tropical hydrological cycle will be affected by the natural variability and a warming climate.

  4. Near-surface Salinity and Temperature structure Observed with Dual-Sensor Drifters in the Subtropical South Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, S.; Volkov, D.; Goni, G. J.; Lumpkin, R.; Foltz, G. R.

    2017-12-01

    Three surface drifters equipped with temperature and salinity sensors at 0.2 m and 5 m depths were deployed in April/May 2015 in the subtropical South Pacific with the objective of measuring near-surface salinity differences seen by satellite and in situ sensors and examining the causes of these differences. Measurements from these drifters indicate that water at a depth of 0.2 m is about 0.013 psu fresher than at 5 m and about 0.024°C warmer. Events with large temperature and salinity differences between the two depths are caused by anomalies in surface freshwater and heat fluxes, modulated by wind. While surface freshening and cooling occurs during rainfall events, surface salinification is generally observed under weak wind conditions (≤4 m/s). Further examination of the drifter measurements demonstrates that (i) the amount of surface freshening and strength of the vertical salinity gradient heavily depend on wind speed during rain events, (ii) salinity differences between 0.2 m and 5 m are positively correlated with the corresponding temperature differences for cases with surface salinification, and (iii) temperature exhibits a diurnal cycle at both depths, whereas the diurnal cycle of salinity is observed only at 0.2 m when the wind speed is less than 6 m/s. The amplitudes of the diurnal cycles of temperature at both depths decrease with increasing wind speed. The mean diurnal cycle of surface salinity is dominated by events with winds less than 2 m/s.

  5. Testing the alkenone D/H ratio as a paleo indicator of sea surface salinity in a coastal ocean margin (Mozambique Channel)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasper, S.; der Meer, M.T.J.; Castañeda, I.S.; Tjallingii, R.; Brummer, G.J.A.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing past ocean salinity is important for assessing paleoceanographic change and therefore past climatic dynamics. Commonly, sea water salinity reconstruction is based on planktonic foraminifera oxygen isotope values combined with sea surface temperature reconstruction. However, the

  6. Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Retrieval Algorithm Using Combined Passive-Active L-Band Microwave Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius is a combined passive/active L-band microwave instrument developed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The data will support studies of the coupling between ocean circulation, the global water cycle, and climate. The primary science objective of this mission is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean with a spatial resolution of 150 kilometers and a retrieval accuracy of 0.2 practical salinity units globally on a monthly basis. The measurement principle is based on the response of the L-band (1.413 gigahertz) sea surface brightness temperatures (T (sub B)) to sea surface salinity. To achieve the required 0.2 practical salinity units accuracy, the impact of sea surface roughness (e.g. wind-generated ripples and waves) along with several factors on the observed brightness temperature has to be corrected to better than a few tenths of a degree Kelvin. To the end, Aquarius includes a scatterometer to help correct for this surface roughness effect.

  7. Bulk and Surface Aqueous Speciation of Calcite: Implications for Low-Salinity Waterflooding of Carbonate Reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Yutkin, Maxim P.

    2017-08-25

    Low-salinity waterflooding (LSW) is ineffective when reservoir rock is strongly water-wet or when crude oil is not asphaltenic. Success of LSW relies heavily on the ability of injected brine to alter surface chemistry of reservoir crude-oil brine/rock (COBR) interfaces. Implementation of LSW in carbonate reservoirs is especially challenging because of high reservoir-brine salinity and, more importantly, because of high reactivity of the rock minerals. Both features complicate understanding of the COBR surface chemistries pertinent to successful LSW. Here, we tackle the complex physicochemical processes in chemically active carbonates flooded with diluted brine that is saturated with atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and possibly supplemented with additional ionic species, such as sulfates or phosphates. When waterflooding carbonate reservoirs, rock equilibrates with the injected brine over short distances. Injected-brine ion speciation is shifted substantially in the presence of reactive carbonate rock. Our new calculations demonstrate that rock-equilibrated aqueous pH is slightly alkaline quite independent of injected-brine pH. We establish, for the first time, that CO2 content of a carbonate reservoir, originating from CO2-rich crude oil and gas, plays a dominant role in setting aqueous pH and rock-surface speciation. A simple ion-complexing model predicts the calcite-surface charge as a function of composition of reservoir brine. The surface charge of calcite may be positive or negative, depending on speciation of reservoir brine in contact with the calcite. There is no single point of zero charge; all dissolved aqueous species are charge determining. Rock-equilibrated aqueous composition controls the calcite-surface ion-exchange behavior, not the injected-brine composition. At high ionic strength, the electrical double layer collapses and is no longer diffuse. All surface charges are located directly in the inner and outer Helmholtz planes. Our evaluation of

  8. Groundwater-surface water interactions in a large semi-arid floodplain: implications for salinity management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontagne, Sébastien; Leaney, Fred W.; Herczeg, Andrew L.

    2005-10-01

    Flow regulation and water diversion for irrigation have considerably impacted the exchange of surface water between the Murray River and its floodplains. However, the way in which river regulation has impacted groundwater-surface water interactions is not completely understood, especially in regards to the salinization and accompanying vegetation dieback currently occurring in many of the floodplains. Groundwater-surface water interactions were studied over a 2 year period in the riparian area of a large floodplain (Hattah-Kulkyne, Victoria) using a combination of piezometric surface monitoring and environmental tracers (Cl-, 2H, and 18O). Despite being located in a local and regional groundwater discharge zone, the Murray River is a losing stream under low flow conditions at Hattah-Kulkyne. The discharge zone for local groundwater, regional groundwater and bank recharge is in the floodplain within 1 km of the river and is probably driven by high rates of transpiration by the riparian Eucalyptus camaldulensis woodland. Environmental tracers data suggest that the origin of groundwater is principally bank recharge in the riparian zone and a combination of diffuse rainfall recharge and localized floodwater recharge elsewhere in the floodplain. Although the Murray River was losing under low flows, bank discharge occurred during some flood recession periods. The way in which the water table responded to changes in river level was a function of the type of stream bank present, with point bars providing a better connection to the alluvial aquifer than the more common clay-lined banks. Understanding the spatial variability in the hydraulic connection with the river channel and in vertical recharge following inundations will be critical to design effective salinity remediation strategies for large semi-arid floodplains.

  9. Mathematical modelling of surface water-groundwater flow and salinity interactions in the coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Kampanis, Nikolaos A.

    2014-05-01

    Coastal areas are the most densely-populated areas in the world. Consequently water demand is high, posing great pressure on fresh water resources. Climatic change and its direct impacts on meteorological variables (e.g. precipitation) and indirect impact on sea level rise, as well as anthropogenic pressures (e.g. groundwater abstraction), are strong drivers causing groundwater salinisation and subsequently affecting coastal wetlands salinity with adverse effects on the corresponding ecosystems. Coastal zones are a difficult hydrologic environment to represent with a mathematical model due to the large number of contributing hydrologic processes and variable-density flow conditions. Simulation of sea level rise and tidal effects on aquifer salinisation and accurate prediction of interactions between coastal waters, groundwater and neighbouring wetlands requires the use of integrated surface water-groundwater models. In the past few decades several computer codes have been developed to simulate coupled surface and groundwater flow. In these numerical models surface water flow is usually described by the 1-D Saint Venant equations (e.g. Swain and Wexler, 1996) or the 2D shallow water equations (e.g. Liang et al., 2007). Further simplified equations, such as the diffusion and kinematic wave approximations to the Saint Venant equations, are also employed for the description of 2D overland flow and 1D stream flow (e.g. Gunduz and Aral, 2005). However, for coastal bays, estuaries and wetlands it is often desirable to solve the 3D shallow water equations to simulate surface water flow. This is the case e.g. for wind-driven flows or density-stratified flows. Furthermore, most integrated models are based on the assumption of constant fluid density and therefore their applicability to coastal regions is questionable. Thus, most of the existing codes are not well-suited to represent surface water-groundwater interactions in coastal areas. To this end, the 3D integrated

  10. Tools, Services & Support of NASA Salinity Mission Data Archival Distribution through PO.DAAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsontos, V. M.; Vazquez, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Center (PO.DAAC) serves as the designated NASA repository and distribution node for all Aquarius/SAC-D and SMAP sea surface salinity (SSS) mission data products in close collaboration with the projects. In addition to these official mission products, that by December 2017 will include the Aquarius V5.0 end-of-mission data, PO.DAAC archives and distributes high-value, principal investigator led satellite SSS products, and also datasets from NASA's "Salinity Processes in the Upper Ocean Regional Study" (SPURS 1 & 2) field campaigns in the N. Atlantic salinity maximum and high rainfall E. Tropical Pacific regions. Here we report on the status of these data holdings at PO.DAAC, and the range of data services and access tools that are provided in support of NASA salinity. These include user support and data discovery services, OPeNDAP and THREDDS web services for subsetting/extraction, and visualization via LAS and SOTO. Emphasis is placed on newer capabilities, including PODAAC's consolidated web services (CWS) and advanced L2 subsetting tool called HiTIDE.

  11. Ocean Surface Emissivity at L-band (1.4 GHz): The Dependence on Salinity and Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R.; Wentz, F.; Messiner, T.

    2012-01-01

    A characterization of the emissivity of sea water at L-band is important for the remote sensing of sea surface salinity. Measurements of salinity are currently being made in the radio astronomy band at 1.413 GHz by ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and NASA's Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory. The goal of both missions is accuracy on the order of 0.1 psu. This requires accurate knowledge of the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature and also the effect of waves (roughness). The former determines the emissivity of an ideal (i.e. flat) surface and the later is the major source of error from predictions based on a flat surface. These two aspects of the problem of characterizing the emissivity are being addressed in the context of the Aquarius mission. First, laboratory measurements are being made of the dielectric constant of sea water. This is being done at the George Washington University using a resonant cavity. In this technique, sea water of known salinity and temperature is fed into the cavity along its axis through a narrow tube. The sea water changes the resonant frequency and Q of the cavity which, if the sample is small enough, can be related to the dielectric constant of the sample. An extensive set of measurements have been conducted at 1.413 GHz to develop a model for the real and imaginary part of the dielectric constant as a function of salinity and temperature. The results are compared to the predictions of models based on parameterization of the Debye resonance of the water molecule. The models and measurements are close; however, the differences are significant for remote sensing of salinity. This is especially true at low temperatures where the sensitivity to salinity is lowest.

  12. Freshwater exchanges and surface salinity in the Colombian basin, Caribbean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Emilio; Bernal, Gladys; Ruiz-Ochoa, Mauricio; Barton, Eric Desmond

    2017-01-01

    Despite the heavy regional rainfall and considerable discharge of many rivers into the Colombian Basin, there have been few detailed studies about the dilution of Caribbean Surface Water and the variability of salinity in the southwestern Caribbean. An analysis of the precipitation, evaporation and runoff in relation to the climate variability demonstrates that although the salt balance in the Colombian Basin overall is in equilibrium, the area south of 12°N is an important dilution sub-basin. In the southwest of the basin, in the region of the Panama-Colombia Gyre, Caribbean Sea Water is diluted by precipitation and runoff year round, while in the northeast, off La Guajira, its salinity increases from December to May by upwelling. At the interannual scale, continental runoff is related to El Niño Southern Oscillation, and precipitation and evaporation south of 12°N are related to the Caribbean Low Level Jet. During El Niño years the maximum salinification occurs in the dry season (December-February) while in La Niña years the maximum dilution (or freshening), reaching La Guajira Coastal Zone, occurs in the wet season (September-November).

  13. Surface pH changes suggest a role for H+/OH-channels in salinity response of Chara australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absolonova, Marketa; Beilby, Mary J; Sommer, Aniela; Hoepflinger, Marion C; Foissner, Ilse

    2017-12-15

    To understand salt stress, the full impact of salinity on plant cell physiology has to be resolved. Electrical measurements suggest that salinity inhibits the proton pump and opens putative H + /OH - channels all over the cell surface of salt sensitive Chara australis (Beilby and Al Khazaaly 2009; Al Khazaaly and Beilby 2012). The channels open transiently at first, causing a characteristic noise in membrane potential difference (PD), and after longer exposure remain open with a typical current-voltage (I/V) profile, both abolished by the addition of 1 mM ZnCl 2 , the main known blocker of animal H + channels. The cells were imaged with confocal microscopy, using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) coupled to dextran 70 to illuminate the pH changes outside the cell wall in artificial fresh water (AFW) and in saline medium. In the early saline exposure, we observed alkaline patches (bright fluorescent spots) appearing transiently in random spatial distribution. After longer exposure, some of the spots became fixed in space. Saline also abolished or diminished the pH banding pattern observed in the untreated control cells. ZnCl 2 suppressed the alkaline spot formation in saline and the pH banding pattern in AFW. The osmotic component of the saline stress did not produce transient bright spots or affect banding. The displacement of H + from the cell wall charges, the H + /OH - channel conductance/density, and self-organization are discussed. No homologies to animal H + channels were found. Salinity activation of the H + /OH - channels might contribute to saline response in roots of land plants and leaves of aquatic angiosperms.

  14. Modulation of SST, SSS over northern Bay of Bengal on ISO time scale

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, S.A.; Saha, S.K.; Pokhrel, S.; Sundar, D.; Dhakate, A.R.; Mahapatra, S.; Ali, S.; Chaudhari, H.S.; Shreeram, P.; Suneel, V.; Srikanth, A.S.; Suresh, R.R.V.

    hypothesize that the intra-seasonal rainfall variation modulates the amount of river discharge, which in turn modulates the salinity over northern Bay of Bengal on intra-seasonal time scale. Since surface warming always follows the surface freshening, the time...

  15. Do cold, low salinity waters pass through the Indo-Sri Lanka Channel during winter?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, R.R.; Girishkumar, M.S.; Ravichandran, M.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Pankajakshan, T.

    . The SeaWiFS chlorophyll-a data (O’Riley et al., 1998) are also utilized as a tracer to track the southward water flow through the ISLC. The mean monthly (July-August) climatologies of SSS from Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) analysis (Carton et al...) and the southward flow through the ISLC if any.The SODA which assimilates all available temperature and salinity observations in the world oceans, satellite altimetry, and sea surface temperature (SST) observations to constrain a numerical model of the primitive...

  16. A new technique for the estimation of sea surface salinity in the tropical Indian Ocean from OLR

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Subrahmanyam, B.; Tilvi, V.; O'Brien, J.J.

    occupied during World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) and also other sections. The SSS differences bring out clearly the impact of the strong 1997-1998 El Nino on the rainfall in the southeastern Indian Ocean and the eastern equatorial region...

  17. Surface Drainage and Mulching Drip-Irrigated Tomatoes Reduces Soil Salinity and Improves Fruit Yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Maomao; Zhu, Lvdan; Jin, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    A study on the effects of mulched drip irrigation combined with surface drainage on saline soil and tomatoes was conducted in coastal areas of eastern China, where the crops are subjected to excessive salt. The treatments contained three irrigation rates-200, 250 and 300 m3/ha-and three drain ditch depths-10, 20 and 30 cm. The contents of soil salinity, organic matter and available nutrient were observed, and the tomato plant height, stem diameter and leaf area index during different growth periods were recorded. Results showed that the total removal rate of salt from soil at a 0-1 m depth was 8.7-13.2% for the three drainages. Compared with the control, the treatments increased the content of available N (by 12.1-47.1%) and available K (by 5.0-21.9%) in the soils inside the mulch and decreased the content of available N (by 3.4-22.1%) and available K (by 7.5-16.4%) in the soils outside the mulch. For tomatoes, the plant height and the stem diameter was increased significantly by the irrigations but was not significantly affected by the drainages, and the leaf area index was increased by 0.39~1.76, 1.10~2.90 and 2.80~6.86 respectively in corresponding to the seedling, flowering and fruit-set stage. Moreover, yield-increase rates of 7.9-27.6% were found for the treatments compared to the control with a similar amount of applied water.

  18. New insight into photo-bromination processes in saline surface waters: The case of salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamtam, Fatima; Chiron, Serge

    2012-01-01

    It was shown, through a combination of field and laboratory observations, that salicylic acid can undergo photo-bromination reactions in sunlit saline surface waters. Laboratory-scale experiments revealed that the photochemical yields of 5-bromosalicylic acid and 3,5-dibromosalicylic acid from salicylic acid were always low (in the 4% range at most). However, this might be of concern since these compounds are potential inhibitors of the 20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme, with potential implications in endocrine disruption processes. At least two mechanisms were involved simultaneously to account for the photo-generation of brominated substances. The first one might involve the formation of reactive brominated radical species (Br·, Br 2 · − ) through hydroxyl radical mediated oxidation of bromide ions. These ions reacted more selectively than hydroxyl radicals with electron-rich organic pollutants such as salicylic acid. The second one might involve the formation of hypobromous acid, through a two electron oxidation of bromine ions by peroxynitrite. This reaction was catalyzed by nitrite, since these ions play a crucial role in the formation of nitric oxide upon photolysis. This nitric oxide further reacts with superoxide radical anions to yield peroxynitrite and by ammonium through the formation of N-bromoamines, probably due to the ability of N-bromoamines to promote the aromatic bromination of phenolic compounds. Field measurements revealed the presence of salicylic acid together with 5-bromosalicylic and 3,5-dibromosalicylic acid in a brackish coastal lagoon, thus confirming the environmental significance of the proposed photochemically induced bromination pathways. -- Highlights: ► Brominated derivatives of salicylic acid were detected in a brackish lagoon. ► A photochemical pathway was hypothesized to account for bromination of salicylic acid. ► Radical bromine species are partly responsible for the bromination process. ► Hypobromous acid

  19. Salinity maxima associated with some sub-surface water masses in the upper layers of the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varadachari, V.V.R.; Murty, C.S.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    The distribution of some sub-surface water masses in the western bay of Bengal during the south-west monsoon period is presented. Based on the salinity maxima and sigma t values the existence of waters of Persian Gulf and Red Sea origin could...

  20. Late Holocene (0-2.4 ka BP) surface water temperature and salinity variability, Feni Drift, NE Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, T.O.; Peeters, F.J.C.; van Weering, T.C.E.

    2009-01-01

    Planktonic foraminiferal Mg/Ca ratios and oxygen isotopic compositions of a spliced sediment record from Feni Drift, NE Atlantic Ocean (box core M200309 and piston core ENAM9606) trace late Holocene sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity changes over the past 2400 years. At this location, the

  1. Electromagnetic evidence that SSS17a is the result of a binary neutron star merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, C. D.; Foley, R. J.; Kasen, D.; Murguia-Berthier, A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Coulter, D. A.; Drout, M. R.; Piro, A. L.; Shappee, B. J.; Boutsia, K.; Contreras, C.; Di Mille, F.; Madore, B. F.; Morrell, N.; Pan, Y.-C.; Prochaska, J. X.; Rest, A.; Rojas-Bravo, C.; Siebert, M. R.; Simon, J. D.; Ulloa, N.

    2017-12-01

    Eleven hours after the detection of gravitational wave source GW170817 by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Virgo Interferometers, an associated optical transient, SSS17a, was identified in the galaxy NGC 4993. Although the gravitational wave data indicate that GW170817 is consistent with the merger of two compact objects, the electromagnetic observations provide independent constraints on the nature of that system. We synthesize the optical to near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SSS17a collected by the One-Meter Two-Hemisphere collaboration, finding that SSS17a is unlike other known transients. The source is best described by theoretical models of a kilonova consisting of radioactive elements produced by rapid neutron capture (the r-process). We conclude that SSS17a was the result of a binary neutron star merger, reinforcing the gravitational wave result.

  2. Electromagnetic evidence that SSS17a is the result of a binary neutron star merger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, C D; Foley, R J; Kasen, D; Murguia-Berthier, A; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Coulter, D A; Drout, M R; Piro, A L; Shappee, B J; Boutsia, K; Contreras, C; Di Mille, F; Madore, B F; Morrell, N; Pan, Y-C; Prochaska, J X; Rest, A; Rojas-Bravo, C; Siebert, M R; Simon, J D; Ulloa, N

    2017-12-22

    Eleven hours after the detection of gravitational wave source GW170817 by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Virgo Interferometers, an associated optical transient, SSS17a, was identified in the galaxy NGC 4993. Although the gravitational wave data indicate that GW170817 is consistent with the merger of two compact objects, the electromagnetic observations provide independent constraints on the nature of that system. We synthesize the optical to near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SSS17a collected by the One-Meter Two-Hemisphere collaboration, finding that SSS17a is unlike other known transients. The source is best described by theoretical models of a kilonova consisting of radioactive elements produced by rapid neutron capture (the r-process). We conclude that SSS17a was the result of a binary neutron star merger, reinforcing the gravitational wave result. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. New insight into photo-bromination processes in saline surface waters: The case of salicylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamtam, Fatima; Chiron, Serge, E-mail: serge.chiron@msem.univ-montp2.fr

    2012-10-01

    It was shown, through a combination of field and laboratory observations, that salicylic acid can undergo photo-bromination reactions in sunlit saline surface waters. Laboratory-scale experiments revealed that the photochemical yields of 5-bromosalicylic acid and 3,5-dibromosalicylic acid from salicylic acid were always low (in the 4% range at most). However, this might be of concern since these compounds are potential inhibitors of the 20{alpha}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme, with potential implications in endocrine disruption processes. At least two mechanisms were involved simultaneously to account for the photo-generation of brominated substances. The first one might involve the formation of reactive brominated radical species (Br{center_dot}, Br{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup -}) through hydroxyl radical mediated oxidation of bromide ions. These ions reacted more selectively than hydroxyl radicals with electron-rich organic pollutants such as salicylic acid. The second one might involve the formation of hypobromous acid, through a two electron oxidation of bromine ions by peroxynitrite. This reaction was catalyzed by nitrite, since these ions play a crucial role in the formation of nitric oxide upon photolysis. This nitric oxide further reacts with superoxide radical anions to yield peroxynitrite and by ammonium through the formation of N-bromoamines, probably due to the ability of N-bromoamines to promote the aromatic bromination of phenolic compounds. Field measurements revealed the presence of salicylic acid together with 5-bromosalicylic and 3,5-dibromosalicylic acid in a brackish coastal lagoon, thus confirming the environmental significance of the proposed photochemically induced bromination pathways. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brominated derivatives of salicylic acid were detected in a brackish lagoon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A photochemical pathway was hypothesized to account for bromination of salicylic acid. Black

  4. Faunal and oxygen isotopic evidence for surface water salinity changes during sapropel formation in the eastern Mediterranean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.F.; Thunell, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    The discovery of the widespread anaerobic deposits (sapropels) in late Cenozoic sediments of the eastern Mediteranean has prompted many workers to propose the periodic occurrence of extremely low surface salinites in the Mediterranean. Oxygen isotopic determinations and total faunal analyses were made at 1000-year intervals across two equivalent sapropels in two piston cores from the Levantine Basin. The sapropel layers were deposited approximately 9000 y.B.P. (Sapropel A) and 80, 000 y. B.P. (Sapropel B). Significant isotopic anomalies were recorded by the foraminiferal species within Sapropels A and B in both cores. The surface dwelling species record a larger 18 O depletion than the mesopelagic species suggesting that surface salinities were reduced by 2-3per 1000 during sapropel formation. The faunal changes associated with the sapropels also indicate that the oceanographic conditions which lead to anoxic conditions in the eastern Mediteranean involve the formation of a low salinity surface layer. The source of the low salinity water might be meltwater produced by disintegration of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet which drained into the Black Sea, into the Aegean Sea and finally into the eastern Mediterranean. (Auth.)

  5. Saline-induced changes of epicuticular waxy layer on the Puccinellia tenuiflora and Oryza sativa leave surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxue Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The epicuticular waxy layer of plant leaves enhances the extreme environmental stress tolerance. However, the relationship between waxy layer and saline tolerance was not established well. The epicuticular waxy layer of rice (Oryza sativa L. was studied under the NaHCO3 stresses. In addition, strong saline tolerance Puccinellia tenuiflora was chosen for comparative studies. RESULTS: Scanning electron microscope (SEM images showed that there were significant changes in waxy morphologies of the rice epicuticular surfaces, while no remarkable changes in those of P. tenuiflora epicuticular surfaces. The NaHCO3-induced morphological changes of the rice epicuticular surfaces appeared as enlarged silica cells, swollen corns-shapes and leaked salt columns under high stress. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopic profiles supported that the changes were caused by significant increment and localization of [Na+] and [Cl-] in the shoot. Atomic absorption spectra showed that [Na+]shoot/[Na+]root for P. tenuiflora maintained stable as the saline stress increased, but that for rice increased significantly. CONCLUSION: In rice, NaHCO3 stress induced localization and accumulation of [Na+] and [Cl-] appeared as the enlarged silica cells (MSC, the swollen corns (S-C, and the leaked columns (C, while no significant changes in P. tenuiflora.

  6. Treatability of a Highly-Impaired, Saline Surface Water for Potential Urban Water Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Pontius

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available As freshwater sources of drinking water become limited, cities and urban areas must consider higher-salinity waters as potential sources of drinking water. The Salton Sea in the Imperial Valley of California has a very high salinity (43 ppt, total dissolved solids (70,000 mg/L, and color (1440 CU. Future wetlands and habitat restoration will have significant ecological benefits, but salinity levels will remain elevated. High salinity eutrophic waters, such as the Salton Sea, are difficult to treat, yet more desirable sources of drinking water are limited. The treatability of Salton Sea water for potential urban water use was evaluated here. Coagulation-sedimentation using aluminum chlorohydrate, ferric chloride, and alum proved to be relatively ineffective for lowering turbidity, with no clear optimum dose for any of the coagulants tested. Alum was most effective for color removal (28 percent at a dose of 40 mg/L. Turbidity was removed effectively with 0.45 μm and 0.1 μm microfiltration. Bench tests of Salton Sea water using sea water reverse osmosis (SWRO achieved initial contaminant rejections of 99 percent salinity, 97.7 percent conductivity, 98.6 percent total dissolved solids, 98.7 percent chloride, 65 percent sulfate, and 99.3 percent turbidity.

  7. Ocean Surface Emissivity at L-band (1.4 GHz): The Dependence on Salinity and Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Lang, R. H.; Wentz, F. J.; Meissner, T.

    2012-12-01

    A characterization of the emissivity of sea water at L-band is important for the remote sensing of sea surface salinity. Measurements of salinity are currently being made in the radio astronomy band at 1.413 GHz by ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and NASA's Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory. The goal of both missions is accuracy on the order of 0.2 psu. This requires accurate knowledge of the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature and also the effect of waves (roughness). The former determines the emissivity of an ideal (i.e. flat) surface and the later is the major source of error from predictions based on a flat surface. These two aspects of the problem of characterizing the emissivity are being addressed in the context of the Aquarius mission. First, laboratory measurements are being made of the dielectric constant of sea water. This is being done at the George Washington University using a resonant cavity. In this technique, sea water of known salinity and temperature is fed into the cavity along its axis through a narrow tube. The sea water changes the resonant frequency and Q of the cavity which, if the sample is small enough, can be related to the dielectric constant of the sample. An extensive set of measurements have been conducted at 1.413 GHz to develop a model for the real and imaginary part of the dielectric constant as a function of salinity and temperature. The results are compared to the predictions of models based on parameterization of the Debye resonance of the water molecule. The models and measurements are close; however, the differences are significant for remote sensing of salinity. This is especially true at low temperatures where the sensitivity to salinity is lowest. Second, observations from Aquarius are being used to develop a model for the effect of wind-driven roughness (waves) on the emissivity in the open ocean. This is done by comparing the measured

  8. Interannual and Decadal Changes in Salinity in the Oceanic Subtropical Gyres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Subrahmanyam

    2017-04-01

    There is evidence that the global water cycle has been undergoing an intensification over several decades as a response to increasing atmospheric temperatures, particularly in regions with skewed evaporation - precipitation (E-P) patterns such as the oceanic subtropical gyres. Moreover, observational data (rain gauges, etc.) are quite sparse over such areas due to the inaccessibility of open ocean regions. In this work, a comparison of observational and model simulations are conducted to highlight the potential applications of satellite derived salinity from NASA Aquarius Salinity mission, NASA Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), and ESA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP). We explored spatial and temporal salinity changes (and trends) in surface and subsurface in the oceanic subtropical gyres using Argo floats salinity data, Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) reanalysis, Estimating the Circulations & Climate of the Ocean GECCO (German ECCO) model simulations, and Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Our results based on SODA reanalysis reveals that a positive rising trend in sea surface salinity in the subtropical gyres emphasizing evidence for decadal intensification in the surface forcing in these regions. Zonal drift in the location of the salinity maximum of the south Pacific, north Atlantic, and south Indian regions implies a change in the mean near-surface currents responsible for advecting high salinity waters into the region. Also we found out that an overall salinity increase within the mixed layer, and a subsurface salinity decrease at depths greater than 200m in the global subtropical gyres over 61 years. We determine that freshwater fluxes at the air-sea interface are the primary drivers of the sea surface salinity (SSS) signature over these open ocean regions by quantifying the advective contribution within the surface layer. This was demonstrated through a mixed layer salinity budget in each subtropical gyre based on the vertically

  9. Gamma-ray co-irradiation induced graft polymerization of NVP and SSS onto polypropylene non-woven fabric and its blood compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Wang, Hengdong; Wang, Wenfeng; Ye, Yin

    2013-10-01

    Sodium styrenesulfonate was grafted onto PPNWF via γ-ray co-irradiation method with the existence of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone. The effect of absorbed dose, dose rate and concentration of binary monomer on the degree of grafting was investigated. The surface chemical change was characterized by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The wettability was characterized through the measurement of adsorption percentage of water and phosphate buffer solution (PBS). The result demonstrated that the grafted poly(NVP-co-SSS) chains can improve the hydrophilicity of PPNWF. Furthermore, the modified PPNWF has good blood compatibility, such as low hemolysis rate, low platelet adhesion and effectively extending the blood coagulation times. Consequently, hydrophilicity and hemocompatibility of PPNWF were greatly enhanced by the immobilization of poly(NVP-co-SSS) chains.

  10. Neptunium sorption and redox speciation at the illite surface under highly saline conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Nidhu Lal; Marsac, Rémi; Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Marquardt, Christian Michael; Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Joerg; Bender, Kerstin; Geckeis, Horst

    2017-10-01

    Neptunium (Np) uptake on illite is investigated in 1 and 3.2 molal (m) NaCl solutions under inert (Ar) atmosphere for 4 nuclear waste disposal since many sedimentary rocks or clay formations that are deemed suitable for this purpose exhibit highly saline porewaters.

  11. Quantitative estimation of Holocene surface salinity variation in the Black Sea using dinoflagellate cyst process length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertens, Kenneth Neil; Bradley, Lee R.; Takano, Yoshihito

    2012-01-01

    this calibration to make a regional reconstruction of paleosalinity in the Black Sea, calculated by averaging out process length variation observed at four core sites from the Black Sea with high sedimentation rates and dated by multiple mollusk shell ages. Results show a very gradual change of salinity from ∼14...

  12. Study of the synergistic effects of salinity, pH, and temperature on the surface-active properties of biosurfactants produced by Lactobacillus pentosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Xanel Vecino; Devesa-Rey, Rosa; Cruz, José Manuel; Moldes, Ana Belén

    2012-02-08

    Many studies have investigated the effects of pH, temperature, and salinity on the surface-active properties of various surfactants, although in most cases the variables have been studied separately, without considering the effects of any interactions between them. In the present study, a Box-Behnken factorial design was applied to study the effects of pH, temperature, and salinity on the surface-active properties of a biosurfactant produced by Lactobacillus pentosus. The data obtained enabled development of a second-order model describing the interrelationships between operational and experimental variables, by equations including linear, interaction, and quadratic terms. The variable that had the greatest effect on the surface-active properties of the biosurfactant was pH. Moreover, at pH 3-5.5, decreases in salinity and temperature acted synergistically, reducing the surface tension of the biosurfactant; at pH 8, the same effect was observed with increasing salinity and temperature.

  13. Commonalities and differences of T3SSs in rhizobia and plant pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampakaki, Anastasia P.

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria and rhizobia infect higher plants albeit the interactions with their hosts are principally distinct and lead to completely different phenotypic outcomes, either pathogenic or mutualistic, respectively. Bacterial protein delivery to plant host plays an essential role in determining the phenotypic outcome of plant-bacteria interactions. The involvement of type III secretion systems (T3SSs) in mediating animal- and plant-pathogen interactions was discovered in the mid-80's and is now recognized as a multiprotein nanomachine dedicated to trans-kingdom movement of effector proteins. The discovery of T3SS in bacteria with symbiotic lifestyles broadened its role beyond virulence. In most T3SS-positive bacterial pathogens, virulence is largely dependent on functional T3SSs, while in rhizobia the system is dispensable for nodulation and can affect positively or negatively the mutualistic associations with their hosts. This review focuses on recent comparative genome analyses in plant pathogens and rhizobia that uncovered similarities and variations among T3SSs in their genetic organization, regulatory networks and type III secreted proteins and discusses the evolutionary adaptations of T3SSs and type III secreted proteins that might account for the distinguishable phenotypes and host range characteristics of plant pathogens and symbionts. PMID:24723933

  14. Sodium concentration in home made salt – sugar – solution (sss ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a cohort of 210 young mothers, selected through cluster sampling technique from Ogida health district of Egor Local Government Area of Edo State, the electrolyte concentration of prepared salt-sugar-solutions (SSS) were evaluated. This was predicated on the need to determine the effects of introduction of various ...

  15. Influence from Polarized Galactic Background Noise on L-band Measurements of the Sea Surface Salinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2004-01-01

    The polarimetric EMIRAD radiometer, based on novel digital down conversion and detection techniques, has been installed on a C-130 aircraft from the Royal Danish. Air Force during the L-band Ocean Salinity Airborne Campaign (LOSAC) in 2001 and 2003. Full 360° circle flight patterns around the same...... target area as well as clover leaf patterns have been measured, and both provide an azimuth signature of the ocean at a constant incidence angle. The resulting azimuth signatures show significant variations in all the three first Stokes parameters, and a correlation is found between the downwelling...

  16. Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a), the optical counterpart to a gravitational wave source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, D A; Foley, R J; Kilpatrick, C D; Drout, M R; Piro, A L; Shappee, B J; Siebert, M R; Simon, J D; Ulloa, N; Kasen, D; Madore, B F; Murguia-Berthier, A; Pan, Y-C; Prochaska, J X; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rest, A; Rojas-Bravo, C

    2017-12-22

    On 17 August 2017, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the Virgo interferometer detected gravitational waves (GWs) emanating from a binary neutron star merger, GW170817. Nearly simultaneously, the Fermi and INTEGRAL (INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory) telescopes detected a gamma-ray transient, GRB 170817A. At 10.9 hours after the GW trigger, we discovered a transient and fading optical source, Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a), coincident with GW170817. SSS17a is located in NGC 4993, an S0 galaxy at a distance of 40 megaparsecs. The precise location of GW170817 provides an opportunity to probe the nature of these cataclysmic events by combining electromagnetic and GW observations. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Weekly gridded Aquarius L-band radiometer/scatterometer observations and salinity retrievals over the polar regions - Part 2: Initial product analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, L.; Dinnat, E. P.; Koenig, L. S.

    2014-05-01

    Following the development and availability of Aquarius weekly polar-gridded products, this study presents the spatial and temporal radiometer and scatterometer observations at L band (frequency ~1.4 GHz) over the cryosphere including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, sea ice in both hemispheres, and over sub-Arctic land for monitoring the soil freeze/thaw state. We provide multiple examples of scientific applications for the L-band data over the cryosphere. For example, we show that over the Greenland Ice Sheet, the unusual 2012 melt event lead to an L-band brightness temperature (TB) sustained decrease of ~5 K at horizontal polarization. Over the Antarctic ice sheet, normalized radar cross section (NRCS) observations recorded during ascending and descending orbits are significantly different, highlighting the anisotropy of the ice cover. Over sub-Arctic land, both passive and active observations show distinct values depending on the soil physical state (freeze/thaw). Aquarius sea surface salinity (SSS) retrievals in the polar waters are also presented. SSS variations could serve as an indicator of fresh water input to the ocean from the cryosphere, however the presence of sea ice often contaminates the SSS retrievals, hindering the analysis. The weekly grided Aquarius L-band products used are distributed by the US Snow and Ice Data Center at blank"> http://nsidc.org/data/aquarius/index.html , and show potential for cryospheric studies.

  18. Feasibility of saline infusion on the liver surface during radiofrequency ablation of subcapsuIar hepatic tumor: an experimentaI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Rang; Kim, Young Sun; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Seo, Heung Suk; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Yong Soo; Kim, Sung Kyu; Paik, Seung Sam

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of infusion of normal saline onto the surface of the liver capsule for minimizing thermal injury of the adjacent organs during radiofrequency ablation of subcapsular hepatic tumor in an ex-vivo porcine model. We used porcine small bowel with it's serosal surface spread onto the porcine liver as an experiment model. The puncturing electrode was inserted into a 6 Fr introducer sheath, and the introducer sheath was connected to the infusion pump for creating a saline flow over the liver surface. A total of 15 ablations were divided into the control group (n=5), intermittent saline infusion group (n=5) and continuous saline infusion (n=5) group. The ablations were done during 3 minutes, and the infusion was set at 2 ml/min and stopped every 30 seconds in the intermittent saline infusion group. After the ablation, we measured the size of the ablated lesion on the surface of bowel and liver, and we also measured the depth of hepatic lesion. Ablated areas of bowel and liver surface in the control group, intermittent saline infusion group and continuous infusion group were 210.7±89.1 mm 2 , 74.6±27.2 mm 2 and 35.8±43.4 mm 2 , respectively, and 312.6±73.6 mm 2 , 228.4±110.5 mm 2 , and 80.9±55.1 mm 2 , respectively. In contrast to the broad base of the ablated area on the surface of the liver in the control group, the shapes of the lesions became narrower approaching to the liver surface in all cases of the continuous saline infusion group, and the shapes of the lesions were broad based in 3 cases and narrow based in 2 cases of the intermittent saline infusion group. Continuous infusion of normaI saline onto the surface of the liver during radiofrequency ablation of subcapsular hepatic tumor is a feasible method for minimizing thermal injury of the adjacent organs. Further exploration of the optimal parameters or techniques to maximize the hepatic ablation and simultaneously to minimize the thermal injury of

  19. Potential of the Moringa oleifera saline extract for the treatment of dairy wastewater: application of the response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formentini-Schmitt, Dalila Maria; Fagundes-Klen, Márcia Regina; Veit, Márcia Teresinha; Palácio, Soraya Moreno; Trigueros, Daniela Estelita Goes; Bergamasco, Rosangela; Mateus, Gustavo Affonso Pisano

    2018-03-02

    In this work, the coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation treatment of dairy wastewater samples was investigated through serial factorial designs utilizing the saline extract obtained from Moringa oleifera (Moringa) as a coagulant. The sedimentation time (ST), pH, Moringa coagulant (MC) dose and concentration of CaCl 2 have been evaluated through the response surface methodology in order to obtain the ideal turbidity removal (TR) conditions. The empirical quadratic model, in conjunction with the desirability function, demonstrated that it is possible to obtain TRs of 98.35% using a coagulant dose, concentration of CaCl 2 and pH of 280 mg L -1 , 0.8 mol L -1 and 9, respectively. The saline extract from Moringa presented its best efficiency at an alkaline pH, which influenced the reduction of the ST to a value of 25 min. It was verified that the increase in the solubility of the proteins in the Moringa stimulated the reduction of the coagulant content in the reaction medium, and it is related to the use of calcium chloride as an extracting agent of these proteins. The MC proved to be an excellent alternative for the dairy wastewater treatment, compared to the traditional coagulants.

  20. Potentially mobile of heavy metals on the surface sediments in tropical hyper-saline and positive estuaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS A. RAMOS E SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Estuarine sediments represent important pools of trace metals, released from both anthropogenic and natural sources. Fluctuations in the water column physicochemical conditions, on the other hand, may transfer metals from solid to liquid compartment and resulting in contamination of the surrounding environment. The present research was carried out to evaluate the weakly bounded heavy metal levels in tropical hyper-saline and positive estuaries, in order to quantify its potentially availability. The monitoring includes five metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn and cover nine estuaries in Rio Grande do Norte state/Brazil, including four hypersaline and five true estuaries. 50 surface sediment samples were collected in each estuary. At the same time, organic matter concentrations were evaluated in order to help explaining possible local variations in heavy metal levels. Organic matter results (0.7% - 7.3% suggest the positive Potengi estuary as the most critical environmental quality situation. On the other hand, according to heavy metals levels, both Conchas and Potengi estuaries registered the higher concentrations of Cr. The highest concentrations were observed in the hyper-saline estuaries, with the exception of the Zn. The present study revealed that the watershed occupation has significantly influenced the heavy metal concentrations in the estuaries.

  1. Long-term trends of salinity along the AMOC upper branch, linked to changing surface freshwater fluxes and ocean freshwater transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, R.; Zika, J. D.; Skliris, N.; McDonagh, E.; Drijfhout, S. S.

    2016-02-01

    The Atlantic exports a substantial quantity of moisture to the Pacific, principally via the trade winds that are part of the atmospheric Walker cell, leading to a 2.0 psu contrast between high salinity in the North Atlantic and low salinity in the North Pacific. This maintains relatively high salinities along the upper branch of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), which favors dense water formation in the North Atlantic and a vigorous AMOC. Over 1950-2010, the Atlantic-Pacific surface salinity contrast increased by 0.2 psu, part of a "pattern amplification" in the global salinity field. This is consistent with some evidence, in reanalysis data, for increases in net evaporation over the Atlantic and in net precipitation in the Pacific. Meanwhile, a decade of RAPID observations at 26°N indicate that southward freshwater transport is strongly correlated with AMOC strength in the subtropical North Atlantic. The relative influence of changing surface freshwater fluxes and ocean freshwater transports on upper branch salinity is investigated, and implications for the strength and stability of the AMOC are considered.

  2. Observed variability of sea surface salinity and thermal inversions in the Lakshadweep Sea during contrast monsoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Johnson, Z.; Salgaonkar, G.; Nisha, K.; Rajan, C.K.; Rao, R.R.

    a weak (2002) monsoon. The resultant near-surface thermal inversions also have shown large differences in the life cycle and depth of occurrence between these two winters. Citation: Gopalakrishna, V. V., Z. Johnson, G. Salgaonkar, K. Nisha, C. K...

  3. Sea surface temperature and salinity from the Global Ocean Surface Underway Data (GOSUD) from 1980-01-03 to present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection contains the Global Ocean Surface Underway Data (GOSUD) from 1980-01-03 to present as submitted to NOAA/NCEI. The data includes information about sea...

  4. Measurement of Near-Surface Salinity, Temperature and Directional Wave Spectra using a Novel Wave-Following, Lagrangian Surface Contact Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Results from a surface contact drifter buoy which measures near-surface conductivity ( 10 cm depth), sea state characteristics and near-surface water temperature ( 2 cm depth) are described. This light (autonomous, with low power requirements and solar panel battery recharging. Onboard sensors include an inductive toroidal conductivity probe for salinity measurement, a nine-degrees-of-freedom motion package for derivation of directional wave spectra and a thermocouple for water temperature measurement. Data retrieval for expendable, ocean-going operation uses an onboard Argos transmitter. Scientific results as well as data processing algorithms are presented from laboratory and field experiments which support qualification of buoy platform measurements. These include sensor calibration experiments, longer-term dock-side biofouling experiments during 2013-2014 and a series of short-duration ocean deployments in the Gulf Stream in 2014. In addition, a treatment method will be described which appears to minimize the effects of biofouling on the inductive conductivity probe when in coastal surface waters. Due to its low cost and ease of deployment, scores, perhaps hundreds of these novel instruments could be deployed from ships or aircraft during process studies or to provide surface validation for satellite-based measurements, particularly in high precipitation regions.

  5. Identification of thermohaline structure of a tropical estuary and its sensitivity to meteorological disturbance through temperature, salinity, and surface meteorological measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A; Mehra, P.; Desai, R.G.P.; Sivadas, T.K.; Balachandran, K.K.; Vijaykumar, K.; Revichandran, C.; Agarvadekar, Y.; Francis, R.; Martin, G.D.

    the thermohaline structure of KB. Rainfall and associated river influx cause large haline stratification in the mouth region, in which a approx. 1-4 m thick layer of low salinity water (approx. 0-2 psu) floats on the surface....

  6. Radiolarian artificial neural network based paleo sea surface water temperature and salinity changes during the last glacial cycle in the Timor Sea, Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S. M.; Malmgren, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The western Pacific water enters into the Timor Sea (tropical Indian Ocean) by the thermohaline conveyor belt, and this region is under the influence of the SW monsoon. The higher precipitation during the monsoon rains lower the surface salinity in the north-eastern Indian Ocean towards the Bay of Bengal; whereas, the Arabian Sea remains highly saline due to higher evaporation in the region surrounding Arabian deserts. The salinity contrast in the northern Indian Ocean is very unique, and the radiolarian micro-zooplanktons living in the surface water serve a very good proxy for the monsoonal changes in the surface sea-water temperature (SST) and salinity in the geological past. We studied radiolarian faunal variation in the core MD01-2378, located at ~13oS and ~121oE (1783 m water depth), at the inlet of the thermohaline circulation into the Timor Sea. We applied the modern radiolarian based artificial neural networks (ANNs) (Gupta and Malmgren, 2009) to derive the SST and salinity during August-October for the last 140 ka (the full last glacial cycle). Based on the mean estimates of the 10 ANNs, the root mean square error in prediction (RMSEP) for SST is ~1.4oC with correlation between observed and estimated values r=0.98 (Gupta and Malmgren, 2009). Similarly, the RMSEP is 0.3 psu (r=0.94) for the salinity estimates. We derived paleo-SSTs and salinity values using modern radiolarian ANNs and the fossil radiolarian data generated from the core for the last 140-ka (Fig.1). The age model of the core is based on δ18O benthic oxygen isotope stratigraphy and 21 AMS 14C ages up to ~30-ka (Holbourn et al., 2005). Paleo SST-summer varied between 22-28.5oC, and it is in very good agreement with the δ18O benthic record of Holbourn et al. (2005) defining the Last Glacial Maximum (~24 ka) and the Eemian (~125 ka) stages. The salinity fluctuated between 34-35 psu, and compared well with oxygen isotope record representing the LGM and Eemian periods. We gratefully acknowledge

  7. Application of FTLOADDS to Simulate Flow, Salinity, and Surface-Water Stage in the Southern Everglades, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John D.; Swain, Eric D.; Wolfert, Melinda A.; Langevin, Christian D.; James, Dawn E.; Telis, Pamela A.

    2007-01-01

    representation of coastal flows. This improvement most likely is due to a more stable numerical representation of the coastal creek outlets. Sensitivity analyses were performed by varying frictional resistance, leakage, barriers to flow, and topography. Changing frictional resistance values in inland areas was shown to improve water-level representation locally, but to have a negligible effect on area-wide values. These changes have only local effects and are not physically based (as are the unchanged values), and thus have limited validity. Sensitivity tests indicate that the overall accuracy of the simulation is diminished if leakage between surface water and ground water is not simulated. The inclusion of a major road as a complete barrier to surface-water flow influenced the local distribution and timing of flow; however, the changes in total flow and individual creekflows were negligible. The model land-surface altitude was lowered by 0.1 meter to determine the sensitivity to topographic variation. This topographic sensitivity test produced mixed results in matching field data. Overall, the representation of stage did not improve definitively. A final calibration utilized the results of the sensitivity analysis to refine the TIME application. To accomplish this calibration, the friction coefficient was reduced at the northern boundary inflow and increased in the southwestern corner of the model, the evapotranspiration function was varied, additional data were used for the ground-water head boundary along the southeast, and the frictional resistance of the primary coastal creek outlet was increased. The calibration improved the match between measured and simulated total flows to Florida Bay and coastal salinities. Agreement also was improved at most of the water-level sites throughout the model domain.

  8. Carbon dioxide, temperature, and salinity collected from surface underway survey from May 1986 to April 1989 (NODC Accession 9400164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains chemical and physical profile data containing measuremnts of depth, salinity and temperature collected between May 1986 and April 1989. Data...

  9. Assessment of utility of Siriraj Stroke Score (SSS in stroke patients of Pt. BD Sharma PGIMS hospital, Rohtak, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Singh

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available India has predominantly poor rural population where brain CT scan, most often advised investigation in patients of stroke, may not always be available, hence Indian physician in such setting base his diagnosis on bed side sign evaluation for which Siriraj Stroke Score (SSS could be helpful. Objective of study: to assess the utility of SSS in patients of stroke. Methodology: sixty subjects of stroke were evaluated on SSS and 'probable' diagnosis so made was compared with CT scan's (brain 'certain' diagnosis. Main findings: by using SSS, the probable bedside diagnosis was cerebral infarct (score < -1 in 32 subjects and cerebral haemorrhage (score > +1 in 24 subjects while 4 subjects had indeterminant score (-1 to +1. Fifty subjects had their probable diagnosis matched with brain CT scan certain diagnosis. The above findings showed that SSS had 93.7% sensitivity, 76.6% specificity, 81.2% positive predictive value, 92% negative predictive value with an overall accuracy as 93.7% for diagnosis of cerebral infarction. For patients of cerebral haemorrhage the sensitivity was 83.3%, specificity was 92.5%, positive predictive value was 86.9%, negative predictive values was 92.5% with overall accuracy as 83.3%. Principal conclusion: physicians in the rural settings may find SSS to be quite useful in the management of stroke especially where more sophisticated radiological investigations may not be available for confirmation of diagnosis due to high cost or attended due to transportation risk. (Med J Indones 2007; 10: 164-8Keywords: stroke, cerebrovascular accident, infarction, haemorrhage

  10. Traitement automatique de données océanographiques pour l'interpolation de la ∫CO₂ de surface dans l'océan Atlantique tropical, en utilisant les données satellitaires

    OpenAIRE

    Moussa, Hadjer

    2016-01-01

    This thesis work consists of using satellite data of SST (sea surface temperature), SSS (sea surface salinity), and Chl-a (chlorophyll-a), in order to interpolate the CO2 fugacity (fCO2) in the surface of the tropical Atlantic ocean, for seasons of the period 2002-2013. Three data types were used: in situ (SOCAT V.3 DB (database)); satellite (MODIS-A, Sea-WIFS, and SMOS sensors); and assimilated (SODA V.2.2.4 DB). The first step was the data classification based on SST. The second step was th...

  11. Distribution of Glass Eel by the Water Surface Salinity Using Landsat TM at Pelabuhan Ratu Bay, West Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irianto, D. S.; Supriatna; Pin, TjiongGiok

    2016-11-01

    Eel (Anguilla spp.) is consumed fish that has an important economic value, either for local or international market. Pelabuhanratu Bay is an area with big potential for supplying eel seed. One of important factor, which affect an eel existence, is salinity, because eel migrate from fresh water, brackish, and sea naturally although the otherwise so that need ways to describe the distribution of glass eel by the salinity. To find out the percentage of salinity, it obtained from Landsat 8 Imagery in year 2015 using salinity prediction of Algorithm Cimandiri. The research has been conducted at Cimandiri Estuary, Citepus Estuary, and Cimaja Estuary based on wet and dry months. The existence of glass eel which is obtained from the catch was occurs on dry month when the most catch was occurs at the edge of estuary. The catch is reduced if it's farther from the edge of estuary, at the beach towards the sea and the inside of the river mouth with the percentage of salinity towards the sea is increase while the percentage of salinity towards the river is decrease.

  12. Receding and advancing (CO2 + brine + quartz) contact angles as a function of pressure, temperature, surface roughness, salt type and salinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Yaseri, Ahmed Z.; Lebedev, Maxim; Barifcani, Ahmed; Iglauer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • (Water + CO 2 ) contact angle on quartz increases substantially with pressure and salinity. • (Water + CO 2 ) contact angle on quartz increases slightly with temperature. • Surface roughness has only a minor influence on (water + CO 2 + quartz) contact angles. - Abstract: The wetting characteristics of CO 2 in rock are of vital importance in carbon geo-storage as they determine fluid dynamics and storage capacities. However, the current literature data has a high uncertainty, which translates into uncertain predictions in terms of containment security and economic project feasibility. We thus measured contact angles for the CO 2 /water/quartz system at relevant reservoir conditions, and analysed the effects of pressure (0.1 to 20) MPa, temperature (296 to 343) K, surface roughness (56 to 1300) nm, salt type (NaCl, CaCl 2 , and MgCl 2 ) and brine salinities (0 to 35) wt%. Water contact angles decreased with surface roughness, but increased with pressure, temperature, and brine salinity. Overall the contact angles were significantly increased at storage conditions (∼50°) when compared to ambient conditions (always 0°). Consequently quartz is weakly water-wet (not completely water-wet) at storage conditions, and structural and residual trapping capacities are reduced accordingly.

  13. Hydrologic modeling in a marsh-mangrove ecotone: Predicting wetland surface water and salinity response to restoration in the Ten Thousand Islands region of Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michot, B.D.; Meselhe, E.A.; Krauss, Ken W.; Shrestha, Surendra; From, Andrew S.; Patino, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    At the fringe of Everglades National Park in southwest Florida, United States, the Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge (TTINWR) habitat has been heavily affected by the disruption of natural freshwater flow across the Tamiami Trail (U.S. Highway 41). As the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) proposes to restore the natural sheet flow from the Picayune Strand Restoration Project area north of the highway, the impact of planned measures on the hydrology in the refuge needs to be taken into account. The objective of this study was to develop a simple, computationally efficient mass balance model to simulate the spatial and temporal patterns of water level and salinity within the area of interest. This model could be used to assess the effects of the proposed management decisions on the surface water hydrological characteristics of the refuge. Surface water variations are critical to the maintenance of wetland processes. The model domain is divided into 10 compartments on the basis of their shared topography, vegetation, and hydrologic characteristics. A diversion of +10% of the discharge recorded during the modeling period was simulated in the primary canal draining the Picayune Strand forest north of the Tamiami Trail (Faka Union Canal) and this discharge was distributed as overland flow through the refuge area. Water depths were affected only modestly. However, in the northern part of the refuge, the hydroperiod, i.e., the duration of seasonal flooding, was increased by 21 days (from 115 to 136 days) for the simulation during the 2008 wet season, with an average water level rise of 0.06 m. The average salinity over a two-year period in the model area just south of Tamiami Trail was reduced by approximately 8 practical salinity units (psu) (from 18 to 10 psu), whereas the peak dry season average was reduced from 35 to 29 psu (by 17%). These salinity reductions were even larger with greater flow diversions (+20%). Naturally, the reduction

  14. Effects of surface and subsurface drip irrigation regimes with saline water on yield and water use efficiency of potato in arid conditions of Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathia El Mokh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted on a sandy soil during spring of 2009 and autumn of 2010 in southern Tunisia for evaluating the effects of two drip irrigation methods and three irrigation regimes on soil moisture and salinity, yield and water use efficiency of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.. The surface drip (SDI and subsurface drip (SSDI irrigation methods were used. Irrigation regimes consisted in replacement of cumulated ETc when readily available water is depleted with levels of 100% (FI100, 60% (DI60 and 30% (DI30. FI100 was considered as full irrigation while DI60 and DI30 were considered as deficit irrigation regimes. Well water with an ECi of 7.0 dS/m was used for irrigation. Findings are globally consistent between the two experiments. Results show that soil moisture content and salinity were significantly affected by irrigation treatments and methods. Higher soil moisture content and lower soil salinity were maintained with SSDI than SDI for all irrigation treatments. For both irrigation methods, higher salinity and lower moisture content in the root zone are observed under DI60 and DI30 treatments compared to FI100. Potato yields were highest over two cropping periods for the SSDI method although no significant differences were observed with the SDI. Irrigation regimes resulted in significant difference in both irrigation methods on yield and its components. Yields were highest under FI100. Compared to FI100, considerable reductions in potato yields were observed under DI60 and DI30 deficit treatments resulting from a reduction in tubers number/m² and average tuber weight and size. Water use efficiency (WUE was found to vary significantly among irrigation methods and treatments and varied between 5.9 and 20.5 kg/m3. WUE of SSDI method had generally higher values than SDI. The lowest WUE values were observed for the FI100 treatment, while the highest values were obtained under DI30 treatment for both methods. SSDI method provides

  15. Social Support Scale (MOS-SSS: Analysis of the Psychometric Properties via Item Response Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Sacramento Zanini

    Full Text Available Abstract The study on social relationships that influence health, as well as the development of reliable measures to assess this construct has been highlighted in the academic literature. The aim of this study was to estimate new evidence of validity based on the internal structure and reliability of the MOS-SSS, as well as the parameters of items and participants by Item response theory. The sample consisted of 998 people (age: M = 27.18, SD = 9.90, 65.1% women from different sampling strata. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA revealed better goodness of fit of the four-factor model when compared to factor structures shown in other Brazilian studies. The multigroup CFA demonstrated invariance of the factor model when comparing the different sampling strata. The partial credit model indicated items with mean difficulty and appropriate adjustments indices (infit/outfit and desirable reliability for the factors. The analysis of the maps indicated the tool's strengths and limitations to assess the construct.

  16. Evidence for Cocoon Emission from the Early Light Curve of SSS17a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Anthony L.; Kollmeier, Juna A.

    2018-03-01

    Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a) was discovered as the first optical counterpart to the gravitational wave event GW170817. Although its light curve on the timescale of weeks roughly matches the expected luminosity and red color of an r-process powered transient, the explanation for the blue emission from high velocity material over the first few days is not as clear. Here we show that the power-law evolution of the luminosity, temperature, and photospheric radius during these early times can be explained by cooling of shock-heated material around the neutron star merger. This heating is likely from the interaction of the gamma-ray burst jet with merger debris, the so-called cocoon emission. We summarize the properties of this emission and provide formulae that can be used to study future detections of shock cooling from merging neutron stars. This argues that optical transient surveys should search for such early, blue light if they wish to find off-axis gamma-ray bursts and double neutron star gravitational wave events as soon as possible after the merger.

  17. Process length variation in cysts of a dinoflagellate, Lingulodinium machaerophorum, in surface sediments: investigating its potential as salinity proxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertens, Kenneth; Ribeiro, Sofia; Ilham, Bouimetarhan

    2009-01-01

    surface sediment samples revealed that the average process length is related to summer salinity and temperature at a water depth of 30 m by the equation (salinity/temperature) = (0.078low asteriskaverage process length + 0.534) with R2 = 0.69. This relationship can be used to reconstruct palaeosalinities......, albeit with caution. The particular ecological window can be associated with known distributions of the corresponding motile stage Lingulodinium polyedrum (Stein) Dodge, 1989. Confocal laser microscopy showed that the average process length is positively related to the average distance between process...... bases (R2 = 0.78), and negatively related to the number of processes (R2 = 0.65). These results document the existence of two end members in cyst formation: one with many short, densely distributed processes and one with a few, long, widely spaced processes, which can be respectively related to low...

  18. Sea surface temperatures and salinities from platforms in the Barents Sea, Sea of Japan, North Atlantic Ocean, Philippine Sea, Red Sea, and the South China Sea (Nan Hai) from 1896-1950 (NODC Accession 0000506)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface temperatures and salinities were collected in the Barents Sea, Sea of Japan, North Atlantic Ocean, Philippine Sea, Red Sea, and South China Sea (Nan Hai)...

  19. Effect of different levels of nitrogen fertilizer on yield and quality of sugar beet Beta vulgaris irrigated with saline groundwater (fertigation and surface irrigation) and grown under saline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janat, M.

    2009-07-01

    In a field experiment Sugar beet Beta vulgaris was grown as a spring crop during the growing seasons of 2004 and 2006, in salt affected soil, previously planted with sesbania and barley (2005 and 2003) to evaluate the response of sugar beet to two irrigation methods, (drip fertigation and surface irrigation), different levels of nitrogen fertilizer and its effect on yield and quality. Different rates of nitrogen fertilizers (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 kg N/ ha) as urea (46% N) were injected for drip irrigation or broadcasted for the surface-irrigated treatments in four equally split applications. The 15 N labelled urea was applied to sub-plots of 1.0 m 2 in each experimental unit in a manner similar to that of unlabeled urea. Irrigation scheduling was carried out using the direct method of neutron scattering technique. Sugar beet was irrigated when soil moisture in the upper 25 cm was 80% of the field capacity (FC) and such practice continued until the six leaf stage. From the latter stage until harvest, sugar beet was irrigated when soil moisture in the upper 50 cm reached 80% of the FC. The amount of irrigation water applied, electrical conductivity of the soil paste, dry matter and fresh roots yield, total nitrogen uptake and N derived from fertilizer were also determined. Furthermore, Nitrogen use as well as water use-efficiencies for dry matter and roots yield were also calculated. Results revealed that sugar beets and dry matter yield increased with increasing N input up to 100-150 kg N/ha which was indicated by the higher dry matter yield, and sugar beet yield. Sugar percentage was also increased relative to the average percentage recorded in Syria. Crop water use efficiencies, for both the drip-fertigated and surface-irrigated treatments were increased in most cases with increasing rate of nitrogen fertilizer. During the course of this study, small increases in soil salinity under both irrigation methods were observed. Higher increases in soil salinity was

  20. Evaluation of effects of changes in canal management and precipitation patterns on salinity in Biscayne Bay, Florida, using an integrated surface-water/groundwater model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Melinda A.; Swain, Eric D.; Wang, John D.; Dixon, Joann

    2012-01-01

    Biscayne National Park, located in Biscayne Bay in southeast Florida, is one of the largest marine parks in the country and sustains a large natural marine fishery where numerous threatened and endangered species reproduce. In recent years, the bay has experienced hypersaline conditions (salinity greater than 35 practical salinity units) of increasing magnitude and duration. Hypersalinity events were particularly pronounced during April to August 2004 in nearshore areas along the southern and middle parts of the bay. Prolonged hypersaline conditions can cause degradation of water quality and permanent damage to, or loss of, brackish nursery habitats for multiple species of fish and crustaceans as well as damage to certain types of seagrasses that are not tolerant of extreme changes in salinity. To evaluate the factors that contribute to hypersalinity events and to test the effects of possible changes in precipitation patterns and canal flows into Biscayne Bay on salinity in the bay, the U.S. Geological Survey constructed a coupled surface-water/groundwater numerical flow model. The model is designed to account for freshwater flows into Biscayne Bay through the canal system, leakage of salty bay water into the underlying Biscayne aquifer, discharge of fresh and salty groundwater from the Biscayne aquifer into the bay, direct effects of precipitation on bay salinity, indirect effects of precipitation on recharge to the Biscayne aquifer, direct effects of evapotranspiration (ET) on bay salinity, indirect effects of ET on recharge to the Biscayne aquifer, and maintenance of mass balance of both water and solute. The model was constructed using the Flow and Transport in a Linked Overland/Aquifer Density Dependent System (FTLOADDS) simulator, version 3.3, which couples the two-dimensional, surface-water flow and solute-transport simulator SWIFT2D with the density-dependent, groundwater flow an solute-transport simulator SEAWAT. The model was calibrated by a trial

  1. Towards the development of a salinity impact category for South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Towards the development of a salinity impact category for South African life cycle assessments: part 3 - salinity potentials. ... Surface water 0.165. Natural surfaces 0.031. Agricultural surfaces 1.000. An additional impact category for salinity effects is therefore proposed, and the derived salinity potentials (also known as ...

  2. Development of sub-surface drainage data base system for use in water logging and salinity managements issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar, A.H.; Alam, M.M; Rafiq, M.

    2005-01-01

    A simple user-friendly menu-driven database management system pertinent to the Impact of Subsurface Drainage Systems on land and Water Conditions (ISLaW) has been developed for use in water logging and salinity management issues of drainage areas. This database has been developed by integrating four software viz; Microsoft Excel, MS Word, Acrobat and MS Access. The information in the form of tables and figures with respect to various drainage projects has been presented in MS Word files. The major data sets of various subsurface drainage projects included in the ISLaW database are: i) technical aspects, ii) groundwater and soil salinity aspects, iii) socio-technical aspects, iv) agro-economic aspects, and v) operation and maintenance aspects. The various ISLaW files can be accessed just by clicking at the Menu buttons of the database system. This database not only gives feedback on the functioning of different subsurface drainage projects with respect to above mentioned various aspects, but also serves as a resource document for these data for future studies at other drainage projects. The developed database system is useful for planners, designers and Farmers' Organizations for improved operation of existing as well as development of future drainage projects. (author)

  3. Comparison of SSS and SRS calculated from normal databases provided by QPS and 4D-MSPECT manufacturers and from identical institutional normals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knollmann, Daniela; Knebel, Ingrid; Gebhard, Michael; Krohn, Thomas; Buell, Ulrich; Schaefer, Wolfgang M. [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Koch, Karl-Christian [University Hospital Aachen, Medical Clinic I (Cardiology), Aachen (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    There is proven evidence for the importance of myocardial perfusion-single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with computerised determination of summed stress and rest scores (SSS/SRS) for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). SSS and SRS can thereby be calculated semi-quantitatively using a 20-segment model by comparing tracer-uptake with values from normal databases (NDB). Four severity-degrees for SSS and SRS are normally used: <4, 4-8, 9-13, and {>=}14. Manufacturers' NDBs (M-NDBs) often do not fit the institutional (I) settings. Therefore, this study compared SSS and SRS obtained with the algorithms Quantitative Perfusion SPECT (QPS) and 4D-MSPECT using M-NDB and I-NDB. I-NDBs were obtained using QPS and 4D-MSPECT from exercise stress data (450 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin, triple-head-camera, 30 s/view, 20 views/head) from 36 men with a low post-stress test CAD probability and visually normal SPECT findings. Patient group was 60 men showing the entire CAD-spectrum referred for routine perfusion-SPECT. Stress/rest results of automatic quantification of the 60 patients were compared to M-NDB and I-NDB. After reclassifying SSS/SRS into the four severity degrees, kappa ({kappa}) values were calculated to objectify agreement. Mean values (vs M-NDB) were 9.4 {+-} 10.3 (SSS) and 5.8 {+-} 9.7 (SRS) for QPS and 8.2 {+-} 8.7 (SSS) and 6.2 {+-} 7.8 (SRS) for 4D-MSPECT. Thirty seven of sixty SSS classifications ({kappa} = 0.462) and 40/60 SRS classifications ({kappa} = 0.457) agreed. Compared to I-NDB, mean values were 10.2 {+-} 11.6 (SSS) and 6.5 {+-} 10.4 (SRS) for QPS and 9.2 {+-} 9.3 (SSS) and 7.2 {+-} 8.6 (SRS) for 4D-MSPECT. Forty four of sixty patients agreed in SSS and SRS ({kappa} = 0.621 resp. 0.58). Considerable differences between SSS/SRS obtained with QPS and 4D-MSPECT were found when using M-NDB. Even using identical patients and identical I-NDB, the algorithms still gave substantial different results. (orig.)

  4. Global relationships of total alkalinity with salinity and temperature in surface waters of the world's oceans. (NCEI Accession 0157795)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Total Alkalinity fields were estimated from five regional TA relationships presented in Lee et al. 2006, using monthly mean sea surface temperature and...

  5. Workplace testing of the new single sphere neutron spectrometer based on Dysprosium activation foils (Dy-SSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedogni, R., E-mail: roberto.bedogni@lnf.infn.it [INFN-LNF (Frascati National Laboratories), Via E. Fermi n. 40-00044 Frascati (Italy); Gomez-Ros, J.M. [INFN-LNF (Frascati National Laboratories), Via E. Fermi n. 40-00044 Frascati (Italy); CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Chiti, M.; Palacios-Perez, L. [INFN-LNF (Frascati National Laboratories), Via E. Fermi n. 40-00044 Frascati (Italy); Angelone, M. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, C.P. 65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Tana, L. [A.O. Universitaria Pisana-Ospedale S. Chiara, Via Bonanno Pisano, Pisa (Italy)

    2012-08-21

    A photon insensitive passive neutron spectrometer consisting of a single moderating polyethylene sphere with Dysprosium activation foils arranged along three perpendicular axes was designed by CIEMAT and INFN. The device is called Dy-SSS (Dy foil-based Single Sphere Spectrometer). It shows nearly isotropic response in terms of neutron fluence up to 20 MeV. The first prototype, previously calibrated with 14 MeV neutrons, has been recently tested in workplaces having different energy and directional distributions. These are a 2.5 MeV nearly mono-chromatic and mono-directional beam available at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) and the photo-neutron field produced in a 15 MV Varian CLINAC DHX medical accelerator, located in the Ospedale S. Chiara (Pisa). Both neutron spectra are known through measurements with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer. In both cases the experimental response of the Dy-SSS agrees with the reference data. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the spectrometric capability of the new device are independent from the directional distribution of the neutron field. This opens the way to a new generation of moderation-based neutron instruments, presenting all advantages of the Bonner sphere spectrometer without the disadvantage of the repeated exposures. This concept is being developed within the NESCOFI@BTF project of INFN (Commissione Scientifica Nazionale 5).

  6. Workplace testing of the new single sphere neutron spectrometer based on Dysprosium activation foils (Dy-SSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedogni, R.; Gómez-Ros, J.M.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Chiti, M.; Palacios-Pérez, L.; Angelone, M.; Tana, L.

    2012-01-01

    A photon insensitive passive neutron spectrometer consisting of a single moderating polyethylene sphere with Dysprosium activation foils arranged along three perpendicular axes was designed by CIEMAT and INFN. The device is called Dy-SSS (Dy foil-based Single Sphere Spectrometer). It shows nearly isotropic response in terms of neutron fluence up to 20 MeV. The first prototype, previously calibrated with 14 MeV neutrons, has been recently tested in workplaces having different energy and directional distributions. These are a 2.5 MeV nearly mono-chromatic and mono-directional beam available at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) and the photo-neutron field produced in a 15 MV Varian CLINAC DHX medical accelerator, located in the Ospedale S. Chiara (Pisa). Both neutron spectra are known through measurements with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer. In both cases the experimental response of the Dy-SSS agrees with the reference data. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the spectrometric capability of the new device are independent from the directional distribution of the neutron field. This opens the way to a new generation of moderation-based neutron instruments, presenting all advantages of the Bonner sphere spectrometer without the disadvantage of the repeated exposures. This concept is being developed within the NESCOFI@BTF project of INFN (Commissione Scientifica Nazionale 5).

  7. Workplace testing of the new single sphere neutron spectrometer based on Dysprosium activation foils (Dy-SSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, R.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Chiti, M.; Palacios-Pérez, L.; Angelone, M.; Tana, L.

    2012-08-01

    A photon insensitive passive neutron spectrometer consisting of a single moderating polyethylene sphere with Dysprosium activation foils arranged along three perpendicular axes was designed by CIEMAT and INFN. The device is called Dy-SSS (Dy foil-based Single Sphere Spectrometer). It shows nearly isotropic response in terms of neutron fluence up to 20 MeV. The first prototype, previously calibrated with 14 MeV neutrons, has been recently tested in workplaces having different energy and directional distributions. These are a 2.5 MeV nearly mono-chromatic and mono-directional beam available at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) and the photo-neutron field produced in a 15 MV Varian CLINAC DHX medical accelerator, located in the Ospedale S. Chiara (Pisa). Both neutron spectra are known through measurements with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer. In both cases the experimental response of the Dy-SSS agrees with the reference data. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the spectrometric capability of the new device are independent from the directional distribution of the neutron field. This opens the way to a new generation of moderation-based neutron instruments, presenting all advantages of the Bonner sphere spectrometer without the disadvantage of the repeated exposures. This concept is being developed within the NESCOFI@BTF project of INFN (Commissione Scientifica Nazionale 5).

  8. Salinity Temperature and Roughness Remote Scanner (STARRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides spatially continuous high-resolution surface salinity imagery in a synoptic manner from small aircraft. Its output complements data collected from...

  9. Development and validation of a five-factor sexual satisfaction and distress scale for women: the Sexual Satisfaction Scale for Women (SSS-W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meston, Cindy; Trapnell, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This article presents data based on the responses of over 800 women who contributed to the development of the Sexual Satisfaction Scale for Women (SSS-W). The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive, multifaceted, valid, and reliable self-report measure of women's sexual satisfaction and distress. Phase I involved the initial selection of items based on past literature and on interviews of women diagnosed with sexual dysfunction and an exploratory factor analysis. Phase II involved an additional administration of the questionnaire, factor analyses, and refinement of the questionnaire items. Phase III involved administration of the final questionnaire to a sample of women with clinically diagnosed sexual dysfunction and controls. Psychometric evaluation of the SSS-W conducted in a sample of women meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for female sexual dysfunction and in a control sample provided preliminary evidence of reliability and validity. The ability of the SSS-W to discriminate between sexually functional and dysfunctional women was demonstrated for each of the SSS-W domain scores and total score. The SSS-W is a brief, 30-item measure of sexual satisfaction and sexual distress, composed of five domains supported by factor analyses: contentment, communication, compatibility, relational concern, and personal concern. It exhibits sound psychometric properties and has a demonstrated ability to discriminate between clinical and nonclinical samples.

  10. The influence of surface low-salinity waters and cold subsurface water masses on picoplankton and ultraplankton distribution in the continental shelf off Rio de Janeiro, SE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, G. A. O.; Castro, N. O.; Takanohashi, R. A.; Fernandes, A. M.; Pollery, R. C. G.; Tenenbaum, D. R.; Varela-Guerra, J.; Barrera-Alba, J. J.; Ciotti, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The smallest phytoplankton groups named picoplankton and ultraplankton can be responsible for about 50-80% of the primary production rates in oligotrophic waters, due to their high surface/volume ratios that enables them for competitive growth rates relative to bigger cells under low light and low nutrient availability. The role of picoplankton and ultraplankton in coastal dynamic regions is less clear. This work relates the spatial distribution of autotrophic and heterotrophic components of these communities to the different properties of the water masses in the Southeastern Brazilian Continental Shelf, generally considered oligotrophic. Picoplankton and ultraplankton communities were related to nutrients present in the subsurface South Atlantic Central Water and waters with salinities below 35.5 originated from different estuarine systems. The enhance of autotrophs were also associated with a near shore feature related to topographic effects of São Sebastião Island to the local currents, first reported in this article. A core of higher chlorophyll a concentration, associated with the northeastward current flow at approximately 21 m depth below the surface, was identified as a dome-like shape. This core dissipated in the subsequent days suggesting that the flow towards NE was no longer a permanent feature two days after its observation. Locally enhancement of the contribution of picoplanktonic and ultraplanktonic autotrophs was observed in the surface and at the deep chlorophyll maximum depth associated with the chlorophyll core. Heterotrophs were more abundant inside and at the mouth of Guanabara Bay as well as inside Sepetiba Bay where light levels were low.

  11. Practically Saline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Schroeder MD

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration issued a recall of all Wallcur simulation products due to reports of their use in clinical practice. We present a case of septic shock and multiorgan failure after the accidental intravenous infusion of a nonsterile Wallcur simulation product. Case . The patient presented with symptoms of rigors and dyspnea occurring immediately after infusion of Wallcur Practi-0.9% saline. Initial laboratory evidence was consistent with severe septic shock and multiorgan dysfunction. His initial lactic acid level was 9 mmol/L (reference range = 0.5-2.2, and he had evidence of acute kidney injury and markers of disseminated intravascular coagulation. All 4 blood culture bottles isolated multidrug-resistant Empedobacter brevis . The patient recovered from his illness and was discharged with ciprofloxacin therapy per susceptibilities. Discussion . This patient represents the first described case of severe septic shock associated with the infusion of a Wallcur simulation product. Intravenous inoculation of a nonsterile fluid is rare and exposes the patient to unusual environmental organisms, toxins, or unsafe fluid characteristics such as tonicity. During course of treatment, we identified the possible culprit to be a multidrug-resistant isolate of Empedobacter brevis . We also discuss the systemic failures that led to this outbreak.

  12. PODAAC-AQR50-3SUCS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aquarius Level 3 sea surface salinity (SSS) standard mapped image data contains gridded 1 degree spatial resolution SSS averaged over daily, 7 day, monthly, and...

  13. PODAAC-AQR50-3UMCS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aquarius Level 3 sea surface salinity (SSS) standard mapped image data contains gridded 1 degree spatial resolution SSS averaged over daily, 7 day, monthly, and...

  14. PODAAC-SMP20-3SMCS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The version 2.0 SMAP-SSS level 3, monthly gridded product is based on the first release of the validated standard mapped sea surface salinity (SSS) data from the...

  15. PODAAC-SMP20-3SPCS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The version 2.0 SMAP-SSS level 3, 8-Day running mean gridded product is based on the first release of the validated standard mapped sea surface salinity (SSS) data...

  16. PODAAC-AQR50-3S7CS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aquarius Level 3 sea surface salinity (SSS) standard mapped image data contains gridded 1 degree spatial resolution SSS averaged over daily, 7 day, monthly, and...

  17. PODAAC-AQR50-3SMCS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aquarius Level 3 sea surface salinity (SSS) standard mapped image data contains gridded 1 degree spatial resolution SSS averaged over daily, 7 day, monthly, and...

  18. PODAAC-AQR50-3S1CS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aquarius Level 3 sea surface salinity (SSS) standard mapped image data contains gridded 1 degree spatial resolution SSS averaged over daily, 7 day, monthly, and...

  19. PODAAC-AQR50-3Y7AS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aquarius Level 3 sea surface salinity (SSS) rain-flagged standard mapped image data contains gridded 1 degree spatial resolution SSS averaged over daily, 7 day,...

  20. PODAAC-AQR50-3S1AS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aquarius Level 3 sea surface salinity (SSS) standard mapped image data contains gridded 1 degree spatial resolution SSS averaged over daily, 7 day, monthly, and...

  1. PODAAC-AQR50-3Y7CS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aquarius Level 3 sea surface salinity (SSS) rain-flagged standard mapped image data contains gridded 1 degree spatial resolution SSS averaged over daily, 7 day,...

  2. PODAAC-AQR50-3S3CS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aquarius Level 3 sea surface salinity (SSS) standard mapped image data contains gridded 1 degree spatial resolution SSS averaged over daily, 7 day, monthly, and...

  3. Development, Testing, and Application of a Coupled Hydrodynamic Surface-Water/Groundwater Model (FTLOADDS) with Heat and Salinity Transport in the Ten Thousand Islands/Picayune Strand Restoration Project Area, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Eric D.; Decker, Jeremy D.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model application was developed for the coastal area inland of the Ten Thousand Islands (TTI) in southwestern Florida using the Flow and Transport in a Linked Overland/Aquifer Density-Dependent System (FTLOADDS) model. This model couples a two-dimensional dynamic surface-water model with a three-dimensional groundwater model, and has been applied to several locations in southern Florida. The model application solves equations for salt transport in groundwater and surface water, and also simulates surface-water temperature using a newly enhanced heat transport algorithm. One of the purposes of the TTI application is to simulate hydrologic factors that relate to habitat suitability for the West Indian Manatee. Both salinity and temperature have been shown to be important factors for manatee survival. The inland area of the TTI domain is the location of the Picayune Strand Restoration Project, which is designed to restore predevelopment hydrology through the filling and plugging of canals, construction of spreader channels, and the construction of levees and pump stations. The effects of these changes are simulated to determine their effects on manatee habitat. The TTI application utilizes a large amount of input data for both surface-water and groundwater flow simulations. These data include topography, frictional resistance, atmospheric data including rainfall and air temperature, aquifer properties, and boundary conditions for tidal levels, inflows, groundwater heads, and salinities. Calibration was achieved by adjusting the parameters having the largest uncertainty: surface-water inflows, the surface-water transport dispersion coefficient, and evapotranspiration. A sensitivity analysis did not indicate that further parameter changes would yield an overall improvement in simulation results. The agreement between field data from GPS-tracked manatees and TTI application results demonstrates that the model can predict the salinity and temperature

  4. The Sensation Seeking Scale (SSS-V and Its Use in Latin American Adolescents: Alcohol Consumption Pattern as an External Criterion for Its Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina Schmidt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sensation Seeking is a trait defined by the seeking of varied, novel, complex, and intense situations and experiences, and the willingness to take physical, social, and financial risks for the sake of such experience. The Sensation Seeking Scale (SSS-V is the most widely used measure to assess this construct. In previous studies a variety of psychometric limitations were found when using the SSS-V with Latin American population. The purpose of this study is to present additional psychometric properties for its use with Latin American adolescents. It was applied to a 506 adolescent sample (from 12 to 20 years. The result is a scale of 22 items that cover four factors. It seems that sensation seeking among Latin American adolescents can be described in terms of four factors, but with some slightly content differences from what is usually found in adult samples from other countries. Future lines of research are proposed.

  5. Chlorophyll a, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using flow-through pump from NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter off the U.S. East Coast during the East Coast Ocean Acidification (ECOA) Cruise from 2015-06-19 to 2015-07-24 (NCEI Accession 0157812)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains chlorophyll a, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations during the East Coast Ocean...

  6. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector and other instruments from the R/V Thomas G. Thompson in the Pacific Ocean from 2016-03-02 to 2016-04-18 (NCEI Accession 0158483)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters collected in the Pacific ocean on the R/V...

  7. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector and other instruments from 3 trans-Pacific crossings onboard container ship Cap Blanche in the Pacific Ocean from 2016-03-13 to 2016-09-13 (NCEI Accession 0158484)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters that were collected during 3 trans-Pacific...

  8. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector, and other instruments from container ship Cap Blanche in the Pacific Ocean from 2014-02-01 to 2014-11-26 (NCEI Accession 0132047)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters were collected during 6 trans-Pacific crossings...

  9. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector, and other instruments from NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson in the Bering Sea and coast of Alaska from 2014-03-03 to 2014-08-13 (NCEI Accession 0132046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters collected in 2014 on board NOAA Ship Oscar...

  10. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector, and other instruments from 4 trans-Pacific crossings onboard container ship Cap Blanche in the Pacific Ocean from 2015-03-28 to 2015-12-04 (NCEI Accession 0141304)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters collected during 4 trans-Pacific crossings in...

  11. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector, and other instruments from container ship Cap Vilano in the Pacific Ocean from 2013-02-01 to 2013-06-06 (NCEI Accession 0132054)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters were collected during 3 trans-Pacific crossings...

  12. Can Satellite-derived Chlorophyll Imagery Be Used to Trace Surface Dynamics in Coastal Zone? A Case Study in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gael André

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of chlorophyll data from SeaWiFS imagery and modeling results from a 3D hydrodynamical model was performed over the northwestern Mediterranean for the entire year of 2001. The study aims at investigating the information content brought by satellite-derived chlorophyll concentration ([Chl] maps concerning surface dynamics in coastal zone. The study is mainly focused on the Gulf of Lions (GoL and its outer region, which are mainly influenced by the Rhône River, local winds and the Northern Current (NC flowing from the East along the continental slope. The physical hydrodynamical model was continuously run and 40 SeaWiFS images, presenting a significant coverage of the studied area, were selected. The comparison between [Chl] and sea surface salinity (SSS fields on a pixel basis showed no definite correlation trends. Three reasons are given in discussion for that result. However, the comparison emphasized areas close to the coasts which were under the influence of different inputs not considered in the model and also of upwellings. A qualitative analysis of the data performed out of these regions exhibited significant similarities between [Chl] and SSS features. The signature of the Rhône ROFI (Region of Fresh Water Influence and, in some cases, of the NC, was evidenced on [Chl] maps. We found that the intensity of this signature is seasonally modulated, e.g., it is low in open sea during the summer, oligotrophic, season. In addition, the signature of the Rhône ROFI in the western part of the GoL can be only partial due to local chlorophyll deficits. We conclude that, for the regional case studied, chlorophyll imagery can be used as a tracer of surface dynamics through surface salinity but with limitations, especially near the coasts.

  13. Salinity intercalibration JONSDAP 76

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    Seven institutes from six countries around the North Sea took 390 salinity samples for a salinity intercalibration exercise during JONSDAP 76. For samples in glass bottles, a mean dispersion in duplicates of 0.03 promille S was found, between salinities of samples determined (soon) after collection

  14. A global algorithm for estimating Absolute Salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. McDougall

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The International Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater – 2010 has defined the thermodynamic properties of seawater in terms of a new salinity variable, Absolute Salinity, which takes into account the spatial variation of the composition of seawater. Absolute Salinity more accurately reflects the effects of the dissolved material in seawater on the thermodynamic properties (particularly density than does Practical Salinity.

    When a seawater sample has standard composition (i.e. the ratios of the constituents of sea salt are the same as those of surface water of the North Atlantic, Practical Salinity can be used to accurately evaluate the thermodynamic properties of seawater. When seawater is not of standard composition, Practical Salinity alone is not sufficient and the Absolute Salinity Anomaly needs to be estimated; this anomaly is as large as 0.025 g kg−1 in the northernmost North Pacific. Here we provide an algorithm for estimating Absolute Salinity Anomaly for any location (x, y, p in the world ocean.

    To develop this algorithm, we used the Absolute Salinity Anomaly that is found by comparing the density calculated from Practical Salinity to the density measured in the laboratory. These estimates of Absolute Salinity Anomaly however are limited to the number of available observations (namely 811. In order to provide a practical method that can be used at any location in the world ocean, we take advantage of approximate relationships between Absolute Salinity Anomaly and silicate concentrations (which are available globally.

  15. Do cold, low salinity waters pass through the Indo-Sri Lanka Channel during winter?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, R.R.; Girishkumar, M.S.; Ravichandran, M.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Pankajakshan, T.

    the southward water flow through the ISLC. The mean monthly (July–August) Indo-Sri Lanka Channel during winter 7385 climatologies of SSS from simple ocean data assimilation (SODA) analysis (Carton et al. 2005), TMI SST and SeaWiFS chlorophyll-a are utilized... Assimilation (SODA) is an ocean general circulation model-using Parallel Ocean Program with eddy-permitting resolution, which assim- ilates all available hydrographic profile data as well as ocean station data, moored temperature and salinity time series...

  16. The LHC SSS cold mass inside the cryostat. The complexity of the bus-bars for the power supply of the magnets and cryogenic links can be seen. The two apertures in the centre will house the beam lines

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The LHC SSS cold mass inside the cryostat. The complexity of the bus-bars for the power supply of the magnets and cryogenic links can be seen. The two apertures in the centre will house the beam lines

  17. Translation and cultural adaptation of the Shame and Stigma Scale (SSS) into Portuguese (Brazil) to evaluate patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirola, William Eduardo; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro; Barroso, Eliane Marçon; Kissane, David W; Serrano, Claudia Valéria Maseti Pimenta; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth leading cause of death from cancer worldwide and its treatment may involve surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The surgical procedure may cause mutilating sequelae, that can alter patient self-image. Thus, head and neck cancer is often connected to the negative stigma with decreased quality of life. Few studies assess the social stigma and shame perceived by patients with head and neck cancer. To perform the translation and cultural adaptation of the Shame and Stigma Scale (SSS) into Portuguese (Brazil). Two independent translations (English into Portuguese) were carried out by two professionals fluent in the English language. After the synthesis of the translations, two independent back-translations (from Portuguese into English) were performed by two translators whose native language is English. All translations were critically assessed by a committee of experts consisting of five members. A sample of 15 patients answered the Brazilian Portuguese version of the SSS to carry out the pretest. At this step, the patients were able to suggest modifications and evaluate the understanding of the items. There was no need to change the scale after this step. Based on the previous steps, we obtained the Portuguese (Brazil) version of the SSS, which was called "Escala de Vergonha e Estigma". The Portuguese (Brazil) version of the SSP was shown to be adequate to be applied to the population with HNC and, therefore, the psychometric properties of the tool will be evaluated during following steps. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Translation and cultural adaptation of the Shame and Stigma Scale (SSS into Portuguese (Brazil to evaluate patients with head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Eduardo Pirola

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Head and neck cancer is the sixth leading cause of death from cancer worldwide and its treatment may involve surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The surgical procedure may cause mutilating sequelae, that can alter patient self-image. Thus, head and neck cancer is often connected to the negative stigma with decreased quality of life. Few studies assess the social stigma and shame perceived by patients with head and neck cancer. Objective: To perform the translation and cultural adaptation of the Shame and Stigma Scale (SSS into Portuguese (Brazil. Methods: Two independent translations (English into Portuguese were carried out by two professionals fluent in the English language. After the synthesis of the translations, two independent back-translations (from Portuguese into English were performed by two translators whose native language is English. All translations were critically assessed by a committee of experts consisting of five members. A sample of 15 patients answered the Brazilian Portuguese version of the SSS to carry out the pretest. At this step, the patients were able to suggest modifications and evaluate the understanding of the items. Results: There was no need to change the scale after this step. Based on the previous steps, we obtained the Portuguese (Brazil version of the SSS, which was called "Escala de Vergonha e Estigma". Conclusion: The Portuguese (Brazil version of the SSP was shown to be adequate to be applied to the population with HNC and, therefore, the psychometric properties of the tool will be evaluated during following steps.

  19. Reconstructing Past Ocean Salinity ((delta)18Owater)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilderson, T P; Pak, D K

    2005-11-23

    Temperature and salinity are two of the key properties of ocean water masses. The distribution of these two independent but related characteristics reflects the interplay of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the uneven distribution of heat loss and gain by the ocean, with that of precipitation, evaporation, and the freezing and melting of ice. Temperature and salinity to a large extent, determine the density of a parcel of water. Small differences in temperature and salinity can increase or decrease the density of a water parcel, which can lead to convection. Once removed from the surface of the ocean where 'local' changes in temperature and salinity can occur, the water parcel retains its distinct relationship between (potential) temperature and salinity. We can take advantage of this 'conservative' behavior where changes only occur as a result of mixing processes, to track the movement of water in the deep ocean (Figure 1). The distribution of density in the ocean is directly related to horizontal pressure gradients and thus (geostrophic) ocean currents. During the Quaternary when we have had systematic growth and decay of large land based ice sheets, salinity has had to change. A quick scaling argument following that of Broecker and Peng [1982] is: the modern ocean has a mean salinity of 34.7 psu and is on average 3500m deep. During glacial maxima sea level was on the order of {approx}120m lower than present. Simply scaling the loss of freshwater (3-4%) requires an average increase in salinity a similar percentage or to {approx}35.9psu. Because much of the deep ocean is of similar temperature, small changes in salinity have a large impact on density, yielding a potentially different distribution of water masses and control of the density driven (thermohaline) ocean circulation. It is partly for this reason that reconstructions of past salinity are of interest to paleoceanographers.

  20. Measuring soil salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Marcus; Doyle, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Soil salinity is a form of land degradation in which salts accumulate in the soil profile to an extent that plant growth or infrastructure are negatively affected. A range of both field and laboratory procedures exist for measuring soil salinity. In the field, soil salinity is usually inferred from apparent electrical conductivity (EC(a)) using a range of devices, depending on the required depth of analysis, or size of the survey area. Field measurements of EC(a) require calibration to the actual salt content by laboratory analysis. In the laboratory, soil salinity is usually assessed by determining either the total soluble salts by evaporation of a soil water extract (TSS), or by determining the electrical conductivity (EC) of either a 1:5 distilled water:soil dilution, or a saturated paste extract. Although procedures for measuring soil salinity appear relatively straightforward, differences in methodology have considerable influence on measured values and interpretation of results.

  1. Fatigue behavior of Ti–6Al–4V alloy in saline solution with the surface modified at a micro- and nanoscale by chemical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claros, Cesar Adolfo Escobar; Oliveira, Diego Pedreira; Campanelli, Leonardo Contri; Pereira da Silva, Paulo Sergio Carvalho; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2016-01-01

    This work evaluated the influence of the surface modification using acid etching combined with alkaline treatment on the fatigue strength of Ti–6Al–4V ELI alloy. The topography developed by chemical surface treatments (CST) was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Increased roughness and effective surface area were investigated and compared with the Ti–6Al–4V samples without modification. Surface composition was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Axial fatigue resistance of polished and modified surfaces was determined by stepwise load increase tests and staircase test method. Light microscopy and SEM were employed to examine the fracture surface of the tested specimens. According to the results, a similar fatigue behavior was found and a negligible difference in the fatigue crack nucleation was observed for the Ti–6Al–4V with CST in comparison to the samples without treatment. - Highlights: • Fatigue behavior of Ti–6Al–4V with the surface modified by chemical treatments • The topography developed did not induce differences in the fatigue resistance. • Untreated and chemically treated surfaces presented fractographic similarities.

  2. Discharge, suspended sediment, and salinity in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway and adjacent surface waters in South-Central Louisiana, 1997–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Perrien, Scott M.

    2015-10-19

    Discharge, suspended sediment, and salinity data collected between 1997 and 2008 indicate that the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW) is an important distributary of river water and suspended sediments to coastal wetlands in south-central coastal Louisiana. Following natural hydraulic gradients, the GIWW passively distributes freshwater and suspended sediments from the Atchafalaya River to areas at least 30 to 50 miles west and east, respectively, of Morgan City. The magnitude and reach of the discharge in the GIWW increase as stage of the Wax Lake Outlet at Calumet and Lower Atchafalaya River (LAR) at Morgan City increase. The magnitude and duration of discharge vary from year to year depending on the flow regime of the Atchafalaya River. Annual discharge of water in the GIWW was greater during years when stage of the LAR remained anomalously high throughout the year, compared with average and peak flood years. During years when Atchafalaya River flow is low, Bayou Boeuf, a waterway draining the Verret subbasin, becomes a major source of water maintaining the eastward flow in the GIWW. The GIWW is the only means of getting river water to some parts of coastal Louisiana.

  3. High salinity anomalies south of Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, K.; Carter, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    Patches of higher salinity water were observed, using Seaglider data, in the upper 50m of the water-column between Oahu and Penguin Bank. These anomalies occur approximately once a month, and are visible in the glider data for an average of 3 days. Anomalies have abrupt transitions occurring over mere hours. Salinity within the patches can reach values in excess of 35.2 psu, 0.3 higher than the average profile for the region. The salinity signature associated with the anomalies corresponds to Subtropical surface water, found north of the Hawaiian island chain. The high salinity water is trapped by the thermocline in the mixed layer. Seasonal variations of the anomaly depth are directly related to the seasonal variations of mixed layer depth. These patches of high salinity coincide with the presence of eddies. Using sea surface height as an indicator, we found that eddy-eddy interaction and eddy-island interaction dictate the advection of upwelled waters into the region. Infrequently, we observe corresponding temperature anomalies. The larger the distance between the center of the eddy and the glider, the less visible the temperature anomaly. Positive (negative) values indicate salinity above (below) the mean profile.

  4. Underway sea surface temperature and salinity data from thermosalinographs collected from multiple platforms assembled by NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection contains sea surface oceanographic data in netCDF and ASCII formatted files assembled by the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological...

  5. World salinization with emphasis on Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengasamy, Pichu

    2006-01-01

    Salinization is the accumulation of water-soluble salts in the soil solum or regolith to a level that impacts on agricultural production, environmental health, and economic welfare. Salt-affected soils occur in more than 100 countries of the world with a variety of extents, nature, and properties. No climatic zone in the world is free from salinization, although the general perception is focused on arid and semi-arid regions. Salinization is a complex process involving the movement of salts and water in soils during seasonal cycles and interactions with groundwater. While rainfall, aeolian deposits, mineral weathering, and stored salts are the sources of salts, surface and groundwaters can redistribute the accumulated salts and may also provide additional sources. Sodium salts dominate in many saline soils of the world, but salts of other cations such as calcium, magnesium, and iron are also found in specific locations. Different types of salinization with a prevalence of sodium salts affect about 30% of the land area in Australia. While more attention is given to groundwater-associated salinity and irrigation salinity, which affects about 16% of the agricultural area, recent investigations suggest that 67% of the agricultural area has a potential for "transient salinity", a type of non-groundwater-associated salinity. Agricultural soils in Australia, being predominantly sodic, accumulate salts under seasonal fluctuations and have multiple subsoil constraints such as alkalinity, acidity, sodicity, and toxic ions. This paper examines soil processes that dictate the exact edaphic environment upon which root functions depend and can help in research on plant improvement.

  6. The boundary lubrication of chemically grafted and cross-linked hyaluronic acid in phosphate buffered saline and lipid solutions measured by the surface forces apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Banquy, Xavier; Greene, George W; Lowrey, Daniel D; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2012-01-31

    High molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HA) is present in articular joints and synovial fluid at high concentrations; yet despite numerous studies, the role of HA in joint lubrication is still not clear. Free HA in solution does not appear to be a good lubricant, being negatively charged and therefore repelled from most biological, including cartilage, surfaces. Recent enzymatic experiments suggested that mechanically or physically (rather than chemically) trapped HA could function as an "adaptive" or "emergency" boundary lubricant to eliminate wear damage in shearing cartilage surfaces. In this work, HA was chemically grafted to a layer of self-assembled amino-propyl-triethoxy-silane (APTES) on mica and then cross-linked. The boundary lubrication behavior of APTES and of chemically grafted and cross-linked HA in both electrolyte and lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) solutions was tested with a surface forces apparatus (SFA). Despite the high coefficient of friction (COF) of μ ≈ 0.50, the chemically grafted HA gel significantly improved the lubrication behavior of HA, particularly the wear resistance, in comparison to free HA. Adding more DOPC lipid to the solution did not improve the lubrication of the chemically grafted and cross-linked HA layer. Damage of the underlying mica surface became visible at higher loads (pressure >2 MPa) after prolonged sliding times. It has generally been assumed that damage caused by or during sliding, also known as "abrasive friction", which is the main biomedical/clinical/morphological manifestation of arthritis, is due to a high friction force and, therefore, a large COF, and that to prevent surface damage or wear (abrasion) one should therefore aim to reduce the COF, which has been the traditional focus of basic research in biolubrication, particularly in cartilage and joint lubrication. Here we combine our results with previous ones on grafted and cross-linked HA on lipid bilayers, and lubricin

  7. Probing connections between deep earth and surface processes in a land-locked ocean basin transformed into a giant saline basin : The Mediterranean GOLD project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabineau, M.; Cloetingh, S.; Kuroda, J.; Aslanian, D.; Droxler, A.; Gorini, C.; Garcia-Castellanos, D.; Moscariello, A.; Burov, E.; Sierro, F.; Lirer, F.; Roure, F.; Pezard, P. A.; Matenco, L.; Hello, Y.; Mart, Y.; Camerlenghi, A.; Tripati, A.

    During the last decade, the interaction of deep processes in the lithosphere and mantle with surface processes (erosion, climate, sea-level, subsidence, glacio-isostatic readjustment) has been the subject of heated discussion. The use of a multidisciplinary approach linking geology, geophysics,

  8. Relationships between molecular structure and kinetic and thermodynamic controls in lipid systems. Part II: Phase behavior and transformation paths of SSS, PSS and PPS saturated triacylglycerols--effect of chain length mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzidi, Laziz; Narine, Suresh S

    2012-01-01

    The kinetic phase behavior and phase transformation paths of purified tristearoylglycerol (SSS), 3-palmitoyl-1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycerol (PSS) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3-stearoyl-sn-glycerol (PPS) were investigated in terms of polymorphism, crystallization and melting. The details of the phase transformation paths were obtained using the heating cycles of two sets of experiments: (a) cooling rate was varied and heating rate fixed and (b) cooling rate was fixed and heating rate varied. Kinetic effects were manifest in all measured properties, underscoring the complexity of the phase transformation paths for each TAG, and the intricate thermodynamics-molecular relationships. For the first time, XRD data obtained for SSS, PSS and PPS TAGs, cooled at rates higher than 0.5°C/min, suggested the formation of a transient structure similar to the so-called α(2)-phase which has been observed in mixed saturated-unsaturated TAGs quenched from the melt. The more stable phases (β' in PSS and PPS, and β in SSS) were only observed for cooling rates lower than 1.0°C/min. The kinetic and thermodynamic differences observed in the crystallization, structure and melting of SSS, PSS and PPS are proposed to be mainly due to the disturbances introduced at the "terrace" level via methyl-end group interactions, i.e., the missing of two or four CH(2) groups compared to SSS. The symmetrical SSS with a relatively flat "terrace" crystallizes preferably in the most stable β-form. Two missing CH(2) groups at the sn-1 position (PSS) introduces enough structural disturbances to promote the relative prevalence and persistence of the β'-phase, and four missing CH(2) groups at the sn-1 and sn-2 positions (PPS) is relatively too large of a disturbance and therefore favors the α-form. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Past 100 Ky surface salinity-gradient response in the eastern Arabian Sea to the summer monsoon variation recorded by delta super(18)O of G. sacculifer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chodankar, A.R.; Banakar, V.K.; Oba, T.

    stream_size 32493 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Global_Planet_Change_47_135.pdf.txt stream_source_info Global_Planet_Change_47_135.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8... variation in freshwater flux to the Bay of Bengal and hence summer monsoon intensity. The north–south contrast in the sea level corrected (residual)-y 18 O G. sacculifer can be interpreted as a measure of surface Global and Planetary Change 47 (2005) 135...

  10. The salinity effect in a mixed layer ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    A model of the thermally mixed layer in the upper ocean as developed by Kraus and Turner and extended by Denman is further extended to investigate the effects of salinity. In the tropical and subtropical Atlantic Ocean rapid increases in salinity occur at the bottom of a uniformly mixed surface layer. The most significant effects produced by the inclusion of salinity are the reduction of the deepening rate and the corresponding change in the heating characteristics of the mixed layer. If the net surface heating is positive, but small, salinity effects must be included to determine whether the mixed layer temperature will increase or decrease. Precipitation over tropical oceans leads to the development of a shallow stable layer accompanied by a decrease in the temperature and salinity at the sea surface.

  11. Hydrologic factors controlling groundwater salinity in northwestern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    system as well as the attitude of the surface water divide has a prime role in changing both the mode of occurrence and the salinity of groundwater ... bility of runoff, the attitude of water divide, and the rate of pumping causing sea ...... environmental implications for future sustainable devel- opment of the northwestern coastal ...

  12. Saline groundwater in crystalline bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampen, P.

    1992-11-01

    The State-of-art report describes research made on deep saline groundwaters and brines found in crystalline bedrock, mainly in site studies for nuclear waste disposal. The occurrence, definitions and classifications of saline groundwaters are reviewed with a special emphasis on the different theories concerning the origins of saline groundwaters. Studies of the saline groundwaters in Finland and Sweden have been reviewed more thoroughly. Also the mixing of different bodies of groundwaters, observations of the contact of saline groundwaters and permafrost, and the geochemical modelling of saline groundwaters as well as the future trends of research have been discussed. (orig.)

  13. Use of microwave remote sensing in salinity estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.P.; Kumar, V.; Srivastav, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Soil-moisture interaction and the consequent liberation of ions causes the salinity of waters. The salinity of river, lake, ocean and ground water changes due to seepage and surface runoff. We have studied the feasibility of using microwave remote sensing for the estimation of salinity by carrying out numerical calculations to study the microwave remote sensing responses of various models representative of river, lake and ocean water. The results show the dependence of microwave remote sensing responses on the salinity and surface temperature of water. The results presented in this paper will be useful in the selection of microwave sensor parameters and in the accurate estimation of salinity from microwave remote sensing data

  14. Breast Implants: Saline vs. Silicone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... differ in material and consistency, however. Saline breast implants Saline implants are filled with sterile salt water. ... of any age for breast reconstruction. Silicone breast implants Silicone implants are pre-filled with silicone gel — ...

  15. Remote Sensing of Salinity: The Dielectric Constant of Sea Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, David M.; Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Tarkocin, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Global monitoring of sea surface salinity from space requires an accurate model for the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature to characterize the emissivity of the surface. Measurements are being made at 1.413 GHz, the center frequency of the Aquarius radiometers, using a resonant cavity and the perturbation method. The cavity is operated in a transmission mode and immersed in a liquid bath to control temperature. Multiple measurements are made at each temperature and salinity. Error budgets indicate a relative accuracy for both real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant of about 1%.

  16. The control of saline groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talsma, T.

    1963-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of the watertable, water-conducting properties of the soil, climatic factors and groundwater salinity on the salinization of soils in the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Areas, Australia.

    Average daily capillary flow rates were calculated from measured salinization (by

  17. Seasonal variation in apparent conductivity and soil salinity at two Narragansett Bay salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurement of the apparent conductivity of salt marsh sediments using electromagnetic induction (EMI) is a rapid alternative to traditional methods of salinity determination that can be used to map soil salinity across a marsh surface. Soil salinity measures can provide informat...

  18. Hydrological controls on salinity exposure and the effects on plants in lowland polders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stofberg, Sija F.

    2017-01-01

    The Dutch lowlands may be subject to salinization, through saline upward seepage and increased salt concentrations in the surface water, which may affect agriculture and nature areas with floating fens. A simple approach was proposed to estimate root zone salinization in areas with fresh water

  19. Salinity and temperature variations around Peninsula Malaysia coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Kadir Ishak; Jeremy Andy Anak Dominic; Nazrul Hizam Yusof; Mohd Rafaei Murtadza

    2004-01-01

    Vertical profiles of salinity and temperature were measured at several offshore stations along east and west coast of Peninsula Malaysia coastal waters. The measurements which covered South China Sea and Straits of Malacca were made during sampling cruises for Marine Database Project for Peninsula Malaysia, and during an IAEA regional training course for Marine Pollution Project. The results show that the water temperature is highest at the surface and minimum at bottom, while the salinity is lowest at the surface and highest at the bottom. In Malacca Straits, the highest surface water temperature was 30.6 degree C and the lowest bottom water temperature was 20.4 degree C, recorded at a station located in Andaman Sea. The same station also recorded the highest surface and bottom salinity i.e. 31.3 ppt and 34.4 ppt, respectively. For South China Sea, the maximum surface water temperature was 30.4 degree C and the minimum bottom temperature was 25.9 degree C, while the highest surface salinity was 33.2 ppt and the highest bottom salinity was 34.1 ppt. The water in South China Sea also showed some degrees of stratifications with thermocline zones located between 10-40 m water depths. In Malacca Straits, stronger thermocline develops at higher latitude, while at lower latitude the water is more readily mixed. Beside the spatial variations, the seawater temperature and salinity around Peninsula Malaysia also subjected to temporal variation as seawater. (Author)

  20. NITRIFICATION OF SALINE EFFLUENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Rosa

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - An Aerated Submerged Biological Filter was used to promote biological nitrification of a synthetic saline wastewater. Black PVC corrugated plates were used to make the structured packing of the 6 liter reactor. Nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia concentrations, pH and DO were periodically measured, according to APHA (1985. In spite of the deleterious effect of salinity, it was possible to obtain nitrogen removal efficiencies as high as 95% for a 25 g/L salt concentration after a three-day reaction in the batch reactor. Continuous operation using a NaCl concentration of 25 g/L was tested using three different hydraulic retention times: 7, 15, and 25 hours. An increase in ammonia removal was observed when the retention time was increased from 7 to 15 hours. However, no further notable increase was obtained for a 25 hour retention time, showing that nitrogen removal tends towards a maximum limit of about 80%.

  1. Modelling the salinization of a coastal lagoon-aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombani, N.; Mastrocicco, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, a coastal area constituted by alternations of saline-brackish lagoons and freshwater bodies was studied and modelled to understand the hydrological processes occurring between the lagoons, the groundwater system of the Po River Delta (Italy) and the Adriatic Sea. The contribution of both evaporation and anthropogenic factors on groundwater salinization was assessed by means of soil, groundwater and surface water monitoring. Highresolution multi-level samplers were used to capture salinity gradients within the aquifer and surface water bodies. Data were employed to calibrate a density-dependent numerical transport model implemented with SEAWAT code along a transect perpendicular to the coast line. The results show that the lagoon is hydraulically well connected with the aquifer, which provides the major source of salinity because of the upcoming of paleo-seawater from the aquitard laying at the base of the unconfined aquifer. On the contrary, the seawater (diluted by the freshwater river outflow) creates only a limited saltwater wedge. The increase in groundwater salinity could be of serious concern, especially for the pinewood located in the dune near the coast, sensitive to salinity increases. This case study represents an interesting paradigm for other similar environmental setting, where the assumption of classical aquifer salinization from a saltwater wedge intruding from the sea is often not representative of the actual aquifer’s salinization mechanisms.

  2. Short-term variability of surface carbon dioxide and sea-air CO2 fluxes in the shelf waters of the Galician coastal upwelling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Marina Cobo-Viveros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using data collected during the DYBAGA and ECO cruises, remote sensing chlorophyll-a estimations and the averaged upwelling index of the previous fortnight (Iw’, we studied the variability of the sea surface CO2 fugacity (fCO2 over the Galician continental shelf during three seasonal cycles. Sea surface salinity (SSS distribution controlled fCO2 mainly in spring, while sea surface temperature (SST did so during periods of intense cooling in November and warming in June. The uptake of carbon by photosynthetic activity, which was more intense during spring and autumn, masked the surface increase in the dissolved inorganic carbon concentration during upwelling events, especially during spring. A significant low correlation between fCO2 and Iw’ was found during spring and summer when upwelling events were observed, whereas no relationship was observed during the downwelling period. High fCO2 exceeding atmospheric values was only found during the summer stratification breakdown. Although sea-air CO2 fluxes showed a marked inter-annual variability, surface waters off the Galician coast were net sinks for atmospheric CO2 in every seasonal cycle, showing a lower CO2 uptake (~65% compared to previously published values. Marked inter-annual changes in the sea-air CO2 fluxes seem to be influenced by fresh water inputs on the continental shelf under different meteorological scenarios.

  3. Spatial variability of soil salinity in coastal saline soil at different scales in the Yellow River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuoran; Zhao, Gengxing; Gao, Mingxiu; Chang, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the spatial variability of soil salinity in coastal saline soil at macro, meso and micro scales in the Yellow River delta, China. Soil electrical conductivities (ECs) were measured at 0-15, 15-30, 30-45 and 45-60 cm soil depths at 49 sampling sites during November 9 to 11, 2013. Soil salinity was converted from soil ECs based on laboratory analyses. Our results indicated that at the macro scale, soil salinity was high with strong variability in each soil layer, and the content increased and the variability weakened with increasing soil depth. From east to west in the region, the farther away from the sea, the lower the soil salinity was. The degrees of soil salinization in three deeper soil layers are 1.14, 1.24 and 1.40 times higher than that in the surface soil. At the meso scale, the sequence of soil salinity in different topographies, soil texture and vegetation decreased, respectively, as follows: depression >flatland >hillock >batture; sandy loam >light loam >medium loam >heavy loam >clay; bare land >suaeda salsa >reed >cogongrass >cotton >paddy >winter wheat. At the micro scale, soil salinity changed with elevation in natural micro-topography and with anthropogenic activities in cultivated land. As the study area narrowed down to different scales, the spatial variability of soil salinity weakened gradually in cultivated land and salt wasteland except the bare land.

  4. Effects of salinity on leaf breakdown: Dryland salinity versus salinity from a coalmine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Felix G; Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schäfer, Ralf B; Thompson, Kristie; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-08-01

    Salinization of freshwater ecosystems as a result of human activities represents a global threat for ecosystems' integrity. Whether different sources of salinity with their differing ionic compositions lead to variable effects in ecosystem functioning is unknown. Therefore, the present study assessed the impact of dryland- (50μS/cm to 11,000μS/cm) and coalmine-induced (100μS/cm to 2400μS/cm) salinization on the leaf litter breakdown, with focus on microorganisms as main decomposer, in two catchments in New South Wales, Australia. The breakdown of Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaves decreased with increasing salinity by up to a factor of three. Coalmine salinity, which is characterised by a higher share of bicarbonates, had a slightly but consistently higher breakdown rate at a given salinity relative to dryland salinity, which is characterised by ionic proportions similar to sea water. Complementary laboratory experiments supported the stimulatory impact of sodium bicarbonates on leaf breakdown when compared to sodium chloride or artificial sea salt. Furthermore, microbial inoculum from a high salinity site (11,000μS/cm) yielded lower leaf breakdown at lower salinity relative to inoculum from a low salinity site (50μS/cm). Conversely, inoculum from the high salinity site was less sensitive towards increasing salinity levels relative to inoculum from the low salinity site. The effects of the different inoculum were the same regardless of salt source (sodium bicarbonate, sodium chloride and artificial sea salt). Finally, the microorganism-mediated leaf litter breakdown was most efficient at intermediate salinity levels (≈500μS/cm). The present study thus points to severe implications of increasing salinity intensities on the ecosystem function of leaf litter breakdown, while the underlying processes need further scrutiny. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Linking water and carbon cycles through salinity observed from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X.; Liu, W. T.

    2017-12-01

    The association of ocean surface salinity in global hydrological cycle and climate change has been traditionally studied through the examination of its tendency and advection as manifestation of ocean's heat and water fluxes with the atmosphere. The variability of surface heat and water fluxes are linked to top of atmosphere radiation, whose imbalance is the main cause of global warming. Besides the link of salinity to greenhouse warming through water balance, this study will focus on the effect of changing salinity on carbon dioxide flux between the ocean and the atmosphere. We have built statistical models to estimate the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and ocean acidification (in terms of total alkalinity and pH) using spacebased data. PCO2 is a critical parameter governing ocean as source and sink of the accumulated greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. The exchange also causes ocean acidification, which is detrimental to marine lives and ecology. Before we had sufficient spacebased salinity measurements coincident with in situ pCO2 measurement, we trained our statistical models to use satellite sea surface temperature and chlorophyll, with one model using salinity climatology and the other without. We found significant differences between the two models in regions of strong water input through river discharge and surface water flux. The pCO2 output follows the seasonal salinity advection of the Amazon outflow. The seasonal salinity advection between Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea are followed by change of pCO2 and total alkalinity. At shorter time scales, the signatures of rain associated with intraseasonal organized convection of summer monsoon can be detected. We have observed distribution agreement of among pCO2, surface salinity, and surface water flux for variation from a few days to a few years under the Pacific ITCZ; the agreement varies slightly with season and longitudes and the reason is under study.

  6. Hypertonic Saline in Treatment of Pulmonary Disease in Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emer P. Reeves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of lung disease in cystic fibrosis is characterised by decreased airway surface liquid volume and subsequent failure of normal mucociliary clearance. Mucus within the cystic fibrosis airways is enriched in negatively charged matrices composed of DNA released from colonizing bacteria or inflammatory cells, as well as F-actin and elevated concentrations of anionic glycosaminoglycans. Therapies acting against airway mucus in cystic fibrosis include aerosolized hypertonic saline. It has been shown that hypertonic saline possesses mucolytic properties and aids mucociliary clearance by restoring the liquid layer lining the airways. However, recent clinical and bench-top studies are beginning to broaden our view on the beneficial effects of hypertonic saline, which now extend to include anti-infective as well as anti-inflammatory properties. This review aims to discuss the described therapeutic benefits of hypertonic saline and specifically to identify novel models of hypertonic saline action independent of airway hydration.

  7. Hypertonic saline in treatment of pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reeves, Emer P

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of lung disease in cystic fibrosis is characterised by decreased airway surface liquid volume and subsequent failure of normal mucociliary clearance. Mucus within the cystic fibrosis airways is enriched in negatively charged matrices composed of DNA released from colonizing bacteria or inflammatory cells, as well as F-actin and elevated concentrations of anionic glycosaminoglycans. Therapies acting against airway mucus in cystic fibrosis include aerosolized hypertonic saline. It has been shown that hypertonic saline possesses mucolytic properties and aids mucociliary clearance by restoring the liquid layer lining the airways. However, recent clinical and bench-top studies are beginning to broaden our view on the beneficial effects of hypertonic saline, which now extend to include anti-infective as well as anti-inflammatory properties. This review aims to discuss the described therapeutic benefits of hypertonic saline and specifically to identify novel models of hypertonic saline action independent of airway hydration.

  8. Hydrologic factors controlling groundwater salinity in northwestern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Accordingly, well drilling in the Miocene aquifer, in the area between El Negila and Barrani to get groundwater of salinities less than 5000 mg/l is recommended in this area, at flow rate less than 10m3/hr/well. In other words, one can expect that the brackish water is probably found where the surface water divide is far from ...

  9. Salinization mechanisms in semi-arid regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, M.M.F.

    1984-01-01

    During a period of three years the basins of the Pereira de Miranda and Caxitore dams, located in the crystalline rock area of Ceara, Brazil, were studied in order to determine the mechanisms of salinization of their waters. Isotope methods ( 18 O/ 16 O) and hidrochemistry (determination of the of the maior ions) were applied to surface, underground and rain water in this study. An isotope model was designed and applied to the determination of evaporation and percolation of dams in semi-arid zones during the dry season. The results are compared to those from a conventional chemical model. As causes of salinization of the water in the dams, the contributions of the rain itself and the lixiviation of the soil are quantified. An interaction between the dams and the underground water is imperceptible. The salinization of the underground water is attributed to recharge of the aquifer with rain water from the surface runoff followed by evaporation of the water rising, due to capilarity, in a one-directional flow to the surface. (Author) [pt

  10. Surface states of a system of Dirac fermions: A minimal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V. A.; Enaldiev, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    A brief survey is given of theoretical works on surface states (SSs) in Dirac materials. Within the formalism of envelope wave functions and boundary conditions for these functions, a minimal model is formulated that analytically describes surface and edge states of various (topological and nontopological) types in several systems with Dirac fermions (DFs). The applicability conditions of this model are discussed.

  11. Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Nick C.; FitzGerald, Duncan M.; Hughes, Zoe J.; Georgiou, Ioannis Y.; Kulp, Mark A.; Miner, Michael D.; Smith, Jane M.; Barras, John A.

    2010-01-01

    During the 2005 hurricane season, the storm surge and wave field associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita eroded 527 km2 of wetlands within the Louisiana coastal plain. Low salinity wetlands were preferentially eroded, while higher salinity wetlands remained robust and largely unchanged. Here we highlight geotechnical differences between the soil profiles of high and low salinity regimes, which are controlled by vegetation and result in differential erosion. In low salinity wetlands, a weak zone (shear strength 500–1450 Pa) was observed ∼30 cm below the marsh surface, coinciding with the base of rooting. High salinity wetlands had no such zone (shear strengths > 4500 Pa) and contained deeper rooting. Storm waves during Hurricane Katrina produced shear stresses between 425–3600 Pa, sufficient to cause widespread erosion of the low salinity wetlands. Vegetation in low salinity marshes is subject to shallower rooting and is susceptible to erosion during large magnitude storms; these conditions may be exacerbated by low inorganic sediment content and high nutrient inputs. The dramatic difference in resiliency of fresh versus more saline marshes suggests that the introduction of freshwater to marshes as part of restoration efforts may therefore weaken existing wetlands rendering them vulnerable to hurricanes. PMID:20660777

  12. Experimental Performance of Spatial Interpolators for Ground Water Salinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsaaran, Nasser A.

    2005-01-01

    Mapping groundwater qualities requires either sampling on a fine regular grid or spatial interpolation. The latter is usually used because the cost of the former is prohibitive. Experimental performance of five spatial interpolators for groundwater salinity was investigated using cross validation. The methods included ordinary kriging (OK), lognormal kriging, inverse distance, inverse squared distance and inverse cubed distance. The results show that OK outperformed other interpolators in terms of bias. Interpolation accuracy based on mean absolute difference criterion is relatively high for all interpolators with small difference among them. While three-dimensional surfaces produced by all inverse distance based procedures are dominated by isolated peaks and pits, surfaces produced by kriging are free from localized pits and peaks, and show areas of low groundwater salinity as elongated basins and areas of high salinity as ridges, which make regional trends easy to identify. Considering all criteria, OK was judged to be the most suitable spatial interpolator for groundwater salinity in this study. (author)

  13. Some spectral considerations for remote sensing of soil salinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hick, P.P.; Russell, W.G.R.

    1990-01-01

    This report concentrates on some of the aspects of spectral analysis and shows that: spectral bands, existing in currently available remote sensing systems, may not be optimal for the delineation of salinity; that volunteer vegetation indicated the impact of increasing salinity; and that minor amounts of soluble salts in surface soils will modify spectra. The usefulness of portable field spectroradiometers and airborne scanning systems are also assessed for the discrimination of areas of land in the early stages of the effects of salinization. 9 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  14. Impacts of a Saline Lake and Its Salinity on Local Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Wen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study, the weather research and forecasting model coupled with the community land model (WRF-CLM is used to investigate impacts of the GSL and its salinity from October 2001 to April 2002. A salinity parameterization scheme is incorporated into the lake scheme of CLM. The WRF-CLM model with the salinity parameterization scheme can better simulate temperature and precipitation compared to that without considering the salinity effects. The improvement of simulation is especially significant under cold weather condition. The precipitation caused by the GSL effect is always positive over the downwind area of the GSL during the study period. Increased precipitation is largely attributed to the warm lake surface temperature and high latent heat flux over the GSL, which are favorable for the development of strong convective activity and horizontal wind and moisture convergence. Such kind of GSL-induced forcing is the primary mechanism for the downstream GSL effect precipitation. The GSL effect precipitation is largely contributed by fresh water effect when the temperature is close to or higher than 0°C. However, with lower temperature, the salinity effect becomes dominant for the GSL effect precipitation.

  15. Broad Salinity Tolerance as a Refuge from Predation in the Harmful Raphidophyte Alga Heterosigma akashiwo (Raphidophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Suzanne L; Harvey, Elizabeth L; Fredrickson, Kerri A; Menden-Deuer, Susanne

    2013-02-01

    The ability of harmful algal species to form dense, nearly monospecific blooms remains an ecological and evolutionary puzzle. We hypothesized that predation interacts with estuarine salinity gradients to promote blooms of Heterosigma akashiwo (Y. Hada) Y. Hada ex Y. Hara et M. Chihara, a cosmopolitan toxic raphidophyte. Specifically, H. akashiwo's broad salinity tolerance appears to provide a refuge from predation that enhances the net growth of H. akashiwo populations through several mechanisms. (1) Contrasting salinity tolerance of predators and prey. Estuarine H. akashiwo isolates from the west coast of North America grew rapidly at salinities as low as six, and distributed throughout experimental salinity gradients to salinities as low as three. In contrast, survival of most protistan predator species was restricted to salinities >15. (2) H. akashiwo physiological and behavioral plasticity. Acclimation to low salinity enhanced H. akashiwo's ability to accumulate and grow in low salinity waters. In addition, the presence of a ciliate predator altered H. akashiwo swimming behavior, promoting accumulation in low-salinity surface layers inhospitable to the ciliate. (3) Negative effects of low salinity on predation processes. Ciliate predation rates decreased sharply at salinities refuge from predation. Broad salinity tolerance in raphidophytes may have evolved in part as a response to selective pressures associated with predation. © 2012 Phycological Society of America.

  16. Saline agriculture in Mediterranean environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Maggio

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Salinization is increasingly affecting world's agricultural land causing serious yield loss and soil degradation. Understanding how we could improve crop productivity in salinized environments is therefore critical to meet the challenging goal of feeding 9.3 billion people by 2050. Our comprehension of fundamental physiological mechanisms in plant salt stress adaptation has greatly advanced over the last decades. However, many of these mechanisms have been linked to salt tolerance in simplified experimental systems whereas they have been rarely functionally proven in real agricultural contexts. In-depth analyses of specific crop-salinity interactions could reveal important aspects of plant salt stress adaptation as well as novel physiological/agronomic targets to improve salinity tolerance. These include the developmental role of root vs. shoot systems respect to water-ion homeostasis, morphological vs. metabolic contributions to stress adaptation, developmental processes vs. seasonal soil salinity evolution, residual effects of saline irrigation in non-irrigated crops, critical parameters of salt tolerance in soil-less systems and controlled environments, response to multiple stresses. Finally, beneficial effects of salinization on qualitative parameters such as stress-induced accumulation of high nutritional value secondary metabolites should be considered, also. In this short review we attempted to highlight the multifaceted nature of salinity in Mediterranean agricultural systems by summarizing most experimental activity carried out at the Department of Agricultural Engineering and Agronomy of University of Naples Federico II in the last few years.

  17. Stochastic modeling of soil salinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suweis, S.; Rinaldo, A.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Daly, E.; Maritan, A.

    2010-01-01

    A minimalist stochastic model of primary soil salinity is proposed, in which the rate of soil salinization is determined by the balance between dry and wet salt deposition and the intermittent leaching events caused by rainfall events. The long term probability density functions of salt mass and

  18. Preparing for SMOS: Sea Salinity Campaigns and Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup

    2006-01-01

    Mapping of sea surface salinity, based on L-band radiometric measurements, is presently investigated as a preparation for space missions. Special concern is on correction for effects caused by the sea surface roughness, and this paper will address two campaigns, LOSAC and CoSMOS, with the aim...

  19. Seasonal variability of salinity and salt transport in the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    D’Addezio, J.M.; Subrahmanyam, B.; Nyadjro, E.S.; Murty, V.S.N.

    of salinity at the surface and at depths up to 200 m, surface salt transport in the top 5-m layer, and depth-integrated salt transports revealed different salinity processes in the NIO that are dominantly related to the semiannual monsoons. Aquarius proves a...

  20. NOAA Average Annual Salinity (3-Zone)

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The 3-Zone Average Annual Salinity Digital Geography is a digital spatial framework developed using geographic information system (GIS) technology. These salinity...

  1. NOAA Average Annual Salinity (3-Zone)

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The 3-Zone Average Annual Salinity Digital Geography is a digital spatial framework developed using geographic information system (GIS) technology. These salinity...

  2. Determinación de la condición saturada y seca superficialmente (S.S.S. de agregados orgánicos para hormigón ligero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Salazar Contreras

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Como parte del provecto de grado titulado "DOSIFICACION DE HORMIGONES LIGEROS UTILIZANDO COMO ARIDO LA CASCARILLA DE CAFE II PARTE", se desarrolló un procedimiento para determinar la condición saturada y seca superficialmente (S.S.S. de la cascarilla de café debido a que no existe ninguna literatura técnica que establezca los pasos a seguir para hallar la condición s.s.s de agregados ligeros, como si la hay para los agregados tradicionales del hormigón. Puesto que los agregados orgánicos presentan una elevada absorción, se hace necesario determinar un procedimiento de ensaya que permita obtener la condición s.s.s., del agregado de una manera precisa y más confiable que la obtenida mediante la inspección visual, procedimiento éste utilizado hasta ahora en el diseño de mezclas para los agregados ligeros de naturaleza orgánica. El ensayo consiste básicamente en someter a un proceso de secado una muestra de cascarilla saturada hasta que desaparece el agua libre contenida en ella, hecho que se manifiesta por la variación de la temperatura del bulbo húmedo medida por un termómetro colocado en el centro de la muestra; la humedad determinada en este momento corresponde a la condición s.s.s. de la cascarilla, valor éste que se utilizará posteriormente para determinar las propiedades físicas requeridas para el diseño y en especial para establecer con gran aproximación la relación agua-cemento (A/c parámetro fundamental que rige la resistencia del hormigón. Estos ensayos se realizaron en el laboratorio de Ingeniería Agrícola de la Universidad Nacional de Bogotá

  3. Effect of Different Alternate Irrigation Strategies using Saline and Non-Saline Water on Corn Yield, Salinity and Moisture Distribution in Soil Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Kiani

    2017-01-01

    water in every other row, respectively; T5 and T6= fixed and variable deficit irrigation with non-saline water in every other rows, respectively and T7= full irrigation with saline water. To create the desired water salinity (8 dS/m, non-saline well water (1.5 dS/m and drainage water (20–35 dS/m were blended in different proportions. A T-tape drip irrigation system (20 m in length was used in the field experiment. Results and Discussion: In general, corn yield in 2013 was about 1270 kg ha-1 higher than in 2012. From the weather records it can be seen that the second year was drier than the first year. Yield analysis showed that deficit irrigation treatments (T2, T5 & T6 and also alternate salinity treatments (T3 & T4 did not significantly difference. In other words, the deficit irrigation management had no effect on yield. Corn yield in T3 and T4 with 50% of saved fresh water was just reduced to 7 and 1 % of T1, respectively. As a result, comparing treatments T3 and T4 with full irrigation have shown that treatments T3 and T4 are the best option. Comparison of moisture distribution in deficit irrigation treatments showed the highest water content in surface and deep layers was related to the treatments T6 and T2, respectively. The distribution of salinity in the soil profile for treatments T3 and T4 showed that after two years of irrigation with saline water, there is the possibility of use saline water for corn production, but drainage and leaching of soil will need to maintain sustainability. Conclusion: Naturally, in water scarce areas that use some strategic management such as deficit irrigation or saline water use, there is available arable farmland to further develop the irrigated area, and thereby increase total production. According to the results of the two-years where there was a shortage of water to meet crop water requirement and saline water was not available, the use of deficit irrigation managements as described in this study can save fresh water

  4. Salinity tolerance of Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; Polle, A

    2010-03-01

    The genus Populus has a wide distribution in different climatic zones. Besides its economic and ecological relevance, Populus also serves as a model for elucidating physiological and molecular mechanisms of stress tolerance in tree species. In this review, adaptation strategies of poplars to excess soil salinity are addressed at different scales, from the cellular to the whole-plant level. Striking differences in salt tolerance exist among different poplar species and ecotypes, with Populus euphratica being outstanding in this respect. Key mechanisms identified in this species to mediate salt tolerance are compartmentalisation of Cl(-) in the vacuoles of the root cortex cells, diminished xylem loading of NaCl, activation of Na(+) extrusion into the soil solution under stress, together with simultaneously avoiding excessive K(+) loss by regulation of depolarisation-activated cation channels. This leads to improved maintenance of the K(+)/Na(+) balance, a crucial precondition for survival under salt stress. Leaf cells of this species are able to compartmentalise Na(+) preferentially in the apoplast, whereas in susceptible poplar species, as well as in crop plants, vacuolar Na(+) deposition precedes apoplastic transport. ABA, Ca(2+)and ROS are involved in stress sensing, with higher or faster activation of defences in tolerant than in susceptible poplar species. P. euphratica develops leaf succulence after prolonged salt exposure as a plastic morphological adaptation that leads to salt dilution. Transgenic approaches to improve salt tolerance by transformation of candidate genes have had limited success, since salt tolerance is a multigenic trait. In future attempts towards increased salt resistance, barriers between different poplar sections must be overcome and application of novel biotechnological tools, such as gene stacking, are recommended.

  5. World Ocean Atlas 2005, Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — World Ocean Atlas 2005 (WOA05) is a set of objectively analyzed (1° grid) climatological fields of in situ temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, Apparent Oxygen...

  6. Surface temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen data collected from handheld instruments from multiple platforms in the northern Gulf of Mexico from June 14, 2010 to October 16, 2010 (NODC Accession 0070786)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains the date, time and location of surface plankton tow conducted between June-October, 2010, as well as the surface temperature (C), surface...

  7. Development of vehicle model test-bending of a simple structural surfaces model for automotive vehicle sedan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, M. K. Mohd; Noordin, A.; Ruzali, M. F. S.; Hussen, M. H.; Mustapa@Othman, N.

    2017-04-01

    Simple Structural Surfaces (SSS) method is offered as a means of organizing the process for rationalizing the basic vehicle body structure load paths. The application of this simplified approach is highly beneficial in the development of modern passenger car structure design. In Malaysia, the SSS topic has been widely adopted and seems compulsory in various automotive programs related to automotive vehicle structures in many higher education institutions. However, there is no real physical model of SSS available to gain considerable insight and understanding into the function of each major subassembly in the whole vehicle structures. Based on this motivation, a real physical SSS of sedan model and the corresponding model vehicle tests of bending is proposed in this work. The proposed approach is relatively easy to understand as compared to Finite Element Method (FEM). The results prove that the proposed vehicle model test is useful to physically demonstrate the importance of providing continuous load path using the necessary structural components within the vehicle structures. It is clearly observed that the global bending stiffness reduce significantly when more panels are removed from the complete SSS model. The analysis shows the front parcel shelf is an important subassembly to sustain bending load.

  8. Análisis de la variable sexo en la escala de Búsqueda de Sensaciones (SSS-V empleando técnicas de Funcionamiento Diferencial de los Ítems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Escorial Martín

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Estudios en el área de la personalidad han encontrado que los hombres y las mujeres difieren sistemáticamente en el grado en que buscan o necesitan experimentar nuevas sensaciones. El objetivo de este estudio es analizar estas diferencias en el instrumento SSS-V utilizando técnicas de Funcionamiento Diferencial de los ítems (DIF, con el fin de determinar si estas diferencias son el resultado de un funcionamiento anómalo de los ítems en el grupo de hombres y mujeres o si, por el contrario, están reflejando diferencias reales. Para ello, se administró el test SSS-V a 1191 participantes de un amplio rango de edad. Se emplearon los siguientes métodos para detectar el posible DIF: SIBTEST, regresión logística, estadístico χ2 de Lord y modelo DFIT. Los resultados obtenidos sugieren que, pese a existir algunos ítems con DIF, las diferencias observadas parecen deberse realmente a una diferencia en el constructo de personalidad y no a la presencia de ítems con DIF.

  9. Maine's MOLLOCKET and METALLAK: Adherents of God's Secret Spirit Signal, SSS, Applied Physicists of the EMF/Manitou, Doctors, Reincarnationists, "Potlachers," Confidants of the Powerful, and, they Did Own the Land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Jennifer; Ferreira, Nadja; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2007-04-01

    Northeastern ``Indians,'' reputed to ``make the weather,'' actually, from youth, observed earth phenomena, including SSS. These are subtle and barely detectable visual artifacts of the electromagnetic field, special information that led/leads to their spiritual belief in reincarnation, which came from the EMF/SSS communication, backward and forward, (up to) seven generations. It commands communal, democratic, ``potlatch'' redistribution of accumulated wealth, Mother Earth's bounty, from their land, gifted by ``The Great Spirit,'' Manitou, Peru's Ñari Huallac, ``Serpent God.'' Genetics established the non-Asian origins of 1/3 of North American Indians. Linguistics indicates a major impact westwards to us. MILLInocket is ``Adherent of God (Spirit-signal) monk Cathar.'' Katahdin, with a shared root, has Manitou. After 1820, Gov. E. Lincoln and at least one US senator went westward to MetALLAk; his biography is by a Rumford, ME Knight of Pythias. Why? MOLLOCKET frequently asserted ownership of western Maine. ``Great Council Fires,'' religious ``Law Things,'' were at Merrymeeting Bay in pre-Colonial times. ``Medicine men/priests'' often participated as their applied scientist-statesmen. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NES07.C2.1

  10. Estimating Leaching Requirements for Barley Growth under Saline Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Busaidi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of marginal water resources for agriculture is receiving considerable attention. The lands irrigated with saline water are required to reduce salt accumulations through leaching and/or drainage practices. A field experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of saline irrigation and leaching fraction on barley (Hordeum vulgare L. growth. For this purpose highly saline water was diluted to the salinity levels of 3, 6 and 9 dS m-1 and applied by drip irrigation at 0.0, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25 leaching fractions (LF. The results of the experiment showed that both quantity and quality of water regulated salts distribution within the soil in the following manner: a the salts were found higher near or immediate below the soil surface; b an enhanced LF carried more salts down the soil horizon but there was no significant difference in plant yield between different treatments of leaching fractions. Salinity of water significantly impaired barley growth. The good drainage of sandy soil enhanced the leaching process and minimized the differences between leaching fractions. The increment in saline treatments (3, 6 and 9 dS m-1 added more salts and stressed plant growth. However, the conjunctive use of marginal water at proportional LF could be effective in enhancing the yield potential of crops in water-scarce areas.

  11. Mapping soil salinity in irrigated land using optical remote sensing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Lhissoui

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity caused by natural or human-induced processes is certainly a severe environmental problem that already affects 400 million hectares and seriously threatens an equivalent surface. Salinization causes negative effects on the ground; it affects agricultural production, infrastructure, water resources and biodiversity. In semi-arid and arid areas, 21% of irrigated lands suffer from waterlogging, salinity and/or sodicity that reduce their yields. 77 million hectares are saline soils induced by human activity, including 58% in the irrigated areas. In the irrigated perimeter of Tadla plain (central Morocco, the increased use of saline groundwater and surface water, coupled with agricultural intensification leads to the deterioration of soil quality. Experimental methods for monitoring soil salinity by direct measurements in situ are very demanding of time and resources, and also very limited in terms of spatial coverage. Several studies have described the usefulness of remote sensing for mapping salinity by its synoptic coverage and the sensitivity of the electromagnetic signal to surface soil parameters. In this study, we used an image of the TM Landsat sensor and field measurements of electrical conductivity (EC, the correlation between the image data and field measurements allowed us to develop a semi-empirical model allowing the mapping of soil salinity in the irrigated perimeter of Tadla plain. The validation of this model by the ground truth provides a correlation coefficient r² = 0.90. Map obtained from this model allows the identification of different salinization classes in the study area.

  12. Effects of alkalinity and salinity at low and high light intensity on hydrogen isotope fractionation of long-chain alkenones produced by

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, G.M.; Pfannerstill, E.Y.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; van der Meer, M.T.J.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, hydrogen isotopes of longchainalkenones have been shown to be a promising proxy forreconstructing paleo sea surface salinity due to a strong hydrogenisotope fractionation response to salinity across differentenvironmental conditions. However, to date, the decouplingof the

  13. Saline nasal irrigation for upper respiratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabago, David; Zgierska, Aleksandra

    2009-11-15

    Saline nasal irrigation is an adjunctive therapy for upper respiratory conditions that bathes the nasal cavity with spray or liquid saline. Nasal irrigation with liquid saline is used to manage symptoms associated with chronic rhinosinusitis. Less conclusive evidence supports the use of spray and liquid saline nasal irrigation to manage symptoms of mild to moderate allergic rhinitis and acute upper respiratory tract infections. Consensus guidelines recommend saline nasal irrigation as a treatment for a variety of other conditions, including rhinitis of pregnancy and acute rhinosinusitis. Saline nasal irrigation appears safe, with no reported serious adverse events. Minor adverse effects can be avoided with technique modification and salinity adjustment.

  14. Salinity fronts in the tropical Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Hsun-Ying; Lagerloef, Gary S E

    2015-02-01

    This study delineates the salinity fronts (SF) across the tropical Pacific, and describes their variability and regional dynamical significance using Aquarius satellite observations. From the monthly maps of the SF, we find that the SF in the tropical Pacific are (1) usually observed around the boundaries of the fresh pool under the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ), (2) stronger in boreal autumn than in other seasons, and (3) usually stronger in the eastern Pacific than in the western Pacific. The relationship between the SF and the precipitation and the surface velocity are also discussed. We further present detailed analysis of the SF in three key tropical Pacific regions. Extending zonally around the ITCZ, where the temperature is nearly homogeneous, we find the strong SF of 1.2 psu from 7° to 11°N to be the main contributor of the horizontal density difference of 0.8 kg/m 3 . In the eastern Pacific, we observe a southward extension of the SF in the boreal spring that could be driven by both precipitation and horizontal advection. In the western Pacific, the importance of these newly resolved SF associated with the western Pacific warm/fresh pool and El Niño southern oscillations are also discussed in the context of prior literature. The main conclusions of this study are that (a) Aquarius satellite salinity measurements reveal the heretofore unknown proliferation, structure, and variability of surface salinity fronts, and that (b) the fine-scale structures of the SF in the tropical Pacific yield important new information on the regional air-sea interaction and the upper ocean dynamics.

  15. Salinity information in coral δ18O records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, J. L.; Thompson, D. M.; Dassié, E. P.; Stevenson, S.; Konecky, B. L.; DeLong, K. L.; Sayani, H. R.; Emile-Geay, J.; Partin, J. W.; Abram, N. J.; Martrat, B.

    2017-12-01

    Coral oxygen isotopic ratios (δ18O) are typically utilized to reconstruct sea surface temperature (SST), or SST-based El Niño-Southern Oscillation metrics (e.g., NIÑO3.4), despite the influence of both SST and the oxygen isotopic composition of seawater (δ18Osw) on coral δ18O. The ideal way to isolate past δ18Osw variations is to develop independent and univariate SST and δ18Osw responders, for instance, via paired coral δ18O and Sr/Ca analyses. Nonetheless, many coral δ18O records without paired Sr/Ca records already exist in the paleoclimatic literature, and these may be able to provide some insight into past δ18Osw and salinity changes due to the nature of the significant positive relationship between instrumental salinity and δ18Osw. Here we use coral δ18O records from the new PAGES Iso2k database to assess the regions in which coral δ18O has the greatest potential to provide salinity information based on the strength of the relationship between instrumental salinity and coral δ18O values. We find from annual pseudocoral similations that corals in the western tropical Pacific share a substantial fraction of their variance with δ18Osw rather than SST. In contrast, in the Indian Ocean and eastern tropical Pacific it is SST that predominantly explains coral δ18O variance. In agreement with this variance decomposition, we find that coral δ18O time series from the western tropical Pacific are significantly correlated with mid to late 20th century salinity. However, variations in the strength of the δ18Osw-salinity relationship across the western tropical Pacific will likely have a significant influence on coral δ18O-based salinity reconstructions. Additionally, in some cases a strong, negative correlation between SST and δ18Osw might not allow their influences to be adequately separated in coral δ18O records without the use of coupled Sr/Ca estimates of the temperature contribution. Overall, we find a range of modern salinity and SST

  16. PODAAC-SMP30-3TPCS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the PI-produced JPL SMAP-SSS CAP, 8-day running mean, level 3 mapped, sea surface salinity product from the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)...

  17. PODAAC-SMP40-3TPCS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the PI-produced JPL SMAP-SSS V4.0 CAP, 8-day running mean, level 3 mapped, sea surface salinity product from the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)...

  18. PODAAC-SMP30-2TOCS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the PI-produced JPL SMAP-SSS, level 2B CAP, validated sea surface salinity orbital/swath product from the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)...

  19. PODAAC-SMP20-2SOCS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The version 2.0 SMAP-SSS, level 2C product contains the first release of the validated sea surface salinity orbital/swath data from the NASA Soil Moisture Active...

  20. PODAAC-SMP40-3TMCS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the PI-produced JPL SMAP-SSS V4.0 CAP, level 3, monthly mapped sea surface salinity product from the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory. It...

  1. PODAAC-SMP30-3TMCS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the PI-produced JPL SMAP-SSS CAP, level 3, monthly mapped sea surface salinity product from the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory. It is...

  2. Influence of salinity on soil chemical properties and surrounding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Akomolafe Gbenga

    2013-11-14

    Nov 14, 2013 ... reorientation, resulting in lost of soil structure, lower hydraulic conductivity, and surface crusting that can break plant stems, inhibit germination and emergence, and slow infiltration (Dollhopf, 2000). Soils affected by salinity, that is, those soils high in soluble salts, are characterised by rising water tables and.

  3. The use of short rotation willows and poplars for the recycling of saline waste waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaconette Mirck; Ronald S. Jr. Zalesny; Ioannis Dimitriou; Jill A. Zalesny; Timothy A. Volk; Warren E. Mabee

    2009-01-01

    The production of high-salinity waste waters by landfills and other waste sites causes environmental concerns. This waste water often contains high concentrations of sodium and chloride, which may end up in local ground and surface waters. Vegetation filter systems comprised of willows and poplars can be used for the recycling of saline waste water. These vegetation...

  4. Effects of salinity on growth of plant species from terrestrializing fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stofberg, S.F.; Klimkovska, A.; Paulissen, M.P.C.P.; Witte, J.Ph.M.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrializing lowland fens may be temporarily exposed to elevated surface water salinity, which may have serious consequences for nature conservation. We investigated the response of five fresh water fen plant species to elevated salinity. In a controlled greenhouse experiment, these species were

  5. Productive use of saline lands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Water is essential for life, and not least for agricultural activity. It interacts with solar energy to determine the climate of the globe, and its interaction with carbon dioxide inside a plant results in photosynthesis on which depends survival of all life. Much of the water available to man is used for agriculture and yet its usage has not been well managed. One result has been the build up of soil salinity. The Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme, with technical support from the Department of Research and Isotopes, to make more productive use of salt-affected land and to limit future build up of salinity. (IAEA)

  6. High salinity facilitates dolomite precipitation mediated by Haloferax volcanii DS52

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xuan; Wang, Hongmei; Yao, Yanchen; Duan, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Although most modern dolomites occur in hypersaline environments, the effects of elevated salinity on the microbial mediation of dolomite precipitation have not been fully evaluated. Here we report results of dolomite precipitation in association with a batch culture of Haloferax volcanii DS52, a halophilic archaeon, under various salinities (from 120‰ to 360‰) and the impact of salinity on microbe-mediated dolomite formation. The mineral phases, morphology and atomic arrangement of the precipitates were analyzed by XRD, SEM and TEM, respectively. The amount of amino acids on the archaeal cell surface was quantified by HPLC/MS. The XRD analysis indicated that disordered dolomite formed successfully with the facilitation of cells harvested from cultures with relatively high salinities (200‰ and 280‰) but was not observed in association with cells harvested from cultures with lower salinity (120‰) or the lysates of cells harvested from extremely high salinity (360‰). The TEM analysis demonstrated that the crystals from cultures with a salinity of 200‰ closely matched that of dolomite. Importantly, we found that more carboxyl groups were presented on the cell surface under high salinity conditions to resist the high osmotic pressure, which may result in the subsequent promotion of dolomite formation. Our finding suggests a link between variations in the hydro-chemical conditions and the formation of dolomite via microbial metabolic activity and enhances our understanding about the mechanism of microbially mediated dolomite formation under high salinity conditions.

  7. Interannual Salinity Variability in the Equatorial Pacific Analyzed Using CMIP5 Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, H.

    2016-12-01

    Interannual salinity variability and its causes are analyzed using coupled general circulation model (CGCM) simulations. The GFDL-ESM2M model is examined in detail. Detailed analysis reveals that the model can accurately reproduce the spatial-temporal variations of the mixed layer salinity (MLS) compared with observations. The salinity budget analyses indicate that interannual salinity evolution is closely related to the Nino3.4 index and predominantly governed by the surface forcing, and the surface advection. The relationships show that the salinity anomaly simulated leads the positive peak of the Nino3.4 index by 1-2 years due to both advection and subsurface forcing. The ocean dynamics explain the sea surface salinity variance and the spatial and temporal differences during ENSO, which are equally important as the surface forcing. The MLS tendency simulated is sensitive to the ocean physics and suffers from a strong interannual biases due to the strong precipitation and weak ocean circulation in the equatorial Pacific. Due to the model biases, the effect of the freshwater flux on the salinity budget simulated is overestimated, and the contributions of the subsurface and surface advection are relatively weak but not negligible. These results may provide useful hints for the interpretation of future observations in the region.

  8. Characterization of soil salinization in typical estuarine area of the Jiaozhou Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qifei; Xi, Min; Wang, Qinggai; Kong, Fanlong; Li, Yue

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the characteristics of soil salinization and the effects of main land use/land cover and other factors in typical estuarine area of the Jiaozhou Bay are investigated. Soil samples were collected in the parallel coastal zone, vertical coastal zone and longitudinal profile depth in the area to determine the soil salt content. The correlation analysis and principal component analysis are used to address the general characteristics of soil salinization in the study area. In the horizontal direction, there are moderate salinization, severe salinization and saline soil state. The farther from the sea (within 1.1 km), the lower the soil salinization degree. In the direction of longitudinal profile depth, there are severe salinization and saline soil state, and the soil salt content is accumulated in the surface and bottom. The Na+ and Cl- are the dominant cation and anion, respectively, the distributions of which are consistent with that of salt content. All the salinization indexes, except for soil pH, are of moderate/strong variability. The invasion of Spartina alterniflora results in the increase of soil salt content and salinization degree, the effects of which are mainly determined by the physiological characteristics and the growth years. The degree of soil salinization increased significantly in the aquaculture ponds, which is mainly caused by the use of chemicals. The correlation between soil salt content and Na+, Cl- is particularly significant. From the results of principal component analysis, Na+, Cl-, Ca2+, Mg2+ and SO42- could be used as main diagnostic factors for salinization in typical estuarine area of the Jiaozhou Bay. The effects of NaCl and sulfate on salt content further affect the degree of salinization in the estuarine area.

  9. Geoelectrical imaging of groundwater salinization in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Peter; Supper, Robert; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2006-10-01

    Soil and groundwater salinization is a major problem in aquatic systems throughout the semi-arid and arid regions. An interesting example of a natural terminal evaporative system is the Okavango Delta, a large inland Delta in Botswana. The system accumulates about 300,000 tons of dissolved solids per year. The majority of the accumulated solutes are deposited on small islands in the wetland. In the centre of the islands, the shallow groundwater is therefore highly saline and displays total dissolved solid (TDS) concentrations around 30 g/l. Fresh groundwater underlying the superficial brines gives rise to a hydrodynamically unstable situation with dense brine perched on less dense fresh water. Instabilities (density fingers) can potentially occur and effectively transport the superficial brines into deeper aquifer units. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used in this study to directly map the salinity distribution in the subsurface below two different islands in the Okavango Delta. Surface arrays as well as borehole-to-surface layouts were used. Due to differences in the regional hydrologic setting, a density finger could be observed on one island, whereas on the other, the high salinity anomaly was confined to the surface layer. To our knowledge, this is the first time that fingering instabilities were observed under field conditions in natural aquifers.

  10. Environmental Evaluation of Soil Salinity with Various Watering Technologies Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitkaziev, Adeubay; Shilibek, Kenzhegali; Fakhrudenova, Idiya; Salybayev, Satybaldy; Zhaparova, Sayagul; Duisenbayeva, Saule; Bayazitova, Zulfia; Aliya, Maimakova; Seitkazieva, Karlygash; Aubakirov, Hamit

    2018-01-01

      The purpose of this study is to develop mathematical tools for evaluating the level of environmental safety of various watering technologies. A set of indicators, was developed with regard to the natural factors, the nature of the man-induced load, degradation type, and characteristics of the disruption of humification conditions. Thermal and physical characteristics of the soil, the state of its surface, and meteorological factors, including air temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, wind speed, solar radiation, etc. were studied with a view to determining the heat and air exchange in the soil. An environmental evaluation of the methods for saline land development was conducted with regard to the heat and moisture supply. This tool can be used to determine the level of environmental safety of soil salinization during the environmental evaluation of the investigation of soil salinity with various watering technologies.

  11. Saline water irrigation for crop production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.R.; Singh, S.S.; Singh, S.R.

    2001-05-01

    Salinity is one of agriculture's most complex production problems. Excessive salts from irrigation water or high water tables can severely limit crop production. Years of saline water irrigation on poorly drained soils can eventually make economic crop production impossible. About 10% of all land are affected by salinity problems. They occur in every continent in different proportions, more frequently in arid and semi-arid areas. This paper discusses a range of problems related to use of saline water for crop irrigation

  12. Spatial variation of soil salinity in the Mexicali Valley, Mexico: application of a practical method for agricultural monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judkins, Gabriel; Myint, Soe

    2012-09-01

    The degradation of irrigated lands through the process of soil salinization, or the buildup of salts in the soil, has hampered recent increases in agricultural productivity and threatens the sustainability of large-scale cultivation in critical agricultural regions of the world. Rapid detection of soil salinity on a regional basis has been identified as key for effective mitigation of such land degradation. The ability to detect regional patterns of soil salinity at an accuracy sufficient for regional-scale resource management is demonstrated using Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery. A case study of the Mexicali Valley of Baja California, Mexico was selected due to the region's agricultural significance and concern for future soil salinity increases. Surface soil salinity was mapped using georeferenced field measurements of electrical conductivity (EC), collected concurrently with Landsat 5 TM imagery. Correlations between EC measurements and common indices derived from the satellite imagery were used to produce a model of soil salinity through regression analysis. Landsat band 7, TNDVI, PCA 1, Tasseled Cap 3 and Tasseled Cap 5 were found to offer the most promising correlations with surface soil salinity. Generally low levels of soil salinity were detected, however, distinct areas of elevated surface salinity were detected at levels potentially impacting sensitive crops cultivated within the region. The difficulty detecting low levels of salinity and the mid-range spatial resolution of Landsat 5 TM imagery restrict the applicability of this methodology to the study of broad regional patterns of degradation most appropriate for use by regional resource managers.

  13. 40 CFR 230.25 - Salinity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Salinity gradients. 230.25 Section 230.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b... Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.25 Salinity gradients. (a) Salinity...

  14. Salinity: Electrical conductivity and total dissolved solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The measurement of soil salinity is a quantification of the total salts present in the liquid portion of the soil. Soil salinity is important in agriculture because salinity reduces crop yields by reducing the osmotic potential making it more difficult for the plant to extract water, by causing spe...

  15. WATER TEMPERATURE and SALINITY - SURFACE WATER, and other parameters collected from R.V. Celtic Explorer in Mid Atlantic Ridge from 2016-05-12 to 2016-05-21 (NCEI Accession 0157069)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains in situ sea surface measurements from R.V. Celtic Explorer in Mid Altlantic Ridge. The survey was conducted between May 12th and May 21, 2016...

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in 2008 (NODC Accession 0109930)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109930 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the North...

  17. Salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using not applicable and other instruments from unknown platforms in various oceans and seas World-Wide from 1965-01-01 to 1994-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0157055)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157055 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from unknown platforms in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea, Bay of Biscay, Indian...

  18. Geophysical study for saline water intrusion in a coastal alluvial terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Kalpan; Saha, D. K.; Chakraborty, P.

    2001-03-01

    Geophysical investigations comprising electrical resistivity and shallow seismic refraction methods have been employed in the alluvial coastal belt of Digha, in the Eastern India for environmental study, to investigate the nature and status of subsurface saline water contamination. Geophysical surveys have delineated different subsurface geological formations such as dune sand, top sandy soil, saline sand and saline clay on the basis of their characteristic resistivity and velocity signatures. It is also inferred from geophysical interpretation that the thickness of the near-surface saline zone decreases inland away from the shore. Fortunately for Digha, clay layers present at different subsurface levels, which have probable extensions under the sea, have acted as barriers against any large-scale saline water intrusion at depth, even though pockets of saline/brackish zones have been interpreted in the subsurface. Clay formations are predominant up to a depth of about 60 m in the area below which an aquifer zone has been demarcated. A few locales that are already saline or are vulnerable for saline water intrusion have been identified at different depth levels and these zones should be avoided for ground water development. Further, several comparatively safe zones where ground water can be effectively exploited, have been delineated in the area. It has been observed that geophysical methods are highly useful in the environmental study for assessing saline water intrusion in alluvial terrain even in the presence of thick clay formations.

  19. Stochastic modeling of soil salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suweis, S.; Porporato, A. M.; Daly, E.; van der Zee, S.; Maritan, A.; Rinaldo, A.

    2010-12-01

    A minimalist stochastic model of primary soil salinity is proposed, in which the rate of soil salinization is determined by the balance between dry and wet salt deposition and the intermittent leaching events caused by rainfall events. The equations for the probability density functions of salt mass and concentration are found by reducing the coupled soil moisture and salt mass balance equations to a single stochastic differential equation (generalized Langevin equation) driven by multiplicative Poisson noise. Generalized Langevin equations with multiplicative white Poisson noise pose the usual Ito (I) or Stratonovich (S) prescription dilemma. Different interpretations lead to different results and then choosing between the I and S prescriptions is crucial to describe correctly the dynamics of the model systems. We show how this choice can be determined by physical information about the timescales involved in the process. We also show that when the multiplicative noise is at most linear in the random variable one prescription can be made equivalent to the other by a suitable transformation in the jump probability distribution. We then apply these results to the generalized Langevin equation that drives the salt mass dynamics. The stationary analytical solutions for the probability density functions of salt mass and concentration provide insight on the interplay of the main soil, plant and climate parameters responsible for long term soil salinization. In particular, they show the existence of two distinct regimes, one where the mean salt mass remains nearly constant (or decreases) with increasing rainfall frequency, and another where mean salt content increases markedly with increasing rainfall frequency. As a result, relatively small reductions of rainfall in drier climates may entail dramatic shifts in longterm soil salinization trends, with significant consequences, e.g. for climate change impacts on rain fed agriculture.

  20. Implications of salinity pollution hotspots on agricultural production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floerke, Martina; Fink, Julia; Malsy, Marcus; Voelker, Jeanette; Alcamo, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Salinity pollution can have many negative impacts on water resources used for drinking, irrigation, and industrial purposes. Elevated concentrations of salinity in irrigation water can lead to decreased crop production or crop death and, thus, causing an economic problem. Overall, salinity pollution is a global problem but tends to be more severe in arid and semi-arid regions where the dilution capacity of rivers and lakes is lower and the use of irrigation higher. Particularly in these regions agricultural production is exposed to high salinity of irrigation water as insufficient water quality further reduces the available freshwater resources. According to the FAO, irrigated agriculture contributes about 40 percent of the total food production globally, and therefore, high salinity pollution poses a major concern for food production and food security. We use the WaterGAP3 modeling framework to simulate hydrological, water use, and water quality conditions on a global scale for the time period 1990 to 2010. The modeling framework is applied to simulate total dissolved solids (TDS) loadings and in-stream concentrations from different point and diffuse sources to get an insight on potential environmental impacts as well as risks to agricultural food production. The model was tested and calibrated against observed data from GEMStat and literature sources. Although global in scope, the focus of this study is on developing countries, i.e., in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, as these are most threatened by salinity pollution. Furthermore, insufficient water quality for irrigation and therefore restrictions in irrigation water use are examined, indicating limitations to crop production. Our results show that elevated salinity concentrations in surface waters mainly occur in peak irrigation regions as irrigated agriculture is not only the most relevant water use sector contributing to water abstractions, but also the dominant source of salinity pollution. Additionally

  1. Salinity Trends within the Upper Layers of the Subpolar North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesdal, J. E.; Abernathey, R.; Goes, J. I.; Gordon, A. L.; Haine, T. W. N.

    2017-12-01

    Examination of a range of salinity products collectively suggest widespread freshening of the North Atlantic from the mid-2000 to the present. Monthly salinity fields reveal negative trends that differ in magnitude and significance between western and eastern regions of the North Atlantic. These differences can be attributed to the large negative interannual excursions in salinity in the western subpolar gyre and the Labrador Sea, which are not apparent in the central or eastern subpolar gyre. This study demonstrates that temporal trends in salinity in the northwest (including the Labrador Sea) are subject to mechanisms that are distinct from those responsible for the salinity trends in central and eastern North Atlantic. In the western subpolar gyre a negative correlation between near surface salinity and the circulation strength of the subpolar gyre suggests that negative salinity anomalies are connected to an intensification of the subpolar gyre, which is causing increased flux of freshwater from the East Greenland Current and subsequent transport into the Labrador Sea during the melting season. Analyses of sea surface wind fields suggest that the strength of the subpolar gyre is linked to the North Atlantic Oscillation and Arctic Oscillation-driven changes in wind stress curl in the eastern subpolar gyre. If this trend of decreasing salinity continues, it has the potential to enhance water column stratification, reduce vertical fluxes of nutrients and cause a decline in biological production and carbon export in the North Atlantic Ocean.

  2. Microenvironments of reduced salinity harbour biofilms in Dead Sea underwater springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, Stefan; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz E; Polerecky, Lubos; Meyer, Volker; de Beer, Dirk; Ionescu, Danny

    2014-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a hypersaline lake where only few types of organisms can grow. Recently, abundant and diverse microbial life was discovered in biofilms covering rocks and permeable sediments around underwater freshwater springs and seeps. We used a newly developed salinity mini-sensor (spatial resolution 300 μm) to investigate the salinity environment around these biofilms in a flume that simulates an underwater spring. Compared with the hypersaline bulk water, salinity at the sediment surface decreased to zero at seeping velocities of 7 cm s(-1). At similar flow velocities, salinity above rocks decreased to 100-200 g L(-1) at a distance of 300 μm from the surface. This depended on the position on the rock, and coincided with locations of natural biofilms. The salinity reduction substantially diminished at flow velocities of 3.5 cm s(-1). We suggest that locally decreased salinity due to freshwater input is one of the main factors that make areas around underwater freshwater springs and seeps in the Dead Sea more favourable for life. However, due to frequent fluctuations in the freshwater flow, the locally decreased salinity is unstable. Therefore, microorganisms that inhabit these environments must be capable of withstanding large and rapid salinity fluctuations. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Using transcriptomics to identify differential gene expression in response to salinity among Australian Phragmites australis clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Donald Holmes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Common Reed (Phragmites australis is a frequent component of inland, and coastal, wetlands in temperate zones worldwide. Ongoing environmental changes have resulted in the decline of this species in many areas and invasive expansion in others. In the Gippsland Lakes coastal waterway system in south-eastern Australia, increasing salinity is thought to have contributed to the loss of fringing P. australis reed beds leading to increased shoreline erosion. A major goal of restoration in this waterway is to address the effect of salinity by planting a genetically-diverse range of salt-tolerant P. australis lineages. This has prompted an interest in examining the variation in salinity tolerance among lineages and the underlying basis of this variation. Transcriptomics is an approach for identifying variation in genes and their expression levels associated with the exposure of plants to environmental stressors. In this paper we present initial results of the first comparative culm transcriptome analysis of P. australis clones. After sampling plants from sites of varied surface water salinity across the Gippsland Lakes, replicates from three clones from highly saline sites (>18 g L-1 TDS and three from low salinity sites (<6 g L-1 were grown in containers irrigated with either fresh (<0.1 g L-1 or saline water (16 g L-1. An RNA-Seq protocol was used to generate sequence data from culm tissues from the 12 samples allowing an analysis of differential gene expression. Among the key findings, we identified several genes uniquely up- or down-regulated in clones from highly saline sites when irrigated with saline water relative to clones from low salinity sites. These included the relative higher expression levels of genes associated with photosynthesis and lignan biosynthesis indicative of a greater ability of these clones to maintain growth under saline conditions. Combined with growth data from a parallel study, our data suggests local adaptation of

  4. Soil disturbance as a driver of increased stream salinity in a semiarid watershed undergoing energy development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Clark, Melanie L.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Holloway, JoAnn M.; Mcdougal, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Salinization is a global threat to the quality of streams and rivers, but it can have many causes. Oil and gas development were investigated as one of several potential causes of changes in the salinity of Muddy Creek, which drains 2470 km2 of mostly public land in Wyoming, U.S.A. Stream discharge and salinity vary with seasonal snowmelt and define a primary salinity-discharge relationship. Salinity, measured by specific conductance, increased substantially in 2009 and was 53-71% higher at low discharge and 33-34% higher at high discharge for the years 2009-2012 compared to 2005-2008. Short-term processes (e.g., flushing of efflorescent salts) cause within-year deviations from the primary relation but do not obscure the overall increase in salinity. Dissolved elements associated with increased salinity include calcium, magnesium, and sulfate, a composition that points to native soil salts derived from marine shales as a likely source. Potential causes of the salinity increase were evaluated for consistency by using measured patterns in stream chemistry, slope of the salinity-discharge relationship, and inter-annual timing of the salinity increase. Potential causes that were inconsistent with one or more of those criteria included effects from precipitation, evapotranspiration, reservoirs, grazing, irrigation return flow, groundwater discharge, discharge of energy co-produced waters, and stream habitat restoration. In contrast, surface disturbance of naturally salt-rich soil by oil and gas development activities, such as pipeline, road, and well pad construction, is a reasonable candidate for explaining the salinity increase. As development continues to expand in semiarid lands worldwide, the potential for soil disturbance to increase stream salinity should be considered, particularly where soils host substantial quantities of native salts.

  5. Detection of Rossby Waves in Multi-Parameters in Multi-Mission Satellite Observations and HYCOM Simulations in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    waves propagat- ing in every ocean basin , with amplitudes between 0.1 and 1.5 K. They noted that it seems most likely that the SST signature is...simulations of sea surface salinity (SSS) to dem - onstrate that Rossby waves can be seen as a signal in salinity as well. We anticipate the high-density...and includes monthly river runoff from 986 global rivers. There is a weak relaxation to monthly mean SSS from the Polar science center Hydrographic

  6. Groundwater salinity in a floodplain forest impacted by saltwater intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, David A; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael

    2014-11-15

    Coastal wetlands occupy a delicate position at the intersection of fresh and saline waters. Changing climate and watershed hydrology can lead to saltwater intrusion into historically freshwater systems, causing plant mortality and loss of freshwater habitat. Understanding the hydrological functioning of tidally influenced floodplain forests is essential for advancing ecosystem protection and restoration goals, however finding direct relationships between hydrological inputs and floodplain hydrology is complicated by interactions between surface water, groundwater, and atmospheric fluxes in variably saturated soils with heterogeneous vegetation and topography. Thus, an alternative method for identifying common trends and causal factors is required. Dynamic factor analysis (DFA), a time series dimension reduction technique, models temporal variation in observed data as linear combinations of common trends, which represent unexplained common variability, and explanatory variables. DFA was applied to model shallow groundwater salinity in the forested floodplain wetlands of the Loxahatchee River (Florida, USA), where altered watershed hydrology has led to changing hydroperiod and salinity regimes and undesired vegetative changes. Long-term, high-resolution groundwater salinity datasets revealed dynamics over seasonal and yearly time periods as well as over tidal cycles and storm events. DFA identified shared trends among salinity time series and a full dynamic factor model simulated observed series well (overall coefficient of efficiency, Ceff=0.85; 0.52≤Ceff≤0.99). A reduced multilinear model based solely on explanatory variables identified in the DFA had fair to good results (Ceff=0.58; 0.38≤Ceff≤0.75) and may be used to assess the effects of restoration and management scenarios on shallow groundwater salinity in the Loxahatchee River floodplain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Box Model of Freshwater, Salinity and Nutrient in the Delta Mahakam, East Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marojahan Simanjuntak

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Box Model of Freshwater, Salinity and Nutrient in the Delta Mahakam, East Kalimantan. Research has been conducted in the southern part of the Mahakam Delta, East Kalimantan. Method of measuring temperature, salinity, light transmission and turbidity by using CTD model 603 SBE and current measurement and bathymetry by using ADCP model RDI. Measurement parameters on the nutrient chemistry are based of water samples taken using Nansen bottles from two depths. The purpose of this study to determine the mechanism of freshwater, salinity and nutrient transport from the land of the Mahakam River which interact with seawater by using box models. The results illustrate that the vertical distribution of salinity in the Mahakam Delta has obtained a high stratification, where the freshwater salinity 12.30 psu at the surface of a river flowing toward the sea, and seawater of high salinity 30.07 psu flowing in the direction river under the surface that are separated by a layer of mixture. Freshwater budget of the sea (VSurf obtained for 0,0306 x 109 m3 day-1, and the sea water salinity budget is going into the bottom layer system (VDeep.SOcn-d obtained for 20,727 x 109 psu day-1. While time dilution (Syst obtained for 0.245 day-1 or 5.87 hours. Nutrient budget in the surface layer obtained by the system is autotrophic while in layers near the bottom tend to be heterotrophic

  8. Geochemical processes controlling water salinization in an irrigated basin in Spain: Identification of natural and anthropogenic influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchán, D., E-mail: d.merchan@igme.es [Geological Survey of Spain — IGME, C/Manuel Lasala 44 9B, 50006 Zaragoza (Spain); Auqué, L.F.; Acero, P.; Gimeno, M.J. [University of Zaragoza — Department of Earth Sciences (Geochemical Modelling Group), C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Causapé, J. [Geological Survey of Spain — IGME, C/Manuel Lasala 44 9B, 50006 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2015-01-01

    Salinization of water bodies represents a significant risk in water systems. The salinization of waters in a small irrigated hydrological basin is studied herein through an integrated hydrogeochemical study including multivariate statistical analyses and geochemical modeling. The study zone has two well differentiated geologic materials: (i) Quaternary sediments of low salinity and high permeability and (ii) Tertiary sediments of high salinity and very low permeability. In this work, soil samples were collected and leaching experiments conducted on them in the laboratory. In addition, water samples were collected from precipitation, irrigation, groundwater, spring and surface waters. The waters show an increase in salinity from precipitation and irrigation water to ground- and, finally, surface water. The enrichment in salinity is related to the dissolution of soluble mineral present mainly in the Tertiary materials. Cation exchange, precipitation of calcite and, probably, incongruent dissolution of dolomite, have been inferred from the hydrochemical data set. Multivariate statistical analysis provided information about the structure of the data, differentiating the group of surface waters from the groundwaters and the salinization from the nitrate pollution processes. The available information was included in geochemical models in which hypothesis of consistency and thermodynamic feasibility were checked. The assessment of the collected information pointed to a natural control on salinization processes in the Lerma Basin with minimal influence of anthropogenic factors. - Highlights: • Salinization in Lerma Basin was controlled by the dissolution of soluble salts. • Water salinization and nitrate pollution were found to be independent processes. • High NO{sub 3}, fresh groundwater evolved to lower NO{sub 3}, higher salinity surface water. • Inverse and direct geochemical modeling confirmed the hypotheses. • Salinization was a natural ongoing process

  9. Impacts of irrigation regimes with saline water on carrot productivity and soil salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Nagaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-year study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different irrigation regimes with saline water on soil salinity, yield and water productivity of carrot as a fall-winter crop under actual commercial-farming conditions in the arid region of Tunisia. Carrot was grown on a sandy soil and surface-irrigated with a water having an ECi of 3.6 dS/m. For the three years, a complete randomized block design with four replicates was used to evaluate five irrigation regimes. Four irrigation methods were based on the use of soil water balance (SWB to estimate irrigation amounts and timing while the fifth consisted of using traditional farmers practices. SWB methods consisted in replacement of cumulated ETc when readily available water is depleted with levels of 100% (FI-100, 80% (DI-80 and 60% (DI-60. FI-100 was considered as full irrigation while DI-80 and DI-60 were considered as deficit irrigation regimes. Regulated deficit irrigation regime where 40% reduction is applied only during ripening stage (FI-DI60 was also used. Farmer method (Farmer consisted in giving fixed amounts of water (25 mm every 7 days from planting till harvest. Results on carrot production and soil salinization are globally consistent between the three-year experiments and shows significant difference between irrigation regimes. Higher soil salinity in the root zone is observed at harvest under DI-60 (3.1, 3.4, 3.9 dS/m, respectively, for the three years and farmer irrigation (3.3, 3.6, 3.9 dS/m treatments compared to FI-100 treatment (2.3, 2.6 and 3.1 dS/m. Relatively low ECe values were also observed under FI-DI60 and DI-80 treatments with respectively (2.7, 3, 3.5 dS/m and (2.5, 2.9, 3.3 dS/m. ECe values under the different irrigation treatments were generally lower than or equal to the EC of irrigation water used. Rainfall received during fall and/or winter periods (57, 26 and 29 mm, respectively, during the three years contributed probably to leaching soluble

  10. [Salinization-alkalization of Leymus chinensis grassland in Songnen Plain of Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dao-Wei; Li, Qiang; Song, Yan-Tao; Wang, Xue-Zhi

    2011-06-01

    Field survey and site study were conducted to approach the process and causes of salinization-alkalization of Leymus chinensis grassland in Songnen Plain, and to examine the hypothesis of soil disturbance-bareness. In the grassland, surface soil (0-30 cm) had a lower salt content, while deeper soil (> 30 cm) was in adverse. Thereby, the grassland was defined as soil-salted grassland. There was an increasing salt content in surface soil. This process was called as soil salinization-alkalization, and the grassland under the salinization:alkalization was named as alkali-salinized grassland. The leading reason for the surface soil salinization-alkalization was that the surface soil originally with low salt content was disturbed and lost away, subsurface soil rich in salt emerged as new surface soil, and the salt in deeper soil layers accumulated in the new surface soil and other soil layers. Secondary halophyte communities formed on the surface-soil-disturbed new bare land, but the communities had no succession sequence. The degradation process of the grassland was soil degradation first, followed by vegetation degradation, halophyte invasion, and successive evolution from nearly primitive condition.

  11. Evolution of Planetary Ice-Ocean Systems: Effects of Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allu Peddinti, D.; McNamara, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary oceanography is enjoying renewed attention thanks to not only the detection of several exoplanetary ocean worlds but also due to the expanding family of ocean worlds within our own star system. Our solar system is now believed to host about nine ocean worlds including Earth, some dwarf planets and few moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Amongst them, Europa, like Earth is thought to have an ice Ih-liquid water system. However, the thickness of the Europan ice-ocean system is much larger than that of the Earth. The evolution of this system would determine the individual thicknesses of the ice shell and the ocean. In turn, these thicknesses can alter the course of evolution of the system. In a pure H2O system, the thickness of the ice shell would govern if heat loss occurs entirely by conduction or if the shell begins to convect as it attains a threshold thickness. This switch between conduction-convection regimes could determine the longevity of the subsurface ocean and hence define the astrobiological potential of the planetary body at any given time. In reality, however, the system is not pure water ice. The detected induced magnetic field infers a saline ocean layer. Salts are expected to act as an anti-freeze allowing a subsurface ocean to persist over long periods but the amount of salts would determine the extent of that effect. In our current study, we use geodynamic models to examine the effect of salinity on the evolution of ice-ocean system. An initial ocean with different salinities is allowed to evolve. The effect of salinity on thickness of the two layers at any time is examined. We also track how salinity controls the switch between conductive-convective modes. The study shows that for a given time period, larger salinities can maintain a thick vigorously convecting ocean while the smaller salinities behave similar to a pure H2O system leading to a thick convecting ice-shell. A range of salinities identified can potentially predict the current state

  12. Moving Forward on Remote Sensing of Soil Salinity at Regional Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elia Scudiero

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity undermines global agriculture by reducing crop yield and impairing soil quality. Irrigation management can help control salinity levels within the soil root-zone. To best manage water and soil resources, accurate regional-scale inventories of soil salinity are needed. The past decade has seen several successful applications of soil salinity remote sensing. Two salinity remote sensing approaches exist: direct assessment based on analysis of surface soil reflectance (the most popular approach, and indirect assessment of root-zone (e.g., 0-1 m soil salinity based on analysis of crop canopy reflectance. In this perspective paper, we call on researchers and funding agencies to pay greater attention to the indirect approach because it is better suited for surveying agriculturally important lands. A joint effort between agricultural producers, irrigation specialists, environmental scientists, and policy makers is needed to better manage saline agricultural soils, especially because of projected future water scarcity in arid and semi-arid irrigated areas. The remote sensing community should focus on providing the best tools for mapping and monitoring salinity in such areas, which are of vital relevance to global food production.

  13. Functional tradeoffs underpin salinity-driven divergence in microbial community composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L Dupont

    Full Text Available Bacterial community composition and functional potential change subtly across gradients in the surface ocean. In contrast, while there are significant phylogenetic divergences between communities from freshwater and marine habitats, the underlying mechanisms to this phylogenetic structuring yet remain unknown. We hypothesized that the functional potential of natural bacterial communities is linked to this striking divide between microbiomes. To test this hypothesis, metagenomic sequencing of microbial communities along a 1,800 km transect in the Baltic Sea area, encompassing a continuous natural salinity gradient from limnic to fully marine conditions, was explored. Multivariate statistical analyses showed that salinity is the main determinant of dramatic changes in microbial community composition, but also of large scale changes in core metabolic functions of bacteria. Strikingly, genetically and metabolically different pathways for key metabolic processes, such as respiration, biosynthesis of quinones and isoprenoids, glycolysis and osmolyte transport, were differentially abundant at high and low salinities. These shifts in functional capacities were observed at multiple taxonomic levels and within dominant bacterial phyla, while bacteria, such as SAR11, were able to adapt to the entire salinity gradient. We propose that the large differences in central metabolism required at high and low salinities dictate the striking divide between freshwater and marine microbiomes, and that the ability to inhabit different salinity regimes evolved early during bacterial phylogenetic differentiation. These findings significantly advance our understanding of microbial distributions and stress the need to incorporate salinity in future climate change models that predict increased levels of precipitation and a reduction in salinity.

  14. Three Dimensional Dynamics of Freshwater Lenses in the Oceans Near Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-14

    the potential impact of these fluxes on the barrier layer and Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite image formations. By...contributing to the salinity field detected in the Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) sat- ellite footprints. The barrier layer (Lukas...operational algorithms for sea surface salinity satellites. Oceanic advection and mixing funda- mentally affect the sea surface salinity sig - nal

  15. Stabilising nanofluids in saline environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Anssari, Sarmad; Arif, Muhammad; Wang, Shaobin; Barifcani, Ahmed; Iglauer, Stefan

    2017-12-15

    Nanofluids (i.e. nanoparticles dispersed in a fluid) have tremendous potential in a broad range of applications, including pharmacy, medicine, water treatment, soil decontamination, or oil recovery and CO 2 geo-sequestration. In these applications nanofluid stability plays a key role, and typically robust stability is required. However, the fluids in these applications are saline, and no stability data is available for such salt-containing fluids. We thus measured and quantified nanofluid stability for a wide range of nanofluid formulations, as a function of salinity, nanoparticle content and various additives, and we investigated how this stability can be improved. Zeta sizer and dynamic light scattering (DLS) principles were used to investigate zeta potential and particle size distribution of nanoparticle-surfactant formulations. Also scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the physicochemical aspects of the suspension. We found that the salt drastically reduced nanofluid stability (because of the screening effect on the repulsive forces between the nanoparticles), while addition of anionic surfactant improved stability. Cationic surfactants again deteriorated stability. Mechanisms for the different behaviour of the different formulations were identified and are discussed here. We thus conclude that for achieving maximum nanofluid stability, anionic surfactant should be added. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bioaccumulation of silver nanoparticles in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): Influence of concentration and salinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salari Joo, Hamid; Kalbassi, Mohammad Reza; Yu, Il Je; Lee, Ji Hyun; Johari, Seyed Ali

    2013-01-01

    : liver > kidneys ≈ gills > white muscles. All the tissue silver levels were significantly higher in the high salinity than in the moderate salinity. In addition, all the fish exposed to Ag-NPs in the low, moderate, and high salinity showed a concentration-dependent increase in their hepatosomatic index (HSI). In conclusion, most Ag-NPs that enter into freshwater ecosystems (low ionic strength) remain suspended, representing a potentially negative threat to the biota in an ionic or nanoscale form. However, in a higher salinity, nanoparticles agglomerate and precipitate on the surface of the sediment

  17. Bioaccumulation of silver nanoparticles in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): Influence of concentration and salinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salari Joo, Hamid, E-mail: h.salary1365@gmail.com [Department of Aquaculture, Marine Science Faculty, Tarbiat Modares University, Mazandaran, Noor (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kalbassi, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: kalbassi_m@modares.ac.ir [Department of Aquaculture, Marine Science Faculty, Tarbiat Modares University, Mazandaran, Noor (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yu, Il Je, E-mail: u1670916@chol.com [Institute of Nano-product Safety Research, Hoseo University, 165 Sechul-ri, Baebang-myun, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ji Hyun, E-mail: toxin@dreamwiz.com [Institute of Nano-product Safety Research, Hoseo University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Johari, Seyed Ali, E-mail: a.johari@uok.ac.ir [Aquaculture Department, Natural Resources Faculty, University of Kurdistan, Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    order: liver > kidneys ≈ gills > white muscles. All the tissue silver levels were significantly higher in the high salinity than in the moderate salinity. In addition, all the fish exposed to Ag-NPs in the low, moderate, and high salinity showed a concentration-dependent increase in their hepatosomatic index (HSI). In conclusion, most Ag-NPs that enter into freshwater ecosystems (low ionic strength) remain suspended, representing a potentially negative threat to the biota in an ionic or nanoscale form. However, in a higher salinity, nanoparticles agglomerate and precipitate on the surface of the sediment.

  18. Effect of saline stress on plasma membrane structure and function of barley roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani, F. H.

    2000-01-01

    Barely (Hordeum vulgare L. c v. Black Local) plants were grown hydroponic ally under different saline stresses (50, 100, 150 And 200 mm NaCI. The adverse effect of each saline stress on the structure and function of root cells plasma membrane was studied in terms of root surface ATPase activation by NaCI in the reaction mixture. Was 0, 50, 100. 150 and 200mM. ATPase activity was found to be increased gradually at certain concentrations of NaCI. For control and 50mM stressed plants, the increase in root surface ATPase activity was started at 150mM NaCI. For 100mM stressed plants it was started at 100mM NaCI. For 150 and 200mM stressed plants it was stated at 50mM NaCI Results indicated that the adverse effect of the growth medium saline stresses on the integrity of the plasma membrane was started at 100mM saline stress. Accordingly the role of plasma membrane bound ATPase in active ion transport was disturbed at 100mM saline stress and may be impaired at 150 and 200mM saline stresses. It was suggested that the lipid environment of the plasma membrane surrounding ATPase was modified by the saline stresses 100-200mM. (author). 38 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Managing the Economics of Soil Salinity

    OpenAIRE

    Hadrich, Joleen C.

    2011-01-01

    Saline soils result in decreased crop growth and yield with the potential for losing productive farm land. Enterprise budget analysis was extended to include the fixed costs of installing tile drainage to manage soil salinity in the Red River Valley of North Dakota for corn, soybeans, wheat, sugar beets, and barley. Installing tile drainage to manage soil salinity decreased per acre crop profitability from 19-49% due to the large upfront capital investment of tile drainage. These losses can b...

  20. ( Phaseolus vulgaris L. ) seedlings to salinity stress

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of salinity stress on five cultivars of common bean: Bassbeer, Beladi, Giza 3, HRS 516 and RO21 were evaluated on a sand/peat medium with different salinity levels (0, 50 and 100 mM NaCl) applied 3 weeks after germination for duration of 10 days. Salinity had adverse effects not only on the biomass yield and ...

  1. Estimating surface pCO2 in the northern Gulf of Mexico: Which remote sensing model to use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuangling; Hu, Chuanmin; Cai, Wei-Jun; Yang, Bo

    2017-12-01

    .10 μatm, MR of 1.001 and 1.000, respectively. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to study the uncertainties in the predicted pCO2 as a result of the uncertainties in the input variables of each model. Although the MeSAA was more sensitive to variations in SST and CHL than in sea surface salinity (SSS), and the locally tuned MeSAA and the empirical regression models were more sensitive to changes in SST and SSS than in CHL, generally for these three models the bias induced by the uncertainties in the empirically derived parameters (river endmember total alkalinity (TA) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), biological coefficient of the MeSAA and locally tuned MeSAA models) and environmental variables (SST, SSS, CHL) was within or close to the uncertainty of each model. While all these three models showed that surface pCO2 was positively correlated to SST, the MeSAA showed negative correlation between surface pCO2 and SSS and CHL but the locally tuned MeSAA and the empirical regression showed the opposite. These results suggest that the locally tuned MeSAA worked better in the river-dominated northern GOM than the original MeSAA, with slightly worse statistics but more meaningful physical and biogeochemical interpretations than the empirical regression model. Because data from abnormal upwelling were not used to train the models, they are not applicable for waters with strong upwelling, yet the empirical regression approach showed ability to be further tuned to adapt to such cases.

  2. SOIL SALINITY MAPPING USING MULTITEMPORAL LANDSAT DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Azabdaftari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is one of the most important problems affecting many areas of the world. Saline soils present in agricultural areas reduce the annual yields of most crops. This research deals with the soil salinity mapping of Seyhan plate of Adana district in Turkey from the years 2009 to 2010, using remote sensing technology. In the analysis, multitemporal data acquired from LANDSAT 7-ETM+ satellite in four different dates (19 April 2009, 12 October 2009, 21 March 2010, 31 October 2010 are used. As a first step, preprocessing of Landsat images is applied. Several salinity indices such as NDSI (Normalized Difference Salinity Index, BI (Brightness Index and SI (Salinity Index are used besides some vegetation indices such as NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, RVI (Ratio Vegetation Index, SAVI (Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index and EVI (Enhamced Vegetation Index for the soil salinity mapping of the study area. The field’s electrical conductivity (EC measurements done in 2009 and 2010, are used as a ground truth data for the correlation analysis with the original band values and different index image bands values. In the correlation analysis, two regression models, the simple linear regression (SLR and multiple linear regression (MLR are considered. According to the highest correlation obtained, the 21st March, 2010 dataset is chosen for production of the soil salinity map in the area. Finally, the efficiency of the remote sensing technology in the soil salinity mapping is outlined.

  3. Soil salinity detection from satellite image analysis: an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Md Manjur; Islam, Md Tazmul; Jamil, Raihan

    2016-02-01

    This paper attempts to detect soil salinity from satellite image analysis using remote sensing and geographic information system. Salinity intrusion is a common problem for the coastal regions of the world. Traditional salinity detection techniques by field survey and sampling are time-consuming and expensive. Remote sensing and geographic information system offer economic and efficient salinity detection, monitoring, and mapping. To predict soil salinity, an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data was used to develop a multiple regression equation. The correlations between different indices and field data of soil salinity were calculated to find out the highly correlated indices. The best regression model was selected considering the high R (2) value, low P value, and low Akaike's Information Criterion. About 20% variation was observed between the field data and predicted EC from the satellite image analysis. The precision of this salinity detection technique depends on the accuracy and uniform distribution of field data.

  4. Measurement of ocean temperature and salinity via microwave radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, H.-J. C.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Sea-surface temperature with an accuracy of 1 C and salinity with an accuracy of 1% were measured with a 1.43 and 2.65 GHz radiometer system after correcting for the influence of cosmic radiation, intervening atmosphere, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers are a third-generation system using null-balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from aircraft over bay regions and coastal areas of the Atlantic resulted in contour maps with spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  5. Assessment of risk to aquatic biota from elevated salinity -- a case study from the Hunter River, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschal, Monika

    2006-05-01

    An ecological risk assessment was performed on salinity levels of the Hunter River and its tributaries to respond to concerns that high salinity may be damaging aquatic ecosystems. Probabilistic techniques were used to assess likelihood and consequence, and hence the risk to aquatic biota from salinity. Continuous electrical conductivity distributions were used to describe the likelihood that high salinity would occur (exposure dataset) and toxicity values were compiled from the limited literature sources available to describe the consequence of high salinity (effects dataset). The assessment was preliminary in the sense that it modelled risk on the basis of existing data and did not undertake site-specific toxicity testing. Some sections of the Hunter River catchment have geologies that are saline because of their marine origins. Catchment development has increased the liberation rates of salts into surface-waters. Such modifying activities include coal-mining, power generation and land clearing. The aquatic biota of tributaries had a greater risk of impairment from high salinity than that of the Hunter River. High salinities in the tributaries were attributed to the combined factors of naturally saline geologies, increased liberation of salts due to modification of the landscape, and reduced dilution by flushing flows. A salinity guideline trigger value of 1100 mg L(-1) was recommended.

  6. Estimation of Surface Seawater Fugacity of Carbon Dioxide Using Satellite Data and Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, E.; Im, J.; Park, G.; Park, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The ocean controls the climate of Earth by absorbing and releasing CO2 through the carbon cycle. The amount of CO2 in the ocean has increased since the industrial revolution. High CO2 concentration in the ocean has a negative influence to marine organisms and reduces the ability of absorbing CO2 in the ocean. This study estimated surface seawater fugacity of CO2 (fCO2) in the East Sea of Korea using Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data, and Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) reanalysis data. GOCI is the world first geostationary ocean color observation satellite sensor, and it provides 8 images with 8 bands hourly per day from 9 am to 4 pm at 500m resolution. Two machine learning approaches (i.e., random forest and support vector regression) were used to model fCO2 in this study. While most of the existing studies used multiple linear regression to estimate the pressure of CO2 in the ocean, machine learning may handle more complex relationship between surface seawater fCO2 and ocean parameters in a dynamic spatiotemporal environment. Five ocean related parameters, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), chlorophyll-a (chla), sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), and mixed layer depth (MLD), were used as input variables. This study examined two schemes, one with GOCI-derived products and the other with MODIS-derived ones. Results show that random forest performed better than support vector regression regardless of satellite data used. The accuracy of GOCI-based estimation was higher than MODIS-based one, possibly thanks to the better spatiotemporal resolution of GOCI data. MLD was identified the most contributing parameter in estimating surface seawater fCO2 among the five ocean related parameters, which might be related with an active deep convection in the East Sea. The surface seawater fCO2 in summer was higher in general with some spatial variation than the other

  7. Management scenarios for the Jordan River salinity crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, E.; Vengosh, A.; Gavrieli, I.; Marie, Amarisa; Bullen, T.D.; Mayer, B.; Holtzman, R.; Segal, M.; Shavit, U.

    2005-01-01

    Recent geochemical and hydrological findings show that the water quality of the base flow of the Lower Jordan River, between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea, is dependent upon the ratio between surface water flow and groundwater discharge. Using water quality data, mass-balance calculations, and actual flow-rate measurements, possible management scenarios for the Lower Jordan River and their potential affects on its salinity are investigated. The predicted scenarios reveal that implementation of some elements of the Israel-Jordan peace treaty will have negative effects on the Jordan River water salinity. It is predicted that removal of sewage effluents dumped into the river (???13 MCM/a) will significantly reduce the river water's flow and increase the relative proportion of the saline groundwater flux into the river. Under this scenario, the Cl content of the river at its southern point (Abdalla Bridge) will rise to almost 7000 mg/L during the summer. In contrast, removal of all the saline water (16.5 MCM/a) that is artificially discharged into the Lower Jordan River will significantly reduce its Cl concentration, to levels of 650-2600 and 3000-3500 mg/L in the northern and southern areas of the Lower Jordan River, respectively. However, because the removal of either the sewage effluents or the saline water will decrease the river's discharge to a level that could potentially cause river desiccation during the summer months, other water sources must be allocated to preserve in-stream flow needs and hence the river's ecosystem. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Salinity Impacts on Agriculture and Groundwater in Delta Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, D.; Salehin, M.; Jairuddin, M.; Saleh, A. F. M.; Rahman, M. M.; Parks, K. E.; Haque, M. A.; Lázár, A. N.; Payo, A.

    2015-12-01

    Delta regions are attractive for high intensity agriculture due to the availability of rich sedimentary soils and of fresh water. Many of the world's tropical deltas support high population densities which are reliant on irrigated agriculture. However environmental changes such as sea level rise, tidal inundation and reduced river flows have reduced the quantity and quality of water available for successful agriculture. Additionally, anthropogenic influences such as the over abstraction of ground water and the increased use of low quality water from river inlets has resulted in the accumulation of salts in the soils which diminishes crop productivity. Communities based in these regions are usually reliant on the same water for drinking and cooking because surface water is frequently contaminated by commercial and urban pollution. The expansion of shallow tube well systems for drinking water and agricultural use over the last few decades has resulted in mobilisation of salinity in the coastal and estuarine fringes. Sustainable development in delta regions is becoming constrained by water salinity. However salinity is often studied as an independent issue by specialists working in the fields of agriculture, community water supply and groundwater. The lack of interaction between these disciplines often results in corrective actions being applied to one sector without fully assessing the effects of these actions on other sectors. This paper describes a framework for indentifying the causes and impacts of salinity in delta regions based on the source-pathway-receptor framework. It uses examples and scenarios from the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta in Bangladesh together with field measurements and observations made in vulnerable coastal communities. The paper demonstrates the importance of creating an holistic understanding of the development and management of water resources to reduce the impact of salinity in fresh water in delta regions.

  9. Growth and Water Relations of Sun-cured Tobacco Irrigated with Saline Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelino G

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the effects of saline irrigation on growth and water relations of two sun-cured tobacco genotypes, Xp102 and Px107, which belong to the Xanthia and Perustitza tobacco ecotypes, respectively. We compared three commercial sea salt concentrations of the irrigation water (0.25%, 0.5%, and 1% w/v plus a non-salinized control, corresponding to an electrical conductivity (ECw of 4.4, 8.5, 15.7, 0.5 dS m-1 and osmotic potentials of -0.22, -0.35, -0.73, -0.02 MPa, respectively. The ECsoil increased with the salinity of the irrigation water. At high salinity (1%, the soil where Px107 plants were grown showed a significantly higher salinity compared to the soil of Xp102. For both genotypes, the soil water content increased at increasing salinity and during the growth season. Increasing salinity progressively reduced the leaf turgor pressure and enhanced the cellular osmotic adjustment. The latter resulted to be more pronounced in Px107 compared to Xp102 (0.36 vs. 0.20 MPa. At higher salinity (0.5% and 1%, both genotypes showed reduced leaf surface area, dry matter accumulation, water use, net assimilation rate (NAR and crop growth rate (CGR. Px107 roots were more sensitive than shoot to salinity (3% reduction per dS m-1 and compared to Xp102 roots, which showed a reduced development only at 1% salinity. Assessment of plant salt tolerance according to the Maas and Hoffman model revealed a slope of 1-2% for both genotypes, indicating that these tobaccos are relatively more salt tolerant compared to other species.

  10. Importance of ocean salinity for climate and habitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullum, Jodie; Stevens, David P; Joshi, Manoj M

    2016-04-19

    Modeling studies of terrestrial extrasolar planetary climates are now including the effects of ocean circulation due to a recognition of the importance of oceans for climate; indeed, the peak equator-pole ocean heat transport on Earth peaks at almost half that of the atmosphere. However, such studies have made the assumption that fundamental oceanic properties, such as salinity, temperature, and depth, are similar to Earth. This assumption results in Earth-like circulations: a meridional overturning with warm water moving poleward at the surface, being cooled, sinking at high latitudes, and traveling equatorward at depth. Here it is shown that an exoplanetary ocean with a different salinity can circulate in the opposite direction: an equatorward flow of polar water at the surface, sinking in the tropics, and filling the deep ocean with warm water. This alternative flow regime results in a dramatic warming in the polar regions, demonstrated here using both a conceptual model and an ocean general circulation model. These results highlight the importance of ocean salinity for exoplanetary climate and consequent habitability and the need for its consideration in future studies.

  11. Seasonal variations of the upper ocean salinity stratification in the Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Christophe; O'Kane, Terence J.

    2014-03-01

    In comparison to the deep ocean, the upper mixed layer is a region typically characterized by substantial vertical gradients in water properties. Within the Tropics, the rich variability in the vertical shapes and forms that these structures can assume through variation in the atmospheric forcing results in a differential effect in terms of the temperature and salinity stratification. Rather than focusing on the strong halocline above the thermocline, commonly referred to as the salinity barrier layer, the present study takes into account the respective thermal and saline dependencies in the Brunt-Väisälä frequency (N2) in order to isolate the specific role of the salinity stratification in the layers above the main pycnocline. We examine daily vertical profiles of temperature and salinity from an ocean reanalysis over the period 2001-2007. We find significant seasonal variations in the Brunt-Väisälä frequency profiles are limited to the upper 300 m depth. Based on this, we determine the ocean salinity stratification (OSS) to be defined as the stabilizing effect (positive values) due to the haline part of N2 averaged over the upper 300 m. In many regions of the tropics, the OSS contributes 40-50% to N2 as compared to the thermal stratification and, in some specific regions, exceeds it for a few months of the seasonal cycle. Away from the tropics, for example, near the centers of action of the subtropical gyres, there are regions characterized by the permanent absence of OSS. In other regions previously characterized with salinity barrier layers, the OSS obviously shares some common variations; however, we show that where temperature and salinity are mixed over the same depth, the salinity stratification can be significant. In addition, relationships between the OSS and the sea surface salinity are shown to be well defined and quasilinear in the tropics, providing some indication that in the future, analyses that consider both satellite surface salinity

  12. Stability of biodegradable waterborne polyurethane films in buffered saline solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying Yi; Hung, Kun-Che; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2015-09-21

    The stability of polyurethane (PU) is of critical importance for applications such as in coating industry or as biomaterials. To eliminate the environmental concerns on the synthesis of PU which involves the use of organic solvents, the aqueous-based or waterborne PU (WBPU) has been developed. WBPU, however, may be unstable in an electrolyte-rich environment. In this study, the authors reported the stability of biodegradable WBPU in the buffered saline solutions evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Various biodegradable WBPU films were prepared by spin coating on coverslip glass, with a thickness of ∼300 nm. The surface AFM images of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) diol-based WBPU revealed nanoglobular structure. The same feature was observed when 20% molar of the PCL diol soft segment was replaced by polyethylene butylenes adipate diol. After hydration in buffered saline solutions for 24 h, the surface domains generally increased in sizes and became irregular in shape. On the other hand, when the soft segment was replaced by 20% poly(l-lactide) diol, a meshlike surface structure was demonstrated by AFM. When the latter WBPU was hydrated, the surface domains appeared to be disconnected. Results from the attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the surface chemistry of WBPU films was altered after hydration. These changes were probably associated with the neutralization of carboxylate by ions in the saline solutions, resulting in the rearrangements of soft and hard segments and causing instability of the WBPU.

  13. EFFECT OF SALINITY ON SURVIVAL AND LARVAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory investigations was conducted to gain a better insight into the effect of changing salinity regime on the development and survival of Macrobrachium vollenhoveli larvae. At water temperature of 28 ± 2oC, larvae reared in the salinity range of 0 to 10 ppt showed low survival (<48%), whereas those reared at 12 ...

  14. (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench) UNDER SALINE STRESS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    H. Rahim Guealia

    1 sept. 2017 ... Department of Biology, Laboratory of Biodiversity and Conservation of Water and Soils,. University of ... factors (salinity and bentonite) imposed in our study have a significant effect on the water status estimated by RWC, ..... 2003, 62: 37-66. [12] Ngasamy P. World salinization with emphasis on Australia.

  15. SUBSURFACE SEQUENCE DELINEATION AND SALINE WATER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The driller's lithological logs aided by gamma and resistivity logs, showed that the area is underlain by clays, sandy/silty clays, clayey sands and sands with shale and limestone in places. The resistivity logs delineate saline water at shallow depth at Lekki wells I and II, Lakowe and Akodo with fresh/saline water interface at ...

  16. Hydrologic factors controlling groundwater salinity in northwestern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    From the comprehensive survey of groundwater conditions in the study area, it has been noticed that the ground- water widely ranges in salinity between 1000 and about 15000 mg/l. This great variation in salinity is mainly attributed to the dominant hydrologic conditions controlling the groundwater occurrence and recharge.

  17. Aquarius salinity and wind retrieval using the cap algorithm and application to water cycle observation in the Indian ocean and subcontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquarius is a combined passive/active L-band microwave instrument developed to map the ocean surface salinity field from space. The primary science objective of this mission is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open oc...

  18. Water logging and salinity control for environmentally sustainable crop production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, M.R.; Bhutta, M.N.

    2005-01-01

    Irrigation supplies at proper time and adequate quantities are imperative for potential agricultural production under arid and semi-arid climatic conditions. To achieve this goal one of the largest integrated irrigation network was established. Without adequate drainage it resulted in the problems of water logging and salinity. To control these problems a big programme of Salinity Control and Reclamation projects (SCARPs) was initiated during 1960 and 82 such SCARPs have been completed and 9 were in progress up to June, 2002 covering an area of 18.6 ma (7.5 mh) at a cost of Rs.93 billions. Under these projects 12746 tube wells in fresh, 3572 in saline groundwater and 13726 km surface and 12612 km tile pipes covering 6391.7 ha, 160 km interceptor drains have been constructed an area of 0.998 ma (GCA). In addition to this some other measures like on farm water management, canal command project, canal lining, construction of evaporation ponds, establishment of research Inst./Organizations were also taken. Many drainage plans like Master Plan (1963), Northern Regional Plan (1967), Water Sector Investment Plan Study (1990), Right Bank Master Plan (1992), Drainage Sector Environmental Assessment (1993) and National Drainage Programme (1995) were prepared and implemented. The cost of the, phase-I of the National Drainage Programme was 785 million US$. The main activities undertaken were remodeling/extension of existing surface and new drains; rehabilitation/replacement of saline ground water (SGW) tube wells; construction of interceptor drains, reclamation of waterlogged areas through biological drainage and transfer of fresh ground water tube wells to the farmers. The data indicate that all the measures taken have played a significant role in reducing the water logging, salinity/sodicity and have increased the crop production and consequently improved the socio-economic conditions of the peoples especially the farming community. The environment in these areas was also

  19. Investigation of soil salinity to distinguish boundary line between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gradual drying of Urmia Lake has left vast saline areas all around it, increasing the risk of salinization of agricultural lands next to the Lake. The current research was aimed to predict soil salinity and distinguish the boundary line between saline and agricultural lands by taking in to account the spatial variability of soil salinity ...

  20. Biochar mitigates salinity stress in potato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleem Akhtar, Saqib; Andersen, M.N.; Liu, Fulai

    2015-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted in a climate-controlled greenhouse to investigate the growth, physiology and yield of potato in response to salinity stress under biochar amendment. It was hypothesized that addition of biochar may improve plant growth and yield by mitigating the negative effect...... of salinity through its high sorption ability. From tuber bulking to harvesting, the plants were exposed to three saline irrigations, that is 0, 25 and 50 mm NaCl solutions, respectively, and two levels of biochar (0 % and 5 % W/W) treatments. An adsorption study was also conducted to study the Na+ adsorption...... capability of biochar. Results indicated that biochar was capable to ameliorate salinity stress by adsorbing Na+. Increasing salinity level resulted in significant reductions of shoot biomass, root length and volume, tuber yield, photosynthetic rate (An), stomatal conductance (gs), midday leaf water...

  1. Drought-induced recharge promotes long-term storage of porewater salinity beneath a prairie wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Zeno F.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Moucha, Robert; Mushet, David M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; LaBaugh, James W.; Fiorentino, Anthony J.; Siegel, Donald I.

    2018-02-01

    Subsurface storage of sulfate salts allows closed-basin wetlands in the semiarid Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America to maintain moderate surface water salinity (total dissolved solids [TDS] from 1 to 10 g L-1), which provides critical habitat for communities of aquatic biota. However, it is unclear how the salinity of wetland ponds will respond to a recent shift in mid-continental climate to wetter conditions. To understand better the mechanisms that control surface-subsurface salinity exchanges during regional dry-wet climate cycles, we made a detailed geoelectrical study of a closed-basin prairie wetland (P1 in the Cottonwood Lake Study Area, North Dakota) that is currently experiencing record wet conditions. We found saline lenses of sulfate-rich porewater (TDS > 10 g L-1) contained in fine-grained wetland sediments 2-4 m beneath the bathymetric low of the wetland and within the currently ponded area along the shoreline of a prior pond stand (c. 1983). During the most recent drought (1988-1993), the wetland switched from a groundwater discharge to recharge function, allowing salts dissolved in surface runoff to move into wetland sediments beneath the bathymetric low of the basin. However, groundwater levels during this time did not decline to the elevation of the saline lenses, suggesting these features formed during more extended paleo-droughts and are stable in the subsurface on at least centennial timescales. We hypothesize a "drought-induced recharge" mechanism that allows wetland ponds to maintain moderate salinity under semiarid climate. Discharge of drought-derived saline groundwater has the potential to increase the salinity of wetland ponds during wet climate.

  2. Mechanisms of Mixed-Layer Salinity Seasonal Variability in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Julia; Serra, Nuno; Bryan, Frank O.; Johnson, Benjamin K.; Stammer, Detlef

    2018-01-01

    Based on a joint analysis of an ensemble mean of satellite sea surface salinity retrievals and the output of a high-resolution numerical ocean circulation simulation, physical processes are identified that control seasonal variations of mixed-layer salinity (MLS) in the Indian Ocean, a basin where salinity changes dominate changes in density. In the northern and near-equatorial Indian Ocean, annual salinity changes are mainly driven by respective changes of the horizontal advection. South of the equatorial region, between 45°E and 90°E, where evaporation minus precipitation has a strong seasonal cycle, surface freshwater fluxes control the seasonal MLS changes. The influence of entrainment on the salinity variance is enhanced in mid-ocean upwelling regions but remains small. The model and observational results reveal that vertical diffusion plays a major role in precipitation and river runoff dominated regions balancing the surface freshwater flux. Vertical diffusion is important as well in regions where the advection of low salinity leads to strong gradients across the mixed-layer base. There, vertical diffusion explains a large percentage of annual MLS variance. The simulation further reveals that (1) high-frequency small-scale eddy processes primarily determine the salinity tendency in coastal regions (in particular in the Bay of Bengal) and (2) shear horizontal advection, brought about by changes in the vertical structure of the mixed layer, acts against mean horizontal advection in the equatorial salinity frontal regions. Observing those latter features with the existing observational components remains a future challenge.

  3. Response of Stream Biodiversity to Increasing Salinization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, C. P.; Vander Laan, J. J.; Olson, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We used a large data set of macroinvertebrate samples collected from streams in both reference-quality (n = 68) and degraded (n = 401) watersheds in the state of Nevada, USA to assess relationships between stream biodiversity and salinity. We used specific electrical conductance (EC)(μS/cm) as a measure of salinity, and applied a previously developed EC model to estimate natural, baseflow salinity at each stream. We used the difference between observed and predicted salinity (EC-Diff) as a measure of salinization associated with watershed degradation. Observed levels of EC varied between 22 and 994 μS/cm across reference sites and 22 to 3,256 uS/cm across non-reference sites. EC-Diff was as high as 2,743 μS/cm. We used a measure of local biodiversity completeness (ratio of observed to expected number of taxa) to assess ecological response to salinity. This O/E index decreased nearly linearly up to about 25% biodiversity loss, which occurred at EC-Diff of about 300 μS/cm. Too few sites had EC-Diff greater than 300 μS/cm to draw reliable inferences regarding biodiversity response to greater levels of salinization. EC-Diff increased with % agricultural land use, mine density, and % urban land use in the watersheds implying that human activities have been largely responsible for increased salinization in Nevada streams and rivers. Comparison of biological responses to EC and other stressors indicates that increased salinization may be the primary stressor causing biodiversity loss in these streams and that more stringent salinity water quality standards may be needed to protect aquatic life.

  4. Influence of salinity and cadmium on the survival and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    osmoregulated at salinities between 5 and 25 and osmoconformed at salinities greater than 25. Chiromantes eulimene followed a hyper-hypo-osmoregulatory strategy; it hyper-regulated in salinities from 0 up to isosmotic conditions at about 28 (c.

  5. Estimation of Recharge from Long-Term Monitoring of Saline Tracer Transport Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haarder, Eline Bojsen; Jensen, Karsten Høgh; Binley, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The movement of a saline tracer added to the soil surface was monitored in the unsaturated zone using cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and subjected to natural rainfall conditions. The ERT data were inverted and corrected for subsurface temperature changes, and spatial moment...... methods. In September 2011, a saline tracer was added across a 142-m2 area at the surface at an application rate mimicking natural infiltration. The movement of the saline tracer front was monitored using cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT); data were collected on a daily to weekly...... located only meters away from the cross-borehole ERT array. This suggests that long-term automated ERT monitoring of a surface-applied tracer is a promising technique for estimating groundwater recharge....

  6. Change in the intensity of low-salinity water inflow from the Bay of Bengal into the Eastern Arabian Sea from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene: Implications for monsoon variations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mahesh, B.S.; Banakar, V.K.

    A 100–400 km wide region of the coastal Eastern Arabian Sea (EAS), off the west-coast of India, is characterized by a low-salinity tongue formed by the inflow of low-salinity surface water from the Bay of Bengal (BoB). This low-salinity tongue...

  7. Element and mineral characterization of dust emission from the saline land at Songnen Plain, Northeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Hu, Ke; Jie, Dongmei; Yang, Junpeng; Li, Jingmin

    2009-01-01

    Recent observations of Asian dust storms show an eastern expansion of the source area to degraded lands, where dust emissions have been little studied. The dust concentrations over the saline land of the western Songnen Plain (SSL), Northeastern China, are circumstantially higher than those from the northwestern Chinese deserts. These concentrations are sensitive to the surface soil conditions and wind velocity on the ground. The dust samples collected during dust storm events on the SSL contain abundant Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Fe and Ti, as well as toxic elements such as Cu, V, Zn and Ba. Individual particle analysis reveals that fine saline particles (fine saline particles uplifted from the SSL are likely transported eastward by the winter monsoon circulation and westerlies. Recent degradation of saline lands in Northeastern China would not only increase the frequency of dust storm events in the downwind area, but also might change the chemical composition of the Asian dust emissions.

  8. Chemical composition and trophic state of shallow saline steppe lakes in central Asia (North Kazakhstan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Emil; Jurecska, Laura; Tatár, Enikő; Vörös, Lajos; Kolpakova, Marina

    2017-10-09

    The purpose of this study was to identify the prevailing chemical composition and trophic state of the shallow saline steppe lakes of North Kazakhstan along a wide size range (SO 4 and Na-Cl (n = 16; 64%); the Ca, Mg, HCO 3 , and SO 4 ions precipitate with increasing salinity (2-322 g L -1 ); and ion composition shifts from Na>Mg-Cl>SO 4 to Na-Cl. The most of the chemical variables positively, but chlorophyll a negatively, correlated with total dissolved solids, and the total phosphorus had no significant correlation with any variables. The trophic state of these lakes in most cases exceeded the hypertrophic level. The increase in salinity causes change in chemical composition and effects on the phytoplankton development independently from the size of water surface, and the human disturbances had negligible effect on the trophic state of shallow saline lakes in this region of Kazakhstan.

  9. Sensor-Based Assessment of Soil Salinity during the First Years of Transition from Flood to Sprinkler Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Auxiliadora Casterad

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A key issue for agriculture in irrigated arid lands is the control of soil salinity, and this is one of the goals for irrigated districts when changing from flood to sprinkling irrigation. We combined soil sampling, proximal electromagnetic induction, and satellite data to appraise how soil salinity and its distribution along a previously flood-irrigated field evolved after its transformation to sprinkling. We also show that the relationship between NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index and ECe (electrical conductivity of the soil saturation extracts mimics the production function between yield and soil salinity. Under sprinkling, the field had a double crop of barley and then sunflower in 2009 and 2011. In both years, about 50% of the soil of the entire studied field—45 ha—had ECe < 8 dS m−1, i.e., allowing barley cultivation, while the percent of surface having ECe ≥ 16 dS m−1 increased from 8.4% in 2009 to 13.7% in 2011. Our methodology may help monitor the soil salinity oscillations associated with irrigation management. After quantifying and mapping the soil salinity in 2009 and 2011, we show that barley was stunted in places of the field where salinity was higher. Additionally, the areas of salinity persisted after the subsequent alfalfa cropping in 2013. Application of differential doses of water to the saline patches is a viable method to optimize irrigation water distribution and lessen soil salinity in sprinkler-irrigated agriculture.

  10. Phytoextraction and phytoexcretion of Cd by the leaves of Tamarix smyrnensis growing on contaminated non-saline and saline soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manousaki, Eleni; Kadukova, Jana; Papadantonakis, Nikolaos; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Phytoremediation and more specifically phytoextraction, is an alternative restoration strategy for the clean up of heavy metal contaminated soils. Phytoextraction can only be successful if suitable plant species colonize the contaminated area, extract the toxic substances and accumulate them in their above ground tissues. In this study, the salt cedar Tamarix smyrnensis that is a widespread salt-tolerant plant in the Mediterranean region has been investigated. A pot experiment is conducted with T. smyrnensis grown in polluted soil with 16 ppm of cadmium and at three different salt concentrations (0.0, 0.5, 3.0% NaCl) for a 10-week period. It took place in an open-air area with natural light, at ambient temperature and humidity in an effort to keep the plants under conditions as similar as possible to those in the field. However, care was taken not to let them be rained on. Temperature ranged from 19 to 50 deg. C with 33 and 21 deg. C being the average day and night temperature, respectively. Humidity ranged from 28% to 87% with a 13-14 h photoperiod. The specific aims of this work are to investigate the accumulation of cadmium via root uptake at different saline conditions and cadmium excretion through salt glands on the surface of the leaves as a probable detoxification mechanism of the plant. Furthermore, measurements of chlorophyll content, biomass, and shoot length are used to evaluate the potential of the plant for the removal of cadmium from contaminated saline and non-saline soils. The experimental data suggest that increased soil salinity results in an increase of the cadmium uptake by T. smyrnensis. Analysis of white salt crystals taken from glandular tissue confirmed the fact that this plant excretes cadmium through its salt glands on the surface of the leaves as a possible detoxification mechanism in order to resist metal toxicity. Excreted cadmium is again released into the environment and it is redeposited on the top soil. Furthermore, increased

  11. Soil Salinity Controls on Water and Carbon Cycling by Sunflower Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkle, B.; Liang, X.; Dracup, J.; Hao, F.; Zeng, A.; Zhang, J.; He, B.; Oki, T.

    2007-12-01

    Agricultural effects on water cycling are of great importance for regional water resources management. These effects vary based on local soil and climate conditions, and are particularly modulated by high soil salinity levels, which stress plant growth and change their water use efficiency. Increasing salinization is predicted under hotter, drier conditions resulting from global climate change and from increased societal pressure on agricultural lands. This increased ionic presence creates a higher soil osmotic pressure that increases the resistance to water flow through the plant. This change also impacts the assimilation of carbon dioxide through the stomatal opening, and so affects rates of both photosynthesis and transpiration. Current agricultural and land-surface models that account for salinity do so in an overly empirical manner that cannot account for changes at different time scales in meteorological conditions. They tend to be ill equipped to examine how changing carbon dioxide levels may modify a plant's response to soil salinity. As a result, we present a new model of soil-vegetation- atmosphere water transfer that explicitly incorporates the role of soil salinity in changing this system's behavior. This model will allow for much greater flexibility in examining how vegetation may change the local water cycle under the joint impacts of both salinity and climate change. This model is supported by field research on the effects of salinity on sunflower plants in a large irrigation district in Inner Mongolia, China. Results presented include the role of salinity in changing stomatal regulation of water use efficiency, sub-canopy changes in leaf pressure, and changes in root activity. Modeling at sub-hourly time scales allows for a more precise understanding of how soil salinity changes the diurnal cycle of plant water use.

  12. Eolian transport, saline lake basins, and groundwater solutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Warren W.; Sanford, Ward E.

    1995-01-01

    Eolian processes associated with saline lakes are shown to be important in determining solute concentration in groundwater in arid and semiarid areas. Steady state mass balance analyses of chloride in the groundwater at Double Lakes, a saline lake basin in the southern High Plains of Texas, United States, suggest that approximately 4.5 × 105 kg of chloride is removed from the relatively small (4.7 km2) basin floor each year by deflation. This mass enters the groundwater down the wind gradient from the lake, degrading the water quality. The estimates of mass transport were independently determined by evaluation of solutes in the unsaturated zone and by solute mass balance calculations of groundwater flux. Transport of salts from the lake was confirmed over a short term (2 years) by strategically placed dust collectors. Results consistent with those at Double Lake were obtained from dune surfaces collected upwind and downwind from a sabkha near the city of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. The eolian transport process provides an explanation of the degraded groundwater quality associated with the 30–40 saline lake basins on the southern half of the southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico and in many other arid and semiarid areas.

  13. Saline groundwater - surface water interaction in coastal lowlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delsman, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Coastal zones are among the world's most densely populated and economically important areas, but these factors put pressure on the often limited available freshwater resources. Global change will undoubtedly increase this pressure through the combined effects of increased population, economic

  14. Salinity extrema in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S; Shetye, S; Gouveia, A.D.; Michael, G.S

    Levitus (1982) climatology has been used to identify four extrema, three maxima and one minimum, in the vertical salinity profiles in the Arabian Sea. Their geographical distribution, depths, theta-S characteristics, and seasonal variability...

  15. Saline water irrigation of quinoa and chickpea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirich, A.; Jelloul, A.; Choukr-Allah, R.

    2014-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted in the south of Morocco to evaluate the response of chickpea and quinoa to different irrigation water salinity treatments (1, 4, 7 and 10 dS m-1 for chickpea and 1, 10, 20 and 30 dS m-1 for quinoa). Increasing salinity affected significantly (P ... and height and caused delay and reduction in seed emergence, quinoa was shown to be more resistant than chickpea. Dry biomass, seed yield, harvest index and crop water productivity were affected significantly (P ... and seed yield for both quinoa and chickpea while increasing salinity resulted in increase - in the case of quinoa - and decrease - in the case of chickpea - in harvest index and crop water productivity. Na+ and Na+/K+ ratio increased with increasing irrigation water salinity, while K+ content decreased...

  16. NOAA NOS SOS, EXPERIMENTAL, 1902-present, Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA NOS SOS server is part of the IOOS DIF SOS Project. The stations in this dataset have salinity data. *These services are for testing and evaluation use...

  17. Increased salinization of fresh water in the Northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, S.S.; Groffman, P.M.; Likens, G.E.; Belt, K.T.; Stack, W.P.; Kelly, V.R.; Band, L.E.; Fisher, G.T.

    2005-01-01

    Chloride concentrations are increasing at a rate that threatens the availability of fresh water in the northeastern United States. Increases in roadways and deicer use are now salinizing fresh waters, degrading habitat for aquatic organisms, and impacting large supplies of drinking water for humans throughout the region. We observed chloride concentrations of up to 25% of the concentration of seawater in streams of Maryland, New York, and New Hampshire during winters, and chloride concentrations remaining up to 100 times greater than unimpacted forest streams during summers. Mean annual chloride concentration increased as a function of impervious surface and exceeded tolerance for freshwater life in suburban and urban watersheds. Our analysis shows that if salinity were to continue to increase at its present rate due to changes in impervious surface coverage and current management practices, many surface waters in the northeastern United States would not be potable for human consumption and would become toxic to freshwater life within the next century. ?? 2005 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  18. Salinity management in southern Italy irrigation areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Monteleone

    Full Text Available After a synthetic review of the most worrisome pressures applied over soils and waters, general criterions and normative principles that have to lead the technical intervention on soil and water protection are accounted, both with respect to farm activity and land planning. The salinity problem is faced, then, through the analysis of the nature and origin of saline soil and of the complex quantitative relationships able to interpret the accumulation and leaching of soil salts. Having specified the theoretical bases of salinity, the related technical features are then considered in order to define a proper management of soil and waters. Particular relevance is assigned to the irrigation and leaching techniques as well as, more briefly, to other agronomic interventions in order to guarantee the most effective salinity control. Another relevant technical facet of salinity control, although quite often neglected or retained of secondary importance in comparison to irrigation, is the drainage and disposal of leached water. The increased sensibility on the environmental impacts that the disposal of these waters can produce has raised today the level of attention on these procedures that are disciplined by norms of law and, therefore, require appropriate techniques of intervention. Finally, after the different scale orders involved in the management of salinity are defined (from the field and farm level up to the land and basin, the fundamental elements in order to work out a risk analysis and an action program are illustrated; some indications about the most up to date salinity monitoring and mapping methods are also provided, considering their great importance to continuously check the possible broadening of salinization and to carefully maintain its control.

  19. Microstrip Patch Sensor for Salinity Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibae Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a compact microstrip feed inset patch sensor is proposed for measuring the salinities in seawater. The working principle of the proposed sensor depends on the fact that different salinities in liquid have different relative permittivities and cause different resonance frequencies. The proposed sensor can obtain better sensitivity to salinity changes than common sensors using conductivity change, since the relative permittivity change to salinity is 2.5 times more sensitive than the conductivity change. The patch and ground plane of the proposed sensor are fabricated by conductive copper spray coating on the masks made by 3D printer. The fabricated patch and the ground plane are bonded to a commercial silicon substrate and then attached to 5 mm-high chamber made by 3D printer so that it contains only 1 mL seawater. For easy fabrication and testing, the maximum resonance frequency was selected under 3 GHz and to cover salinities in real seawater, it was assumed that the salinity changes from 20 to 35 ppt. The sensor was designed by the finite element method-based ANSYS high-frequency structure simulator (HFSS, and it can detect the salinity with 0.01 ppt resolution. The designed sensor has a resonance frequency separation of 37.9 kHz and reflection coefficients under −20 dB at the resonant frequencies. The fabricated sensor showed better performance with average frequency separation of 48 kHz and maximum reflection coefficient of −35 dB. By comparing with the existing sensors, the proposed compact and low-cost sensor showed a better detection capability. Therefore, the proposed patch sensor can be utilized in radio frequency (RF tunable sensors for salinity determination.

  20. Halophytes and Soil Salinity in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Abul Fatih, HA. [حسين علي ابوالفتح; Abdel Bari, E. M.; Alsubaey, A.; Ibrahim, Y. M.

    2002-01-01

    Saline soils cover approximately 6% of the land in Qatar. Halophytes are common along the coastal areas and inland salt flats and wetlands, where saline water is available in their natural habitats permanently or periodically. The prevailing plants are mostly perennials including dwarf succulent shrubs (Anabasis setifera, Arthrocnemum glaucum, Atriplex leucoclada, Cornulaca aucheri, Halocnemum stro-bilaceum, Halopeplis perfoliata, Heliotropium bacciferum, Limonium axillare, Salicornia europae...

  1. Microstrip Patch Sensor for Salinity Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kibae; Hassan, Arshad; Lee, Chong Hyun; Bae, Jinho

    2017-12-18

    In this paper, a compact microstrip feed inset patch sensor is proposed for measuring the salinities in seawater. The working principle of the proposed sensor depends on the fact that different salinities in liquid have different relative permittivities and cause different resonance frequencies. The proposed sensor can obtain better sensitivity to salinity changes than common sensors using conductivity change, since the relative permittivity change to salinity is 2.5 times more sensitive than the conductivity change. The patch and ground plane of the proposed sensor are fabricated by conductive copper spray coating on the masks made by 3D printer. The fabricated patch and the ground plane are bonded to a commercial silicon substrate and then attached to 5 mm-high chamber made by 3D printer so that it contains only 1 mL seawater. For easy fabrication and testing, the maximum resonance frequency was selected under 3 GHz and to cover salinities in real seawater, it was assumed that the salinity changes from 20 to 35 ppt. The sensor was designed by the finite element method-based ANSYS high-frequency structure simulator (HFSS), and it can detect the salinity with 0.01 ppt resolution. The designed sensor has a resonance frequency separation of 37.9 kHz and reflection coefficients under -20 dB at the resonant frequencies. The fabricated sensor showed better performance with average frequency separation of 48 kHz and maximum reflection coefficient of -35 dB. By comparing with the existing sensors, the proposed compact and low-cost sensor showed a better detection capability. Therefore, the proposed patch sensor can be utilized in radio frequency (RF) tunable sensors for salinity determination.

  2. Influence of upwelling saline groundwater on iron and manganese cycling in the Rio Grande floodplain aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Matthew F. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)], E-mail: matthew.f.kirk@gmail.com; Crossey, Laura J. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Newell, Dennis L. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bowman, Robert S. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Salinity contributions from upwelling groundwater significantly degrade water quality in the Rio Grande, a major source of water for the southwestern USA. This study considers the influence of this upwelling water on the geochemistry and microbiology of the Rio Grande floodplain alluvial aquifer. The composition of surface water, groundwater, and floodplain sediment samples collected from three transects in the Socorro Basin was examined. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) was also used to examine microbial biomass samples. The distribution of salinity in the floodplain groundwater largely reflects the configuration of local groundwater flow and mixing of two major water sources, deeply-sourced saline groundwater and river water. Microbial populations in the shallow aquifer consume O{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} and serve to redistribute metal oxides from the saturated zone to locations of groundwater discharge at the surface and possibly near the water table. The upwelling saline groundwater affects floodplain microbial processes by transporting reduced metals and organic electron donors to the alluvial aquifer system. This enhances metal reduction in the saturated zone and ultimately metal oxidation at or near the surface. Geochemical modeling suggests that mixing of the saline groundwater with more dilute water in the floodplain creates conditions more favorable for metal oxidation to occur and thereby influences the distribution of metal oxides.

  3. Surface modification-induced phase transformation of hexagonal close-packed gold square sheets

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Zhanxi

    2015-03-13

    Conventionally, the phase transformation of inorganic nanocrystals is realized under extreme conditions (for example, high temperature or high pressure). Here we report the complete phase transformation of Au square sheets (AuSSs) from hexagonal close-packed (hcp) to face-centered cubic (fcc) structures at ambient conditions via surface ligand exchange, resulting in the formation of (100)f-oriented fcc AuSSs. Importantly, the phase transformation can also be realized through the coating of a thin metal film (for example, Ag) on hcp AuSSs. Depending on the surfactants used during the metal coating process, two transformation pathways are observed, leading to the formation of (100)f-oriented fcc Au@Ag core-shell square sheets and (110)h/(101)f-oriented hcp/fcc mixed Au@Ag nanosheets. Furthermore, monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy reveals the strong surface plasmon resonance absorption of fcc AuSS and Au@Ag square sheet in the infrared region. Our findings may offer a new route for the crystal-phase and shape-controlled synthesis of inorganic nanocrystals. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessing Soil Salinity with the use of WorldView-2 Hyperspectral Images in Timpaki, Crete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, Dimitrios D.; Daliakopoulos, Ioannis N.; Panagea, Ioanna S.; Tsanis, Ioannis K.

    2016-04-01

    Salinization is one of the major soil degradation threats occurring worldwide, with its effects being observed in numerous vital ecological and non-ecological soil functions. Traditionally, soil salinity is assessed by laboratory determination of the soil electrical conductivity (ECe), rendering large scale studies labor and cost intensive. This study evaluates the feasibility of surface soil salinity estimation, monitoring, and mapping based on images acquired by the WorldView-2 and Landsat 8 multispectral sensors after calibration with a limited number of soil samples. A range of satellite image processing techniques are applied, starting with geometric, radiometric and atmospheric preprocessing corrections. More than 10 spectral salinity indices (algebric equations between visible and infrared band) including three newly introduced salinity indices, as well as vegetation indices (NDVI, SAVI, etc.) are implemented to detect surface salt deposition and vegetation health. Spectral unmixing is used to monitor salinity employing sophisticated classification approaches. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is applied to a WorldView-2 images in order to determine the initial axes used for the orthogonal transformation, followed by a subsequent 3D rotation of the PCA axes. The linear coefficients of the transformation are retrieved and adjusted to detect salinity in all the range of WorldView-2 image. Furthermore, Landsat 8 images are used to establish and compare the diachronic vegetation regime and plant health in both brackish irrigation and salinity-free olive groves areas. The proposed methods are tested in the RECARE FP7 Project Case Study of Timpaki, a coastal semi-arid region in south-central Crete. Long term agricultural over-exploitation in the area and little irrigation alternatives have led to seawater intrusion and in turn to soil salinization. EO products are calibrated using soil samples collected from bare soil plots at 0-5 cm depth and representing a

  5. PRODUCTION OF TOMATO SEEDLINGS UNDER SALINE IRRIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Brasiliano Campos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Processing tomato is the most important vegetable crop of the Brazilian agribusiness and few researches have been conducted to evaluate the tolerance of this crop to saline stress. In this study, the effects of five levels of salinity of the irrigation water (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 dS m-1 and three equivalent proportions of Na:Ca:Mg (1:1:0.5, 4:1:0.5 and 7:1:0.5 were tested on the emergence and vigor of processing tomato, cultivar IPA 6. Seeds were sowed in expanded polystyrene tray (128 cells and each tray received 1 L of water after sowing. The trays were piled and, four days after sowing, they were placed on suspended supports in a greenhouse. Irrigation was accomplished daily from the fifth day after sowing. Only dry weight of shoot and root was affected by sodium proportions, while linear reductions of the speed of emergence, stem length and the dry weight of shoot and root were observed with increasing salinity. Root was more affected than shoot by salinity and relative growth ratioincreased with salinity levels on the 14-21 days after sowing period, indicating that the crop showed a certain increase of salinity tolerance with the time of exposure to salts.

  6. [Investigation and canonical correspondence analysis of salinity contents in secondary salinization greenhouse soils in Shanghai suburb].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dong; Mao, Liang; Zhi, Yue-e; Zhang, Jin-Zhong; Zhou, Pei; Chai, Xiao-Tong

    2014-12-01

    The salinity characteristics of greenhouse soils with cropping obstacles in Shanghai suburb were investigated and analyzed. The salinity contents of the salinization greenhouse soils showed a trend of first increasing and then decreasing with the increasing cropping duration. The salinized soils mainly included slightly salted, mildly salted and salted soils, which accounted for 17.39%, 56.52% and 13.04%, respectively. Among them, the degree of salinity in greenhouse soil planted with asparagus in Chongming County was the highest. Among the salt ions in greenhouse soils, the cations were mainly Ca2+ and Na+, while the anions were mainly NO3- and SO4(2-). The degree of salinity was mainly influenced by fertilization mode, cropping duration, crop type and management level, which led to the great variation in the salinity contents and salt ions. Canonical correspondence analysis found that the contents of Ca2+, Mg2+ and NO3- in greenhouse soils were greatly affected by cropping duration, and the degree of salinity would be enhanced and attenuated with long-term application of single fertilizer and mixed application of chemical fertilizer and organic manure, respectively. The greenhouse soils in Shanghai suburb could be classified as four patterns influenced by the relationship between salinity ions and samples, and the most soils were influenced by Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3- and Cl-, which required to be primarily controlled.

  7. Effect of seawater salinity on pore-size distribution on a poly(styrene)-based HP20 resin and its adsorption of diarrhetic shellfish toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lin; Sun, Geng; Qiu, Jiangbing; Ma, Qimin; Hess, Philipp; Li, Aifeng

    2014-12-19

    In the present study, okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX1) were spiked into artificial seawater at low, medium and high estuarine salinities (9‰, 13.5‰ and 27‰). Passive samplers (HP20 resin) used for solid phase adsorption toxin tracking (SPATT) technology were exposed in these seawaters for 12-h periods. Adsorption curves well fitted a pseudo-secondary kinetics model. The highest initial sorption rates of both toxins occurred in the seawater of medium salinity, followed by seawater of low and high estuarine salinity. Pore volumes of micropores (seawater at high and low salinity but not in seawater at medium salinity, which demonstrated that the toxin molecules entered into micropores and mesopores (below 10nm in size) in seawaters of high and low salinity. More toxin or other matrix agglomerates were displayed on the surface of resin deployed in the seawater of medium salinity. Taking into consideration the pore-size distribution and surface images, it appears that intra-particle diffusion governs toxin adsorption in seawater at high salinity while film diffusion mainly controls the adsorption process in seawater at medium salinity. This is the first study to confirm that molecules of OA and DTX1 are able to enter into micropores (seawater with high salinity (∼27‰). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Soil salinity under deficit drip irrigation of potato and millet in in an arid environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Nagaz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of deficit irrigation (DI with saline water on soil salinity in a drip-irrigated potato and millet fields was investigated. We had compared proportional soil salinity developed under Full and DI under drip irrigation. For both experiments, the treatments were (1 Full, control treatment where rooting zone soil water content was increased to field capacity at each irrigation; (2 DI80; (3 DI60 and DI40; 20, 40 and 60% deficit irrigation compared to Full treatment were applied, respectively. Soil salinity was assessed using the isosalinity maps constructed with grid soil sampling of plant root zone at harvest. Results show that high spatial variability was observed in salinity along soil profiles when applying saline water with drip irrigation for potato. For the DI40 and DI60 treatments, high soil salinity was recorded in the upper soil layer close to the emitter. Increase of soil salinity within soil depths of 30 cm or below was also observed under DI60 and DI40 treatments. The lowest increase was noted under the full treatment. Surface soil salinity was somewhat higher under DI60 and DI40 compared with that of full and DI80 irrigation treatments. The distribution of salts around the dripper changes during the crop season according to applied irrigation treatments, with overall higher concentrations between the drippers and towards the margin of wetted band. Iso-salinity maps at harvest of potato showed that the surface layer of 30 cm depth had the lowest salinity which gradually increased at deeper zones irrespective of the treatment. Salt accumulation essentially occurred at wetting front between the drippers and the plant row. Although salt accumulation was relatively highest along the row under DI treatments, the area of accumulation was relatively shifted toward the center between the rows and the drip line. The results also show the importance of the potato cropping season to benefit from the leaching of soluble salts with the

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and others from 2011-05-17 to 2012-10-26 (NODC Accession 0083197)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0083197 includes chemical, physical and underway - surface data collected from HEALY in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea, Bering Sea, Coastal Waters of...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and others from 1994-11-04 to 2012-08-31 (NODC Accession 0083189)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0083189 includes chemical, physical and underway - surface data collected from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea, Bering Sea,...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from ODEN in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2006-12-14 to 2006-12-26 (NODC Accession 0108159)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108159 includes Surface underway data collected from ODEN in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the USS BOLD in the Gulf of Mexico from 2007-05-02 to 2007-08-24 (NODC Accession 0117500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117500 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from USS BOLD in the Gulf of Mexico from 2007-05-02 to 2007-08-24. These data...

  13. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Munida in the South Pacific Ocean from 2004-01-26 to 2006-07-30 (NODC Accession 0100218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0100218 includes Surface underway data collected from Munida in the South Pacific Ocean from 2004-01-26 to 2006-07-30. These data include Partial...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Marcus G. Langseth in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea and others from 2010-05-07 to 2013-06-25 (NODC Accession 0109901)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0109901 includes Surface underway data collected from Marcus G. Langseth in the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort Sea, Bering Sea, Caribbean Sea, Cordell Bank...

  15. Investigation of Soil Salinity to Distinguish Boundary Line between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: Gradual drying of Urmia Lake has left vast saline areas all around it, increasing the risk of salinization of ... have been numerous attempts in mapping spatial variability of soil electrical .... Salinity map resulted from spatial prediction of soil salinity using 78 laboratory measured soil samples is presented in Figure ...

  16. Salinity tolerance of the South African endemic amphipod ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salinities were prepared using natural seawater and synthetic sea salt. Grandidierella lignorum tolerated all salinities, but showed highest survival at salinities of 7–42. Salinity tolerance was modified by temperature, with highest survival occurring between 10 and 25 °C. These represent the range of conditions at which ...

  17. Vascular flora of saline lakes in the southern high plains of Texas and eastern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, David J.; Conway, Warren C.; Haukos, David A.; Caskey, Amber D.

    2013-01-01

    Saline lakes and freshwater playas form the principal surface hydrological feature of the High Plains of the Southern Great Plains. Saline lakes number less than 50 and historically functioned as discharge wetlands with relatively consistent water availability due to the presence of one or more springs. Currently, less than ten saline lakes contain functional springs. A survey of vascular plants at six saline lakes in the Southern High Plains of northwest Texas and one in eastern New Mexico during May and September 2009 resulted in a checklist of 49 species representing 16 families and 40 genera. The four families with the most species were Asteraceae (12), Amaranthaceae (8), Cyperaceae (5), and Poaceae (12). Non-native species (Bromus catharticus, Poa compressa, Polypogon monspeliensis, Sonchus oleraceus, Kochia scoparia, and Tamarix ramosissima) accounted for 10% of the total species recorded. Whereas nearly 350 species of vascular plants have been identified in playas in the Southern High Plains, saline lakes contain a fraction of this species richness. The Southern High Plains saline lake flora is regionally unique, containing taxa not found in playas, with species composition that is more similar to temperate desert wetlands of the Intermountain Region and Gulf Coastal Plain of North America.

  18. The structural modification of cassava starch using a saline water pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanny Frans SANGIAN

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cassava has been modified successfully by using the saline water, which was abundantly available on the planet. The biomass was submerged in saline waters that salt concentrations were altered at 0, 3.5 percent (seawater and 10 percent (w/w and were kept 5 days. After recovery by washing steps, the treated solids were characterized by using XRD (X-ray diffraction , FTIR (Fourier transform infra-red, and SEM (Scanning electron microscopic. The results showed that the XRD pattern of saline water pretreatment decreased significantly. The biggest decrease of X-ray intensity occurred at around 18o. Meanwhile, the fingerprint of FTIR revealed the transmittance intensity of infra-red ray of saline water treated solid inclined for all wave constant numbers, suggesting that many hydrogen bonds were disconnected. Those findings also were enhanced by SEM pictures that showed the change of surface morphology of treated biomass. It was indicative that cassava structure was modified becoming more textured after employing saline water pretreatment. This work is an innovative finding to gradually substitute commercial ionic liquids that are very expensive with saline water for biomass pretreatment.

  19. The influence of salinity of fly ash mixtures on energy looses during flow in pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    И. Собота

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In Polish mining for backfilling the fly ash mixtures are used. Last time for fly ash mixtures preparation the saline water from mine have been used, to thanks to that the saline water missing the surface waters. Usage of saline water for fly ash mixture preparation causes the changes in energy looses during the flow in pipelines. The paper presents the results of energy looses measurement іn laboratory pipeline installation with diameter D =50 mm. The measurements have been performed for different fly ash – saline water proportions. Tested fly-ash from Siersza power plant has typical properties (grain size distribution curve, density for ashes used for backfilling mixtures preparation. Increase of fluid (water salinity modifies fluid viscosity. Brine in comparison with pure water retains as liquid with increased viscosity. Increased viscosity can influence on the mixture ash-brine properties for example causing flocculation effect. Also changeable salinity has an influence on proper determination of resistance (frictional coefficient λ during mixtures flow in pipelines because it depends on Reynolds number which depends on liquid viscosity. Increase of fly-ash concentrations in fly-ash – brine mixtures cause increase of energy losses.

  20. Optical tool for salinity detection by remote sensing spectroscopy: application on Oran watershed, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, Dehni; Mourad, Lounis

    2017-07-01

    Soil salinity is a complex problem that affects groundwater aquifers and agricultural lands in the semiarid regions. Remote sensing and spectroscopy database systems provide accuracy for salinity autodetection and dynamical delineation. Salinity detection techniques using polychromatic wavebands by field geocomputation and experimental data are time consuming and expensive. This paper presents an automated spectral detection and identification of salt minerals using a monochromatic waveband concept from multispectral bands-Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS) and spectroscopy United States Geological Survey database. For detecting mineral salts related to electrolytes, such as electronical and vibrational transitions, an integrated approach of salinity detection related to the optical monochromatic concept has been addressed. The purpose of this paper is to discriminate waveband intrinsic spectral similarity using the Beer-Lambert and Van 't Hoff laws for spectral curve extraction such as transmittance, reflectance, absorbance, land surface temperature, molar concentration, and osmotic pressure. These parameters are primordial for hydrodynamic salinity modeling and continuity identification using chemical and physical approaches. The established regression fitted models have been addressed for salt spectroscopy validation for suitable calibration and validation. Furthermore, our analytical tool is conducted for better decision interface using spectral salinity detection and identification in the Oran watershed, Algeria.

  1. Base of moderately saline ground water in San Juan County, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, L.

    1990-01-01

    The base of moderately saline groundwater was delineated for San Juan County, Utah, based on water-quality data and formation-water resistivity determined from geophysical well logs using the resistivity-porosity, spontaneous-potential, and resistivity-ratio methods. These data and the contour map developed from them show that a thick layer of very saline to briny groundwater underlies the eastern two-thirds of San Juan County. The upper surface of this layer is affected by the geologic structure of the area, is affected by the geologic structure of the area, but it may be modified locally by recharge mounds of less saline water and by vertical leakage of water through transmissive faults and fractures. The highest altitude of the base of moderately saline water is west of the Abajo Mountains where it is more than 6,500 ft above sea level. The lowest altitude is in the western part of the county and is below sea level; depressions in the base of moderately saline water in recharge areas in the La Sal and Abajo Mountains also may be that low. The base of moderately saline water commonly is in the Permian Cutler Formation or the Pennsylvanian Honaker Trail Formation of the Hermosa Group, but locally may be as high stratigraphically as the Triassic and Jurassic Navajo Sandstone north of the Abajo Mountains and in the Jurassic Morrison Formation south of the mountains

  2. Improved classification of soil salinity by decision tree on remotely sensed images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ping; Chen, Shengbo; Sun, Ke

    2006-01-01

    Soil Salinity, caused by natural or human-induced processes, is not only a major cause of soil degradation but also a major environmental hazard all over the world. This results in increasing impact on crop yields and agricultural production in both dry and irrigated areas due to poor land and water management. Multi-temporal optical and microwave remote sensing can significantly contribute to detecting spatial-temporal changes of salt-related surface features. The study area is located in the west of Jilin Province, Northeast China, which is one of most important saline-alkalized areas in semi-arid and arid area in North China. Decision tree classifiers are used to improve the classification of soil salinity on Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images in later autumn of 1996. The Kauth-Thomas (K-T) transformation was performed after TM image preprocessing including image registration, mosaic and resizing for the study area. Then the first component of KT transformation, TM 6 imagery (thermal infrared imagery), and NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) from TM 4 and TM 3 images, were density-sliced respectively to establish suitable feature classes of soil salinity as the decision nodes. Thus, the classification of soil salinity was improved using decision trees based on these feature classes. Compared with the conventional maximum likelihood classification, this method is more effective to distinguish soil salinity from mixed residential and sand areas in the west of Jilin Province, China.

  3. Dietary flexibility in three representative waterbirds across salinity and depth gradients in salt ponds of San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, John Y.; Miles, A.K.; Tsao-Melcer, D. C.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Fregien, S.; Athearn, N.D.

    2009-01-01

    Salt evaporation ponds have existed in San Francisco Bay, California, for more than a century. In the past decade, most of the salt ponds have been retired from production and purchased for resource conservation with a focus on tidal marsh restoration. However, large numbers of waterbirds are found in salt ponds, especially during migration and wintering periods. The value of these hypersaline wetlands for waterbirds is not well understood, including how different avian foraging guilds use invertebrate prey resources at different salinities and depths. The aim of this study was to investigate the dietary flexibility of waterbirds by examining the population number and diet of three feeding guilds across a salinity and depth gradient in former salt ponds of the Napa-Sonoma Marshes. Although total invertebrate biomass and species richness were greater in low than high salinity salt ponds, waterbirds fed in ponds that ranged from low (20 g l-1) to very high salinities (250 g l -1). American avocets (surface sweeper) foraged in shallow areas at pond edges and consumed a wide range of prey types (8) including seeds at low salinity, but preferred brine flies at mid salinity (40-80 g l-1). Western sandpipers (prober) focused on exposed edges and shoal habitats and consumed only a few prey types (2-4) at both low and mid salinities. Suitable depths for foraging were greatest for ruddy ducks (diving benthivore) that consumed a wide variety of invertebrate taxa (5) at low salinity, but focused on fewer prey (3) at mid salinity. We found few brine shrimp, common in higher salinity waters, in the digestive tracts of any of these species. Dietary flexibility allows different guilds to use ponds across a range of salinities, but their foraging extent is limited by available water depths. ?? 2009 USGS, US Government.

  4. Dwarf cashew growth irrigated with saline waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Orlando Carvallo Guerra

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The cashew production is one of the most important agricultural activities from the social-economical viewpoint for the North East of Brazil; besides to produce a great deal of hand labor, it is very important as an exporting commodity. The inadequate use of irrigation in the semi arid regions of the North East of Brazil has induced soil salinization and consequently problems for the irrigated agriculture. In spite of this, few works have been conducted to study the effect of saline stress on the growth and development of the cashew. Because of the lack of information for this crop, an experiment was conducted to study the effect of salinity stress on the phytomass production and nutrient accumulation on the different organs of the precocious dwarf cashew (Anacardium occidentale L. clone CCP76. The study was conducted under controlled conditions using as statistical scheme a randomized block design factorial with six replicates. Five salinity treatments were considered for the irrigation water (electrical conductivities of 0.8, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2 and 4.0 dS m-1 at 25oC. The increasing in salinity of the irrigation water reduced the phytomass at different organs of the studied plant. The nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, chloride and sodium in the plant varied with the salinity of the irrigation water according with the part of the plant analyzed; in some parts increased, in others decreased, in others increased initially and decreased afterwards, and finally, in other part of the plant the salinity of the irrigation water did not affect the nutrient concentration.

  5. The effects of salinity in the soil water balance: A Budyko's approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, S.; Viola, F.; Molini, A.

    2017-12-01

    Soil degradation and water scarcity pose important constraints on productivity and development of arid and semi-arid countries. Among the main causes of loss of soil fertility, aridification and soil salinization are deeply connected threats enhanced by climate change. Assessing water availability is fundamental for a large number of applications especially in arid regions. An approach often adopted to estimate the long-term rainfall partitioning into evapotranspiration and runoff is the Budyko's curve. However, the classical Budyko framework might not be able to properly reproduce the water balance in salt affected basins, especially under elevated soil salinization conditions. Salinity is a limiting factor for plant transpiration (as well as growth) affecting both short and long term soil moisture dynamics and ultimately the hydrologic balance. Soluble salts cause a reduction of soil water potential similar to the one arising from droughts, although plant adaptations to soil salinity show extremely different traits and can vary from species to species. In a similar context, the salt-tolerance plants are expected to control the amount of soil moisture lost to transpiration in saline soils, also because salinity reduces evaporation. We propose a simple framework to include the effects of salinization on the surface energy and water balance within a simple Budyko approach. By introducing the effects of salinity in the stochastic water balance we are able to include the influence of vegetation type (i.e. in terms of salt-tolerance) on evapotranspiration-runoff partitioning under different climatic conditions. The water balance components are thus compared to data obtained from arid salt-affected regions.

  6. Hyperspectral Imaging to Evaluate the Effect of IrrigationWater Salinity in Lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Lara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is one of the most important stress factors in crop production, particularly in arid regions. This research focuses on the effect of salinity on the growth of lettuce plants; three solutions with different levels of salinity were considered and compared (S1 = 50, S2 = 100 and S3 = 150 mM NaCl with a control solution (Ct = 0 mM NaCl. The osmotic potential and water content of the leaves were measured, and hyperspectral images of the surfaces of 40 leaves (10 leaves per treatment were taken after two weeks of growth. The mean spectra of the leaves (n = 32,000 were pre-processed by means of a Savitzky–Golay algorithm and standard normal variate normalization. Principal component analysis was then performed on a calibration set of 28 mean spectra, yielding an initial model for salinity effect detection. A second model was subsequently proposed based on an index computing an approximation to the second derivative at the red edge region. Both models were applied to all the hyperspectral images to obtain the corresponding artificial images, distinguishing between the 28 that were used to extract the calibration mean spectra and the rest that constituted an external validation. Those virtual images were studied using analysis of variance in order to compare their ability for detecting salinity effects on the leaves. Both models showed significant differences between each salinity level, and the hyperspectral images allowed observations of the distribution of the salinity effects on the leaf surfaces, which were more intense in the areas distant from the veins. However, the index-based model is simpler and easier to apply because it is based solely on the reflectance at three different wavelengths, thus allowing for the implementation of less expensive multispectral devices.

  7. Cl/Br ratios and chlorine isotope evidences for groundwater salinization and its impact on groundwater arsenic, fluoride and iodine enrichment in the Datong basin, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junxia; Wang, Yanxin, E-mail: yx.wang@cug.edu.cn; Xie, Xianjun

    2016-02-15

    In order to identify the salinization processes and its impact on arsenic, fluoride and iodine enrichment in groundwater, hydrogeochemical and environmental isotope studies have been conducted on groundwater from the Datong basin, China. The total dissolved solid (TDS) concentrations in groundwater ranged from 451 to 8250 mg/L, and 41% of all samples were identified as moderately saline groundwater with TDS of 3000–10,000 mg/L. The results of groundwater Cl concentrations, Cl/Br molar ratio and Cl isotope composition suggest that three processes including water-rock interaction, surface saline soil flushing, and evapotranspiration result in the groundwater salinization in the study area. The relatively higher Cl/Br molar ratio in groundwater from multiple screening wells indicates the contribution of halite dissolution from saline soil flushed by vertical infiltration to the groundwater salinization. However, the results of groundwater Cl/Br molar ratio model indicate that the effect of saline soil flushing practice is limited to account for the observed salinity variation in groundwater. The plots of groundwater Cl vs. Cl/Br molar ratio, and Cl vs δ{sup 37}Cl perform the dominant effects of evapotranspiration on groundwater salinization. Inverse geochemical modeling results show that evapotranspiration may cause approximately 66% loss of shallow groundwater to account for the observed hydrochemical pattern. Due to the redox condition fluctuation induced by irrigation activities and evapotranspiration, groundwater salinization processes have negative effects on groundwater arsenic enrichment. For groundwater iodine and fluoride enrichment, evapotranspiration partly accounts for their elevation in slightly saline water. However, too strong evapotranspiration would restrict groundwater fluoride concentration due to the limitation of fluorite solubility. - Highlights: • Natural high arsenic, fluoride and iodine groundwater co-occur with saline water.

  8. Effects of the Ionosphere on Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Ocean Salinity from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, D. M.; Abaham, Saji; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Among the remote sensing applications currently being considered from space is the measurement of sea surface salinity. The salinity of the open ocean is important for understanding ocean circulation and for modeling energy exchange with the atmosphere. Passive microwave remote sensors operating near 1.4 GHz (L-band) could provide data needed to fill the gap in current coverage and to complement in situ arrays being planned to provide subsurface profiles in the future. However, the dynamic range of the salinity signal in the open ocean is relatively small and propagation effects along the path from surface to sensor must be taken into account. In particular, Faraday rotation and even attenuation/emission in the ionosphere can be important sources of error. The purpose or this work is to estimate the magnitude of these effects in the context of a future remote sensing system in space to measure salinity in L-band. Data will be presented as a function of time location and solar activity using IRI-95 to model the ionosphere. The ionosphere presents two potential sources of error for the measurement of salinity: Rotation of the polarization vector (Faraday rotation) and attenuation/emission. Estimates of the effect of these two phenomena on passive remote sensing over the oceans at L-band (1.4 GHz) are presented.

  9. Effect of Saline Solution on the Electrical Response of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes-Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammad Younes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of saline solution on the electrical resistance of single wall carbon nanotubes-epoxy nanocomposites have been investigated experimentally. Ultrasonic assisted fabricated 1.0% and 0.5 W/W% SWCNTs epoxy nanocomposites are integrated into a Kelvin structure by smear cast the nanocomposites on a glass wafer. Four metal pads are deposited on the nanocomposites using the beam evaporator and wires are tethered using soldering. The effect of saline solution on the electrical resistance of the nanocomposites is studied by adding drop of saline solution to the surface of the fabricated nanocomposites and measuring electrical resistance. Moreover, the nanocomposites are soaked completely into 3 wt.% saline solution and real-time measurement of the electrical resistance is conducted. It is found that a drop of saline solution on the surface of the nanocomposites film increases the resistance by 50%. Furthermore, the real-time measurement reveals a 40% increase in the resistance of the nanocomposites film. More importantly, the nanocomposites are successfully reset by soaking in DI water for four hours. This study may open the door for using SWCNTs epoxy nanocomposites as scale sensors in oil and gas industry.

  10. Episodic Salinization of Urban Rivers: Potential Impacts on Carbon, Cation, and Nutrient Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, S.; Kaushal, S.

    2017-12-01

    Human dominated watersheds are subjected to an array of salt inputs (e.g. road salts), and in urban areas, infrastructure and impervious surfaces quickly drain applied road salts into the river channel. As a result, many streams experience episodic salinization over the course of hours to days following a snow event (e.g. road salt pulse), and long-term salinization over the course of seasons to decades. Salinization of streams can release contaminants (e.g. heavy metals), reduce biodiversity, and degrade drinking water quality. We investigated the water quality effects of episodic salinization in urban streams. Sediment and streamwater were incubated from twelve sites in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area under a range of sodium chloride treatments in a lab environment to mimic a vertical stream column with a sediment-water interface undergoing episodic salinization, and to characterize relationships between experimental salinization and nutrient/cation fluxes. Eight sites (Baltimore) exhibit a land use gradient and are routinely monitored within the Baltimore Ecosystem Study LTER project, and four sites (Washington DC) are suburban and offer a contrasting lithology and physiographic province. Our research suggests that salinization can mobilize total dissolved nitrogen, soluble reactive phosphorous, and base cations; potentially due to coupled biotic-abiotic processes, such as ion exchange, rapid nitrification, pH changes, and chloride-organic matter dispersal. The impact of salinization on dissolved inorganic and organic carbon varied between sites, potentially due to sediment composition, organic matter content, and ambient water quality. We contrasted the experimental results with measurements of salinization (specific conductance) and nutrients (nitrate) from real-time sensors operated by the US Geological Survey that encompass the same watersheds as our experimental sites. Sensor data was analyzed to provide insight on the timescales of salinity

  11. On the occurrence of high salinity waters off the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sasamal, S.K.

    Some high salinity waters (35 x 10 super(3)) are observed in the surface layer of the western Bay of Bengal during northeast monsoon and in subsurface layer during southwest monsoon. These values are discussed on the basis of prevaling climaitc...

  12. L-Band Radiometers Measuring Salinity From Space: Atmospheric Propagation Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Hofman-Bang, Dorthe

    2005-01-01

    Microwave radiometers can measure sea surface salinity from space using L-band frequencies around 1.4 GHz. However, requirements to the accuracy of the measurements, in order to be satisfactory for the user, are so stringent that the influence of the intervening atmosphere cannot be neglected...

  13. Collection of High Energy Yielding Strains of Saline Microalgae from Southwestern States: Final Report Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommerfield, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Approximately 1,400 individual isolates of microalgae were obtained from surface waters in the Southwest. Of the initial 23 algae screened for growth characteristics, the majority grew best at the lower salinities in both SERI Type I and Type II Media. Growth rates for selected strains approached three doublings per day.

  14. Hydrochemical and physical processes influencing salinization and freshening in Mediterranean low-lying coastal environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollema, P.N.; Antonelli, M.; Dinelli, E.; Gabbianelli, G.; Greggio, N.; Stuijfzand, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    Ground- and surface water chemistry and stable isotope data from the coastal zone near Ravenna (Italy) have been examined to determine the geochemical conditions and processes that occur and their implications for fresh water availability in the various brackish/saline coastal environments. Fresh

  15. Salinity changes in the Agulhas leakage area recorded by stable hydrogen isotopes of C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasper, S.; van der Meer, M.T.J.; Mets, A.; Zahn, R.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.

    2014-01-01

    At the southern tip of Africa, the Agulhas Current reflects back into the Indian Ocean causing so-called "Agulhas rings" to spin off and release relatively warm and saline water into the South Atlantic Ocean. Previous reconstructions of the dynamics of the Agulhas Current, based on paleo-sea surface

  16. δ18O and salinity variability from the last glacial maximum to recent in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sijinkumar, A.V.; Clemens, S.; Nath, B.N.; Prella, W.; Benshila, Rachid; Lengaigne, M.

    spanning 20°N to 5°N. Combined with temperature estimates and the observed seawater μ18O-salinity relationship, these data are used to estimate past changes in BoB salinity structure. Compared to modern, mid-Holocene (9–6 cal ka BP) surface...

  17. Temporal variations of groundwater salinity and temperature in a tidal flat in front of a tide pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashita, Shinya; Hibino, Tadashi; Komai, Katsuaki; Narong, Touch

    2016-07-01

    A tidal flat in an estuary is a complex hydrological system, which is characterized by interactions between surface water in river and groundwater and is particularly driven by tides. Small-scale variability in the discharge or inflow could lead to variable results of surface groundwater salinity and temperature. In particular, there is a high possibility that a hydraulic head difference due to the presence of a tide pool, lagoon, or seep would cause the generation of small-scale spatial submarine groundwater discharge. This study investigates the spatio-temporal variations in surface groundwater salinity and temperature (0-50 cm depth) and the groundwater table in a tidal flat in the presence and absence of a tide pool. A tide pool formed in the Ota River diversion channel at the study observation site following the construction of a masonry revetment in the intertidal zone. We established observation sites at three locations to consider the effects of the presence or absence of a tide pool. Specifically, we measured the surface water in river and groundwater salinity, temperature, and level in the presence and absence of a tide pool in 2007 and 2009. Reviewing the past data based on these results, we found the characteristic variation of groundwater salinity around the tide pool during flood event in 2004. Groundwater salinity and temperature were directly measured by setting conductivity-temperature meters in the tidal flat. We conclude that the groundwater table in the presence of the tide pool was 20 cm higher than in areas where no tide pool existed. The temporal variation of groundwater salinity in the presence of the tide pool was 5 psu lower than those where a tide pool was absent. Moreover, we confirmed the increase in groundwater salinity up to 8 psu in the tidal flat during flood, when river water salinity was at 0 psu and groundwater salinity in the tide pool was at 10 psu. We consider that the high groundwater table, the low salinity, and the increase

  18. Freshwater salinization syndrome on a continental scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Sujay S; Likens, Gene E; Pace, Michael L; Utz, Ryan M; Haq, Shahan; Gorman, Julia; Grese, Melissa

    2018-01-23

    Salt pollution and human-accelerated weathering are shifting the chemical composition of major ions in fresh water and increasing salinization and alkalinization across North America. We propose a concept, the freshwater salinization syndrome, which links salinization and alkalinization processes. This syndrome manifests as concurrent trends in specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, and base cations. Although individual trends can vary in strength, changes in salinization and alkalinization have affected 37% and 90%, respectively, of the drainage area of the contiguous United States over the past century. Across 232 United States Geological Survey (USGS) monitoring sites, 66% of stream and river sites showed a statistical increase in pH, which often began decades before acid rain regulations. The syndrome is most prominent in the densely populated eastern and midwestern United States, where salinity and alkalinity have increased most rapidly. The syndrome is caused by salt pollution (e.g., road deicers, irrigation runoff, sewage, potash), accelerated weathering and soil cation exchange, mining and resource extraction, and the presence of easily weathered minerals used in agriculture (lime) and urbanization (concrete). Increasing salts with strong bases and carbonates elevate acid neutralizing capacity and pH, and increasing sodium from salt pollution eventually displaces base cations on soil exchange sites, which further increases pH and alkalinization. Symptoms of the syndrome can include: infrastructure corrosion, contaminant mobilization, and variations in coastal ocean acidification caused by increasingly alkaline river inputs. Unless regulated and managed, the freshwater salinization syndrome can have significant impacts on ecosystem services such as safe drinking water, contaminant retention, and biodiversity. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  19. Freshwater salinization syndrome on a continental scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likens, Gene E.; Pace, Michael L.; Utz, Ryan M.; Haq, Shahan; Gorman, Julia; Grese, Melissa

    2018-01-01

    Salt pollution and human-accelerated weathering are shifting the chemical composition of major ions in fresh water and increasing salinization and alkalinization across North America. We propose a concept, the freshwater salinization syndrome, which links salinization and alkalinization processes. This syndrome manifests as concurrent trends in specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, and base cations. Although individual trends can vary in strength, changes in salinization and alkalinization have affected 37% and 90%, respectively, of the drainage area of the contiguous United States over the past century. Across 232 United States Geological Survey (USGS) monitoring sites, 66% of stream and river sites showed a statistical increase in pH, which often began decades before acid rain regulations. The syndrome is most prominent in the densely populated eastern and midwestern United States, where salinity and alkalinity have increased most rapidly. The syndrome is caused by salt pollution (e.g., road deicers, irrigation runoff, sewage, potash), accelerated weathering and soil cation exchange, mining and resource extraction, and the presence of easily weathered minerals used in agriculture (lime) and urbanization (concrete). Increasing salts with strong bases and carbonates elevate acid neutralizing capacity and pH, and increasing sodium from salt pollution eventually displaces base cations on soil exchange sites, which further increases pH and alkalinization. Symptoms of the syndrome can include: infrastructure corrosion, contaminant mobilization, and variations in coastal ocean acidification caused by increasingly alkaline river inputs. Unless regulated and managed, the freshwater salinization syndrome can have significant impacts on ecosystem services such as safe drinking water, contaminant retention, and biodiversity. PMID:29311318

  20. Soil Salinity: Effect on Vegetable Crop Growth. Management Practices to Prevent and Mitigate Soil Salinization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Manuel Almeida Machado

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is a major problem affecting crop production all over the world: 20% of cultivated land in the world, and 33% of irrigated land, are salt-affected and degraded. This process can be accentuated by climate change, excessive use of groundwater (mainly if close to the sea, increasing use of low-quality water in irrigation, and massive introduction of irrigation associated with intensive farming. Excessive soil salinity reduces the productivity of many agricultural crops, including most vegetables, which are particularly sensitive throughout the ontogeny of the plant. The salinity threshold (ECt of the majority of vegetable crops is low (ranging from 1 to 2.5 dS m−1 in saturated soil extracts and vegetable salt tolerance decreases when saline water is used for irrigation. The objective of this review is to discuss the effects of salinity on vegetable growth and how management practices (irrigation, drainage, and fertilization can prevent soil and water salinization and mitigate the adverse effects of salinity.

  1. A groundwater salinity hotspot and its connection to an intermittent stream identified by environmental tracers (Mt Lofty Ranges, South Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas A.; Bestland, Erick A.; Soloninka, Lesja; Wallis, Ilka; Banks, Edward W.; Pichler, Markus

    2017-12-01

    High and variable levels of salinity were investigated in an intermittent stream in a high-rainfall area (˜800 mm/year) of the Mt. Lofty Ranges of South Australia. The groundwater system was found to have a local, upslope saline lens, referred to here as a groundwater salinity `hotspot'. Environmental tracer analyses (δ18O, δ2H, 87/86Sr, and major elements) of water from the intermittent stream, a nearby permanent stream, shallow and deep groundwater, and soil-water/runoff demonstrate seasonal groundwater input of very saline composition into the intermittent stream. This input results in large salinity increases of the stream water because the winter wet-season stream flow decreases during spring in this Mediterranean climate. Furthermore, strontium and water isotope analyses demonstrate: (1) the upslope-saline-groundwater zone (hotspot) mixes with the dominant groundwater system, (2) the intermittent-stream water is a mixture of soil-water/runoff and the upslope saline groundwater, and (3) the upslope-saline-groundwater zone results from the flushing of unsaturated-zone salts from the thick clayey regolith and soil which overlie the metamorphosed shale bedrock. The preferred theory on the origin of the upslope-saline-groundwater hotspot is land clearing of native deep-rooted woodland, followed by flushing of accumulated salts from the unsaturated zone due to increased recharge. This cause of elevated groundwater and surface-water salinity, if correct, could be widespread in Mt. Lofty Ranges areas, as well as other climatically and geologically similar areas with comparable hydrogeologic conditions.

  2. Soil Porewater Salinity Response to Sea-level Rise in Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands: A Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, C. L.; Wang, H.; Krauss, K.; Conrads, P. A.; Swarzenski, C.; Duberstein, J. A.; DeAngelis, D.

    2017-12-01

    There is a growing concern about the adverse effects of salt water intrusion via tidal rivers and creeks into tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFWs) due to rising sea levels and reduction of freshwater flow. The distribution and composition of plant species, vegetation productivity, and biogeochemical functions including carbon sequestration capacity and flux rates in TFFWs have been found to be affected by increasing river and soil porewater salinities, with significant shifts occurring at a porewater salinity threshold of 3 PSU. However, the drivers of soil porewater salinity, which impact the health and ecological functions of TFFWs remains unclear, limiting our capability of predicting the future impacts of saltwater intrusion on ecosystem services provided by TFFWs. In this study, we developed a soil porewater salinity model for TFFWs based on an existing salt and water balance model with modifications to several key features such as the feedback mechanisms of soil salinity on evapotranspiration reduction and hydraulic conductivity. We selected sites along the floodplains of two rivers, the Waccamaw River (SC, USA) and the Savannah River (GA and SC, USA) that represent landscape salinity gradients of both surface water and soil porewater from tidal influence of the Atlantic Ocean. These sites represent healthy, moderately and highly salt-impacted forests, and oligohaline marshes. The soil porewater salinity model was calibrated and validated using field data collected at these sites throughout 2008-2016. The model results agreed well with field measurements. Analyses of the preliminary simulation results indicate that the magnitude, seasonal and annual variability, and duration of threshold salinities (e.g., 3 PSU) tend to vary significantly with vegetation status and type (i.e., healthy, degraded forests, and oligohaline marshes), especially during drought conditions. The soil porewater salinity model could be coupled with a wetland soil biogeochemistry

  3. Increase of urban lake salinity by road deicing salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, Eric V.; Murphy, Dan; Stefan, Heinz G.

    2008-01-01

    Over 317,000 tonnes of road salt (NaCl) are applied annually for road deicing in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area (TCMA) of Minnesota. Although road salt is applied to increase driving safety, this practice influences environmental water quality. Thirteen lakes in the TCMA were studied over 46 months to determine if and how they respond to the seasonal applications of road salt. Sodium and chloride concentrations in these lakes were 10 and 25 times higher, respectively, than in other non-urban lakes in the region. Seasonal salinity/chloride cycles in the lakes were correlated with road salt applications: High concentrations in the winter and spring, especially near the bottom of the lakes, were followed by lower concentrations in the summer and fall due to flushing of the lakes by rainfall runoff. The seasonal salt storage/flushing rates for individual lakes were derived from volume-weighted average chloride concentration time series. The rate ranged from 9 to 55% of a lake's minimum salt content. In some of the lakes studied salt concentrations were high enough to stop spring turnover preventing oxygen from reaching the benthic sediments. Concentrations above the sediments were also high enough to induce convective mixing of the saline water into the sediment pore water. A regional analysis of historical water quality records of 38 lakes in the TCMA showed increases in lake salinity from 1984 to 2005 that were highly correlated with the amount of rock salt purchased by the State of Minnesota. Chloride concentrations in individual lakes were positively correlated with the percent of impervious surfaces in the watershed and inversely with lake volume. Taken together, the results show a continuing degradation of the water quality of urban lakes due to application of NaCl in their watersheds

  4. Saline agriculture: A technology for economic utilization and improvement of saline environments (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, Z.; Malik, K.A.; Khurshid, S.J.; Awan, A.R.; Akram, M.; Hashmi, Z.; Ali, Y.; Gulnaz, A.; Hussain, M.; Hussain, F.

    2005-01-01

    The salinity problem is one of the severe constraints for agriculture in Pakistan. In a socio-economic and salinity and drainage survey over an area of about 25000 acres of salt-affected land recently, crop production is found to be very low. Livestock is underfed and malnourished. Pakistan has spent and allocated over one billion US dollars on Salinity Control and Reclamation Projects (SCARP), of course, with dubious results. Over the years, a Saline Agriculture Technology has been developed as a cheap alternative at NIAB for comfortably living with salinity and to profitably utilize saline land rather than its reclamation. The soil improvement is a fringe benefit in this approach. The Saline Agriculture Technology has been tested at laboratory level, at field stations and at farms of some progressive farmers. Now we are sharing this technology with farming communities through a 'Saline Agriculture Farmer Participatory Development Project in Pakistan', with assistance from the National Rural Support Programme. The new project has been launched simultaneously in all four provinces of Pakistan on 25000 acres of salt-affected land. Under this project seeds of salt tolerant crop varieties wheat, cotton, rice, castor, brassica and barley and saplings of trees/shrubs, e.g. Acacia ampliceps, A. nilotica, Casuarina glauca, ber, jaman, etc selected for development work in various institutions of Pakistan are being provided to farmers. Know-how on new irrigation techniques like bed-and-corrugation and bed-and-furrow, agronomic practices like laser land leveling, planting on beds and in auger holes and soil/water amendment practices (use of gypsum and mineral acids) are being shared with farmers. These interventions are quite efficient, save water up to 40% and enable farmers to utilize bad quality water. In general, farmers are being familiarized with prevalent animal diseases, nutritional problems and prophylactic techniques. They are being helped in developing Saline

  5. Cuticle hydrocarbons in saline aquatic beetles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Botella-Cruz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbons are the principal component of insect cuticle and play an important role in maintaining water balance. Cuticular impermeability could be an adaptative response to salinity and desiccation in aquatic insects; however, cuticular hydrocarbons have been poorly explored in this group and there are no previous data on saline species. We characterized cuticular hydrocarbons of adults and larvae of two saline aquatic beetles, namely Nebrioporus baeticus (Dytiscidae and Enochrus jesusarribasi (Hydrophilidae, using a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. The CHC profile of adults of both species, characterized by a high abundance of branched alkanes and low of unsaturated alkenes, seems to be more similar to that of some terrestrial beetles (e.g., desert Tenebrionidae compared with other aquatic Coleoptera (freshwater Dytiscidae. Adults of E. jesusarribasi had longer chain compounds than N. baeticus, in agreement with their higher resistance to salinity and desiccation. The more permeable cuticle of larvae was characterized by a lower diversity in compounds, shorter carbon chain length and a higher proportion of unsaturated hydrocarbons compared with that of the adults. These results suggest that osmotic stress on aquatic insects could exert a selection pressure on CHC profile similar to aridity in terrestrial species.

  6. Paratethys response to the Messinian salinity crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baak, Christiaan G.C.; Krijgsman, Wout; Magyar, Imre; Sztanó, Orsolya; Golovina, Larisa A.; Grothe, Arjen; Hoyle, Thomas M.; Mandic, Oleg; Patina, Irina S.; Popov, Sergey V.; Radionova, Eleonora P.; Stoica, Marius; Vasiliev, Iuliana

    2017-01-01

    The Black Sea and Caspian Sea are the present-day remnants of a much larger epicontinental sea on the Eurasian continental interior, the Paratethys. During the late Miocene Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC), a unique oceanographic event where 10% of the salt in the world's ocean got deposited in the

  7. Salinity transfer in bounded double diffusive convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Yantao; van der Poel, Erwin; Ostilla Monico, Rodolfo; Sun, Chao; Verzicco, Roberto; Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    The double diffusive convection between two parallel plates is numerically studied for a series of parameters. The flow is driven by the salinity difference and stabilised by the thermal field. Our simulations are directly compared with experiments by Hage & Tilgner (Phys. Fluids, vol. 22, 2010,

  8. Empirical Relationships Between Electrical Conductivity, Salinity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This means that some level of desalination/treatment for the water before consumption would be necessary. On the other hand, the values obtained for Abraka, Ughelli, Oleh and Ozoro fall within the WHO maximum permissible limit for fresh drinking water. KEY WORDS: Electrical Conductivity, Salinity, Density, pH, Water ...

  9. Hydrogeochemical evolution and potability evaluation of saline ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Potability analysis of the samples is sugges- tive of widespread unsuitability for domestic, agriculture and industrial uses. The extensive occurrence of salinity hazards, sodium hazards and magnesium hazards across the terrain makes the groundwater unsafe for domestic and agricultural utilization while industrial potability ...

  10. (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench) UNDER SALINE STRESS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    H. Rahim Guealia

    1 sept. 2017 ... treatments of NaCl (Control, 100 mM and 300 mM) for 7 days, on young okra plants. (Abelmoschus esculentus), grown in two types of substrate with bentonite (B) 7% and without bentonite (WB) under controlled greenhouse conditions. The results showed that the two factors (salinity and bentonite) imposed ...

  11. About uncertainties in practical salinity calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Le Menn

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current state of the art, salinity is a quantity computed from conductivity ratio measurements, with temperature and pressure known at the time of the measurement, and using the Practical Salinity Scale algorithm of 1978 (PSS-78. This calculation gives practical salinity values S. The uncertainty expected in PSS-78 values is ±0.002, but no details have ever been given on the method used to work out this uncertainty, and the error sources to include in this calculation. Following a guide published by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM, using two independent methods, this paper assesses the uncertainties of salinity values obtained from a laboratory salinometer and Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD measurements after laboratory calibration of a conductivity cell. The results show that the part due to the PSS-78 relations fits is sometimes as significant as the instrument's. This is particularly the case with CTD measurements where correlations between variables contribute mainly to decreasing the uncertainty of S, even when expanded uncertainties of conductivity cell calibrations are for the most part in the order of 0.002 mS cm−1. The relations given here, and obtained with the normalized GUM method, allow a real analysis of the uncertainties' sources and they can be used in a more general way, with instruments having different specifications.

  12. Routine saline infusion sonohysterography prior to assisted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    53.85%), 8 (30.77%) and 4 (15.38%) respectively. The average duration of the procedure was 6 minutes with a range of 4-9 minutes. Saline infusion sonohysterography is a reliable, cost effective and safe diagnostic tool in the evaluation of the ...

  13. Hydrologic factors controlling groundwater salinity in northwestern

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aim of this article is to assess the main factors influencing salinity of groundwater in the coastal area between El Dabaa and Sidi Barani, Egypt. The types and ages of the main aquifers in this area are the fractured limestone of Middle Miocene, the calcareous sandstone of Pliocene and the Oolitic Limestone of ...

  14. Estimation of salinity power potential in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Das, V.K.; RamaRaju, D.V.

    at the estuaries where freshwater flows into the sea or wherever sources of different salinities exist. In India, the total freshwater discharge from rivers and streams flowing into the seas around amounts to about 23 x 103 m3/sec which could provide a power...

  15. Decline of the world's saline lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtsbaugh, Wayne A.; Miller, Craig; Null, Sarah E.; Derose, R. Justin; Wilcock, Peter; Hahnenberger, Maura; Howe, Frank; Moore, Johnnie

    2017-11-01

    Many of the world's saline lakes are shrinking at alarming rates, reducing waterbird habitat and economic benefits while threatening human health. Saline lakes are long-term basin-wide integrators of climatic conditions that shrink and grow with natural climatic variation. In contrast, water withdrawals for human use exert a sustained reduction in lake inflows and levels. Quantifying the relative contributions of natural variability and human impacts to lake inflows is needed to preserve these lakes. With a credible water balance, causes of lake decline from water diversions or climate variability can be identified and the inflow needed to maintain lake health can be defined. Without a water balance, natural variability can be an excuse for inaction. Here we describe the decline of several of the world's large saline lakes and use a water balance for Great Salt Lake (USA) to demonstrate that consumptive water use rather than long-term climate change has greatly reduced its size. The inflow needed to maintain bird habitat, support lake-related industries and prevent dust storms that threaten human health and agriculture can be identified and provides the information to evaluate the difficult tradeoffs between direct benefits of consumptive water use and ecosystem services provided by saline lakes.

  16. CROP DENSITY AND IRRIGATION WITH SALINE WATER

    OpenAIRE

    Feinerman, Eli

    1983-01-01

    The economic implications of plant density for irrigation water use under saline conditions are investigated, utilizing the involved physical and biological relationships. The analysis considers a single crop and is applied to cotton data. The results suggest that treating plant density as an endogenous control variable has substantial impact on profits and the optimal quantities and qualities of the applied irrigation water.

  17. Two Fixed Ratio Dilutions for Soil Salinity Monitoring in Hypersaline Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Juan; Weindorf, David C.; Castañeda, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Highly soluble salts are undesirable in agriculture because they reduce yields or the quality of most cash crops and can leak to surface or sub-surface waters. In some cases salinity can be associated with unique history, rarity, or special habitats protected by environmental laws. Yet in considering the measurement of soil salinity for long-term monitoring purposes, adequate methods are required. Both saturated paste extracts, intended for agriculture, and direct surface and/or porewater salinity measurement, used in inundated wetlands, are unsuited for hypersaline wetlands that often are only occasionally inundated. For these cases, we propose the use of 1:5 soil/water (weight/weight) extracts as the standard for expressing the electrical conductivity (EC) of such soils and for further salt determinations. We also propose checking for ion-pairing with a 1:10 or more diluted extract in hypersaline soils. As an illustration, we apply the two-dilutions approach to a set of 359 soil samples from saline wetlands ranging in ECe from 2.3 dS m-1 to 183.0 dS m-1. This easy procedure will be useful in survey campaigns and in the monitoring of soil salt content. PMID:26001130

  18. Irrigation salinity hazard assessment and risk mapping in the lower Macintyre Valley, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingyi; Prochazka, Melissa J; Triantafilis, John

    2016-05-01

    In the Murray-Darling Basin of Australia, secondary soil salinization occurs due to excessive deep drainage and the presence of shallow saline water tables. In order to understand the cause and best management, soil and vadose zone information is necessary. This type of information has been generated in the Toobeah district but owing to the state border an inconsistent methodology was used. This has led to much confusion from stakeholders who are unable to understand the ambiguity of the results in terms of final overall risk of salinization. In this research, a digital soil mapping method that employs various ancillary data is presented. Firstly, an electromagnetic induction survey using a Geonics EM34 and EM38 was used to characterise soil and vadose zone stratigraphy. From the apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) collected, soil sampling locations were selected and with laboratory analysis carried out to determine average (2-12m) clay and EC of a saturated soil-paste extract (ECe). EM34 ECa, land surface parameters derived from a digital elevation model and measured soil data were used to establish multiple linear regression models, which allowed for mapping of various hazard factors, including clay and ECe. EM38 ECa data were calibrated to deep drainage obtained from Salt and Leaching Fraction (SaLF) modelling of soil data. Expert knowledge and indicator kriging were used to determine critical values where the salinity hazard factors were likely to contribute to a shallow saline water table (i.e., clay ≤35%; ECe>2.5dS/m, and deep drainage >100mm/year). This information was combined to produce an overall salinity risk map for the Toobeah district using indicator kriging. The risk map shows potential salinization areas and where detailed information is required and where targeted research can be conducted to monitor soil conditions and water table heights and determine best management strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Modelling of seasonal and long-term trends in lake salinity in southwestern Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yihdego, Yohannes; Webb, John

    2012-12-15

    In southwestern Victoria a large number of lakes are scattered across the volcanic plains; many have problems with increasing salinity. To identify the hydrologic components behind this problem, three lakes, Burrumbeet, Linlithgow and Buninjon, were selected for detailed water and salt budget modelling using monthly values of rainfall, evaporation, surface inflow and outflow, and groundwater inflow and outflow (using the new modified difference method developed in this study). On average, rainfall begins to exceed evaporation with the onset of winter rainfall in May, so lake levels rise and lake salinities decline. The modelled lakes have become more saline over the last decade, a time of drought with below average rainfall, and all eventually dried out, their salinities rising to very high levels as they shallowed. Lake Burrumbeet is generally much less saline than Lakes Linlithgow and Buninjon, because it has substantial groundwater outflow, probably due to leakage through one or more volcanic necks. This limits the amount of time the lake water is subject to evaporation, and also allows significant salt export. The other lakes do not leak. The modelling indicates that when the lakes dry out, salt is lost from the lake-beds, probably due to wind deflation of salt crusts and leakage into the underlying groundwater. The removal of salt during drying-out phases resets the salinity of the lakes, limiting their ability to become more saline with time. Drying-out phases may therefore be essential in preventing the increased salinisation of lakes and wetland environments across the volcanic plains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Echinoderm responses to variation in salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Although Echinodermata is one of the only stenohaline phyla in the animal kingdom, several species show remarkable abilities to acclimate and survive in euryhaline habitats. The last comprehensive review of this topic was over 25 years ago and much work has been published since. These recent studies expand the field reports of species living in hyposaline environments and detail experimental research on the responses, physiological range, and limits of echinoderms to salinity challenges. I provide a brief review of the historical concepts and measures of salinity and relate this overview to the physiological and ecological studies on echinoderms. Many marine biologists are not aware that chemical oceanographers advocate abandoning today's commonly used measure of salinity, 'PSU', in favour of absolute salinity (SA)-a return to the ppt (‰) metric. The literature survey reveals only one euryhaline-tolerant species in the Southern Hemisphere (there are 42 in the North) and more euryhaline species in the geologically older, brackish seas. The green sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, is one of the most tolerant echinoids to hyposalinity. Different source populations have varying levels of acclimation and tolerance to hyposalinity. Experiments show that green urchins previously unexposed to hyposalinity experience a clear decrease in growth rates; however, this adverse effect is short lived. Green urchins already acclimated to hyposalinity can endure intense and repeated bouts and grow at the same rate of urchins not exposed. Promising future work on the physiological and cellular mechanisms of hyposalinity acclimation includes comparative studies of the role of heat shock proteins in the response to changing salinities. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Management of saline soils in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawitz, E.

    1983-01-01

    The main soil salinity problem in Israel is the danger of gradual salinization as a result of excessively efficient water management. Aquifer management is aimed at preventing flow of groundwater into the ocean, causing a creeping salinization at a rate of about 2 ppm per year. Successful efforts to improve irrigation efficiency brought with them the danger of salt accumulation in the soil. A ten-year monitoring programme carried out by the Irrigation Extension Service at 250 sampling sites showed that appreciable salt accumulation indeed occurred during the rainless irrigation season. However, where annual rainfall is more than about 350 mm this salt accumulation is adequately leached out of the root zone by the winter rains. Soil salinity in the autumn is typically two to three times that in the spring, a level which does not affect yields adversely. In the drier regions of the country long-term increasing soil salinity has been observed, and leaching is required. This is generally accomplished during the pre-irrigation given in the spring, whose size is determined by the rainfall amount of the preceding winter. The increasing need to utilize brackish groundwater and recycled sewage effluent requires special measures, which have so far been successful. In particular, drip irrigation with its high average soil-water potential regime and partial wetting of the soil volume has achieved high yields under adverse conditions. However, the long-term trend of water-quality deterioration is unavoidable under present conditions, and will eventually necessitate either major changes in agricultural patterns or the provision of desalinated water for dilution of the irrigation water. (author)

  2. Effect of salinity and temperature on water cut determination in oil reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Abdel-Mohsen O.; El Gamal, Maisa [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17555, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates); Zekri, Abdulrazag Y. [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, College of Engineering, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17555, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2003-12-01

    In this study, system stability and water cut were evaluated via IR analysis and physicochemical properties of the tested mixture. Samples were prepared with different water cuts at a specified salinity and tested by IR. Different cations were also used in the water portion of the mixture to evaluate its effect of interaction and stability. In addition, the effect of water cut, temperature, salinity and cation type, and composition on specific gravity, API gravity, kinematic and dynamic viscosities and surface tension were investigated. The studied water content range was from 0 to 0.8 while temperature from 20 to 100 C. Salinity effect up to 40,000 ppm was also evaluated. For each mixed ion solution, equivalent sodium concentrations and mixture resistivity were calculated. Relationships between water cut, major functional groups and mixture physicochemical properties were developed. Therefore, for a known property, water cut could be predicted.

  3. The Effect of Water Table Fluctuation and its Salinity on Fe Crystal and Noncrystal in some Khuzestan Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mostafa Pajohannia

    2017-01-01

    -tionite treatments was different regarding the salinity, texture, organic matters, cultivation and the water table fluctuation. The total Fe content in the middle layers had permanently increased due to the groundwater fluctuation levels and this caused the creation of mottle in this layer. All saline soils had saline subsurface water. The salinity has caused that the effective microorganisms have not been actived on the reduction processes in some profiles and the Fe deposit more in the Fe3+forms. The Fe was found more in non-crystal form in saline regions, but it was in the crystal form in non-saline regions which indicated the suitable conditions for Fe’s nodule formation. For example, when soil salinity decreased from 14.9 to 8.1 dS/m, Fec increased from 460.1 to 497.8 mg/kg soil. With increasing the amount of clay, and cultivation periods, the Fed content has also been increased. The Feo/ Fec ratio in undevelopted soils was higher than developed soils. This ratio was low in non-saline soil and was high for saline soil. this indicates that non-saline soil had more development than saline soils. The maximum amount (1.6 was belonged to saline soil and minimum was for no saline soils. With increasing in soil age, tillage periods and clay content this ratio was decreased., statistical analysis Also showed that there was significant difference between Fec and Feo in saline and no saline soils. Also, with increasing in salinity, Fec content decreased and Feo increased. aggregate stability was also increased with increasing Fec content. Conclusions: The Feo content was more in surface of saline soil than subsurface when pedon was ponded and saturated from surface. Feo was very higher in saline soils than no saline soils. Fec had not significant difference between saline and nonsaline soils. Salinity decreased Fec and increased Feo content in soils. Feo/Fec ratio of saline soils was 4 to 5 times fold of non-saline soils. Increasing Feo/Fec ratio in saline soils and decreasing in this

  4. Temperature, salinity and other parameters from bottle casts in the northeast Pacific Ocean from SWAN from 1965-10-30 to 1966-09-18 (NODC Accession 7000633)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profile data, barometric pressure, air temperature and surface winds measurements were collected during nine bottle cast at six stations in...

  5. Use of radioactive sodium-22 to study the processes of soil salinization and desalinization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzubaidi, A.H.

    1979-01-01

    This study deals with the salinization of four undisturbed soil columns of silt loam soil, collected with special plexiglass columns. The salinization was effected by adding a certain volume of salt solution consisting of a mixture of NaCl, CaCl 2 and MgCl 2 and containing 0.5 mCi of sodium-22. The salt solution was added to the surface of the first two columns and then the soil columns were leached with distilled water, while for the other two columns, the salt solution was added from the bottom of the columns using a syphon technique. The first two columns represent a model for the desalinization process of saline soils, while the latter two columns represent a model for the salinization process under the effect of high groundwater table. The downward and upward movements of sodium through the soil columns were recorded by measuring sodium radioactivity periodically, using a special scanner which continuously and automatically detected the radioactivity of sodium with the help of a gamma spectrometer. The final distribution curves for sodium movement throughout these soil columns versus time were obtained by computer. The data obtained indicate that radioactive sodium can be used with success to study the movement of salts in soil. The results also bring a new and better understanding of the nature of the salt movement during the processes of salinization and desalinization, the most important soil processes in the arid and semi-arid regions. (author)

  6. Evidence for deep-water deposition of abyssal Mediterranean evaporites during the Messinian salinity crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christeleit, Elizabeth C.; Brandon, Mark T.; Zhuang, Guangsheng

    2015-10-01

    Scientific drilling of the abyssal evaporites beneath the deepest parts of the Mediterranean basin gave rise to the idea that the Mediterranean sea completely evaporated at the end of the Messinian. Herein, we show, using new organic geochemical data, that those evaporites were deposited beneath a deep-water saline basin, not in a subaerial saltpan, as originally proposed. Abundant fossil organic lipids were extracted from evaporites in Mediterranean Deep Sea Drilling Project cores. The archaeal lipid distribution and new analyses, using the ACE salinity proxy and TEX86 temperature proxy, indicate that surface waters at the time of evaporite deposition had normal marine salinity, ranging from ∼26 to 34 practical salinity units, and temperatures of 25-28 °C. These conditions require a deep-water setting, with a mixed layer with normal marine salinity and an underlying brine layer at gypsum and halite saturation. After correction for isostatic rebound, our results indicate maximum drawdown of ∼2000 m and ∼2900 m relative to modern sea level in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins, respectively. Our results are consistent with previously proposed scenarios for sea level drawdown based on both subaerial and submarine incision and backfilling of the Rhone and Nile rivers, which require Messinian sea level drops of ∼1300 m and ∼200 m, respectively. This study provides new evidence for an old debate and also demonstrates the importance of further scientific drilling and sampling of deeper part of the abyssal Messinian units.

  7. Global Temperature and Salinity Profile Programme (GTSPP) Data, 1985-present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Programme (GTSPP) develops and maintains a global ocean temperature and salinity resource with data that are both up-to-date...

  8. Penaeid Shrimp Salinity Gradient Tank Study 2005-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — We designed an experimental gradient tank to examine salinity preferences of juvenile brown shrimp and white shrimp. Although no strong pattern of salinity avoidance...

  9. Climate change and soil salinity: The case of coastal Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Susmita; Hossain, Md Moqbul; Huq, Mainul; Wheeler, David

    2015-12-01

    This paper estimates location-specific soil salinity in coastal Bangladesh for 2050. The analysis was conducted in two stages: First, changes in soil salinity for the period 2001-2009 were assessed using information recorded at 41 soil monitoring stations by the Soil Research Development Institute. Using these data, a spatial econometric model was estimated linking soil salinity with the salinity of nearby rivers, land elevation, temperature, and rainfall. Second, future soil salinity for 69 coastal sub-districts was projected from climate-induced changes in river salinity and projections of rainfall and temperature based on time trends for 20 Bangladesh Meteorological Department weather stations in the coastal region. The findings indicate that climate change poses a major soil salinization risk in coastal Bangladesh. Across 41 monitoring stations, the annual median projected change in soil salinity is 39 % by 2050. Above the median, 25 % of all stations have projected changes of 51 % or higher.

  10. Zeta Potential of Carbonates in Saline Brines as a Function of NaCl Salinity and Potential Determining Ions: Ca, Mg and SO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahrouqi, D.; Vinogradov, J.; Jackson, M.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of zeta potential are typically obtained using crushed samples and commercial zetameters at ionic strength age and provenance. For low salinity NaCl brines (1M) the surface charge polarity was inverted for one rock sample, yet equilibrium Ca and Mg concentrations remained constant (c. 1.3x10-3 and 7x10-5M respectively) and similar for both samples, regardless of NaCl salinity. We suggest charge inversion was caused by differences in SO4 concentration (3x10-4 versus 1.2x10-3M) in the two samples after equilibration. At higher and externally controlled concentrations of Ca (0.1 - 0.42M), the zeta potential was less affected by NaCl salinity and pCa was the dominant control, although the role of SO4 in distinguishing between rock samples remained valid. The iso-electric point was different for the two samples (pCa 1.7 versus 0.5) and lower than any previously published values. Our results suggest that small differences in PDI concentration may invert surface charge polarity at high NaCl concentration; moreover, trace amounts of anhydrite or other minerals that yield aqueous SO4 can significantly modify surface charge in carbonates that otherwise appear identical. These results are important when interpreting the streaming component of SP measurements in carbonates.

  11. The effect of low salinity on teredinids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristine C. Barreto

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Teredinids survival in low salinities was determined in aquaria. Panels previously immersed in Ponta de Leste, Ilha Grande Bay, Rio de Janeiro, were transferred to aquaria with salinities ranging from 5.0 to 15.0 Practical Salinity Unities (PSU. The waters of Ilha Grande Bay receive a large amount of wood from the marginal rainforest vegetation, being suitable for the development of teredinids. The coastal areas of the bay are subjected to wide salinity fluctuations due to strong and sudden tropical storms. Eleven different species of teredinids were found in the panels. The critical salinity concentration for the survival of the two most common species was 11.93 PSU for Lyrodus floridanus and 12.90 PSU for Teredo furcifera. The effect of time on the mortality of teredinids at low salinities is also discussed.A sobrevivência de moluscos bivalves perfurantes de madeira da família Teredinidae foi avaliada a partir de sua manutenção em aquários de baixa salinidade. Painéis de madeira previamente imersos em Ponta de Leste, Baía da Ilha Grande, RJ, foram transferidos para aquários, contendo água do mar, cujas concentrações salinas variaram de 5,0 a 15,0 PSU. A Baía da Ilha Grande recebe uma grande quantidade de madeira da vegetação marginal de Mata Atlântica, o que torna o ambiente particularmente favorável ao desenvolvimento de teredinídeos. As áreas costeiras da baía estão sujeitas a grandes variações salinas decorrentes de tempestades tropicais que ocorrem súbita e intensamente. A salinidade crítica à sobrevivência das duas espécies mais comuns nos painéis foi de 11,93, para Lyrodus floridanus e 12,90 para Teredo furcifera. O efeito do tempo na mortalidade dos teredinídeos, quando sujeitos a baixas salinidades, foi discutido.

  12. Microbial Fuel Cells under Extreme Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzon del Olmo, Oihane

    I developed a Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) that unprecedentedly works (i.e., produces electricity) under extreme salinity (≈ 100 g/L NaCl). Many industries, such as oil and gas extraction, generate hypersaline wastewaters with high organic strength, accounting for about 5% of worldwide generated effluents, which represent a major challenge for pollution control and resource recovery. This study assesses the potential for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to treat such wastewaters and generate electricity under extreme saline conditions. Specifically, the focus is on the feasibility to treat hypersaline wastewater generated by the emerging unconventional oil and gas industry (hydraulic fracturing) and so, with mean salinity of 100 g/L NaCl (3-fold higher than sea water). The success of this novel technology strongly depends on finding a competent and resilient microbial community that can degrade the waste under extreme saline conditions and be able to use the anode as their terminal electron acceptor (exoelectrogenic capability). I demonstrated that MFCs can produce electricity at extremely high salinity (up to 250 g/l NaCl) with a power production of 71mW/m2. Pyrosequencing analysis of the anode population showed the predominance of Halanaerobium spp. (85%), which has been found in shale formations and oil reservoirs. Promoting Quorum sensing (QS, cell to cell communication between bacteria to control gene expression) was used as strategy to increase the attachment of bacteria to the anode and thus improve the MFC performance. Results show that the power output can be bolstered by adding 100nM of quinolone signal with an increase in power density of 30%, for the first time showing QS in Halanaerobium extremophiles. To make this technology closer to market applications, experiments with real wastewaters were also carried out. A sample of produced wastewater from Barnet Shale, Texas (86 g/L NaCl) produced electricity when fed in an MFC, leading to my discovery of another

  13. The difference of saline and sterile water for tetracycline hydrochloride solvents in cementum demineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinta Ferronika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The root cementum demineralization is an important step in regenerative periodontal therapy to smear layer removal on the root surface. Smear layer on the root surface becomes a barrier of the new attachment between periodontal tissues with the root surface. The use of tetracycline capsules as root surface demineralizing agent cannot be applied directly on the root surface and solvents such as saline or sterile water are needed. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine differences between sterile water and saline solvent for tetracycline HCl (tetra HCl as a cementum demineralization. Method: In this study the specimens were divided into three groups: a control, tetra HCl dissolved in saline, and tetra HCl dissolved in sterile water. Application using burnishing method for 3 minutes. Samples were dehydrated with ethanol series of 30% to 100%. Results of the root demineralization observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis followed by a Mann-Whitney nonparametric test. Result: Upon statistical analysis showed that the sterile water as a solvent of tetra HCl is more effective in smear layer removal and collagen structure exposure in the cementum. Conclusion: Tetra HCl dissolved in sterile water was found to be the best root cementum demineralization agent.

  14. 2H/1H fractionation in lipids of the mangrove Bruguiera gymnorhiza increases with salinity in marine lakes of Palau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, S. Nemiah; Sachs, Julian P.

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios (2H/1H or D/H) of sedimentary mangrove lipid biomarkers can be exploited as a quantitative proxy of past salinity and water isotopes. This approach is based on the observation that apparent 2H/1H fractionation between surface water and mangrove leaf lipids increases with surface water salinity. In order to better understand the mechanisms responsible for this empirical relationship, we analyzed the isotopic composition of surface water, xylem water, leaf water and leaf lipids from Bruguiera gymnorhiza mangroves growing around eleven marine lakes and a lagoon on the rock islands of Palau, spanning a salinity range of 5-32 parts per thousand (ppt). Net fractionation increased with increasing salinity for both nC31-alkane (0.7 ± 0.1‰ ppt-1) and for the pentacyclic triterpenoid lupeol (0.5 ± 0.2‰ ppt-1). These trends could not be attributed to changes in biosynthetic fractionation with salinity, but seem more likely to be due to increasing disequilibrium between xylem water and water vapor as salinity increases. In Palau's humid climate, this most likely causes leaf water to become less 2H-enriched relative to surface water and to xylem water as salinity increases. This supposition is supported not only by measurements of leaf water 2H enrichment, but also by the correlation (R2 = 0.66) between leaf water isotopes and those of rain water, which are assumed to be in equilibrium with water vapor isotopes, and by the dependence of leaf water isotopes on water vapor isotopes in a Péclet-modified Craig-Gordon model. These results should inform the application of sedimentary mangrove lipid hydrogen isotope ratios to infer past hydroclimatic changes.

  15. Shallow rainwater lenses in deltaic areas with saline seepage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Louw, Perry G.B.; Eeman, Sara; Siemon, Bernhard; Voortman, Bernard R.; Gunnink, Jan; Van Baaren, Esther S.; Oude Essink, Gualbert

    2011-01-01

    In deltaic areas with saline seepage, fresh water availability is often limited to shallow rainwater lenses lying on top of saline groundwater. Here we describe the characteristics and spatial variability of such lenses in areas with saline seepage and the mechanisms that control their occurrence

  16. Shallow rainwater lenses in deltaic areas with saline seepage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louw, de P.G.B.; Eeman, S.; Siemon, B.; `Voortman, B.R.; Gunnink, J.; Baaren, E.S.; Oude Essink, G.H.P.

    2011-01-01

    In deltaic areas with saline seepage, freshwater availability is often limited to shallow rainwater lenses lying on top of saline groundwater. Here we describe the characteristics and spatial variability of such lenses in areas with saline seepage and the mechanisms that control their occurrence and

  17. Measurement of salinity and electrical conductivity of some soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The salinity and electrical conductivity of some selected soil samples from Uruan Local government area of Akwa Ibom state of the Federal Republic of Nigeria were measured. The results show that an increase in salinity gives rise to an increase in electrical conductivity. The salinities of the area under study falls within the ...

  18. Differential toxicity and influence of salinity on acute toxicity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Differential toxicity and influence of salinity on acute toxicity of copper sulphate and lead nitrate against Oreochromis niloticus. KA Bawa-Allah, F Osuala, J Effiong. Abstract. This study investigated the salinity-tolerance of Oreochromis niloticus and the influence of salinity changes on the acute toxicities of copper sulphate ...

  19. Effects of salinity on growth and organic solutes accumulation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-27

    Mar 27, 2013 ... solution (½ strength) with the salinity treatments (0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 mM NaCl). The saline treatments ... At 30 days after the beginning of saline treatments, the plants were evaluated for height, leaf number .... water stress: biophysical analysis and relation to water transport. J. Exp. Bot. 51: 1595-1616.

  20. Partnership for adapting Vulnerable Populations to Soil Salinization ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Partnership for adapting Vulnerable Populations to Soil Salinization resulting from Climate Change in Sénégal. Soil salinization affects nearly all regions of Sénégal. Nearly a million hectares are affected by salinization and acidification. It is only in the last few years that researchers have understood the relation between ...

  1. Salinity affects behavioral thermoregulation in a marine decapod crustacean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Stefan; Mues, Annika; Herrmann, Jens-Peter; Eckhardt, André; Hufnagl, Marc; Temming, Axel

    2017-10-01

    Thermoregulation in aquatic ectotherms is a complex behavioral pattern that is affected by various biotic and abiotic factors with one being salinity. Especially in coastal and estuarine habitats, altering levels of salinity involve osmoregulatory adjustments that affect total energy budgets and may influence behavioral responses towards temperature. To examine the effect of salinity on behavioral thermoregulation in a marine evertebrate ectotherm, we acclimated juvenile and sub-adult common brown shrimp (Crangon crangon, L.) to salinities of 10, 20 and 30 PSU and investigated their thermal preference in an annular chamber system using the gravitational method for temperature preference determination. Thermal preference of individual brown shrimp was considerably variable and brown shrimp selected a wide range of temperatures in each level of salinity as well as within individual experimental trials. However, salinity significantly affected thermal preference with the shrimp selecting higher temperatures at 10 and 20 PSU when compared to 30 PSU of salinity. Body size had no effect on thermal selection and did not interact with salinity. Temperature preference differed by sex and male shrimp selected significantly higher temperatures at 10 PSU when compared to females. The results show that salinity strongly affects thermal selection in brown shrimp and confirms the strong interrelation of temperature and salinity on seasonal migratory movements that has been previously derived from observations in the field. In the field, however, it remains unclear whether salinity drives thermal selection or whether changes in temperature modify salinity preference.

  2. Salinity ranges of some southern African fish species occurring in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The recorded salinity ranges of 96 fish species occurring in southern African estuaries are documented. Factors influen- cing the tolerance of fishes to low and high salinity regimes are discussed, with most species tolerant of low rather than high salinity conditions. This is important since most systems are subject to periodic ...

  3. Effect of salinity stress on plant fresh weight and nutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil salinity is a major limitation to crop production in many areas of the world. A pot experiment was carried out with rapeseed cultivars in order to investigate the effects of salinity stress on plant development and nutrient composition. For the salinity studies, 150 mM NaCl concentration was applied to12 rapseed cultivars ...

  4. Efficacy of nebulised L-adrenaline with 3% hypertonic saline versus normal saline in bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Sharmin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bronchiolitis is one of the most common respiratory diseases requiring hospitalization. Nebulized epineph­rine and salbutamol therapy has been used in different centres with varying results. Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy of nebulised adrenaline diluted with 3% hypertonic saline with nebulised adrenaline diluted with normal saline in bronchiolitis. Methods: Fifty three infants and young children with bronchiolitis, age ranging from 2 months to 2 years, presenting in the emergency department of Manikganj Sadar Hospital were enrolled in the study. After initial evaluation, patients were randomized to receive either nebulized adrenaline I .5 ml ( 1.5 mg diluted with 2 ml of3% hypertonic saline (group I ornebulised adrenaline 1.5 ml (1.5 mg diluted with 2 ml of normal saline (group II. Patients were evaluated again 30 minutes after nebulization. Results: Twenty eight patients in the group I (hypertonic saline and twenty five in groupII (normal saline were included in the study. After nebulization, mean respiratory rate decreased from 63.7 to 48.1 (p<.01, mean clinical severity score decreased from 8.5 to 3.5 (p<.01 and mean oxygen satw·ation increased 94.7% to 96.9% (p<.01 in group I. In group II, mean respiratory rate decreased from 62.4 to 47.4 (p<.01, mean clinical severity score decreased from 7.2 to 4.1 (p<.01 and mean oxygen saturation increased from 94. 7% to 96. 7% (p<.01. Mean respiratory rate decreased by 16 in group I versus 14.8 (p>.05 in group 11, mean clinical severity score decreased by 4.6 in group versus 3 (p<.05 in group, and mean oxygen saturation increased by 2.2% and 1.9% in group and group respectively. Difference in reduction in clinical severity score was statistically significant , though the changes in respiratory rate and oxygen saturation were not statistically significant. Conclusion: The study concluded that both nebulised adrenaline diluted with 3% hypertonic saline and

  5. Effect of salinity on methylation of mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, J.E.; Bartha, R.

    1980-09-01

    Monomethyl and dimethylmercury are potent neurotoxins subject to biomagnification in food webs. This fact was tragically demonstrated by the Minamata and Niigata poisoning incidents in Japan in which 168 persons who ate seafood from mercury polluted waters were poisoned, 52 fatally. Shortly after these two incidents, work conducted in freshwater environments demonstrated the microbial conversion of inorganic and phenylmercury compounds to mono- and di-methylmercury. Consideration of some fragmentary evidence from the literature, however, indicates that the rate and the significance of microbial methylation of mercury in freshwater and saltwater environments may not be the same. A demonstrated relationship between mercury methylation rates and water salinity would greatly influence our thinking about mercury pollution effects in marine versus freshwater environments. Since we were unable to locate published reports on this subject, we are investigating the influence of salinity on the rate of mercury methylation in an estuarine sediment.

  6. Saline Nasal Irrigation for Upper Respiratory Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic upper respiratory conditions are common and expensive disorders with enormous impact on patient quality of life and society at large. Saline nasal irrigation (SNI), a therapy with roots in Ayurvedic medicine that bathes the nasal mucosa with in spray or liquid saline, has been used as adjunctive care for upper respiratory conditions. In liquid form, SNI has been found to be effective adjunctive care by the Cochrane Collaboration for symptoms associated with chronic rhinosinusitis. Less conclusive clinical trial evidence supports its use in spray and liquid forms as adjunctive treatment for mild-to-moderate allergic rhinitis and acute upper respiratory infections. Consensus or expert opinion recommendations exist for SNI as a treatment for a variety of other conditions including rhinitis of pregnancy. SNI appears safe; side effects are minimal and transient. It can be recommended by clinicians to interested patients with a range of upper respiratory conditions in the context of patient education and printed instructional handouts. PMID:19904896

  7. Density-stratified flow events in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA: implications for mercury and salinity cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, David L.; Carling, Gregory T.; Angeroth, Cory; Freeman, Michael; Rowland, Ryan; Pazmiño, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    Density stratification in saline and hypersaline water bodies from throughout the world can have large impacts on the internal cycling and loading of salinity, nutrients, and trace elements. High temporal resolution hydroacoustic and physical/chemical data were collected at two sites in Great Salt Lake (GSL), a saline lake in the western USA, to understand how density stratification may influence salinity and mercury (Hg) distributions. The first study site was in a causeway breach where saline water from GSL exchanges with less saline water from a flow restricted bay. Near-surface-specific conductance values measured in water at the breach displayed a good relationship with both flow and wind direction. No diurnal variations in the concentration of dissolved (total and MeHg loadings was observed during periods of elevated salinity. The second study site was located on the bottom of GSL where movement of a high-salinity water layer, referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), is restricted to a naturally occurring 1.5-km-wide “spillway” structure. During selected time periods in April/May, 2012, wind-induced flow reversals in a railroad causeway breach, separating Gunnison and Gilbert Bays, were coupled with high-velocity flow pulses (up to 55 cm/s) in the DBL at the spillway site. These flow pulses were likely driven by a pressure response of highly saline water from Gunnison Bay flowing into the north basin of Gilbert Bay. Short-term flow reversal events measured at the railroad causeway breach have the ability to move measurable amounts of salt and Hg from Gunnison Bay into the DBL. Future disturbance to the steady state conditions currently imposed by the railroad causeway infrastructure could result in changes to the existing chemical balance between Gunnison and Gilbert Bays. Monitoring instruments were installed at six additional sites in the DBL during October 2012 to assess impacts from any future modifications to the railroad causeway.

  8. Water sources accessed by arid zone riparian trees in highly saline environments, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costelloe, Justin F; Payne, Emily; Woodrow, Ian E; Irvine, Elizabeth C; Western, Andrew W; Leaney, Fred W

    2008-05-01

    The flow regimes of arid zone rivers are often highly variable, and shallow groundwater in the alluvial aquifers can be very saline, thus constraining the availability and quality of the major water sources available to riparian trees-soil water, shallow groundwater and stream water. We have identified water sources and strategies used by riparian trees in more highly saline and arid conditions than previously studied for riparian trees of arid zone rivers. Our research focused on the riparian species Eucalyptus coolabah, one of the major riparian trees of ephemeral arid zone rivers in Australia. The water sources available to this riparian tree were examined using delta(18)O isotope data from xylem, soil water, groundwater and surface water. Additionally, soil chloride and matric potential data were used to infer zones of water availability for root uptake. Despite the saline conditions, the trees used a mixture of soil water and groundwater sources, but they did not use surface water directly. The study identified three strategies used to cope with typically high groundwater and soil water salinities. Firstly, the trees preferentially grow in zones of most frequent flushing by infiltrating streamflow, such as the bank-tops of channels. Secondly, the trees limit water use by having low transpiration rates. Thirdly, the trees are able to extract water at very low osmotic potentials, with water uptake continuing at chloride concentrations of at least 20,000-30,000 mg L(-1).

  9. Effects of salinity and organic matter on the partitioning of perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAs) to clay particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Junho; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Lim, Byung J; An, Kwang Guk; Kim, Sang Don

    2011-06-01

    The influence of salinity and organic matter on the distribution coefficient (K(d)) for perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in a brackish water-clay system was studied. The distribution coefficients (K(d)) for PFAs onto inorganic clay surfaces increased with salinity, providing evidence for electrostatic interaction for the sorption of PFAs, whereas the relationship between K(d) and organic carbon content (f(oc)) suggested that hydrophobic interaction is the primary driving force for the sorption of PFAs onto organic matter. The organic carbon normalized adsorption coefficient (K(oc)) of PFAs can be slightly overestimated due to the electrostatic interaction within uncoated inorganic surfaces. In addition, the dissolved organic matter released from coated clay particles seemed to solvate PFA molecules in solution, which contributed to a decrease in K(d). A positive relationship between K(d) and salinity was apparent, but an empirical relationship for the 'salting-out' effect was not evident. The K(d) values of PFAs are relatively small compared with those reported for persistent organic pollutants. Thus, sorption may not be a significant route of mass transfer of PFAs from water columns in estuarine environments. However, enhancement of sorption of PFAs to particulate matter at high salinity values could evoke potential risks to benthic organisms in estuarine areas.

  10. Airborne EM, Lithology and in-situ Data Used for Quantizing Groundwater Salinity in Zeeland (NL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, U.; Siemon, B.; van Baaren, E.; Dabekaussen, W.; Delsman, J. R.; Karaoulis, M.; Gunnink, J.; Pauw, P.; Vermaas, T.

    2017-12-01

    In a setting of predominantly saline surface waters in Zeeland, the Netherlands, the only available shallow fresh groundwater is present in the form of freshwater lenses floating on top of the saline groundwater. This fresh water is vital for agricultural, industrial, ecological, water conservation and drinking water functions. An essential first step for managing the usable water properly is to know the present spatial fresh-brackish-saline groundwater distribution. As traditional salinity monitoring is labor-intensive, airborne electromagnetics, which is fast and can cover large areas in short time, is an efficient alternative. A consortium of BGR, Deltares and TNO conducted FRESHEM Zeeland (FREsh Salt groundwater distribution by Helicopter ElectroMagnetic survey in the Province of Zeeland) in 2014-17. An area of more than 2000 square km was surveyed using BGR's helicopter-borne geophysical system totaling to about 9,600 line-km. The HEM data, after inversion to 2.5 Million resistivity-depth models for each of the three 1D inversion procedures applied (Marquardt single site, smooth and sharp laterally constrained inversion), served as base-line information for further interpretation. A probabilistic Monte Carlo approach combines HEM resistivities, 3D lithology model data (GeoTOP), laboratory results (formation factor and surface conductivity) and local in-situ groundwater measurements for the translation of resistivity to Chloride concentration. The resulting 3D voxel model enables stakeholders to implement spatial Chloride concentration in their groundwater models.

  11. Links between salinity variation in the Caribbean and North Atlantic thermohaline circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Matthew W; Spero, Howard J; Lea, David W

    2004-03-11

    Variations in the strength of the North Atlantic Ocean thermohaline circulation have been linked to rapid climate changes during the last glacial cycle through oscillations in North Atlantic Deep Water formation and northward oceanic heat flux. The strength of the thermohaline circulation depends on the supply of warm, salty water to the North Atlantic, which, after losing heat to the atmosphere, produces the dense water masses that sink to great depths and circulate back south. Here we analyse two Caribbean Sea sediment cores, combining Mg/Ca palaeothermometry with measurements of oxygen isotopes in foraminiferal calcite in order to reconstruct tropical Atlantic surface salinity during the last glacial cycle. We find that Caribbean salinity oscillated between saltier conditions during the cold oxygen isotope stages 2, 4 and 6, and lower salinities during the warm stages 3 and 5, covarying with the strength of North Atlantic Deep Water formation. At the initiation of the Bølling/Allerød warm interval, Caribbean surface salinity decreased abruptly, suggesting that the advection of salty tropical waters into the North Atlantic amplified thermohaline circulation and contributed to high-latitude warming.

  12. Fresh meteoric versus recirculated saline groundwater nutrient inputs into a subtropical estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadat-Noori, Mahmood; Santos, Isaac R.; Tait, Douglas R.; Maher, Damien T.

    2016-01-01

    The role of groundwater in transporting nutrients to coastal aquatic systems has recently received considerable attention. However, the relative importance of fresh versus saline groundwater-derived nutrient inputs to estuaries and how these groundwater pathways may alter surface water N:P ratios remains poorly constrained. We performed detailed time series measurements of nutrients in a tidal estuary (Hat Head, NSW, Australia) and used radium to quantify the contribution of fresh and saline groundwater to total surface water estuarine exports under contrasting hydrological conditions (wet and dry season). Tidally integrated nutrient fluxes showed that the estuary was a source of nutrients to the coastal waters. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export was 7-fold higher than the average global areal flux rate for rivers likely due to the small catchment size, surrounding wetlands and high groundwater inputs. Fresh groundwater discharge was dominant in the wet season accounting for up to 45% of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and 48% of total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) estuarine exports. In the dry season, fresh and saline groundwater accounted for 21 and 33% of TDN export, respectively. The combined fresh and saline groundwater fluxes of NO 3 , PO 4 , NH 4 , DON, DOP, TDN and TDP were estimated to account for 66, 58, 55, 31, 21, 53 and 47% of surface water exports, respectively. Groundwater-derived nitrogen inputs to the estuary were responsible for a change in the surface water N:P ratio from typical N-limiting conditions to P-limiting as predicted by previous studies. This shows the importance of both fresh and saline groundwater as a source of nutrients for coastal productivity and nutrient budgets of coastal waters. - Highlights: • Groundwater TDN and TDP fluxes account for 53 and 47% of surface water exports. • The estuary DIN export was 7-fold higher than the average global areal flux. • Fresh GW nutrient input dominated the wet season and saline GW the

  13. Fresh meteoric versus recirculated saline groundwater nutrient inputs into a subtropical estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadat-Noori, Mahmood, E-mail: mahmood.sadat-noori@scu.edu.au [National Marine Science Centre, School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, NSW (Australia); School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW (Australia); Santos, Isaac R. [National Marine Science Centre, School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, NSW (Australia); Tait, Douglas R. [National Marine Science Centre, School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, NSW (Australia); School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW (Australia); Maher, Damien T. [School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW (Australia)

    2016-10-01

    The role of groundwater in transporting nutrients to coastal aquatic systems has recently received considerable attention. However, the relative importance of fresh versus saline groundwater-derived nutrient inputs to estuaries and how these groundwater pathways may alter surface water N:P ratios remains poorly constrained. We performed detailed time series measurements of nutrients in a tidal estuary (Hat Head, NSW, Australia) and used radium to quantify the contribution of fresh and saline groundwater to total surface water estuarine exports under contrasting hydrological conditions (wet and dry season). Tidally integrated nutrient fluxes showed that the estuary was a source of nutrients to the coastal waters. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export was 7-fold higher than the average global areal flux rate for rivers likely due to the small catchment size, surrounding wetlands and high groundwater inputs. Fresh groundwater discharge was dominant in the wet season accounting for up to 45% of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and 48% of total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) estuarine exports. In the dry season, fresh and saline groundwater accounted for 21 and 33% of TDN export, respectively. The combined fresh and saline groundwater fluxes of NO{sub 3}, PO{sub 4}, NH{sub 4}, DON, DOP, TDN and TDP were estimated to account for 66, 58, 55, 31, 21, 53 and 47% of surface water exports, respectively. Groundwater-derived nitrogen inputs to the estuary were responsible for a change in the surface water N:P ratio from typical N-limiting conditions to P-limiting as predicted by previous studies. This shows the importance of both fresh and saline groundwater as a source of nutrients for coastal productivity and nutrient budgets of coastal waters. - Highlights: • Groundwater TDN and TDP fluxes account for 53 and 47% of surface water exports. • The estuary DIN export was 7-fold higher than the average global areal flux. • Fresh GW nutrient input dominated the wet season and

  14. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, Brian P [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  15. Impact of saline water sources on hypertension and cardiovascular disease risk in coastal Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Adrian; Hoque, Mohammad; Mathewson, Eleanor; Ahmed, Kazi; Rahman, Moshuir; Vineis, Paolo; Scheelbeek, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    Southern Bangladesh is periodically affected by tropical cyclone induced storm surges. Such events can result in the inundation of large areas of the coastal plain by sea water. Over time these episodic influxes of saline water have led to the build-up of a high of salinities (e.g. > 1,000 mg/l) in the shallow (up to ca. 150 m depth) groundwater. Owing to the highly saline groundwater, local communities have developed alternative surface water sources by constructing artificial drinking water ponds, which collect monsoonal rainwater. These have far greater storage than traditional rainwater harvesting systems, which typically use 40 litre storage containers that are quickly depleted during the dry season. Unfortunately, the ponds can also become salinised during storm surge events, the impacts of which can last for a number of years. A combined hydrological and epidemiological research programme over the past two years has been undertaken to understand the potential health risks associated with these saline water sources, as excessive intake of sodium can lead to hypertension and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (such as stroke and heart attack). An important aspect of the selected research sites was the variety of drinking water sources available. These included the presence of managed aquifer recharge sites where monsoonal rainwater is stored in near-surface (semi-)confined aquifers for abstraction during the dry season. This provided an opportunity for the effects of interventions with lower salinity sources to be assessed. Adjusting for confounding factors such as age, gender and diet, the results show a significant association between salinity and blood pressure. Furthermore, the results also showed such impacts are reversible. In order to evaluate the costs and benefits of such interventions, a water salinity - dose impact model is being developed to assess the effectiveness of alternative drinking water sources, such as enhanced rainwater

  16. Origin and mechanisms of high salinity in Hombolo Dam and groundwater in Dodoma municipality Tanzania, revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemsanga, Ceven; Muzuka, Alfred Nzibavuga Nyarubakula; Martz, Lawrance; Komakech, Hans Charles; Elisante, Eliapenda; Kisaka, Marry; Ntuza, Cosmas

    2017-10-01

    The Hombolo dam (HD), in central Tanzania, is a shallow reservoir characterized by high salinity that limits its use for human activities. The origin of the salinity, mechanisms of reaching and concentrating in the dam remain unclear. These were assessed using hydrogeochemical facies, water type evolutions and mapping. The source of HD salinity was identified to be shallow groundwater (SG) and runoff from a seasonal floodplain with NaCl-rich lithological materails, along Little Kinyasungwe River that feeds the dam. The NaCl-rich lithological units, about 5-7 km upstream of the dam, were highly concentrated with NaCl to the extent that the local community was commercially separating table salt from them. The physicochemical parameters from these NaCl-rich lithological materials were well represented in HD and nearby groundwater sources, which suggests active water interactions. Water type evolution and surface hydrology assessments clearly showed that SG in the salty-floodplain was influenced by evaporation (ET) and was periodically carried to the HD. Clearly; HD water had high chemical similarity with the nearby SG. This agrees with previous studies that HD is partly fed by the local aquifer. However, this is the first attempt at mapping its physical origin. The origin of HD salinity was further supported by the spatial distribution of electrical conductivity (EC), where very high EC (up to 21,230 μScm-1) was recorded in SG within the NaCl-rich lithological unit while water sources far away from the NaCl-rich materials had much lower EC values. Thus, the study disagrees with previous conclusions that HD salinity was sorely due to high dam surface ET but is primarily due to geological reasons. Comparisons of HD with a nearby Matumbulu dam (MD), another earthen dam in climatologically similar settings, reveals that MD water was less saline/mineralised. This further shows that HD high salinity is most likely a geologic phenomenon, but local climatic factors, namely

  17. The effectiveness of dispersants under various temperature and salinity regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.; Fieldhouse, B.; Wang, Z.; Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON

    2005-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to determine the effectiveness of dispersants in Arctic waters where salinity and temperature interactions play a critical role. In particular, Corexit 9500 was tested on Alaska North Slope oil at different temperatures and salinity using the ASTM standard test and variations of this test. Results were compared to the only historically reported test in which both temperature and salinity were changed over a range of values. This series of tests demonstrated that there is an interaction between salinity, temperature and dispersant effectiveness. It was shown that conventional and currently available dispersants are nearly ineffective at 0 salinity. Dispersant effectiveness peaks at 20 to 40 units of salinity, depending on the type of dispersant. Corexit is less sensitive to salinity, while Corexit 9527 is more sensitive to salinity. There is a smooth gradient of effectiveness with salinity both as the salinity rises to a peak point of effectiveness and as it exceeds this value. Results from the 2 field trials in fresh water suggest that laboratory tests correctly conclude that the effectiveness of dispersants is very low in freshwater. The study also examined several analytical factors such as the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) versus relative petroleum hydrocarbon (RPH) methods, specific versus general calibration curves, and automatic versus manual baseline placement. The analytical variations of effectiveness by RPH or TPH methods do not affect the fundamental relationship between salinity and temperature. 6 refs., 6 tabs., 8 figs

  18. Evaluating physiological responses of plants to salinity stress

    KAUST Repository

    Negrão, Sónia

    2016-10-06

    Background Because soil salinity is a major abiotic constraint affecting crop yield, much research has been conducted to develop plants with improved salinity tolerance. Salinity stress impacts many aspects of a plant’s physiology, making it difficult to study in toto. Instead, it is more tractable to dissect the plant’s response into traits that are hypothesized to be involved in the overall tolerance of the plant to salinity. Scope and conclusions We discuss how to quantify the impact of salinity on different traits, such as relative growth rate, water relations, transpiration, transpiration use efficiency, ionic relations, photosynthesis, senescence, yield and yield components. We also suggest some guidelines to assist with the selection of appropriate experimental systems, imposition of salinity stress, and obtaining and analysing relevant physiological data using appropriate indices. We illustrate how these indices can be used to identify relationships amongst the proposed traits to identify which traits are the most important contributors to salinity tolerance. Salinity tolerance is complex and involves many genes, but progress has been made in studying the mechanisms underlying a plant’s response to salinity. Nevertheless, several previous studies on salinity tolerance could have benefited from improved experimental design. We hope that this paper will provide pertinent information to researchers on performing proficient assays and interpreting results from salinity tolerance experiments.

  19. Hydrochemical Characteristics and Formation of the Saline or Salty Springs in Eastern Sichuan Basin of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.

    2017-12-01

    Saline or salty springs provide important information on the hydrogeochemical processes and hydrology within subsurface aquifers. More than 20 saline and salty springs occur in the core of anticlines in the eastern Sichuan Basin in southwestern China where the Lower and Middle Triassic carbonates outcrop. Water samples of 8 saline and salty springs (including one saline hot spring) were collected for analyses of the major and minor constituents, trace elements and stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes. The TDS of the springs range from 4 to 83 g/L, and they are mainly of Cl-Na type. Sr, Ba and Li are the predominant trace elements. The δ2H and δ18O of the water samples indicate that they are of meteoric origin. The source of salinity of the springs originates from dissolution of minerals in the carbonates, including halite, gypsum, calcite and dolomite. The formation mechanism of the springs is that groundwater receives recharge from infiltration of precipitation, undergoes shallow or deep circulation in the core of the anticline and incongruent dissolution of the salt-bearing carbonates occurs, and emerges in the river valley in the form of springs with relatively high TDS. The 8 springs can be classified into 4 springs of shallow groundwater circulation and 4 springs of deep groundwater circulation according to the depth of groundwater circulation, 7 springs of normal temperature and 1 hot spring according to temperature. There are also 2 up-flow springs: the carbonate aquifers are overlain by relatively impervious sandstone and shale, groundwater may flows up to the ground surface through the local portion of the overlying aquiclude where fractures were relatively well developed, and emerges as an up-flow spring. Knowledge of the hydrochemical characteristics and the geneses of the saline and salty springs are of important significance for the utilization and preservation of the springs.

  20. FRESHEM - Fresh-saline groundwater distribution in Zeeland (NL) derived from airborne EM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemon, Bernhard; van Baaren, Esther; Dabekaussen, Willem; Delsman, Joost; Gunnik, Jan; Karaoulis, Marios; de Louw, Perry; Oude Essink, Gualbert; Pauw, Pieter; Steuer, Annika; Meyer, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    In a setting of predominantly saline surface waters, the availability of fresh water for agricultural purposes is not obvious in Zeeland, The Netherlands. Canals and ditches are mainly brackish to saline due to saline seepage, which originates from old marine deposits and salt-water transgressions during historical times. The only available fresh groundwater is present in the form of freshwater lenses floating on top of the saline groundwater. This fresh groundwater is vital for agricultural, industrial, ecological, water conservation and drinking water functions. An essential first step for managing this fresh groundwater properly is to know the present spatial fresh-brackish-saline groundwater distribution. As traditional salinity monitoring is labour-intensive, airborne electromagnetics (AEM), which is fast and can cover large areas in short time, is an efficient alternative. A consortium of BGR, Deltares and TNO started FRESHEM Zeeland (FREsh Salt groundwater distribution by Helicopter ElectroMagnetic survey in the Province of Zeeland) in October 2014. Within 3x2 weeks of the first project year, the entire area of about 2000 km2 was surveyed using BGR's helicopter-borne geophysical system totalling to about 10,000 line-km. The HEM datasets of 17 subareas were carefully processed using advanced BGR in-house software and inverted to 2.5 Million resistivity-depth models. Ground truthing demonstrated that the large-scale HEM results fit very well with small-scale ground EM data (ECPT). Based on this spatial resistivity distribution, a 3D voxel model for Chloride concentration was derived for the entire province taking into account geological model data (GeoTOP) for the lithology correction and local in-situ groundwater measurements for the translation of water conductivity to Chloride concentration. The 3D voxel model enables stakeholders to implement spatial Chloride concentration in their groundwater models.

  1. Field-scale spatial variation of saline-sodic soil and its relation with environmental factors in Western Songnen Plain of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Guangxin; Yin, Xiongrui; Liu, Zhijun

    2011-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the degree of spatial variability and variance structure of salinization parameters using classical and geostatistical method in Songnen Plain of China, which is one of largest saline-sodic areas in the World, and to analyze the relationship between salinization parameters, including soil salinity content (SC), electrical conductivity (EC), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), and pH, and seven environmental factors by Pearson and stepwise regression analysis. The environmental factors were ground elevation, surface ponding time, surface ponding depth, and soil moistures at four layers (0-10 cm, 10-30 cm, 30-60 cm, and 60-100 cm). The results indicated that SC, EC, and SAR showed great variations, whereas pH exhibited low variations. Four salinization parameters showed strongly spatial autocorrelation resulting from the compound impact of structural factors. The empirical semivariograms in the four parameters could be simulated by spherical and exponential models. The spatial distributions of SC, EC, SAR and pH showed similar patterns, with the coexistence of high salinity and sodicity in the areas with high ground elevation. By Pearson analysis, the soil salinization parameters showed a significant positive relationship with ground elevation, but a negative correlation with surface ponding time, surface ponding depth, and soil moistures. Both correlation and stepwise regression analysis showed that ground elevation is the most important environmental factor for spatial variation of soil sanilization. The results from this research can provide some useful information for explaining mechanism of salinization process and utilization of saline-sodic soils in the Western Songnen Plain.

  2. Local and large-scale climate forcing of Puget Sound oceanographic properties on seasonal to interdecadal timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanie K. Moore; Nathan J. Mantua; Jonathan P. Kellogg; Jan A. Newton

    2008-01-01

    The influence of climate on Puget Sound oceanographic properties is investigated on seasonal to interannual timescales using continuous profile data at 16 stations from 1993 to 2002 and records of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) from 1951 to 2002. Principal components analyses of profile data identify indices representing 42%, 58%, and 56%...

  3. Observations on the relationship between the Antarctic coastal diatoms Thalassiosira antarctica Comber and Porosira glacialis (Grunow) Jørgensen and sea ice concentrations during the Late Quaternary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pike, J.; Crosta, X.; Maddison, E.J.; Stickley, C.E.; Denis, D.; Barbara, L.; Renssen, H.

    2009-01-01

    The available ecological and palaeoecological information for two sea ice-related marine diatoms (Bacillariophyceae), Thalassiosira antarctica Comber and Porosira glacialis (Grunow) Jørgensen, suggests that these two species have similar sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS) and

  4. Salinity of animal manure and potential risk of secondary soil salinization through successive manure application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Xian, Yao; Guo-Liang, Li; Shi-Hua, Tu; Gavin, Sulewski; Zhao-Huan, He

    2007-09-20

    To enhance animal productivity and maximize economic returns, mineral salts are routinely added to animal feed worldwide. Salinity and ionic composition of animal manure from intensive poultry and livestock farms in Guangdong province were investigated. Field experiments were conducted for six successive crops of Brassica Parachinensis to evaluate the possibility of secondary soil salinization by successive application of chicken manure (CM) and pigeon manure (PM) to a garden soil. The concentration of total soluble salts (TSS), which were mainly composed of sulfate and chloride of potassium and sodium, averaged 49.0, 20.6 and 60.3 g.kg(- 1) in chicken, pig and pigeon manure, respectively. After three crops, successive application of CM and PM increased soil concentrations of TSS, Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), SO(4)(2-), and Cl(-) with application rate, resulting in a rise in soil salinity from low to medium levels and a slight reduction in soil pH. After heavy rains during the last three crops, soil TSS was reduced considerably and pH showed a slight increase. Concentrations of Cl(-) and Mg(2+) increased and Ca(2+) decreased at the end of the experiment, all leading to changes in the ionic composition of soil salinity. Manure with higher ion concentrations appeared to play a more important role in affecting ionic composition of soil salinity. The results further suggest that even in a region with abundant rainfall like Guangzhou, there is still potential risk for secondary soil salinization when high rates of CM and PM are applied.

  5. Assessing the groundwater salinization in closed hydrologic basins due to overdraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z.; Pauloo, R.; Fogg, G. E.

    2016-12-01

    Population growth and the expansion of agriculture, coupled with climate uncertainties, have accelerated groundwater pumping and overdraft in alluvial aquifers worldwide. In many agricultural basins, the low rate of replenishment is far exceeded by the rate of groundwater pumping in overdrafted aquifers, which results in the substantial water table declines and in effect contributes to the formation of a "closed" basin. In fact, even modest amounts of groundwater system drawdown that do not produce what is construed as overdraft, can result in most of the groundwater discharge occurring as evapotranspiration via irrigation practices, converting the basin to a closed groundwater basin. Moreover, in past decades, extreme weather conditions (i.e., severe drought in California for the past five years) have resulted in substantially reduced surface water storage. This increases demand for groundwater to supplement low surface water supplies, and consequently, drives groundwater overdraft, and hence, groundwater salinization. In these newly closed basins, just as in other naturally closed basins such as Death Valley and the Great Salt Lake, groundwater salinity must increase not only due to evaporation, but also due to rock water interactions in the groundwater system, and lack of a natural outlet for the groundwater. In this study, the water balance and salt balance in closed basins of the Central Valley, California are computed. Groundwater degradation under the current overdraft conditions is further investigated using simple models that are developed by upscaling more complex and heterogeneous transport models. The focus of this study is to determine the applicability of these simple models to represent regional transport without explicitly including the large-scale heterogeneity inherent in the more complex models. Groundwater salinization processes, including salt accumulation caused by evapotranspiration of applied irrigation water and rock

  6. Inferring coastal processes from regional-scale mapping of 222Radon and salinity: examples from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas C.; Cook, Peter G.; Burnett, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The radon isotope 222 Rn and salinity in coastal surface water were mapped on regional scales, to improve the understanding of coastal processes and their spatial variability. Radon was measured with a surface-towed, continuously recording multi-detector setup on a moving vessel. Numerous processes and locations of land-ocean interaction along the Central Great Barrier Reef coastline were identified and interpreted based on the data collected. These included riverine fluxes, terrestrially-derived fresh submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and the tidal pumping of seawater through mangrove forests. Based on variations in the relationship of the tracers radon and salinity, some aspects of regional freshwater inputs to the coastal zone and to estuaries could be assessed. Concurrent mapping of radon and salinity allowed an efficient qualitative assessment of land-ocean interaction on various spatial and temporal scales, indicating that such surveys on coastal scales can be a useful tool to obtain an overview of SGD locations and processes.

  7. Investigation of processing effects on the corrosion resistance of Ti20Mo alloy in saline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolat, G.; Izquierdo, J.; Gloriant, T.; Chelariu, R.; Mareci, D.; Souto, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Alloy fabrication method affects both surface finish and corrosion resistance. • More porous surface finish and higher wettability produced by powder sintering. • Passive layer formed on sintered alloy breaks down in saline solution. • Increase in surface porosity facilitated electron transfer through the oxide film. • More corrosion resistant alloy produced by cold crucible levitation melting. - Abstract: The electrochemical properties of Ti20Mo alloys prepared using different fabrication procedures, namely cold crucible levitation melting (CCLM) and powder sintering, were investigated using linear potentiodynamic polarization and EIS measurements. The surface condition was established using AFM, with the observation of a more porous surface finish in the case of powder sintering. A major effect of surface conditioning on the corrosion resistance of Ti20Mo alloys was observed, where the compact finish exhibits a superior corrosion resistance in chloride-containing saline solutions. Less insulating surfaces towards electron exchange resulted for the more porous finish as revealed by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM)

  8. Groundwater salinity and hydrochemical processes in the volcano-sedimentary aquifer of La Aldea, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Fuentes, Tatiana; Cabrera, María del Carmen; Heredia, Javier; Custodio, Emilio

    2014-06-15

    The origin of the groundwater salinity and hydrochemical conditions of a 44km(2) volcano-sedimentary aquifer in the semi-arid to arid La Aldea Valley (western Gran Canaria, Spain) has been studied, using major physical and chemical components. Current aquifer recharge is mainly the result of irrigation return flows and secondarily that of rainfall infiltration. Graphical, multivariate statistical and modeling tools have been applied in order to improve the hydrogeological conceptual model and identify the natural and anthropogenic factors controlling groundwater salinity. Groundwater ranges from Na-Cl-HCO3 type for moderate salinity water to Na-Mg-Cl-SO4 type for high salinity water. This is mainly the result of atmospheric airborne salt deposition; silicate weathering, and recharge incorporating irrigation return flows. High evapotranspiration produces significant evapo-concentration leading to relative high groundwater salinity in the area. Under average conditions, about 70% of the water used for intensive agricultural exploitation in the valley comes from three low salinity water runoff storage reservoirs upstream, out of the area, while the remaining 30% derives from groundwater. The main alluvial aquifer behaves as a short turnover time reservoir that adds to the surface waters to complement irrigation water supply in dry periods, when it reaches 70% of irrigation water requirements. The high seasonality and intra-annual variability of water demand for irrigation press on decision making on aquifer use by a large number of aquifer users acting on their own. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A risk assessment of water salinization during the initial impounding period of a proposed reservoir in Tianjin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liqin; Jiang, Cuiling; Wang, Youheng; Peng, Yanmei; Zhang, Peng

    2013-09-01

    Water salinization of coastal reservoirs seriously threatens the safety of their water supply. To elucidate the mechanism of salinization and to quantitatively analyze the risk in the initial period of the impoundment of a proposed reservoir in Tianjin Binhai New Area, laboratory and field simulation experiments were implemented and integrated with the actual operation of Beitang Reservoir, which is located in the same region and has been operational for many years. The results suggested that water salinization of the proposed reservoir was mainly governed by soil saline release, evaporation and leakage. Saline release was the prevailing factor in the earlier stage of the impoundment, then the evaporation and leakage effects gradually became notable over time. By referring to the actual case of Beitang Reservoir, it was predicted that the chloride ion (Cl(-)) concentration of the water during the initial impounding period of the proposed reservoir would exceed the standard for quality of drinking water from surface water sources (250 mg L(-1)), and that the proposed reservoir had a high risk of water salinization.

  10. The role of ethylene in plants under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Jun eTao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the roles of ethylene in plant response to salinity and other stresses have been extensively studied, there are still some obscure points left to be clarified. Generally, in Arabidopsis and many other terrestrial plants, ethylene signaling is indispensable for plant rapid response and tolerance to salinity stress. However, a few studies showed that functional knock-out of some ACSs increased plant salinity-tolerance, while overexpression of them caused more sensitivity. This seems to be contradictory to the known opinion that ethylene plays positive roles in salinity response. Differently, ethylene in rice may play negative roles in regulating seedling tolerance to salinity. The main positive ethylene signaling components MHZ7/OsEIN2, MHZ6/OsEIL1 and OsEIL2 all negatively regulate the salinity-tolerance of rice seedlings. Recently, several different research groups all proposed a negative feedback mechanism of coordinating plant growth and ethylene response, in which several ethylene-inducible proteins (including NtTCTP, NEIP2, SAUR76/77/78 and ARGOS act as inhibitors of ethylene response but activators of plant growth. Therefore, in addition to a summary of the general roles of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling in salinity response, this review mainly focused on discussing (i the discrepancies between ethylene biosynthesis and signaling in salinity response, (ii the divergence between rice and Arabidopsis in regulation of salinity response by ethylene, and (iii the possible negative feedback mechanism of coordinating plant growth and salinity response by ethylene.

  11. Integrating water by plant roots over spatially distributed soil salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homaee, Mehdi; Schmidhalter, Urs

    2010-05-01

    In numerical simulation models dealing with water movement and solute transport in vadose zone, the water budget largely depends on uptake patterns by plant roots. In real field conditions, the uptake pattern largely changes in time and space. When dealing with soil and water salinity, most saline soils demonstrate spatially distributed osmotic head over the root zone. In order to quantify such processes, the major difficulty stems from lacking a sink term function that adequately accounts for the extraction term especially under variable soil water osmotic heads. The question of how plants integrate such space variable over its rooting depth remains as interesting issue for investigators. To move one step forward towards countering this concern, a well equipped experiment was conducted under heterogeneously distributed salinity over the root zone with alfalfa. The extraction rates of soil increments were calculated with the one dimensional form of Richards equation. The results indicated that the plant uptake rate under different mean soil salinities preliminary reacts to soil salinity, whereas at given water content and salinity the "evaporative demand" and "root activity" become more important to control the uptake patterns. Further analysis revealed that root activity is inconstant when imposed to variable soil salinity. It can be concluded that under heterogeneously distributed salinity, most water is taken from the less saline increment while the extraction from other root zone increments with higher salinities never stops.

  12. Ecological, biogeochemical and salinity changes in coastal lakes and wetlands over the last 200 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lucy; Holmes, Jonathan; Horne, David

    2016-04-01

    Shallow lakes provide extensive ecosystem services and are ecologically important aquatic resources supporting a diverse flora and fauna. In marginal-marine areas, where such lakes are subjected to the multiple pressures of coastal erosion, sea level rise, increasing sea surface temperature and increasing frequency and intensity of storm surges, environments are complex and unstable. They are characterised by physico-chemical variations due to climatic (precipitation/evaporation cycles) and dynamic factors (tides, currents, freshwater drainage and sea level changes). Combined with human activity in the catchment these processes can alter the salinity, habitat and ecology of coastal fresh- to brackish water ecosystems. In this study the chemical and biological stability of coastal lakes forming the Upper Thurne catchment in the NE of the Norfolk Broads, East Anglia, UK are seriously threatened by long-term changes in salinity resulting from storm surges, complex hydrogeology and anthropogenic activity in the catchment. Future management decisions depend on a sound understanding of the potential ecological impacts, but such understanding is limited by short-term observations and measurements. This research uses palaeolimnological approaches, which can be validated and calibrated with historical records, to reconstruct changes in the aquatic environment on a longer time scale than can be achieved by observations alone. Here, salinity is quantitatively reconstructed using the trace-element geochemistry (Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca) of low Mg-calcite shells of Ostracoda (microscopic bivalved crustaceans) and macrophyte and macroinvertebrate macrofossil remains are used as a proxy to assess ecological change in response to variations in salinity. δ13C values of Cladocera (which are potentially outcompeted by the mysid Neomysis integer with increasing salinity and eutrophication) can be used to reconstruct carbon cycling and energy pathways in lake food webs, which alongside

  13. Climatology and seasonality of upper ocean salinity: a three-dimensional view from argo floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ge; Peng, Lin; Ma, Chunyong

    2017-06-01

    Primarily due to the constraints of observation technologies (both field and satellite measurements), our understanding of ocean salinity is much less mature compared to ocean temperature. As a result, the characterizations of the two most important properties of the ocean are unfortunately out of step: the former is one generation behind the latter in terms of data availability and applicability. This situation has been substantially changed with the advent of the Argo floats which measure the two variables simultaneously on a global scale since early this century. The first decade of Argo-acquired salinity data are analyzed here in the context of climatology and seasonality, yielding the following main findings for the global upper oceans. First, the six well-defined "salty pools" observed around ±20° in each hemisphere of the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans are found to tilt westward vertically from the sea surface to about 600 m depth, forming six saline cores within the subsurface oceans. Second, while potential temperature climatology decreases monotonically to the bottom in most places of the ocean, the vertical distribution of salinity can be classified into two categories: A double-halocline type forming immediately above and below the local salinity maximum around 100-150 m depths in the tropical and subtropical oceans, and a single halocline type existing at about 100 m depth in the extratropical oceans. Third, in contrast to the midlatitude dominance for temperature, seasonal variability of salinity in the oceanic mixed layer has a clear tropical dominance. Meanwhile, it is found that a two-mode structure with annual and semiannual periodicities can effectively penetrate through the upper ocean into a depth of 2000 m. Fourth, signature of Rossby waves is identified in the annual phase map of ocean salinity within 200-600 m depths in the tropical oceans, revealing a strongly co-varying nature of ocean temperature and salinity at specific depths

  14. Climatology and seasonality of upper ocean salinity: a three-dimensional view from argo floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ge; Peng, Lin; Ma, Chunyong

    2018-03-01

    Primarily due to the constraints of observation technologies (both field and satellite measurements), our understanding of ocean salinity is much less mature compared to ocean temperature. As a result, the characterizations of the two most important properties of the ocean are unfortunately out of step: the former is one generation behind the latter in terms of data availability and applicability. This situation has been substantially changed with the advent of the Argo floats which measure the two variables simultaneously on a global scale since early this century. The first decade of Argo-acquired salinity data are analyzed here in the context of climatology and seasonality, yielding the following main findings for the global upper oceans. First, the six well-defined "salty pools" observed around ±20° in each hemisphere of the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans are found to tilt westward vertically from the sea surface to about 600 m depth, forming six saline cores within the subsurface oceans. Second, while potential temperature climatology decreases monotonically to the bottom in most places of the ocean, the vertical distribution of salinity can be classified into two categories: A double-halocline type forming immediately above and below the local salinity maximum around 100-150 m depths in the tropical and subtropical oceans, and a single halocline type existing at about 100 m depth in the extratropical oceans. Third, in contrast to the midlatitude dominance for temperature, seasonal variability of salinity in the oceanic mixed layer has a clear tropical dominance. Meanwhile, it is found that a two-mode structure with annual and semiannual periodicities can effectively penetrate through the upper ocean into a depth of 2000 m. Fourth, signature of Rossby waves is identified in the annual phase map of ocean salinity within 200-600 m depths in the tropical oceans, revealing a strongly co-varying nature of ocean temperature and salinity at specific depths

  15. Study of the Effect of Clay Particles on Low Salinity Water Injection in Sandstone Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Rezaei Gomari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The need for optimal recovery of crude oil from sandstone and carbonate reservoirs around the world has never been greater for the petroleum industry. Water-flooding has been applied to the supplement primary depletion process or as a separate secondary recovery method. Low salinity water injection is a relatively new method that involves injecting low salinity brines at high pressure similar to conventional water-flooding techniques, in order to recover crude oil. The effectiveness of low salinity water injection in sandstone reservoirs depends on a number of parameters such as reservoir temperature, pressure, type of clay particle and salinity of injected brine. Clay particles present on reservoir rock surfaces adsorb polar components of oil and modify wettability of sandstone rocks to the oil-wet state, which is accountable for the reduced recovery rates by conventional water-flooding. The extent of wettability alteration caused by three low salinity brines on oil-wet sandstone samples containing varying clay content (15% or 30% and type of clay (kaolinite/montmorillonite were analyzed in the laboratory experiment. Contact angles of mica powder and clay mixture (kaolinite/montmorillonite modified with crude oil were measured before and after injection with three low salinity sodium chloride brines. The effect of temperature was also analyzed for each sample. The results of the experiment indicate that samples with kaolinite clay tend to produce higher contact angles than samples with montmorillonite clay when modified with crude oil. The highest degree or extent of wettability alteration from oil-wet to intermediate-wet state upon injection with low salinity brines was observed for samples injected with brine having salinity concentration of 2000 ppm. The increase in temperature tends to produce contact angles values lying in the higher end of the intermediate-wet range (75°–115° for samples treated at 50 °C, while their corresponding

  16. Cl/Br ratios and chlorine isotope evidences for groundwater salinization and its impact on groundwater arsenic, fluoride and iodine enrichment in the Datong basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junxia; Wang, Yanxin; Xie, Xianjun

    2016-02-15

    In order to identify the salinization processes and its impact on arsenic, fluoride and iodine enrichment in groundwater, hydrogeochemical and environmental isotope studies have been conducted on groundwater from the Datong basin, China. The total dissolved solid (TDS) concentrations in groundwater ranged from 451 to 8250 mg/L, and 41% of all samples were identified as moderately saline groundwater with TDS of 3000-10,000 mg/L. The results of groundwater Cl concentrations, Cl/Br molar ratio and Cl isotope composition suggest that three processes including water-rock interaction, surface saline soil flushing, and evapotranspiration result in the groundwater salinization in the study area. The relatively higher Cl/Br molar ratio in groundwater from multiple screening wells indicates the contribution of halite dissolution from saline soil flushed by vertical infiltration to the groundwater salinization. However, the results of groundwater Cl/Br molar ratio model indicate that the effect of saline soil flushing practice is limited to account for the observed salinity variation in groundwater. The plots of groundwater Cl vs. Cl/Br molar ratio, and Cl vs δ(37)Cl perform the dominant effects of evapotranspiration on groundwater salinization. Inverse geochemical modeling results show that evapotranspiration may cause approximately 66% loss of shallow groundwater to account for the observed hydrochemical pattern. Due to the redox condition fluctuation induced by irrigation activities and evapotranspiration, groundwater salinization processes have negative effects on groundwater arsenic enrichment. For groundwater iodine and fluoride enrichment, evapotranspiration partly accounts for their elevation in slightly saline water. However, too strong evapotranspiration would restrict groundwater fluoride concentration due to the limitation of fluorite solubility. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Groundwater salinity at Olkiluoto and its effects on a spent fuel repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieno, T.

    2000-06-01

    The Olkiluoto island rose from the Baltic Sea 2500 to 3000 years ago. The layered sequence of groundwaters can be related to climatic and shoreline changes from modern tune through former Baltic stages to the deglaciation phase about 10 000 years ago and even to preglacial times. Fresh groundwater is found to the depth of about 150 metres, brackish between 100 and 400 metres, deeper groundwaters are saline. At the depth of 500 meters, the content of Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) varies between 10 and 25 g/l. The most saline waters at depths greater than 800 metres have TDS values between 30 and 75 g/l. These deep saline waters seem to have been undisturbed during the most recent glaciation and even much longer in the past. Today fresh water infiltrating at the surface gradually displaces brackish and saline groundwater in the bedrock. Due to the still ongoing postglacial land uplift, Olkiluoto is likely to become an inland site with brackish or fresh groundwater at the depth of 500 metres within the next 10 000 years. During the construction and operation phases groundwater will be drawn into the repository from the surrounding bedrock. As a consequence, more saline groundwaters, presently laying 100 to 200 metres below the repository level, may rise to the disposal level. After the closing of the repository the salinity distribution will gradually return towards the natural state. During the glacial cycle groundwater salinity may increase, for example, during freezing of groundwater into permafrost, when dissolved solids concentrate in the remaining water phase, and in a situation where deep saline groundwaters from under the centre of the glacier are pushed to the upper parts of the bedrock at the periphery of the glacier. The most significant open issue related to saline groundwater is the performance of the tunnel backfill which in the BS-3 concept has been planned to consist of a mixture of crushed rock and 10-30% of bentonite. Saline groundwater may

  18. Radium Adsorption to Iron Bearing Minerals in Variable Salinity Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Kocar, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Radium is a common, naturally occurring radioactive metal found in many subsurface environments. Radium isotopes are a product of natural uranium and thorium decay, and are particularly abundant within groundwaters where minimal flux leads to accumulation within porewaters. Radium has been used as a natural tracer to estimate submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) [1], where the ratios of various radium isotopes are used to estimate total groundwater flux to and from the ocean [2]. Further, it represents a substantial hazard in waste water produced after hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction [3], resulting in a significant risk of environmental release and increased cost for water treatment or disposal. Adsorption to mineral surfaces represents a primary pathway of radium retention within subsurface environments. For SGD studies, it is important to understand adsorption processes to correctly estimate GW fluxes, while in hydraulic fracturing, radium adsorption to aquifer solids will mediate the activities of radium within produced water. While some studies of radium adsorption to various minerals have been performed [4], there is a limited understanding of the surface chemistry of radium adsorption, particularly to iron-bearing minerals such as pyrite, goethite and ferrihydrite. Accordingly, we present the results of sorption experiments of radium to a suite of iron-bearing minerals representative of those found within deep saline and near-surface (freshwater) aquifers, and evaluate impacts of varying salinity solutions through the use of artificial groundwater, seawater, and shale formation brine. Further, we explore the impacts of pyrite oxidation and ferrihydrite transformation to other iron-bearing secondary minerals on the retention of radium. This work lays the groundwork for further study of radium use as a tracer for SGD, as well as understanding mechanisms of radium retention and release from deep aquifer materials following hydraulic fracturing

  19. Impact of hydrogeological factors on groundwater salinization due to ocean-surge inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Zhang, Huichen; Yu, Xuan; Graf, Thomas; Michael, Holly A.

    2018-01-01

    Ocean surges cause seawater inundation of coastal inland areas. Subsequently, seawater infiltrates into coastal aquifers and threatens the fresh groundwater resource. The severity of resulting salinization can be affected by hydrogeological factors including aquifer properties and hydrologic conditions, however, little research has been done to assess these effects. To understand the impacts of hydrogeological factors on groundwater salinization, we numerically simulated an ocean-surge inundation event on a two-dimensional conceptual coastal aquifer using a coupled surface-subsurface approach. We varied model permeability (including anisotropy), inland hydraulic gradient, and recharge rate. Three salinization-assessment indicators were developed, based on flushing time, depth of salt penetration, and a combination of the two, weighted flushing time, with which the impact of hydrogeological factors on groundwater vulnerability to salinization were quantitatively assessed. The vulnerability of coastal aquifers increases with increasing isotropic permeability. Low horizontal permeability (kx) and high vertical permeability (kz) lead to high aquifer vulnerability, and high kx and low kz lead to low aquifer vulnerability. Vulnerability decreases with increasing groundwater hydraulic gradient and increasing recharge rate. Additionally, coastal aquifers with a low recharge rate (R ≤ 300 mm yr-1) may be highly vulnerable to ocean-surge inundation. This study shows how the newly introduced indicators can be used to quantitatively assess coastal aquifer vulnerability. The results are important for global vulnerability assessment of coastal aquifers to ocean-surge inundation.

  20. The Earthworm Eisenia fetida Can Help Desalinate a Coastal Saline Soil in Tianjin, North China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    Full Text Available A laboratory microcosm experiment was conducted to determine whether the earthworm Eisenia fetida could survive in a saline soil from a field site in North China, and an experiment using response surface methodology was conducted at that field site to quantify the effects of E. fetida and green waste compost (GWC on the salt content of the soil. The microcosm results showed that E. fetida survived in GWC-amended saline soil and increased the contents of humic acid, available N, and available P in the GWC-amended soil. The data from the field experiment were described by the following second-order model: [Formula in text], where y is the decrease in soil salinity (g of salt per kg of dry soil relative to the untreated control, x1 is the number of E. fetida added per m2, and x2 is the quantity of GWC added in kg per m2. The model predicted that the total salt content of the saline soil would decrease by > 2 g kg(-1 (p<0.05 when 29-90 individuals m-2 of E. fetida and 6.1-15.0 kg m(-2 of GWC were applied. We conclude that the use of E. fetida for soil desalination is promising and warrants additional investigation.

  1. Effects of salinity variations on CODAR ranges during the 2016 Bonnet Carré Spillway Opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, S. D.; Diercks, A. R.; Hode, L. E.; Cambazoglu, M. K.; Martin, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    On January 10, 2016 the Bonnet Carré Spillway was opened to relieve flooding on the Mississippi River, diverting river water into Lake Pontchartrain and then through the western Mississippi Sound. As part of the response to understand the effects of the spillway opening on the Mississippi Sound, a pair of 25 MHz CODAR SeaSondes were deployed on the coast of the western Mississippi Sound to monitor surface currents. This presented the additional opportunity to run a natural experiment on the effect of salinity on the range of CODAR signals. During the spillway event, salinities in the CODAR coverage area, as measured by monitoring stations operated by a partnership between the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources and the United States Geological Survey in the Sound ranged from over 30 to less than 2. Ranges from the CODAR stations were significantly correlated with these salinities. Additionally, the Naval Coastal Ocean Model output, run with real-time river input plus the Bonnet Carré Spillway freshwater input, was available for the analyzes for the spillway event time frame. The observations and modeling were used to investigate the role of salinity on SeaSonde range and how well those variations agree with theory.

  2. Effect of Two Halophyte Plants Irrigated with Saline Water on Soil Salinization under Different Soil Type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Sabour, M. F.; Rizk, M. A.; Abdel Aziz, A.; Moustafa, S. M.; Eigala, A. M.; Abuo El-Naga, H.

    2007-01-01

    A lysimeter experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of saline water irrigation at three levels namely, fresh water (0.3), 4 and 8 dS/m on salt accumulation and its effect on different soil types. The tested halophyte plants were Kallar grass and Atriplex (Salt bush). The tested soil types were sandy, calcareous and clayey soils. Irrigating the soil with saline water (either 4 or 8 dS/m) resulted in increasing salinity levels in soil profile with different orders of magnitude, depending on the soil type layer and the cultivated plant. Kallar grass seems limit the accumulation of salts in soil profile, compared to Atriplex at any tested soil. This may be attributed to its root effect on soil profile such as dispersed soil matrix and improved soil structure, which provide channels for solute movement through the profile under halophyte cultivation. Calculating the SAR average values for each irrigation treatment (18 values) showed significant increase in soil SAR values, especially under Kallar grass compared to Atriplex. The highest SAR values were observed in the case of clayey soil. However, the relevant SAR values under Atriplex cultivation were always lower. Values for SAR were always higher in the saline clayey > calcareous > sandy soils

  3. Salinization of soil over saline-sodic overburden from the oil sands in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, S.; Dobchuk, B.S. [O' Kane Consultants Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Barbour, S.L. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). College of Engineering; Van Rees, K.C.J. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Agricultural and Bioresource Engineering

    2010-11-15

    This paper characterized the 4-year evolution of salinity profiles in the reclaimed soil covers placed over saline-sodic overburden in the Athabasca region of Alberta, evaluated the influence of cover thickness and salt redistribution in the reclaimed material, and sought to identify the dominant mechanism of salt transport contributing to these profiles. A comparison of 4 reclamation treatments showed that salts accumulated in the cover soils, increasing the electrical conductivity in the lower part of the soils to levels exceeding the acceptable value for plant growth. Diffusion and not slope position was found to be the predominant mechanism driving the salt redistribution in the soils, at least for the 4-year period under observation. The cover thickness had no effect on the extent of salt ingress, but the average salinity for thinner soils was substantially higher than the average for thicker covers. The higher salinity levels compromised the overall quality of the thinner covers for vegetative growth. The thicker covers performed better as a reclamation prescription because the water storage capacity above the salt-affected zone was sufficient for the maintenance of vegetative communities. 46 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  4. Environmental Assessment for the Saline Valley Radar Facility Project Saline Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    positions. In 1999, a Marine Corps jet aircraft crashed in the Saline Valley area. Because of the lack of radar data, the search area initially...Sauromalus obesus), zebra-tailed lizards (Callisaurus draconoides), desert iguanas Section 3.0 – Description of Proposed Action FINAL December

  5. Aggregation and adhesion of gold nanoparticles in phosphate buffered saline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shangfeng; Kendall, Kevin; Toloueinia, Panteha; Mehrabadi, Yasamin; Gupta, Gaurav; Newton, Jill

    2012-03-01

    In applications in medicine and more specifically drug delivery, the dispersion stability of nanoparticles plays a significant role on their final performances. In this study, with the use of two laser technologies, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), we report a simple method to estimate the stability of nanoparticles dispersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Stability has two features: (1) self-aggregation as the particles tend to stick to each other; (2) disappearance of particles as they adhere to surrounding substrate surfaces such as glass, metal, or polymer. By investigating the effects of sonication treatment and surface modification by five types of surfactants, including nonylphenol ethoxylate (NP9), polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), human serum albumin (HSA), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and citrate ions on the dispersion stability, the varying self-aggregation and adhesion of gold nanoparticles dispersed in PBS are demonstrated. The results showed that PVP effectively prevented aggregation, while HSA exhibited the best performance in avoiding the adhesion of gold nanoparticle in PBS onto glass and metal. The simple principle of this method makes it a high potential to be applied to other nanoparticles, including virus particles, used in dispersing and processing.

  6. Aggregation and adhesion of gold nanoparticles in phosphate buffered saline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Shangfeng, E-mail: s.du@bham.ac.uk; Kendall, Kevin; Toloueinia, Panteha; Mehrabadi, Yasamin; Gupta, Gaurav; Newton, Jill [University of Birmingham, School of Chemical Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    In applications in medicine and more specifically drug delivery, the dispersion stability of nanoparticles plays a significant role on their final performances. In this study, with the use of two laser technologies, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), we report a simple method to estimate the stability of nanoparticles dispersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Stability has two features: (1) self-aggregation as the particles tend to stick to each other; (2) disappearance of particles as they adhere to surrounding substrate surfaces such as glass, metal, or polymer. By investigating the effects of sonication treatment and surface modification by five types of surfactants, including nonylphenol ethoxylate (NP9), polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), human serum albumin (HSA), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and citrate ions on the dispersion stability, the varying self-aggregation and adhesion of gold nanoparticles dispersed in PBS are demonstrated. The results showed that PVP effectively prevented aggregation, while HSA exhibited the best performance in avoiding the adhesion of gold nanoparticle in PBS onto glass and metal. The simple principle of this method makes it a high potential to be applied to other nanoparticles, including virus particles, used in dispersing and processing.

  7. Types, harms and improvement of saline soil in Songnen Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengjun; Zhuang, Jingjing; Zhao, Anping; Li, Xinxin

    2018-03-01

    Saline soil is an extremely difficult and modified soil, widely distributed around the world. According to UN-UNESCO and FAO, the world’s saline soil area is about 9.54×108hm2, and there is a growing trend, every year in 1.0×106-1.5×106hm2 speed growth, the effective utilization of land resources to the world is the most serious threat. The total area of saline-alkali land in China is about 9.91×107hm2, including the Songnen Plain, which is called one of the three major saline soil concentrations in the world. The Songnen plain is an important grain producing area in China, and the saline soil occupies most of the Songnen plain, so it is of great significance to study the saline soil and improvement in Songnen plain.

  8. Salinity sources of Kefar Uriya wells in the Judea Group aquifer of Israel. Part 1—conceptual hydrogeological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avisar, D.; Rosenthal, E.; Flexer, A.; Shulman, H.; Ben-Avraham, Z.; Guttman, J.

    2003-01-01

    In the Yarkon-Taninim groundwater basin, the karstic Judea Group aquifer contains groundwater of high quality. However, in the western wells of the Kefar Uriya area located in the foothills of the Judea Mountains, brackish groundwater was locally encountered. The salinity of this water is caused presumably by two end members designated as the 'Hazerim' and 'Lakhish' water types. The Hazerim type represents surface water percolating through a highly fractured thin chalky limestone formation overlying the Judea Group aquifer. The salinity of the water derives conjointly from several sources such as leachates from rendzina and grumosols, dissolution of caliche crusts which contain evaporites and of rock debris from the surrounding formations. This surface water percolates downwards into the aquifer through a funnel- or chimney-like mechanism. This local salinization mechanism supercedes another regional process caused by the Lakhish waters. These are essentially diluted brines originating from deep formations in the western parts of the Coastal Plain. The study results show that salinization is not caused by the thick chalky beds of the Senonian Mt Scopus Group overlying the Judea Group aquifer, as traditionally considered but prevalently by aqueous leachates from soils and rock debris. The conceptual qualitative hydrogeological model of the salinization as demonstrated in this study, is supported by a quantitative hydrological model presented in another paper in this volume.

  9. Dynamic changes in water and salinity in saline-alkali soils after simulated irrigation and leaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutao Wang

    Full Text Available Soil salinization is a global problem that limits agricultural development and impacts human life. This study aimed to understand the dynamic changes in water and salinity in saline-alkali soil based on an indoor soil column simulation. We studied the changes in the water and salt contents of soils with different degrees of salinization under various irrigation conditions. The results showed that after seven irrigations, the pH, conductivity and total soluble salt content of the percolation samples after irrigation generally increased initially then decreased with repeated irrigation. The soil moisture did not change significantly after irrigation. The pH, conductivity, and total soluble salt content of each layer of the soil profile exhibited general declining trends. In the soil profile from Changguo Township (CG, the pH decreased from 8.21-8.35 to 7.71-7.88, the conductivity decreased from 0.95-1.14 ms/cm to 0.45-0.68 ms/cm, and the total soluble salt content decreased from 2.63-2.81 g/kg to 2.28-2.51 g/kg. In the soil profile from Zhongjie Industrial Park (ZJ, the pH decreased from 8.36-8.54 to 7.73-7.96, the conductivity decreased from 1.58-1.68 ms/cm to 1.45-1.54 ms/cm, and the total soluble salt decreased from 2.81-4.03 g/kg to 2.56-3.28 g/kg. The transported salt ions were primarily K+, Na+ and Cl-. After several irrigations, a representative desalination effect was achieved. The results of this study can provide technical guidance for the comprehensive management of saline-alkali soils.

  10. Estimation of sea surface temperature (SST) using marine seismic data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sinha, S.K.; Dewangan, P.; Sain, K.

    diurnal variation in temperature. Keywords: Marine Seismic; Direct Arrivals; Soundspeed; Sea Surface Temperature; Diurnal variations. 2 INTRODUCTION Properties of sound waves in oceans are governed by temperature, salinity, water composition... understand ocean dynamics, researchers in the field of ocean acoustics invert for temperature and salinity from observed sound waves, whereas oceanographers measure governing parameters directly by deploying devices such as Expendable Bathythermographs...

  11. Simulation of Salinity Distribution in Soil Under Drip Irrigation Tape with Saline Water Using SWAP Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tabei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The to be limited available water amount from one side and to be increased needs of world population from the other side have caused increase of cultivation for products. For this reason, employing new irrigation ways and using new water resources like using the uncommon water (salty water, water drainage are two main strategies for regulating water shortage conditions. On the other side, accumulation of salts on the soil surface in dry regions having low rainfall and much evaporation, i.e. an avoidable case. As doing experiment for determining moisture distribution form demands needs a lot of time and conducting desert experiments are costly, stimulator models are suitable alternatives in answering the problem concerning moving and saltiness distribution. Materials and Methods: In this research, simulation of soil saltiness under drip irrigation was done by the SWAP model and potency of the above model was done in comparison with evaluated relevant results. SWAP model was performed based on measured data in a corn field equipped with drip irrigation system in the farming year 1391-92 in the number one research field in the engineering faculty of water science, ShahidChamran university of Ahvaz and hydraulic parameters of soil obtained from RETC . Statistical model in the form of a random full base plan with four attendants for irrigating water saltiness including salinity S1 (Karoon River water with salinity 3 ds/m as a control treatment, S2 (S1 +0/5, S3 (S1 +1 and S4 (S1 +1/5 dS/m, in 3 repetition and in 3 intervals of 10 cm emitter, 20 cm emitters on the stack, at a depth of 0-90 cm (instead of each 30 cm from soil surface and intervals of 30, 60 and 90 days after modeling cultiviation was done. The cultivation way was done handheld in plots including four rows of 3 m in distance of 75 cm rows and with denseness of 80 bushes in a hectar. Drip irrigation system was of type strip with space of 20 cm pores. Results and Discussion

  12. Coagulation processes of kaolinite and montmorillonite in calm, saline water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Qing-He; Maa, Jerome P.-Y.

    2018-03-01

    A three dimensional numerical model for simulating the coagulation processes of colloids has been performed by monitoring the time evolution of particle number concentration, the size distribution of aggregates, the averaged settling velocity, the collision frequency, and the collision efficiency in quiescent water with selected salinities. This model directly simulates all interaction forces between particles based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory, and thus, can reveal the collision and coagulation processes of colloidal suspensions. Although using perfect spherical particles in the modeling, the results were compared with those for kaolinite and montmorillonite suspensions to demonstrate the capability of simulating the responses of these particles with highly irregular shape. The averaged settling velocity of kaolinite aggregates in quiescent saline water reached a maximum of 0.16 mm/s when the salinity increasing to about 3, and then, exhibited little dependence on salinity thereafter. Model simulations results (by choosing specific values that represent kaolinite's characteristics) indicate a similar trend: rapid decrease of the particle number concentration (i.e., rapidly flocculated, and thus, settling velocity also increases rapidly) when salinity increases from 0 to 2, and then, only increased slightly when salinity was further increased from 5 to 20. The collision frequency for kaolinite only decreases slightly with increasing salinity because that the fluid density and viscosity increase slightly in sea water. It suggests that the collision efficiency for kaolinite rises rapidly at low salinities and levels off at high salinity. For montmorillonite, the settling velocity of aggregates in quiescent saline water continuedly increases to 0.022 mm/s over the whole salinity range 0-20, and the collision efficiency for montmorillonite rises with increasing salinities.

  13. Variable Saline Concentrations for Initial Resuscitation Following Polytrauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    cerebral edema . In addition, 3% saline may be the optimal crystalloid fluid to resuscitate in the setting of hypotension after head injury, as it limits...ongoing inflammation, cerebral edema , and neurologic injury while preserving blood pressure and survival. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Resuscitation, saline...leads to increased mortality despite decreased posttraumatic cerebral edema . In addition, 3% saline may be the optimal crystalloid fluid to resuscitate

  14. Influence of salinity and water content on soil microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Nan; Marschner, Petra; Cao, Wenhong; Zuo, Changqing; Qin, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Salinization is one of the most serious land degradation problems facing world. Salinity results in poor plant growth and low soil microbial activity due to osmotic stress and toxic ions. Soil microorganisms play a pivotal role in soils through mineralization of organic matter into plant available nutrients. Therefore it is important to maintain high microbial activity in soils. Salinity tolerant soil microbes counteract osmotic stress by synthesizing osmolytes which allows them to maintain t...

  15. Rainwater lens dynamics and mixing between infiltrating rainwater and upward saline groundwater seepage beneath a tile-drained agricultural field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louw, de P.G.B.; Eeman, S.; Oude Essink, G.H.P.; Vermue, E.; Post, V.E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Thin rainwater lenses (RW-lenses) near the land surface are often the only source of freshwater in agricultural areas with regionally-extensive brackish to saline groundwater. The seasonal and inter-annual dynamics of these lenses are poorly known. Here this knowledge gap is addressed by

  16. Low-salinity water off West Luzon Island in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yunwei; Wang, Guihua; Wang, Chunzai; Su, Jilan

    2015-04-01

    Low-salinity water with two cores is found off West Luzon Island in the South China Sea (SCS) during summer. A series of salinity observations and model results show that the low-salinity water begins to appear in June, reaches its lowest salinity in September, and disappears after October. Rainfall associated with the summer monsoon impinging on the Philippine mountain ranges plays an important role in the formation of the low-salinity water, while upward Ekman pumping of high-salinity subsurface water caused by the strong winter monsoon is important for its disappearance. Variation in mixed layer depth is responsible for the formation of the two cores of the low-salinity water, while advection also contributes. The study further demonstrates that the low-salinity water has considerable interannual variability associated with El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO): during the summer of the decaying year of an El Niño, an anticyclonic wind anomaly occurs in the SCS. The anticyclonic wind anomaly is associated with a northeasterly anomaly south of 18°N, reducing precipitation and causing salting of the low-salinity water off West Luzon Island. The situation is reversed during the summer of the decaying year of a La Niña.

  17. Phenanthrene partitioning in sediment-surfactant-fresh/saline water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hongwen; Wu Wenling; Wang Lei

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of salinity on the effectiveness of surfactants in the remediation of sediments contaminated with phenanthrene (PHE). This is an example of a more general application of surfactants in removing hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) from contaminated soil/sediment in saline environments via in-situ enhanced sorption or ex-situ soil washing. Salinity effects on surfactant micelle formation and PHE partitioning into solution surfactant micelles and sorbed surfactant were investigated. The critical micelle concentration of surfactants decreased, and PHE partition between surfactant micelles and water increased with increasing salinity. Carbon-normalized partition coefficients (K ss ) of PHE onto the sorbed cationic surfactant increased significantly with increasing salinity, which illustrates a more pronounced immobilization of PHE by cationic surfactant in a saline system. Reduction of PHE sorption by anionic surfactant was more pronounced in the saline system, indicating that the anionic surfactant has a higher soil washing effectiveness in saline systems. - The effectiveness of surfactant-enhanced remediation technology was promoted when applying it in estuarine environment with a higher salinity.

  18. Production of salinity tolerant Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of salinity tolerant Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus through traditional and modern breeding methods: II. Application of genetically modified breeding by introducing foreign DNA into fish gonads.

  19. Influence of salinity and water content on soil microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Yan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Salinization is one of the most serious land degradation problems facing world. Salinity results in poor plant growth and low soil microbial activity due to osmotic stress and toxic ions. Soil microorganisms play a pivotal role in soils through mineralization of organic matter into plant available nutrients. Therefore it is important to maintain high microbial activity in soils. Salinity tolerant soil microbes counteract osmotic stress by synthesizing osmolytes which allows them to maintain their cell turgor and metabolism. Osmotic potential is a function of the salt concentration in the soil solution and therefore affected by both salinity (measured as electrical conductivity at a certain water content and soil water content. Soil salinity and water content vary in time and space. Understanding the effect of changes in salinity and water content on soil microorganisms is important for crop production, sustainable land use and rehabilitation of saline soils. In this review, the effects of soil salinity and water content on microbes are discussed to guide future research into management of saline soils.

  20. Improvement of Salinity Stress Tolerance in Rice: Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi My Linh Hoang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice (Oryza sativa L. is an important staple crop that feeds more than one half of the world’s population and is the model system for monocotyledonous plants. However, rice is very sensitive to salinity and is the most salt sensitive cereal crop with a threshold of 3 dSm−1 for most cultivated varieties. Despite many attempts using different strategies to improve salinity tolerance in rice, the achievements so far are quite modest. This review aims to discuss challenges that hinder the improvement of salinity stress tolerance in rice as well as potential opportunities for enhancing salinity stress tolerance in this important crop.

  1. Numerical Modeling of Water Flow and Salt Transport in Bare Saline Soil Subjected to Transient Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, X.; Boufadel, M.; Saleh, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    It has been found that evaporation over bare soil plays an important role in subsurface solute transport processes. A numerical study, based on a density-dependent variably saturated groundwater flow model MARUN, was conducted to investigate subsurface flow and salt transport in bare saline aquifers subjected to transient evaporation. The bulk aerodynamic formulation was adopted to simulate transient evaporation rate at ground surface. Subsurface flow pattern, moisture distribution, and salt migration were quantified. Key factors likely affecting this process, including saturated hydraulic conductivity, capillary drive, air humidity, and surrounding water supply, were examined. The results showed that evaporation induced an upward flow pattern, which led to a high saline plume formed beneath the evaporation zone. In absence of surrounding water supply, as the humidity between the ground surface and air tended to equilibrium, evaporation-induced density gradient generated pore water circulations around the plume edge and caused the salt to migrate downwards with "finger" shapes. It was found that capillary properties and atmospheric condition had significant impacts on subsurface moisture distribution and salt migration in response to the evaporation. Larger capillary fringe and/or lower air humidity would allow evaporation to extract more water from the ground. It would induce a larger and denser saline plume formed beneath the evaporation zone. The results also suggested that the presence of the surrounding water supply (represented as a constant water table herein) could provide a steady evaporation rate at the ground surface; meanwhile, in response to the evaporation, a hydraulic gradient was formed from the water supply boundary, which induced an inclined upper saline plume with greater density far from the supply boundary.

  2. Geochemical characteristics of naturally acid and alkaline saline lakes in southern Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, Brenda Beitler; Benison, Kathleen C.

    2009-01-01

    Abundant shallow saline lakes on the Archean Yilgarn Craton in southern Western Australia exhibit a rare spectrum of geochemical conditions. Here the field geochemistry over three seasons (pH, salinity, and temperature), as well as major ions, trace elements, and H, O, and S stable isotopes of surface waters and shallow groundwaters from 59 ephemeral lakes in southern Western Australia (WA) are reported. Approximately 40% of the lakes and 84% of the measured groundwaters in WA are extremely acidic (pH 28%. The fluids are typically Na-Cl to Na-Mg-Cl-SO 4 brines with variable yet locally high amounts of Ca, K, Al, Fe, Si, and Br. The acid brine fluid compositions are unusual. For example, in some fluids the amount of Al>>Ca, the amount of Br > K, and comparison of total S to SO 4 2- values suggest the presence of other uncommon S-bearing species. Trends in δ 18 O and δ 2 H illustrate the separation between surface lake water and shallow groundwaters, and indicate the contribution of meteoric waters to the lakes. The chemical and isotopic compositions of these fluids indicate a spatially and temporally dynamic, yet regionally consistent, history of brine evolution that is fundamentally different from most other terrestrial closed basin brines. The WA lake brines do not evolve from surface evaporation of dilute inflow waters, but rather are fed by highly evolved regionally acid saline groundwaters. The lake waters then diversify with locally varying surface and near-surface processes such as meteoric dilution by flooding, evapoconcentration, mineral precipitation and dissolution, and fluid mixing. The WA lake waters and groundwaters are somewhat similar to those in an entirely different geologic setting in northeastern Victoria, illustrating the potential for different geochemical pathways to lead to the formation of similar lacustrine acid brines. Although these types of environments are rare in modern settings, ancient ephemeral acid saline lake deposits have been

  3. Differences in salinity tolerance and gene expression between two populations of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in response to salinity stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Foged; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Meier, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    in salinity tolerance and gene expression among Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) from two populations distributed across a steep salinity gradient, we observed high mortality (45% North Sea cod and 80% Baltic Sea cod) in a reciprocal common garden setup. Quantitative RT-PCR assays for expression of hsp70 and Na....... The findings strongly suggest that Atlantic cod are adapted to local saline conditions, despite relatively low levels of neutral genetic divergence between populations...

  4. Saline Alone vs Saline plus Mannitol Hydration for the Prevention of Acute Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-15

    REPORT TYPE 10/15/2017 Presentation 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Saline Alone vs Saline plus Mannitol Hydration for the Prevention of Acute Cisplatin ...Saline plus Mannitol Hydration for the Prevention of Acute Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity: A Randomized Trial Wilfred Dela Cruz, Frederick Flynt, Sandra...America Background Cisplatin is widely used as an effective chemotherapy in diverse neoplasms and is associated with renal toxicity. Several studies

  5. Detecting the Spatio-temporal Distribution of Soil Salinity and Its Relationship to Crop Growth in a Large-scale Arid Irrigation District Based on Sampling Experiment and Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, D.; Huang, G., Sr.; Xu, X.; Huang, Q., Sr.; Xiong, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Soil salinity analysis on a regional scale is of great significance for protecting agriculture production and maintaining eco-environmental health in arid and semi-arid irrigated areas. In this study, the Hetao Irrigation District (Hetao) in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, with suffering long-term soil salinization problems, was selected as the case study area. Field sampling experiments and investigations related to soil salt contents, crop growth and yields were carried out across the whole area, during April to August in 2015. Soil salinity characteristics in space and time were systematically analyzed for Hetao as well as the corresponding impacts on crops. Remotely sensed map of soil salinity distribution for surface soil was also derived based on the Landsat OLI data with a 30 m resolution. The results elaborated the temporal and spatial dynamics of soil salinity and the relationships with irrigation, groundwater depth and crop water consumption in Hetao. In addition, the strong spatial variability of salinization was clearly presented by the remotely sensed map of soil salinity. Further, the relationship between soil salinity and crop growth was analyzed, and then the impact degrees of soil salinization on cropping pattern, leaf area index, plant height and crop yield were preliminarily revealed. Overall, this study can provide very useful information for salinization control and guide the future agricultural production and soil-water management for the arid irrigation districts analogous to Hetao.

  6. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Salinity, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_salinity_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) salinity data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which characterizes...

  7. Assessing spatial variability of soil properties and ions associated to salinity using the multifractal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado Siqueira, Glécio; Soares da Silva, Jucicleia; Farías França e Silva, Ênio; Lado, Marcos; Paz-González, Antonio; Vidal-Vázquez, Eva

    2017-04-01

    The lowlands coastal region of the state of Pernambuco, Northeast of Brazil, was formerly covered by humid Atlantic forest (Mata Atlântica) and then has been increasingly devoted to Sugar cane production. Because the water table is near to the soil surface salinity can occur in this area. The objective of this study was to assess the scale dependence of parameters associated to soil salinity and ions responsible for salination using multifractal analysis. The field work was conducted at an experimental field located in the Goiania municipality, Pernambuco, Brazil. This site is located 10 km east from the Atlantic coast. The field has been devoted to monoculture of sugarcane (Saccharum of?cinarum sp.) since 25 years. The climate of the region is tropical, with average annual temperature of 24°C and 1800 mm of precipitation per year. Soil was sampled every 3 m at 128 locations across a 384 m transect at a depth of 0-20 cm. The soil samples were analysed for pH, electrical conductivity (EC), Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl- and SO4-2; also sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) was calculated. The spatial distributions of all the studied variables associated to soil salinity exhibited multifractal behaviour. Although all the variables studied exhibited a very strong power law scaling, different degrees of multifractality, assessed by differences in the amplitude and several selected parameters of the generalized dimension and singularity spectrum curves, have been appreciated. The multifractal approach gives a good description of the patterns of spatial variability of properties and ions describing soil salinity, and allows discriminating differences between them.

  8. Impact of salinity on cathode catalyst performance in microbial fuel cells (MFCs)

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xi

    2011-10-01

    Several alternative cathode catalysts have been proposed for microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but effects of salinity (sodium chloride) on catalyst performance, separate from those of conductivity on internal resistance, have not been previously examined. Three different types of cathode materials were tested here with increasingly saline solutions using single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs. The best MFC performance was obtained using a Co catalyst (cobalt tetramethoxyphenyl porphyrin; CoTMPP), with power increasing by 24 ± 1% to 1062 ± 9 mW/m2 (normalized to the projected cathode surface area) when 250 mM NaCl (final conductivity of 31.3 mS/cm) was added (initial conductivity of 7.5 mS/cm). This power density was 25 ± 1% higher than that achieved with Pt on carbon cloth, and 27 ± 1% more than that produced using an activated carbon/nickel mesh (AC) cathode in the highest salinity solution. Linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) was used to separate changes in performance due to solution conductivity from those produced by reductions in ohmic resistance with the higher conductivity solutions. The potential of the cathode with CoTMPP increased by 17-20 mV in LSVs when the NaCl addition was increased from 0 to 250 mM independent of solution conductivity changes. Increases in current were observed with salinity increases in LSVs for AC, but not for Pt cathodes. Cathodes with CoTMPP had increased catalytic activity at higher salt concentrations in cyclic voltammograms compared to Pt and AC. These results suggest that special consideration should be given to the type of catalyst used with more saline wastewaters. While Pt oxygen reduction activity is reduced, CoTMPP cathode performance will be improved at higher salt concentrations expected for wastewaters containing seawater. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Monitoring and Modelling of Salinity Behaviour in Drinking Water Ponds in Southern Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, M. A.; Williams, A.; Mathewson, E.; Rahman, A. K. M. M.; Ahmed, K. M.; Scheelbeek, P. F. D.; Vineis, P.; Butler, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Drinking water in southern Bangladesh is provided by a variety of sources including constructed storage ponds, seasonal rainwater and, ubiquitously saline, shallow groundwater. The ponds, the communal reservoirs for harvested rainwater, also tend to be saline, some as high as 2 g/l. Drinking water salinity has several health impacts including high blood pressure associated major risk factor for several cardio-vascular diseases. Two representative drinking water ponds in Dacope Upazila of Khulna District in southwest Bangladesh were monitored over two years for rainfall, evaporation, pond and groundwater level, abstraction, and solute concentration, to better understand the controls on drinking water salinity. Water level monitoring at both ponds shows groundwater levels predominantly below the pond level throughout the year implying a downward gradient. The grain size analysis of the underlying sediments gives an estimated hydraulic conductivity of 3E-8 m/s allowing limited seepage loss. Water balance modelling indicates that the seepage has a relatively minor effect on the pond level and that the bulk of the losses come from the combination of evaporation and abstraction particularly in dry season when precipitation, the only inflow to the pond, is close to zero. Seasonal variation in salinity (electrical conductivities, EC, ranged between 1500 to 3000 μS/cm) has been observed, and are primarily due to dilution from rainfall and concentration from evaporation, except on one occasion when EC reached 16,000 μS/cm due to a breach in the pond levee. This event was analogous to the episodic inundation that occurs from tropical cyclone storm surges and appears to indicate that such events are important for explaining the widespread salinisation of surface water and shallow groundwater bodies in coastal areas. A variety of adaptations (either from practical protection measures) or novel alternative drinking sources (such as aquifer storage and recovery) can be applied

  10. Salinity and spectral reflectance of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, A.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    The basic spectral response related to the salt content of soils in the visible and reflective IR wavelengths is analyzed in order to explore remote sensing applications for monitoring processes of the earth system. The bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) was determined at 10 nm of increments over the 520-2320-nm spectral range. The effect of salts on reflectance was analyzed on the basis of 162 spectral measurements. MSS and TM bands were simulated within the measured spectral region. A strong relationship was found in variations of reflectance and soil characteristics pertaining to salinization and desalinization. Although the individual MSS bands had high R-squared values and 75-79 percent of soil/treatment combinations were separable, there was a large number of soil/treatment combinations not distinguished by any of the four highly correlated MSS bands under consideration.

  11. Drinking water salinity associated health crisis in coastal Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Al Nahian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Salinity intrusion in coastal Bangladesh has serious population health implications, which are yet to be clearly understood. The study was undertaken through the ‘Assessing Health, Livelihoods, Ecosystem Services and Poverty Alleviation in Populous Deltas’ project in coastal Bangladesh. Drinking water salinity and blood pressure measurements were carried out during the household survey campaign. The study explored association among Socio-Ecological Systems (SESs, drinking water salinity and blood pressure. High blood pressure (prehypertension and hypertension was found significantly associated with drinking water salinity. People exposed to slightly saline (1000–2000 mg/l and moderately saline (≥2000 mg/l concentration drinking water had respectively 17% (p < 0.1 and 42% (p < 0.05 higher chance of being hypertensive than those who consumed fresh water (<1000 mg/l. Women had 31% higher chance of being hypertensive than men. Also, respondents of 35 years and above were about 2.4 times more likely to be hypertensive compared to below 35 years age group. For the 35 years and above age group, both prehypertension and hypertension were found higher than national rural statistics (50.1% for saline water categories (53.8% for slightly and 62.5% for moderate saline. For moderate salinity exposure, hypertension prevalence was found respectively 21%, 60% and 48% higher than national statistics (23.6% in consecutive survey rounds among the respondents. Though there was small seasonal variation in drinking water salinity, however blood pressure showed an increasing trend and maximum during the dry season. Mean salinity and associated hypertension prevalence were found higher for deep aquifer (21.6% compared to shallow aquifer (20.8%. Localized increase in soil and groundwater salinity was predicted over the study area. Shallow aquifer salinity increase was projected based on modelled output of soil salinity. Rather than uniform increase, there were

  12. Salinity effects on germination properties of Kochia scoparia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    majid jami ahmadi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine seed germination responses of kochia to different levels of salinity, an experiment was performed in the Institute of Sustainable Agriculture (CSIC, Cordoba, Spain, in a completely randomized design with two replications. Treatments were different levels of salinities equal to 0,5, 10, 15, and 20 ds/m, obtained by mixing NaCl and CaCl2 in a 2:1 molar ratio. Evaluated properties were germination percentage, rate and final number of germinated seeds. The results showed that the germinated seed number and the germination percentage had a converse relation with salinity levels. About 91% of seeds were germinated in distilled water. This value reduced to about 36% in 20 ds/m. Increasing salinity up to 10 ds/m did not have any significant effects on germination, but after that, the germination rate and percentage begun to reduce significantly. Salinity also increased the time required for 50% germination from 28 hours in distilled water to 78 hours in 20 ds/m, showing a delay in germination as salinity increased. Regarding linear reduction in germination rate in response to increase in salinity, it seems that as salinity exceeds 30 ds/m, germination rate of kochia approaches zero. This perhaps could be accepted as the threshold of kochia germination tolerance to salinity. According to the results, the germination stage of kochia has a good tolerance to elevated levels of salinity and it seems that a good stand establishment in saline soils and water conditions could be insured, if proper management is exerted in farms.

  13. Saline water in southeastern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiss, W.L.; Peterson, J.B.; Ramsey, T.R.

    1969-01-01

    Saline waters from formations of several geologic ages are being studied in a seven-county area in southeastern New Mexico and western Texas, where more than 30,000 oil and gas tests have been drilled in the past 40 years. This area of 7,500 sq. miles, which is stratigraphically complex, includes the northern and eastern margins of the Delaware Basin between the Guadalupe and Glass Mountains. Chloride-ion concentrations in water produced from rocks of various ages and depths have been mapped in Lea County, New Mexico, using machine map-plotting techniques and trend analyses. Anomalously low chloride concentrations (1,000-3,000 mg/l) were found along the western margin of the Central Basin platform in the San Andres and Capitan Limestone Formations of Permian age. These low chloride-ion concentrations may be due to preferential circulation of ground water through the more porous and permeable rocks. Data being used in the study were obtained principally from oil companies and from related service companies. The P.B.W.D.S. (Permian Basin Well Data System) scout-record magnetic-tape file was used as a framework in all computer operations. Shallow or non-oil-field water analyses acquired from state, municipal, or federal agencies were added to these data utilizing P.B.W.D.S.-compatible reference numbers and decimal latitude-longitude coordinates. Approximately 20,000 water analyses collected from over 65 sources were coded, recorded on punch cards and stored on magnetic tape for computer operations. Extensive manual and computer error checks for duplication and accuracy were made to eliminate data errors resulting from poorly located or identified samples; non-representative or contaminated samples; mistakes in coding, reproducing or key-punching; laboratory errors; and inconsistent reporting. The original 20,000 analyses considered were reduced to 6,000 representative analyses which are being used in the saline water studies. ?? 1969.

  14. Morphology and Kinetics of Growth of CaCO3 Precipitates Formed in Saline Water at 30°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xin; Wang, Baohui; Wu, Haiming

    2018-02-01

    The crystallization kinetics and morphology of CaCO3 crystals precipitated from the high salinity oilfield water were studied. The crystallization kinetics measurements show that nucleation and nuclei growth obey the first order reaction kinetics. The induction period of precipitation is extended in the high salinity solutions. Morphological studies show that impurity ions remain mostly in the solution phase instead of filling the CaCO3 crystal lattice. The morphology of CaCO3 precipitates can be changed from a smooth surface (calcite) to rough spheres (vaterite), and spindle rod bundles, or spherical, ellipsoid, flowers, plates and other shapes (aragonite).

  15. Hydrogeologic framework and salinity distribution of the Floridan aquifer system of Broward County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Ronald S.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Concerns about water-level decline and seawater intrusion in the surficial Biscayne aquifer, currently the principal source of water supply to Broward County, prompted a study to refine the hydrogeologic framework of the underlying Floridan aquifer system to evaluate its potential as an alternative source of supply. This report presents cross sections that illustrate the stratigraphy and hydrogeology in eastern Broward County; maps of the upper surfaces and thicknesses of several geologic formations or units within the Floridan aquifer system; and maps of two of the potentially productive water-bearing zones within the system, the Upper Floridan aquifer and the Avon Park permeable zone. An analysis of data on rock depositional textures, associated pore networks, and flow zones in the Floridan aquifer system shows that groundwater moves through the system in two ways. These data support a conceptual, dual-porosity model of the system wherein groundwater moves either as concentrated flow in discrete, thin bedding-plane vugs or zones of vuggy megaporosity, or as diffuse flow through rocks with primarily interparticle and moldic-particle porosity. Because considerable exchange of groundwater may occur between the zones of vuggy and matrix-dominated porosity, understanding the distribution of that porosity and flow zone types is important to evaluating the suitability of the several units within the Floridan aquifer system for managing the water through practices such as aquifer storage and recovery (ASR). The salinity of the water in the Floridan aquifer system is highest in the central part of the study area, and lower toward the north and south. Although salinity generally increases with depth, in the western part of the study area a zone of relatively high saline water is perched above water of lower salinity in the underlying Avon Park permeable zone. Overall, the areas of highest salinity in the aquifer system coincide with those with the lowest estimated

  16. Salinity guidelines for irrigation: Case studies from Water Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salinity guidelines for irrigation: Case studies from Water Research Commission projects along the Lower Vaal, Riet, Berg and Breede Rivers. ... It is suggested that a more dynamic approach be used for managing salinity under irrigation at farm level, i.e. the use of models. Amongst others, future research should focus on ...

  17. Sustainable management of coastal saline soils in the Saloum river ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    assess the constraints and potentialities of these saline soils and propose sustainable soil management strategies. One transect (2.2 km) oriented ... Keywords: soil salinity, soil management, Saloum river basin, Senegal, West Africa. INTRODUCTION ...... yield of potato in eastern India. Agriculture Water Management, 94:.

  18. Morphological responses of forage sorghums to salinity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The response of forage sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] varieties to salinity and irrigation frequency were studied from December 2007 to December 2009. Two forage sorghum varieties (Speedfeed and KFS4) were grown under salinity levels of 0, 5, 10 and 15 dS m-1 and irrigated when the leaf water potential ...

  19. Identification of quantitative trait loci for salinity tolerance in rice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. B. BIZIMANA

    2017-08-16

    Aug 16, 2017 ... Many earlier studies reported big qSaltol for seedling stage salinity tolerance in rice is on short arm of chromosome 1 but none of the QTL in our study was on qSaltol or nearby position, therefore, Hasawi conferred salinity tolerance in. RILs due to novel QTLs. It is suggested to fine map the novel QTLs so ...

  20. Durum wheat and barley productivity in saline-drought environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katerji, N.; Mastrorilli, M.; Hoorn, van J.W.; Lahmer, F.Z.; Hamdy, A.; Oweis, T.

    2009-01-01

    In two Successive years, durum wheat (Triticum turgidum Desf.) and barley (Hodeum vulgare L.) were tested in a factorial salinity-drought experiment, combining three levels of salinity and two levels of drought. The two drought treatments were obtained by applying irrigation water when the pre-dawn

  1. Evaluation of bread wheat genotypes for salinity tolerance under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In two consecutive seasons (2007-08 and 2008-09), field experiments were conducted at Soil Salinity Research Institute, Pindi Bhattian and Biosaline Agricultural Research Station, Pakka Aana, Pakistan. During 2007-08, 103 wheat landrace genotypes were evaluated for salinity tolerance. During 2008-09, 47 selected ...

  2. Spatial distribution of saline water and possible sources of intrusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The spatial distribution of saline water and possible sources of intrusion into Lekki lagoon and transitional effects on the lacustrine ichthyofaunal characteristics were studied during March, 2006 and. February, 2008. The water quality analysis indicated that, salinity has drastically increased recently in the lagoon (0.007 to ...

  3. Geology and groundwater regions to quantify primary salinity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although anthropogenic salinisation and sodification has been researched extensively, little is known about the primary salinity in South Africa. This paper therefore aimed to determine the primary salinity, sodicity and alkalinity conditions for South African soils, based on geological units and groundwater regions, and ...

  4. Plant succession - a key to the utilisation of saline soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandhu, G.R.; Malik, K.A.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes the extent of salinity in the Indus Plain and mentions some of the methods employed for reclaiming the salt-affected soils. The rationale of a biological approach consisting of introduction of a plant succession on calcareous saline-sodic soils has been described, and has given encouraging results in the preliminary experiments carried out by the authors

  5. Silicon mediated biochemical changes in wheat under salinized and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report on the effects of silicon (150 mg L-1) on the morphological, physiological and biochemical traits in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars (salt sensitive; Auqab-2000 and salt tolerant; SARC-5) differing in salt tolerance under saline (10 dS m-1) and non-saline (2 dS m-1) hydroponic culture. Silicon supplementation ...

  6. Time-dependence of salinity in monsoonal estuaries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vijith, V.; Sundar, D.; Shetye, S.R.

    The theories and classification schemes commonly used for understanding estuarine dynamics often refer to a steady state of the estuary in which the salinity field is time-independent. In this state salinity-ingress into the estuary due to different...

  7. Spatial distribution of saline water and possible sources of intrusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spatial distribution of saline water and possible sources of intrusion into Lekki lagoon and transitional effects on the lacustrine ichthyofaunal characteristics were studied during March, 2006 and February, 2008. The water quality analysis indicated that, salinity has drastically increased recently in the lagoon (0.007 to ...

  8. Salinity ranges of some southern African fish species occurring in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors influencing the tolerance of fishes to low and high salinity regimes are discussed, with most species tolerant of low rather than high salinity conditions. This is important since most systems are subject to periodic freshwater flooding, especially during summer. The penetration of freshwater teleosts and elasmobranchs ...

  9. Salinity tolerance of the burrowing ocypodid crab, Paratylodiplax ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This difference was ascribed to the exposure of the Mhlathuze population to wider salinity fluctuations arising from greater tidal exchange volumes and freshwater input compared with St. Lucia, which has no major rivers entering it. Keywords: Paratylodiplax blephariskios; Ocypodidae; Brachyura; salinity; temperature; ...

  10. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes: Perspectives for saline agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruning, B.; Rozema, J.

    2013-01-01

    Saline agriculture provides a solution for at least two environmental and social problems. It allows us to return to agricultural production areas that have been lost as a consequence of salinization and it can save valuable fresh water by using brackish or salt water to irrigate arable lands. Sea

  11. Constructed wetlands for saline wastewater treatment: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saline wastewater originating from sources such as agriculture, aquaculture, and many industrial sectors usually contains high levels of salts and other contaminants, which can adversely affect both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Therefore, the treatment of saline wastewater (removal of both sa...

  12. Analysis of Production-Water-Salinity of Index Crops in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifan, H.; Ghahreman, B.

    2009-04-01

    One method to investigate the advantages of irrigation in cultivation is to evaluate the amount of increase in productions as a result of irrigation. Such relations which usually characterized by mathematics formulas or curves are called production to water function. In the agricultural analysis like pattern optimization and culture accumulation, we need some function like agricultural crops production, water and salinity. The amount of water used and salinity has influence on crops function, so that by increase in both components in various stages of plant growth, crop function decreases. Many researches have been performed on production-water and production-salinity function, therefore less researches on production-water-salinity components. The equation provided by Letey and Dinar (1986) is a sample of these researches. Their model is a quadratics equation from independent variables of water salinity in irrigation (ECi) and dimensionless proportion of the amount of water used to evaporation in class A (AW/EP) in plant growth stage. Therefore, by using this model and parameters like evaporation, rainfall and also quantity and quality water potential in Golestan farmlands, we obtained production-water-salinity components for each product in three different areas across Golestan province (moisture to dry areas). These products include sunflower, cotton, wheat, barely, potato, tomato, corn, sorgom, water melon, soybean and rice. Finally, these equations were compared by results of previous experiments, some results correspond and others were different. Key Word: production-water, production-salinity and production-water-salinity function, Letey and Dinar, Golestan.

  13. Enhanced remediation of an oily sludge with saline water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UFUOMA

    biodegradation of oily sludge by hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria (Bacillus subtilis) at salinity (NaCl ... petroleum waste. In recent times, several literatures have shown that bioremediation has high potentials for restoring polluted media with least negative impact on the ..... salinity, bacterial consortium is highly stable in immo-.

  14. Screening of recombinant inbred lines for salinity tolerance in bread ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Screening a large number of plants for salinity tolerance is not easy, therefore this investigation was performed to evaluate and screen 186 F8 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between Superhead#2 (Super Seri) and Roshan wheat varieties for salinity tolerance. All the individuals were evaluated under ...

  15. Growth and ionic content of quinoa under saline irrigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riccardi, M.; Pulvento, C.; Lavini, A.

    2014-01-01

    . An irrigation experiment was carried out in 2009 and 2010 in the Volturno river plain. Three treatments irrigated with fresh water (Q100, Q50 and Q25) and three irrigated with saline water (Q100S, Q50S and Q25S) were tested. For saline irrigation, water with an electrical conductivity of 22 dS m-1 was used...

  16. First attempts for predicting future Salinization in coastal irrigated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salinity contamination of irrigation ground water is a serious worldwide problem. The Mnasra zone, which has an agricultural land area that represents 70% of the total area and its agricultural production reaches 12% of the national production, is threatened by a Salinization of underground waters. The ground water ...

  17. Varietal differences of quinoa's tolerance to saline conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adolf, Verena Isabelle; Shabala, Sergey; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

    2012-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to assess varietal differences of quinoa’s tolerance to salinity and to investigate physiological mechanisms conferring these differences. Methods Production of biomass in fourteen varieties grown under saline conditions was analysed in a pot experiment. For two contrasting...

  18. Towards the development of a salinity impact category for South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salinisation of South African water resources is of strategic concern, and the need for life-cycle assessments to be able to incorporate salinity effects is apparent. There are sufficiently clear cause-effect relationships between the sources and impacts of salinity, and impacts are sufficiently different in nature from existing ...

  19. Effect of salinity on growth of juvenile silver kob, Argyrosomus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We conclude that silver kob perform at least as well at reduced salinities as in full strength seawater. This could lead to significant cost savings when rearing fish inland using artificial seawater. Keywords: fish physiology; mariculture; mulloway; osmolality; salinity tolerance. African Journal of Aquatic Science 2008, 33(2): ...

  20. Effects of salinity on growth and metabolism in blue tilapia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood samples were taken to analyse plasma sodium, chloride, potassium, total protein and triglycerides. Liver and muscle samples were collected for HSI and moisture values. Plasma sodium chloride increased in parallel with salinity rise. Total protein and triglycerides significantly reduced as salinity increased. Glucose ...