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Sample records for surface respiration asr

  1. Early micromovement of the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) femoral component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, J O; Ding, M; Varmarken, J E

    2012-01-01

    Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) can detect early micromovement in unstable implant designs which are likely subsequently to have a high failure rate. In 2010, the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) was withdrawn because of a high failure rate. In 19 ASR femoral components, the mean micromovement...

  2. Aquatic surface respiration and swimming behaviour in adult and developing zebrafish exposed to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Sara J; Thomas, Benjamin S; Jonz, Michael G

    2015-06-01

    Severe hypoxia elicits aquatic surface respiration (ASR) behaviour in many species of fish, where ventilation of the gills at the air-water interface improves O2 uptake and survival. ASR is an important adaptation that may have given rise to air breathing in vertebrates. The neural substrate of this behaviour, however, is not defined. We characterized ASR in developing and adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) to ascertain a potential role for peripheral chemoreceptors in initiation or modulation of this response. Adult zebrafish exposed to acute, progressive hypoxia (PO2 from 158 to 15 mmHg) performed ASR with a threshold of 30 mmHg, and spent more time at the surface as PO2 decreased. Acclimation to hypoxia attenuated ASR responses. In larvae, ASR behaviour was observed between 5 and 21 days postfertilization with a threshold of 16 mmHg. Zebrafish decreased swimming behaviour (i.e. distance, velocity and acceleration) as PO2 was decreased, with a secondary increase in behaviour near or below threshold PO2 . In adults that underwent a 10-day intraperitoneal injection regime of 10 μg g(-1) serotonin (5-HT) or 20 μg g(-1) acetylcholine (ACh), an acute bout of hypoxia (15 mmHg) increased the time engaged in ASR by 5.5 and 4.9 times, respectively, compared with controls. Larvae previously immersed in 10 μmol l(-1) 5-HT or ACh also displayed an increased ASR response. Our results support the notion that ASR is a behavioural response that is reliant upon input from peripheral O2 chemoreceptors. We discuss implications for the role of chemoreceptors in the evolution of air breathing. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Revision of Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) Total Hip Arthroplasty: Correlation of Perioperative Data and Early Post-Revision Outcome Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cip, Johannes; Bach, Christian; Widemschek, Mark; Luegmair, Matthias; Martin, Arno

    2015-09-01

    The articular surface replacement (ASR) total hip arthroplasty (THA) showed accelerated failure rates due to adverse-reaction to metal debris (ARMD). Literature correlating preoperative with intraoperative revision findings respectively post-revision outcome results are rare. 30 of 99 available ASR THA were revised due to ARMD. Mean post-revision follow-up term was 2.3 years. In part, preoperative data did not correlate with intraoperative revision findings. ARMD was even found in asymptomatic patients with non-elevated ion levels. Postoperative pain and metal ions decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.016). Cobalt decreased faster than chrome. Patients with intraoperative pseudotumors, osteolysis or bilateral THA did not have higher pre- or postoperative ion values (P ≥ 0.053). Females showed higher postoperative chrome levels (P=0.031). One major post-revision complication (femoral nerve palsy) and one re-revision (late onset infection) occurred. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of branchial and orobranchial O2 chemoreceptors in the control of aquatic surface respiration in the neotropical fish tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum): progressive responses to prolonged hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florindo, Luiz H; Leite, Cléo A C; Kalinin, Ana L; Reid, Stephen G; Milsom, William K; Rantin, F Tadeu

    2006-05-01

    The present study examined the role of branchial and orobranchial O(2) chemoreceptors in the cardiorespiratory responses, aquatic surface respiration (ASR), and the development of inferior lip swelling in tambaqui during prolonged (6 h) exposure to hypoxia. Intact fish (control) and three groups of denervated fish (bilateral denervation of cranial nerves IX+X (to the gills), of cranial nerves V+VII (to the orobranchial cavity) or of cranial nerves V alone), were exposed to severe hypoxia (Pw(O)2=10 mmHg) for 360 min. Respiratory frequency (fr) and heart rate (fh) were recorded simultaneously with ASR. Intact (control) fish increased fr, ventilation amplitude (V(AMP)) and developed hypoxic bradycardia in the first 60 min of hypoxia. The bradycardia, however, abated progressively and had returned to normoxic levels by the last hour of exposure to hypoxia. The changes in respiratory frequency and the hypoxic bradycardia were eliminated by denervation of cranial nerves IX and X but were not affected by denervation of cranial nerves V or V+VII. The V(AMP) was not abolished by the various denervation protocols. The fh in fish with denervation of cranial nerves V or V+VII, however, did not recover to control values as in intact fish. After 360 min of exposure to hypoxia only the intact and IX+X denervated fish performed ASR. Denervation of cranial nerve V abolished the ASR behavior. However, all (control and denervated (IX+X, V and V+VII) fish developed inferior lip swelling. These results indicate that ASR is triggered by O(2) chemoreceptors innervated by cranial nerve V but that other mechanisms, such as a direct effect of hypoxia on the lip tissue, trigger lip swelling.

  5. ASR and RE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim

    2016-01-01

    and as such also true to its scientific basis. In what follows I map and evaluate some of the many approaches to RE as well as some of the obstacles to a study-of-religions approach. Likewise, I ever so briefly argue why my approach to RE may be seen as a 'natural' and 'good' kind of 'applied ASR ', as an obvious......As a university discipline, the academic study of religions (ASR) has produced a critical approach to the study of religion which is (or ought be), I think, of fundamental importance for a modern secular and enlightened democratic state. However, the ”study-of-religions” approach has percolated...... with limited success into society at large as well as into the primary and secondary educational systems of Western democracies. Too often so-called religious education (RE) really is religious or confessional, and even so-called non-confessional RE is, mostly if not always, mixed with crypto...

  6. Severe ASR damaged concrete bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonio Barbosa, Ricardo; Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and University of Southern Denmark (SDU) have conducted several full-scale experiments with severe ASR deteriorated bridges. This paper presents few and preliminary results from both the shear tests and the measuring of the material properties. The shear test...... show that the shear capacity is almost unaffected of ASR despite significant reduction in compressive concrete strength. Furthermore, measurements show a significant tensile reinforcement strain developed due to ASR expansion....

  7. ASR DIAGNOSIS BY PETROGRAPHIC INVESTIGATION AND EVALUATION OF MECHANICAL PERFORMANCE OF ASR DETERIORATED PRETENSIONED PC BEAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, Jun; Yamada, Kazuo; Kaneda, Kazuo; Iraha, Shigeo; Oshiro, Takeshi

    ASR diagnosis and evaluation of load carrying capacity have been performed on the pre-tensioned PC beam which was cut out of a national high way bridge. The bridge was replaced lately after 25years service due to ASR deterioration. Comprehensive investigations such as crack measurement, material strength test, petrographic investigation, beam bending test have been performed on the deteriorated beam. Cracks have been observed on all sides and the appearance has been classified as severe deterioration grade. Petrographic investigation concluded that the reacted mineral was mainly reactive cristobalite contained in andesite of fine aggregates and EPMA investigation found that the reaction seemed to be the final stage. The late expansive ASR has been superimposed by cryptocrystalline quartz in coarse aggregates and it is still in progress. Deteriorated concrete cores with no visual crack have reduced only 10% of compressive strength compared with design strength, but significant loss has been observed on the elastic modulus. The static bending load test on the deteriorated test beam showed 95% of design load capacity indicating that the visual deterioration on surfaces has affected slight damages at this moment. But loss of bending rigidity has been appeared on the deteriorated beam .after bending cracks have started. This comprehensive study including the petrographic diagnosis and the appraisal on mechanical performance of the deteriorated beam conclude that there is a possibility of ASR deterioration in progress and further loss of mechanical performance though the beam had some margin for loading capacity at this moment.

  8. Quartz in coal dust deposited on internal surface of respirable size selective samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Taekhee; Kashon, Michael; Kusti, Mohannad; Harper, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to quantify quartz mass in coal dust deposited on the internal cassette surface of respirable size-selective samplers. Coal dust was collected with four different respirable size-selective samplers (10 mm Dorr-Oliver nylon [Sensidyne, St. Petersburg, Fla.], SKC Aluminum [SKC Inc., Eighty Four, Pa.], BGI4L [BGI USA Inc., Waltham, Mass.], and GK2.69 cyclones [BGI USA Inc.]) with two different cassette types (polystyrene and static-dissipative polypropylene cassettes). The coal dust was aerosolized in a calm air chamber by using a fluidized bed aerosol generator without neutralization under the assumption that the procedure is similar to field sampling conditions. The mass of coal dust was measured gravimetrically and quartz mass was determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Manual of Analytical Methods, Method 7603. The mass fractions of the total quartz sample on the internal cassette surface are significantly different between polystyrene and static-dissipative cassettes for all cyclones (p quartz mass on cassette internal surface and coal dust filter mass was observed. The BGI4L cyclone showed a higher (but not significantly) and the GK2.69 cyclone showed a significantly lower (p quartz mass fraction for polystyrene cassettes compared to other cyclones. This study confirms previous observations that the interior surface deposits in polystyrene cassettes attached to cyclone pre-selectors can be a substantial part of the sample, and therefore need to be included in any analysis for accurate exposure assessment. On the other hand, the research presented here supports the position that the internal surface deposits in static-dissipative cassettes used with size-selective cyclones are negligible and that it is only necessary to analyze the filter catch.

  9. Flexible surface acoustic wave respiration sensor for monitoring obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hao; Tao, Xiang; Dong, Shurong; Qin, Yiheng; Yu, Liyang; Luo, Jikui; Deen, M. Jamal

    2017-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has received much attention in recent years due to its significant harm to human health and high morbidity rate. A respiration monitoring system is needed to detect OSAS, so that the patient can receive treatment in a timely manner. Wired and wireless OSAS monitoring systems have been developed, but they require a wire connection and batteries to operate, and they are bulky, heavy and not user-friendly. In this paper, we propose the use of a flexible surface acoustic wave (SAW) microsensor to detect and monitor OSAS by measuring the humidity change associated with the respiration of a person. SAW sensors on rigid 128° YX LiNbO3 substrate are also characterized for this application. Results show both types of SAW sensors are suitable for OSAS monitoring with good sensitivity, repeatability and reliability, and the response time and recovery time for the flexible SAW sensors are 1.125 and 0.75 s, respectively. Our work demonstrates the potential for an innovative flexible microsensor for the detection and monitoring of OSAS.

  10. Respiration of new and old carbon in the surface ocean: Implications for estimates of global oceanic gross primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Matheus C.; Schulz, Kai G.; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2017-06-01

    New respiration (Rnew, of freshly fixated carbon) and old respiration (Rold, of storage carbon) were estimated for different regions of the global surface ocean using published data on simultaneous measurements of the following: (1) primary productivity using 14C (14PP); (2) gross primary productivity (GPP) based on 18O or O2; and (3) net community productivity (NCP) using O2. The ratio Rnew/GPP in 24 h incubations was typically between 0.1 and 0.3 regardless of depth and geographical area, demonstrating that values were almost constant regardless of large variations in temperature (0 to 27°C), irradiance (surface to 100 m deep), nutrients (nutrient-rich and nutrient-poor waters), and community composition (diatoms, flagellates, etc,). As such, between 10 and 30% of primary production in the surface ocean is respired in less than 24 h, and most respiration (between 55 and 75%) was of older carbon. Rnew was most likely associated with autotrophs, with minor contribution from heterotrophic bacteria. Patterns were less clear for Rold. Short 14C incubations are less affected by respiratory losses. Global oceanic GPP is estimated to be between 70 and 145 Gt C yr-1.Plain Language SummaryHere we present a comprehensive coverage of ocean new and old respiration. Our results show that nearly 20% of oceanic gross primary production is consumed in the first 24 h. However, most (about 60%) respiration is of older carbon fixed at least 24 h before its consumption. Rates of new respiration relative to gross primary production were remarkably constant for the entire ocean, which allowed a preliminary estimation of global primary productivity as between 70 and 145 gt C yr-1.

  11. ASRS Reports on Wake Vortex Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Linda J.; Taube, Elisa Ann; Drew, Charles Robert; Barclay, Tommy Earl

    2010-01-01

    ASRS is conducting a structured callback research project of wake vortex incidents reported to the ASRS at all US airports, as well as wake encounters in the enroute environment. This study has three objectives: (1) Utilize the established ASRS supplemental data collection methodology and provide ongoing analysis of wake vortex encounter reports; (2) Document event dynamics and contributing factors underlying wake vortex encounter events; and (3) Support ongoing FAA efforts to address pre-emptive wake vortex risk reduction by utilizing ASRS reporting contributions.

  12. NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Linda J.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) collects, analyzes, and distributes de-identified safety information provided through confidentially submitted reports from frontline aviation personnel. Since its inception in 1976, the ASRS has collected over 1.4 million reports and has never breached the identity of the people sharing their information about events or safety issues. From this volume of data, the ASRS has released over 6,000 aviation safety alerts concerning potential hazards and safety concerns. The ASRS processes these reports, evaluates the information, and provides selected de-identified report information through the online ASRS Database at http:asrs.arc.nasa.gov. The NASA ASRS is also a founding member of the International Confidential Aviation Safety Systems (ICASS) group which is a collection of other national aviation reporting systems throughout the world. The ASRS model has also been replicated for application to improving safety in railroad, medical, fire fighting, and other domains. This presentation will discuss confidential, voluntary, and non-punitive reporting systems and their advantages in providing information for safety improvements.

  13. Separation of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) from automobile shredder residue (ASR) by froth flotation with ozonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Mallampati Srinivasa; Kurose, Keisuke; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nishijima, Wataru; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop froth flotation to separate polyvinyl chloride (PVC) from automobile shredder residue (ASR) plastic mixtures of variable composition. Some polymers in ASR polymer mixtures have similar density and hydrophobicity with PVC and thus selective flotation of PVC from ASR polymer mixtures cannot be achieved. The present study focused on the surface modification of PVC with ozonation, and then the modified PVC can be separated from other polymers by the following froth flotation. The results of this study indicate that the selective recovery of PVC from real ASR polyethylene tetra pethelate (PET), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polybutyl methacralate (PBMA), ethyl acrylate (EA), polycarbonate (PC) and rubber mixtures can be accomplished in a three-step process involving a gravity separation, ozonation and froth flotation. The rubber was removed from other heavy ASR (PVC, PET, PMMA, PBMA, EA and PC) polymers by froth flotation without mixing. It was found that ozonation process produced the desired difference in contact angle required (from 89.5 to 73.0 o ) for separation of PVC from other heavy ASR polymers, whereas the contact angles of other polymers was slightly decreased. The most of the load ASR, i.e. about 72.4% is floated away and 27.6% was settled down. The highest component 96.7% of PVC was recovered in the settled fraction. As a result of this research effort, the surface modification of PVC with ozonation can be efficiently useful to separate the PVC from other similar density ASR mixed polymers

  14. Cross-bandwidth adaptation for ASR systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kleynhans, N

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mismatches between application and training data greatly reduce the performance of automatic speech recognition (ASR) systems. However, collecting suitable amounts of in-domain and application-specific data for training is resource intensive and may...

  15. Suppression of ASR through aggregate coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Many highways, runways, parking lots and bridges are suffering from premature deterioration due to : alkali silica reaction (ASR) that takes place between the alkalis contributed primarily by the cement and : a reactive form of silica from specific s...

  16. Inhibitory Effect of Waste Glass Powder on ASR Expansion Induced by Waste Glass Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Detailed research is carried out to ascertain the inhibitory effect of waste glass powder (WGP on alkali-silica reaction (ASR expansion induced by waste glass aggregate in this paper. The alkali reactivity of waste glass aggregate is examined by two methods in accordance with the China Test Code SL352-2006. The potential of WGP to control the ASR expansion is determined in terms of mean diameter, specific surface area, content of WGP and curing temperature. Two mathematical models are developed to estimate the inhibitory efficiency of WGP. These studies show that there is ASR risk with an ASR expansion rate over 0.2% when the sand contains more than 30% glass aggregate. However, WGP can effectively control the ASR expansion and inhibit the expansion rate induced by the glass aggregate to be under 0.1%. The two mathematical models have good simulation results, which can be used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of WGP on ASR risk.

  17. Rapid microbial respiration of oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in offshore surface waters of the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Bethanie R; Reddy, Christopher M; Carmichael, Catherine A; Longnecker, Krista; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S [Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole (United States); Camilli, Richard, E-mail: bvanmooy@whoi.edu [Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole (United States)

    2011-07-15

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill was one of the largest oil spills in history, and the fate of this oil within the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem remains to be fully understood. The goal of this study-conducted in mid-June of 2010, approximately two months after the oil spill began-was to understand the key role that microbes would play in the degradation of the oil in the offshore oligotrophic surface waters near the Deepwater Horizon site. As the utilization of organic carbon by bacteria in the surface waters of the Gulf had been previously shown to be phosphorus limited, we hypothesized that bacteria would be unable to rapidly utilize the oil released from the Macondo well. Although phosphate was scarce throughout the sampling region and microbes exhibited enzymatic signs of phosphate stress within the oil slick, microbial respiration within the slick was enhanced by approximately a factor of five. An incubation experiment to determine hydrocarbon degradation rates confirmed that a large fraction of this enhanced respiration was supported by hydrocarbon degradation. Extrapolating our observations to the entire area of the slick suggests that microbes had the potential to degrade a large fraction of the oil as it arrived at the surface from the well. These observations decidedly refuted our hypothesis. However, a concomitant increase in microbial abundance or biomass was not observed in the slick, suggesting that microbial growth was nutrient limited; incubations amended with nutrients showed rapid increases in cell number and biomass, which supported this conclusion. Our study shows that the dynamic microbial community of the Gulf of Mexico supported remarkable rates of oil respiration, despite a dearth of dissolved nutrients.

  18. Rapid microbial respiration of oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in offshore surface waters of the Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Bethanie R; Reddy, Christopher M; Carmichael, Catherine A; Longnecker, Krista; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Camilli, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill was one of the largest oil spills in history, and the fate of this oil within the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem remains to be fully understood. The goal of this study-conducted in mid-June of 2010, approximately two months after the oil spill began-was to understand the key role that microbes would play in the degradation of the oil in the offshore oligotrophic surface waters near the Deepwater Horizon site. As the utilization of organic carbon by bacteria in the surface waters of the Gulf had been previously shown to be phosphorus limited, we hypothesized that bacteria would be unable to rapidly utilize the oil released from the Macondo well. Although phosphate was scarce throughout the sampling region and microbes exhibited enzymatic signs of phosphate stress within the oil slick, microbial respiration within the slick was enhanced by approximately a factor of five. An incubation experiment to determine hydrocarbon degradation rates confirmed that a large fraction of this enhanced respiration was supported by hydrocarbon degradation. Extrapolating our observations to the entire area of the slick suggests that microbes had the potential to degrade a large fraction of the oil as it arrived at the surface from the well. These observations decidedly refuted our hypothesis. However, a concomitant increase in microbial abundance or biomass was not observed in the slick, suggesting that microbial growth was nutrient limited; incubations amended with nutrients showed rapid increases in cell number and biomass, which supported this conclusion. Our study shows that the dynamic microbial community of the Gulf of Mexico supported remarkable rates of oil respiration, despite a dearth of dissolved nutrients.

  19. On the ASR and ASR thermal residues characterization of full scale treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, G; Viotti, P; Luciano, A; Fino, D

    2014-02-01

    In order to obtain 85% recycling, several procedures on Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR) could be implemented, such as advanced metal and polymer recovery, mechanical recycling, pyrolysis, the direct use of ASR in the cement industry, and/or the direct use of ASR as a secondary raw material. However, many of these recovery options appear to be limited, due to the possible low acceptability of ASR based products on the market. The recovery of bottom ash and slag after an ASR thermal treatment is an option that is not usually considered in most countries (e.g. Italy) due to the excessive amount of contaminants, especially metals. The purpose of this paper is to provide information on the characteristics of ASR and its full-scale incineration residues. Experiments have been carried out, in two different experimental campaigns, in a full-scale tyre incineration plant specifically modified to treat ASR waste. Detailed analysis of ASR samples and combustion residues were carried out and compared with literature data. On the basis of the analytical results, the slag and bottom ash from the combustion process have been classified as non-hazardous wastes, according to the EU waste acceptance criteria (WAC), and therefore after further tests could be used in future in the construction industry. It has also been concluded that ASR bottom ash (EWC - European Waste Catalogue - code 19 01 12) could be landfilled in SNRHW (stabilized non-reactive hazardous waste) cells or used as raw material for road construction, with or without further treatment for the removal of heavy metals. In the case of fly ash from boiler or Air Pollution Control (APC) residues, it has been found that the Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations exceeded regulatory leaching test limits therefore their removal, or a stabilization process, would be essential prior to landfilling the use of these residues as construction material. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. ASRS application in radioactive material handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalina Sheik Muhamad and Rosli Darmawan

    2007-01-01

    ASRS is a computer controlled methods for automatically depositing and retrieving loads from defined storage locations. It consists of several major components which are the Controls System, Storage Structure (Racks), Storage/Retrieval (S/R) Machines, Fire Protection Systems, Pickup and Delivery (P and D) Stations, Storage Modules (Pallets, Baskets, Containers), Aisle Hardware, Aisle Transfer Cars, Conveyors and other transportation equipment. This paper aims to provide an overview of the potential application of the ASRS in Nuclear Malaysia. The need to use the system, operating principle and potential application will be discussed. (Author)

  1. ASR performance analysis of an experimental call routing system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modipa, T

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Call routing is an important application of Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) technology. In this paper the authors discuss the main issues affecting the performance of a call routing system and describe the ASR component of the "Auto...

  2. ASR prevention — Effect of aluminum and lithium ions on the reaction products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemann, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.leemann@empa.ch [Laboratory for Concrete/Construction Chemistry, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Bernard, Laetitia [Laboratory for Nanoscale Materials Science, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Alahrache, Salaheddine; Winnefeld, Frank [Laboratory for Concrete/Construction Chemistry, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of the recent progress in the understanding of the mechanisms enabling aluminum-containing SCM like metakaolin and added LiNO{sub 3} to limit the extent of ASR in mortar and concrete, some gaps still remain. They concern mainly the effect of aluminum-containing SCM on the formed ASR products and the influence of aggregate characteristics on the effectiveness of LiNO{sub 3}. In this study, a model system, concrete and mortar were investigated by pore solution analysis, TGA, XRD, NMR, SEM combined with EDX and ToF-SIMS to address these questions. The amount of aluminum present in the pore solution of concrete and mortar is only able to slow down SiO{sub 2} dissolution but not to alter morphology, structure and composition of the reaction products. LiNO{sub 3} can suppress ASR by forming dense products protecting reactive minerals from further reaction. But its effectiveness is decreasing with increasing specific surface area of the reactive minerals in aggregates. - Highlights: • Aluminum of SCM slows down SiO{sub 2} dissolution. • Aluminum of SCM does not alter morphology and structure of ASR product. • ASR suppressing effect of LiNO{sub 3} depends on specific surface area of the aggregates.

  3. ASR prevention — Effect of aluminum and lithium ions on the reaction products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemann, Andreas; Bernard, Laetitia; Alahrache, Salaheddine; Winnefeld, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the recent progress in the understanding of the mechanisms enabling aluminum-containing SCM like metakaolin and added LiNO 3 to limit the extent of ASR in mortar and concrete, some gaps still remain. They concern mainly the effect of aluminum-containing SCM on the formed ASR products and the influence of aggregate characteristics on the effectiveness of LiNO 3 . In this study, a model system, concrete and mortar were investigated by pore solution analysis, TGA, XRD, NMR, SEM combined with EDX and ToF-SIMS to address these questions. The amount of aluminum present in the pore solution of concrete and mortar is only able to slow down SiO 2 dissolution but not to alter morphology, structure and composition of the reaction products. LiNO 3 can suppress ASR by forming dense products protecting reactive minerals from further reaction. But its effectiveness is decreasing with increasing specific surface area of the reactive minerals in aggregates. - Highlights: • Aluminum of SCM slows down SiO 2 dissolution. • Aluminum of SCM does not alter morphology and structure of ASR product. • ASR suppressing effect of LiNO 3 depends on specific surface area of the aggregates

  4. 2010 Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team Meeting Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, DL

    2011-05-04

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented in poster format at the March 2010 Atmospheric System Research Science Team Meeting held in Bethesda, Maryland. More than 260 posters were presented during the Science Team Meeting. Posters were sorted into the following subject areas: aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions, aerosol properties, atmospheric state and surface, cloud properties, field campaigns, infrastructure and outreach, instruments, modeling, and radiation. To put these posters in context, the status of ASR at the time of the meeting is provided here.

  5. Novel synthesis and applications of Thiomer solidification for heavy metals immobilization in hazardous ASR/ISW thermal residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jin Woong; Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Park, Hung Suck

    2016-03-01

    The present paper reports the novel synthesis and application of Thiomer solidification for heavy metal immobilization in hazardous automobile shredder residues and industrial solid waste (ASR/ISW) thermal residues. The word Thiomer is a combination of the prefix of a sulfur-containing compound "Thio" and the suffix of "Polymer" meaning a large molecule compound of many repeated subunits. To immobilize heavy metals, either ASR/ISW thermal residues (including bottom and fly ash) was mixed well with Thiomer and heated at 140°C. After Thiomer solidification, approximately 91-100% heavy metal immobilization was achieved. The morphology and mineral phases of the Thiomer-solidified ASR/ISW thermal residue were characterized by field emission-scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), which indicated that the amounts of heavy metals detectable on the ASR/ISW thermal residue surface decreased and the sulfur mass percent increased. XRD indicated that the main fraction of the enclosed/bound materials on the ASR/ISW residue contained sulfur associated crystalline complexes. The Thiomer solidified process could convert the heavy metal compounds into highly insoluble metal sulfides and simultaneously encapsulate the ASR/ISW thermal residue. These results show that the proposed method can be applied to the immobilization of ASR/ISW hazardous ash involving heavy metals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anxiety Self Report (ASR (1,2,3,4,). X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Jane S.

    The Anxiety Self Report (ASR 1,2,3,4) is provided, followed by information about the report. The ASR is discussed as to its development, description, response bias, scoring procedures, reliability, stability, validity, and correlation between the ASR and the Manifest Anxiety Scale. (For related documents, see TM 002 928, 929.) (DB)

  7. ASR damage detection in concrete from ultrasonic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peng; Patton, Mark E.; Greve, David W.; Harley, Joel B.; Junker, Warren R.; Liu, Chang; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2014-03-01

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a chemical reaction that can occur between alkaline components in cement paste and reactive forms of silica in susceptible aggregates when sufficient moisture is present. The ASR product, known as ASR gel, can cause expansion and cracking that damages the structure. We pass ultrasonic signals through concrete laboratory specimens and use three different ultrasonic methods to detect the onset of ASR damage, or the presence of ASR damage while still at the microscale. Our test specimens are fabricated with aggregate known to be reactive and are then exposed to an aggressive environment to accelerate ASR development. We use swept-sine excitations and obtain pitch-catch records from specimens that have been exposed to the accelerated environment. From this data, we demonstrate an ultrasonic passband method shows high frequency components diminish faster than low frequency components, and therefore the ultrasonic passband shifts to the low frequency side due to ASR damage. The test results also show that the ultrasonic passband is logically related to specimen size. We also demonstrate a stretching factor method is able to track the progress of ASR damage in concrete very well. These methods are shown to be more reliable than attenuation spectrum or attenuation methods that do not detect the ASR damage in concrete at early stages.

  8. Evaluation of ASR potential of quartz-rich rocks by alkaline etching of polished rock sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šachlová, Šárka; Kuchařová, Aneta; Pertold, Zdeněk; Přikryl, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Damaging effect of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) on concrete structures has been observed in various countries all over the World. Civil engineers and real state owners are demanding reliable methods in the assessment of ASR potential of aggregates before they are used in constructions. Time feasible methods are expected, as well as methods which enable prediction of long-term behaviour of aggregates in concrete. The most frequently employed accelerated mortar bar test (AMBT) quantifies ASR potential of aggregates according to the expansion values of mortar bars measured after fourteen days testing period. Current study aimed to develop a new methodical approach facilitating identification and quantification of ASR potential of aggregates. Polished rock sections of quartz and amorphous SiO2 (coming from orthoquartzite, quartz meta-greywacke, pegmatite, phyllite, chert, and flint) were subjected to experimental leaching in 1M NaOH solution at 80°C. After 14 days of alkaline etching, the rock sections were analyzed employing scanning electron microscope combined with energy dispersive spectrometer. Representative areas were documented in back scattered electron (BSE) images and measured using fully-automatic petrographic image analysis (PIA). Several features connected to alkaline etching were observed on the surface of polished rock sections: deep alkaline etching, partial leach-out of quartz and amorphous particles, alkaline etching connected to quartz grain boundaries, and alkaline etching without any connection to grain boundaries. All features mentioned above had significant influence on grey-scale spectrum of BSE images. A specific part of the grey-scale spectrum (i.e. grey-shade 0-70) was characteristic of areas affected by alkaline etching (ASR area). By measuring such areas we quantified the extent of alkaline etching in studied samples. Very good correlation was found between the ASR area and ASR potential of investigated rocks measured according to the

  9. Cardiorespiratory reflexes and aquatic surface respiration in the neotropical fish tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum): acute responses to hypercarbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florindo, Luiz H; Reid, Stephen G; Kalinin, Ana L; Milsom, William K; Rantin, Francisco T

    2004-05-01

    We examined the cardiorespiratory responses to 6 h of acute hypercarbia (1, 2.5, and 5% CO(2)) in intact and gill-denervated (bilateral denervation of branchial branches of cranial nerves IX and X) tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum. Intact fish exposed to 1 and 2.5% CO(2) increased respiratory frequency ( f(R)) and ventilation amplitude ( V(AMP)) slowly over a 1- to 3-h period. Denervated fish did not show this response, suggesting that tambaqui possess receptors in the gills that will produce excitatory responses to low levels of hypercarbia (1 and 2.5% CO(2)) if the exposure is prolonged. The cardiac response to stimulation of these receptors with this level of CO(2) was a tachycardia and not a bradycardia. During exposure to 5% CO(2), intact fish increased f(R) and V(AMP), and showed a pronounced bradycardia after 1 h. After 2 h, the heart rate ( f(H)) started to increase, but returned to control values after 6 h. In denervated fish, the increase in f(R) was abolished. The slow increase in V(AMP) and the bradycardia were not abolished, suggesting that these changes arose from extra-branchial receptors. Neither intact nor denervated fish developed the swelling of the lower lip or performed aquatic surface respiration, even after 6 h, suggesting that these are unique responses to hypoxia and not hypercarbia.

  10. Analysis of ASR Clogging Investigations at Three Australian ASR Sites in a Bayesian Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Dillon

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available When evaluating uncertainties in developing an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR system, under normal budgetary constraints, a systematic approach is needed to prioritise investigations. Three case studies where field trials have been undertaken, and clogging evaluated, reveal the changing perceptions of viability of ASR from a clogging perspective as a result of the progress of investigations. Two stormwater and one recycled water ASR investigations in siliceous aquifers are described that involved different strategies to evaluate the potential for clogging. This paper reviews these sites, as well as earlier case studies and information relating water quality, to clogging in column studies. Two novel theoretical concepts are introduced in the paper. Bayesian analysis is applied to demonstrate the increase in expected net benefit in developing a new ASR operation by undertaking clogging experiments (that have an assumed known reliability for predicting viability for the injectant treatment options and aquifer material from the site. Results for an example situation demonstrate benefit cost ratios of experiments ranging from 1.5 to 6 and apply if decisions are based on experimental results whether success or failure are predicted. Additionally, a theoretical assessment of clogging rates characterised as acute and chronic is given, to explore their combined impact, for two operating parameters that define the onset of purging for recovery of reversible clogging and the onset of occasional advanced bore rehabilitation to address recovery of chronic clogging. These allow the assessment of net recharge and the proportion of water purged or redeveloped. Both analyses could inform economic decisions and help motivate an improved investigation methodology. It is expected that aquifer heterogeneity will result in differing injection rates among wells, so operational experience will ultimately be valuable in differentiating clogging behaviour under

  11. Carbon fluxes of surfaces vs. ecosystems. Advantages of measuring eddy covariance and soil respiration simultaneously in dry grassland ecosystems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nagy, Z.; Pintér, K.; Pavelka, Marian; Dařenová, Eva; Balogh, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 9 (2011), s. 2523-2534 ISSN 1726-4170 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : carbon fluxes * ecosystems * grassland ecoystems * measuring eddy covariance * soil respiration Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.859, year: 2011

  12. Anomaly Detection from ASRS Databases of Textual Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our primary goal is to automatically analyze textual reports from the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) database to detect/discover the anomaly categories...

  13. ASR4, 4-Gage Anelastic Strain Recovery Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warpinski, N.R.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: ASR4 is a nonlinear least-squares regression of Anelastic Strain Recovery (ASR) data for the purpose of determining in situ stress orientations and magnitudes. ASR4 fits the viscoelastic model of Warpinski and Teufel to measure ASR data, calculates the stress orientations directly, and stress magnitudes if sufficient input data are available. The code also calculates the stress orientation using strain-rosette equations, and it calculates stress magnitudes using Blanton's approach, assuming sufficient input data are available. 2 - Method of solution: The viscoelastic analysis models the time- dependent response, fitting the model to the experimental data, and calculating stress and material property information. The actual experimental data are least-squares fit using a modified Levenberg-Marquardt procedure

  14. Analysis of lead content in automotive shredder residue (ASR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Oscar; Pessanha, Sofia; Queralt, Ignacio; Carvalho, Maria Luisa

    2009-01-01

    Automotive shredder residue (ASR) is a very heterogeneous waste, which could have a very high metal content on finest fractions φ -1 in the fraction -1 in the fraction between 2 and 6 mm) and that such type of instrumentation enables a fast measurement with a limit of detection of 1.1 mg kg -1 for 1000 s measurement).

  15. Heating and burn scenarios for ASR and ASB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmeyer, E.; Kisslinger, J.; Rau, F.; Wobig, H.

    1987-01-01

    Heating and Burn scenarios for Advanced Stellarator Reactors (ASR) and Burner configurations (ASB) are established as sequences of computed equilibria, using a one-dimensional code to calculate the coupled equations of particle and energy transport (heat conduction and bremsstrahlung) for electrons and ions in the presence of electric fields. The complicated structure of the magnetic fields in ASR and ASB is modelled by an effective ripple ranging from 2 to about 10% between the magnetic axis and the edge. For start-up, an effective heating power of 30 to 50 MW is sufficient. By increased refuelling, ASR is brought up to full power, preferentially at a moderate temperature T = 12...15 keV at the plasma center. The fusion power amounts to typically P th approx. 4 GW for ASR, whereas ASB stays at about 10% of this value. For ASR6C, central radiation losses up to 300 MW can be tolerated if the fusion power output is increased by an increased refuelling rate. Particle input fluxes of Φ 0 of 1.0 to 1.1x10 23 s -1 are required in the two cases without and with radiation, yielding values of the average β of 5.3 and 6.4% at a thermal fusion power of 3.8 and 5.6 GW. In a different computation with a radiative power loss of 300 MW near the plasma edge and a refuelling rate of 1.1x10 23 s -1 , a total fusion power of 3.9 GW is obtained at an average β of 5.0%. The peak temperature is T approx. 19 keV. In this case the ripple losses are reduced by a factor of two, in order to to take account of the improved confinement of an Advanced Stellarator, and the field is raised to 5.5 T at the axis. (author). 5 refs, 6 figs

  16. The unipolar ASR : Viable option in unsalvageable femoral head conditions in the young patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marya SKS

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of unsalvageable femoral head conditions in the young patient has remained an unresolved dilemma. Articular surface replacement of the hip has recently made some headway in terms of providing near-normal hip joint mechanics and function. However, this surgery has been limited to early stages of arthritis only with reasonable maintenance of head-neck congruity and morphology. Femoral neck fractures, osteonecrosis with large segment collapse, advanced arthritis with femoral incongruity, etc are traditional contraindications to the resurfacing technique. Methods: We present here a report on our series of 20 cases of unsalvageable femoral heads in young patients (age range, 27 to 52yrs, over a twelve month period (Aug 2004 to Jul 2005, treated with the unipolar ASR prosthesis. Fifteen patients (two had bilateral hip pathology had primary or secondary arthritis (degenerative, post-traumatic, ankylosing spondylitis and post-avascular necrosis while three had old operated femoral neck fractures. All patients underwent hip replacement surgery using the Unipolar ASR prosthesis. Results: Clinical and radiological results at 6-month follow up have been very encouraging and warrant further study. At an average of 4 months post-operatively, patients were able to squat, sit on the ground and perform light sporting activities. Conclusions: The Unipolar ASR prosthesis is an extension of the articular resurfacing technique employing similar principles (large size bearings, metal-on-metal interfaces, and has incorporated the advantages of the uncemented technique. We propose that this technique be more frequently used so as to brighten the prognosis of the young active patient with unsalvageable hip conditions, especially in the Asian scenario.

  17. EVALUATIONS ON ASR DAMAGE OF CONCRETE STRUCTURE AND ITS STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Naoshi; Nakamura, Hikaru; Kunieda, Minoru; Maeno, Hirofumi; Morishit, Noriaki; Asai, Hiroshi

    In this paper, experiments and finite element analyses were conducted in order to evaluate effects of ASR on structural performance of RC and PC structures. From the experimental results, it was confirmed that the ASR expansion was affected by the restraint of reinforcement and the magnitude of prestress. The material properties of concrete damaged by ASR had anisotropic characteristics depending on the degree of ASR expansion. Therefore, when the structural performance of RC and PC structures were evaluated by using the material properties of core concrete, the direction and place where cylinder specimens were cored should be considered. On the other hand, by means of proposed analytical method, ASR expansion behaviors of RC and PC beams and changing of their structural performance were evaluated. As the results, it was confirmed that PC structure had much advantage comparing with RC structure regarding the structural performance under ASR damage because of restraint by prestress against the ASR.

  18. Respirator Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to protect myself, my family, and/or my employees? If available and used correctly, a respirator can ... Respirator Fact Sheet [PDF - 706 KB] Follow NIOSH Facebook Flickr Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A- ...

  19. Respirator field performance factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.J.; DeField, J.D.; Strandberg, S.W.; Sutcliffe, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Industrial Hygiene Group assisted OSHA and the NRC in measurements of respirator performance under field conditions. They reviewed problems associated with sampling aerosols within the respirator in order to determine fit factors (FFs) or field performance factor (FPF). In addition, they designed an environmental chamber study to determine the effects of temperature and humidity on a respirator wearer

  20. Stimulation of abdominal and upper thoracic muscles with surface electrodes for respiration and cough: acute studies in adult canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, James S; Posluszny, Joseph; Dieter, Raymond; Dieter, Robert S; Sayers, Scott; Iamsakul, Kiratipath; Staunton, Christine; Thomas, Donald; Rabbat, Mark; Singh, Sanjay

    2017-06-14

    To optimize maximal respiratory responses with surface stimulation over abdominal and upper thorax muscles and using a 12-Channel Neuroprosthetic Platform. Following instrumentation, six anesthetized adult canines were hyperventilated sufficiently to produce respiratory apnea. Six abdominal tests optimized electrode arrangements and stimulation parameters using bipolar sets of 4.5 cm square electrodes. Tests in the upper thorax optimized electrode locations, and forelimb moment was limited to slight-to-moderate. During combined muscle stimulation tests, the upper thoracic was followed immediately by abdominal stimulation. Finally, a model of glottal closure for cough was conducted with the goal of increased peak expiratory flow. Optimized stimulation of abdominal muscles included three sets of bilateral surface electrodes located 4.5 cm dorsal to the lateral line and from the 8 th intercostal space to caudal to the 13 th rib, 80 or 100 mA current, and 50 Hz stimulation frequency. The maximal expired volume was 343 ± 23 ml (n=3). Optimized upper thorax stimulation included a single bilateral set of electrodes located over the 2 nd interspace, 60 to 80 mA, and 50 Hz. The maximal inspired volume was 304 ± 54 ml (n=4). Sequential stimulation of the two muscles increased the volume to 600 ± 152 ml (n=2), and the glottal closure maneuver increased the flow. Studies in an adult canine model identified optimal surface stimulation methods for upper thorax and abdominal muscles to induce sufficient volumes for ventilation and cough. Further study with this neuroprosthetic platform is warranted.

  1. Effects of lithium salts on ASR gel composition and expansion of mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Mitsunori; Fuwa, Hirohito

    2003-01-01

    Suppression of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) expansion in mortar and concrete by the addition of lithium salts has been confirmed by some workers. It has been revealed that lithium hydroxide tended to reduce the reaction between sodium or potassium hydroxide and reactive silica, and that the ASR gel incorporating lithium was less expansive. However, it has not been reported how the addition of a lithium salt influenced the composition of the ASR gel. The calcium in ASR gel is considered to play an important role in the expansion of the gel. Thus, it is significant to characterize ASR gel composition in mortars containing lithium salts by BSE-EDS analysis. This study aims to discuss the mechanisms of suppression of ASR expansion in mortar by lithium salts from the viewpoint of ASR gel composition. The average CaO/SiO 2 ratio in ASR gels decreased with increasing amount of added lithium salts. It should be noted that the extent of variations in the CaO/SiO 2 ratio in ASR gels significantly decreased with increasing amount of lithium salts. The addition of relatively small amounts of LiOH and Li 2 CO 3 resulted in increased expansion. We also obtained an unexpected result that ASR gels became homogeneous with respect to their CaO contents at high dosage levels. However, the reduction in average CaO/SiO 2 ratios and the homogenization in the CaO content of ASR gels due to the addition of lithium salts may not be related to the expansion of mortars

  2. Variable mineral composition of metamorphic rocks from a single quarry compared to their ASR potential (Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stastna, Aneta; Sachlova, Sarka; Pertold, Zdenek; Nekvasilova, Zuzana; Prikryl, Richard

    2013-04-01

    The alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is one of the most damaging factors for concrete structures. ASR originates due to the presence of reactive silica (SiO2) that reacts with alkaline ions under wet conditions. The reaction mechanism consists of four different steps: initial attack of OH- compounds on SiO2 at aggregate-cement paste boundary; formation of silanol groups at SiO2 surface; formation of siloxane groups and their polymerization; adsorption of alkaline and Ca2+ ions and formation of alkali-silica gels. Alkali-silica gels tend to absorb water molecules and swell causing increasing internal pressures in concrete and microcracking. The most reactive aggregates are mainly composed of amorphous and/or fine-grained SiO2-rich phases. In the Czech Republic, ASR was observed in deteriorating concrete structures containing very fine-grained quartz (quartz in tuffaceous sandstones and greywackes), as well as quartz indicating variable degree of deformation (quartz in quartzite, granodiorite and various metamorphic rock types). In this study, mineralogical-petrographic methods (polarizing, electron and cathodoluminescence microscopy) were combined with the accelerated mortar bar test (following the standard ASTM C1260), with the aim to quantify the ASR potential, as well as to distinguish reactive mineral phases. Different aggregate varieties from the Těchobuz quarry (Moldanubian Zone, Czech Republic) have been compared. Mineralogical-petrographic characteristics permit a distinction between 1) medium-grained plagioclase quartzite and 2) fine-grained biotite-plagioclase-quartz paragneiss and 3) fine-grained calc-silicate rock. Mineralogical composition of the first type is quartz + Ca-plagioclase + K-feldspar + biotite + chlorite + diopside + pyrite + apatite + titanite ± calcite. The second type has mineral assemblage including quartz + Ca-plagioclase + K-feldspar + biotite + chlorite + pyrite + tourmaline + apatite + titanite ± calcite. The third type contains

  3. Use of DOE SGP Radars in Support of ASR Modeling Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutledge, Steven A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2015-12-13

    The objective of this work was to use the DOE Southern Great Plains (SGP) precipitation radars to investigate physical characteristics of clouds and precipitation, and use this knowledge in support of DOE ASR modeling efforts. The goal was to develop an integrated data set based on the SGP instrumentation to yield statistically robust fields to aid in the task of verifying simulated cloud dynamical and microphysical fields. For this effort we relied heavily on the ARM scanning precipitation radars, X-SAPR’s and C-SAPR, and also incorporating data from wind profilers, surface disdrometers and the nearby WSR-88D radar, KVNX. Initially we lent our expertise to quality controlling the data from the newly installed ARM radars, particularly the X-band polarimetric data, and additionally assessed automatic radial velocity unfolding algorithms developed by other ASR researchers. We focused our efforts on four cases from the MC3E field campaign in 2011 and developed a dataset including microphysical information derived from hydrometeor identification and kinematic analysis using multiple-Doppler retrieval techniques. This dataset became a PI product and was released to the community in 2014. This analysis was used to investigate the source of big drops (> 5 mm) observed with disdrometers at the surface. It was found that the big drops were coincident with the strongest updrafts, suggesting they resulted from the melting of large precipitation ice, likely hail. We teamed up with W-K Tao and T. Matsui to statistically compare radar-derived observational kinematics and microphysics to WRF model output for the 25 April 2011. Comparisons highlighted some areas where the model may need improvement, such as generating too much hail and big drops, as well as overly-strong updrafts and overly-weak of downdrafts.

  4. Isolation of a novel abscisic acid stress ripening ( OsASR ) gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The expression profile of OsASR obtained by the microarray analysis was confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of the gene. The two sets of data matched very well, suggesting that OsASR is a multiple stresses responsive gene in rice. Based on the sequence ...

  5. Isolation of a novel abscisic acid stress ripening (OsASR) gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-09-13

    Sep 13, 2012 ... but surprisingly these genes are not present in. Arabidopsis (Carrari et al., 2004). The expression patterns of the ASR gene family members vary among different species during plant development and abiotic stresses (Maskin et al., 2001). Tomato ASR1 protein is localized in both the nucleus and the cytosol ...

  6. Modeling of expansion and cracking due to ASR with a 3D lattice model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Copuroglu, O.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally possible to consider modeling of ASR damage in concrete in two main groups: modeling of gel formation and its expansion; modeling of ASR related damage. In this paper, authors take an attempt to combine both: simulating the correct crack formation and the connected concrete

  7. Degradation of the mechanical properties in ASR-affected concrete : Overview and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, R.; Hendriks, M.A.N.

    2012-01-01

    The Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR) can generate harmful effects in the concrete structures. In this paper the degradation of the mechanical properties of ASR-affected concrete is studied by comparing the experimental results available in literature. An overview of the macroscopic material modelling

  8. Monitoring of an hydraulic structure affected by ASR: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, Patrice; Ballivy, Gerard; Gravel, Clermont; Saint-Pierre, Francois

    2010-01-01

    Relevant and effective instruments and techniques must be selected for monitoring hydraulic structures affected by Alkali-Silica Reaction ('ASR'). A program aiming at assessing the condition of a hydraulic structure affected by ASR is presented in this paper. The structure has been exhibiting signs of ASR for more than 30 years and shows various levels of damage. The program encompassed different components, consisting of: (1) stress measurement, (2) evaluation of concrete condition by nondestructive methods without drilling (seismic tomography), (3) the evaluation of the mechanical, physical and petrographic properties of the concrete determined from cores recovered from full-length boreholes. The results of this case study suggest that ASR may generate relatively little damage in structures and that the concrete mechanical properties do not seem to be significantly affected despite high expansion levels measured in this structure. A major crack was localized with the seismic tomography. The monitoring program will be used to follow the development of ASR in the structure.

  9. Choosing the right respirator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    Selecting respirators to help protect workers from airborne contaminants can be a confusing process. The consequences of selecting the incorrect respirator can be intimidating, and worker safety and health may be dramatically and irreparably affected if an inappropriate respirator is chosen. When used in the workplace, a formal respiratory protection program must be established covering the basic requirements outlined in the OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard (29 CFR 1910.134). Education and training must be properly emphasized and conducted periodically. Maintenance, cleaning, and storage programs must be established and routinely followed for reusable respirators. The process of establishing a respiratory protection program can be broken down into four basic steps: Identify respiratory hazards and concentrations; understand the contaminants effects on workers' health; select appropriate respiratory protection; and train in proper respirator use and maintenance. These four steps are the foundation for establishing a basic respirator protection program. Be sure to consult state and federal OSHA requirements to ensure that the program complies. Leading industrial respirator manufacturers should be able to assist with on-site training and education in this four-step process, in addition to helping employers train their workers and conduct respirator fit testing

  10. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Diagnosis and Prognosis of ASR Damage in Dry Cask Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Jianmin; Bazant, Zdenek; Jacobs, Laurence; Guimaraes, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a deleterious chemical process that may occur in cement-based materials such as mortars and concretes, where the hydroxyl ions in the highly alkaline pore solution attack the siloxane groups in the siliceous minerals in the aggregates. The reaction produces a cross-linked alkali-silica gel. The ASR gel swells in the presence of water. Expansion of the gel results in cracking when the swelling-induced stress exceeds the fracture toughness of the concrete. As the ASR continues, cracks may grow and eventually coalesce, which results in reduced service life and a decrease safety of concrete structures. Since concrete is widely used as a critical structural component in dry cask storage of used nuclear fuels, ASR damage poses a significant threat to the sustainability of long term dry cask storage systems. Therefore, techniques for effectively detecting, managing and mitigating ASR damage are needed. Currently, there are no nondestructive methods to accurately detect ASR damage in existing concrete structures. The only current way of accurately assessing ASR damage is to drill a core from an existing structure, and conduct microscopy on this drilled cylindrical core. Clearly, such a practice is not applicable to dry cask storage systems. To meet these needs, this research is aimed at developing (1) a suite of nonlinear ultrasonic quantitative nondestructive evaluation (QNDE) techniques to characterize ASR damage, and (2) a physics-based model for ASR damage evolution using the QNDE data. Outcomes of this research will provide a nondestructive diagnostic tool to evaluate the extent of the ASR damage, and a prognostic tool to estimate the future reliability and safety of the concrete structures in dry cask storage systems

  11. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Diagnosis and Prognosis of ASR Damage in Dry Cask Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jianmin [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Bazant, Zdenek [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Jacobs, Laurence [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Guimaraes, Maria [Electrical Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a deleterious chemical process that may occur in cement-based materials such as mortars and concretes, where the hydroxyl ions in the highly alkaline pore solution attack the siloxane groups in the siliceous minerals in the aggregates. The reaction produces a cross-linked alkali-silica gel. The ASR gel swells in the presence of water. Expansion of the gel results in cracking when the swelling-induced stress exceeds the fracture toughness of the concrete. As the ASR continues, cracks may grow and eventually coalesce, which results in reduced service life and a decrease safety of concrete structures. Since concrete is widely used as a critical structural component in dry cask storage of used nuclear fuels, ASR damage poses a significant threat to the sustainability of long term dry cask storage systems. Therefore, techniques for effectively detecting, managing and mitigating ASR damage are needed. Currently, there are no nondestructive methods to accurately detect ASR damage in existing concrete structures. The only current way of accurately assessing ASR damage is to drill a core from an existing structure, and conduct microscopy on this drilled cylindrical core. Clearly, such a practice is not applicable to dry cask storage systems. To meet these needs, this research is aimed at developing (1) a suite of nonlinear ultrasonic quantitative nondestructive evaluation (QNDE) techniques to characterize ASR damage, and (2) a physics-based model for ASR damage evolution using the QNDE data. Outcomes of this research will provide a nondestructive diagnostic tool to evaluate the extent of the ASR damage, and a prognostic tool to estimate the future reliability and safety of the concrete structures in dry cask storage systems

  12. Photosynthesis, respiration, and carbon turnover in sinking marine snow from surface waters of Southern California Bight: implications for the carbon cycle in the ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Grossart, HP; Azam, F.

    1999-01-01

    aggregate in darkness, which yielded a turnover time of 8 to 9 d for the total organic carbon in aggregates. Thus, marine snow is not only a vehicle for vertical flux of organic matter; the aggregates are also hotspots of microbial respiration which cause a fast and efficient respiratory turnover...... of particulate organic carbon in the sea....

  13. Plastron Respiration Using Commercial Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Atherton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of insect and arachnid species are able to remain submerged in water indefinitely using plastron respiration. A plastron is a surface-retained film of air produced by surface morphology that acts as an oxygen-carbon dioxide exchange surface. Many highly water repellent and hydrophobic surfaces when placed in water exhibit a silvery sheen which is characteristic of a plastron. In this article, the hydrophobicity of a range of commercially available water repellent fabrics and polymer membranes is investigated, and how the surface of the materials mimics this mechanism of underwater respiration is demonstrated allowing direct extraction of oxygen from oxygenated water. The coverage of the surface with the plastron air layer was measured using confocal microscopy. A zinc/oxygen cell is used to consume oxygen within containers constructed from the different membranes, and the oxygen consumed by the cell is compared to the change in oxygen concentration as measured by an oxygen probe. By comparing the membranes to an air-tight reference sample, it was found that the membranes facilitated oxygen transfer from the water into the container, with the most successful membrane showing a 1.90:1 ratio between the cell oxygen consumption and the change in concentration within the container.

  14. Interpreting diel hysteresis between soil respiration and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Phillips; N. Nickerson; D. Risk; B.J. Bond

    2011-01-01

    Increasing use of automated soil respiration chambers in recent years has demonstrated complex diel relationships between soil respiration and temperature that are not apparent from less frequent measurements. Soil surface flux is often lagged from soil temperature by several hours, which results in semielliptical hysteresis loops when surface flux is plotted as a...

  15. The Usefulness of Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR Eyespeak Software in Improving Iraqi EFL Students’ Pronunciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Fathi Sidig Sidgi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on determining whether automatic speech recognition (ASR technology is reliable for improving English pronunciation to Iraqi EFL students. Non-native learners of English are generally concerned about improving their pronunciation skills, and Iraqi students face difficulties in pronouncing English sounds that are not found in their native language (Arabic. This study is concerned with ASR and its effectiveness in overcoming this difficulty. The data were obtained from twenty participants randomly selected from first-year college students at Al-Turath University College from the Department of English in Baghdad-Iraq. The students had participated in a two month pronunciation instruction course using ASR Eyespeak software. At the end of the pronunciation instruction course using ASR Eyespeak software, the students completed a questionnaire to get their opinions about the usefulness of the ASR Eyespeak in improving their pronunciation. The findings of the study revealed that the students found ASR Eyespeak software very useful in improving their pronunciation and helping them realise their pronunciation mistakes. They also reported that learning pronunciation with ASR Eyespeak enjoyable.

  16. Diagnosing ADHD in Israeli adults: the psychometric properties of the adult ADHD Self Report Scale (ASRS) in Hebrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Ada H; Konfortes, Hani

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues for the importance of diagnosing ADHD in adults, while acknowledging the many attendant difficulties. The paper presents results from two studies implementing the Adult ADHD Self Report Screen (ASRS) in Hebrew. The Hebrew version of the ASRS as approved by the World Health Organization is appended to this paper. The first of the two studies used a paper and pencil version of the ASRS (ASRS_PP) and the second used a computer administered version (ASRS_C). A subset of the participants in the two studies was given both versions. The Hebrew ASRS had excellent test-retest reliability. It had good internal consistency in both forms. Support for the validity of the Hebrew ASRS is given by the significantly higher scores of adults with ADHD versus those without, on both versions of the ASRS and on all of its subscales. The sensitivity of the raw sum of all 18 items was significantly higher than that of the 6-item screen suggested by the authors of the ASRS. The sensitivity and specificity of the ASRS in Hebrew should be further examined in future studies including clinically referred participants. The benefit of using the ASRS as part of the diagnostic process for adult ADHD is discussed.

  17. Modeling of expansion and cracking due to ASR with a 3D lattice model

    OpenAIRE

    Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Copuroglu, O.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally possible to consider modeling of ASR damage in concrete in two main groups: modeling of gel formation and its expansion; modeling of ASR related damage. In this paper, authors take an attempt to combine both: simulating the correct crack formation and the connected concrete expansion. It is aimed to simulate ASR damage in a cementitious material bearing reactive aggregates. The model that is used is a 3D lattice type model. It models concrete on a meso-scale in which particles...

  18. Assesment of Severely ASR Damaged Bridges: From Diagnosis to Structural Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, Ricardo Antonio; Hansen, Søren Gustenhoff; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade an increasing number of bridges are becoming severely deteriorated due to alkali-silica reaction (ASR) in Denmark. Some bridges have already been demolished due to lack of knowledge on the residual load carrying capacity. The deterioration of concrete by ASR has been widely...... documented. The majority of the experimental data are based on relatively small scale laboratory specimens accelerated by various exposure conditions. Research on assessment and influence of severely ASR deterioration on the material properties and residual load carrying capacity of real-life structures...

  19. MULTI-LABEL ASRS DATASET CLASSIFICATION USING SEMI-SUPERVISED SUBSPACE CLUSTERING

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MULTI-LABEL ASRS DATASET CLASSIFICATION USING SEMI-SUPERVISED SUBSPACE CLUSTERING MOHAMMAD SALIM AHMED, LATIFUR KHAN, NIKUNJ OZA, AND MANDAVA RAJESWARI Abstract....

  20. Alkali silica reaction (ASR) in cement free alkali activated sustainable concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    This report summarizes the findings of an experimental evaluation into alkali silica : reaction (ASR) in cement free alkali-activated slag and fly ash binder concrete. The : susceptibility of alkali-activated fly ash and slag concrete binders to dele...

  1. Soil respiration partition and its components in the total agro-ecosystem respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delogu, Emilie; LeDantec, Valerie; Mordelet, Patrick; Buysse, Pauline; Aubinet, Marc; Pattey, Elizabeth; Mary, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Close to 15% of the Earth's terrestrial surface is used for cropland. In the context of global warming, and acknowledged by the Kyoto Protocol, agricultural soils could be a significant sink for atmospheric CO2. Understanding the factors influencing carbon fluxes of agricultural soils is essential for implementing efficient mitigation practices. Most of the soil respiration modeling studies was carried out in forest ecosystems, but only a few was carried out in agricultural ecosystems. In the study, we evaluated simple formalisms to model soil respiration using wheat data from four contrasting geographical mi-latitude regions. Soil respiration were measured in three winter wheat fields at Lamasquère (43°49'N, 01°23'E, 2007) and Auradé (43°54'N, 01°10'E, 2008), South-West France and Lonzée (50°33'N, 4°44'E, 2007), Belgium, and in a spring wheat field at Ottawa (45°22'N, 75°43'W, 2007, 2011), Ontario, Canada. Manual closed chambers were used in the French sites. The Belgium and Canadian sites were equipped with automated closed chamber systems, which continuously collected 30-min soil respiration exchanges. All the sites were also equipped with eddy flux towers. When eddy flux data were collected over bare soil, the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was equal to soil respiration exchange. These NEE data were used to validate the model. Different biotic and abiotic descriptors were used to model daily soil respiration and its heterotrophic and autotrophic components: soil temperature, soil relative humidity, Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), shoot biomass, crop height, with different formalisms. It was interesting to conclude that using biotic descriptors did not improve the performances of the model. In fact, a combination of abiotic descriptors (soil humidity and soil temperature) allowed significant model formalism to model soil respiration. The simple soil respiration model was used to calculate the heterotrophic and autotrophic source contributions to

  2. Automatic speech recognition (ASR) based approach for speech therapy of aphasic patients: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Norezmi; Shanta, Shahnoor; Mahmud, Farhanahani; Sha'abani, MNAH

    2017-09-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art an automatic speech recognition (ASR) based approach for speech therapy of aphasic patients. Aphasia is a condition in which the affected person suffers from speech and language disorder resulting from a stroke or brain injury. Since there is a growing body of evidence indicating the possibility of improving the symptoms at an early stage, ASR based solutions are increasingly being researched for speech and language therapy. ASR is a technology that transfers human speech into transcript text by matching with the system's library. This is particularly useful in speech rehabilitation therapies as they provide accurate, real-time evaluation for speech input from an individual with speech disorder. ASR based approaches for speech therapy recognize the speech input from the aphasic patient and provide real-time feedback response to their mistakes. However, the accuracy of ASR is dependent on many factors such as, phoneme recognition, speech continuity, speaker and environmental differences as well as our depth of knowledge on human language understanding. Hence, the review examines recent development of ASR technologies and its performance for individuals with speech and language disorders.

  3. The ASRS-6 has two latent factors: attention deficit and hyper-activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To test whether the Adult Self-Report Scale for ADHD, 6-items version (ASRS-6), measures inattentiveness and hyperactivity independently. Methods: The ASRS-6 was completed by 234 university students and 157 outpatients treated for drug dependence. In both samples, the ASRS-6 was subjec......Objective: To test whether the Adult Self-Report Scale for ADHD, 6-items version (ASRS-6), measures inattentiveness and hyperactivity independently. Methods: The ASRS-6 was completed by 234 university students and 157 outpatients treated for drug dependence. In both samples, the ASRS-6...... was subjected to two confirmatory factor analyses, one testing a one-factor model, and one testing a model with two correlated factors indicating inattentiveness and hyperactivity respectively. Test-retest reliability of the subscales was tested on a subset of the student sample (n=25). Results: In both samples......, a one-factor solution did not fit the data, but the two-factor solution fit the data better. Sub-scales differed in their correlates in ways that mirror the correlates of inattentiveness and hyperactivity in the published literature on ADHD. In the student sample, the test-retest reliability...

  4. Over-expression of Gene FaASR Promotes Strawberry Fruit Coloring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhongjie

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fruit development and ripening is a complicate process. Although much progress has been made on the ripenig process, the molecular mechamism of fruit development is not yet clear. In this study, we used ‘Sweet Charlie’ strawberry as test materials, based on cloning the strawberries ASR homologous gene, we carried out the bioinformatics and temporal expression analysis of FaASR, by manipulating ASR gene expression level in strawberry fruit, we tested the changes of physiological indicators, including sugar, ABA, pigments content, and fruit firmness, as well as phenotypic changes. In addition, we measured the expression changes of some anthocyanin-related gene, such as CHS and UFGT, by which we revealed the regulation mechanisms of ASR gene over strawberry fruit ripening. Strawberry ASR contained a typical domain of ABA/WDS that was related to fruit ripening and stress-resistance, and ASR gene over-expression could promote strawberry fruit coloring, endogenous ABA and sucrose accumulation, fruit softening, and induced the transcription levels of anthocyanin-related genes CHS and UFGT. The present study will further reveal the molecular mechanisms of information transmission in fruit development, and will also play an important foundation for future molecular improvement of strawberries breeding.

  5. Development of conformal respirator monitoring technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shonka, J.J.; Weismann, J.J.; Logan, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a Small Business Innovative Research Phase II project to develop a modular, surface conforming respirator monitor to improve upon the manual survey techniques presently used by the nuclear industry. Research was performed with plastic scintillator and gas proportional modules in an effort to find the most conducive geometry for a surface conformal, position sensitive monitor. The respirator monitor prototype developed is a computer controlled, position-sensitive detection system employing 56 modular proportional counters mounted in molds conforming to the inner and outer surfaces of a commonly used respirator (Scott Model 801450-40). The molds are housed in separate enclosures and hinged to create a open-quotes waffle-ironclose quotes effect so that the closed monitor will simultaneously survey both surfaces of the respirator. The proportional counter prototype was also designed to incorporate Shonka Research Associates previously developed charge-division electronics. This research provided valuable experience into pixellated position sensitive detection systems. The technology developed can be adapted to other monitoring applications where there is a need for deployment of many traditional radiation detectors

  6. Origin and mobility of alkalies in two Dutch ASR-concretes. II: Microscale element distribution around sandstone and chert. Implications for the mechanism of ASR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekmans, M.A.T.M.; Nijland, T.G.; Jansen, J.B.H.

    2001-01-01

    River gravel used as aggregate for concrete in the Netherlands contains several potentially deleterious components with respect to alkali-silica reaction (ASR), viz. porous chert, chalcedony, and impure sandstones (greywackes. mica- and sericite-rich sandstones, siltstones, arkoses etc.). Whereas

  7. Light-enhanced oxygen respiration in benthic phototrophic communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epping, EHG; Jørgensen, BB

    1996-01-01

    Two microelectrode studies demonstrate the effect of Light intensity and photosynthesis on areal oxygen respiration in a hypersaline mat at Guerrero Negro, Mexico, and in an intertidal sediment at Texel, The Netherlands. The hypersaline mat was studied in the laboratory at light intensities of 0...... light intensities. Areal respiration, calculated from the difference between areal gross and areal net photosynthesis, increased from 3.9 to 14.4 nmol O-2 cm(2) min(-1) with increasing surface irradiance. This light-enhanced areal respiration was related to an increase in oxygen penetration depth from 0.......2 to 2.0 mm, thus expanding the volume of sediment involved in oxygen respiration beneath the mat surface. The mean rate of oxygen respiration per volume of mat remained constant at a rate of similar to 100 nmol O-2 cm(-3) min(-1). Oxygen profiles for the intertidal sediment were recorded in situ during...

  8. Transport modeling and multivariate adaptive regression splines for evaluating performance of ASR systems in freshwater aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani, Ali; Peralta, Richard C.

    2017-10-01

    The study presents a procedure using solute transport and statistical models to evaluate the performance of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems designed to earn additional water rights in freshwater aquifers. The recovery effectiveness (REN) index quantifies the performance of these ASR systems. REN is the proportion of the injected water that the same ASR well can recapture during subsequent extraction periods. To estimate REN for individual ASR wells, the presented procedure uses finely discretized groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling. Then, the procedure uses multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) analysis to identify the significant variables affecting REN, and to identify the most recovery-effective wells. Achieving REN values close to 100% is the desire of the studied 14-well ASR system operator. This recovery is feasible for most of the ASR wells by extracting three times the injectate volume during the same year as injection. Most of the wells would achieve RENs below 75% if extracting merely the same volume as they injected. In other words, recovering almost all the same water molecules that are injected requires having a pre-existing water right to extract groundwater annually. MARS shows that REN most significantly correlates with groundwater flow velocity, or hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic gradient. MARS results also demonstrate that maximizing REN requires utilizing the wells located in areas with background Darcian groundwater velocities less than 0.03 m/d. The study also highlights the superiority of MARS over regular multiple linear regressions to identify the wells that can provide the maximum REN. This is the first reported application of MARS for evaluating performance of an ASR system in fresh water aquifers.

  9. Dimerization and DNA-binding of ASR1, a small hydrophilic protein abundant in plant tissues suffering from water loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskin, Laura; Frankel, Nicolas; Gudesblat, Gustavo; Demergasso, Maria J.; Pietrasanta, Lia I.; Iusem, Norberto D.

    2007-01-01

    The Asr gene family is present in Spermatophyta. Its members are generally activated under water stress. We present evidence that tomato ASR1, one of the proteins of the family, accumulates in seed during late stages of embryogenesis, a physiological process characterized by water loss. In vitro, electrophoretic assays show a homo-dimeric structure for ASR1 and highlight strong non-covalent interactions between monomers prone to self-assemble. Direct visualization of single molecules by atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirms that ASR1 forms homodimers and that uncovers both monomers and dimers bind double stranded DNA

  10. Validity and Reliability of Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale Thai Version (ASRS-V1.1 TH)

    OpenAIRE

    KIATRUNGRIT, Komsan; PUTTHISRI, Suwannee; HONGSANGUANSRI, Sirichai; WISAJAN, Pattaraporn; JULLAGATE, Sudawan

    2017-01-01

    Background The adult ADHD Self–Report Scale Thai version (ASRS-V1.1) (18 items) is a questionnaire for screening adult ADHD. Aim To test the validity and reliability of the 18-question ASRS-V1.1 Thai version (ASRS-V1.1 TH) as a screening tool for adult ADHD Methods The original 18-question ASRS-V1.1 version was translated into Thai. The process was composed of forward-translation, synthesis of the translation, and back translation. Cross cultural adaptation, field testing, and final adjustmen...

  11. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ethanol stress involves actions of protein Asr1p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Junmei; Huang, Xiaowei; Zhao, Na; Gao, Feng; Lu, Qian; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2010-12-01

    During the fermentation process of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yeast cells must rapidly respond to a wide variety of external stresses in order to survive the constantly changing environment, including ethanol stress. The accumulation of ethanol can severely inhibit cell growth activity and productivity. Thus, the response to changing ethanol concentrations is one of the most important stress reactions in S. cerevisiae and worthy of thorough investigation. Therefore, this study examined the relationship between ethanol tolerance in S. cerevisiae and a unique protein called alcohol sensitive RING/PHD finger 1 protein (Asr1p). A real-time PCR showed that upon exposure to 8% ethanol, the expression of Asr1 was continuously enhanced, reaching a peak 2 h after stimulation. This result was confirmed by monitoring the fluorescence levels using a strain with a green fluorescent protein tagged to the C-terminal of Asr1p. The fluorescent microscopy also revealed a change in the subcellular localization before and after stimulation. Furthermore, the disruption of the Asr1 gene resulted in hypersensitivity on the medium containing ethanol, when compared with the wild-type strain. Thus, when taken together, the present results suggest that Asr1 is involved in the response to ethanol stress in the yeast S. cerevisiae.

  12. A real case of steam-cured concrete track slab premature deterioration due to ASR and DEF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunlin Ma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deterioration mechanisms of some premature damaged steam-cured concrete track slabs (CTS in Chinese railway less than 4 years were investigated. Field investigation, raw materials test and suspicious products analysis were carried out. Results show that steam-cured heat damage (SCHD of concrete takes place in steam-cured process. Expansion products are ettringite in hydrated products and alkali-silica gels between the interface of hydrated products and coarse aggregate. SCHD makes CTS surface layer loose, porous and more micro-cracks. Long-term fatigue load from high-speed train acting on CTS enlarges concrete microcracks, leading to water penetrating into concrete easily in moist and rainy environment. In the process of water ingression, alkali-silica reaction (ASR and delayed ettringite formation (DEF take place, hence resulting in CTS cracking and premature deterioration.

  13. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  14. Reactive transport impacts on recovered freshwater quality during multiple partially penetrating wells (MPPW-)ASR in a brackish heterogeneous aquifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Koen G.; Hartog, Niels; Stuyfzand, Pieter J.

    The use of multiple partially penetrating wells (MPPW) during aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) in brackish aquifers can significantly improve the recovery efficiency (RE) of unmixed injected water. The water quality changes by reactive transport processes in a field MPPW-ASR system and their

  15. Observations and prediction of recovered quality of desalinated seawater in the strategic ASR project in Liwa, Abu Dhabi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuijfzand, Pieter; Smidt, Ebel; Zuurbier, Koen; Hartog, Niels; Dawoud, Mohamed A.

    2017-01-01

    To be able to overcome water shortages, Abu Dhabi Emirate started an Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) project with desalinated seawater (DSW) as source water near Liwa. It is the largest DSW-ASR project in the world (stored volume ~10 Mm3/year), and should recover potable water for

  16. Estimating Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR Regional and Local Suitability: A Case Study in Washington State, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria T. Gibson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing aquifers as underground water supply reservoirs is an advantageous approach applicable to meeting water management objectives. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR is a direct injection and subsequent withdrawal technology that is used to increase water supply storage through injection wells. Due to site-specific hydrogeological quantification and evaluation to assess ASR suitability, limited methods have been developed to identify suitability on regional scales that are also applicable at local scales. This paper presents an ASR site scoring system developed to qualitatively assess regional and local suitability of ASR using 9 scored metrics to determine total percent of ASR suitability, partitioned into hydrogeologic properties, operational considerations, and regulatory influences. The development and application of a qualitative water well suitability method was used to assess the potential groundwater response to injection, estimate suitability based on predesignated injection rates, and provide cumulative approximation of statewide and local storage prospects. The two methods allowed for rapid assessment of ASR suitability and its applicability to regional and local water management objectives at over 280 locations within 62 watersheds in Washington, USA. It was determined that over 50% of locations evaluated are suitable for ASR and statewide injection potential equaled 6400 million liters per day. The results also indicate current limitations and/or potential benefits of developing ASR systems at the local level with the intent of assisting local water managers in strategic water supply planning.

  17. Respirable dust and respirable silica exposure in Ontario gold mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dave K; Rajhans, Gyan S; Malik, Om P; des Tombe, Karen

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of respirable dust and respirable silica in Ontario gold mines was conducted by the Ontario Ministry of Labor during 1978-1979. The aim was to assess the feasibility of introducing gravimetric sampling to replace the assessment method which used konimeters, a device which gave results in terms of number of particles per cubic centimeter (ppcc) of air. The study involved both laboratory and field assessments. The field assessment involved measurement of airborne respirable dust and respirable silica at all eight operating gold mines of the time. This article describes the details of the field assessment. A total of 288 long-term (7-8 hr) personal respirable dust air samples were collected from seven occupational categories in eight gold mines. The respirable silica (α-quartz) was determined by x-ray diffraction method. The results show that during 1978-1979, the industry wide mean respirable dust was about 1 mg/m(3), and the mean respirable silica was 0.08 mg/m(3.)The mean% silica in respirable dust was 7.5%. The data set would be useful in future epidemiological and health studies, as well as in assessment of workers' compensation claims for occupational diseases such as silicosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and autoimmune diseases such as renal disease and rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Cattle respiration facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Lund, Peter; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    2012-01-01

    In Denmark, the emission rate of methane from dairy cows has been calculated using the IPCC standard values for dairy cows in Western countries, due to the lack of national data. Therefore, four respiration chambers for dairy cows were built with the main purpose of measuring methane, but also...... for dairy cows is between 800 to 1500 L/min depending on the milk production and liveweight. This gives an average concentration of 5000−6000 ppm of carbon dioxide and 500−600 ppm of methane in the chambers....

  19. Material and energy recovery from Automotive Shredded Residues (ASR) via sequential gasification and combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganò, F; Consonni, S; Grosso, M; Rigamonti, L

    2010-01-01

    Shredding is the common end-of-life treatment in Europe for dismantled car wrecks. It produces the so-called Automotive Shredded Residue (ASR), usually disposed of in landfill. This paper summarizes the outcome of a study carried out by Politecnico di Milano and LEAP with the support of Actelios SpA on the prospects of a technology based on sequential gasification and combustion of this specific waste stream. Its application to the treatment of ASR allows the recovery of large fractions of metals as non-oxidized, easily marketable secondary raw materials, the vitrification of most of the ash content and the production of power via a steam cycle. Results show that despite the unfavourable characteristics of ASR, the proposed technology can reach appealing energy performances. Three of four environmental impact indicators and the cumulative energy demand index are favourable, the main positive contributes being electricity production and metal recovery (mainly aluminium and copper). The only unfavourable indicator is the global warming index because, since most of the carbon in ASR comes from fossil sources, the carbon dioxide emissions at the stack of the thermal treatment plant are mainly non-renewable and, at the same time, the avoided biogas production from the alternative disposal route of landfilling is minor.

  20. The Usefulness of Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) Eyespeak Software in Improving Iraqi EFL Students' Pronunciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidgi, Lina Fathi Sidig; Shaari, Ahmad Jelani

    2017-01-01

    The present study focuses on determining whether automatic speech recognition (ASR) technology is reliable for improving English pronunciation to Iraqi EFL students. Non-native learners of English are generally concerned about improving their pronunciation skills, and Iraqi students face difficulties in pronouncing English sounds that are not…

  1. Optimal Storage Rack Design for a 3-dimensional Compact AS/RS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Le-Duc (Tho); M.B.M. de Koster (René)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we consider a newly-designed automated storage and retrieval system (AS/RS). The system consists of an automated crane taking care of movements in the horizontal and vertical direction. A gravity conveying mechanism takes care of the depth movement. The aim of the research

  2. Ageing Voices: The Effect of Changes in Voice Parameters on ASR Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichander Vipperla

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With ageing, human voices undergo several changes which are typically characterized by increased hoarseness and changes in articulation patterns. In this study, we have examined the effect on Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR and found that the Word Error Rates (WER on older voices is 10% absolute higher compared to those of adult voices. Subsequently, we compared several voice source parameters including fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, harmonicity, and cepstral peak prominence of adult and older males. Several of these parameters show statistically significant difference for the two groups. However, artificially increasing jitter and shimmer measures do not effect the ASR accuracies significantly. Artificially lowering the fundamental frequency degrades the ASR performance marginally but this drop in performance can be overcome to some extent using Vocal Tract Length Normalisation (VTLN. Overall, we observe that the changes in the voice source parameters do not have a significant impact on ASR performance. Comparison of the likelihood scores of all the phonemes for the two age groups show that there is a systematic mismatch in the acoustic space of the two age groups. Comparison of the phoneme recognition rates show that mid vowels, nasals, and phonemes that depend on the ability to create constrictions with tongue tip for articulation are more affected by ageing than other phonemes.

  3. QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF ASR DETERIORATION LEVEL BASED ON SURVEY RESULT OF EXISTING STRUCTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Yasushi; Kosa, Kenji; Matsumoto, Shigeru; Miura, Masatsugu

    The relationship between the crack density and compressive strength of the core cylinder, which drilled from actual structure damaged by ASR, was investigated. The results showed that even if the crack density increased about 1.0m/m2, the compressive strength decreased only 2N/mm2. Then, the new method for estimating future compressive strength using the accumulation crack density in the current is proposed. In addition, the declining tendency of compressive strength by the ASR expansion was early proportional to the expansion, and it was examined on the reason for becoming gentle curve afterwards. As a technique, the detailed observation of ASR crack which arose in the loading test for the plane was carried out, after cylindrical specimen for test was cut in longitudinal direction. As the result, It was proven that the proportion in which line of rupture overlaps with the ASR crack was low, and the load is resisted by interlocking between coarse aggregate and concrete in the crack plane.

  4. Acoustic emission measurement in the proof loading of an existing bridge affected by ASR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Hordijk, D.A.; de Boer, A.; Bakker, J.; Frangopol, D.M.; van Breugel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Proof loading has been considered as an effective approach in the assessment of existing concrete bridges. This paper presents a study of acoustic emission measurement in a proof loading of an ASR affected concrete slab bridge (Zijlweg bridge). Because of the uncertainty on the mechanical properties

  5. The pedagogical effectiveness of ASR-based computer assisted pronunciation training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neri, A.

    2007-01-01

    Computer Assisted Pronunciation Training (CAPT) systems with Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) technology have become increasingly popular to train pronunciation in the second language (L2). The advantage of these systems is the provision of a self-paced, stress-free type of training with automatic

  6. Residual shear strength of a severely ASR-damaged flat slab bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, Ricardo Antonio; Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2018-01-01

    based on the compressive strength of drilled cores were rather conservative at low shear span-to-effective depth ratios. However, the conservatism of the Eurocode 2 decreased with increasing shear span-to-effective depth ratios. With the inclusion of ASR-induced pre-stress effect, the calculated shear...

  7. Chemo-mechanical modeling for prediction of alkali silica reaction (ASR) expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multon, Stephane; Sellier, Alain; Cyr, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the size of the aggregate on ASR expansion has already been well illustrated. This paper presents a microscopic model to analyze the development of ASR expansion of mortars containing reactive aggregate of different sizes. The attack of the reactive silica by alkali was determined through the mass balance equation, which controls the diffusion mechanism in the aggregate and the fixation of the alkali in the ASR gels. The mechanical part of the model is based on the damage theory in order to assess the decrease of stiffness of the mortar due to cracking caused by ASR and to calculate the expansion of a Representative Elementary Volume (REV) of concrete. Parameters of the model were estimated by curve fitting the expansions of four experimental mortars. The paper shows that the decrease of expansion with the size of the aggregate and the increase of the expansion with the alkali content are reproduced by the model, which is able to predict the expansions of six other mortars containing two sizes of reactive aggregate and cast with two alkali contents.

  8. A Novel Role for Banana MaASR in the Regulation of Flowering Time in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiguang Sun

    Full Text Available The abscisic acid (ABA-, stress-, and ripening-induced (ASR protein is a plant-specific hydrophilic transcriptional factor involved in fruit ripening and the abiotic stress response. To date, there have been no studies on the role of ASR genes in delayed flowering time. Here, we found that the ASR from banana, designated as MaASR, was preferentially expressed in the banana female flowers from the eighth, fourth, and first cluster of the inflorescence. MaASR transgenic lines (L14 and L38 had a clear delayed-flowering phenotype. The number of rosette leaves, sepals, and pedicel trichomes in L14 and L38 was greater than in the wild type (WT under long day (LD conditions. The period of buds, mid-flowers, and full bloom of L14 and L38 appeared later than the WT. cDNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analyses revealed that overexpression of MaASR delays flowering through reduced expression of several genes, including photoperiod pathway genes, vernalization pathway genes, gibberellic acid pathway genes, and floral integrator genes, under short days (SD for 28 d (from vegetative to reproductive transition stage; however, the expression of the autonomous pathway genes was not affected. This study provides the first evidence of a role for ASR genes in delayed flowering time in plants.

  9. A Novel Role for Banana MaASR in the Regulation of Flowering Time in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peiguang; Miao, Hongxia; Yu, Xiaomeng; Jia, Caihong; Liu, Juhua; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jingyi; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Anbang; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The abscisic acid (ABA)-, stress-, and ripening-induced (ASR) protein is a plant-specific hydrophilic transcriptional factor involved in fruit ripening and the abiotic stress response. To date, there have been no studies on the role of ASR genes in delayed flowering time. Here, we found that the ASR from banana, designated as MaASR, was preferentially expressed in the banana female flowers from the eighth, fourth, and first cluster of the inflorescence. MaASR transgenic lines (L14 and L38) had a clear delayed-flowering phenotype. The number of rosette leaves, sepals, and pedicel trichomes in L14 and L38 was greater than in the wild type (WT) under long day (LD) conditions. The period of buds, mid-flowers, and full bloom of L14 and L38 appeared later than the WT. cDNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that overexpression of MaASR delays flowering through reduced expression of several genes, including photoperiod pathway genes, vernalization pathway genes, gibberellic acid pathway genes, and floral integrator genes, under short days (SD) for 28 d (from vegetative to reproductive transition stage); however, the expression of the autonomous pathway genes was not affected. This study provides the first evidence of a role for ASR genes in delayed flowering time in plants.

  10. Mitigation of ASR by the use of LiNO{sub 3}—Characterization of the reaction products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemann, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.leemann@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lörtscher, Luzia [Institute for Surface Science and Technology (D-MATL), ETH Zurich, Schafmattstr. 6, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Bernard, Laetitia; Le Saout, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M. [Institute for Surface Science and Technology (D-MATL), ETH Zurich, Schafmattstr. 6, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-05-01

    The influence of the LiNO{sub 3} on the ASR product was studied both in a model system and in mortars. In the model system, the addition of LiNO{sub 3} decreases the dissolution rate and the solubility of silica. Lithium changes the 2-dimensional cross-linked (Q{sub 3} dominated) network of the ASR product into a less structured, Q{sub 2} dominated product, likely by adopting the role of calcium. In the mortar samples the addition of LiNO{sub 3} decreases expansion and significantly influences the chemical composition and the morphology of the reaction product. Lithium decreases the calcium, sodium and potassium content and changes the relatively porous plate-like reaction product into a dense one without texture. The findings in the mortars indicate that the ASR-suppressing effect of lithium is caused by the lower potential of the reaction product to swell. Furthermore, it forms a protective barrier after an initial reaction slowing down ASR. - Highlights: • Detection of lithium in ASR product by ToF-SIMS • Relation between composition of pore solution and ASR product • Identification of ASR suppressing mechanisms of LiNO{sub 3}.

  11. Mitigation of ASR by the use of LiNO3—Characterization of the reaction products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemann, Andreas; Lörtscher, Luzia; Bernard, Laetitia; Le Saout, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the LiNO 3 on the ASR product was studied both in a model system and in mortars. In the model system, the addition of LiNO 3 decreases the dissolution rate and the solubility of silica. Lithium changes the 2-dimensional cross-linked (Q 3 dominated) network of the ASR product into a less structured, Q 2 dominated product, likely by adopting the role of calcium. In the mortar samples the addition of LiNO 3 decreases expansion and significantly influences the chemical composition and the morphology of the reaction product. Lithium decreases the calcium, sodium and potassium content and changes the relatively porous plate-like reaction product into a dense one without texture. The findings in the mortars indicate that the ASR-suppressing effect of lithium is caused by the lower potential of the reaction product to swell. Furthermore, it forms a protective barrier after an initial reaction slowing down ASR. - Highlights: • Detection of lithium in ASR product by ToF-SIMS • Relation between composition of pore solution and ASR product • Identification of ASR suppressing mechanisms of LiNO 3

  12. Two Proximal Skin Electrodes — A Respiration Rate Body Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Avbelj

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new body sensor for extracting the respiration rate based on the amplitude changes in the body surface potential differences between two proximal body electrodes. The sensor could be designed as a plaster-like reusable unit that can be easily fixed onto the surface of the body. It could be equipped either with a sufficiently large memory for storing the measured data or with a low-power radio system that can transmit the measured data to a gateway for further processing. We explore the influence of the sensor’s position on the quality of the extracted results using multi-channel ECG measurements and considering all the pairs of two neighboring electrodes as potential respiration-rate sensors. The analysis of the clinical measurements, which also include reference thermistor-based respiration signals, shows that the proposed approach is a viable option for monitoring the respiration frequency and for a rough classification of breathing types. The obtained results were evaluated on a wireless prototype of a respiration body sensor. We indicate the best positions for the respiration body sensor and prove that a single sensor for body surface potential difference on proximal skin electrodes can be used for combined measurements of respiratory and cardiac activities.

  13. AsrR is an oxidative stress sensing regulator modulating Enterococcus faecium opportunistic traits, antimicrobial resistance, and pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Lebreton

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress serves as an important host/environmental signal that triggers a wide range of responses in microorganisms. Here, we identified an oxidative stress sensor and response regulator in the important multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecium belonging to the MarR family and called AsrR (antibiotic and stress response regulator. The AsrR regulator used cysteine oxidation to sense the hydrogen peroxide which results in its dissociation to promoter DNA. Transcriptome analysis showed that the AsrR regulon was composed of 181 genes, including representing functionally diverse groups involved in pathogenesis, antibiotic and antimicrobial peptide resistance, oxidative stress, and adaptive responses. Consistent with the upregulated expression of the pbp5 gene, encoding a low-affinity penicillin-binding protein, the asrR null mutant was found to be more resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Deletion of asrR markedly decreased the bactericidal activity of ampicillin and vancomycin, which are both commonly used to treat infections due to enterococci, and also led to over-expression of two major adhesins, acm and ecbA, which resulted in enhanced in vitro adhesion to human intestinal cells. Additional pathogenic traits were also reinforced in the asrR null mutant including greater capacity than the parental strain to form biofilm in vitro and greater persistance in Galleria mellonella colonization and mouse systemic infection models. Despite overexpression of oxidative stress-response genes, deletion of asrR was associated with a decreased oxidative stress resistance in vitro, which correlated with a reduced resistance to phagocytic killing by murine macrophages. Interestingly, both strains showed similar amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Finally, we observed a mutator phenotype and enhanced DNA transfer frequencies in the asrR deleted strain. These data indicate that AsrR plays a major role in antimicrobial

  14. AsrR Is an Oxidative Stress Sensing Regulator Modulating Enterococcus faecium Opportunistic Traits, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, François; van Schaik, Willem; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Torelli, Riccardo; Le Bras, Florian; Verneuil, Nicolas; Zhang, Xinglin; Giard, Jean-Christophe; Dhalluin, Anne; Willems, Rob J. L.; Leclercq, Roland; Cattoir, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress serves as an important host/environmental signal that triggers a wide range of responses in microorganisms. Here, we identified an oxidative stress sensor and response regulator in the important multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecium belonging to the MarR family and called AsrR (antibiotic and stress response regulator). The AsrR regulator used cysteine oxidation to sense the hydrogen peroxide which results in its dissociation to promoter DNA. Transcriptome analysis showed that the AsrR regulon was composed of 181 genes, including representing functionally diverse groups involved in pathogenesis, antibiotic and antimicrobial peptide resistance, oxidative stress, and adaptive responses. Consistent with the upregulated expression of the pbp5 gene, encoding a low-affinity penicillin-binding protein, the asrR null mutant was found to be more resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Deletion of asrR markedly decreased the bactericidal activity of ampicillin and vancomycin, which are both commonly used to treat infections due to enterococci, and also led to over-expression of two major adhesins, acm and ecbA, which resulted in enhanced in vitro adhesion to human intestinal cells. Additional pathogenic traits were also reinforced in the asrR null mutant including greater capacity than the parental strain to form biofilm in vitro and greater persistance in Galleria mellonella colonization and mouse systemic infection models. Despite overexpression of oxidative stress-response genes, deletion of asrR was associated with a decreased oxidative stress resistance in vitro, which correlated with a reduced resistance to phagocytic killing by murine macrophages. Interestingly, both strains showed similar amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Finally, we observed a mutator phenotype and enhanced DNA transfer frequencies in the asrR deleted strain. These data indicate that AsrR plays a major role in antimicrobial resistance and

  15. Plankton Respiration from the Cellular to the Basin Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C.; Garcia-Martin, E. E.; Hull, T.; Kitidis, V. A.; Ostle, C.; Serret, P.; Tilstone, G.

    2016-02-01

    Estimates of marine plankton respiration provide an important constraint on the magnitude of the biological carbon pump and global elemental nutrient cycles, yet respiration remains one of the least constrained terms in models of metabolism, gas exchange and carbon mass balance. This is due in part to the difficulty in measuring both total oceanic respiration and that attributable to specific plankton groups or size classes and the resulting lack of earth observation algorithms. Respiration in the surface layer of the ocean is usually estimated from either the consumption of dissolved oxygen in a contained sample volume or from enzymatic proxies such as INT, and is less frequently determined from mixed layer oxygen utilisation, allometric equations or biomass / abundance spectra.As part of a tracer release (SF6) experiment in the Mauritanian upwelling and a seasonal study of UK shelf sea biogeochemistry, we measured plankton respiration using a range of methods which span time and space scales from cells to the mixed layer and hours to years. This presentation will compare and contrast these concurrent measurements with a view to assessing the range of variability in respiration relative to that in primary production alongside measures of parameters such as plankton community structure and organic carbon availability which may lead to this variability. In addition, by comparing between systems and between seasons in the same system, and utilising the available global dataset, we aim to test predictive empirical models of respiration in an attempt to extrapolate to the basin scale.

  16. The Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS: utility in college students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Gray

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The number of students with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD enrolled in colleges and universities has increased markedly over the past few decades, giving rise to questions about how best to document symptoms and impairment in the post-secondary setting. The aim of the present study was to investigate the utility and psychometric properties of a widely-used rating scale for adults with ADHD, the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-V1.1, in a sample of post-secondary students with ADHD.Methods. A total of 135 college students (mean age = 24, 42% males with ADHD were recruited from Student Disability Services in post-secondary institutions. We compared informant responses on the ASRS administered via different modalities. First, students’ self-report was ascertained using the ASRS Screener administered via telephone interview, in which they were asked to provide real-life examples of behavior for each of the six items. Next, students self-reported symptoms on the 18-item paper version of the ASRS Symptom Checklist administered about 1–2 weeks later, and a collateral report using an online version of the 18-item ASRS Symptom Checklist. Students also completed self-report measures of everyday cognitive failure (CFQ and executive functioning (BDEFS.Results. Results revealed moderate to good congruency between the 18-item ASRS-Self and ASRS-Collateral reports (correlation = .47, and between student self-report on the 6-item telephone-based and paper versions of the ASRS, with the paper version administered two weeks later (correlation = .66. The full ASRS self-report was related to impairment, such as in executive functioning (correlation = .63 and everyday cognitive failure (correlation = .74. Executive functioning was the only significant predictor of ASRS total scores.Discussion. Current findings suggest that the ASRS provides an easy-to-use, reliable, and cost-effective approach for gathering information about current

  17. ASR potential of quartz based on expansion values and microscopic characteristics of mortar bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stastna, Aneta; Sachlova, Sarka; Kuchynova, Marketa; Pertold, Zdenek; Prikryl, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is one of the most damaging factors for concrete structures. Different analytical techniques are used to quantify ASR potential of aggregates. The accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) in combination with the petrographic examination of aggregates by microscopic techniques belongs to the frequently employed methods. Such a methodical approach enables quantification of the ASR potential, based on the expansion values of accelerated mortar bars; and also to identify deleterious components in aggregates. In this study, the accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) was modified and combined with the scanning electron microscopy of polished sections prepared from mortar bars. The standard 14-day test period of mortar bars was prolonged to 1-year. ASR potential of aggregates was assessed based on expansion values (both 14-day and 1-year) of mortar bars and microscopic analysis of ASR products (alkali silica gels, microcracks, dissolution gaps) detected in the sections. Different varieties of quartz-rich rocks including chert, quartz meta-greywacke, three types of quartzite and pegmatite were used as aggregate. Only quartz from pegmatite was assessed to be non reactive (14-day expansion of 0.08%, 1-year expansion of 1.25%). Aggregate sections exhibited minor ASR products even after 1-year of mortar bar immersion in 1 M NaOH. Expansion values of the rest of samples exceeded the limit of 0.10% after 14-day test period indicating aggregates as reactive. The highest ASR potential was detected in mortar bars containing chert (14-day expansion of 0.55%, 1-year expansion of 2.70%) and quartz meta-greywacke (14-day expansion of 0.46%, 1-year expansion of 2.41%). The high ASR potential was explained by presence of cryptocrystalline matrix in significant volumes (24 - 65 vol%). Influence of the lengths of the immersion in the alkaline solution was observed mainly in the microstructure of the cement paste and on the extension of ASR products. The

  18. Automatic speech recognition (ASR) and its use as a tool for assessment or therapy of voice, speech, and language disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzing, Peter; Maier, Andreas; Ahlander, Viveka Lyberg

    2009-01-01

    In general opinion computerized automatic speech recognition (ASR) seems to be regarded as a method only to accomplish transcriptions from spoken language to written text and as such quite insecure and rather cumbersome. However, due to great advances in computer technology and informatics methodology ASR has nowadays become quite dependable and easier to handle, and the number of applications has increased considerably. After some introductory background information on ASR a number of applications of great interest for professionals in voice, speech, and language therapy are pointed out. In the foreseeable future, the keyboard and mouse will by means of ASR technology be replaced in many functions by a microphone as the human-computer interface, and the computer will talk back via its loud-speaker. It seems important that professionals engaged in the care of oral communication disorders take part in this development so their clients may get the optimal benefit from this new technology.

  19. Validation of the Augmentation Severity Rating Scale (ASRS): a multicentric, prospective study with levodopa on restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Borreguero, Diego; Kohnen, Ralf; Högl, Birgit; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Hornyak, Magdolna; de Weerd, Al W; Happe, Svenja; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin; Gschliesser, Viola; Egatz, Renata; Cabrero, Belen; Frauscher, Birgit; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Hening, Wayne A; Allen, Richard P

    2007-08-01

    Augmentation is the main complication during long-term dopaminergic treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS) and reflects an overall increase in RLS severity. Its severity varies considerably from a minor problem to a devastating exacerbation of disease. Despite its clinical relevance, systematic evaluations have rarely been undertaken and there has been no development of methods to assess the severity of augmentation. To fill this gap, the European RLS Study Group (EURLSSG) has developed the Augmentation Severity Rating Scale (ASRS), using three items that assess the degree of change in three specific dimensions of augmentation. The changes in each dimension are summed to give an ASRS total score. The ASRS was developed to cover the basic dimensions defining RLS augmentation. The items were developed by an interactive process involving professional and patient input. The ASRS that was evaluated included four major items and two alternative forms of one item. The validation was conducted using 63 (85%) mostly untreated RLS patients from six centers, who were treated for six months with levodopa (L-Dopa) (up to 500 mg/day, as clinically needed). Two consecutive assessments before and at baseline measured test-retest reliability. Consecutive ASRS ratings by two independent raters on a subsample of patients evaluated inter-rater reliability. Comparison with clinical severity ratings of two independent experts provided external validation of the ASRS. Comparison of patients with and without augmentation with regard to the items and the total score of the ASRS added discriminant validity. Sixty patients (63% females, mean age: 53 years, baseline International RLS Severity Rating (IRLS) score 24.7+/-5.2) were treated with a median daily dose of 300 mg L-Dopa (range: 50-500 mg). Thirty-six patients (60%) experienced augmentation. Item analyses indicated that one item could be removed as it did not contribute significantly to the test score and only one form of the

  20. Acute stress responses: A review and synthesis of ASD, ASR, and CSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isserlin, Leanna; Zerach, Gadi; Solomon, Zahava

    2008-10-01

    Toward the development of a unifying diagnosis for acute stress responses this article attempts to find a place for combat stress reaction (CSR) within the spectrum of other defined acute stress responses. This article critically compares the diagnostic criteria of acute stress disorder (ASD), acute stress reaction (ASR), and CSR. Prospective studies concerning the predictive value of ASD, ASR, and CSR are reviewed. Questions, recommendations, and implications for clinical practice are raised concerning the completeness of the current acute stress response diagnoses, the heterogeneity of different stressors, the scope of expected outcomes, and the importance of decline in function as an indicator of future psychological, psychiatric, and somatic distress. PsycINFO Database Record 2009 APA.

  1. Novel shear capacity testing of ASR damaged full scale concrete bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Hansen, Søren Gustenhoff; Barbosa, Ricardo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    A large number of concrete bridges in Denmark have to undergo wide-ranging maintenance work to prevent deterioration due to aggressive Alkali Silica Reaction (ASR). This destructive mechanism results in extensive cracking which is believed to affect the load carrying capacity of the structure...... concrete bridges with considerable economical expenses as a consequence. A novel ASR test and measurement method, which can be used to perform shear testing locally on concrete bridges, is presented in this paper. Shear capacity testing is performed on a three span concrete bridge and several material test...... samples were taken from the test areas on the bridge deck. In addition, the test method is used to directly predict the shear capacity without disturbing the traffic significantly. Verification of the load carrying capacity of the bridge was the ultimate goal of the tests. A test rig, which could easily...

  2. Inverkan av alkalisilikareaktion (ASR) på lamelldammars bärförmåga

    OpenAIRE

    Norberg, Sara; Sawasa, Hadeel

    2014-01-01

    Dammar är en viktig konstruktion i Sverige och i världen bland annat för vattenförsörjning, reglering av flöden och elproduktion. En expansion på grund av en alkalisilikareaktion (ASR) i en betongdamm kan leda till många problem. Bland annat kan det uppstå läckage av vatten och problem med öppning och stängning av luckor. Mycket forskning har lagts ner på att ta reda på hur ASR påverkar hållfastheten och bärförmågan hos betong. Detta examensarbete syftar till att genom en litteraturstudie vis...

  3. Alkali Release from Typical Danish Aggregates to Potential ASR Reactive Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hans Christian Brolin; Grelk, Bent; Barbosa, Ricardo Antonio

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) in concrete is a well-known deterioration mechanism affecting the long term durability of Danish concrete structures. Deleterious ASR cracking can be significantly reduced or prevented by limiting the total alkali content of concrete under a certain threshold limit......, which in Denmark is recommended to 3 kg/m3 Na2Oeq.. However, this threshold limit does not account for the possible internal contribution of alkali to the concrete pore solution by release from aggregates or external contributions from varies sources. This study indicates that certain Danish aggregates...... are capable of releasing more than 0.46 kg/m3 Na2Oeq. at 13 weeks of exposure in laboratory test which may increase the risk for deleterious cracking due to an increase in alkali content in the concrete....

  4. Questioning the Specificity of ASRS-v1.1 to Accurately Detect ADHD in Substance Abusing Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasson, Jean-Pierre; Stavro, Katherine; Rizkallah, Elie; Lapierre, Luc; Dussault, Maxime; Legault, Louis; Potvin, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the specificity of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-v1.1) in detecting ADHD among individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs). Method: A chart review of 183 SUD patients was conducted. Patients were screened for ADHD with the ASRS-v1.1 and were later assessed by a psychiatrist specialized in ADHD. Results: Among SUD…

  5. Diffusion-controlled and creep-mitigated ASR damage via microplane model: II. Material degra- dation, drying, and verification

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi-Aghdam, Saeed; P. Bažant, Zdenek; Caner, Ferhun Cem

    2016-01-01

    The theory for the material and structural damage due to the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) in concrete is calibrated and validated by finite element fitting of the main test results from the literature. The fracture mechanics aspects, and particularly the localization limiter, are handled by the crack band model. It is shown that the theory can capture the following features quite well: (1) the effects of various loading conditions and stress states on the ASR-induced expansion and it...

  6. From breathing to respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitting, Jean-William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of breathing remained an enigma for a long time. The Hippocratic school described breathing patterns but did not associate breathing with the lungs. Empedocles and Plato postulated that breathing was linked to the passage of air through pores of the skin. This was refuted by Aristotle who believed that the role of breathing was to cool the heart. In Alexandria, breakthroughs were accomplished in the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Later, Galen proposed an accurate description of the respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing. However, his heart-lung model was hampered by the traditional view of two non-communicating vascular systems - veins and arteries. After a period of stagnation in the Middle Ages, knowledge progressed with the discovery of pulmonary circulation. The comprehension of the purpose of breathing progressed by steps thanks to Boyle and Mayow among others, and culminated with the contribution of Priestley and the discovery of oxygen by Lavoisier. Only then was breathing recognized as fulfilling the purpose of respiration, or gas exchange. A century later, a controversy emerged concerning the active or passive transfer of oxygen from alveoli to the blood. August and Marie Krogh settled the dispute, showing that passive diffusion was sufficient to meet the oxygen needs. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Accounting for Prosodic Information to Improve ASR-Based Topic Tracking for TV Broadcast News

    OpenAIRE

    Guinaudeau , Camille; Hirschberg , Julia

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The increasing quantity of video material available on line requires improved methods to help users navigate such data, among which are topic tracking techniques. The goal of this paper is to show that prosodic information can improve an ASR based topic tracking system for French TV Broadcast News. To this end, two kinds of prosodic information--extracted with and without a learning phase--are integrated in the system. This integration shows significant improvements in...

  8. Plant respiration under low oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Toro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Respiration is an oxidative process controlled by three pathways: glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Respiratory metabolism is ubiquitous in all organisms, but with differences among each other. For example in plants, because their high plasticity, respiration involves metabolic pathways with unique characteristics. In this way, in order to avoid states of low energy availability, plants exhibit great flexibility to bypass conventional steps of glycolysis, TCA cycle, and OXPHOS. To understand the energetic link between these alternative pathways, it is important to know the growth, maintenance, and ion uptake components of the respiration in plants. Changes in these components have been reported when plants are subjected to stress, such as oxygen deficiency. This review analyzes the current knowledge on the metabolic and functional aspects of plant respiration, its components and its response to environmental changes.

  9. Microwave NDE method for health-monitoring of concrete structures containing alkali-silica reaction (ASR) gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, A.; Hatfield, S.; Donnell, K. M.; Zoughi, R.; Kurtis, K. E.

    2014-02-01

    The presence of reactive aggregates combined with sufficient moisture and concentration of alkalis are the three basic requirements for damage due alkali-silica reaction (ASR) gel formation and expansion in concrete. For health-monitoring of concrete structures, and in order to investigate the potential for detecting ASR gel formation in existing structures, one potential technique involves studying changes in the temporal complex dielectric constant of concrete structures. In this paper, a microwave nondestructive testing approach is proposed which involves soaking two hardened mortar samples and measuring the change in their temporal complex dielectric constant in order to distinguish between the sample containing ASR gel and the one devoid of it. Part of the free water becomes bound in the sample containing ASR gel and since a portion of the microcracks in this sample contain ASR gel, the rate of evaporation of water of the two samples is expected to be different. The complex dielectric constant of the samples is significantly dependent upon the volumetric level and movement (in and out of the samples) of free water. Therefore, studying the relative different temporal rate of change in this parameter is expected to yield information about the presence or absence of ASR gel.

  10. Effect of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) on recovered stormwater quality variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, D W; Peeters, L; Vanderzalm, J; Barry, K; Gonzalez, D

    2017-06-15

    Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) is increasingly being considered as a means of reusing urban stormwater to supplement available urban water resources. Storage of stormwater in an aquifer has been shown to affect water quality but it has also been claimed that storage will also decrease the stormwater quality variability making for improved predictability and management. This study is the first to document the changes in stormwater quality variability as a result of subsurface storage at four full scale ASR sites using advanced statistical techniques. New methods to examine water quality are required as data is often highly left censored and so traditional measures of variability such as the coefficient of variation are inappropriate. It was observed that for some water quality parameters (most notably E. coli) there was a marked improvement of water quality and a significant decrease in variability at all sites. This means that aquifer storage prior to engineered treatment systems may be advantageous in terms of system design to avoid over engineering. For other parameters such as metal(loids)s and nutrients the trend was less clear due to the numerous processes occurring during storage leading to an increase in variability, especially for geogenic metals and metalloids such as iron and arsenic. Depending upon the specific water quality parameters and end use, use of ASR may not have a dampening effect on stormwater quality variability. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The burning of automotive shredder residue (ASR) using fluidized bed technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abelha, Pedro; Gulyurtlu, Ibrahim; Lopes, H.; Cabrita, I. [INETI/DEECA, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility and the environmental performance of FBC technology to burn a fluff fraction of an ASR from a Portuguese vehicle dismantling plant. The combustion studies were carried out on the pilot installation at INETI. The results obtained suggest that the Portuguese ASR has a very high mineral content (70%) and the combustion had to be sustained with the use of an auxiliary fuel (propane); the combustion efficiency was very high; the gaseous pollutants could easily be controlled below the permitted limits and sulphur and chlorine emissions were low. ASR could give rise to fluidising problems due to the accumulation of ashes in the bed; therefore, it is essential that a more efficient metal separation method be used during dismantling process; there was an enrichment of heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Mn and Zn) on ashes retained in the cyclones, specially in the smaller particle size range (less than 10 m); however, the ashes did not have a tendency for leaching.

  12. Recovery of ferrous and nonferrous metal from ASR by physical separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-gyu; Han, Oh-hyung; Park, Chul-hyun

    2017-04-01

    A recycle ratio of waste automobiles in Korea is low, compared to that of the advanced countries. Especially in its recycle, separation of automotive shredder residue (ASR), the residual fraction of approximate 25% obtained after dismantling and shredding from waste car, is needed. However ASR is cannot be effectively separated due to its heterogeneous materials and coated or laminated complexes and then is largely deposited in land-fill sites as waste. In this study ASR was separated by a series of physical processing operations such as comminution, air classification and magnetic separation and electrostatic separations. In particular it focuses on estimating the optimal conditions of magnetic and electrostatic separations for improving the separation efficiency of valuable ferrous and non-ferrous metals such as iron (Fe), aluminum, copper and etc. In magnetic separation, 91.5% Fe grade and 91% recovery could be obtained at conditions of particle size under 10mm and magnetic intensity of 400 gauss. In corona electrostatic separation for recovering nonferrous metals, a grade of 79.2% and recovery of 90.7% could be successfully achieved under conditions of -6mm particle size, 50kV electrode potential, 35rpm drum speed and 20 degree splitter position, respectively. Acknowledgments This study was supported by the R&D Center for Valuable Recycling (Global-Top R&BD Program) of the Ministry of Environment. (Project No. 2016002250001)

  13. Linear Array Ultrasonic Test Results from Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR) Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dwight A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Khazanovich, Dr. Lev [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Salles, Lucio [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations.This report presents results of the ultrasound evaluation of four concrete slabs with varying levels of ASR damage present. This included an investigation of the experimental results, as well as a supplemental simulation considering the effect of ASR damage by elasto-dynamic wave propagation using a finite integration technique method. It was found that the Hilbert Transform Indicator (HTI), developed for quantification of freeze/thaw damage in concrete structures, could also be successfully utilized for quantification of ASR damage. internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations.

  14. Linear Array Ultrasonic Test Results from Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR) Specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, Dwight A; Khazanovich, Dr. Lev; Salles, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations.This report presents results of the ultrasound evaluation of four concrete slabs with varying levels of ASR damage present. This included an investigation of the experimental results, as well as a supplemental simulation considering the effect of ASR damage by elasto-dynamic wave propagation using a finite integration technique method. It was found that the Hilbert Transform Indicator (HTI), developed for quantification of freeze/thaw damage in concrete structures, could also be successfully utilized for quantification of ASR damage. internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations.

  15. Studies on lithium salts to mitigate ASR-induced expansion in new concrete: a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Thomas, M.D.A.; Bremner, T.W.; Balcom, B.J.; Folliard, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a critical review of the research work conducted so far on the suppressive effects of lithium compounds on expansion due to alkali-silica reaction (ASR) in concrete and on the mechanism or mechanisms by which lithium inhibits the expansion. After a thorough examination of the existing literature regarding lithium salts in controlling ASR expansion, a summary of research findings is provided. It shows that all the lithium salts studied, including LiF, LiCl, LiBr, LiOH, LiOH.H 2 O, LiNO 3 , LiNO 2 , Li 2 CO 3 , Li 2 SO 4 , Li 2 HPO 4 , and Li 2 SiO 3 , are effective in suppressing ASR expansion in new concrete, provided they are used at the appropriate dosages. Among these compounds, LiNO 3 appears to be the most promising one. Although the mechanism(s) for the suppressive effects of lithium are not well understood, several mechanisms have been proposed. A detailed discussion about these existing mechanisms is provided in the paper. Finally, some recommendations for future studies are identified

  16. Mitochondrial Respiration and Oxygen Tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Daniel S; Meitha, Karlia; Considine, Michael J; Foyer, Christine H

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of respiration and oxygen tension in plant organs allow a precise understanding of mitochondrial capacity and function within the context of cellular oxygen metabolism. Here we describe methods that can be routinely used for the isolation of intact mitochondria, and the determination of respiratory electron transport, together with techniques for in vivo determination of oxygen tension and measurement of respiration by both CO 2 production and O 2 consumption that enables calculation of the respiratory quotient [CO 2 ]/[O 2 ].

  17. Contribution of root respiration to soil respiration in a C3/C4 mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spatial and temporal variations of soil respiration were studied from May 2004 to June 2005 in a C3/C4 mixed grassland of Japan. The linear regression relationship between soil respiration and root biomass was used to determine the contribution of root respiration to soil respiration. The highest soil respiration rate of ...

  18. Contribution of root respiration to soil respiration in a C3/C4 mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The spatial and temporal variations of soil respiration were studied from May 2004 to June 2005 in a C3/C4 mixed grassland of Japan. The linear regression relationship between soil respiration and root biomass was used to determine the contribution of root respiration to soil respiration. The highest soil respiration rate of.

  19. Automatic respiration tracking for radiotherapy using optical 3D camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason; Li, Shidong

    2013-03-01

    Rapid optical three-dimensional (O3D) imaging systems provide accurate digitized 3D surface data in real-time, with no patient contact nor radiation. The accurate 3D surface images offer crucial information in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) treatments for accurate patient repositioning and respiration management. However, applications of O3D imaging techniques to image-guided radiotherapy have been clinically challenged by body deformation, pathological and anatomical variations among individual patients, extremely high dimensionality of the 3D surface data, and irregular respiration motion. In existing clinical radiation therapy (RT) procedures target displacements are caused by (1) inter-fractional anatomy changes due to weight, swell, food/water intake; (2) intra-fractional variations from anatomy changes within any treatment session due to voluntary/involuntary physiologic processes (e.g. respiration, muscle relaxation); (3) patient setup misalignment in daily reposition due to user errors; and (4) changes of marker or positioning device, etc. Presently, viable solution is lacking for in-vivo tracking of target motion and anatomy changes during the beam-on time without exposing patient with additional ionized radiation or high magnet field. Current O3D-guided radiotherapy systems relay on selected points or areas in the 3D surface to track surface motion. The configuration of the marks or areas may change with time that makes it inconsistent in quantifying and interpreting the respiration patterns. To meet the challenge of performing real-time respiration tracking using O3D imaging technology in IGRT, we propose a new approach to automatic respiration motion analysis based on linear dimensionality reduction technique based on PCA (principle component analysis). Optical 3D image sequence is decomposed with principle component analysis into a limited number of independent (orthogonal) motion patterns (a low dimension eigen-space span by eigen-vectors). New

  20. Nitric oxide and mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G C

    1999-05-05

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its derivative peroxynitrite (ONOO-) inhibit mitochondrial respiration by distinct mechanisms. Low (nanomolar) concentrations of NO specifically inhibit cytochrome oxidase in competition with oxygen, and this inhibition is fully reversible when NO is removed. Higher concentrations of NO can inhibit the other respiratory chain complexes, probably by nitrosylating or oxidising protein thiols and removing iron from the iron-sulphur centres. Peroxynitrite causes irreversible inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and damage to a variety of mitochondrial components via oxidising reactions. Thus peroxynitrite inhibits or damages mitochondrial complexes I, II, IV and V, aconitase, creatine kinase, the mitochondrial membrane, mitochondrial DNA, superoxide dismutase, and induces mitochondrial swelling, depolarisation, calcium release and permeability transition. The NO inhibition of cytochrome oxidase may be involved in the physiological regulation of respiration rate, as indicated by the finding that isolated cells producing NO can regulate cellular respiration by this means, and the finding that inhibition of NO synthase in vivo causes a stimulation of tissue and whole body oxygen consumption. The recent finding that mitochondria may contain a NO synthase and can produce significant amounts of NO to regulate their own respiration also suggests this regulation may be important for physiological regulation of energy metabolism. However, definitive evidence that NO regulation of mitochondrial respiration occurs in vivo is still missing, and interpretation is complicated by the fact that NO appears to affect tissue respiration by cGMP-dependent mechanisms. The NO inhibition of cytochrome oxidase may also be involved in the cytotoxicity of NO, and may cause increased oxygen radical production by mitochondria, which may in turn lead to the generation of peroxynitrite. Mitochondrial damage by peroxynitrite may mediate the cytotoxicity of NO, and may be

  1. New insights into desiccation-associated gene regulation by Lilium longiflorum ASR during pollen maturation and in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Co-Shine; Hsu, Ssu-Wei; Hsu, Yi-Feng

    2013-01-01

    LLA23, a member of the abscisic acid-, stress-, and ripening-induced (ASR) protein family, was previously isolated from lily (Lilium longiflorum) pollen. The lily ASR is induced through desiccation-associated ABA signaling transduction in the pollen. ASRs are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured proteins with molecular masses generally less than 18 kDa. LLA23 is abundant in the cytoplasm and nuclei of both vegetative and generative cells of pollen grains. The protein in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm is partly regulated by dehydration. A dual role is proposed for LLA23, as a regulator and a protective molecule, upon exposure to water deficits. This chapter reviews the current state of literature on Asr genes, protein structure, function, and their responses to various stresses. In a study, a genome-wide microarray was used to monitor the expression of LLA23-regulated genes, focusing on the relationship between ASR-, glucose-, and drought-inducible genes, and outlined the difference and cross talk of gene expression among these signaling networks. A strong association was observed in the expression of stress-responsive genes and found 25 genes that respond to all three treatments. Highly inducible genes were also found in each specific stress treatment. Promoter sequence analysis of LLA23-inducible genes enabled us not only to identify possible known cis-acting elements in the promoter regions but also to expect the existence of novel cis-acting elements involved in ASR-responsive gene expression. ASR can be used to improve crops and economically important plants against various environmental stresses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The SbASR-1 gene cloned from an extreme halophyte Salicornia brachiata enhances salt tolerance in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Bhavanath; Lal, Sanjay; Tiwari, Vivekanand; Yadav, Sweta Kumari; Agarwal, Pradeep K

    2012-12-01

    Salinity severely affects plant growth and development. Plants evolved various mechanisms to cope up stress both at molecular and cellular levels. Halophytes have developed better mechanism to alleviate the salt stress than glycophytes, and therefore, it is advantageous to study the role of different genes from halophytes. Salicornia brachiata is an extreme halophyte, which grows luxuriantly in the salty marshes in the coastal areas. Earlier, we have isolated SbASR-1 (abscisic acid stress ripening-1) gene from S. brachiata using cDNA subtractive hybridisation library. ASR-1 genes are abscisic acid (ABA) responsive, whose expression level increases under abiotic stresses, injury, during fruit ripening and in pollen grains. The SbASR-1 transcript showed up-regulation under salt stress conditions. The SbASR-1 protein contains 202 amino acids of 21.01-kDa molecular mass and has 79 amino acid long signatures of ABA/WDS gene family. It has a maximum identity (73 %) with Solanum chilense ASR-1 protein. The SbASR-1 has a large number of disorder-promoting amino acids, which make it an intrinsically disordered protein. The SbASR-1 gene was over-expressed under CaMV 35S promoter in tobacco plant to study its physiological functions under salt stress. T(0) transgenic tobacco seeds showed better germination and seedling growth as compared to wild type (Wt) in a salt stress condition. In the leaf tissues of transgenic lines, Na(+) and proline contents were significantly lower, as compared to Wt plant, under salt treatment, suggesting that transgenic plants are better adapted to salt stress.

  3. Validity and Reliability of Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale Thai Version (ASRS-V1.1 TH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiatrungrit, Komsan; Putthisri, Suwannee; Hongsanguansri, Sirichai; Wisajan, Pattaraporn; Jullagate, Sudawan

    2017-08-25

    The adult ADHD Self-Report Scale Thai version (ASRS-V1.1) (18 items) is a questionnaire for screening adult ADHD. To test the validity and reliability of the 18-question ASRS-V1.1 Thai version (ASRS-V1.1 TH) as a screening tool for adult ADHD. The original 18-question ASRS-V1.1 version was translated into Thai. The process was composed of forward-translation, synthesis of the translation, and back translation. Cross cultural adaptation, field testing, and final adjustment were completed consecutively. The 18-question ASRS-V1.1 TH were sent to 1,500 parents of kindergarten and elementary school students in Bangkok, Thailand. The diagnostic interview was randomly selected for 50 parents from the positive result group and 50 parents from the negative result group. The clinical interview for confirming diagnosis was run by 3 psychiatrists who were blinded to the results and used DSM-5 ADHD criteria for diagnosis. The 18-question ASRS-V1.1 TH had satisfactory internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92: Cronbach's alpha = 0.87 for inattentive scale, Cronbach's alpha = 0.84 for hyperactive / impulsive scale). For testing the criteria validity, the questionnaire has an adequate. The AUC from the first 6 questions was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.68-0.92) while from the 18 questions was 0.71(95% CI: 0.55-0.86). The 18-question ASRS-V1.1TH is a psychometrically reliable and valid measure for screening adult ADHD in Thai clinical samples, especially the first 6 questions of the questionnaire.

  4. Predicting soil respiration from peatlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowson, J G; Worrall, F; Evans, M G; Dixon, S D

    2013-01-01

    This study considers the relative performance of six different models to predict soil respiration from upland peat. Predicting soil respiration is important for global carbon budgets and gap filling measured data from eddy covariance and closed chamber measurements. Further to models previously published new models are presented using two sub-soil zones and season. Models are tested using data from the Bleaklow plateau, southern Pennines, UK. Presented literature models include ANOVA using logged environmental data, the Arrhenius equation, modified versions of the Arrhenius equation to include soil respiration activation energy and water table depth. New models are proposed including the introduction of two soil zones in the peat profile, and season. The first new model proposes a zone of high CO(2) productivity related to increased soil microbial CO(2) production due to the supply of labile carbon from plant root exudates and root respiration. The second zone is a deeper zone where CO(2) production is lower with less labile carbon. A final model allows the zone of high CO(2) production to become dormant during winter months when plants will senesce and will vary depending upon vegetation type within a fixed location. The final model accounted for, on average, 31.9% of variance in net ecosystem respiration within 11 different restoration sites whilst, using the same data set, the best fitting literature equation only accounted for 18.7% of the total variance. Our results demonstrate that soil respiration models can be improved by explicitly accounting for seasonality and the vertically stratified nature of soil processes. These improved models provide an enhanced basis for calculating the peatland carbon budgets which are essential in understanding the role of peatlands in the global C cycle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effectiveness of High Quality Supplementary Cementitious Materials for Mitigating ASR Expansion in Concrete with High Alkali Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Prasetia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alkali silica reaction (ASR is influenced by external factors such as the surrounding environment of high alkalinity. Countries with cold climate have a high probability to be exposed to high concentrations of NaCl solution by the deicing salt. This condition will lead to serious ASR problems in concrete, if the aggregates contain reactive silica. The main research work in this paper is to investigate the effect of 15% replacement ratio of high quality fine fly ash (FA15% and 42% replacement ratio of blast furnace slag (BFS42% on the ASR mitigation in concrete with different alkali amount inside the pore solution. The experiments were conducted according to the accelerated mortar bars experiment following the JIS A1146 mortar bar test method. In addition, post-analysis such as observation of ASR gel formation by the Uranyl Acetate Fluorescence Method and observation of thin sections using a Polarizing Microscope were also conducted. The mortar bar tests show a very good mitigation effect of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs. The results show that only small ASR expansions, which can be categorized as “innocuous”, occurred for specimens with 1.2% Na2Oeq using FA15% and BFS42%. However, larger alkali amount inside the system will require more SCMs amount.

  6. Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-v1.1) symptom checklist in patients with substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigre Blanco, Constanza; Ramos-Quiroga, J A; Valero, S; Bosch, R; Roncero, C; Gonzalvo, B; Nogueira, M

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosing attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in patients with substance use disorder (SUD) is a complicated process in which a screening tool may be useful. We analyzed the ASRS-v1.1 validity in patients with SUD, considering the addiction severity and co-morbidity with depressive disorders, antisocial and borderline personality. Eighty outpatients with SUD were evaluated with the following instruments: ASRS-v1.1, CAAD-II, EuropASI, SCID-I, SCID-II. A factor analysis was performed with Varimax rotation to determine the structure of the intercorrelations among the items. Accuracy of ASRS-v1.1 was also analyzed. The diagnostic interview CAADID used as a gold standard indicated that 20% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11-29) meet the criteria for ADHD. The ASRSv1.1 factor structure is marked by two factors related to inattention and hyperactivity / impulsivity that account for 67.7% of the variance. ASRS-v1.1, with a 4 cut-off, showed an 87.5% sensitivity and 68.6% specificity. ASRS-v1.1 is a simple screening tool that is useful and has acceptable validity for the identification of ADHD among addicted patients.

  7. Separation of non-ferrous metals from ASR by corona electrostatic separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yang-soo; Choi, Jin-Young; Jeon, Ho-Seok; Han, Oh-Hyung; Park, Chul-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Automotive shredder residue (ASR), the residual fraction of approximate 25% obtained after dismantling and shredding from waste car, consists of polymers (plastics and rubber), metals (ferrous and non-ferrous), wood, glass and fluff (textile and fiber). ASR cannot be effectively separated due to its heterogeneous materials and coated or laminated complexes and then largely deposited in land-fill sites as waste. Thus reducing a pollutant release before disposal, techniques that can improve the liberation of coated (or laminated) complexes and the recovery of valuable metals from the shredder residue are needed. ASR may be separated by a series of physical processing operations such as comminution, air, magnetic and electrostatic separations. The work deals with the characterization of the shredder residue coming from an industrial plant in korea and focuses on estimating the optimal conditions of corona electrostatic separation for improving the separation efficiency of valuable non-ferrous metals such as aluminum, copper and etc. From the results of test, the maximum separation achievable for non-ferrous metals using a corona electrostatic separation has been shown to be recovery of 92.5% at a grade of 75.8%. The recommended values of the process variables, particle size, electrode potential, drum speed, splitter position and relative humidity are -6mm, 50 kV, 35rpm, 20° and less 40%, respectively. Acknowledgments This study was supported by the R&D Center for Valuable Recycling (Global-Top R&BD Program) of the Ministry of Environment. (Project No. GT-11-C-01-170-0)

  8. Experimental investigation of the mechanisms by which LiNO3 is effective against ASR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremblay, C.; Berube, M.A.; Fournier, B.; Thomas, M.D.; Folliard, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Various series of experiments were carried out on cements pastes, concretes made with a variety of reactive aggregates, composite specimens made of cement paste and reactive aggregate particles, and a variety of reactive natural aggregates and mineral phases immersed in various Li-bearing solutions. The main objective was to determine which mechanisms(s) better explain(s) the effectiveness of LiNO 3 against ASR and variations in this effectiveness as well with the type of reactive aggregate to counteract. The principal conclusions are the following: (1), the pH in the concrete pore solution does not significantly decrease in the presence of LiNO 3 ; (2), the concentration of silica in the pore solution is always low and not affected by the presence of LiNO 3 , which does not support the mechanism relating to higher solubility of silica in the presence of lithium; (3), the only reaction product observed in the LiNO 3 -bearing concretes looks like classical ASR gel and its abundance is proportional to concrete expansion, thus is likely expansive while likely containing lithium; this does not support the mechanisms relating to formation of a non or less expansive Si-Li crystalline product or amorphous gel; (4), early-formed reaction products coating the reactive silica grains or aggregate particles, which could act as a physical barrier against further chemical attack of silica, were not observed in the LiNO 3 -bearing concretes, but only for a number of reactive materials after immersion in 1 N LiOH at 350 deg. C in the autoclave (also at 80 deg. C for obsidian); (5), higher chemical stability of silica due to another reason than pH reduction or early formation of a protective coating over the reactive phases, is the mechanism among those considered in this study that better explains the effectiveness of LiNO 3 against ASR.

  9. Aquifer Storage Recovery (ASR) of chlorinated municipal drinking water in a confined aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicki, John A.; Petersen, Christen E.; Glotzbach, Kenneth J.; Metzger, Loren F.; Christensen, Allen H.; Smith, Gregory A.; O'Leary, David R.; Fram, Miranda S.; Joseph, Trevor; Shannon, Heather

    2010-01-01

    About 1.02 x 106 m3 of chlorinated municipal drinking water was injected into a confined aquifer, 94-137 m below Roseville, California, between December 2005 and April 2006. The water was stored in the aquifer for 438 days, and 2.64 x 106 m3 of water were extracted between July 2007 and February 2008. On the basis of Cl data, 35% of the injected water was recovered and 65% of the injected water and associated disinfection by-products (DBPs) remained in the aquifer at the end of extraction. About 46.3 kg of total trihalomethanes (TTHM) entered the aquifer with the injected water and 37.6 kg of TTHM were extracted. As much as 44 kg of TTHMs remained in the aquifer at the end of extraction because of incomplete recovery of injected water and formation of THMs within the aquifer by reactions with freechlorine in the injected water. Well-bore velocity log data collected from the Aquifer Storage Recovery (ASR) well show as much as 60% of the injected water entered the aquifer through a 9 m thick, high-permeability layer within the confined aquifer near the top of the screened interval. Model simulations of ground-water flow near the ASR well indicate that (1) aquifer heterogeneity allowed injected water to move rapidly through the aquifer to nearby monitoring wells, (2) aquifer heterogeneity caused injected water to move further than expected assuming uniform aquifer properties, and (3) physical clogging of high-permeability layers is the probable cause for the observed change in the distribution of borehole flow. Aquifer heterogeneity also enhanced mixing of native anoxic ground water with oxic injected water, promoting removal of THMs primarily through sorption. A 3 to 4-fold reduction in TTHM concentrations was observed in the furthest monitoring well 427 m downgradient from the ASR well, and similar magnitude reductions were observed in depth-dependent water samples collected from the upper part of the screened interval in the ASR well near the end of the extraction

  10. Optimal Scheduling for Retrieval Jobs in Double-Deep AS/RS by Evolutionary Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Yang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the optimal scheduling of retrieval jobs for double-deep type Automated Storage and Retrieval Systems (AS/RS in the Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS used in modern industrial production. Three types of evolutionary algorithms, the Genetic Algorithm (GA, the Immune Genetic Algorithm (IGA, and the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO algorithm, are implemented to obtain the optimal assignments. The objective is to minimize the working distance, that is, the shortest retrieval time travelled by the Storage and Retrieval (S/R machine. Simulation results and comparisons show the advantages and feasibility of the proposed methods.

  11. Shear Capacity of Large-Scale RC Beams Affected by ASR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Barbosa, Ricardo Antonio; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) on the shear capacity for concrete slabs without shear reinforcement. An experimental full-scale in-situ program consisting of four slabs from a bridge (Vosnæsvej) has been carried out and the results have been published in ref. [1......] with the principal author of this paper as co-author. After the experiments, a detailed measurement of the test specimens was conducted. Based on these measurements a thorough analysis of the experimental results was carried out and evaluated by a plastic model for shear capacity, Crack Sliding Model (CSM...

  12. Effects of a clear-cut harvest on soil respiration in a jack pine - Lichen woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegl, Robert G.; Wickland, K.P.

    1998-01-01

    Quantification of the components of ecosystem respiration is essential to understanding carbon (C) cycling of natural and disturbed landscapes. Soil respiration, which includes autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration from throughout the soil profile, is the second largest flux in the global carbon cycle. We measured soil respiration (soil CO2 emission) at an undisturbed mature jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) stand in Saskatchewan (old jack pine, OJP), and at a formerly continuous portion of the stand that was clear-cut during the previous winter (clear-cut, CC). Tree harvesting reduced soil CO2 emission from ???22.5 to ???9.1 mol CO2??m2 for the 1994 growing season. OJP was a small net sink of atmospheric CO2, while CC was a net source of CO2. Winter emissions were similar at both sites. Reduction of soil respiration was attributed to disruption of the soil surface and to the death of tree roots. Flux simulations for CC and OJP identify 40% of CO2 emission at the undisturbed OJP site as near-surface respiration, 25% as deep-soil respiration, and 35% as tree-root respiration. The near-surface component was larger than the estimated annual C input to soil, suggesting fast C turnover and no net C accumulation in these boreal uplands in 1994.

  13. General Instructions for Disposable Respirators

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-09

    This podcast, intended for the general public, demonstrates how to put on and take off disposable respirators that are to be used in areas affected by the influenza outbreak.  Created: 4/9/2009 by CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 4/29/2009.

  14. Use of Facemasks and Respirators

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-05-15

    This program demonstrates the differences of facemasks and respirators that are to be used in public settings during an influenza pandemic.  Created: 5/15/2007 by CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 5/25/2007.

  15. Solidification/stabilization of ASR fly ash using Thiomer material: Optimization of compressive strength and heavy metals leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jin Woong; Choi, Angelo Earvin Sy; Park, Hung Suck

    2017-12-01

    Optimization studies of a novel and eco-friendly construction material, Thiomer, was investigated in the solidification/stabilization of automobile shredded residue (ASR) fly ash. A D-optimal mixture design was used to evaluate and optimize maximum compressive strength and heavy metals leaching by varying Thiomer (20-40wt%), ASR fly ash (30-50wt%) and sand (20-40wt%). The analysis of variance was utilized to determine the level of significance of each process parameters and interactions. The microstructure of the solidified materials was taken from a field emission-scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy that confirmed successful Thiomer solidified ASR fly ash due to reduced pores and gaps in comparison with an untreated ASR fly ash. The X-ray diffraction detected the enclosed materials on the ASR fly ash primarily contained sulfur associated crystalline complexes. Results indicated the optimal conditions of 30wt% Thiomer, 30wt% ASR fly ash and 40wt% sand reached a compressive strength of 54.9MPa. For the optimum results in heavy metals leaching, 0.0078mg/LPb, 0.0260mg/L Cr, 0.0007mg/LCd, 0.0020mg/L Cu, 0.1027mg/L Fe, 0.0046mg/L Ni and 0.0920mg/L Zn were leached out, being environmentally safe due to being substantially lower than the Korean standard leaching requirements. The results also showed that Thiomer has superiority over the commonly used Portland cement asa binding material which confirmed its potential usage as an innovative approach to simultaneously synthesize durable concrete and satisfactorily pass strict environmental regulations by heavy metals leaching. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Contribution of root respiration to soil respiration in a C3/C4 mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Root respiration can be estimated by the differences between soil respiration and microbial respiration. 2.5 Statistical analysis. Coefficient of variation (CV) was calculated to provide a measure of within-site variation of soil respiration, soil temperature, soil moisture content, root biomass, micro- bial biomass carbon, and total ...

  17. Dynamic characteristics of soil respiration in Yellow River Delta wetlands, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Luo, Xianxiang; Jia, Hongli; Zheng, Hao

    2018-02-01

    The stable soil carbon (C) pool in coastal wetlands, referred to as "blue C", which has been extensively damaged by climate change and soil degradation, is of importance to maintain global C cycle. Therefore, to investigate the dynamic characteristics of soil respiration rate and evaluate C budgets in coastal wetlands are urgently. In this study, the diurnal and seasonal variation of soil respiration rate in the reed wetland land (RL) and the bare wetland land (BL) was measured in situ with the dynamic gas-infrared CO2 method in four seasons, and the factors impacted on the dynamic characteristics of soil respiration were investigated. The results showed that the diurnal variation of soil respiration rate consistently presented a "U" curve pattern in April, July, and September, with the maximum values at 12:00 a.m. and the minimum values at 6:00 a.m. In the same season, the diurnal soil respiration rate in RL was significantly greater than those in BL (P soil respiration rate was 0.14, 0.42, and 0.39 μmol m-2 s-1 in RL, 0.05, 0.22, 0.13, and 0.01 μmol m-2 s-1 in BL, respectively. Soil surface temperature was the primary factor that influenced soil respiration, which was confirmed by the exponential positive correlation between the soil respiration rate and soil surface temperature in BL and RL (P salinity of soils suppressed soil respiration, confirming by the significantly negative correlation between soil respiration rate and the content of soluble salt. These results will be useful for understanding the mechanisms underlying soil respiration and elevating C sequestration potential in the coastal wetlands.

  18. How multiple partially penetrating wells improve the freshwater recovery of coastal aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems: A field and modeling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, K.G.; Zaadnoordijk, W.J.; Stuijfzand, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) of freshwater in brackish or saline aquifers can be an efficient technique to bridge freshwater shortages in coastal areas. However, buoyancy effects may cause salinization at the bottom of the ASR well during recovery, making a part of the freshwater

  19. Decision Support System for Aquifer Recharge (AR) and Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) Planning, Design, and Evaluation Decision Support System for Aquifer Recharge (AR) and Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) Planning, Design, and Evaluation – Principles and Technical Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquifer recharge (AR) is a technical method being utilized to enhance groundwater resources through man-made replenishment means, such as infiltration basins and injections wells. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) furthers the AR techniques by withdrawal of stored groundwater at...

  20. Comparative study of the alkali-silica reaction (ASR in granitic aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velasco-Torres, A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The reaction between certain reactive components of aggregates (like opal and metaestable silica and concrete pore solution is well documented. Nevertheless, in this study it has been shown that some aggregates, like granite, could develop a rapid or slow alkali-silica reaction (ASR depending on the deleterious component involved. Mortar bars were cast with two granitic aggregates extracted from concrete cores drilled in two Spanish Dams affected by ASR, being classified as granitic rocks. The main difference between them is the reactive component: microcrystalline quartz in one case and strained and microcracked quartz in the other case. A petrographic examination was carried out in the mortar bars. Thin sections were cut and the alkalisilica gel was stained for an easier detection. Then, the thin sections were examinated with a stereomicroscope comparing the differences in the progress of the ASR for both aggregates. It can be concluded that the main mechanism of formation and storage of gel is associated to the micro-cracks instead of the subgrain boundaries.

    La reacción entre los componentes de la fase intersticial del hormigón y áridos con minerales como el ópalo o la sílice metaestable, se encuentra bien documentada. Sin embargo, en este estudio, se ha detectado que dentro de un mismo tipo de roca, como es el granito, puede haber diferencias en el tipo de reacción (lenta o rápida dependiendo del componente reactivo que aparezca en la misma. Se han fabricado barras de mortero con los áridos extraídos de dos presas españolas afectadas por la reacción álcali-sílice. Estos áridos son rocas graníticas y la diferencia entre ambos reside en que una de las muestras contiene cuarzo microcristalino como componente reactivo y, la otra, cuarzo deformado. Mediante el estudio petrográfico de barras de mortero y el teñido del gel álcali-sílice se ha podido observar la evolución y progreso de la reacción para cada

  1. Strategies for the enhancement of automobile shredder residues (ASRs) recycling: results and cost assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffino, Barbara; Fiore, Silvia; Zanetti, Maria Chiara

    2014-01-01

    With reference to the European regulation about the management of End-of-Life Vehicles (ELVs), Directive 2000/53/EC imposes the achievement of a recycling target of 85%, and 95% of total recovery by 2015. Over the last few years many efforts have been made to find solutions to properly manage the waste coming from ELVs with the aim of complying with the targets fixed by the Directive. This paper focuses on the economical evaluation of a treatment process, that includes physical (size and density), magnetic and electrical separations, performed on the light fraction of the automobile shredder residue (ASR) with the aim of reducing the amount of waste to dispose of in a landfill and enhancing the recovery of valuable fractions as stated by the EU Directive. The afore mentioned process is able to enhance the recovery of ferrous and non-ferrous metals of an amount equal to about 1% b.w. (by weight) of the ELV weight, and to separate a high energetic-content product suitable for thermal valorization for an amount close to (but not higher than) 10% b.w. of the ELV weight. The results of the economical assessment led to annual operating costs of the treatment ranging from 300,000 €/y to 350,000 €/y. Since the considered plant treats about 13,500 metrictons of ASR per year, this would correspond to an operating cost of approximately 20-25 €/t. Taking into account the amount and the selling price of the scrap iron and of the non magnetic metal recovered by the process, thus leading to a gain of about 30 €/t per ton of light ASR treated, the cost of the recovery process is balanced by the profit from the selling of the recovered metals. On the other hand, the proposed treatment is able to achieve the fulfillment of the targets stated by Directive 2000/53/EC concerning thermal valorization and reduce the amount of waste generated from ELV shredding to landfill. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of the MaASR1 gene in banana and functional characterization under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Miao

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that overexpression of MaASR1 in Arabidopsis confers salt stress tolerance by reducing the expression of ABA/stress-responsive genes, but does not affect the expression of the ABA-independent pathway and biosynthesis pathway genes.

  3. ASR Systems in Noisy Environment: Analysis and Solutions for Increasing Noise Robustness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rajnoha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the analysis of Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR suitable for usage within noisy environment and suggests optimum configuration under various noisy conditions. The behavior of standard parameterization techniques was analyzed from the viewpoint of robustness against background noise. It was done for Melfrequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC, Perceptual linear predictive (PLP coefficients, and their modified forms combining main blocks of PLP and MFCC. The second part is devoted to the analysis and contribution of modified techniques containing frequency-domain noise suppression and voice activity detection. The above-mentioned techniques were tested with signals in real noisy environment within Czech digit recognition task and AURORA databases. Finally, the contribution of special VAD selective training and MLLR adaptation of acoustic models were studied for various signal features.

  4. Validity of pilot Adult ADHD Self- Report Scale (ASRS) to Rate Adult ADHD symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Lenard A; Spencer, Thomas; Faraone, Stephen V; Kessler, Ronald C; Howes, Mary J; Biederman, Joseph; Secnik, Kristina

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to validate the pilot Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (pilot ASRS) versus standard clinician ratings on the ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD RS). Sixty adult ADHD patients took the self-administered ADHD RS and then raters administered the standard ADHD RS. Internal consistency of symptom scores was assessed by Cronbach's alpha. Agreement of raters was established by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) between scales. Internal consistency was high for both patient and rater-administered versions (Cronbach's alpha 0.88, 0.89, respectively). The ICC between scales for total scores was also high (0.84); ICCs for subset symptom scores were also high (both 0.83). There was acceptable agreement for individual items (% agreement: 43%-72%) and significant kappa coefficients for all items (p valid scale for evaluating ADHD for adults and shows a high internal consistency and high concurrent validity with the rater-administered ADHD RS.

  5. Assessment of half-mask elastomeric respirator and powered air-purifying respirator reprocessing for an influenza pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Caryn; Harnish, Delbert A; Sandoval-Powers, Megan; Mills, Devin; Bergman, Michael; Heimbuch, Brian K

    2017-12-01

    Health care facilities are considering the use of reusable respiratory protective devices (RPDs) to mitigate a potential N95 filtering facepiece respirator shortage caused by an influenza pandemic. US regulators are also considering stockpiling reusable RPDs for pandemic preparedness, but limited data exist on the effectiveness of cleaning and disinfection of these devices. This study defines reprocessing protocols and evaluates their effectiveness against a pandemic influenza strain in a laboratory setting. Five half-mask elastomeric respirator models and 3 powered air-purifying respirator models were contaminated with influenza virus and artificial skin oil on multiple surfaces. RPDs were then manually treated with 1 of 2 methods: cleaned or cleaned and disinfected. Presence of viable influenza was determined via swab sampling and a median tissue culture infectious dose assay. Across 41 RPD surfaces, a mean log reduction in viable influenza of 4.54 ± 0.97 log 10 median tissue culture infectious dose was achieved for all treated surfaces, which included both cleaned and cleaned and disinfected surfaces. The methods defined as part of this study are effective for eliminating viable influenza in the presence of artificial skin oil on most of the RPD surfaces tested. Material type and RPD design should be considered when implementing RPD reprocessing protocols. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hydrometallurgical recovery of heavy metals from low grade automobile shredder residue (ASR): An application of advanced Fenton process (AFP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jiwan; Lee, Byeong-Kyu

    2015-09-15

    To investigate the leaching and recovery of heavy metals from low-grade automobile shredder residue (ASR), the effects of nitric acid (HNO3) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations, liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, leaching temperature and ASR particle size fractions on the heavy metal leaching rate were determined. The heavy metals were recovered by fractional precipitation and advanced Fenton process (AFP) at different pHs. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test was also performed in the residue remaining after heavy metal leaching to evaluate the potential toxicity of ASR. The heavy metal leaching efficiency was increased with increasing HNO3 and H2O2 concentrations, L/S ratio and temperature. The heavy metal leaching efficiencies were maximized in the lowest ASR size fraction at 303 K and L/S ratio of 100 mL/g. The kinetic study showed that the metal leaching was best represented by a second-order reaction model, with a value of R(2) > 0.99 for all selected heavy metals. The determined activation energy (kJ/mol) was 21.61, 17.10, 12.15, 34.50, 13.07 and 11.45 for Zn, Fe, Ni, Pb, Cd and Cr, respectively. In the final residue, the concentrations of Cd, Cr and Pb were under their threshold limits in all ASR size fractions. Hydrometallurgical metal recovery was greatly increased by AFP up to 99.96% for Zn, 99.97% for Fe, 95.62% for Ni, 99.62% for Pb, 94.11% for Cd and 96.79% for Cr. AFP is highly recommended for the recovery of leached metals from solution even at low concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of Vali Asr (aj hospital effluent for irrigation of the green

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher Shahryari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Recycling of sewage in our country can be one of the ways to overcome the problem of water shortage. The aim of this paper is Evaluation of Valli-e-asr hospital effluent for irrigation of the green. Materials and Methods: During the 12 months of the project since January 2009, twelve samples of the hospital water were selected. 35 samples were taken both from raw sewage and refined effluent with the average frequency of two samples every month. Various physical, chemical, and biological factors were measured on the basis of the standard method book (AWWA. The gathered data was statistically analyzed using SPSS software (version 15 and paired T test at the significant level . Results: The percentages of separating some parameters such as BOD, TSS, COD, and MPS in the exiting effluent were 63.56%, 44.9%, 42.9%, and 89.97% respectively and those of the parameters PH, Mg, SO4, and SAR were 7.52mg/l, 66.82 mg/l, 382.14 mg/l, and 0.54 mg/l respectively. The amount of parameters BOD, COD, TSS, MPN, EC, CL, TDS, and NA% were 165.14mg/l, 887.657mg/l, 784.4286mg/l, 1856857 MPN, 4137.97µs/cm, 999mg/l, 2866.57mg/l, and 75.11% respectively. Conclusion: The sewage refinery of Valli-e-asr hospital does not produce a favorable outcome and some of the parameters of the effluent such as PH, Mg, SO4, and SAR are in accord with the standards of reusing in agriculture and irrigation but many of the necessary parameters do not correspond with the necessary standards for this task.

  8. Identification of critical residues in loop E in the 5-HT3ASR binding site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthalagi Mani

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serotonin type 3 receptor (5-HT3R is a member of a superfamily of ligand gated ion channels. All members of this family share a large degree of sequence homology and presumably significant structural similarity. A large number of studies have explored the structure-function relationships of members of this family, particularly the nicotinic and GABA receptors. This information can be utilized to gain additional insights into specific structural and functional features of other receptors in this family. Results Thirteen amino acids in the mouse 5-HT3ASR that correspond to the putative E binding loop of the nicotinic α7 receptor were chosen for mutagenesis. Due to the presence of a highly conserved glycine in this region, it has been suggested that this binding loop is comprised of a hairpin turn and may form a portion of the ligand-binding site in this ion channel family. Mutation of the conserved glycine (G147 to alanine eliminated binding of the 5-HT3R antagonist [3H]granisetron. Three tyrosine residues (Y140, Y142 and Y152 also significantly altered the binding of 5-HT3R ligands. Mutations in neighboring residues had little or no effect on binding of these ligands to the 5-HT3ASR. Conclusion Our data supports a role for the putative E-loop region of the 5-HT3R in the binding of 5-HT, mCPBG, d-tc and lerisetron. 5-HT and mCPBG interact with Y142, d-tc with Y140 and lerisetron with both Y142 and Y152. Our data also provides support for the hypothesis that this region of the receptor is present in a loop structure.

  9. Benchmarking, Research, Development, and Support for ORNL Automated Image and Signature Retrieval (AIR/ASR) Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, K.W.

    2004-06-01

    This report describes the results of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Applied Materials, Inc. (AMAT) of Santa Clara, California. This project encompassed the continued development and integration of the ORNL Automated Image Retrieval (AIR) technology, and an extension of the technology denoted Automated Signature Retrieval (ASR), and other related technologies with the Defect Source Identification (DSI) software system that was under development by AMAT at the time this work was performed. In the semiconductor manufacturing environment, defect imagery is used to diagnose problems in the manufacturing line, train yield management engineers, and examine historical data for trends. Image management in semiconductor data systems is a growing cause of concern in the industry as fabricators are now collecting up to 20,000 images each week. In response to this concern, researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed a semiconductor-specific content-based image retrieval method and system, also known as AIR. The system uses an image-based query-by-example method to locate and retrieve similar imagery from a database of digital imagery using visual image characteristics. The query method is based on a unique architecture that takes advantage of the statistical, morphological, and structural characteristics of image data, generated by inspection equipment in industrial applications. The system improves the manufacturing process by allowing rapid access to historical records of similar events so that errant process equipment can be isolated and corrective actions can be quickly taken to improve yield. The combined ORNL and AMAT technology is referred to hereafter as DSI-AIR and DSI-ASR.

  10. Automotive shredder residue (ASR): reviewing its production from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) and its recycling, energy or chemicals' valorisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, I; Van Caneghem, J; Block, C; Baeyens, J; Vandecasteele, C

    2011-06-15

    ASR is in Europe classified as hazardous waste. Both the stringent landfill legislation and the objectives/legislation related to ELV treatment of various countries, will limit current landfilling practice and impose an increased efficiency of the recovery and recycling of ELVs. The present paper situates ASR within the ELV context. Primary recovery techniques recycle up to 75% of the ELV components; the remaining 25% is called ASR. Characteristics of ASR and possible upgrading by secondary recovery techniques are reviewed. The latter techniques can produce a fuel- or fillergrade ASR, however with limitations as discussed. A further reduction of ASR to be disposed of calls upon (co-)incineration or the use of thermo-chemical processes, such as pyrolysis or gasification. The application in waste-to-energy plants, in cement kilns or in metallurgical processes is possible, with attention to the possible environmental impact: research into these impacts is discussed in detail. Pyrolysis and gasification are emerging technologies: although the sole use of ASR is debatable, its mixing with other waste streams is gradually being applied in commercial processes. The environmental impacts of the processes are acceptable, but more supporting data are needed and the advantage over (co-)incineration remains to be proven. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative analysis and reduction of the eco-toxicity risk of heavy metals for the fine fraction of automobile shredder residue (ASR) using H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jiwan; Yang, Jae-Kyu; Chang, Yoon-Young

    2016-02-01

    Automobile shredder residue (ASR) fraction (size <0.25mm) can be considered as hazardous due to presence of high concentrations of heavy metals. Hydrogen peroxide combined with nitric acid has been used for the recovery of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe, Ni, Pb, Cd and Cr) from the fine fraction of ASR. A sequential extraction procedure has also been used to determine the heavy metal speciation in the fine fraction of ASR before and after treatment. A risk analysis of the fine fraction of ASR before and after treatment was conducted to assess the bioavailability and eco-toxicity of heavy metals. These results showed that the recovery of heavy metals from ASR increased with an increase in the hydrogen peroxide concentration. A high concentration of heavy metals was found to be present in Cbio fractions (the sum of the exchangeable and carbonate fractions) in the fine fraction of ASR, indicating high toxicity risk. The Cbio rate of all selected heavy metals was found to range from 8.6% to 33.4% of the total metal content in the fine fraction of ASR. After treatment, Cbio was reduced to 0.3-3.3% of total metal upon a treatment with 2.0% hydrogen peroxide. On the basis of the risk assessment code (RAC), the environmental risk values for heavy metals in the fine fraction of ASR reflect high risk/medium risk. However, after treatment, the heavy metals would be categorized as low risk/no risk. The present study concludes that hydrogen peroxide combined with nitric acid is a promising treatment for the recovery and reduction of the eco-toxicity risk of heavy metals in ASR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of respirator use on worker performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardarelli, R. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In 1993, EPRI funded Yankee Atomic Electric Company to examine the effects of respirator use on worker efficiency. Phase I of Yankee`s effort was to develop a study design to determine respirator effects. Given success in Phase I, a larger population will be tested to determine if a stasitically significant respirator effect on performance can be measured. This paper summarizes the 1993 EPRI/Yankee Respirator Effects of Pilot Study, and describes the study design for the 1994 EPRI/Yankee Respirator Study to be conducted at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant. Also described is a summary of respirator effect studies that have been conducted during the last ten (10) years.

  13. The Contribution of Old Carbon to Respiration from Alaskan Tundra Following Permafrost Thaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuur, E. A.; Vogel, J. G.; Crummer, K. G.; Lee, H.; Sickman, J. O.; Dutta, K.

    2007-12-01

    More than 450 Pg of soil carbon (C) has accumulated in high latitude ecosystems after the retreat of the last major ice sheets. Recent studies suggest that, due to climate warming, these ecosystems may no longer be accumulating C, and in some cases may be losing stored C to the atmosphere. We used radiocarbon measurements of carbon dioxide to detect the age of C respired from tussock tundra near Denali National Park, Alaska. At this tundra site, permafrost has been observed to warm and thaw over the past several decades, causing the ground surface to subside as ice volume in the soil decreased. We established three sites within this area that differed in vegetation and surface topography; both characteristics varied in relation to the degree of permafrost thaw. We made radiocarbon measurements of ecosystem respiration, incubations of soil organic matter, and incubations of above and belowground plant biomass to determine the age and isotopic value of C respired from these sites. Over the study period from 2004 to 2006, ecosystem respiration radiocarbon values averaged from +35‰ to +95‰ in different months across sites. For soil incubations, surface soil radiocarbon was elevated relative both to ecosystem respiration and the current atmospheric radiocarbon value, demonstrating the significant contribution from C fixed over the past years to several decades. The deeper soil, in contrast, had respiration isotope values that averaged below zero, reflecting the significant effect of radioactive decay on the isotope content of deeper soil layers. The plant and soil incubations were combined in a multi- source mixing model to determine probable contributions from these different sources to ecosystem respiration. Deep soil respiration generally averaged between 5-15% of total ecosystem respiration, but reached as high as 40% in some months. When aggregated across the growing season, the two sites undergoing more disturbance from permafrost thaw had on average 2-3 times

  14. Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study #43442

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    This course, Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study (#43442), addresses training requirements for supervisors of respirator wearers as specified by the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) Standard for Respiratory Protection, ANSI Z88.2, and as incorporated by reference in the Department of Energy (DOE) Worker Health and Safety Rule, 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 851. This course also presents the responsibilities of supervisors of respirator wearers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  15. Sensing winter soil respiration dynamics in near-real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contosta, A.; Burakowski, E. A.; Varner, R. K.; Frey, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Some of the largest reductions in seasonal snow cover are projected to occur in temperate latitudes. Limited measurements from these ecosystems indicate that winter soil respiration releases as much as 30% of carbon fixed during the previous growing season. This respiration is possible with a snowpack that insulates soil from ambient fluctuations in climate. However, relationships among snowpack, soil temperature, soil moisture, and winter soil respiration in temperate regions are not well-understood. Most studies have infrequently sampled soil respiration and its drivers, and most measurements have been limited to the soil surface. We made near-real time, continuous measurements of temperature, moisture, and CO2 fluxes from the soil profile, through the snowpack, and into the atmosphere in a deciduous forest of New Hampshire, USA. We coupled these data with daily sampling of snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE). Our objectives were to continuously measure soil CO2 production (Psoil) and CO2 flux through the snowpack (Fsnow) and to compare Fsnow and Psoil with environmental drivers. We found that Fsnow was more dynamic than Psoil, changing as much as 30% over several days with shifting environmental conditions. Multiple regression indicated that SWE, air temperature, surface soil temperature, surface soil CO2 concentrations, and soil moisture at 15 cm were significant predictors of Fsnow. The transition of surface temperature from below to above 0°C was particularly important as it represented a phase change from ice to liquid water. Only air temperature and soil moisture at 15 cm were significant drivers of Psoil, where higher moisture at 15 cm resulted in lower Psoil rates. Time series analysis showed that Fsnow lagged 40 days behind Psoil. This lag may be due to slow CO2 diffusion through soil to overlying snow under high moisture conditions. Our results suggest that surface soil CO2 losses are driven by rapid changes in snow cover, surface temperature

  16. The Effect of Wearing Different Types of Respirators on Postural Stability and Comfort

    OpenAIRE

    Farhang Akbar-Khanzadeh; Sandra M. Woolley; Kent Huang

    2012-01-01

    Respirators are commonly used to protect workers against workplace airborne contaminants, but this equipment may become a safety hazard by creating discomfort, disorientation and postural instability.Although postural stability is critical to workers, especially those working near moving objects or on surfaces where a loss of balance may become life threatening, little attention has been given to the effect of respirators on wearers’ postural stability. The purpose of this study was to examin...

  17. Respirators: APR Issuer Self Study 33461

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-07-13

    Respirators: APR Issuer Self-Study (course 33461) is designed to introduce and familiarize employees selected as air-purifying respirator (APR) issuers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with the responsibilities, limitations, procedures, and resources for issuing APRs at LANL. The goal is to enable these issuers to consistently provide proper, functioning APRs to authorized users

  18. Students' Chemical Knowledge in Photosynthesis and Respiration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students' Chemical Knowledge in Photosynthesis and Respiration in Port Harcourt Metropolis of Rivers State of Nigeria. ... African Journal of Chemical Education ... Photosynthesis-Respiration Chemical Reaction Test (P-RCRT) and PLDRT-essay test on light and dark reactions of photosynthesis and fate of glucose in ...

  19. Management effects on European cropland respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eugster, W.; Moffat, A.M.; Ceschia, E.; Jacobs, C.M.J.; Moors, E.J.; Jans, W.W.P.

    2010-01-01

    Increases in respiration rates following management activities in croplands are considered a relevant anthropogenic source of CO2. In this paper, we quantify the impact of management events on cropland respiration fluxes of CO2 as they occur under current climate and management conditions. Our

  20. Soil respiration in different agricultural and natural ecosystems in an arid region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Lai

    Full Text Available The variation of different ecosystems on the terrestrial carbon balance is predicted to be large. We investigated a typical arid region with widespread saline/alkaline soils, and evaluated soil respiration of different agricultural and natural ecosystems. Soil respiration for five ecosystems together with soil temperature, soil moisture, soil pH, soil electric conductivity and soil organic carbon content were investigated in the field. Comparing with the natural ecosystems, the mean seasonal soil respiration rates of the agricultural ecosystems were 96%-386% higher and agricultural ecosystems exhibited lower CO(2 absorption by the saline/alkaline soil. Soil temperature and moisture together explained 48%, 86%, 84%, 54% and 54% of the seasonal variations of soil respiration in the five ecosystems, respectively. There was a significant negative relationship between soil respiration and soil electrical conductivity, but a weak correlation between soil respiration and soil pH or soil organic carbon content. Our results showed that soil CO(2 emissions were significantly different among different agricultural and natural ecosystems, although we caution that this was an observational, not manipulative, study. Temperature at the soil surface and electric conductivity were the main driving factors of soil respiration across the five ecosystems. Care should be taken when converting native vegetation into cropland from the point of view of greenhouse gas emissions.

  1. Convergence in the temperature response of leaf respiration across biomes and plant functional types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heskel, Mary A; O'Sullivan, Odhran S; Reich, Peter B; Tjoelker, Mark G; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Penillard, Aurore; Egerton, John J G; Creek, Danielle; Bloomfield, Keith J; Xiang, Jen; Sinca, Felipe; Stangl, Zsofia R; Martinez-de la Torre, Alberto; Griffin, Kevin L; Huntingford, Chris; Hurry, Vaughan; Meir, Patrick; Turnbull, Matthew H; Atkin, Owen K

    2016-04-05

    Plant respiration constitutes a massive carbon flux to the atmosphere, and a major control on the evolution of the global carbon cycle. It therefore has the potential to modulate levels of climate change due to the human burning of fossil fuels. Neither current physiological nor terrestrial biosphere models adequately describe its short-term temperature response, and even minor differences in the shape of the response curve can significantly impact estimates of ecosystem carbon release and/or storage. Given this, it is critical to establish whether there are predictable patterns in the shape of the respiration-temperature response curve, and thus in the intrinsic temperature sensitivity of respiration across the globe. Analyzing measurements in a comprehensive database for 231 species spanning 7 biomes, we demonstrate that temperature-dependent increases in leaf respiration do not follow a commonly used exponential function. Instead, we find a decelerating function as leaves warm, reflecting a declining sensitivity to higher temperatures that is remarkably uniform across all biomes and plant functional types. Such convergence in the temperature sensitivity of leaf respiration suggests that there are universally applicable controls on the temperature response of plant energy metabolism, such that a single new function can predict the temperature dependence of leaf respiration for global vegetation. This simple function enables straightforward description of plant respiration in the land-surface components of coupled earth system models. Our cross-biome analyses shows significant implications for such fluxes in cold climates, generally projecting lower values compared with previous estimates.

  2. 42 CFR 84.1131 - Respirators; required components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1131 Respirators; required components. (a) Each respirator described in § 84.1130 shall...

  3. Respiration in neonate sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Edwin R; Paladino, Frank V; Strohl, Kingman P; Santidrián T, Pilar; Klann, Kenneth; Spotila, James R

    2007-03-01

    The pattern and control of respiration is virtually unknown in hatchling sea turtles. Using incubator-raised turtles, we measured oxygen consumption, frequency, tidal volume, and minute volume for leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) and olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) turtle hatchlings for the first six days after pipping. In addition, we tested the hatchlings' response to hypercapnic, hyperoxic, and hypoxic challenges over this time period. Hatchling sea turtles generally showed resting ventilation characteristics that are similar to those of adults: a single breath followed by a long respiratory pause, slow frequency, and high metabolic rate. With hypercapnic challenge, both species responded primarily by elevating respiratory frequency via a decrease in the non-ventilatory period. Leatherback resting tidal volume increased with age but otherwise, neither species' resting respiratory pattern nor response to gas challenge changed significantly over the first few days after hatching. At the time of nest emergence, sea turtles have achieved a respiratory pattern that is similar to that of actively diving adults.

  4. Sleep and Respiration in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Sleep is often reported to be of poor quality in microgravity, and studies on the ground have shown a strong relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption. During the 16-day Neurolab mission, we studied the influence of possible changes in respiratory function on sleep by performing comprehensive sleep recordings on the payload crew on four nights during the mission. In addition, we measured the changes in the ventilatory response to low oxygen and high carbon dioxide in the same subjects during the day, hypothesizing that changes in ventilatory control might affect respiration during sleep. Microgravity caused a large reduction in the ventilatory response to reduced oxygen. This is likely the result of an increase in blood pressure at the peripheral chemoreceptors in the neck that occurs when the normally present hydrostatic pressure gradient between the heart and upper body is abolished. This reduction was similar to that seen when the subjects were placed acutely in the supine position in one-G. In sharp contrast to low oxygen, the ventilatory response to elevated carbon dioxide was unaltered by microgravity or the supine position. Because of the similarities of the findings in microgravity and the supine position, it is unlikely that changes in ventilatory control alter respiration during sleep in microgravity. During sleep on the ground, there were a small number of apneas (cessation of breathing) and hypopneas (reduced breathing) in these normal subjects. During sleep in microgravity, there was a reduction in the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour compared to preflight. Obstructive apneas virtually disappeared in microgravity, suggesting that the removal of gravity prevents the collapse of upper airways during sleep. Arousals from sleep were reduced in microgravity compared to preflight, and virtually all of this reduction was as a result of a reduction in the number of arousals from apneas and hypopneas. We conclude that any sleep

  5. Integrated subsurface water solutions for coastal environments through integrated pump&treat and aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdikaki, Martha; Kallioras, Andreas; Christoforidis, Christophoros; Iossifidis, Dimitris; Zafeiropoulos, Anastasios; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Makropoulos, Christos; Raat, Klaasjan; van den Berg, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Coastal wetlands in semi-arid regions, as in Circum-Mediterranean, are considered important ecosystems that provide valuable services to human population and the environment, such as: flood protection, erosion control, wildlife habitat, water quality, recreation and carbon sequestration. Un-managed surface and groundwater exploitation in these areas usually leads to deterioration of such sensitive ecosystems by means of water resources degradation and/or increased salinity. Groundwater usually plays a vital role for the sustainability of these hydrological systems, as the underlying aquifers operate as regulators for both quantity and quality of their waters. Multi-layer and multi-objective Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) systems can be proved effective groundwater engineered solutions for the restoration of deteriorated coastal wetlands in semi- and arid regions. The plain of Marathon is a typical Mediterranean environment that hosts a naturally occurring -and today degraded- coastal wetland with the characteristics of a distinct ecosystem linked to a typical coastal hydrogeological system of a semi-arid region; and therefore can serve as a model for similar systems world-wide. The geo-hydrological setting of the area involves a multi-layer aquifer system consisting of (i) an upper un-consolidated formation of depositional unit dominated mostly by fluvial sediments and (ii) the surrounding and underlying karstified marbles; both being linked to the investigated wetland and also subjected to seawater encroachment. A smart engineered MAR system via an optimised Pump & Treat system integrated with an Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) scheme in this area would include the abstraction of brackish groundwater from the deeper karst aquifer at a location close to the shoreline and direct treatment with Reverse Osmosis (RO). for desalination. Two-fold re-use scheme of the purified effluent can then be engineered for (i) the restoration of the coastal wetland; and (ii

  6. Automated Storage Retrieval System (ASRS) Role Towards Achievement of Safety Objective and Safety Culture in Radioactive Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Hakiman Mohd Yusoff; Nurul Wahida Ahmad Khairuddin; Nik Marzukee Nik Ibrahim; Mat Bakar Mahusin; Muhammad, Z.A.; Nur Azna Mahmud; Norfazlina Zainal Abidin

    2012-01-01

    Waste Technology Development Centre (WasTeC) has been awarded with quality management system ISO 9001:2000 in June 2004 or now known as ISO 9001:2008. The scope of the unit's ISO certification is radioactive waste management and storage of radioactive material. To meet the objectives and requirements ISO 9001:2008, WasTeC has started a project known as Automated Storage and Retrieval System (ASRS). ASRS is a computing controlled method for automatically depositing and retrieving waste from defined locations. The system is used to replace the existing process of storage and retrieval of radioactive waste at storage facility at block 33.The main objective of this project is to reduced the radiation exposure to the worker and potential forklift accident occur during storage and retrieval of the radioactive waste. By using the ASRS system, WasTeC/ Nuclear Malaysia can provide a safe storage of radioactive waste and the use of this system can eliminate the repeat handling and can improve productivity. (author)

  7. Lipid peroxidation and cytotoxicity induced by respirable volcanic ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gomez-Vidales, Virginia; Ramirez-Apan, María Teresa; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención; Kaufhold, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Respirable volcanic ash induces oxidative degradation of lipids in cell membranes. • Respirable volcanic ash triggers cytotoxicity in murin monocyle/macrophage cells. • Oxidative stress is surface controlled but not restricted by surface- Fe 3+ . • Surface Fe 3+ acts as a stronger inductor in allophanes vs phyllosilicates or oxides. • Registered cell-viability values were as low as 68.5 ± 6.7%. - Abstract: This paper reports that the main component of respirable volcanic ash, allophane, induces lipid peroxidation (LP), the oxidative degradation of lipids in cell membranes, and cytotoxicity in murin monocyle/macrophage cells. Naturally-occurring allophane collected from New Zealand, Japan, and Ecuador was studied. The quantification of LP was conducted using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) assay. The cytotoxic effect was determined by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay. Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) determinations of naturally-occurring allophane confirmed the incorporation in the structure and clustering of structural Fe 3+ , and nucleation and growth of small-sized Fe (oxyhydr)oxide or gibbsite. LP induced by allophane varied with time, and solid concentration and composition, reaching 6.7 ± 0.2 nmol TBARS mg prot −1 . LP was surface controlled but not restricted by structural or surface-bound Fe 3+ , because redox processes induced by soluble components other than perferryl iron. The reactivity of Fe 3+ soluble species stemming from surface-bound Fe 3+ or small-sized Fe 3+ refractory minerals in allophane surpassed that of structural Fe 3+ located in tetrahedral or octahedral sites of phyllosilicates or bulk iron oxides. Desferrioxamine B mesylate salt (DFOB) or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) inhibited LP. EDTA acted as a more effective inhibitor, explained by multiple electron transfer pathways. Registered cell-viability values were as low as 68.5

  8. Literacy effects on language and vision: emergent effects from an amodal shared resource (ASR) computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alastair C; Monaghan, Padraic; Huettig, Falk

    2014-12-01

    Learning to read and write requires an individual to connect additional orthographic representations to pre-existing mappings between phonological and semantic representations of words. Past empirical results suggest that the process of learning to read and write (at least in alphabetic languages) elicits changes in the language processing system, by either increasing the cognitive efficiency of mapping between representations associated with a word, or by changing the granularity of phonological processing of spoken language, or through a combination of both. Behavioural effects of literacy have typically been assessed in offline explicit tasks that have addressed only phonological processing. However, a recent eye tracking study compared high and low literate participants on effects of phonology and semantics in processing measured implicitly using eye movements. High literates' eye movements were more affected by phonological overlap in online speech than low literates, with only subtle differences observed in semantics. We determined whether these effects were due to cognitive efficiency and/or granularity of speech processing in a multimodal model of speech processing - the amodal shared resource model (ASR, Smith, Monaghan, & Huettig, 2013a,b). We found that cognitive efficiency in the model had only a marginal effect on semantic processing and did not affect performance for phonological processing, whereas fine-grained versus coarse-grained phonological representations in the model simulated the high/low literacy effects on phonological processing, suggesting that literacy has a focused effect in changing the grain-size of phonological mappings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ecosystem Respiration in an Undisturbed, Old-Growth, Temperate Rain Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. E.; Walcroft, A. S.; McSeveny, T. M.; Rogers, G. N.; Whitehead, D.

    2008-12-01

    Old-growth forests are usually close to carbon neutral, and climate change may push them towards becoming net carbon sources. Ecosystem carbon exchange and its component fluxes, were measured in a temperate rainforest in South Westland, New Zealand. The forest, which receives over 3 m of rain a year, is dominated by 400 year-old podocarp trees, and is on a low nutrient, acidic, peat soil. Nighttime respiration measurements using eddy covariance were problematic due to katabatic induced CO2 drainage flows near the ground and low turbulence. Instead of the friction velocity filtering technique, we used the maximum eddy flux within a few hours of sunset to derive a function relating nighttime ecosystem respiration to soil temperature. The function was then used to calculate respiration for the nighttime periods. Soil respiration was measured at regular intervals during the growing season. Soil temperature was regulated by incoming radiation and changes in the soil heat capacity. The water table was typically only 160 mm below the ground surface. Soil respiration (mean = 2.9 μmol m-2 s-1) increased strongly with both an increase in soil temperature and an increase in the depth to the water table, and accounted for approximately 50% of ecosystem respiration. Changes in the water table depth caused by altered rainfall regime, evaporation and drainage are likely to have a significant effect on the soil respiration rate and carbon balance of this old-growth forest. Foliage and stem respiration were also measured and integrated to the canopy scale using a model. The model was then used to decompose ecosystem respiration measurements into its components. A combination of measured and modelled data indicates that the ecosystem is a net source for carbon (-0.34 kg C m&-2 yr-1).

  10. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26

    anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing; 4. An acid-stable red cytochrome with a novel absorbance peak at 579 nm was purified from cell-free extracts of L. ferriphilum. Functional studies demonstrated that this cytochrome was an important component of the aerobic iron respiratory chain in this organism; 5. The specific adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to pyrite is mediated by an extracellular protein that was identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to minerals was characterized by high affinity binding that exhibited a high specificity for pyrite over other sulfide minerals. The principal biopolymer involved in this high-affinity adhesion to pyrite was isolated by mineral affinity chromatography and identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of purified aporusticyanin to minerals was observed to adhere to different mineral with a pattern of reactivity identical to that observed with the intact bacterium. Further, preincubation of pyrite with excess exogenous aporusticyanin served to inhibit the adherence of intact cells to the surface of the mineral, indicating that the protein and the cells adhered to the pyrite in a mutually exclusive manner. Taken together, these observations support a model where aporusticyanin located on the surface of the bacterial cell acts as a mineral-specific receptor for the initial adherence of At. ferrooxidans to solid pyrite; 6. The specific adhesion of L. ferriphilum to pyrite was mediated by a different acid-stable extracellular protein than aporusticyanin; and 7. A prototype integrating cavity absorption meter (ICAM) was assembled to determine whether this novel spectrophotometer could be used to study cellular respiration in situ.

  11. Clinical pulmonary function and industrial respirator wear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raven, P.B. (Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth); Moss, R.F.; Page, K.; Garmon, R.; Skaggs, B.

    1981-12-01

    This investigation was the initial step in determining a clinical pulmonary test which could be used to evaluate workers as to their suitability to industrial respirator wear. Sixty subjects, 12 superior, 37 normal, and 11 moderately impaired with respect to lung function tests were evaluated with a battery of clinical pulmonary tests while wearing an industrial respirator. The respirator was a full-face mask (MSA-Ultravue) demand breathing type equipped with an inspiratory resistance of 85mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow and an expiratory resistance of 25mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow. Comparisons of these tests were made between the three groups of subjects both with and without a respirator. It appears that those lung tests which measure the flow characteristics of the lung especially those that are effort dependant are more susceptible to change as a result of respirator wear. Hence, the respirator affects the person with superior lung function to a greater degree than the moderately impaired person. It was suggested that the clinical test of 15 second maximum voluntary ventilations (MVV./sub 25/) may be the test of choice for determining worker capability in wearing an industrial respirator.

  12. Co-combustion of automotive shredder residue (ASR) and sewage sludge with a mixture of industrial and household waste in an 20MW fluidized bed combustor; Samfoerbraenning av bilfluff, roetslam och avfall i en 20 MW fluidbaeddpanna - Studier av braenslesammansaettningens paaverkan paa belaeggningsbildning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskilsson, David; Johansson, Andreas; Johansson, Linda; Wikstroem-Blomqvist, Evalena

    2007-07-01

    In order to prevent a further increased use of resources and to decrease the environmental impact from landfills, organic wastes are today diverted towards material and energy recovery. This creates a waste market with an increasing number of waste fractions that needs to be treated properly. As an example, in Sweden it has recently been prohibited to landfill source separated combustible waste (2002) and organic waste (2005). Wastes as automotive shredder residue (ASR) and sewage sludge can no longer be landfilled and needs to be either material or energy recovered, which challenge the waste treatment sector. This work investigates the effects of ASR and sewage sludge co-combustion in a 20 MW Energy-from-Waste plant (bubbling fluidised bed). The long term objective of the work is to increase the fuel flexibility, the boiler availability and the power production. This report focus on boiler operation and combustion performance in terms of agglomeration, deposit rates and emissions. In addition to the tests with ASR and sewage sludge, repeated measurements were performed during normal load as a reference. The results show that the co-combusted fractions of ASR and sewage sludge, which on mass basis constituted 6 % and 15 % respectively, did not increase the risk for agglomeration or deposits on heat-exchanging surfaces. Instead, compared to the two reference cases, the deposit rates decreased when sewage sludge was added. Only minor variation in the emissions was seen between the different cases. The levels of I-TEQs were far below the legislated values in all cases

  13. Light respiration by subtropical seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Matheus C; Eyre, Bradley D

    2017-06-01

    Here, we report the first-ever measurements of light CO 2 respiration rate (CRR) by seaweeds. We measured the influence of temperature (15-25°C) and light (irradiance from 60 to 670 μmol · m -2  · s -1 ) on the light CCR of two subtropical seaweed species, and measured the CRR of seven different seaweed species under the same light (150 μmol · m -2  · s -1 ) and temperature (25°C). There was little effect of irradiance on light CRR, but there was an effect of temperature. Across the seven species light CRR was similar to OCR (oxygen consumption rate in the dark), with the exception of a single species. The outlier species was a coralline alga, and the higher light CRR was probably driven by calcification. CRR could be estimated from OCR, as well as carbon photosynthetic rates from oxygen photosynthetic rates, which suggests that previous studies have probably provided good estimations of gross photosynthesis for seaweeds. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  14. Molecular ecology and selection in the drought-related Asr gene polymorphisms in wild and cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The abscisic acid (ABA) pathway plays an important role in the plants’ reaction to drought stress and ABA-stress response (Asr) genes are important in controlling this process. In this sense, we accessed nucleotide diversity at two candidate genes for drought tolerance (Asr1 and Asr2), involved in an ABA signaling pathway, in the reference collection of cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and a core collection of wild common bean accessions. Results Our wild population samples covered a range of mesic (semi-arid) to very dry (desert) habitats, while our cultivated samples presented a wide spectrum of drought tolerance. Both genes showed very different patterns of nucleotide variation. Asr1 exhibited very low nucleotide diversity relative to the neutral reference loci that were previously surveyed in these populations. This suggests that strong purifying selection has been acting on this gene. In contrast, Asr2 exhibited higher levels of nucleotide diversity, which is indicative of adaptive selection. These patterns were more notable in wild beans than in cultivated common beans indicting that natural selection has played a role over long time periods compared to farmer selection since domestication. Conclusions Together these results suggested the importance of Asr1 in the context of drought tolerance, and constitute the first steps towards an association study between genetic polymorphism of this gene family and variation in drought tolerance traits. Furthermore, one of our major successes was to find that wild common bean is a reservoir of genetic variation and selection signatures at Asr genes, which may be useful for breeding drought tolerance in cultivated common bean. PMID:22799462

  15. Physicochemical properties of respirable-size lunar dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D. S.; Cooper, B. L.; Taylor, L. A.; James, J. T.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Pieters, C. M.; Wentworth, S. J.; Wallace, W. T.; Lee, T. S.

    2015-02-01

    We separated the respirable dust and other size fractions from Apollo 14 bulk sample 14003,96 in a dry nitrogen environment. While our toxicology team performed in vivo and in vitro experiments with the respirable fraction, we studied the size distribution and shape, chemistry, mineralogy, spectroscopy, iron content and magnetic resonance of various size fractions. These represent the finest-grained lunar samples ever measured for either FMR np-Fe0 index or precise bulk chemistry, and are the first instance we know of in which SEM/TEM samples have been obtained without using liquids. The concentration of single-domain, nanophase metallic iron (np-Fe0) increases as particle size diminishes to 2 μm, confirming previous extrapolations. Size-distribution studies disclosed that the most frequent particle size was in the 0.1-0.2 μm range suggesting a relatively high surface area and therefore higher potential toxicity. Lunar dust particles are insoluble in isopropanol but slightly soluble in distilled water (~0.2 wt%/3 days). The interaction between water and lunar fines, which results in both agglomeration and partial dissolution, is observable on a macro scale over time periods of less than an hour. Most of the respirable grains were smooth amorphous glass. This suggests less toxicity than if the grains were irregular, porous, or jagged, and may account for the fact that lunar dust is less toxic than ground quartz.

  16. Quantitative Respirator Fit, Face Sizes, and Determinants of Fit in South African Diagnostic Laboratory Respirator Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganyi, Jeanneth; Wilson, Kerry S; Rees, David

    2017-11-10

    Respirators are widely used in health care settings but there is scant information on adequacy of fit and its determinants, particularly in resource-constrained settings. The aim of the study is to describe the proportion of South African diagnostic laboratory respirator users with adequate quantitative respirator fit while wearing their currently selected respirators which were generally supplied without regard to face size, and to identify determinants of fit test pass and fail. This was a cross-sectional study with 562 participants. Quantitative respirator fit testing was conducted using a PortaCount fit testing machine. Four facial dimensions were taken using callipers and a tape measure. STATA 14 was used to perform descriptive and inferential statistics. The effect of the independent variables including face dimensions, race, smoking, respirator make and size, and age group was explored using multiple logistic regression stratified by sex. Ninety one percent of the respirators supplied were medium-sized. Seventy eight percent of respirator users failed fit testing and were thus probably not protected by their currently supplied respirator. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that face length in mm (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.00-1.09), nasal root breadth in mm (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.06-1.28), and respirator shape (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.39-0.78) were significant predictors of overall fit for all subjects and for women alone, but these factors explained only a small percentage of fit test outcomes. A large proportion of diagnostic laboratory employees were using poorly fitting respirators. This creates a false impression of protection. Fit testing of respirators is therefore important and recommended. The determinants evaluated described only a small portion of the variability in fit; important determinants were absent from the models. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British

  17. Cardiac, Skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I

    2014-01-01

    in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle suggest all mitochondria are created equal, the contrasting RCR and non-phosphorylating respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation...

  18. Perinatal risk factors for neonatal asphyxia in Vali-e-Asr hospital, Tehran-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Nayeri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asphyxia is a medical condition in which placental or pulmonary gas exchange is impaired or they cease all together, typically producing a combination of progressive hypoxemia and hypercapnea. Objective: In addition to regional differences in its etiology; it is important to know its risk factors. Materials and Methods: This is a case-control study, all neonates born from May 2002 to September 2005 in Vali-e-Asr Hospital were studied. 9488 newborns were born of which 6091 of the live patients were hospitalized in NICU. 546 newborns were studied as case and control group. 260 neonates (48% were female and 286 neonates (52% were male. Among the neonates who were admitted, 182 of them were diagnosed with asphyxia and twice of them (364 newborns were selected as a control group. The variables consist of; gestational age, type of delivery, birth weight, prenatal care, pregnancy and peripartum complications and neonatal disorders. Results: Our studies showed that 35 (19.2% patients had mild asphyxia, 107 (58.8% had moderate asphyxia and 40 (22% were diagnosed as severe asphyxia. Mean maternal age was 34.23±4.29yr; (range: 23-38 yr; and mean of parity was 2±1.2; (range: 1-8. Risk factors in our study included emergent Caesarian Section, preterm labor (<37w, low birth weight (<2500g, 5 minute Apgar (less than 6, need for resuscitation, nuchal cord, impaired Biophysical Profile, neonatal anemia, and maternal infertility. Conclusion: All risk factors listed above play a role in asphyxia. The majority of these factors are avoidable by means of good perinatal care

  19. Medium-term results of hip arthroplasty with ASR XL (DePuy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Danilyak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose - to identify factors affect on instability and to access the medium-term survivorship of metal-on-metal X-large heads total hip prostheses. Material and methods. From January 2007 March 2009 we performed 134 ASR XL head - Corail total hip arthroplasties in 119 patients. The medium-term results were studied in 94 (105 hips. Mean follow-up was 76±3 months. Radiological evaluation was carried out in standard views. Clinical and functional results were accessed with Harris Hip Score. We determined metal ions concentration in whole blood with atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS and mass spectrometry in the induced coupled plasma (ICP-MS. Changes in periprosthetic tissues were studied at high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with subsequent histological confirmation. “Gamma test” was applied for statistic analysis revision risk factors. Results. Medium-term survivorship of studied implants amounted to 85.5% (95% CI 78.7% to 92.3%. Average ions concentration in the whole blood of amounted to 3.2 ppb and 2.9 ppb foe Co and Cr respectively Specific risk factors of instability were gender (female, small size of the cups, and high angle of abduction (>45°. The main reason for revision was cup loosening (over 50%. Conclusions. Patients in this cohort are in a great danger of early aseptic loosening, especially in the presence of specific risk factors. So the annual monitoring is considered mandatory for them. The indications for revision surgery are not only the evident implant instability, but also the pathological changes in periprosthetic tissues associated with high ions level in whole blood.

  20. Effect of Music on Emotions and Respiration

    OpenAIRE

    NOGUCHI Kengo:筆頭著者; MASAOKA Yuri; SATOH Kanako; KATO Nobumasa; HOMMA Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    In the present study we investigated whether the emotional state induced by music can change respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (VT), minute ventilation (VE), and end-tidal CO2concentration (ETCO2). In a pioneering study investigating the effect of music on respiration, the music of Stockhausen and Chopin was used. In the present study, we examined the effects of the same musical stimuli used in that study on respiration. Each stimulus (Stockhausen, Chopin, and silence) was delivered for 30 ...

  1. 42 CFR 84.134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.134... Respirators § 84.134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Supplied-air respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type and...

  2. 42 CFR 84.197 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.197... Cartridge Respirators § 84.197 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type and...

  3. 42 CFR 84.174 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.174... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.174 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except..., durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type of respirator it contains...

  4. Convergence in the temperature response of leaf respiration across biomes and plant functional types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heskel, Mary A.; O’Sullivan, Odhran S.; Reich, Peter B.; Tjoelker, Mark G.; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K.; Penillard, Aurore; Egerton, John J. G.; Creek, Danielle; Bloomfield, Keith J.; Xiang, Jen; Sinca, Felipe; Stangl, Zsofia R.; Martinez-de la Torre, Alberto; Griffin, Kevin L.; Huntingford, Chris; Hurry, Vaughan; Meir, Patrick; Turnbull, Matthew H.; Atkin, Owen K.

    2016-01-01

    Plant respiration constitutes a massive carbon flux to the atmosphere, and a major control on the evolution of the global carbon cycle. It therefore has the potential to modulate levels of climate change due to the human burning of fossil fuels. Neither current physiological nor terrestrial biosphere models adequately describe its short-term temperature response, and even minor differences in the shape of the response curve can significantly impact estimates of ecosystem carbon release and/or storage. Given this, it is critical to establish whether there are predictable patterns in the shape of the respiration–temperature response curve, and thus in the intrinsic temperature sensitivity of respiration across the globe. Analyzing measurements in a comprehensive database for 231 species spanning 7 biomes, we demonstrate that temperature-dependent increases in leaf respiration do not follow a commonly used exponential function. Instead, we find a decelerating function as leaves warm, reflecting a declining sensitivity to higher temperatures that is remarkably uniform across all biomes and plant functional types. Such convergence in the temperature sensitivity of leaf respiration suggests that there are universally applicable controls on the temperature response of plant energy metabolism, such that a single new function can predict the temperature dependence of leaf respiration for global vegetation. This simple function enables straightforward description of plant respiration in the land-surface components of coupled earth system models. Our cross-biome analyses shows significant implications for such fluxes in cold climates, generally projecting lower values compared with previous estimates. PMID:27001849

  5. Inferring candidate genes for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) assessed by the World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, M; Kirsch, P; Hennig, J

    2006-07-01

    The present study tests the psychometric properties and validity of the German version of the World Health Organization Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Self-Report Scale (ASRS), which is a short screening instrument for use in the general population. Furthermore, two candidate genes for ADHD, the COMT VAL158MET and the 5-HT2a T102C polymorphisms, were tested for associations with the ASRS subscales inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity in N = 203 healthy subjects. The ordinal CFA yielded a two-factorial model corroborating the structure of the official English WHO version. Genetic analysis revealed an association between the VAL allele of COMT and the inattention scale (F(1, 201) = 7.20, p = 0.008), the hyperactivity/impulsivity scale (F(1, 201) = 4.30, p = 0.039), and the total ASRS scale (F(2, 201) = 7.64, p = 0.006) with highest scores in carriers of the MET/MET genotype. The C-allele of 5-HT2a was significantly associated with the hyperactivity/impulsivity scale (F(1, 201) = 5.52, p = 0.020) and the total ASRS scale (F(1, 201) = 4.21, p = 0.042) with highest scores in carriers of the TT genotype. The data provide evidence for the structural as well as for the external validity of the ASRS.

  6. Validity of the World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) Screener in a representative sample of health plan members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C; Adler, Lenard A; Gruber, Michael J; Sarawate, Chaitanya A; Spencer, Thomas; Van Brunt, David L

    2007-01-01

    The validity of the six-question World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) Screener was assessed in a sample of subscribers to a large health plan in the US. A convenience subsample of 668 subscribers was administered the ASRS Screener twice to assess test-retest reliability and then a third time in conjunction with a clinical interviewer for DSM-IV adult ADHD. The data were weighted to adjust for discrepancies between the sample and the population on socio-demographics and past medical claims. Internal consistency reliability of the continuous ASRS Screener was in the range 0.63-0.72 and test-retest reliability (Pearson correlations) in the range 0.58-0.77. A four-category version The ASRS Screener had strong concordance with clinician diagnoses, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.90. The brevity and ability to discriminate DSM-IV cases from non-cases make the six-question ASRS Screener attractive for use both in community epidemiological surveys and in clinical outreach and case-finding initiatives. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Validity and reliability of the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder self-report scale (ASRS-v1.1) in a clinical sample with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, Samantha; Ivanova, Iryna; Bissada, Hany; Tasca, Giorgio A

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with eating disorders (EDs) commonly experience comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The shared features of EDs and ADHD, such as inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity, may exacerbate ED symptomatology and pose challenges to treatment. It is important to screen patients with EDs for symptoms of ADHD to optimize their treatment outcomes. However, the psychometrics of common measures of ADHD have not yet been examined within an ED population. An example of such a measure is the ADHD self-report scale (ASRS-v1.1) symptom checklist, which identifies the presence of ADHD symptoms. This study reports a psychometric study of the ASRS-v1.1 in a clinical sample of 500 adults with an ED. A confirmatory factor analysis indicated the ASRS-v1.1 maintained its two-factor structure of inattention and impulsivity/hyperactivity. The item loadings demonstrated path invariance across ED diagnostic groups indicating construct validity. Further, the subscales exhibited good internal consistency and they were significantly correlated with other measures of impulsivity indicating convergent validity. The ED sample had significantly higher mean scores than published nonclinical norms indicating predictive validity, but the ASRS-v1.1 scores were not significantly different among ED diagnostic groups. Results suggest the ASRS-v1.1 is a valid and reliable screening tool for identifying symptoms of ADHD among adults seeking treatment for ED. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antimicrobial resistance pattern of Gram –negative bacilli isolated of Vali-Asr Hospital wards in Arak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Didgar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infectious diseases are of the most important causes of mortality all around the world particular in developing countries. Recently, the most important thing that has worried medical society is antibiotic resistance. Multi-resistant gram_negative rods are important pathogens in hospitals, causing high rate of mortality.The main goal of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance patterns among common gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients of Vali-Asr Hospital. Material and Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted between the years 2010-2012 in Vali-Asr hospital in Arak. In this study 1120 specimen were examined. Bacterial strains were isolated by conventional methods from various clinical samples of patients including: blood, urine, wound, sputum, CSF, andetc.All isolates were examined for antimicrobial resistance using disc diffusion method. Results: In this study 737 specimen were positive cultures. A total of 332 isolates of Gram-negative bacilli were identified. The most frequent gram negative bacteria were isolated from urine, wound, blood, respiratory secretion and catheter. The most frequent pathogens were E.coli followed by k.pneumonia, entrobacter, p.oaeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp, citrobacter and proteus. High rate of resistance to third generation of cephalospoins & carbapenems observed amang isolates of Acintobacter spp.Prodution of extended spectrum beralactamases (ESBLS was found in 51.4% of all Gram negative bacteria. Conclusion: Antibiotic resistance, particularly multi-drug resistance is frequent among microorganisms of ValiAsr Hospital. Resistance in our country, like other countries have been shown to be increased, so it is highly recommended to prohibit unnecessary prescription of antibiotics.

  9. Respiration and heartbeat monitoring using a distributed pulsed MIMO radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterscheid, Ingo; Smith, Graeme E

    2017-07-01

    This paper addresses non-contact monitoring of physiological signals induced by respiration and heartbeat. To detect the tiny physiological movements of the chest or other parts of the torso, a Mulitple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) radar is used. The spatially distributed transmitters and receivers are able to detect the chest surface movements of one or multiple persons in a room. Due to several bistatic measurements at the same time a robust detection and measuring of the breathing and heartbeat rate is possible. Using an appropriate geometrical configuration of the sensors even a localization of the person is feasible.

  10. CORROSION LOCALISEE DES ACIERS API 5L-X52 DE LA LIGNE ASR/MP SOLLICITE EN SOL ALGERIEN

    OpenAIRE

    BENDJEBBOUR, Amina

    2011-01-01

    L'étude porte sur les défaillances par corrosion localisée dans les aciers API de grade X52 de la ligne de pipelines ASR/MP acheminant les produits pétroliers sollicités en sol corrosif après échec des systèmes de protection anticorrosion (AC) à base de liants hydrocarbonés ou encore à base d'un système en multicouche complétée par une protection cathodique.

  11. Comparison of HMM experts with MLP experts in the Full Combination Multi-Band Approach to Robust ASR

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, Astrid; Morris, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we apply the Full Combination (FC) multi-band approach, which has originally been introduced in the framework of posterior-based HMM/ANN (Hidden Markov Model/Artificial Neural Network) hybrid systems, to systems in which the ANN (or Multilayer Perceptron (MLP)) is itself replaced by a Multi Gaussian HMM (MGM). Both systems represent the most widely used statistical models for robust ASR (automatic speech recognition). It is shown how the FC formula for the likelihood--based MGMs...

  12. Effect of Heating Rate on Accelerated Carbide Spheroidisation (ASR in 100CrMnSi6-4 Bearing Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauserova D.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Typical processing routes for bearing steels include a soft annealing stage, the purpose of which is to obtain a microstructure containing globular carbides in ferritic matrix. A newly developed process called ASR cuts the carbide spheroidisation times several fold, producing considerably finer globular carbides than conventional soft annealing. The present paper explores the effect of the heating rate and temperature on the accelerated carbide spheroidisation process and on the resulting hardness. Accelerated spheroidisation was achieved by thermal cycling for several minutes around various temperatures close to the transformation temperature at various heating rates applied by induction heating.

  13. Plant Respiration and Climate Change Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, D.

    2002-04-01

    Plant respiration is one of the key processes in terms of an understanding of plant growth and functioning in a future climate. Short- and long-term effects of temperature and CO 2 on plant respiration were investigated in a number of plant species. The experiments tested effects of either temperature and/or CO 2 from the level of individual respiratory enzymes, isolated mitochondria, whole-tissue, and up to the whole canopy level. The short-term effects of elevated atmospheric CO 2 on plant respiration appeared to be less than suggested so far in the literature. This was true both at the tissue level and for intact mitochondria. Respiratory enzymes can, however, be affected already at low CO 2 . These effects did not manifest itself at the tissue level, though, due to low degrees of control on the whole respiratory process exerted by the particular enzymes. Plant respiration on the other hand was affected by long-term growth at elevated atmospheric CO 2 . The findings of the reduced plant respiration at the leaf level were consistent with the literature and potential causes are discussed. Short-term effects of temperature on plant respiration were demonstrated to be dependent on the actual measurement temperature. Further, it is shown that mitochondrial leaf respiration in darkness and light differ substantially in the temperature sensitivity with the former being the far most sensitive. This has implications for modelling CO 2 exchange between vegetation and atmosphere as demonstrated here, since this has so far been neglected. Long-term effects of temperature resulted in respiratory acclimation in a number of species. Respiratory acclimation appeared not to occur to any one single type of growth temperature. The implications of this finding in combination with the timing of acclimation are discussed for modelling respiratory CO 2 release. (au)

  14. Plant Respiration and Climate Change Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, D.

    2002-04-01

    Plant respiration is one of the key processes in terms of an understanding of plant growth and functioning in a future climate. Short- and long-term effects of temperature and CO{sub 2} on plant respiration were investigated in a number of plant species. The experiments tested effects of either temperature and/or CO{sub 2} from the level of individual respiratory enzymes, isolated mitochondria, whole-tissue, and up to the whole canopy level. The short-term effects of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on plant respiration appeared to be less than suggested so far in the literature. This was true both at the tissue level and for intact mitochondria. Respiratory enzymes can, however, be affected already at low CO{sub 2}. These effects did not manifest itself at the tissue level, though, due to low degrees of control on the whole respiratory process exerted by the particular enzymes. Plant respiration on the other hand was affected by long-term growth at elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The findings of the reduced plant respiration at the leaf level were consistent with the literature and potential causes are discussed. Short-term effects of temperature on plant respiration were demonstrated to be dependent on the actual measurement temperature. Further, it is shown that mitochondrial leaf respiration in darkness and light differ substantially in the temperature sensitivity with the former being the far most sensitive. This has implications for modelling CO{sub 2} exchange between vegetation and atmosphere as demonstrated here, since this has so far been neglected. Long-term effects of temperature resulted in respiratory acclimation in a number of species. Respiratory acclimation appeared not to occur to any one single type of growth temperature. The implications of this finding in combination with the timing of acclimation are discussed for modelling respiratory CO{sub 2} release. (au)

  15. Effect of rotenone on gill-respiring and plastron-respiring insects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rotenone, a commonly-used piscicide, interferes with the cellular respiration of aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates by preventing the uptake of oxygen. While dose-response relationships have been developed for fish, there are limited comparative data available on aquatic insects that respire either with tracheal gills or ...

  16. Simplified pressure method for respirator fit testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D; Xu, M; Foo, S; Pilacinski, W; Willeke, K

    1991-08-01

    A simplified pressure method has been developed for fit testing air-purifying respirators. In this method, the air-purifying cartridges are replaced by a pressure-sensing attachment and a valve. While wearers hold their breath, a small pump extracts air from the respirator cavity until a steady-state pressure is reached in 1 to 2 sec. The flow rate through the face seal leak is a unique function of this pressure, which is determined once for all respirators, regardless of the respirator's cavity volume or deformation because of pliability. The contaminant concentration inside the respirator depends on the degree of dilution by the flow through the cartridges. The cartridge flow varies among different brands and is measured once for each brand. The ratio of cartridge to leakflow is a measure of fit. This flow ratio has been measured on human subjects and has been compared to fit factors determined on the same subjects by means of photometric and particle count tests. The aerosol tests gave higher values of fit.

  17. Integrating Spatial Multi Criteria Decision Making (SMCDM) with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for delineation of the most suitable areas for aquifer storage and recovery (ASR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahani Amineh, Zainab Banoo; Hashemian, Seyyed Jamal Al-Din; Magholi, Alireza

    2017-08-01

    Hamoon-Jazmoorian plain is located in southeast of Iran. Overexploitation of groundwater in this plain has led to water level decline and caused serious problems such as land subsidence, aquifer destruction and water quality degradation. The increasing population and agricultural development along with drought and climate change, have further increased the pressure on water resources in this region over the last years. In order to overcome such crisis, introduction of surface water into an aquifer at particular locations can be a suitable solution. A wide variety of methods have been developed to recharge groundwater, one of which is aquifer storage and recovery (ASR). One of the fundamental principles of making such systems is delineation of suitable areas based on scientific and natural facts in order to achieve relevant objectives. To that end, the Multi Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) in conjunction with the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) was applied in this study. More specifically, nine main parameters including depth of runoff as the considered source of water, morphology of the earth surface features such as geology, geomorphology, land use and land cover, drainage and aquifer characteristics along with quality of water in the aquifer were considered as the main layers in GIS. The runoff water available for artificial recharge in the basin was estimated through Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number method. The weighted curve number for each watershed was derived through spatial intersection of land use and hydrological soil group layers. Other thematic layers were extracted from satellite images, topographical map, and other collateral data sources, then weighed according to their influence in locating process. The Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) method was then used to calculate weights of individual parameters. The normalized weighted layers were then overlaid to build up the recharge potential map. The results revealed that 34% of the

  18. [ASRS v.1.1., a tool for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder screening in adults treated for addictive behaviors: psychometric properties and estimated prevalence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrero Pérez, Eduardo J; Puerta García, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    ASRS v.1.1. is a self-applied brief instrument for the screening of individuals presenting symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and proposed by the WHO. The purpose of the present work was to test the instrument and examine the results of its application to a sample of 280 individuals in treatment for substance-related disorders (cross-sectional descriptive study). We administered simultaneously in the initial phases of treatment the ASRS v.1.1. (short form) and the MCMI-II to the full sample and the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS), ADHD-Rating Scale-IV and ASRS v.1.1. (complete form) to various sub-samples. Diagnostic interviews were also carried out and the psychometric properties and factorial structure of ASRS v.1.1. were explored. Good convergent validity, sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic capability were obtained for the six-item version of ASRS v.1.1., even though 4 out of 6 items did not discriminate between Axis I and II disorders assessed through the MCMI-II and diagnostic interviews. According to DSM-IV-TR criteria the estimated prevalence of ADHD in the sample of addicts was 8.2%. ASRS v.1.1. is criticized as a specific instrument for ADHD detection, since most of its items appear to measure a non-specific dimension of compulsiveness/impulsiveness, common to Axis-I and Axis-II disorders. Other criticisms made in the discussion concern the lack of specificity of DSM criteria and the confusion they generate among the concepts of symptom, sign and trait (including the impact on study results), the general use of the A criterion but the omission of the B, C, D and E criteria of the DSM category, differences in samples (with regard to both severity and selection criteria), and the artifactual increases in prevalence found in many studies.

  19. Validity of the World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) Screener in a representative sample of health plan members

    OpenAIRE

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Adler, Lenard; Gruber, Michael J.; Sarawate, Chaitanya A.; Spencer, Thomas; Van Brunt, David L.

    2007-01-01

    The validity of the 6-question World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) Screener was assessed in a sample of subscribers to a large health plan in the US. A convenience sub-sample of 668 subscribers was administered the ASRS Screener twice to assess test-retest reliability and then a third time in conjunction with a clinical interviewer for DSM-IV adult ADHD. The data were weighted to adjust for discrepancies between the sample and the population on socio-demographics and...

  20. The ''Adatom Model'' of SERS (Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering): The present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, A.; Billmann, J.; Eickmans, J.; Ertuerk, U.; Pettenkofer, C.

    1984-01-01

    The model predicts resonant Raman scattering by adsorbate vibrations through photon excited charge transfer transition from localized electronic states at sites of atomic scale roughness (e.g. 'adatoms') on silver surfaces to the affinity levels of the adsorbates. Experimental tests are discussed: search for the localized states, shifts of the affinity levels, comparison of SERS at sites of ASR and at atomically smooth parts of the surface, changes in SER vibrational bands by shifts of the affinity levels, 'SERS' vibrational selection rules. Infrared enhancement at sites of ASR is conjectured. Different hypotheses on the role of the 'porosity' of coldly deposited silver films are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Lipid peroxidation and cytotoxicity induced by respirable volcanic ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera, E-mail: jcervini@correo.cua.uam.mx [Departamento de Procesos y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Cuajimalpa, México City (Mexico); Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Nieto-Camacho, Antonio [Laboratorio de Pruebas Biológicas, Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, México City (Mexico); Gomez-Vidales, Virginia [Laboratorio de Resonancia Paramagnética Electrónica, Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, México City (Mexico); Ramirez-Apan, María Teresa [Laboratorio de Pruebas Biológicas, Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, México City (Mexico); Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención [Dirección de Investigación y Posgrado, Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo (Mexico); Kaufhold, Stephan [BGR Bundesansaltfür Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); and others

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Respirable volcanic ash induces oxidative degradation of lipids in cell membranes. • Respirable volcanic ash triggers cytotoxicity in murin monocyle/macrophage cells. • Oxidative stress is surface controlled but not restricted by surface- Fe{sup 3+}. • Surface Fe{sup 3+} acts as a stronger inductor in allophanes vs phyllosilicates or oxides. • Registered cell-viability values were as low as 68.5 ± 6.7%. - Abstract: This paper reports that the main component of respirable volcanic ash, allophane, induces lipid peroxidation (LP), the oxidative degradation of lipids in cell membranes, and cytotoxicity in murin monocyle/macrophage cells. Naturally-occurring allophane collected from New Zealand, Japan, and Ecuador was studied. The quantification of LP was conducted using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) assay. The cytotoxic effect was determined by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay. Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) determinations of naturally-occurring allophane confirmed the incorporation in the structure and clustering of structural Fe{sup 3+}, and nucleation and growth of small-sized Fe (oxyhydr)oxide or gibbsite. LP induced by allophane varied with time, and solid concentration and composition, reaching 6.7 ± 0.2 nmol TBARS mg prot{sup −1}. LP was surface controlled but not restricted by structural or surface-bound Fe{sup 3+}, because redox processes induced by soluble components other than perferryl iron. The reactivity of Fe{sup 3+} soluble species stemming from surface-bound Fe{sup 3+} or small-sized Fe{sup 3+} refractory minerals in allophane surpassed that of structural Fe{sup 3+} located in tetrahedral or octahedral sites of phyllosilicates or bulk iron oxides. Desferrioxamine B mesylate salt (DFOB) or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) inhibited LP. EDTA acted as a more effective inhibitor, explained by multiple electron transfer pathways. Registered cell

  2. Genotoxic activity and inhibition of soil respiration by ptaquiloside, a bracken fern carcinogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Bjørn; Rasmussen, L.H.; Svendsen, Gitte Winkel

    2005-01-01

    Ptaquiloside (PTA) is a natural toxin produced by bracken (Pteridium aquilinum [L.] Kuhn). Assessment of PTA toxicity is needed because PTA deposited from bracken to soil may leach to surface and groundwater. Inhibition of soil respiration and genotoxic activity of PTA was determined by a soil...

  3. Fit Factor of Respirators Against CBR Agents of Nanoparticles Dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovasevic-Stojanovic, M.; Stojanovic, B.; Ristanovic, E.

    2007-01-01

    Personal protective equipment including respiratory protective devices is generally considered to provide adequate protection efficiency for exposures to nano sized CBR particulates, but at the other side no one is certain how effective are respiratory protective devices against CBR nanoparticles contaminants. Methodologies that are currently used in the aim of measuring particle exposures were in the most of cases not sufficiently sensitive to measure occupational or ambient nanoparticle aerosol concentrations, whether in terms of particle mass, particle numbers, or surface area. There are two different mechanisms of inward leakage into respirator: (1) filter penetration, and (2) leakage flow through orifices and cracks between face and facepiece, in exhalation valve, and in facepiece body. Filter penetration is recently investigated, electret filter are much more efficient than mechanical filters for protection against CBR nano sized particles. Filter efficiency is better for inhalation flow of 30 lpm than 85 lpm. Uncertainties related to efficiency of respiratory protective devices against CBR nanoparticles are primary due to faceseal leakage or it may be underlined that methods and methodology of fit factor of respirator determination in domain of CBR nano sized particles must be more investigated. In this paper it is discuss distribution of protection factor of RPD measured on two respirators for one male and one female subject, test is repeated 30 times for both of subjects. Distribution of PF for male and female subjects was compared with distribution of PF for population, measured on 30 subjects. Challenge atmosphere was polydisperse aerosol of NaCl with MMD=0.47 μm, σg 2.21, CMD= 0.071 μm.(author)

  4. LIMITATION OF SOIL RESPIRATION DURING DRY PERIOD

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Marian; Janouš, Dalibor; Acosta, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 16, - (2003), s. 47-52. ISBN 80-7157-297-7 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA AV ČR IBS6087005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : moisture * Norway spruce * precipitation * respiration * soil CO2 efflux Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  5. Respiration during sleep in Huntington's chorea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollen, E. L.; den Heijer, J. C.; Ponsioen, C.; Kramer, C.; van der Velde, E. A.; van Dijk, J. G.; Roos, R. A.; Kamphuisen, H. A.; Buruma, O. J.

    1988-01-01

    In view of recent reports on lower brainstem dysfunction in Huntington's chorea, we studied respiration during sleep in 12 patients with Huntington's chorea (HC) and in controls. There were no statistically significant differences between patients and controls with respect to apnea periods,

  6. THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL DAMAGE ON RESPIRATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The drops were meant to simulate handling, road and vehicle conditions that the tomatoes are subjected to from the areas of production to market outlets. Respiration, compositional ... The level of ripeness followed the reverse trend to that of chlorophyll as it was measured in terms of the attainment of red color. Decay was ...

  7. The Nucleus Retroambiguus Control of Respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramanian, Hari H.; Holstege, Gert

    2009-01-01

    The role of the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) in the context of respiration control has been subject of debate for considerable time. To solve this problem, we chemically (using D, L-homocysteic acid) stimulated the NRA in unanesthetized precollicularly decerebrated cats and studied the respiratory

  8. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4) Air...

  9. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic...

  10. Partitioning of ecosystem respiration in a beech forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brændholt, Andreas; Ibrom, Andreas; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg

    2018-01-01

    of Reco in a temperate beech forest at diel, seasonal and annual time scales. Reco was measured by eddy covariance while respiration rates from soil, tree stems and isolated coarse tree roots were measured bi-hourly by an automated closed-chamber system. Soil respiration (Rsoil) was measured in intact...... with the highest respiration rates around 13:00-15:00 CET for Rstem, and the highest respiration seen from 9:00–15:00 for Rroot. In contrast, Rsoil showed the lowest respiration during daytime with no clear difference in the diel pattern between the intact and trenched soil plots. Finally, we calculated annual......Terrestrial ecosystem respiration (Reco) represents a major component of the global carbon cycle. It consists of many sub-components, such as aboveground plant respiration and belowground root and microbial respiration, each of which may respond differently to abiotic factors, and thus to global...

  11. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic ...

  12. Cold season soil respiration in response to grazing and warming in the High Arctic Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strebel, Ditte; Elberling, Bo; Morgner, Elke

    2010-01-01

    of Arctic Goose Habitat: Impacts of Land Use, Conservation and Elevated Temperatures). New measurements of soil CO2 effluxes, temperatures and water contents were regularly made from July to November 2007. SOC stocks were quantified, and the reactivity and composition measured by basal soil respiration (BSR...... in significantly higher CO2 effluxes. Different grazing intensities had no significant effects on observed soil respiration, but BSR rates at the mesic site (13-23 mu g CO2 g soil-C-1 h-1) were highest with moderate grazing and lowest in the absence of grazing. A limited effect of grazing on microbial respiration......The influence of goose grazing intensity and open-topped chambers (OTCs) on near-surface quantities and qualities of soil organic carbon (SOC) was evaluated in wet and mesic ecosystems in Svalbard. This study followed up a field experiment carried out in 2003-05 (part of the project Fragility...

  13. [Soil heterotrophic respiration and its sensitivity to soil temperature and moisture in Liquidambar formosana and Pinus massoniana forests in hilly areas of southeast Hubei Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan-hua; Chen, Fang-qing; Wang, Yuan; Li, Jun-qing

    2011-03-01

    Field monitoring was conducted to study the annual dynamics of soil heterotrophic respiration and soil temperature and moisture in Liquidambar formosana and Pinus massoniana forests in hilly areas of southeast Hubei Province, China. At the same time, laboratory experiment was performed to study the heterotrophic respiration rate along soil profile, and the sensitivity of surface soil (0-5 cm) heterotrophic respiration to soil temperature and moisture. Then, a model was established to valuate the potential effects of warming change on the soil heterotrophic respiration in study area. In L. formosana and P. massoniana forests, the soil heterotrophic respiration rate in 0-5 cm layer was 2.39 and 2.62 times, and 2.01 and 2.94 times of that in 5-10 cm and 10-20 cm layers, respectively, illustrating that soil heterotrophic respiration mainly occurred in 0-5 cm surface layer. The temperature sensitivity factor (Q10) of soil heterotrophic respiration in 0-5 cm, 5-10 cm, and 10-20 cm layers was 2.10, 1.86, and 1.78 in L. formosana forest, and 1.86, 1.77, and 1.44 in P. massoniana forest, respectively. The relationship between surface soil heterotrophic respiration and temperature (T) well fitted exponential function R = alphaexp (beta3T), and that between surface soil heterotrophic respiration and moisture (W) well fitted quadratic function R = a+bW+cW2. Therefore, the relationship of surface soil heterotrophic respiration with soil temperature and moisture could be described by the model lnR = a+bW+cW2 +dT+eT2, which suggested that the response of soil heterotrophic respiration to soil moisture was depended on soil temperature, i.e., the sensitivity decreased with decreasing soil temperature. The calculation of the annual soil heterotrophic respiration rate in the two forests with the established model showed that the calculated respiration rate was a slightly higher in L. formosana forest but close to the measured one in P. massoniana forest, illustrating the applied

  14. Acceptable respiratory protection program and LASL respirator research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaggs, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    A short history is presented on the LASL Respiratory Protection Training Programs. Then a discussion is given on the major points of an acceptable respiratory protection program utilizing the points required by the Occupational, Safety, and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulation 29 CFR 1910.134. Contributions to respirator research are reviewed. Discussion is presented under the following section headings: program administration; respirator selection; respirator use; fitting and training; respirator maintenance; medical clearance and surveillance; special problems; program evaluation; and documentation (records).

  15. Contribution of root to soil respiration and carbon balance in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soil respiration varied from 2.5 to 11.9 g CO2 m-2 d-1 and from 1.5 to 9.3 g CO2 m-2 d-1, and the contribution of root respiration to total soil respiration from 38% to 76% and from 25% to 72% in Communities 1 and 2, respectively. During the growing season (May–September), soil respiration, shoot biomass, live root ...

  16. Acceptable respiratory protection program and LASL respirator research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    A short history is presented on the LASL Respiratory Protection Training Programs. Then a discussion is given on the major points of an acceptable respiratory protection program utilizing the points required by the Occupational, Safety, and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulation 29 CFR 1910.134. Contributions to respirator research are reviewed. Discussion is presented under the following section headings: program administration; respirator selection; respirator use; fitting and training; respirator maintenance; medical clearance and surveillance; special problems; program evaluation; and documentation

  17. Reactive transport modeling of an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) pilot to assess long-term water quality improvements and potential solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, E.A.; Stuijfzand, P.J.; van Breukelen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    This reactive transport modeling study presents a follow up to the mass balance-based identification and quantification of the main hydrogeochemical processes that occurred during an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) trial in an anoxic sandy aquifer (Herten, the Netherlands). Kinetic rate

  18. Psychometric properties and adaptation of the ASRS in a Spanish sample of patients with substance use disorders: Application of two IRT Rasch models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Fernandez-Calderon, Fermin; Carmona-Marquez, Jose; Chico-Garcia, Marilo; Velez-Moreno, Antonio; Perez-Gomez, Lorena

    2015-06-01

    The Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS; Kessler et al., 2005) is one of the most extensively used scales to detect attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults. The aim of this work is to analyze the psychometric properties of the 18 ASRS items in people with substance use disorders (SUDs). Furthermore, we aimed to (a) confirm or, if necessary, modify the dichotomization criteria of the items proposed by the authors, and (b) identify the most informative items for a screening version or, when applicable, confirm the use of the 6 items that comprise the initially proposed short version. The ASRS was completed for 170 patients with SUD at the Provincial Unit for Drug Dependence of Huelva, Spain, aged 16 to 78 years. Two Rasch models—the dichotomous Rasch model and the Rating Scale Model (RSM) for polytomous items—were used in the psychometric analysis. The ASRS items fitted the RSM adequately, but the locations of the items along the underlying construct led us to propose new criteria of dichotomization. After analyzing the information function of dichotomized items, we identified 6 items that should integrate a new screening scale. Our dichotomization proposal is different from the original one and takes into account the different weights of the items. The selected screening version showed better metric properties than the other analyzed versions. Future research should test our proposal by using external criteria and to obtain evidences for other populations, cultures, or patient profiles. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Slotting optimization of automated storage and retrieval system (AS/RS) for efficient delivery of parts in an assembly shop using genetic algorithm: A case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, L.; Guan, Z.; He, C.; Luo, D.; Saif, U.

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, the competitive pressure on manufacturing companies shifted them from mass production to mass customization to produce large variety of products. It is a great challenge for companies nowadays to produce customized mixed flow mode of production to meet customized demand on time. Due to large variety of products, the storage system to deliver variety of products to production lines influences on the timely production of variety of products, as investigated from by simulation study of an inefficient storage system of a real Company, in the current research. Therefore, current research proposed a slotting optimization model with mixed model sequence to assemble in consideration of the final flow lines to optimize whole automated storage and retrieval system (AS/RS) and distribution system in the case company. Current research is aimed to minimize vertical height of centre of gravity of AS/RS and total time spent for taking the materials out from the AS/RS simultaneously. Genetic algorithm is adopted to solve the proposed problem and computational result shows significant improvement in stability and efficiency of AS/RS as compared to the existing method used in the case company.

  20. Characterization of the Rheological and Swelling Properties of Synthetic Alkali Silicate Gels in Order to Predict Their Behavior in ASR Damaged Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayghan, Asghar Gholizadeh

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a major concrete durability concern that is responsible for the deterioration of concrete infrastructure in the world. The resultant of the reaction between the cement alkali hydroxides and the metastable silicates in the aggregates is a hygroscopic and expansive alkali-silicate gel (referred to as ASR gel in this document). The swelling behavior of ASR gels determines the extent of damage to concrete structures and, as such, mitigation of ASR relies on understanding these gels and finding ways to prevent them either from formation, or from swelling after formation. This dissertation focuses on the synthesis and characterization of ASR gels with wide ranges of compositions similar to what has been reported for the filed ASR gels in the literature. The experimental work consisted of three phases as follow. Phase I: Investigation of rheology, chemistry and physics of ASR gels produced through sol-method. Inspired from the existing literature, two sol-gel methods have been developed for the synthesis of ASR gels. The rheological (primarily gelation time, yield stress, and equilibrium stress), chemical (pore solution pH, pore solution composition, osmotic pressure, solid phase composition, stoichiometry of gelation reactions) and physical (evaporable water, solid content, etc.) properties of synthetic ASR gels have been extensively investigated in this phase. Ca/Si, Na/Si and K/Si, and water content were considered as the main chemical composition variables. In order to investigate the suppressing effects of lithium on the swelling properties of ASR gels, the gels were added with lithium in a part of the experimental program. The results strongly suggested that Ca/Si has a positive effect on the yield stress of the gels and their rate of gelation. Na/Si was found to have a decreasing effect on the yield stress and gelation rate (especially at low Ca/Si levels). K/Si and Li/Si had second-order (i.e., polynomial) effects on the yield

  1. Validity of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) as a screener for adult ADHD in treatment seeking substance use disorder patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Glind, Geurt; van den Brink, Wim; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Carpentier, Pieter-Jan; van Emmerik-van Oortmerssen, Katelijne; Kaye, Sharlene; Skutle, Arvid; Bu, Eli-Torild H.; Franck, Johan; Konstenius, Maija; Moggi, Franz; Dom, Geert; Verspreet, Sofie; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Kapitány-Fövény, Máté; Fatséas, Melina; Auriacombe, Marc; Schillinger, Arild; Seitz, Andrea; Johnson, Brian; Faraone, Stephen V.; Ramos-Quiroga, J. Antoni; Casas, Miguel; Allsop, Steve; Carruthers, Susan; Barta, Csaba; Schoevers, Robert A.; Levin, Frances R.

    2013-01-01

    To detect attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in treatment seeking substance use disorders (SUD) patients, a valid screening instrument is needed. To test the performance of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale V 1.1(ASRS) for adult ADHD in an international sample of treatment seeking SUD

  2. Validity of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) as a screener for adult ADHD in treatment seeking substance use disorder patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Glind, Geurt; van den Brink, Wim; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Carpentier, Pieter-Jan; van Emmerik-van Oortmerssen, Katelijne; Kaye, Sharlene; Skutle, Arvid; Bu, Eli-Torild H.; Franck, Johan; Konstenius, Maija; Moggi, Franz; Dom, Geert; Verspreet, Sofie; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Kapitany-Foeveny, Mate; Fatseas, Melina; Auriacombe, Marc; Schillinger, Arild; Seitz, Andrea; Johnson, Brian; Faraone, Stephen V.; Ramos-Quiroga, J. Antoni; Casas, Miguel; Allsop, Steve; Carruthers, Susan; Bartar, Csaba; Schoevers, Robert A.; Levin, Frances R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To detect attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in treatment seeking substance use disorders (SUD) patients, a valid screening instrument is needed. Objectives: To test the performance of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale V 1.1(ASRS) for adult ADHD in an international sample of

  3. Separating autotrophic respiration due to roots from soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil respiration is the largest component of ecosystem respiration but little is known about it and its components in parkland systems. We therefore conducted an experiment to estimate the amount of CO2 respired and to partition it into soil, tree root and crop root contributions in parkland systems in Burkina Faso.

  4. 21 CFR 892.1970 - Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. 892.1970... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1970 Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. (a) Identification. A radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer is a device intended to be used to...

  5. 20 CFR 718.303 - Death from a respirable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Death from a respirable disease. 718.303... from a respirable disease. (a)(1) If a deceased miner was employed for ten or more years in one or more coal mines and died from a respirable disease, there shall be a rebuttable presumption that his or her...

  6. 20 CFR 410.462 - Presumption relating to respirable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Presumption relating to respirable disease... Pneumoconiosis § 410.462 Presumption relating to respirable disease. (a) Even though the existence of... was employed for 10 years or more in the Nation's coal mines and died from a respirable disease, it...

  7. Redefinition and global estimation of basal ecosystem respiration rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, C.M.J.; Yuan, W.

    2011-01-01

    Basal ecosystem respiration rate (BR), the ecosystem respiration rate at a given temperature, is a common and important parameter in empirical models for quantifying ecosystem respiration (ER) globally. Numerous studies have indicated that BR varies in space. However, many empirical ER models still

  8. Induction by ethylene of cyanide-resistant respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomos, T.; Laties, G.G.

    1976-05-17

    Ethylene and cyanide induce an increase in respiration in a variety of plant tissues, whereas ethylene has no effect on tissues whose respiration is strongly inhibited by cyanide. It is suggested that the existence of a cyanide-insensitive electron transport path is a prerequisite for stimulation of respiration by ethylene.

  9. Aflatoxins produced by Aspergillus nomius ASR3, a pathogen isolated from the leaf-cutter ant Atta sexdens rubropilosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Afonso da Silva-Junior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Aspergillus spp. cause economic impacts due to aflatoxins production. Although the toxicity of aflatoxins is already known, little information about their ecological roles is available. Here we investigated the compounds produced by Aspergillus nomius ASR3 directly from a dead leaf-cutter queen ant Atta sexdens rubropilosa and the fungal axenic culture. Chemical analyses were carried out by high-resolution mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry techniques. Aflatoxins B1 and G1 were detected in both the axenic culture and in the dead leaf-cutter queen ant. The presence of these mycotoxins in the dead leaf-cutter queen ant suggests that these compounds can be related to the insect pathogenicity of A. nomius against A. sexdens rubropilosa.

  10. Validity of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) as a screener for adult ADHD in treatment seeking substance use disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Glind, Geurt; van den Brink, Wim; Koeter, Maarten W J; Carpentier, Pieter-Jan; van Emmerik-van Oortmerssen, Katelijne; Kaye, Sharlene; Skutle, Arvid; Bu, Eli-Torild H; Franck, Johan; Konstenius, Maija; Moggi, Franz; Dom, Geert; Verspreet, Sofie; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Kapitány-Fövény, Máté; Fatséas, Melina; Auriacombe, Marc; Schillinger, Arild; Seitz, Andrea; Johnson, Brian; Faraone, Stephen V; Ramos-Quiroga, J Antoni; Casas, Miguel; Allsop, Steve; Carruthers, Susan; Barta, Csaba; Schoevers, Robert A; Levin, Frances R

    2013-10-01

    To detect attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in treatment seeking substance use disorders (SUD) patients, a valid screening instrument is needed. To test the performance of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale V 1.1(ASRS) for adult ADHD in an international sample of treatment seeking SUD patients for DSM-IV-TR; for the proposed DSM-5 criteria; in different subpopulations, at intake and 1-2 weeks after intake; using different scoring algorithms; and different externalizing disorders as external criterion (including adult ADHD, bipolar disorder, antisocial and borderline personality disorder). In 1138 treatment seeking SUD subjects, ASRS performance was determined using diagnoses based on Conner's Adult ADHD Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV (CAADID) as gold standard. The prevalence of adult ADHD was 13.0% (95% CI: 11.0-15.0%). The overall positive predictive value (PPV) of the ASRS was 0.26 (95% CI: 0.22-0.30), the negative predictive value (NPV) was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.96-0.98). The sensitivity (0.84, 95% CI: 0.76-0.88) and specificity (0.66, 95% CI: 0.63-0.69) measured at admission were similar to the sensitivity (0.88, 95% CI: 0.83-0.93) and specificity (0.67, 95% CI: 0.64-0.70) measured 2 weeks after admission. Sensitivity was similar, but specificity was significantly better in patients with alcohol compared to (illicit) drugs as the primary substance of abuse (0.76 vs. 0.56). ASRS was not a good screener for externalizing disorders other than ADHD. The ASRS is a sensitive screener for identifying possible ADHD cases with very few missed cases among those screening negative in this population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Löscher, Carolin; Schunck, Harald; Desai, Dhwani K; Hauss, Helena; Kiko, Rainer; Holtappels, Moritz; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz, Ruth A; Graco, Michelle I; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100%) in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein.

  12. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Kalvelage

    Full Text Available Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100% in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein.

  13. Epidemiologic study of patients with DVT in Birjand Vali-e-asr hospital- (2009-2014: Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toba Kazemi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT is a condition that, in case of delay in diagnosis and treatment, can lead to serious complications like pulmonary embolism. Given the importance of assessment and identification of diseases in every community, the current study aimed at assessing the epidemiology of DVT patients in Birjand. Materials and Methods: The present descriptive-analytical study was conducted on all DVT patients admitted to Birjand Vali-e-asr hospital between 2009 and 2014. A trained medical student completed each researcher-designed questionnaire. based on an intern’s history recording, a physician's orders ,and a nurse’s note. Then, the patients were called up demanding the status of the patient and disease complications, readmission ,or death. Finally, the obtained data was encoded and analyzed by SPSS(V: 18 at the significant level P<0.05. Results: During the study period,263 patients with DVThad been hospitalized in Birjand Vali-e-asr hospital .Out of the patients, 50.2% were males. Mean age of the subjects was 55.84 ± 18.45 years. In 98.1% of the cases the lower extremity was involved. The most prevalent risk factor was immobilization and the least risk factor was family history of DVT. Regarding the relationship between DVT risk factors and sex only smoking cigarettes was both significant and more prevalent. During 5 years, 3.8% of the population had died due to DVT complications. Recurrent DVT in 6% and pulmonary emboli in 3.4% of the patients were diagnosed. Conclusion: Given that the most common risk factor for DVT in our study was immobilization, prophylaxis is necessary in patients at high risk tin order to decrease occurrence possibility of DVT.

  14. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Or Sperling

    Full Text Available Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0 °C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq. cm(-3 yr(-1 on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics.

  15. Did Respiration or Photosynthesis Come First

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    The similarity of the mechanisms in photosynthetic and in oxidative phosphorylation suggests a common origin ( convers ion hypothesis). It is proposed that an early form of electron flow with oxidative phosphorylation ( p rerespiration ) , to terminal electron acceptors available in a reducing biosphere, was supplemented by a photocatalyst capable of a redox reaction. In this way, cyclic photophosphorylation arose. Further stages in evolution were reverse electron flow powered by ATP, to make NADH as a reductant for CO2 , and subsequently noncyclic electron flow. These processes concomitantly provided the oxidants indispensable for full development of oxidative phosphorylation, i.e. for normal respiration: sulphate, O2 and with participation of the nitrificants, nitrite and nitrate. Thus, prerespiration preceded photosynthesis, and this preceded respiration. It is also suggested that nonredox photoprocesses of the Halobacterium type are not part of the mainstream of bioenergetic evolution. They do not lead to photoprocesses with electron flow. (author)

  16. Mitochondrial respiration in hummingbird flight muscles.

    OpenAIRE

    Suarez, R K; Lighton, J R; Brown, G S; Mathieu-Costello, O

    1991-01-01

    Respiration rates of muscle mitochondria in flying hummingbirds range from 7 to 10 ml of O2 per cm3 of mitochondria per min, which is about 2 times higher than the range obtained in the locomotory muscles of mammals running at their maximum aerobic capacities (VO2max). Capillary volume density is higher in hummingbird flight muscles than in mammalian skeletal muscles. Mitochondria occupy approximately 35% of fiber volume in hummingbird flight muscles and cluster beneath the sarcolemmal membra...

  17. An optical measurement method for the simultaneous assessment of respiration and heart rates in preterm infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionni, P.; Scalise, L.; Ercoli, I.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2013-12-01

    Many conventional medical monitoring devices, while not technically invasive, are nevertheless obtrusive insofar as they require contact with the patient. This obtrusiveness sometimes poses problems in daily clinical practice. The need for contact with electrodes or transducers is particularly relevant in the case of patients recovering in intensive care units where continuous monitoring is required, in turn requiring continuous direct transducer contact for prolonged periods. Among the many physiological parameters commonly acquired, the respiratory and the cardiac rates of the patients are of primary importance. Typically these two parameters are measured respectively using spirometry and electrocardiography (ECG), both involving obtrusive measurement systems requiring contact with the patient with an air conduit and electrodes. This paper presents an optical measurement method for the simultaneous assessment of respiration and heart rates based on the measurement of the chest wall movements, associated with inspiratory/expiratory activities of the lungs and by the mechanical pumping action of the heart. The measurement method has been adapted for use with preterm infants and it has been applied to 55 patients recovering in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The method is based on the use of a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDVi) pointed at the left, ventral thoracic surface of the patient. LDVi-based measures of respiration and heart rate have been simultaneously acquired for each patient, in parallel with the same quantities acquired using conventional reference instrumentation (flow-meter and ECG) for comparison purposes. Results show that for respiration rate, differences with respect to the spirometer data are instrument, the simultaneous measurement of respiration and heart rates, thus reducing the burden of the number of electrodes, transducers, and other instrumentation that must be applied to the patient—a consideration that is particularly important in the

  18. Moisture Controls on Soil Respiration Sources in a Pine Forest on Santa Cruz Island, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, M. S.; Ambrose, A.; Boot, C. M.; Dawson, T. E.; Schaeffer, S. M.; Schimel, J.; Still, C. J.; Williams, P.

    2009-12-01

    This presentation will include results from a study in a coastal pine forest/chaparral ecosystem on Santa Cruz Island, California characterized by a Mediterranean type climate. However, in this coastal ecosystem, fog and low-level clouds enhance summertime moisture availability through shading and fog-drip. Thus, the summer has many small fog-drip events, while the winter has fewer, larger rain events. Not surprisingly, moisture and moisture pulses drive carbon fluxes and dynamics in this ecosystem. We used automated measurements of soil respiration, soil pore space CO2 profiles, pine sap flux, as well as targeted measurements of soil nutrient/microbial dynamics, radiocarbon soil respiration source partitioning, and manipulations of water to assess how moisture/moisture pulses influence ecosystem metabolism over diel, episodic (moisture pulse), and seasonal time scales. On the diel time scale, the fraction of soil respiration from autotrophic sources was generally greater during the day than at night. Seasonally, changes in soil respiration fluxes were largely determined by variation in autotrophic respiration, with autotrophic rates more than doubling in the winter versus summer. Pine sap flux responded to winter rain events but not to summer fog-drip, suggesting that summer fog-water inputs are insufficient to significantly affect belowground pine activity. In contrast, summertime fog-drip and cloud shading enhanced soil respiration primarily through microbial decomposition, by reducing microbial drought stress in surface soil/litter. Finally, moisture manipulations in the laboratory showed more soil carbon released following one large pulse (rain event) versus multiple smaller pulses (fog events) of moisture.

  19. Evaluation of treatment options for ASR-affected concrete : final report, December 11, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-11

    This research project was undertaken to evaluate the potential of using surface treatments including lithium nitrate, : sodium tartarate, siloxanes, silane, and boiled linseed oil to mitigate or slow the rate of concrete deterioration : associated wi...

  20. Soil respiration and photosynthetic uptake of carbon dioxide by ground-cover plants in four ages of jack pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegl, Robert G.; Wickland, K.P.

    2001-01-01

    Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emission (soil respiration), net CO2 exchange after photosynthetic uptake by ground-cover plants, and soil CO2 concentration versus depth below land surface were measured at four ages of jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) forest in central Saskatchewan. Soil respiration was smallest at a clear-cut site, largest in an 8-year-old stand, and decreased with stand age in 20-year-old and mature (60-75 years old) stands during May-September 1994 (12.1, 34.6, 31.5, and 24.9 mol C??m-2, respectively). Simulations of soil respiration at each stand based on continuously recorded soil temperature were within one standard deviation of measured flux for 48 of 52 measurement periods, but were 10%-30% less than linear interpolations of measured flux for the season. This was probably due to decreased soil respiration at night modeled by the temperature-flux relationships, but not documented by daytime chamber measurements. CO2 uptake by ground-cover plants ranged from 0 at the clear-cut site to 29, 25, and 9% of total growing season soil respiration at the 8-year, 20-year, and mature stands. CO2 concentrations were as great as 7150 ppmv in the upper 1 m of unsaturated zone and were proportional to measured soil respiration.

  1. Estimation of global soil respiration by accounting for land-use changes derived from remote sensing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Minaco; Ito, Akihiko; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Takeuchi, Wataru

    2017-09-15

    Soil respiration is one of the largest carbon fluxes from terrestrial ecosystems. Estimating global soil respiration is difficult because of its high spatiotemporal variability and sensitivity to land-use change. Satellite monitoring provides useful data for estimating the global carbon budget, but few studies have estimated global soil respiration using satellite data. We provide preliminary insights into the estimation of global soil respiration in 2001 and 2009 using empirically derived soil temperature equations for 17 ecosystems obtained by field studies, as well as MODIS climate data and land-use maps at a 4-km resolution. The daytime surface temperature from winter to early summer based on the MODIS data tended to be higher than the field-observed soil temperatures in subarctic and temperate ecosystems. The estimated global soil respiration was 94.8 and 93.8 Pg C yr -1 in 2001 and 2009, respectively. However, the MODIS land-use maps had insufficient spatial resolution to evaluate the effect of land-use change on soil respiration. The spatial variation of soil respiration (Q 10 ) values was higher but its spatial variation was lower in high-latitude areas than in other areas. However, Q 10 in tropical areas was more variable and was not accurately estimated (the values were >7.5 or soil respiration in tropical ecosystems. To solve these problems, it will be necessary to validate our results using a combination of remote sensing data at higher spatial resolution and field observations for many different ecosystems, and it will be necessary to account for the effects of more soil factors in the predictive equations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Natural Arsenic in the Miocene Hawthorn Group, Florida: Wide Ranging Implications for ASR, Phosphate Mining, Private Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareva, O. V.; Pichler, T.

    2004-12-01

    organic material, clays, and iron oxides contain lower As concentrations contrasted to pyrite; (5) Pyrite occurs in framboidal and euhedral forms. Because phosphorous, arsenic and sulfur are chemically closely related, they often occur together in nature, thus posing a potential problem for the phosphate industry. There have been several occurrences of swine fatalities due to arsenic poisoning as a result of phosphate feed supplements. Information about the concentration, distribution and mineralogical association of naturally occurring As is important, because this is a first step to forecast its behavior during anthropogenic induced physico-chemical changes in the aquifer. Recently, aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) facilities in central Florida reported As concentrations in excess of 100 μ g/L in recovered water. The ASR storage zone is the Suwannee Limestone, which directly underlies the Hawthorn sediments. It is crucial to the future of ASR in this area to understand the source and distribution of arsenic in the overlying Hawthorn Group and the cycling of arsenic in the Florida platform.

  3. Introgression of the SbASR-1 Gene Cloned from a Halophyte Salicornia brachiata Enhances Salinity and Drought Endurance in Transgenic Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) and Acts as a Transcription Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivekanand; Chaturvedi, Amit Kumar; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-01-01

    The SbASR-1 gene, cloned from a halophyte Salicornia brachiata, encodes a plant-specific hydrophilic and stress responsive protein. The genome of S. brachiata has two paralogs of the SbASR-1 gene (2549 bp), which is comprised of a single intron of 1611 bp, the largest intron of the  abscisic acid stress ripening [ASR] gene family yet reported. In silico analysis of the 843-bp putative promoter revealed the presence of ABA, biotic stress, dehydration, phytohormone, salinity, and sugar responsive cis-regulatory motifs. The SbASR-1 protein belongs to Group 7 LEA protein family with different amino acid composition compared to their glycophytic homologs. Bipartite Nuclear Localization Signal (NLS) was found on the C-terminal end of protein and localization study confirmed that SbASR-1 is a nuclear protein. Furthermore, transgenic groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) plants over-expressing the SbASR-1 gene constitutively showed enhanced salinity and drought stress tolerance in the T1 generation. Leaves of transgenic lines exhibited higher chlorophyll and relative water contents and lower electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde content, proline, sugars, and starch accumulation under stress treatments than wild-type (Wt) plants. Also, lower accumulation of H2O2 and O2.- radicals was detected in transgenic lines compared to Wt plants under stress conditions. Transcript expression of APX (ascorbate peroxidase) and CAT (catalase) genes were higher in Wt plants, whereas the SOD (superoxide dismutase) transcripts were higher in transgenic lines under stress. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) confirmed that the SbASR-1 protein binds at the consensus sequence (C/G/A)(G/T)CC(C/G)(C/G/A)(A/T). Based on results of the present study, it may be concluded that SbASR-1 enhances the salinity and drought stress tolerance in transgenic groundnut by functioning as a LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) protein and a transcription factor. PMID:26158616

  4. The Strengthening of an ASR-Affected Water Intake Tower in a Hydro-Electric Dam by Using Post-tensioned Tendons and the Long-term Monitoring of the Tower

    OpenAIRE

    Torii, Kazuyuki; Sannoh, Chikao; Kanitani, Maki

    2016-01-01

    In the Hokuriku district in Japan, large numbers of concrete structures have been suffering from damage caused by alkali silica reaction (ASR). Some huge volcanoes are located within this district, and the headwaters of main rivers prompt the outflow and spreading of volcanic rocks such as andesite, rhyolite and tuff stones, which are the main volcanic reactive stones causing the serious damage of ASR in the entire area. To solve this problem effective countermeasures such as repair and stren...

  5. Development and Commercialization of Analyte Specific Reagents (ASRs )for the Diagnosis of Selected Arthropod-Borne Viruses on FDA-Cleared Real-time PCR Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    arbovirus pathogens: Dengue , Rift Valley Fever , Chikungunya, Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever , Sand Fly Fever , and Tick-Borne Encephalitis viruses. The...Specific Reagents (ASRs). The designated pathogens are Dengue fever (DEN), Rift Valley Fever (RVF), Chikungunya (CHIK), Crimean- Congo Hemorrhagic Fever ...synthetic targets) for the assays. Work product in Phase II included: (1) design and synthesis of a synthetic target representing all four Dengue

  6. Tillage Effects on Soil Properties & Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Teodor; Bogdan, Ileana; Moraru, Paula; Pop, Adrian; Duda, Bogdan; Cacovean, Horea; Coste, Camelia

    2015-04-01

    Soil tillage systems can be able to influence soil compaction, water dynamics, soil temperature and soil structural condition. These processes can be expressed as changes of soil microbiological activity, soil respiration and sustainability of agriculture. Objectives of this study were: 1) to assess the effects of tillage systems (Conventional System-CS, Minimum Tillage-MT, No-Tillage-NT) on soil compaction, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration and 2) to establish the relationship that exists in changing soil properties. Three treatments were installed: CS-plough + disc; MT-paraplow + rotary grape; NT-direct sowing. The study was conducted on an Argic-Stagnic Faeoziom. The MT and NT applications reduce or completely eliminate the soil mobilization, due to this, soil is compacted in the first year of application. The degree of compaction is directly related to soil type and its state of degradation. The state of soil compaction diminished over time, tending toward a specific type of soil density. Soil moisture was higher in NT and MT at the time of sowing and in the early stages of vegetation and differences diminished over time. Moisture determinations showed statistically significant differences. The MT and NT applications reduced the thermal amplitude in the first 15 cm of soil depth and increased the soil temperature by 0.5-2.20C. The determinations confirm the effect of soil tillage system on soil respiration; the daily average was lower at NT (315-1914 mmoli m-2s-1) and followed by MT (318-2395 mmoli m-2s-1) and is higher in the CS (321-2480 mmol m-2s-1). Comparing with CS, all the two conservation tillage measures decreased soil respiration, with the best effects of no-tillage. An exceeding amount of CO2 produced in the soil and released into the atmosphere, resulting from aerobic processes of mineralization of organic matter (excessive loosening) is considered to be not only a way of increasing the CO2 in the atmosphere, but also a loss of

  7. Real-time Modification of Music with Dancer's Respiration Pattern

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jeong-seob; Yeo, Woon Seung

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to improve the correspondence between music and dance, and explores the use of human respiration pattern for musical applications with focus on the motional aspect of breathing. While respiration is frequently considered as an indicator of the metabolic state of human body that contains meaningful information for medicine or psychology, motional aspect of respiration has been relatively unnoticed in spite of its strong correlation with muscles and the brain. This paper intr...

  8. Performance of mechanical filters and respirators for capturing nanoparticles--limitations and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofi, Reza; Wang, Bei; Haghighat, Fariborz; Bahloul, Ali; Jaime, Lara

    2010-01-01

    There is an increasing concern about the health hazard posed to workers exposed to inhalation of nanoparticles. Inhaling nanoparticles possess an occupational hazard due to elevated amount emitted to the atmosphere and working environment. Nanoparticles have potential toxic properties: the high particle surface area, number concentration, and surface reactivity. Inhalation, the most common route of nanoparticle exposure, has been shown to cause adverse effects on pulmonary functions and the deposited particles in the lung can be translocated to the blood system by passing through the pulmonary protection barriers. Filtration is the simplest and most common method of aerosol control. It is widely used in mechanical ventilation and respiratory protection. However, concerns have been raised regarding the effectiveness of the filters for capturing nanoparticles. This paper reviews the literature on the filtration performance of mechanical filters and respirators against nanoparticles. It includes the discussion about filtration mechanisms, theoretical models, affecting factors of the filtration efficiency, and testing protocols for respirator and filter certification.

  9. Long-Term Vibration Monitoring of the Effects of Temperature and Humidity on PC Girders with and without Fly Ash considering ASR Deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan Minh Ha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural responses have been used as inputs in the evaluation procedures of civil structures for years. Apart from the degradation of a structure itself, changes in the environmental conditions affect its characteristics. For adequate maintenance, it is necessary to quantify the environment-induced changes and discriminate them from the effects due to damage. This study investigates the variation in the vibration responses of prestressed concrete (PC girders, which were deteriorated because of the alkali–silica reaction (ASR, concerning ambient temperature and humidity. Three PC girders were exposed to outdoor weather conditions outside the laboratory, one of which had a selected amount of fly ash in its mixture to mitigate the ASR. The girders were periodically vibration tested for one and a half years. It was found that when the temperature and humidity increased, the frequencies and damping ratios decreased in proportion. No apparent variation in the mode shapes could be identified. A finite element model was proposed for numerical verification, the results of which were in good agreement with the measured changes in the natural frequencies. Moreover, the different dynamic performances of the three specimens indicated that the fly ash significantly affected the vibrations of the PC girders under ASR deterioration.

  10. [Validation of the Spanish version of the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder adult screening scale (ASRS v. 1.1): a novel scoring strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Quiroga, J A; Daigre, C; Valero, S; Bosch, R; Gómez-Barros, N; Nogueira, M; Palomar, G; Roncero, C; Casas, M

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder in the adulthood. It's diagnosis is a complex process in which a screening tool can be useful. To analyze the six-question Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS v. 1.1) validity in an outpatient clinical context. We performed a case-control study, involving 90 patients with ADHD and 90 controls without ADHD. They were outpatient treated in a program for adults ADHD in a hospital. The clinical disorder diagnosis was measured by the Conners Adult ADHD Diagnostic Interview. We analyzed the test accuracy for different ways to score and cut-offs. We found the best psychometric characteristics of ASRS v. 1.1 using a quantitative ranking between 0 and 24 points, setting as cut-off 12 points. We observed a sensitivity of 96.7%, specificity 91.1%, positive predictive value 91.6% negative predictive value 96.5%, kappa index 0.88 and area under the curve 0.94 (odds ratio = 297.3; 95% confidence interval = 76.2-1,159). The ASRS is a valid and useful tool for the adult ADHD screening in the clinical context.

  11. [The development of a respiration and temperature monitor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X; Wu, B; Liu, Y; He, Q; Xiao, J

    2001-12-01

    This paper introduces the design of a monitoring system to measure the respiration and temperature of a body with an 8Xc196 single-chip microcomputer. This system can measure and display the respiration wave, respiration frequency and the body temperature in real-time with a liquid crystal display (LCD) and give an alarm when the parameters are beyond the normal scope. In addition, this device can provide a 24 hours trend graph of the respiration frequency and the body temperature parameters measured. Data can also be exchanged through serial communication interfaces (RS232) between the PC and the monitor.

  12. Respirator studies for the ERDA Division of Safety, Standards, and Compliance. Progress report, July 1, 1974--June 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, D.D.; Hack, A.L.; Davis, T.O.; Shafer, C.; Moore, T.O.; Richards, C.P.; Revoir, W.H.

    1976-08-01

    Major accomplishments during FY 1975 were the initiation of a respirator research program to investigate the physiological effects of wearing a respirator under stress, assisting ERDA contractors by providing information and training concerning respirator programs, quality assurance of respirators, and respirator applications. A newsletter of respirator developments for ERDA contractor personnel was published, and a Respirator Symposium was conducted

  13. Evaluation of Drug Resistance Pattern of Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Fasa Vali-e-Asr Hospital Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Abdollahi Kheirabadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Antibiotic resistance due to the widespread use of antibiotics is one of the major causes of failure in antibiotic treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the rates of antibiotic resistance among Escherichia coli isolates from Fasa Vali-e-Asr Hospital patients.   Materials & Methods : In total, 234 isolates of Escherichia coli strains, obtained from inpatients and outpatients, were studied. The identity of the isolated strains was confirmed by bacteriologic methods. T he drug sensitivity definition test to 17 antibiotics was done via the disk diffusion antibiogram method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the resistant isolates to Ciprofloxacin and Imipenem was measured using the s erial dilution method according to the CLSI standards.   Results : The resistance rates of the isolates to Ciprofloxacin and Imipenem by disk diffusion antibiogram method were 22.65% and 11.11% and by serial dilution method were 19.66 % and 9.4% of all the isolates, respectively.   Conclusion: These results show higher resistance of Escherichia coli to Ciprofloxacin and Imipenem as compared to the results in previous studies. Further investigation will shed light on how to more effectively battle antibiotic resistance of virulent microorganisms.

  14. Soil respiration dynamics in the middle taiga of Central Siberia region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhnykina, Anastasia; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Polosukhina, Daria

    2017-04-01

    A large amount of carbon in soil is released to the atmosphere through soil respiration, which is the main pathway of transferring carbon from terrestrial ecosystems (Comstedt et al., 2011). Considering that boreal forests is a large terrestrial sink (Tans et al., 1990) and represent approximately 11 % of the Earth's total land area (Gower et al., 2001), even a small change in soil respiration could significantly intensify - or mitigate - current atmospheric increases of CO2, with potential feedbacks to climate change. The objectives of the present study are: (a) to study the dynamic of CO2 emission from the soil surface during summer season (from May to October); (b) to identify the reaction of soil respiration to different amount of precipitation as the main limiting factor in the region. The research was located in the pine forests in Central Siberia (60°N, 90°E), Russia. Sample plots were represented by the lichen pine forest, moss pine forest, mixed forest and anthropogenic destroyed area. We used the automated soil CO2 flux system based on the infrared gas analyzer -LI-8100 for measuring the soil efflux. Soil temperature was measured with Soil Temperature Probe Type E in three depths -5, 10, 15 cm. Volumetric soil moisture was measured with Theta Probe Model ML2. The presence and type of ground cover substantially affects the value of soil respiration fluxes. The carbon dioxide emission from the soil surface averaged 5.4 ±2.3 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. The destroyed area without plant cover demonstrated the lowest soil respiration (0.1-5.6 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1). The lowest soil respiration among forested areas was observed in the feathermoss pine forest. The lichen pine forest was characterized by the intermediate values of soil respiration. The maximum soil respiration values and seasonal fluctuations were obtained in the mixed forest (2.3-29.3 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1). The analysis of relation between soil CO2 efflux and climatic conditions identified the parameters with

  15. Permafrost collapse alters soil carbon stocks, respiration, CH4 , and N2O in upland tundra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Benjamin W; Jones, Jeremy B

    2015-12-01

    Release of greenhouse gases from thawing permafrost is potentially the largest terrestrial feedback to climate change and one of the most likely to occur; however, estimates of its strength vary by a factor of thirty. Some of this uncertainty stems from abrupt thaw processes known as thermokarst (permafrost collapse due to ground ice melt), which alter controls on carbon and nitrogen cycling and expose organic matter from meters below the surface. Thermokarst may affect 20-50% of tundra uplands by the end of the century; however, little is known about the effect of different thermokarst morphologies on carbon and nitrogen release. We measured soil organic matter displacement, ecosystem respiration, and soil gas concentrations at 26 upland thermokarst features on the North Slope of Alaska. Features included the three most common upland thermokarst morphologies: active-layer detachment slides, thermo-erosion gullies, and retrogressive thaw slumps. We found that thermokarst morphology interacted with landscape parameters to determine both the initial displacement of organic matter and subsequent carbon and nitrogen cycling. The large proportion of ecosystem carbon exported off-site by slumps and slides resulted in decreased ecosystem respiration postfailure, while gullies removed a smaller portion of ecosystem carbon but strongly increased respiration and N2 O concentration. Elevated N2 O in gully soils persisted through most of the growing season, indicating sustained nitrification and denitrification in disturbed soils, representing a potential noncarbon permafrost climate feedback. While upland thermokarst formation did not substantially alter redox conditions within features, it redistributed organic matter into both oxic and anoxic environments. Across morphologies, residual organic matter cover, and predisturbance respiration explained 83% of the variation in respiration response. Consistent differences between upland thermokarst types may contribute to the

  16. The external respiration and gas exchange in space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, V. M.; Tikhonov, M. A.; Kotov, A. N.

    both and its individual systems including an external respiration function. In this case, it should be remembered that the external respiration system has some physiological and morphological properties due to which the body systems are particularly subjected to environmental effects. Thus, according to figurative comparison by Evald Veible a contact area of the lungs with an external environment i.e. an alveolar surface is large and equaled approximately to tennis-court size, as the alveolocapillary membrane thickness is negligible and amounts to one fiftieth of a writing-paper sheet [1]. From this it follows that such a fine and highly organized structure must be extremely dependent upon any external exposures including gravitational ones since from the physical viewpoint of physics the lungs represent a quasiconical three-dimensional elastic body suspended in the thoracic cavity and in which there occur the gravity-induced internal tensions incrementing in a base-to-apices direction. As a result of these tensions, in the lungs various physical gradients: hydrostatic, pleural and transpulmonary pressures, pulmonary time constant, vertical gradient of the volume and structure of alveoli, etc. are developed.

  17. The agony of agonal respiration: is the last gasp necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkin, R M; Resnik, D B

    2002-06-01

    Gasping respiration in the dying patient is the last respiratory pattern prior to terminal apnoea. The duration of the gasping respiration phase varies; it may be as brief as one or two breaths to a prolonged period of gasping lasting minutes or even hours. Gasping respiration is very abnormal, easy to recognise and distinguish from other respiratory patterns and, in the dying patient who has elected to not be resuscitated, will always result in terminal apnoea. Gasping respiration is also referred to as agonal respiration and the name is appropriate because the gasping breaths appear uncomfortable and raise concern that the patient is suffering and in agony. Enough uncertainty exists about the influence of gasping respiration on patient wellbeing, that it is appropriate to assume that the gasping breaths are burdensome to patients. Therefore, gasping respiration at the end of life should be treated. We propose that there is an ethical basis, in rare circumstances, for the use of neuromuscular blockade to suppress prolonged episodes of agonal respiration in the well-sedated patient in order to allow a peaceful and comfortable death.

  18. Contribution of root to soil respiration and carbon balance in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    Global soil respiration is estimated to be 76.5 Pg C yr-1, which is 30–60 Pg C yr-1 greater than the net primary productivity. (NPP) (Raich and Potter 1995). Therefore, soil respiration is a major pathway for carbon to move from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere and even small changes can strongly influence net ...

  19. Soil Respiration and Student Inquiry: A Perfect Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Catherine Marie; Wallenstein, Matthew David

    2011-01-01

    This activity explores the cycling of carbon between the atmosphere (primarily as CO[subscript 2]) and biomass in plants, animals, and microscopic organisms. Students design soil respiration experiments using a protocol that resembles current practice in soil ecology. Three methods for measuring soil respiration are presented. Student-derived…

  20. Simulation of Human Respiration with Breathing Thermal Manikin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Erik

    The human respiration contains carbon dioxide, bioeffluents, and perhaps virus or bacteria. People may also indulge in activities that produce contaminants, as for example tobacco smoking. For these reasons, the human respiration remains one of the main contributors to contamination of the indoor...

  1. respiration and transpiration characteristics of selected fresh fruits

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    Respiration and transpiration characteristics of mushrooms, strawberries, broccoli and tomatoes were determined under different temperature, atmospheric and humidity conditions in order to get information for modified humidity atmosphere conception. The respiration rate was determined using a static method. (scanning ...

  2. Respiration and transpiration characteristics of selected fresh fruits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Respiration and transpiration characteristics of mushrooms, strawberries, broccoli and tomatoes were determined under different temperature, atmospheric and humidity conditions in order to get information for modified humidity atmosphere conception. The respiration rate was determined using a static method (scanning ...

  3. Determination of radon gas and respirable ore dust concentrations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study has estimated the concentrations of radon gas and respirable ore dust in the Merelani underground tanzanite mines. Two different portable monitors were used to measure the radon gas and respirable ore dust concentrations respectively. The mean radon gas concentration (disintegrations per second per cubic ...

  4. Respirators: Air Purifying, Self-Study, Course 40723

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-21

    Respirators: Air Purifying Self-Study (COURSE 40723) is designed for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) workers, support services subcontractors, and other LANL subcontractors who work under the LANL Respiratory Protection Program (RPP). This course also meets the air-purifying respirators (APRs) retraining requirement.

  5. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except as provided in...) Containers for gas masks combinations shall be designed and constructed to permit easy removal of the mask. ...

  6. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general... gas mask 70 85 20 Chin-style gas mask 65 80 20 Powered air-purifying 2 2 50 2 70 20 Chemical Cartridge...

  7. CO(2) Inhibits Respiration in Leaves of Rumex crispus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, J S; Koch, G W; Bloom, A J

    1992-02-01

    Curly dock (Rumex crispus L.) was grown from seed in a glasshouse at an ambient CO(2) partial pressure of about 35 pascals. Apparent respiration rate (CO(2) efflux in the dark) of expanded leaves was then measured at ambient CO(2) partial pressure of 5 to 95 pascals. Calculated intercellular CO(2) partial pressure was proportional to ambient CO(2) partial pressure in these short-term experiments. The CO(2) level strongly affected apparent respiration rate: a doubling of the partial pressure of CO(2) typically inhibited respiration by 25 to 30%, whereas a decrease in CO(2) elicited a corresponding increase in respiration. These responses were readily reversible. A flexible, sensitive regulatory interaction between CO(2) (a byproduct of respiration) and some component(s) of heterotrophic metabolism is indicated.

  8. A Global Database of Soil Respiration Data, Version 2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides an updated soil respiration database (SRDB), a near-universal compendium of published soil respiration (RS) data. Soil respiration,...

  9. A Global Database of Soil Respiration Data, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides a soil respiration data database (SRDB), a near-universal compendium of published soil respiration (RS) data. Soil respiration, the...

  10. Measurements of photosynthesis and respiration in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Stephen

    2003-03-01

    Methods for measuring the rates of photosynthesis and respiration in plants are reviewed. Closed systems that involve manometric techniques, 14CO2 fixation, O2 electrodes and other methods for measuring dissolved and gas phase O2 are described. These methods typically provide time-integrated rate measurements, and limitations to their use are discussed. Open gas exchange systems that use infra-red CO2 gas analysers and differential O2 analysers for measuring instantaneous rates of CO2 and O2 exchange are described. Important features of the analysers, design features of gas exchange systems, and sources of potential error are considered. The analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters for estimating the quantum yield for O2 evolution and CO2 fixation is described in relation to new fluorescence imaging systems for large scale screening of photosynthetic phenotypes, and the microimaging of individual chloroplasts.

  11. Management effects on European cropland respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugster, Werner; Moffat, Antje M.; Ceschia, Eric

    2010-01-01

    findings are based on all available CarboEurope IP eddy covariance flux measurements during a 4-year period (2004–2007). Detailed management information was available for 15 out of the 22 sites that contributed flux data, from which we compiled 30 types of management for European-scale comparison...... +83% (early season tillage) to -50% (rice paddy flooding and burning of rice residues) on the 28 days time scale,whenonlymanagementtypes with aminimumof 7 replications are considered. Most management types showed a large variationamongevents and between sites, indicating that additional factors other...... management types with adequate statistical coverage of at least 5 events during the years 2004–2007. In this comparison, late-season moldboard ploughing (30–45 cm) led to highest median increase in respiration on the 7 days timescale (+43%), which was still +15% in the 28 days comparison. On average, however...

  12. Evaluation of respiration in compost landfill biocovers intended for methane oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Pedicone, Alessio; Pedersen, Gitte Bukh

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost alternative approach to reduce landfill gas (LFG) emissions is to integrate compost into the landfill cover design in order to establish a biocover that is optimized for biological oxidation of methane (CH4). A laboratory and field investigation was performed to quantify respiration...... in an experimental compost biocover in terms of oxygen (O2) consumption and carbon dioxide (CO2) production and emission rates. O2 consumption and CO2 production rates were measured in batch and column experiments containing compost sampled from a landfill biowindow at Fakse landfill in Denmark. Column gas...... the compost layer, and CO2 concentrations exceeded 20% at a depth of 40cm below the surface of the biowindow. Overall, the results showed that respiration of compost material placed in biowindows might generate significant CO2 emissions. In landfill compost covers, methanotrophs carrying out CH4 oxidation...

  13. Workplace Breathing Rates: Defining Anticipated Values and Ranges for Respirator Certification Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caretti, David M; Gardner, Paul D; Coyne, Karen M

    2004-01-01

    .... For air-purifying respirators (APRs), the primary performance tests most affected by airflow rate are filter gas-life capacity, particulate filter efficiency, and respirator breathing resistances...

  14. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Ji, Lei; Hou, Xiangyang; Schellenberg, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures) on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17 μmol.m(-2).s(-1)) and clipping (2.06 μmol.m(-2).s(-1)) than under grazing (1.65 μmol.m-(2).s(-1)) over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content) and biotic (ANPP and BNPP) factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China.

  15. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    Full Text Available Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17 μmol.m(-2.s(-1 and clipping (2.06 μmol.m(-2.s(-1 than under grazing (1.65 μmol.m-(2.s(-1 over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP. Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content and biotic (ANPP and BNPP factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China.

  16. Alternative respiration and fumaric acid production of Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuai; Xu, Qing; Huang, He; Li, Shuang

    2014-06-01

    Under the conditions of fumaric acid fermentation, Rhizopus oryzae ME-F14 possessed at least two respiratory systems. The respiration of mycelia was partially inhibited by the cytochrome respiration inhibitor antimycin A or the alternative respiration inhibitor salicylhydroxamic acid and was completely inhibited in the presence of both antimycin A and salicylhydroxamic acid. During fumaric acid fermentation process, the activity of alternative respiration had a great correlation with fumaric acid productivity; both of them reached peak at the same time. The alternative oxidase gene, which encoded the mitochondrial alternative oxidase responsible for alternative respiration in R. oryzae ME-F14, was cloned and characterized in Escherichia coli. The activity of alternative respiration, the alternative oxidase gene transcription level, as well as the fumaric acid titer were measured under different carbon sources and different carbon-nitrogen ratios. The activity of alternative respiration was found to be comparable to the transcription level of the alternative oxidase gene and the fumaric acid titer. These results indicated that the activity of the alternative oxidase was regulated at the transcription stage under the conditions tested for R. oryzae ME-F14.

  17. Temperature response of soil respiration largely unaltered with experimental warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Joanna C.; Tang, Jianwu; Templer, Pamela H.; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Crowther, Thomas W.; Burton, Andrew J.; Dukes, Jeffrey S.; Emmett, Bridget; Frey, Serita D.; Heskel, Mary A.; Jiang, Lifen; Machmuller, Megan B.; Mohan, Jacqueline; Panetta, Anne Marie; Reich, Peter B.; Reinsch, Sabine; Wang, Xin; Allison, Steven D.; Bamminger, Chris; Bridgham, Scott; Collins, Scott L.; de Dato, Giovanbattista; Eddy, William C.; Enquist, Brian J.; Estiarte, Marc; Harte, John; Henderson, Amanda; Johnson, Bart R.; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Luo, Yiqi; Marhan, Sven; Melillo, Jerry M.; Penuelas, Josep; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Poll, Christian; Rastetter, Edward B.; Reinmann, Andrew B.; Reynolds, Lorien L.; Schmidt, Inger K.; Shaver, Gaius R.; Strong, Aaron L.; Suseela, Vidya; Tietema, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soil is a major yet poorly understood flux in the global carbon cycle. Climatic warming is hypothesized to increase rates of soil respiration, potentially fueling further increases in global temperatures. However, despite considerable scientific attention in recent decades, the overall response of soil respiration to anticipated climatic warming remains unclear. We synthesize the largest global dataset to date of soil respiration, moisture, and temperature measurements, totaling >3,800 observations representing 27 temperature manipulation studies, spanning nine biomes and over 2 decades of warming. Our analysis reveals no significant differences in the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration between control and warmed plots in all biomes, with the exception of deserts and boreal forests. Thus, our data provide limited evidence of acclimation of soil respiration to experimental warming in several major biome types, contrary to the results from multiple single-site studies. Moreover, across all nondesert biomes, respiration rates with and without experimental warming follow a Gaussian response, increasing with soil temperature up to a threshold of ∼25 °C, above which respiration rates decrease with further increases in temperature. This consistent decrease in temperature sensitivity at higher temperatures demonstrates that rising global temperatures may result in regionally variable responses in soil respiration, with colder climates being considerably more responsive to increased ambient temperatures compared with warmer regions. Our analysis adds a unique cross-biome perspective on the temperature response of soil respiration, information critical to improving our mechanistic understanding of how soil carbon dynamics change with climatic warming.

  18. [Factors influencing the variability in soil heterotrophic respiration from terrestrial ecosystem in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Chen, Shu-Tao; Hu, Zheng-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Soil heterotrophic respiration is one of the key factors for estimating ecosystem carbon balance. Measurement data of soil heterotrophic respiration from terrestrial ecosystem in China were collected. Climate data (annual precipitation and annual mean air temperature) and relevant environmental factors (e. g. tree age) were also collected. Results indicated that the relationship between heterotrophic respiration and soil respiration could be explained by a power function. Heterotrophic respiration increased with the increase of soil respiration. The power function explained 73% of the variability (R2 = 0.730, P power function could be used to explain the relationship between the ratio of heterotrophic respiration to soil respiration and tree age. Further investigation showed that the relationship between measured annual heterotrophic respiration and modeled heterotrophic respiration by using an empirical model could be described by a linear function, indicating that the empirical model well fitted the variability in heterotrophic respiration.

  19. Shear capacity of ASR damaged structures – in-depth analysis of some in-situ shear tests on bridge slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren Gustenhoff; Barbosa, Ricardo Antonio; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) on the shear capacity for concrete slabs without shear reinforcement. An experimental full-scale in-situ program consisting of four slabs from a bridge (Vosnæsvej) has been carried out and the results have been published in ref. [1......] with the principal author of this paper as co-author. After the experiments, a detailed measurement of the test specimens was conducted. Based on these measurements a thorough analysis of the experimental results was carried out and evaluated by a plastic model for shear capacity, Crack Sliding Model (CSM...

  20. Content Validity of the ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD RS-IV) and Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) in Phenylketonuria

    OpenAIRE

    Kathleen W. Wyrwich PhD; Shannon Shaffer BA; Katharine Gries PharmD, PhD; Priscilla Auguste MHS; Kim Hart Mooney MS, CGC; Suyash Prasad MD; Deborah A. Bilder MD

    2016-01-01

    The ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD RS-IV; parent report) and Adult ADHD Self-Rating Scale (ASRS; self-report) are validated instruments for measuring symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The objectives of this study were to elicit descriptions of phenylketonuria (PKU) symptoms and assess content validity of these instruments in PKU. Parents (N = 15) of children with PKU (≥8 years old) and adults with PKU (N=13) described PKU-related symptoms and commented on the scale’s clari...

  1. Respirator studies for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.J.; Fairchild, C.I.; DeField, J.D.; Hack, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    A project of the Health, Safety and Environment Division is described. The project provides the NRC with information of respiratory protective devices and programs for their licensee personnel. The following activities were performed during FY 1983: selection of alternate test aerosols for quality assurance testing of high-efficiency particulate air respirator filters; evaluation of MAG-1 spectacles for use with positive and negative-pressure respirators; development of a Manual of Respiratory Protection in Emergencies Involving Airborne Radioactive Materials, and technical assistance to NRC licensees regarding respirator applications. 2 references, 1 figure

  2. Control of respiration in fish, amphibians and reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.W. Taylor

    Full Text Available Fish and amphibians utilise a suction/force pump to ventilate gills or lungs, with the respiratory muscles innervated by cranial nerves, while reptiles have a thoracic, aspiratory pump innervated by spinal nerves. However, fish can recruit a hypobranchial pump for active jaw occlusion during hypoxia, using feeding muscles innervated by anterior spinal nerves. This same pump is used to ventilate the air-breathing organ in air-breathing fishes. Some reptiles retain a buccal force pump for use during hypoxia or exercise. All vertebrates have respiratory rhythm generators (RRG located in the brainstem. In cyclostomes and possibly jawed fishes, this may comprise elements of the trigeminal nucleus, though in the latter group RRG neurons have been located in the reticular formation. In air-breathing fishes and amphibians, there may be separate RRG for gill and lung ventilation. There is some evidence for multiple RRG in reptiles. Both amphibians and reptiles show episodic breathing patterns that may be centrally generated, though they do respond to changes in oxygen supply. Fish and larval amphibians have chemoreceptors sensitive to oxygen partial pressure located on the gills. Hypoxia induces increased ventilation and a reflex bradycardia and may trigger aquatic surface respiration or air-breathing, though these latter activities also respond to behavioural cues. Adult amphibians and reptiles have peripheral chemoreceptors located on the carotid arteries and central chemoreceptors sensitive to blood carbon dioxide levels. Lung perfusion may be regulated by cardiac shunting and lung ventilation stimulates lung stretch receptors.

  3. Control of respiration in fish, amphibians and reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.W. Taylor

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fish and amphibians utilise a suction/force pump to ventilate gills or lungs, with the respiratory muscles innervated by cranial nerves, while reptiles have a thoracic, aspiratory pump innervated by spinal nerves. However, fish can recruit a hypobranchial pump for active jaw occlusion during hypoxia, using feeding muscles innervated by anterior spinal nerves. This same pump is used to ventilate the air-breathing organ in air-breathing fishes. Some reptiles retain a buccal force pump for use during hypoxia or exercise. All vertebrates have respiratory rhythm generators (RRG located in the brainstem. In cyclostomes and possibly jawed fishes, this may comprise elements of the trigeminal nucleus, though in the latter group RRG neurons have been located in the reticular formation. In air-breathing fishes and amphibians, there may be separate RRG for gill and lung ventilation. There is some evidence for multiple RRG in reptiles. Both amphibians and reptiles show episodic breathing patterns that may be centrally generated, though they do respond to changes in oxygen supply. Fish and larval amphibians have chemoreceptors sensitive to oxygen partial pressure located on the gills. Hypoxia induces increased ventilation and a reflex bradycardia and may trigger aquatic surface respiration or air-breathing, though these latter activities also respond to behavioural cues. Adult amphibians and reptiles have peripheral chemoreceptors located on the carotid arteries and central chemoreceptors sensitive to blood carbon dioxide levels. Lung perfusion may be regulated by cardiac shunting and lung ventilation stimulates lung stretch receptors.

  4. Control of respiration in fish, amphibians and reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, E W; Leite, C A C; McKenzie, D J; Wang, T

    2010-05-01

    Fish and amphibians utilise a suction/force pump to ventilate gills or lungs, with the respiratory muscles innervated by cranial nerves, while reptiles have a thoracic, aspiratory pump innervated by spinal nerves. However, fish can recruit a hypobranchial pump for active jaw occlusion during hypoxia, using feeding muscles innervated by anterior spinal nerves. This same pump is used to ventilate the air-breathing organ in air-breathing fishes. Some reptiles retain a buccal force pump for use during hypoxia or exercise. All vertebrates have respiratory rhythm generators (RRG) located in the brainstem. In cyclostomes and possibly jawed fishes, this may comprise elements of the trigeminal nucleus, though in the latter group RRG neurons have been located in the reticular formation. In air-breathing fishes and amphibians, there may be separate RRG for gill and lung ventilation. There is some evidence for multiple RRG in reptiles. Both amphibians and reptiles show episodic breathing patterns that may be centrally generated, though they do respond to changes in oxygen supply. Fish and larval amphibians have chemoreceptors sensitive to oxygen partial pressure located on the gills. Hypoxia induces increased ventilation and a reflex bradycardia and may trigger aquatic surface respiration or air-breathing, though these latter activities also respond to behavioural cues. Adult amphibians and reptiles have peripheral chemoreceptors located on the carotid arteries and central chemoreceptors sensitive to blood carbon dioxide levels. Lung perfusion may be regulated by cardiac shunting and lung ventilation stimulates lung stretch receptors.

  5. Respiration in Heterotrophic Unicellular Eukaryotic Organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Surface:volume quotient, mitochondrial volume fraction, and their distribution within cells were investigated and oxygen gradients within and outside cells were modelled. Cell surface increases allometrically with cell size. Mitochondrial volume fraction is invariant with cell size and constitute...

  6. Dicarbanonaborates in yeast respiration and membrane transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyk, A; Lapathitis, G

    1997-04-01

    Two derivatives of carborates, sodium 5,6-dichloro-7,8-dicarbanonaborate (CB-Cl) and sodium 5-mercapto-7,8-dicarbanonaborate (CB-SH) were found to inhibit endogenous as well as glucose-induced respiration of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both substances slightly increased endogenous acid production, were neutral toward H(+)-ATPase-associated acidification but pronouncedly inhibited the K(+)-stimulated acidification. The same effects were observed also with an ATPase-deficient mutant of the yeast. The ATP-hydrolyzing activity of yeast plasma membranes in vitro was severely reduced. The membrane potential was substantially increased toward more negative values. The H(+)-symporting uptake of glutamic acid was considerably decreased, that of adenine was diminished much less. The effects of the dicarbanonaborates are obviously pleiotropic but their inhibition of ATP hydrolysis and of uptake of H(+)-symported substances, on the one hand, and absolute lack of effect on ATPase-catalyzed acidification, on the other, pose an unresolved problem.

  7. Comparison of the morphology of alkali–silica gel formed in limestones in concrete affected by the so-called alkali–carbonate reaction (ACR) and alkali–silica reaction (ASR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grattan-Bellew, P.E.; Chan, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    The morphology of alkali–silica gel formed in dolomitic limestone affected by the so-called alkali–carbonate reaction (ACR) is compared to that formed in a siliceous limestone affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR). The particle of dolomitic limestone was extracted from the experimental sidewalk in Kingston, Ontario, Canada that was badly cracked due to ACR. The siliceous limestone particle was extracted from a core taken from a highway structure in Quebec, affected by ASR. Both cores exhibited marked reaction rims around limestone particles. The aggregate particles were polished and given a light gold coating in preparation for examination in a scanning electron microscope. The gel in the ACR aggregate formed stringers between the calcite crystals in the matrix of the rock, whereas gel in ASR concrete formed a thick layer on top of the calcite crystals, that are of the same size as in the ACR aggregate

  8. An imaging method for oxygen distribution, respiration and photosynthesis at a microscopic level of resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschiersch, Henning; Liebsch, Gregor; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Stangelmayer, Achim; Rolletschek, Hardy

    2012-11-01

    Biological samples are far from homogeneous, with complex compartmentation being the norm. Major physiological processes such as respiration do not therefore occur in a uniform manner within most tissues, and it is currently not possible to image its gradients in living plant tissues. A compact fluorescence ratiometric-based device is presented here, consisting of an oxygen-sensitive foil and a USB (universal serial bus) microscope. The sensor foil is placed on the sample surface and, based on the localized change in fluorescence signal over time, information about the oxygen consumption (respiration) or evolution (photosynthesis) can be obtained. Using this imaging technique, it was possible to demonstrate the spatial pattern of oxygen production and consumption at a c. 20-μm level of resolution, and their visualization in the rhizosphere, stem and leaf, and within the developing seed. The oxygen mapping highlighted the vascular tissues as the major stem sink for oxygen. In the leaf, the level of spatial resolution was sufficient to visualize the gas exchange in individual stomata. We conclude that the novel sensor set-up can visualize gradients in oxygen-consuming and producing processes, thereby facilitating the study of the spatial dynamics of respiration and photosynthesis in heterogeneous plant tissues. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Development of a Portable Non-Invasive Swallowing and Respiration Assessment Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Yun Shieh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia is a condition that happens when a person cannot smoothly swallow food from the mouth to the stomach. It causes malnourishment in patients, or can even cause death due to aspiration pneumonia. Recently, more and more researchers have focused their attention on the importance of swallowing and respiration coordination, and the use of non-invasive assessment systems has become a hot research trend. In this study, we aimed to integrate the timing and pattern monitoring of respiration and swallowing by using a portable and non-invasive approach which can be applied at the bedside in hospitals or institutions, or in a home environment. In this approach, we use a force sensing resistor (FSR to detect the motions of the thyroid cartilage in the pharyngeal phase. We also use the surface electromyography (sEMG to detect the contraction of the submental muscle in the oral phase, and a nasal cannula to detect nasal airflow for respiration monitoring during the swallowing process. All signals are received and processed for swallowing event recognition. A total of 19 volunteers participated in the testing and over 57 measurements were made. The results show that the proposed approach can effectively distinguish the swallowing function in people of different ages and genders.

  10. Characterization of respirable mine dust and diesel particulate matter

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahlangu, Vusi J

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the preliminary outcomes to develop and optimize methods to characterize DPM and respirable dust samples for the following: Crystalline compounds Common mineral analyses Particle size distribution Elemental Carbon (EC...

  11. Redefinition and global estimation of basal ecosystem respiration rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Wenping [College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; Luo, Yiqi [Department of Botany and Microbiology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA; Li, Xianglan [College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; Liu, Shuguang; Yu, Guirui [Key Laboratory of Ecosystem Network Observation and Modeling, Synthesis Research Center of Chinese Ecosystem Research Network, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Zhou, Tao [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; Bahn, Michael [Institute of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria; Black, Andy [Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B. C., Canada; Desai, Ankur R. [Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Department, Center for Climatic Research, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; Cescatti, Alessandro [Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Ispra, Italy; Marcolla, Barbara [Sustainable Agro-ecosystems and Bioresources Department, Fondazione Edmund Mach-IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, San Michele all' Adige, Italy; Jacobs, Cor [Alterra, Earth System Science-Climate Change, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands; Chen, Jiquan [Department of Earth, Ecological, and Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio, USA; Aurela, Mika [Climate and Global Change Research, Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland; Bernhofer, Christian [Chair of Meteorology, Institute of Hydrology and Meteorology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; Gielen, Bert [Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium; Bohrer, Gil [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Geodetic Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA; Cook, David R. [Climate Research Section, Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA; Dragoni, Danilo [Department of Geography, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA; Dunn, Allison L. [Department of Physical and Earth Sciences, Worcester State College, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA; Gianelle, Damiano [Sustainable Agro-ecosystems and Bioresources Department, Fondazione Edmund Mach-IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, San Michele all' Adige, Italy; Grünwald, Thomas [Chair of Meteorology, Institute of Hydrology and Meteorology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; Ibrom, Andreas [Risø DTU National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Biosystems Division, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde, Denmark; Leclerc, Monique Y. [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Georgia, Griffin, Georgia, USA; Lindroth, Anders [Geobiosphere Science Centre, Physical Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Liu, Heping [Laboratory for Atmospheric Research, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA; Marchesini, Luca Belelli [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-Food and Forest Systems, University of Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy; Montagnani, Leonardo; Pita, Gabriel [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon, Portugal; Rodeghiero, Mirco [Sustainable Agro-ecosystems and Bioresources Department, Fondazione Edmund Mach-IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, San Michele all' Adige, Italy; Rodrigues, Abel [Unidade de Silvicultura e Produtos Florestais, Instituto Nacional dos Recursos Biológicos, Oeiras, Portugal; Starr, Gregory [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA; Stoy, Paul C. [Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana, USA

    2011-10-13

    Basal ecosystem respiration rate (BR), the ecosystem respiration rate at a given temperature, is a common and important parameter in empirical models for quantifying ecosystem respiration (ER) globally. Numerous studies have indicated that BR varies in space. However, many empirical ER models still use a global constant BR largely due to the lack of a functional description for BR. In this study, we redefined BR to be ecosystem respiration rate at the mean annual temperature. To test the validity of this concept, we conducted a synthesis analysis using 276 site-years of eddy covariance data, from 79 research sites located at latitudes ranging from ~3°S to ~70°N. Results showed that mean annual ER rate closely matches ER rate at mean annual temperature. Incorporation of site-specific BR into global ER model substantially improved simulated ER compared to an invariant BR at all sites. These results confirm that ER at the mean annual

  12. Influence of vestibular activation on respiration in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Kevin D.; Sharpe, Melissa K.; Drury, Daniel; Ertl, Andrew C.; Ray, Chester A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the semicircular canals and otolith organs on respiration in humans. On the basis of animal studies, we hypothesized that vestibular activation would elicit a vestibulorespiratory reflex. To test this hypothesis, respiratory measures, arterial blood pressure, and heart rate were measured during engagement of semicircular canals and/or otolith organs. Dynamic upright pitch and roll (15 cycles/min), which activate the otolith organs and semicircular canals, increased respiratory rate (Delta2 +/- 1 and Delta3 +/- 1 breaths/min, respectively; P respiration similarly (Delta3 +/- 1 and Delta2 +/- 1, respectively; P muscle afferent, increased respiration (Delta3 +/- 1; P muscle afferents, mediate increased ventilation in humans and support the concept that vestibular activation alters respiration in humans.

  13. Global Annual Soil Respiration Data (Raich and Schlesinger 1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set is a compilation of soil respiration rates (g C m-2 yr-1) from terrestrial and wetland ecosystems reported in the literature prior to 1992....

  14. Ecosystem respiration depends strongly on photosynthesis in a temperate heath

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Ibrom, A.; Beier, C.

    2007-01-01

    We measured net ecosystem CO2 flux (F-n) and ecosystem respiration (R-E), and estimated gross ecosystem photosynthesis (P-g) by difference, for two years in a temperate heath ecosystem using a chamber method. The exchange rates of carbon were high and of similar magnitude as for productive forest...... respiration from October to March was 22% and 30% of annual flux, respectively, suggesting that both cold-season carbon gain and loss were important in the annual carbon cycle of the ecosystem. Model fit of R-E of a classic, first-order exponential equation related to temperature ( second year; R-2 = 0......) of 2.5 by the modified model. The model introduces R-photo, which describes the part of respiration being tightly coupled to the photosynthetic rate. It makes up 5% of the assimilated carbon dioxide flux at 0 degrees C and 35% at 20 degrees C implying a high sensitivity of respiration to photosynthesis...

  15. Global Annual Soil Respiration Data (Raich and Schlesinger 1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is a compilation of soil respiration rates (g C m-2 yr-1) from terrestrial and wetland ecosystems reported in the literature prior to 1992. These rates...

  16. Respiration in the yeast and mycelial phases of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, B; Lambowitz, A M; Kobayashi, G S; Medoff, G

    1979-05-01

    Respiration in the yeast and mycelial phases of Histoplasma capsulatum proceeds via a cytochrome system and an alternate oxidase, both present constitutively. The mycelial cytochrome system is distinguished by an additional partial shunt around the antimycin-sensitive site.

  17. A practical mechanical respirator, 1929: the "iron lung".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J A

    1990-09-01

    No satisfactory mechanical respirator existed before 1929, when Philip Drinker and Louis Shaw described an apparatus of their own design. This machine was in the form of a cylindrical tank enclosing the patient's body and chest, leaving the head outside the chamber under atmospheric pressure. Air pumps, later a bellows, raised and lowered pressure within the tank to assume the entire work of breathing. Popularly named the iron lung, the Drinker respirator supported thousands of patients afflicted with respiratory paralysis during the polio era. It was being superseded by positive-pressure airway ventilators just as the polio era came to a close. Today the Drinker respirator has disappeared virtually without a trace. Although its disadvantage was its cumbersome size, we must concede that it supported patients over the long term with fewer complications than do the respirators of today.

  18. SAFARI 2000 Annual Soil Respiration Data (Raich and Schlesinger 1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is a compilation of soil respiration rates (g C m-2 yr-1) from terrestrial and wetland ecosystems reported in the literature prior to 1992 subset for...

  19. SAFARI 2000 Annual Soil Respiration Data (Raich and Schlesinger 1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set is a compilation of soil respiration rates (g C m-2 yr-1) from terrestrial and wetland ecosystems reported in the literature prior to 1992...

  20. Carbon dioxide titration method for soil respiration measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Rubio, Luis

    2017-01-01

    This thesis was commissioned by Tampere University of Applied Sciences, which was interested in studying and developing a titration measurement method for soil respiration and biodegradability. Some experiments were carried out measuring soil respiration for testing the method and others adding some biodegradable material like polylactic acid compressed material and 100% biodegradable plastic bags to test its biodegradability and the possibility to measure it via titration. The thesi...

  1. The classic: The chemical constitution of respiration ferment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburg, Otto Heinrich

    2010-11-01

    This Classic Article is a reprint of the original work by Otto Heinrich Warburg, The Chemical Constitution of Respiration Ferment. An accompanying biographical sketch of Otto Heinrich Warburg, PhD, MD, is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-010-1533-z . The Classic Article is from Warburg O. The chemical constitution of respiration ferment. Science. 1928;68:437-443. Reprinted with permission from AAAS.

  2. The Classic: The Chemical Constitution of Respiration Ferment

    OpenAIRE

    Warburg, Otto Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    This Classic Article is a reprint of the original work by Otto Heinrich Warburg, The Chemical Constitution of Respiration Ferment. An accompanying biographical sketch of Otto Heinrich Warburg, PhD, MD, is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-010-1533-z. The Classic Article is from Warburg O. The chemical constitution of respiration ferment. Science. 1928;68:437–443. Reprinted with permission from AAAS.

  3. Use of respirators for protection of workers against airborne radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revoir, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    The various types of respirators and the requirements for an effective respirator program are outlined. The use of specific types of respirators to protect workers against inhalation of airborne radioactive materials is discussed. Problems encountered in using respirators in the nuclear industry which have resulted in worker injury and death are described

  4. ASR 8.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hilarybenjamin

    30 août 2010 ... Jean Pierre Olivier de Sardan a reconnu que les savoirs populaires et les systèmes de sens évoluent et incorporent de nombreux acquis des contacts avec l'extérieur23 (Olivier de Sardan. 1991 : 22). Bien d'initiatives privées de conservation enrichies d'apports extérieurs sont répertoriées dans les milieux ...

  5. ASR 2.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hilarybenjamin

    2010-08-30

    Aug 30, 2010 ... and data (the asuwada African oral poetry) which form the basis of Akiwowo's sociology of knowledge. Akiwowo has a view of human sociality and a view of ..... “Akiwowo, Orature and Divination: Approaches To he Construction of An Emic Sociological Paradigm of Society” Sociological Analysis 53:2: ...

  6. ASR 7.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hilarybenjamin

    2010-08-30

    Aug 30, 2010 ... Keywords: NGOs, organizational stability, Zimbabwe, land reform, agrarian change, SOS. Children's Village ... the organisation yet the tensions became embedded in the life of the organisation. his became ..... aligned to the MDC to stay at the SOS farm house when the latter was experiencing extremely diffi ...

  7. ASR 8.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hilarybenjamin

    30 août 2010 ... prévues par le nouveau code, de minimiser les risques de spéculation foncière. Ce moratoire doit ... donc d'être étroitement associées à la gestion de la quotité fiscale rétrocédée au titre de la R.S.F, si celle-ci .... forestière consiste dans la répartition des recettes fiscales entre le Trésor public et certaines ...

  8. ASR 2.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hilarybenjamin

    2010-08-30

    Aug 30, 2010 ... that these two conclusions show Akiwowo's theoretical distance from positivism. is rejection of positivism moves him ... a perspective of man and society from a non-positivistic standpoint. ..... for the existence of a thing, but it is strange to even science to claim that something simply exists. herefore, on the ...

  9. ASR 4.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hilarybenjamin

    30 ago. 2010 ... modo, que articulação têm a televisão e a escola para a formação dos adolescentes? É essa a principal ... socialização que têm grande influência na vida desta categoria social, nesta comunicação pretendemos .... transmite totalmente a realidade, pois rodeia e isola determinados aspectos da vida. Toda.

  10. Respiration during Postharvest Development of Soursop Fruit, Annona muricata L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Johan; Paull, Robert E.

    1984-01-01

    Fruit of soursop, Annona muricata L., showed increased CO2 production 2 days after harvest, preceding the respiratory increase that coincided with autocatalytic ethylene evolution and other ripening phenomena. Experiments to alter gas exchange patterns of postharvest fruit parts and tissue cylinders had little success. The respiratory quotient of tissue discs was near unity throughout development. 2,4-Dinitrophenol uncoupled respiration more effectively than carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone; 0.4 millimolar KCN stimulated, 4 millimolar salicylhydroxamic acid slightly inhibited, and their combination strongly inhibited respiration, as did 10 millimolar NaN3. Tricarboxylic acid cycle members and ascorbate were more effective substrates than sugars, but acetate and glutarate strongly inhibited. Disc respiration showed the same early peak as whole fruit respiration; this peak is thus an inherent characteristic of postharvest development and cannot be ascribed to differences between ovaries of the aggregatetype fruit. The capacity of the respiratory apparatus did not change during this preclimacteric peak, but the contents of rate-limiting malate and citrate increased after harvest. It is concluded that the preclimacteric rise in CO2 evolution reflects increased mitochondrial respiration because of enhanced supply of carboxylates as a substrate, probably induced by detachment from the tree. The second rise corresponds with the respiration during ripening of other climacteric fruits. PMID:16663783

  11. Heterogeneous nano-Fe/Ca/CaO catalytic ozonation for selective surface hydrophilization of plastics containing brominated and chlorinated flame retardants (B/CFRs): separation from automobile shredder residue by froth flotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Lee, Byoung Ho; Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Simion, Cristian

    2017-02-01

    One method of weakening the inherently hydrophobic surface of plastics relevant to flotation separation is heterogeneous nano-Fe/Ca/CaO catalytic ozonation. Nano-Fe/Ca/CaO-catalyzed ozonation for 15 min efficiently decreases the surface hydrophobicity of brominated and chlorinated flame retardant (B/CFR)-containing plastics (such as acrylonitrile-butadienestyrene (ABS), high-impact polystyrene (HIPS), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)) in automobile shredder residue (ASR) to such an extent that their flotation ability is entirely depressed. Such a hydrophilization treatment also stimulates the ABS, HIPS, and PVC surface roughness, wetting of the surface, and the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions at the surface and ultimately changes surface polarity. SEM-EDS, AFM, and XPS analyses of the PVC and ABS surfaces demonstrated a marked decrease in [Cl/Br] and a significant increase in the number of hydrophilic groups, such as C-O, C=O, and (C=O)-O. Under froth flotation conditions at 50 rpm, about 99.5 % of ABS and 99.5 % of HIPS in ASR samples settled out, resulting in a purity of 98 and 98.5 % for ABS and HIPS in ASR samples, respectively. Furthermore, at 150 rpm, we also obtained 100 % PVC separation in the settled fraction, with 98 % purity in ASR. Total recovery of non-B/CFR-containing plastics reached nearly 100 % in the floating fraction. The amount of nano-Fe/Ca/CaO reagent employed during ozonation is very small, and additional removal of surface contaminants from the recycled ASR plastic surfaces by ozonation makes the developed process simpler, greener, and more effective.

  12. Post-Fire Soil Respiration in Relation to the Burnt Wood Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón Jiménez, Sara; Castro, J.; Kowalski, A.; Serrano-Ortiz, P.; Ruiz, B.; Sancez-Canete, Ep; Zamora, R.

    2010-05-01

    Wildfires are the main cause of forests and understory destruction in Mediterranean areas. One of the most dramatic consequences is the perturbation of carbon fluxes. A high percentage of the CO2 emitted by the ecosystem after a wildfire is due to soil respiration, which represents the most important uncertainty in the global carbon cycle. In this study we have quantified the soil respiration and its seasonal variability in reforested pine forests in the National and Natural Park of Sierra Nevada which were burned in September of 2005. Measurement campaigns were carried out along two years in two experimental plots at different altitudinal levels (1500 and 2200 m a.s.l.), in which three post-fire silvicultural treatments of burned wood were established: 1) "Non-Intervention" (NI), leaving all of the burnt trees standing. 2) "Cut plus Lopping" (CL), a treatment where most of the trees were cut and felled, with the main branches also lopped off, but leaving all the cut biomass in situ covering partially the ground surface 3) "Salvage Logging" (SL), all trees were cut and the trunks and branches were removed. Soil respiration was highly determined by the effects derived of the altitudinal level, with the highest values at the lowest altitude. The seasonal precipitation regime had also a key role. Soil respiration kept a basal level during the summer drought, during this period the response to the altitudinal level and post-fire treatments were reduced. On the other hand, soil respiration boosted after rain events, when the differences between treatments became more pronounced. In general, especially under these conditions of absence of water limitation, the post-fire burnt wood treatment with the highest CO2 fluxes was that in which all the burnt wood biomass remained covering partially the soil surface ("Cut plus Lopping") while the lowest values were registered in the treatment in which the soil was bared ("Salvage Logging"). Results of this study are especially

  13. Surfactants and the Mechanics of Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbaily, Abdulrahman; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Alveoli are small sacs found at the end of terminal bronchioles in human lungs with a mean diameter of 200 μm. A thin layer of fluid (hypophase) coats the inner face of an alveolus and is in contact with the air in the lungs. The thickness of this layer varies among alveoli, but is in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 μm for many portions of the alveolar network. The interfacial tension σ at the air-hypophase interface tends to favor collapse of the alveolus, and resists its expansion during inhalation. Type II alveolar cells synthesize and secrete a mixture of phospholipids and proteins called pulmonary surfactant. These surfactant molecules adsorb to the interface causing σ of water at body temperature is 70 mN/m and falls to an equilibrium value of 25 mN/m when surfactants are present. Also, in a dynamic sense, it is known that σ is reduced to near 0 during exhalation when the surfactant film compresses. In this work, the authors develop a mechanical and transport model of the alveolus to study the effect of surfactants on various aspects of respiration. The model is composed of three principal parts: (i) air movement into and out of the alveolus; (ii) a balance of linear momentum across the two-layered membrane of the alveolus (hypophase and elastic wall); and (iii) a pulmonary surfactant transport problem in the hypophase. The goal is to evaluate the influence of pulmonary surfactant on respiratory mechanics.

  14. Relationships between root respiration rate and root morphology, chemistry and anatomy in Larix gmelinii and Fraxinus mandshurica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shuxia; McLaughlin, Neil B; Gu, Jiacun; Li, Xingpeng; Wang, Zhengquan

    2013-06-01

    Tree roots are highly heterogeneous in form and function. Previous studies revealed that fine root respiration was related to root morphology, tissue nitrogen (N) concentration and temperature, and varied with both soil depth and season. The underlying mechanisms governing the relationship between root respiration and root morphology, chemistry and anatomy along the root branch order have not been addressed. Here, we examined these relationships of the first- to fifth-order roots for near surface roots (0-10 cm) of 22-year-old larch (Larix gmelinii L.) and ash (Fraxinus mandshurica L.) plantations. Root respiration rate at 18 °C was measured by gas phase O2 electrodes across the first five branching order roots (the distal roots numbered as first order) at three times of the year. Root parameters of root diameter, specific root length (SRL), tissue N concentration, total non-structural carbohydrates (starch and soluble sugar) concentration (TNC), cortical thickness and stele diameter were also measured concurrently. With increasing root order, root diameter, TNC and the ratio of root TNC to tissue N concentration increased, while the SRL, tissue N concentration and cortical proportion decreased. Root respiration rate also monotonically decreased with increasing root order in both species. Cortical tissue (including exodermis, cortical parenchyma and endodermis) was present in the first three order roots, and cross sections of the cortex for the first-order root accounted for 68% (larch) and 86% (ash) of the total cross section of the root. Root respiration was closely related to root traits such as diameter, SRL, tissue N concentration, root TNC : tissue N ratio and stele-to-root diameter proportion among the first five orders, which explained up to 81-94% of variation in the rate of root respiration for larch and up to 83-93% for ash. These results suggest that the systematic variations of root respiration rate within tree fine root system are possibly due to the

  15. Respirator studies for the ERDA Division of Safety, Standards, and Compliance, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976. [Physiological effects of wearing respirators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, T.O.; Raven, P.B.; Shafer, C.L.; Linnebur, A.C.; Bustos, J.M.; Wheat, L.D.; Douglas, D.D.

    1977-03-01

    Results of a study to determine what effect wearing a respirator has on worker performance, and which physiological parameters an industrial physician should consider when examining an employee who will be wearing a respirator while working are presented. (TFD)

  16. Effects of Tillage Practices on Soil Organic Carbon and Soil Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Teodor; Ioana Moraru, Paula; Bogdan, Ileana; Ioan Pop, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Soil tillage system and its intensity modify by direct and indirect action soil temperature, moisture, bulk density, porosity, penetration resistance and soil structural condition. Minimum tillage and no-tillage application reduce or completely eliminate the soil mobilization, due to this, soil is compacted in the first years of application. The degree of compaction is directly related to soil type and its state of degradation. All this physicochemical changes affect soil biology and soil respiration. Soil respiration leads to CO2 emissions from soil to the atmosphere, in significant amounts for the global carbon cycle. Soil respiration is one measure of biological activity and decomposition. Soil capacity to produce CO2 varies depending on soil, season, intensity and quality of agrotechnical tillage, soil water, cultivated plant and fertilizer. Our research follows the effects of the three tillage systems: conventional system, minimum tillage and no-tillage on soil respiration and finally on soil organic carbon on rotation soybean - wheat - maize, obtained on an Argic Faeoziom from the Somes Plateau, Romania. To quantify the change in soil respiration under different tillage practices, determinations were made for each crop in four vegetative stages (spring, 5-6 leaves, bean forming, harvest). Soil monitoring system of CO2 and O2 included gradient method, made by using a new generation of sensors capable of measuring CO2 concentration in-situ and quasi-instantaneous in gaseous phase. At surface soil respiration is made by using ACE Automated Soil CO2 Exchange System. These areas were was our research presents a medium multi annual temperature of 8.20C medium of multi annual rain drowns: 613 mm. The experimental variants chosen were: i). Conventional system: reversible plough (22-25 cm) + rotary grape (8-10 cm); ii). Minimum tillage system: paraplow (18-22 cm) + rotary grape (8-10 cm); iii). No-tillage. The experimental design was a split-plot design with three

  17. Impact of Land Use on Soil Respiration in Southwestern Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodosio, B.; Daly, E.; Pauwels, V. R. N.

    2015-12-01

    Land use management is one of the key contributors to the global environmental change. Considerable changes in landscapes have been experienced in Southwestern Victoria, Australia in the past two decades. Eucalyptus globulus (blue gum) plantations have expanded, resulting in possible changes in the water and carbon balances of catchments. The shift from pastures to plantations could have a significant impact on the local carbon balance with possible effects on atmospheric CO2 concentration and vegetation productivity. We present preliminary measurements from a field study comparing soil respiration in a plantation and a pasture. Adjacent catchments in Southwestern Victoria, near Gatum, were used as study areas; the prominent difference between the two catchments is the land use, with one catchment being used as a pasture for livestock grazing and the other catchment being mainly planted with blue gums. The variability of soil respiration in the pasture is governed by differences in soil moisture and substrate content due to local features of the topography and livestock grazing. Soil respiration measurements in the plantation were taken on mounds, access tracks, and open spaces. Most observations on mounds had higher soil respiration possibly due to root and mycorrhizal respiration. The measurements in open spaces had comparable values with mound measurements; this might be due to a less limited radiation. The soil respiration between trees had lower values, possibly because of radiation limitation due to the canopy cover. These preliminary measurements allow us to compare soil respiration variability across catchments with different land uses. This is important to estimate CO2 fluxes from soil to the atmosphere in large areas and will be valuable in estimating gross primary production from measurements of net ecosystem exchange.

  18. Bariatric surgery rapidly improves mitochondrial respiration in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, Sheetal; Richards, William; O'Hea, Martha F; Audia, Jonathon P; Alvarez, Diego F

    2013-12-01

    Obesity and its attendant comorbidities are an emerging epidemic. Chronic metabolic inflammation (metainflammation) is thought to precipitate obesity-associated morbidities; however, its mechanistic progression is poorly understood. Moreover, although interventions such as diet, exercise, and bariatric surgery can control body weight, their effects on metainflammation are also poorly understood. Recently, metainflammation and the pathobiology of obesity have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Herein we examined the effects of bariatric surgery on mitochondrial respiration as an index of resolving metainflammation in morbidly obese patients. This institutional review board-approved study involved morbidly obese patients (body mass index > 35 kg/m(2)) undergoing sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in peripheral blood monocytes and in skeletal muscle samples before surgery and at 12 weeks after surgery. Patient biometrics, homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) score, C-reactive protein, and lipid profile were analyzed. Twenty patients were enrolled and showed an average percent excess body weight loss of 30.3% weight loss at 12 weeks after surgery. Average HOMA-IR score decreased from 3.0 to 1.2 in insulin-resistant patients. C-reactive protein, an index of metainflammation, showed a modest decrease. Lipid profile remained stable. Intriguingly, mitochondrial basal and maximal respiration rates in peripheral blood monocytes increased after surgery. Basal rates of skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration were unchanged, but the maximal respiration rate trended toward an increase after surgery. Cellular and tissue mitochondrial respiration increased in a morbidly obese patient cohort after laparoscopic bariatric surgery. These changes were consistent in patients with postsurgical weight loss. Importantly, no significant changes or improvements occurred in canonical indices used to

  19. Mitochondrial respiration as a target for neuroprotection and cognitive enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Lima, F; Barksdale, Bryan R; Rojas, Julio C

    2014-04-15

    This paper focuses on brain mitochondrial respiration as a therapeutic target for neuroprotection and cognitive enhancement. We propose that improving brain mitochondrial respiration is an important future direction in research and treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other conditions associated with cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. The central thesis is that supporting and improving brain mitochondrial respiration constitutes a promising neurotherapeutic principle, with potential applications in AD as well as in a wide variety of neuropsychological conditions. We propose three different interventional approaches to improve brain mitochondrial respiration based on (a) pharmacology, (b) photobiomodulation and (c) nutrition interventions, and provide detailed examples for each type of intervention. First, low-dose USP methylene blue is described as a pharmacological intervention that can successfully increase mitochondrial respiration and result in memory enhancement and neuroprotection. Second, transcranial low-level light/laser therapy with near-infrared light is used to illustrate a photobiomodulation intervention with similar neurometabolic mechanisms of action as low-dose methylene blue. Finally, a nutrition intervention to improve mitochondrial respiration is proposed by increasing ketone bodies in the diet. The evidence discussed for each intervention supports a fundamental neurotherapeutic strategy based on improving oxidative energy metabolism while at the same time reducing the pro-oxidant tendencies of the nervous system. Targeting brain mitochondrial respiration with these three types of interventions is proposed as part of a holistic neurotherapeutic approach to improve brain energy metabolism and antioxidant defenses. This strategy represents a promising new bioenergetics direction for treatment of AD and other neuropsychological disorders featuring cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. Seasonality of temperate forest photosynthesis and daytime respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, R.; Munger, J. W.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.; Zahniser, M. S.; Davidson, E. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Saleska, S. R.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems currently offset one-quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions because of a slight imbalance between global terrestrial photosynthesis and respiration. Understanding what controls these two biological fluxes is therefore crucial to predicting climate change. Yet there is no way of directly measuring the photosynthesis or daytime respiration of a whole ecosystem of interacting organisms; instead, these fluxes are generally inferred from measurements of net ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange (NEE), in a way that is based on assumed ecosystem-scale responses to the environment. The consequent view of temperate deciduous forests (an important CO2 sink) is that, first, ecosystem respiration is greater during the day than at night; and second, ecosystem photosynthetic light-use efficiency peaks after leaf expansion in spring and then declines, presumably because of leaf ageing or water stress. This view has underlain the development of terrestrial biosphere models used in climate prediction and of remote sensing indices of global biosphere productivity. Here, we use new isotopic instrumentation to determine ecosystem photosynthesis and daytime respiration in a temperate deciduous forest over a three-year period. We find that ecosystem respiration is lower during the day than at night—the first robust evidence of the inhibition of leaf respiration by light at the ecosystem scale. Because they do not capture this effect, standard approaches overestimate ecosystem photosynthesis and daytime respiration in the first half of the growing season at our site, and inaccurately portray ecosystem photosynthetic light-use efficiency. These findings revise our understanding of forest-atmosphere carbon exchange, and provide a basis for investigating how leaf-level physiological dynamics manifest at the canopy scale in other ecosystems.

  1. A global database of soil respiration data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bond-Lamberty

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil respirationRS, the flux of CO2 from the soil to the atmosphere – is probably the least well constrained component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Here we introduce the SRDB database, a near-universal compendium of published RS data, and make it available to the scientific community both as a traditional static archive and as a dynamic community database that may be updated over time by interested users. The database encompasses all published studies that report one of the following data measured in the field (not laboratory: annual RS, mean seasonal RS, a seasonal or annual partitioning of RS into its sources fluxes, RS temperature response (Q10, or RS at 10 °C. Its orientation is thus to seasonal and annual fluxes, not shorter-term or chamber-specific measurements. To date, data from 818 studies have been entered into the database, constituting 3379 records. The data span the measurement years 1961–2007 and are dominated by temperate, well-drained forests. We briefly examine some aspects of the SRDB data – its climate space coverage, mean annual RS fluxes and their correlation with other carbon fluxes, RS variability, temperature sensitivities, and the partitioning of RS source flux – and suggest some potential lines of research that could be explored using these data. The SRDB database is available online in a permanent archive as well as via a project-hosting repository; the latter source leverages open-source software technologies to encourage wider participation in the database's future development. Ultimately, we hope that the updating of, and corrections to, the SRDB will become a shared project, managed by the users of these data in the scientific community.

  2. Circulation and Respiration in Ice-covered Alaskan Arctic Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, S.; Cortés, A.

    2016-12-01

    Arctic lakes are ice-covered 9 months of the year. For some of this time, the sediments heat the overlying water, and respiration in the sediments increases specific conductivity, depletes oxygen, and produces greenhouse gases (GHG). Whether anoxia forms and whether the greenhouse gases are sequestered at depth depends on processes inducing circulation and upward fluxes. Similarly, whether the GHG are released at ice off depends on the extent of vertical mixing at that time. Using time series meteorological data and biogeochemical arrays with temperature, specific conductivity, and optical oxygen sensors in 5 lakes ranging from 1 to 150 ha, we illustrate the connections between meteorological forcing and within lake processes including gravity currents resulting from increased density just above the sediment water interface and internal waves including those induced by winds acting on the surface of the ice and at ice off. CO2 production was well predicted by the initial rate of oxygen drawdown near the bottom at ice on and that the upward density flux depended on lake size, with values initially high in all lakes but near molecular in lakes of a few hectares in size by mid-winter. Both CO2 production and within lake vertical fluxes were independent of the rate of cooling in fall and subsequent within lake temperatures under the ice. Anoxia formed near the sediments in all 5 lakes with the concentration of CH4 dependent, in part, on lake size and depth. Twenty to fifty percent of the greenhouse gases produced under the ice remained in the lakes by the time thermal stratification was established in summer despite considerable internal wave induced mixing at the time of ice off. These observations and analysis lay a framework for understanding the links between within lake hydrodynamics, within year variability, and the fraction of greenhouse gases produced over the winter which evade at ice off.

  3. Soil respiration in a long-term tillage treatment experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelybó, Györgyi; Birkás, Márta; Dencsö, Márton; Horel, Ágota; Kása, Ilona; Tóth, Eszter

    2016-04-01

    Regular soil CO2 efflux measurements have been carried out at Józsefmajor longterm tillage experimental site in 2014 and 2015 with static chamber technique in no-till and ploughing plots in seven spatial replicates. The trial was established in 2002 on a loamy chernozem soil at the experimental site of the Szent István University nearby the city Hatvan, northern Hungary. At the site sunflower (Helianthus A.) and wheat (Triticum A.) was grown in 2014 and 2015, respectively. Ancillary measurements carried out at the site included weather parameters, soil water content, soil temperature. The aim of the investigation was to detect the effect of soil disturbance and soil tillage treatments on soil CO2 emission in agricultural ecosystems. Soil respiration measurements were carried out every week during the vegetation period and campaign measurements were performed scheduled to tillage application. In this latter case, measurements were carried out 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120 hours and 7 days after tillage operation. Results showed that during the vegetation season in the majority of measurement occasions emission was higher in the no-till plots. These differences; however were not found to be statistically significant. Due to the short term effect of tillage treatment, emissions increased following tillage treatment in the ploughed plots. Soil water content was also examined as main driver of soil CO2 fluxes. Soil water content sharply decreases in the surface layer (5-10 cm depth) after tillage treatment indicating a fast drying due to soil disturbance. This effect slowly attenuated and eventually extincted in approx. two weeks. CO2 emission measurements were associated with high uncertainties as a result of the measurement technique. Our further aim is to reduce this uncertainty using independent measurement techniques on the field.

  4. Respirable crystalline silica: Analysis methodologies; Silice cristalina respirable: Metodologias de analisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Tena, M. P.; Zumaquero, E.; Ibanez, M. J.; Machi, C.; Escric, A.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes different analysis methodologies in occupational environments and raw materials. A review is presented of the existing methodologies, the approximations made, some of the constraints involved, as well as the best measurement options for the different raw materials. In addition, the different factors that might affect the precision and accuracy of the results are examined. With regard to the methodologies used for the quantitative analysis of any of the polymorph s, particularly of quartz, the study centres particularly on the analytical X-ray diffraction method. Simplified methods of calculation and experimental separation are evaluated for the estimation of this fraction in the raw materials, such as separation methods by centrifugation, sedimentation, and dust generation in controlled environments. In addition, a review is presented of the methodologies used for the collection of respirable crystalline silica in environmental dust. (Author)

  5. Exposures of geotechnical laboratory workers to respirable crystalline silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S K; Bigelow, P L; Sharp-Geiger, R; Buchan, R M

    1999-01-01

    Geotechnical laboratory testing involves the determination of the physical properties of soil, rock, and other building materials for engineering purposes. Individuals working in these laboratories are exposed to airborne soil, rock, and other dusts during the preparation and testing of these materials. Crystalline silica as quartz is a common constituent of these materials and represents a potential hazard to geotechnical laboratory workers when airborne as a respirable dust. The authors conducted an examination of the potential for geotechnical laboratory workers to be exposed to respirable dust and respirable quartz during the performance of three routine laboratory tasks. A task-based exposure assessment strategy was used. Although respirable dust was generated during the performance of each of these tasks, its impact on exposures was generally overridden by the presence of respirable quartz in the dust. Quartz content in the respirable dust ranged from below the detection limit to greater than 50 percent. Mean exposure to respirable quartz, based on the duration of the task and assuming no other exposures for the rest of the 8-hour day, exceeded the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) "action level" (the exposure level at which certain actions must be taken) of 0.025 mg/m3. If exposure was assumed to continue for the rest of the 8-hour day at the measured concentration, mean exposure to respirable quartz exceeded the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) time-weighted average (TWA), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) PEL, and the NIOSH REL. Seven percent of 57 individual task exposure measurements exceeded the TLV-TWA and the PEL, 18 percent exceeded the REL, and another 12 percent exceeded excursion limits as defined by ACGIH. The results of this study support the conclusion that geotechnical laboratory workers are potentially exposed to respirable

  6. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Möhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements welding fume. Concentrations were mainly predicted by the welding process and were significantly higher when local exhaust ventilation (LEV) was inefficient or when welding was performed in confined spaces. Substitution of high-emission techniques like FCAW, efficient LEV, and using PAPRs where applicable can reduce exposure to welding fume. However, harmonizing the different exposure metrics for UFP (as particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging.

  7. Breathing simulator of workers for respirator performance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Hisashi; Kumita, Mikio; Honda, Takeshi; Kimura, Kazushi; Nozaki, Kosuke; Emi, Hitoshi; Otani, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Breathing machines are widely used to evaluate respirator performance but they are capable of generating only limited air flow patterns, such as, sine, triangular and square waves. In order to evaluate the respirator performance in practical use, it is desirable to test the respirator using the actual breathing patterns of wearers. However, it has been a difficult task for a breathing machine to generate such complicated flow patterns, since the human respiratory volume changes depending on the human activities and workload. In this study, we have developed an electromechanical breathing simulator and a respiration sampling device to record and reproduce worker's respiration. It is capable of generating various flow patterns by inputting breathing pattern signals recorded by a computer, as well as the fixed air flow patterns. The device is equipped with a self-control program to compensate the difference in inhalation and exhalation volume and the measurement errors on the breathing flow rate. The system was successfully applied to record the breathing patterns of workers engaging in welding and reproduced the breathing patterns.

  8. Scaling relationship between tree respiration rates and biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dong-Liang; Li, Tao; Zhong, Quan-Lin; Wang, Gen-Xuan

    2010-10-23

    The WBE theory proposed by West, Brown and Enquist predicts that larger plant respiration rate, R, scales to the three-quarters power of body size, M. However, studies on the R versus M relationship for larger plants (i.e. trees larger than saplings) have not been reported. Published respiration rates of field-grown trees (saplings and larger trees) were examined to test this relationship. Our results showed that for larger trees, aboveground respiration rates RA scaled as the 0.82-power of aboveground biomass MA, and that total respiration rates RT scaled as the 0.85-power of total biomass MT, both of which significantly deviated from the three-quarters scaling law predicted by the WBE theory, and which agreed with 0.81-0.84-power scaling of biomass to respiration across the full range of measured tree sizes for an independent dataset reported by Reich et al. (Reich et al. 2006 Nature 439, 457-461). By contrast, R scaled nearly isometrically with M in saplings. We contend that the scaling exponent of plant metabolism is close to unity for saplings and decreases (but is significantly larger than three-quarters) as trees grow, implying that there is no universal metabolic scaling in plants.

  9. Genome-wide data (ChIP-seq) enabled identification of cell wall-related and aquaporin genes as targets of tomato ASR1, a drought stress-responsive transcription factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we report efforts to take advantage of previous knowledge on well characterized proteins that extensively accumulate in dehydration, for example those belonging to the LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) superfamily. ASR proteins, a subgroup exclusive to the plant kingdom (albeit absent in Arabid...

  10. The effects of some prostaglandins on respiration in anaesthetized cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, D.S.

    1974-01-01

    1 Some prostaglandins have been found to be capable of affecting respiration in anaesthetized cats. 2 Prostaglandins E1, E2, F2α, A1 and A2 all elicited increases in respiratory frequency when administered to cats anaesthetized with either pentobarbitone or α-chloralose. This effect was abolished by bilateral vagotomy. 3 Prostaglandins of the E and A series, but not prostaglandin F2α, elicited increases in tidal volume which were accompanied by falls in systemic blood pressure in cats anaesthetized with pentobarbitone. The changes in blood pressure were also obtained in cats anaesthetized with α-chloralose, but not the tidal volume changes. 4 It is unlikely that the prostaglandins influenced respiration by direct actions on arterial chemoreceptors or baroreceptors. 5 Mechanisms by which the prostaglandins may be acting to affect respiration are discussed. PMID:4447858

  11. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis VII. Respiration and Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, A. A.; Calvin, M.

    1949-07-21

    The relationship of respiration to photosynthesis in barley seedling leaves and the algae, Chlorella and Scenedesmus, has been investigated using radioactive carbon dioxide and the techniques of paper chromatography and radioautography. The plants are allowed to photosynthesize normally for thirty seconds in c{sup 14}O{sub 2} after which they are allowed to respire in air or helium in the light or dark. Respiration of photosynthetic intermediates as evidenced by the appearance of labeled glutomic, isocitric, fumaric and succinic acids is slower in the light than in the dark. Labeled glycolic acid is observed in barley and algae. It disappears rapidly in the dark and is maintained and increased in quantity in the light in C0{sub 2}-free air.

  12. Effect of organic synthetic food colours on mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, F G; Valim, M F; Vercesi, A E

    1996-01-01

    Eleven organic synthetic dyes, currently or formerly used as food colours in Brazil, were tested to determine their effect on mitochondrial respiration in mitochondria isolated from rat liver and kidney. The compounds tested were: Erythrosine, Ponceau 4R, Allura Red, Sunset yellow, Tartrazine, Amaranth, Brilliant Blue, Blue, Fast Red E, Orange GGN and Scarlet GN. All food colours tested inhibited mitochondrial respiration (State III respiration, uncoupled) supported either by alpha-ketoglutarate or succinate. This inhibition varied largely, e.g. from 100% to 16% for Erythrosine and Tartrazine respectively, at a concentration of 0.1 mg food colour per mitochondrial protein. Both rat liver and kidney mitochondria showed similar patterns of inhibition among the food colours tested. This effect was dose related and the concentration to give 50% inhibition was determined for some of the dyes. The xanthene dye Erythrosine, which showed the strongest effect, was selected for further investigation on mitochondria in vivo.

  13. [Histomorphologic lung findings in long-term artificial respiration with special reference to extreme continuous artificial respiration using pure oxygen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, C; Weiler, G; Adebahr, G

    1985-01-01

    The respirator lung is characterized histologically in the first exudative phase by capillary congestion, intra-alveolary edema, hyaline membranes and in most cases by concomitant inflammatory alterations. In the following irreversible phase, fibrous organization processes dominate and show a variable tendency towards pulmonary fibrosis. In 27 cases with long-term artificial respiration from 4 days to 12 weeks, mainly the proliferative alterations were investigated. In 18 cases, the histopathological findings indicated fibrosis of the alveolar septa with disseminated distribution. In 9 cases, focal fibrosis with obliterations of alveoli prevailed. The extent of pathological results in the lungs does not correlate with the duration of artificial respiration. In cases of artificial respiration with pure oxygen, there is a special toxic component, which is illustrated by a young woman with polytraumatism who was administered artificial respiration for 5 weeks with pure oxygen. She died from respiratory insufficiency with severe pulmonary fibrosis. As different pathogenetic factors may cause irreversible pulmonary fibrosis, histomorphological classification is difficult later and, moreover, forensic problems result.

  14. Cyanide-insensitive respiration in Acanthamoeba castellanii. Changes in sensitivity of whole cell respiration during exponential growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, S.W.; Lloyd, D.

    1977-01-01

    Respiration of Acanthamoeba castellanii shows varying sensitivity to cyanide during exponential growth in a medium containing proteose peptone, glucose and yeast extract. After 20 h growth, respiration was stimulated up to 40% by I mM-cyanide; sensitivity to cyanide then gradually increased until 90% inhibition of respiration was attained in late exponential phase cultures. Salicyl hydroxamic acid alone never stimulated or inhibited respiration by more than 20% but, when added together with cyanide, inhibition was always 70 to 100% from 3 h onward. Sensitivity to antimycin A was similar, but not identical to that shown to cyanide; when antimycin A was added together with salicyl hydroxamic acid, the inhibition was greater. Increased sensitivities to arsenite and malonate were also observed in late-exponential phase cultures. These changes in sensitivities were not associated with alterations in the growth medium since similar changes in sensitivity to inhibitors were observed during growth in conditioned medium. A rotenone-sensitive site is associated with cyanide-stimulated respiration and the results suggest that A. castellanii possesses a branched electron transport system.

  15. Cheyne-Stokes respiration in patients hospitalised for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mared Lena

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showing a strong relationship between Cheyne-Stokes respiration and the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction have usually been done in selected patient populations with lower age and a higher proportion of males than the "typical" in-hospital patient with heart failure. The purpose of the present study was test the strength of this relationship in unselected patients admitted to hospital due to decompensated chronic heart failure. Methods We evaluated 191 patients (32% women, mean age 73 years, ready for discharge from the heart failure unit in the University Hospital of Malmö, Sweden. The patients underwent echocardiography for determination of left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular inner diastolic diameter. A respiratory investigation during sleep was performed the last night before discharge. Results We found that 66% of the patients had Cheyne-Stokes respiration more than 10% of the total recording time. Only 7 (3.6% of the patients had predominantly obstructive apnoeas. There was a significant but very weak relationship between left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular inner diastolic diameter on one hand and Cheyne-Stokes respiration on the other. Age was a stronger determinant of Cheyne-Stokes respiration than any of the cardiac or other clinical variables. Conclusion Although presence of Cheyne-Stokes respiration indicates left ventricular dysfunction, its severity seems only weakly related to the severity of heart failure. Age was found to be a stronger determinant, which may reflect the underlying age-dependency found also in healthy subjects. Due to age restrictions or other selection criteria, the importance of age may have been underestimated in many previous studies on factors associated with Cheyne-Stokes respiration.

  16. Evaluation of Five Decontamination Methods for Filtering Facepiece Respirators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Michael S.; Eimer, Benjamin C.; Shaffer, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding the availability of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-certified N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) during an influenza pandemic. One possible strategy to mitigate a respirator shortage is to reuse FFRs following a biological decontamination process to render infectious material on the FFR inactive. However, little data exist on the effects of decontamination methods on respirator integrity and performance. This study evaluated five decontamination methods [ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI), ethylene oxide, vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP), microwave oven irradiation, and bleach] using nine models of NIOSH-certified respirators (three models each of N95 FFRs, surgical N95 respirators, and P100 FFRs) to determine which methods should be considered for future research studies. Following treatment by each decontamination method, the FFRs were evaluated for changes in physical appearance, odor, and laboratory performance (filter aerosol penetration and filter airflow resistance). Additional experiments (dry heat laboratory oven exposures, off-gassing, and FFR hydrophobicity) were subsequently conducted to better understand material properties and possible health risks to the respirator user following decontamination. However, this study did not assess the efficiency of the decontamination methods to inactivate viable microorganisms. Microwave oven irradiation melted samples from two FFR models. The remainder of the FFR samples that had been decontaminated had expected levels of filter aerosol penetration and filter airflow resistance. The scent of bleach remained noticeable following overnight drying and low levels of chlorine gas were found to off-gas from bleach-decontaminated FFRs when rehydrated with deionized water. UVGI, ethylene oxide (EtO), and VHP were found to be the most promising decontamination methods; however, concerns remain about the throughput capabilities for EtO and VHP

  17. Antoine Lavoisier and the study of respiration: 200 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, M A

    1991-03-01

    Antoine Lavoisier has been called the father of modern chemistry. From a medical point of view, he introduced the study of respiration and metabolism and so founded biochemistry. With his experiments, our knowledge of how the body works made immense strides forward. Two hundred years ago, he wrote his last authentic and untouched account of his views on respiration, in a letter to Joseph Black in Edinburgh. This opportunity has been taken to briefly review this work and the life of a man who did much to improve our understanding of ourselves.

  18. Elemental Concentration of Inhalable and Respirable Particulate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previously, the capture of suspended particulate matter focused on the total suspended particulate matter, until recent research into the health impacts of suspended particulate matter suggests that minute particles that have toxic substances adsorbed onto their surface are insidious and deleterious for human health and ...

  19. Response of Soil Respiration to Soil Temperature and Moisture in a 50-Year-Old Oriental Arborvitae Plantation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinxiao; Zha, Tianshan; Pang, Zhuo; Wu, Bin; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Guopeng; Li, Chunping; Cao, Jixin; Jia, Guodong; Li, Xizhi; Wu, Hailong

    2011-01-01

    China possesses large areas of plantation forests which take up great quantities of carbon. However, studies on soil respiration in these plantation forests are rather scarce and their soil carbon flux remains an uncertainty. In this study, we used an automatic chamber system to measure soil surface flux of a 50-year-old mature plantation of Platycladus orientalis at Jiufeng Mountain, Beijing, China. Mean daily soil respiration rates (Rs) ranged from 0.09 to 4.87 µmol CO2 m−2s−1, with the highest values observed in August and the lowest in the winter months. A logistic model gave the best fit to the relationship between hourly Rs and soil temperature (Ts), explaining 82% of the variation in Rs over the annual cycle. The annual total of soil respiration estimated from the logistic model was 645±5 g C m−2 year−1. The performance of the logistic model was poorest during periods of high soil temperature or low soil volumetric water content (VWC), which limits the model's ability to predict the seasonal dynamics of Rs. The logistic model will potentially overestimate Rs at high Ts and low VWC. Seasonally, Rs increased significantly and linearly with increasing VWC in May and July, in which VWC was low. In the months from August to November, inclusive, in which VWC was not limiting, Rs showed a positively exponential relationship with Ts. The seasonal sensitivity of soil respiration to Ts (Q10) ranged from 0.76 in May to 4.38 in October. It was suggested that soil temperature was the main determinant of soil respiration when soil water was not limiting. PMID:22163012

  20. Response of soil respiration to soil temperature and moisture in a 50-year-old oriental arborvitae plantation in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxiao Yu

    Full Text Available China possesses large areas of plantation forests which take up great quantities of carbon. However, studies on soil respiration in these plantation forests are rather scarce and their soil carbon flux remains an uncertainty. In this study, we used an automatic chamber system to measure soil surface flux of a 50-year-old mature plantation of Platycladus orientalis at Jiufeng Mountain, Beijing, China. Mean daily soil respiration rates (R(s ranged from 0.09 to 4.87 µmol CO(2 m(-2 s(-1, with the highest values observed in August and the lowest in the winter months. A logistic model gave the best fit to the relationship between hourly R(s and soil temperature (T(s, explaining 82% of the variation in R(s over the annual cycle. The annual total of soil respiration estimated from the logistic model was 645±5 g C m(-2 year(-1. The performance of the logistic model was poorest during periods of high soil temperature or low soil volumetric water content (VWC, which limits the model's ability to predict the seasonal dynamics of R(s. The logistic model will potentially overestimate R(s at high T(s and low VWC. Seasonally, R(s increased significantly and linearly with increasing VWC in May and July, in which VWC was low. In the months from August to November, inclusive, in which VWC was not limiting, R(s showed a positively exponential relationship with T(s. The seasonal sensitivity of soil respiration to T(s (Q(10 ranged from 0.76 in May to 4.38 in October. It was suggested that soil temperature was the main determinant of soil respiration when soil water was not limiting.

  1. Sun Basking in Red Wood Ants Formica polyctena (Hymenoptera, Formicidae): Individual Behaviour and Temperature-Dependent Respiration Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadochová, Štěpánka; Frouz, Jan; Roces, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    In early spring, red wood ants Formica polyctena are often observed clustering on the nest surface in large numbers basking in the sun. It has been hypothesized that sun-basking behaviour may contribute to nest heating because of both heat carriage into the nest by sun-basking workers, and catabolic heat production from the mobilization of the workers' lipid reserves. We investigated sun-basking behaviour in laboratory colonies of F. polyctena exposed to an artificial heat source. Observations on identified individuals revealed that not all ants bask in the sun. Sun-basking and non-sun-basking workers did not differ in body size nor in respiration rates. The number of sun-basking ants and the number of their visits to the hot spot depended on the temperature of both the air and the hot spot. To investigate whether sun basking leads to a physiological activation linked with increased lipolysis, we measured respiration rates of individual workers as a function of temperature, and compared respiration rates of sun-basking workers before and two days after they were allowed to expose themselves to a heat source over 10 days, at self-determined intervals. As expected for ectothermic animals, respiration rates increased with increasing temperatures in the range 5 to 35°C. However, the respiration rates of sun-basking workers measured two days after a long-term exposure to the heat source were similar to those before sun basking, providing no evidence for a sustained increase of the basal metabolic rates after prolonged sun basking. Based on our measurements, we argue that self-heating of the nest mound in early spring has therefore to rely on alternative heat sources, and speculate that physical transport of heat in the ant bodies may have a significant effect.

  2. Influence of Disturbance on Soil Respiration in Biologically Crusted Soil during the Dry Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil respiration (Rs is a major pathway for carbon cycling and is a complex process involving abiotic and biotic factors. Biological soil crusts (BSCs are a key biotic component of desert ecosystems worldwide. In desert ecosystems, soils are protected from surface disturbance by BSCs, but it is unknown whether Rs is affected by disturbance of this crust layer. We measured Rs in three types of disturbed and undisturbed crusted soils (algae, lichen, and moss, as well as bare land from April to August, 2010, in Mu Us desert, northwest China. Rs was similar among undisturbed soils but increased significantly in disturbed moss and algae crusted soils. The variation of Rs in undisturbed and disturbed soil was related to soil bulk density. Disturbance also led to changes in soil organic carbon and fine particles contents, including declines of 60–70% in surface soil C and N, relative to predisturbance values. Once BSCs were disturbed, Q10 increased. Our findings indicate that a loss of BSCs cover will lead to greater soil C loss through respiration. Given these results, understanding the disturbance sensitivity impact on Rs could be helpful to modify soil management practices which promote carbon sequestration.

  3. Powder, capsule and device: An imperative ménage à trois for respirable dry powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoubben, Aurélie; Blasi, Paolo; Giontella, Andrea; Giovagnoli, Stefano; Ricci, Maurizio

    2015-10-15

    The development of inhaled products to treat or to prevent lung infection is a very active research field in drug delivery. The pulmonary route is extremely attractive but very challenging. This paper reports the study of excipient, capsule brand and device influence on the aerodynamic behavior of dry powder formulations to treat tuberculosis. A capreomycin hydrophobic salt was powdered using spray-drying and formulated using lactose (added after spray-drying, external excipient) or L-leucine (added before spray-drying, internal excipient). Aerosolization performances were investigated loading the formulations in 2 different capsule brands and aerosolizing them with 3 different devices. Capreomycin oleate and capreomycin oleate/l-leucine powders were produced with a yield around 70%. Capreomycin oleate powder was composed of particles with an irregular surface. Particles of capreomycin oleate/l-leucine were roundish and wrinkled on the surface. Capreomycin oleate/l-leucine formulation gave the highest values of respirable fraction in all cases. Statistical analysis asserted the significant effect on the respirable fraction of the powder (p≤0.001), the capsule brand (p≤0.01) and the device (p≤0.05). The use of L-leucine as internal excipient allows one to avoid the use of lactose, obtaining a carrier-free formulation. Even though differences are not very large, to obtain the highest RFE, the best choice between capsule and device is Quali-V(®) and model 8. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Respirable concrete dust--silicosis hazard in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linch, Kenneth D

    2002-03-01

    Concrete is an extremely important part of the infrastructure of modern life and must be replaced as it ages. Many of the methods of removing, repairing, or altering existing concrete structures have the potential for producing vast quantities of respirable dust. Since crystalline silica in the form of quartz is a major component of concrete, airborne respirable quartz dust may be produced during construction work involving the disturbance of concrete, thereby producing a silicosis hazard for exposed workers. Silicosis is a debilitating and sometimes fatal lung disease resulting from breathing microscopic particles of crystalline silica. Between 1992 and 1998, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) made visits to construction projects where concrete was being mechanically disturbed in order to obtain data concerning respirable crystalline silica dust exposures. The construction activities studied included: abrasive blasting, concrete pavement sawing and drilling, and asphalt/concrete milling. Air samples of respirable dust were obtained using 10-mm nylon cyclone pre-separators, 37-mm polyvinyl chloride (PVC) filters, and constant-flow pumps calibrated at 1.7 L/min. In addition, high-volume respirable dust samples were obtained on 37-mm PVC filters using 1/2" metal cyclones (Sensidyne model 18) and constant-flow pumps calibrated at 9.0 L/min. Air sample analysis included total weight gain by gravimetric analysis according to NIOSH Analytical Method 600 and respirable crystalline silica (quartz and cristobalite) using x-ray diffraction, as per NIOSH Analytical Method 7500. For abrasive blasting of concrete structures, the respirable crystalline silica (quartz) concentration ranged up to 14.0 mg/m3 for a 96-minute sample resulting in an eight-hour time-weighted average (TWA) of 2.8 mg/m3. For drilling concrete highway pavement the respirable quartz concentrations ranged up to 4.4 mg/m3 for a 358-minute sample, resulting in an eight-hour TWA

  5. Controls on 13C of ecosystem respired CO2 in Southeastern US forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, B.; Chanton, J.; Smith, M.

    2006-12-01

    Pine-dominated southeastern United States forests constitute the largest documented carbon sink among North American or European forests. The extent of large-scale (hundreds of kilometers) spatial variability in the isotopic composition of ecosystem respired CO2 in this region is unresolved. We determined the δ13C of ecosystem (δCr), soil (δCs), and foliage (δCf) respired CO2 over a 2 year period (i) in a rotation-aged pine plantation and a (ii) 80 year old naturally regenerated pine forest in Florida, and contrasted our results with those from similar investigations in a pine plantation and naturally regenerated hardwood forest in North Carolina. We related δCr, δCf, and δCs to environmental factors using a time lag of 5 days. This time lag was based on metabolic pool turnover times determined with a year-long slash pine labeling experiment. Despite large variability in aboveground meteorological conditions, the isotopic composition of ecosystem respired carbon remained relatively constant. The isotopic composition of foliage soluble carbohydrates exhibited the same order of variability as δCr. Soil and stem water δ 18O profiles at both Florida sites indicate that the plants' primary water uptake zone is below the surficial layer of highly variable moisture content. This suggests that the plants are less responsive to variability in aboveground meteorological conditions due to reliable access to groundwater. In contrast, the forests studied in North Carolina derive water primarily from the variable surficial zone, and exhibited a time-lagged response to aboveground conditions. These results highlight that successful regional-scale generalizations of δCr based on local measurements must account for spatial variability in plant physiological responses to meteorological conditions and surface soil water conditions.

  6. Pulmonary inflammation and crystalline silica in respirable coal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    This study demonstrates dose-response relationships between respirable crystalline silica in coal mine dust and pulmonary inflammation, antioxidant production, and radiographic small opacities. [Kuempel E D, Attfield M D, Vallyathan V, Lapp N L, Hale J M, Smith R J and Castranova V 2003 Pulmonary inflammation and ...

  7. Engineered sodium hyaluronate respirable dry powders for pulmonary drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Francesco; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Kumar, Abhinav; Sonvico, Fabio; Forbes, Ben; Bettini, Ruggero; Buttini, Francesca

    2017-01-30

    Sodium hyaluronate (HYA) warrants attention as a material for inhalation due to its (i) therapeutic potential, (ii) utility as a formulation excipient or drug carrier, and (iii) ability to target lung inflammation and cancer. This study aimed to overcome formulation and manufacturing impediments to engineer biocompatible spray-dried HYA powders for inhalation. Novel methodology was developed to produce HYA microparticles by spray drying. Different types of surfactant were included in the formulation to improve powder respirability, which was evaluated in vitro using cascade impactors. The individual formulation components and formulated products were evaluated for their biocompatibility with A549 respiratory epithelial cells. The inclusion of stearyl surfactants, 5% w/v, produced the most respirable HYA-powders; FPF 59.0-66.3%. A trend to marginally higher respirability was observed for powders containing stearylamine>stearyl alcohol>cetostearyl alcohol. Pure HYA was biocompatible with A549 cells at all concentrations measured, but the biocompatibility of the stearyl surfactants (based on lethal concentration 50%; LC 50 ) in the MTT assay ranked stearyl alcohol>cetostearyl alcohol>stearylamine with LC 50 of 24.7, 13.2 and 1.8μg/mL, respectively. We report the first respirable HYA powders produced by spray-drying. A lead formulation containing 5% stearyl alcohol was identified for further studies aimed at translating the proposed benefits of inhaled HYA into safe and clinically effective HYA products. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative change of EEG and respiration signals during mindfulness meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahani, Asieh; Wahbeh, Helane; Nezamfar, Hooman; Miller, Meghan; Erdogmus, Deniz; Oken, Barry

    2014-05-14

    This study investigates measures of mindfulness meditation (MM) as a mental practice, in which a resting but alert state of mind is maintained. A population of older people with high stress level participated in this study, while electroencephalographic (EEG) and respiration signals were recorded during a MM intervention. The physiological signals during meditation and control conditions were analyzed with signal processing. EEG and respiration data were collected and analyzed on 34 novice meditators after a 6-week meditation intervention. Collected data were analyzed with spectral analysis, phase analysis and classification to evaluate an objective marker for meditation. Different frequency bands showed differences in meditation and control conditions. Furthermore, we established a classifier using EEG and respiration signals with a higher accuracy (85%) at discriminating between meditation and control conditions than a classifier using the EEG signal only (78%). Support vector machine (SVM) classifier with EEG and respiration feature vector is a viable objective marker for meditation ability. This classifier should be able to quantify different levels of meditation depth and meditation experience in future studies.

  9. Plant species richness regulates soil respiration through changes in productivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavares Correa Dias, A.; van Ruijven, J.; Berendse, F.

    2010-01-01

    Soil respiration is an important pathway of the C cycle. However, it is still poorly understood how changes in plant community diversity can affect this ecosystem process. Here we used a long-term experiment consisting of a gradient of grassland plant species richness to test for effects of

  10. Temperature response of soil respiration largely unaltered with experimental warming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carey, Joanna C.; Tang, Jianwu; Templer, Pamela H.; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Crowther, Thomas W.; Burton, Andrew J.; Dukes, Jeffrey S.; Emmett, Bridget; Frey, Serita D.; Heskel, Mary A.; Jiang, Lifen; Machmuller, Megan B.; Mohan, Jacqueline; Panetta, Anne Marie; Reich, Peter B.; Reinsch, Sabine; Wang, Xin; Allison, Steven D.; Bamminger, Chris; Bridgham, Scott; Collins, Scott L.; de Dato, Giovanbattista; Eddy, William C.; Enquist, Brian J.; Estiarte, Marc; Harte, John; Henderson, Amanda; Johnson, Bart R.; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Luo, Yiqi; Marhan, Sven; Melillo, Jerry M.; Peñuelas, Josep; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Poll, Christian; Rastetter, Edward; Reinmann, Andrew B.; Reynolds, Lorien L.; Schmidt, Inger K.; Shaver, Gaius R.; Strong, Aaron L.; Suseela, Vidya; Tietema, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soil is a major yet poorly understood flux in the global carbon cycle. Climatic warming is hypothesized to increase rates of soil respiration, potentially fueling further increases in global temperatures. However, despite considerable scientific

  11. Plant species richness regulates soil respiration through changes in productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dias, A.A.; Ruijven, van J.; Berendse, F.

    2010-01-01

    Soil respiration is an important pathway of the C cycle. However, it is still poorly understood how changes in plant community diversity can affect this ecosystem process. Here we used a long-term experiment consisting of a gradient of grassland plant species richness to test for effects of

  12. Ecophysiology and environmental distribution of organohalide-respiring bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Organohalide-respiring bacteria (OHRB) are able to breathe natural and anthropogenically  produced organohalides persistent in a broad range of oxygen-depleted environments. Therefore, these microorganisms are of high interest for organohalide-contaminated site bioremediation and natural

  13. Quantitative change of EEG and respiration signals during mindfulness meditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigates measures of mindfulness meditation (MM) as a mental practice, in which a resting but alert state of mind is maintained. A population of older people with high stress level participated in this study, while electroencephalographic (EEG) and respiration signals were recorded during a MM intervention. The physiological signals during meditation and control conditions were analyzed with signal processing. Methods EEG and respiration data were collected and analyzed on 34 novice meditators after a 6-week meditation intervention. Collected data were analyzed with spectral analysis, phase analysis and classification to evaluate an objective marker for meditation. Results Different frequency bands showed differences in meditation and control conditions. Furthermore, we established a classifier using EEG and respiration signals with a higher accuracy (85%) at discriminating between meditation and control conditions than a classifier using the EEG signal only (78%). Conclusion Support vector machine (SVM) classifier with EEG and respiration feature vector is a viable objective marker for meditation ability. This classifier should be able to quantify different levels of meditation depth and meditation experience in future studies. PMID:24939519

  14. Tillage and manure effect on soil microbial biomass and respiration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of both tillage and liquid pig manure application on soil microbial biomass, enzyme activities and microbial respiration in a meadow soil. The results obtained did not show any significant effect of tillage and manure on microbial biomass carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) ...

  15. Divergent apparent temperature sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystem respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing Song; Shuli Niu; Ruise Luo; Yiqi Luo; Jiquan Chen; Guirui Yu; Janusz Olejnik; Georg Wohlfahrt; Gerard Kiely; Ako Noormets; Leonardo Montagnani; Alessandro Cescatti; Vincenzo Magliulo; Beverly Elizabeth Law; Magnus Lund; Andrej Varlagin; Antonio Raschi; Matthias Peichl; Mats B. Nilsson; Lutz Merbold

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies revealed convergent temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration (Re) within aquatic ecosystems and between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We do not know yet whether various terrestrial ecosystems have consistent or divergent temperature sensitivity. Here, we synthesized 163 eddy covariance flux sites across the world and...

  16. Estimating daytime ecosystem respiration from eddy-flux data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Herbst, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    based on whole ecosystem fluxes from a linear regression of photosynthetic photon flux density data vs. daytime net ecosystem exchange data at forest ecosystem level. This method is based on the principles of the Kok-method applied at leaf level for estimating daytime respiration. We demonstrate...

  17. ECG-derived respiration methods: adapted ICA and PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiinanen, Suvi; Noponen, Kai; Tulppo, Mikko; Kiviniemi, Antti; Seppänen, Tapio

    2015-05-01

    Respiration is an important signal in early diagnostics, prediction, and treatment of several diseases. Moreover, a growing trend toward ambulatory measurements outside laboratory environments encourages developing indirect measurement methods such as ECG derived respiration (EDR). Recently, decomposition techniques like principal component analysis (PCA), and its nonlinear version, kernel PCA (KPCA), have been used to derive a surrogate respiration signal from single-channel ECG. In this paper, we propose an adapted independent component analysis (AICA) algorithm to obtain EDR signal, and extend the normal linear PCA technique based on the best principal component (PC) selection (APCA, adapted PCA) to improve its performance further. We also demonstrate that the usage of smoothing spline resampling and bandpass-filtering improve the performance of all EDR methods. Compared with other recent EDR methods using correlation coefficient and magnitude squared coherence, the proposed AICA and APCA yield a statistically significant improvement with correlations 0.84, 0.82, 0.76 and coherences 0.90, 0.91, 0.85 between reference respiration and AICA, APCA and KPCA, respectively. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Inhibitory Effects of Respiration Inhibitors on Aflatoxin Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Sakuda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin production inhibitors, which do not inhibit the growth of aflatoxigenic fungi, may be used to control aflatoxin without incurring a rapid spread of resistant strains. A respiration inhibitor that inhibits aflatoxin production was identified during a screening process for natural, aflatoxin-production inhibitors. This prompted us to evaluate respiration inhibitors as potential aflatoxin control agents. The inhibitory activities of four natural inhibitors, seven synthetic miticides, and nine synthetic fungicides were evaluated on aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus. All of the natural inhibitors (rotenone, siccanin, aptenin A5, and antimycin A inhibited fungal aflatoxin production with IC50 values around 10 µM. Among the synthetic miticides, pyridaben, fluacrypyrim, and tolfenpyrad exhibited strong inhibitory activities with IC50 values less than 0.2 µM, whereas cyflumetofen did not show significant inhibitory activity. Of the synthetic fungicides, boscalid, pyribencarb, azoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, and kresoxim-methyl demonstrated strong inhibitory activities, with IC50 values less than 0.5 µM. Fungal growth was not significantly affected by any of the inhibitors tested at concentrations used. There was no correlation observed between the targets of respiration inhibitors (complexes I, II, and III and their IC50 values for aflatoxin-production inhibitory activity. This study suggests that respiration inhibitors, including commonly used pesticides, are useful for aflatoxin control.

  19. Pulmonary inflammation and crystalline silica in respirable coal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    silica in coal mine dust and pulmonary inflammation, antioxidant production, and radiographic small opacities. [Kuempel E D, Attfield M D, Vallyathan V, Lapp N L, Hale J M, Smith R J and Castranova V 2003 Pulmonary inflammation and crystal- line silica in respirable coal mine dust: dose-response; J. Biosci. 28 61–69]. 1.

  20. [Therapy of Cheyne-Stokes respiration with nocturnal oxygen therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreas, S; von Breska, B; Clemens, C; Schulz, R; Kreuzer, H

    1995-01-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration is common in patients with severe congestive heart failure and is associated with significant nocturnal oxygen desaturation and sleep disruption. The pathogenesis of Cheyne-Stokes respiration in patients with congestive heart failure has been well described and is related to prolonged circulation time between the lung and the carotid body mainly due to increased cardiac dimensions, reduced body stores of oxygen and carbon dioxide, disturbance of ventilation and respiratory control due to arousals and a relatively high hypercapnic ventilatory response. Oxygen is likely to reduce Cheyne-Stokes respiration by increasing oxygen and carbon dioxide stores and reduces the hypercapnic ventilatory response. In the following paper we describe a study designed to determine the impact of nasal nocturnal oxygen on Cheyne-Stokes respiration, sleep, peak oxygen consumption during bicycle exercise, cognitive function evaluated by the trailmaking test and daytime symptoms in patients with severe congestive heart failure. The study is designed as a randomized, cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled protocol on about 20 patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction < 35%.

  1. Respirable dust meter locates super polluters in traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt-Ott's, A.; Kurniawan, A.; Schrauwers, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Netherlands is having trouble with the EU standards for respirable dust (PM 10). The Dutch Council of State recently blocked a number of residential development projects because local conditions failed to meet the PM 10 standard. Research by the Nano Structured Materials group at TU Delft shows

  2. Temperature response of soil respiration largely unaltered with experimental warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, Joanna C; Tang, Jianwu; Templer, Pamela H

    2016-01-01

    , spanning nine biomes and over 2 decades of warming. Our analysis reveals no significant differences in the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration between control and warmed plots in all biomes, with the exception of deserts and boreal forests. Thus, our data provide limited evidence of acclimation...

  3. Effect of Hyperglycemia on Mitochondrial Respiration in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Højberg, Patricia M V; Almdal, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    DM. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eleven patients with T2DM [9 males, 2 females; age, 52.8 +/- 2.5 yr (mean +/- se); body mass index, 30.2 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2)] in poor glycemic control were treated with insulin aspart and NPH insulin for a median period of 46 d (range, 31-59). Mitochondrial respiration...

  4. Controls on winter ecosystem respiration in temperate and boreal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Wang; P. Ciais; S.L. Piao; C. Ottle; P. Brender; F. Maignan; A. Arain; A. Cescatti; D. Gianelle; C. Gough; L Gu; P. Lafleur; T. Laurila; B. Marcolla; H. Margolis; L. Montagnani; E. Moors; N. Saigusa; T. Vesala; G. Wohlfahrt; C. Koven; A. Black; E. Dellwik; A. Don; D. Hollinger; A. Knohl; R. Monson; J. Munger; A. Suyker; A. Varlagin; S. Verma

    2011-01-01

    Winter CO2 fluxes represent an important component of the annual carbon budget in northern ecosystems. Understanding winter respiration processes and their responses to climate change is also central to our ability to assess terrestrial carbon cycle and climate feedbacks in the future. However, the factors influencing the spatial and temporal...

  5. Connecting Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration: Preservice Teachers' Conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mary H.; Schwartz, Renee S.

    2009-01-01

    The biological processes of photosynthesis and plant cellular respiration include multiple biochemical steps, occur simultaneously within plant cells, and share common molecular components. Yet, learners often compartmentalize functions and specialization of cell organelles relevant to these two processes, without considering the interconnections…

  6. Misconceptions about Photosynthesis and Respiration held by 'O ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Misconceptions about Photosynthesis and Respiration held by 'O' Level Students in Gweru Urban High Schools. Alois S Chiromo. Abstract. No Abstract Available Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research Vol.14(2) 2002: 156-166. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  7. Controls on winter ecosystem respiration in temperate and boreal ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciais, P.; Wang, T.; Piao, S.L.; Ottlé, C.; Brender, P.; Moors, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Winter CO2 fluxes represent an important component of the annual carbon budget in northern ecosystems. Understanding winter respiration processes and their responses to climate change is also central to our ability to assess terrestrial carbon cycle and climate feedbacks in the future. However, the

  8. Soil respiration in Mexico: Advances and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Cueva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil respiration (RS is a CO2 efflux from the soil to the atmosphere defined as the sum of autotrophic (respiration by roots and mycorrhizae, and heterotrophic (respiration of microorganisms that decompose fractions of organic matter and of soil fauna respiration. Globally, RS is considered to be the second largest flux of C to the atmosphere. From published literature it is clear that its main controls are soil temperature, soil moisture, photosynthesis, organic matter inputs and soil biota composition. Despite its relevance in C cycle science, there have been only twenty eight studies in Mexico in the last decade where direct measurement of gas exchange was conducted in the field. These studies were held mostly in agricultural and forest ecosystems, in Central and Southern Mexico where mild subtropical conditions prevail. However, arid, semi-arid, tropical and wetland ecosystems may have an important role in Mexico’s CO2 emissions because of their extent and extensive land use changes. From the twenty eight studies, only two provided continuous measurements of RS with high temporal resolution, highlighting the need for long-term studies to evaluate the complex biophysical controls of this flux and associated processes over different ecological succession stages. We conclude that Mexico represents an important opportunity to understand its complex dynamics, in national and global context, as ecosystems in the country cover a wide range of climatic conditions. This is particularly important because deforestation and degradation of Mexican ecosystems is rapidly increasing along with expected changes in climate.

  9. Impact of some selected insecticides application on soil microbial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, M A; Razzaque, M A; Rahman, M M

    2008-08-15

    The aim of present study was to investigate the impact of selected insecticides used for controlling brinjal shoot and fruit borer on soil microorganisms and to find out the insecticides or nontoxic to soil microorganism the impact of nine selected insecticides on soil microbial respiration was studied in the laboratory. After injection of different insecticides solutions, the soil was incubated in the laboratory at room temperature for 32 days. The amount of CO2 evolved due to soil microbial respiration was determined at 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 and 32 days of incubation. Flubendiamide, nimbicidine, lambda-cyhalothrin, abamectin and thiodicarb had stimulatory effect on microbial respiration during the initial period of incubation. Chlorpyriphos, cartap and carbosulfan had inhibitory effect on microbial respiration and cypermethrin had no remarkable effect during the early stage of incubation. The negative effect of chlorpyriphos, cartap and carbosulfan was temporary, which was disappeared after 4 days of insecticides application. No effect of the selected insecticides on soil microorganisms was observed after 24 or 32 days of incubation.

  10. Divergent apparent temperature sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystem respiration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Song, B.; Niu, S.; Luo, R.; Chen, J.; Yu, G.; Olejnik, Janusz; Wohlfahrt, G.; Kiely, G.; Noormels, A.; Montagnani, L.; Cescatti, A.; Magliulo, V.; Law, B. E.; Lund, M.; Varlagin, A.; Raschi, A.; Peichl, M.; Nilsson, M.; Merbold, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 5 (2014), s. 419-428 ISSN 1752-9921 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : activation energy * ecosystem respiration * index of water availability * gross primary productivity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.646, year: 2014

  11. 42 CFR 84.1140 - Dust, fume, and mist respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1140 Dust, fume, and mist respirators; performance requirements...

  12. Formation of a Snf1-Mec1-Atg1 Module on Mitochondria Governs Energy Deprivation-Induced Autophagy by Regulating Mitochondrial Respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Cong; Tong, Jingjing; Lu, Puzhong; Wang, Yizheng; Zhang, Jinxie; Sun, Chen; Yuan, Kangning; Xue, Renyu; Zou, Bing; Li, Nianzhong; Xiao, Shuhua; Dai, Chong; Huang, Yuwei; Xu, Liling; Li, Lin; Chen, She; Miao, Di; Deng, Haiteng; Li, Hongliang; Yu, Li

    2017-04-10

    Autophagy is essential for maintaining glucose homeostasis, but the mechanism by which energy deprivation activates autophagy is not fully understood. We show that Mec1/ATR, a member of the DNA damage response pathway, is essential for glucose starvation-induced autophagy. Mec1, Atg13, Atg1, and the energy-sensing kinase Snf1 are recruited to mitochondria shortly after glucose starvation. Mec1 is recruited through the adaptor protein Ggc1. Snf1 phosphorylates Mec1 on the mitochondrial surface, leading to recruitment of Atg1 to mitochondria. Furthermore, the Snf1-mediated Mec1 phosphorylation and mitochondrial recruitment of Atg1 are essential for maintaining mitochondrial respiration during glucose starvation, and active mitochondrial respiration is required for energy deprivation-activated autophagy. Thus, formation of a Snf1-Mec1-Atg1 module on mitochondria governs energy deprivation-induced autophagy by regulating mitochondrial respiration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Long-term mindfulness training is associated with reliable differences in resting respiration rate

    OpenAIRE

    Wielgosz, Joseph; Schuyler, Brianna S.; Lutz, Antoine; Davidson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Respiration rate is known to correlate with aspects of psychological well-being, and attention to respiration is a central component of mindfulness meditation training. Both traditional contemplative systems and recent empirical evidence support an association between formal mindfulness practice and decreased respiration rate. However, the question of whether long-term mindfulness training is associated with stable, generalized changes in respiration has yet to be directly investigated. We an...

  14. Underwater photosynthesis and respiration in leaves of submerged wetland plants: gas films improve CO2 and O2 exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colmer, Timothy David; Pedersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Many wetland plants have gas films on submerged leaf surfaces. We tested the hypotheses that leaf gas films enhance CO(2) uptake for net photosynthesis (P(N)) during light periods, and enhance O(2) uptake for respiration during dark periods. Leaves of four wetland species that form gas films......(N) was enhanced up to sixfold. Gas films on submerged leaves enable continued gas exchange via stomata and thus bypassing of cuticle resistance, enhancing exchange of O(2) and CO(2) with the surrounding water, and therefore underwater P(N) and respiration......., and two species that do not, were used. Gas films were also experimentally removed by brushing with 0.05% (v/v) Triton X. Net O(2) production in light, or O(2) consumption in darkness, was measured at various CO(2) and O(2) concentrations. When gas films were removed, O(2) uptake in darkness was already...

  15. In situ respiration measurements of megafauna in the Kermadec Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnally, Clifton C.; Friedman, Jason R.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to measure metabolic rates of megafauna living in depths greater than 6000 m. Echinoderms, actinarians and a polychaete were captured by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) and inserted into respiration chambers in situ at depths of 4049 m, 7140 m and 8074 m in the region of the Kermadec Trench SW Pacific Ocean. Hadal research has moved into a new frontier as technological improvements now allow for a meticulous investigation of trench ecology in depths greater than 6000 m. The development of an in situ respirometer for use in these studies was deployed in the Kermadec Trench to obtain the first ever rates of basal metabolic rates of hadal megafauna. Typical deep-sea experiments of individual animal physiology must deal with covarying factors of pressure, temperature, light and food supply in this study investigated the effects of pressure and increased food supply on overall animal metabolism. In the Kermadec Trench, holothurian respiration rates (n=4), 0.079±0.011 (mean±SE) μmol-O2 g-1 h-1, were higher than those captured at abyssal depths (n=2), 0.018±0.002 μmol-O2 g-1h-1, in the same region (p<0.001). When Q10 adjusted to a common temperature of 2.5 °C trench holothurian respiration rates ranged between 0.068 and 0.119 μmol-O2 g-1 h-1. Anemone respiration rates were remarkably similar between abyssal and hadal specimens, 0.110 and 0.111 μmol-O2 g-1 h-1, respectively. Our results on echinoderm respiration when corrected for temperature and mass fall below the slope regression when compared with other in situ measurements at shallower ocean depths.

  16. Redefinition and global estimation of basal ecosystem respiration rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, W.; Luo, Y.; Li, X.; Liu, S.; Yu, G.; Zhou, T.; Bahn, M.; Black, A.; Desai, A.R.; Cescatti, A.; Marcolla, B.; Jacobs, C.; Chen, J.; Aurela, M.; Bernhofer, C.; Gielen, B.; Bohrer, G.; Cook, D.R.; Dragoni, D.; Dunn, A.L.; Gianelle, D.; Grnwald, T.; Ibrom, A.; Leclerc, M.Y.; Lindroth, A.; Liu, H.; Marchesini, L.B.; Montagnani, L.; Pita, G.; Rodeghiero, M.; Rodrigues, A.; Starr, G.; Stoy, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Basal ecosystem respiration rate (BR), the ecosystem respiration rate at a given temperature, is a common and important parameter in empirical models for quantifying ecosystem respiration (ER) globally. Numerous studies have indicated that BR varies in space. However, many empirical ER models still use a global constant BR largely due to the lack of a functional description for BR. In this study, we redefined BR to be ecosystem respiration rate at the mean annual temperature. To test the validity of this concept, we conducted a synthesis analysis using 276 site-years of eddy covariance data, from 79 research sites located at latitudes ranging from ∼3°S to ∼70°N. Results showed that mean annual ER rate closely matches ER rate at mean annual temperature. Incorporation of site-specific BR into global ER model substantially improved simulated ER compared to an invariant BR at all sites. These results confirm that ER at the mean annual temperature can be considered as BR in empirical models. A strong correlation was found between the mean annual ER and mean annual gross primary production (GPP). Consequently, GPP, which is typically more accurately modeled, can be used to estimate BR. A light use efficiency GPP model (i.e., EC-LUE) was applied to estimate global GPP, BR and ER with input data from MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications) and MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). The global ER was 103 Pg C yr −1, with the highest respiration rate over tropical forests and the lowest value in dry and high-latitude areas.

  17. Respirator studies for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Progress report, July 1, 1974--June 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, D.D.; Revoir, W.; Lowry, P.L.

    1976-08-01

    Respirator studies carried out in FY 1975 for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health were concentrated in two major areas: (1) the development of respirator test equipment and methods to improve the means of evaluating the performance of respirators, (2) the testing of respirators to obtain quantitative data to permit recommendations to be made to upgrade respirator performance criteria. Major accomplishments included obtaining man-test results on several different respirators using an anthropometrically selected test panel, determination of respirator exhalation valve leakages under static and dynamic conditions, and determination of the effects of respirator strap tension on facepiece leakage.

  18. Respirator studies for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Progress report, July 1, 1974--June 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, D.D.; Revoir, W.; Lowry, P.L.

    1976-08-01

    Respirator studies carried out in FY 1975 for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health were concentrated in two major areas: (1) the development of respirator test equipment and methods to improve the means of evaluating the performance of respirators, (2) the testing of respirators to obtain quantitative data to permit recommendations to be made to upgrade respirator performance criteria. Major accomplishments included obtaining man-test results on several different respirators using an anthropometrically selected test panel, determination of respirator exhalation valve leakages under static and dynamic conditions, and determination of the effects of respirator strap tension on facepiece leakage

  19. Phenophases alter the soil respiration-temperature relationship in an oak-dominated forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jared L. DeForest; Askoo Noormets; Steve G. McNulty; Ge Sun; Gwen Teeney; Jiquan Chen

    2006-01-01

    Soil respiration (SR) represents a major component of forest ecosystem respiration and is influenced seasonally by environmental factors such as temperature, soil moisture, root respiration, and litter fall. Changes in these environmental factors correspond with shifts in plant phenology. In this study, we examined the relationship between canopy phenophases @re-growth...

  20. 46 CFR Appendix E to Subpart C to... - Respirator Fit Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: (1) Name of employee. (2) Type, brand, and size of respirator. (3) Date of test. Where QNFT is used... performed in a test chamber and in which the normal air-purifying element of the respirator is replaced with...-purifying respirators, the normal filter or cartridge element must be replaced with a high-efficiency...

  1. [Variation characteristic in soil respiration of apple orchard and its biotic and abiotic influencing factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Guo, Sheng-Li; Liu, Qing-Fang; Zhang, Yan-Jun; Jiang, Ji-Shao; Guo, Hui-Min; Li, Ru-Jian

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the orchard variability of soil respiration and the response of soil respiration to its influencing factors is helpful for a deep understanding about the effects of converting cropland to apple orchard. A field experiment was conducted in the Changwu State Key Agro-Ecological Station. Soil respiration, soil temperature, soil moisture and roots biomasses were periodically measured in a mature apple orchard during 2011 and 2012. Soil respiration decreased as the distance from the trunk increased. The cumulative soil respiration in the 0.5 m-distance from the trunk was 20% and 31% higher than that in the 2 m-distance from the trunk, respectively in 2011 and 2012. The temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Q10) was relatively lower in the 2 m-distance than that in the 0. 5 m-distance in both years. Soil temperature and soil moisture were slightly higher in the 2 m-distance, but there was no significant difference between the 2 m-distance and the 0. 5 m-distance. Soil respiration and soil temperature showed a significant exponential relationship, but there was no positive correlation between soil moisture and soil respiration. Soil temperature changes can explain seasonal variation of soil respiration well, but it could not explain its spatial variability. Root density was an important factor for the spatial variability of soil respiration and Q15. Variation of soil respiration coefficient was 23% -31%. Therefore, the distance from the trunk should be considered when estimating orchards soil respiration.

  2. High- and low-pressure pneumotachometers measure respiration rates accurately in adverse environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagot, R. J.; Mc Donald, R. T.; Roman, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Respiration-rate transducers in the form of pneumotachometers measure respiration rates of pilots operating high performance research aircraft. In each low pressure or high pressure oxygen system a sensor is placed in series with the pilots oxygen supply line to detect gas flow accompanying respiration.

  3. Foliar and ecosystem respiration in an old-growth tropical rain forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molly A. Cavaleri; Steven F. Oberbauer; Michael G. Ryan

    2008-01-01

    Foliar respiration is a major component of ecosystem respiration, yet extrapolations are often uncertain in tropical forests because of indirect estimates of leaf area index (LAI).A portable tower was used to directly measure LAI and night-time foliar respiration from 52 vertical transects throughout an old-growth tropical rain forest in Costa Rica. In this study, we (...

  4. 30 CFR 71.101 - Respirable dust standard when quartz is present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respirable dust standard when quartz is present... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Dust Standards § 71.101 Respirable dust standard when quartz is present. When the respirable dust in the mine atmosphere of the active workings contains more than 5 percent quartz, the...

  5. 30 CFR 70.101 - Respirable dust standard when quartz is present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respirable dust standard when quartz is present... Respirable dust standard when quartz is present. When the respirable dust in the mine atmosphere of the active workings contains more than 5 percent quartz, the operator shall continuously maintain the average...

  6. Glycolysis is dynamic and relates closely to respiration rate in stored sugarbeet roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although respiration is the principal cause of postharvest sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) sucrose loss, the internal mechanisms that control sugarbeet root respiration have not been established. Available evidence, however, indicates that respiration is likely to be controlled by the availability of r...

  7. 30 CFR 57.11059 - Respirable atmosphere for hoist operators underground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respirable atmosphere for hoist operators... NONMETAL MINES Travelways and Escapeways Escapeways-Underground Only § 57.11059 Respirable atmosphere for... be provided with a respirable atmosphere completely independent of the mine atmosphere. This...

  8. 42 CFR 84.1157 - Chemical cartridge respirators with particulate filters; performance requirements; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1157 Chemical cartridge respirators... respirator mounted on a test fixture with air flowing at a continuous rate of 85 liters per minute, both...

  9. Tundra ecosystem respiration is dominated by recent C inputs, masking contributions from old and more decomposed substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritz, M.; Celis, G.; Ebert, C.; Hutchings, J. A.; Ledman, J.; Pegoraro, E.; Salmon, V.; Schaedel, C.; Taylor, M.; Schuur, E.

    2017-12-01

    Rising global temperatures and increasing soil respiration are of great concern in high latitude permafrost ecosystems where substantial amounts of carbon (C) are stabilized by cold temperatures. The isotopic δ13C and Δ14C signature of respiration can be used to determine contributions of decomposition from above- and belowground plant respiration, and different parts of the soil column because δ13C and Δ14C change with depth, reflecting new plant inputs at the surface and organic matter in later stages of decomposition at depth. We measured ecosystem respiration (Reco) δ13C from early summer thaw until the end of summer transition from net ecosystem C uptake to net C release in a warming experiment with accelerated permafrost thaw and a vegetation removal treatment and determined the effect of thaw, water table, and plant productivity on seasonal Reco δ13C. When the system was a net CO2 sink in early August and after the system switched to a source we measured Δ14C to further resolve Reco sources. Reco δ13C was most enriched in spring (-23.02 ‰) suggesting that spring thaw released winter-trapped CO2 from soil decomposition in deeper soil layers. In areas with shallow thaw depletion of Reco δ13C from spring (-22.54 ‰) to autumn (-24.54 ‰) indicates a seasonally increasing contribution from plant root respiration and surface soil decomposition, even after surface soils cooled and aboveground leaves senesced. In deeply thawed, dry areas Reco δ13C (-23.33 ‰) was significantly enriched and showed no seasonal pattern while Reco δ13C from deeply thawed, wet areas (-24.19 ‰) was significantly depleted and similarly lacked seasonal change. Reco δ 13C from vegetation free areas was depleted and remained similar all season (-25.28 ‰). Decline of Reco Δ14C between early August (Δ14C: 30 ‰) and September (Δ14C: 6.85 ‰), indicates an underlying contribution to Reco from old, deep soil sources that was masked by high plant activity and surface

  10. Floating of the lobes of mosquito (Aedes togoi) larva for respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Chul; Kim, Jun Ho; Lee, Sang Joon

    2017-02-20

    Mosquito (Aedes togoi) larva has to float its siphon on the water surface to breathe air. To elucidate the floating mechanism of the siphon, morphological structures, especially the flap-like lobes and spiracle of the siphon, were observed. Wettability and dynamic behavior of the lobes on the water surface were also experimentally examined. The lobes formed a hollow cone shape under water and expanded on the water surface. The spiracle was located at the base of the cone. The lobes exhibited hydrophobic wettability. During floating process, the lobes were spread into a triangular shape in apical view, and the spiracle was exposed to air. When they were submerged in water, the lobes were folded into a cone shape to seal the spiracle and protect it from water penetration. These dynamic processes occurred at the water surface. In this study, the floating mechanism of the lobes for respiration was described based on the cross-sectional morphology of the lobes with the pressure induced by surface tension and the hydrostatic pressure proportional to depth. This study would be helpful in elucidating the behavior of mosquito larvae near the water surface and may facilitate the formulation of methods to control mosquito larvae.

  11. Shape Analysis of 3D Head Scan Data for U.S. Respirator Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slice DennisE

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2003, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH conducted a head-and-face anthropometric survey of diverse, civilian respirator users. Of the 3,997 subjects measured using traditional anthropometric techniques, surface scans and 26 three-dimensional (3D landmark locations were collected for 947 subjects. The objective of this study was to report the size and shape variation of the survey participants using the 3D data. Generalized Procrustes Analysis (GPA was conducted to standardize configurations of landmarks associated with individuals into a common coordinate system. The superimposed coordinates for each individual were used as commensurate variables that describe individual shape and were analyzed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA to identify population variation. The first four principal components (PC account for 49% of the total sample variation. The first PC indicates that overall size is an important component of facial variability. The second PC accounts for long and narrow or short and wide faces. Longer narrow orbits versus shorter wider orbits can be described by PC3, and PC4 represents variation in the degree of ortho/prognathism. Geometric Morphometrics provides a detailed and interpretable assessment of morphological variation that may be useful in assessing respirators and devising new test and certification standards.

  12. Planktonic production and respiration in a subtropical lake dominated by Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonetta, D; Laudares-Silva, R; Petrucio, M M

    2015-05-01

    Planktonic primary production and respiration rates were estimated in a subtropical coastal lake dominated by Cyanobacteria in order to investigate the temporal and vertical variation in this lake and to evaluate its relationships with limnological variables and phytoplankton. Light and dark bottles were incubated at four different depths in the central part of the lake and were performed bimonthly from June/2009 to December/2010. No significant difference was evident among depths in relation to phytoplankton, limnological variables and metabolic rates. However, the highest production rates were recorded at the surface, and decreased towards the bottom, coupled with phytoplanktonic photosynthetic capacity. Wind induced mixing in Peri Lake played an important role in nutrient and phytoplankton redistribution, characterizing this lake as polymictic. According to density and biovolume, the phytoplankton community was dominated by filamentous Cyanobacteria, especially Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Woloszynska) Seenayya and Subba-Raju. This study has shown that both water temperature and nutrient availability drive phytoplankton growth and consequently the temporal variation in metabolic rates, where respiration is higher than primary production.

  13. Planktonic production and respiration in a subtropical lake dominated by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tonetta

    Full Text Available Planktonic primary production and respiration rates were estimated in a subtropical coastal lake dominated by Cyanobacteria in order to investigate the temporal and vertical variation in this lake and to evaluate its relationships with limnological variables and phytoplankton. Light and dark bottles were incubated at four different depths in the central part of the lake and were performed bimonthly from June/2009 to December/2010. No significant difference was evident among depths in relation to phytoplankton, limnological variables and metabolic rates. However, the highest production rates were recorded at the surface, and decreased towards the bottom, coupled with phytoplanktonic photosynthetic capacity. Wind induced mixing in Peri Lake played an important role in nutrient and phytoplankton redistribution, characterizing this lake as polymictic. According to density and biovolume, the phytoplankton community was dominated by filamentous Cyanobacteria, especially Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Woloszynska Seenayya and Subba-Raju. This study has shown that both water temperature and nutrient availability drive phytoplankton growth and consequently the temporal variation in metabolic rates, where respiration is higher than primary production.

  14. Spatial distribution of an uranium-respiring betaproteobacterium at the Rifle, CO field research site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Koribanics

    Full Text Available The Department of Energy's Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site (IFRC at Rifle, Colorado was created to address the gaps in knowledge on the mechanisms and rates of U(VI bioreduction in alluvial sediments. Previous studies at the Rifle IFRC have linked microbial processes to uranium immobilization during acetate amendment. Several key bacteria believed to be involved in radionuclide containment have been described; however, most of the evidence implicating uranium reduction with specific microbiota has been indirect. Here, we report on the cultivation of a microorganism from the Rifle IFRC that reduces uranium and appears to utilize it as a terminal electron acceptor for respiration with acetate as electron donor. Furthermore, this bacterium constitutes a significant proportion of the subsurface sediment community prior to biostimulation based on TRFLP profiling of 16S rRNA genes. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicates that the microorganism is a betaproteobacterium with a high similarity to Burkholderia fungorum. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a betaproteobacterium capable of uranium respiration. Our results indicate that this microorganism occurs commonly in alluvial sediments located between 3-6 m below ground surface at Rifle and may play a role in the initial reduction of uranium at the site.

  15. Soil Respiration of Three Mangrove Forests on Sanibel Island, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, F.; Bovard, B. D.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon cycling studies conducted in mangrove forests have typically focused on aboveground processes. Our understanding of carbon storage in these systems is therefore limited by the lack information on belowground processes such as fine root production and soil respiration. To our knowledge there exist no studies investigating temporal patterns in and environmental controls on soil respiration in multiple types of mangrove ecosystems concurrently. This study is part of a larger study on carbon storage in three mangrove forests on Sanibel Island, Florida. Here we report on eight months of soil respiration data within these forests that will ultimately be incorporated into an annual carbon budget for each habitat type. Soil respiration was monitored in the following three mangrove habitat types: a fringe mangrove forest dominated by Rhizophora mangle, a basin mangrove forest dominated by Avicennia germinans, and a higher elevation forest comprised of a mix of Avicennia germinans and Laguncularia racemosa, and non-woody salt marsh species. Beginning in June of 2010, we measured soil emissions of carbon dioxide at 5 random locations within three-100 m2 plots within each habitat type. Sampling was performed at monthly intervals and conducted over the course of three days. For each day, one plot from each habitat type was measured. In addition to soil respiration, soil temperature, salinity and gravimetric moisture content were also measured. Our data indicate the Black mangrove forest, dominated by Avicennia germinans, experiences the highest rates of soil respiration with a mean rate of 4.61 ± 0.60 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. The mixed mangrove and salt marsh habitat has the lowest soil carbon emission rates with a mean of 2.78 ± 0.40 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. Soil carbon effluxes appear to peak in the early part of the wet season around May to June and are lower and relatively constant the remainder of the year. Our data also suggest there are important but brief periods where

  16. Supporting Aspartate Biosynthesis Is an Essential Function of Respiration in Proliferating Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Lucas B; Gui, Dan Y; Hosios, Aaron M; Bush, Lauren N; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Vander Heiden, Matthew G

    2015-07-30

    Mitochondrial respiration is important for cell proliferation; however, the specific metabolic requirements fulfilled by respiration to support proliferation have not been defined. Here, we show that a major role of respiration in proliferating cells is to provide electron acceptors for aspartate synthesis. This finding is consistent with the observation that cells lacking a functional respiratory chain are auxotrophic for pyruvate, which serves as an exogenous electron acceptor. Further, the pyruvate requirement can be fulfilled with an alternative electron acceptor, alpha-ketobutyrate, which provides cells neither carbon nor ATP. Alpha-ketobutyrate restores proliferation when respiration is inhibited, suggesting that an alternative electron acceptor can substitute for respiration to support proliferation. We find that electron acceptors are limiting for producing aspartate, and supplying aspartate enables proliferation of respiration deficient cells in the absence of exogenous electron acceptors. Together, these data argue a major function of respiration in proliferating cells is to support aspartate synthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of metabolic inhibitors on the development of respiration in anaerobically grown yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, W.; Tustanoff, E. R.

    1966-01-01

    1. Iodoacetate and fluoride did not prevent the development of respiration in aerobically grown yeast. 2. The effect of dinitrophenol suggested that phosphorylation developed simultaneously with respiration in anaerobically grown yeast, but the effect of oligomycin suggested that the phosphorylation and oxidation were not tightly coupled. 3. Inhibitors of electron transport showed that both the respiratory peak and the subsequent respiration were cyanide-sensitive, but the peak respiration was insensitive to antimycin. 4. Of the inhibitors of protein or RNA synthesis tested, only p-fluorophenylalanine inhibited the development of respiration. The results are not consistent with a new synthesis of mitochondria. 5. 2-Phenylethanol inhibited the development of respiration in anaerobically grown yeast and also yeast growth. Other inhibitors of DNA synthesis had no effect on the development of respiration. 6. The relevance of the results to mitochondrial morphogenesis is discussed. PMID:4290405

  18. Effects of bioirrigation of non-biting midges (Diptera: Chironomidae) on lake sediment respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Viktor; Lewandowski, Jörg; Romeijn, Paul; Singer, Gabriel; Krause, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Bioirrigation or the transport of fluids into the sediment matrix due to the activities of organisms such as bloodworms (larvae of Diptera, Chironomidae), has substantial impacts on sediment respiration in lakes. However, previous quantifications of bioirrigation impacts of Chironomidae have been limited by technical challenges such as the difficulty to separate faunal and bacterial respiration. This paper describes a novel method based on the bioreactive tracer resazurin for measuring respiration in-situ in non-sealed systems with constant oxygen supply. Applying this new method in microcosm experiments revealed that bioirrigation enhanced sediment respiration by up to 2.5 times. The new method is yielding lower oxygen consumption than previously reported, as it is only sensitive to aerobic heterotrophous respiration and not to other processes causing oxygen decrease. Hence it decouples the quantification of respiration of animals and inorganic oxygen consumption from microbe respiration in sediment.

  19. Oxidative stress negatively affects human sperm mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Pinto Provenzano, Sara; Montagna, Daniela Domenica; Coppola, Lamberto; Zara, Vincenzo

    2013-07-01

    To correlate the level of oxidative stress in serum and seminal fluid and the level of sperm deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation with sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency. Sperm mitochondrial respiratory activity was evaluated with a polarographic assay of oxygen consumption carried out in hypotonically treated sperm cells. A possible relationship between sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency, the level of oxidative stress, and the level of sperm DNA fragmentation was investigated. Sperm motility was positively correlated with mitochondrial respiration but negatively correlated with oxidative stress and DNA fragmentation. Interestingly, sperm mitochondrial respiratory activity was negatively affected by oxidative stress and DNA fragmentation. Our data indicate that sperm mitochondrial respiration is decreased in patients with high levels of reactive oxygen species by an uncoupling between electron transport and adenosine triphosphate synthesis. This reduction in mitochondrial functionality might be 1 of the reasons responsible for the decrease in spermatozoa motility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Light-enhanced oxygen respiration in benthic phototrophic communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epping, EHG; Jørgensen, BB

    1996-01-01

    the day at prevailing light intensities. A 1-dimensional diffusion-reaction model was used to estimate gross photosynthesis and oxygen respiration per volume of sediment, as well as the euphotic depth and the sediment-water interface concentration of oxygen. Areal gross photosynthesis ranged from 9......Two microelectrode studies demonstrate the effect of Light intensity and photosynthesis on areal oxygen respiration in a hypersaline mat at Guerrero Negro, Mexico, and in an intertidal sediment at Texel, The Netherlands. The hypersaline mat was studied in the laboratory at light intensities of 0......, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 500 mu E m(-2) s(-1) using the light-dark shift technique to measure gross photos synthesis rates. Areal gross photosynthesis increased from 0 to 31.3 nmol O-2 cm(-2) min(-1) and areal net photosynthesis increased from -3.9 to 16.7 nmol O-2 cm(-2) min(-1) with increasing...

  1. Respirable crystalline silica - a failure to control exposure!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, J. R.

    2009-02-01

    Several sites were visited to monitor stonemason exposure to respirable crystalline silica (RCS), inhalable dust and respirable dust. At all sites, exposure to RCS exceeded the Workplace Exposure Limit of 0.1 mg/m3 8-hour TWA. There was therefore a continuing high risk of workers developing silicosis unless the appropriate measures were instigated to prevent or control exposure. Exposure control was ineffective at all sites e.g. water wall extraction systems were not well designed. There was evidence that foreign workers were at a greater exposure risk. But even with appropriate controls to mitigate exposure to RCS it may not be possible to sustain exposure to below 0.1 mg/m3 8-hour TWA without on-going HSE intervention.

  2. Plants at high altitude exhibit higher component of alternative respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narinder; Vyas, Dhiraj; Kumar, Sanjay

    2007-01-01

    Total respiration, capacities of cytochrome (CytR) and alternative respiration (AR) were studied in two varieties of barley (Horedum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) each and one variety of pea (Pisum sativum) at low (Palampur; 1300 m) and high altitudes (Kibber; 4200 m). Similar studies were carried out in naturally growing Rumex nepalensis and Trifoilum repenses at Palampur, Palchan (2250 m) and Marhi (3250 m). All the plants species exhibited lower CytR but significantly higher AR capacity at high altitude (HA) (72-1117% higher) as compared to those at low altitude (LA). Glycolytic product, pyruvate and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate, citrate increased with increase in altitude. While the role of these metabolites in relation to HA biology is discussed, significantly higher AR at HA is proposed to be an adaptive mechanism against the metabolic perturbations wherein it might act to lower reactive oxygen species and also provides metabolic homeostasis to plants under the environment of HA.

  3. Aquatic respiration rate measurements at low oxygen concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Holtappels

    Full Text Available Despite its huge ecological importance, microbial oxygen respiration in pelagic waters is little studied, primarily due to methodological difficulties. Respiration measurements are challenging because of the required high resolution of oxygen concentration measurements. Recent improvements in oxygen sensing techniques bear great potential to overcome these limitations. Here we compare 3 different methods to measure oxygen consumption rates at low oxygen concentrations, utilizing amperometric Clark type sensors (STOX, optical sensors (optodes, and mass spectrometry in combination with (18-18O2 labeling. Oxygen concentrations and consumption rates agreed well between the different methods when applied in the same experimental setting. Oxygen consumption rates between 30 and 400 nmol L(-1 h(-1 were measured with high precision and relative standard errors of less than 3%. Rate detection limits in the range of 1 nmol L(-1 h(-1 were suitable for rate determinations in open ocean water and were lowest at the lowest applied O2 concentration.

  4. Formation of Phases and Variation of Area Specific Resistance with Surface Roughness in Oxidized Crofer 22 APU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Myoung Youp; Mumm, Daniel R.; Song, Jiyoung; Yoon, Soon-Do

    2014-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steel Crofer 22 APU specimens with various surface roughnesses were prepared by grinding with different grit SiC grinding papers. The samples were then thermally cycled 20 times between 298 K and 1073 K (a total oxygen exposure time of 500 h at 1073 K). Observations of the microstructure, measurements of the area specific resistance (ASR), and analysis of the atomic percentages of elements by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy were performed. As the grit number of the grinding paper, with which the sample was ground, increased from grit 80 through grit 800, the particle size decreased. The particle sizes of the sample ground with grit 800 and the polished sample were similar. A trench of a Crofer 22 APU sample ground with grit 80 after 120 thermal cycles between 298 K and 1073 K (a total oxygen exposure time of 3000 h at 1073 K), observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after focused ion beam (FIB) milling, exhibited an alloy substrate phase, Cr 2 O 3 layer, and (Cr, Mn) 3 O 4 spinel phase from the inside to the surface of the sample. The Cr 2 O 3 layer was undulated with a thickness of about 3 μm. At the same measuring temperature, the ASR increased as the surface of the sample became rougher. Plots of ln (ASR/T ) versus 1/T for samples ground with grit 120, grit 240, and grit 800 after 20 thermal cycles exhibited good linearity.

  5. Linear programming model can explain respiration of fermentation products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Möller

    Full Text Available Many differentiated cells rely primarily on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for generating energy in the form of ATP needed for cellular metabolism. In contrast most tumor cells instead rely on aerobic glycolysis leading to lactate to about the same extent as on respiration. Warburg found that cancer cells to support oxidative phosphorylation, tend to ferment glucose or other energy source into lactate even in the presence of sufficient oxygen, which is an inefficient way to generate ATP. This effect also occurs in striated muscle cells, activated lymphocytes and microglia, endothelial cells and several mammalian cell types, a phenomenon termed the "Warburg effect". The effect is paradoxical at first glance because the ATP production rate of aerobic glycolysis is much slower than that of respiration and the energy demands are better to be met by pure oxidative phosphorylation. We tackle this question by building a minimal model including three combined reactions. The new aspect in extension to earlier models is that we take into account the possible uptake and oxidation of the fermentation products. We examine the case where the cell can allocate protein on several enzymes in a varying distribution and model this by a linear programming problem in which the objective is to maximize the ATP production rate under different combinations of constraints on enzymes. Depending on the cost of reactions and limitation of the substrates, this leads to pure respiration, pure fermentation, and a mixture of respiration and fermentation. The model predicts that fermentation products are only oxidized when glucose is scarce or its uptake is severely limited.

  6. Visible light alters yeast metabolic rhythms by inhibiting respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, James Brian; Davis, Chris R.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-01-01

    In some organisms, respiration fluctuates cyclically, and these rhythms can be a sensitive gauge of metabolism. Constant or pulsatile exposure of yeast to visible wavelengths of light significantly alters and/or initiates these respiratory oscillations, revealing a further dimension of the challenges to yeast living in natural environments. Our results also have implications for the use of light as research tools—e.g., for excitation of fluorescence microscopically—even in organisms such as y...

  7. Carcinogenic oestrogens induce respiration deficiency mutation in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Stopper, Helga; Metzler, M.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to hormonal activity, genetic darnage has been proposed as an important factor in oestrogen-mediated carcinogenesis. However, as short-term tests for oestrogens usually fail to show DNA mutations, lesions other than dassie nuclear DNA mutation have to be considered. Oestrogeninduced mitochondrial darnage was studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Stilbene-type, but not steroidal, oestrogens were found to induce respiration-dcficient petite mutation. The effect was inversel...

  8. Quantitative respirator man-testing at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, J.D.

    The dioctyl phthalate quantitative respirator man-testing method used at Rocky Flats is outlined. Using this method, 93 persons trained to use self contained breathing equipment were tested with eight respiratory protective devices. Test results obtained with the seven devices using high efficiency particulate filters are compared to the results obtained with the self contained breathing equipment. Also comparison is made for these results to test results for 1667 other employees

  9. Quantitative respirator man-testing at Rocky Flats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The dioctyl phthalate quantitative respirator man-testing method used at Rocky Flats is outlined. Using this method, 93 persons trained to use self contained breathing equipment were tested with eight respiratory protective devices. Test results obtained with the seven devices using high efficiency particulate filters are compared to the results obtained with the self contained breathing equipment. Also comparison is made for these results to test results for 1667 other employees.

  10. The importance of in vitro diagnostics in respiration allergy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wever, A.M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Out of the 4 types of allergic reactions, in respiration allergy the anaphylactic reaction caused by IgE antibodies is the most important. Determination of IgE with radioimmunoassay: the radio-allergo-sorbent test (Rast) and the Phadiatop (pharmacie-differential atopy test) was investigated in 248 patients with pulmonal complaints. Phadiatop can be used as a screening test and for a better application of the specific Rast-diagnostic. 1 table

  11. Oxygen dependence of respiration in rat spinotrapezius muscle in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Golub, Aleksander S.; Pittman, Roland N.

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen dependence of respiration in striated muscle in situ was studied by measuring the rate of decrease of interstitial Po2 [oxygen disappearance curve (ODC)] following rapid arrest of blood flow by pneumatic tissue compression, which ejected red blood cells from the muscle vessels and made the ODC independent from oxygen bound to hemoglobin. After the contribution of photo-consumption of oxygen by the method was evaluated and accounted for, the corrected ODCs were converted into the Po...

  12. Independent Evaluation of The Lepestok Filtering Facepiece Respirator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, Mark D; Vargo, George J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the protection factor of the Lepestok-200 filtering facepiece respirator by conducting a standard quantitative fit test on a panel of 25 representative adults (14 males and 11 females) using the TSI Incorporated PortaCount PlusTM quantitative fit-testing system. Each subject was tested four times. In the total of 100 tests, 95% of the overall fit factors were greater than 3, more than 80% of the overall fit factors were greater than 14, approximately 50% were greater than 86, and 20% were greater than 200. The pass-fail performance of the respirator was similar for each of the six exercises in the test series: (1) normal breathing, (2) deep breathing, (3) moving the head side to side, (4) moving the head up and down, (5) reading a passage of text out loud, and (6) normal breathing, indicating that the respirator performs equally well for each type of exercise. A significant and sustained improvement in fit factor was observed after the initial test, indicating that the subjects benefited from the knowledge gained in the first of the four quantitative fit tests. In the 75 tests conducted after the initial test for each individual, 95% of the overall fit factors were greater than 6, more than 80% of the overall fit factors were greater than 23, and 50% were greater than 116, and 20% were greater than 200. Thus, the initial learning experienced doubled the fit factor for subsequent tests. In addition, there is an indication that the Lepestok-200 may perform better on wearers with wider faces than on individuals with narrower faces. The results of this study demonstrate the effectiveness of the Lepestok-200 respirator and reinforce the general conclusion that quantitative fit-testing can make an important contribution to ensuring that proper protection factors are achieved for workers

  13. Occupational exposures to respirable crystalline silica during hydraulic fracturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esswein, Eric J; Breitenstein, Michael; Snawder, John; Kiefer, Max; Sieber, W Karl

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a previously uncharacterized occupational health hazard: work crew exposures to respirable crystalline silica during hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulic fracturing involves high pressure injection of large volumes of water and sand, and smaller quantities of well treatment chemicals, into a gas or oil well to fracture shale or other rock formations, allowing more efficient recovery of hydrocarbons from a petroleum-bearing reservoir. Crystalline silica ("frac sand") is commonly used as a proppant to hold open cracks and fissures created by hydraulic pressure. Each stage of the process requires hundreds of thousands of pounds of quartz-containing sand; millions of pounds may be needed for all zones of a well. Mechanical handling of frac sand creates respirable crystalline silica dust, a potential exposure hazard for workers. Researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health collected 111 personal breathing zone samples at 11 sites in five states to evaluate worker exposures to respirable crystalline silica during hydraulic fracturing. At each of the 11 sites, full-shift samples exceeded occupational health criteria (e.g., the Occupational Safety and Health Administration calculated permissible exposure limit, the NIOSH recommended exposure limit, or the ACGIH threshold limit value), in some cases, by 10 or more times the occupational health criteria. Based on these evaluations, an occupational health hazard was determined to exist for workplace exposures to crystalline silica. Seven points of dust generation were identified, including sand handling machinery and dust generated from the work site itself. Recommendations to control exposures include product substitution (when feasible), engineering controls or modifications to sand handling machinery, administrative controls, and use of personal protective equipment. To our knowledge, this represents the first systematic study of work crew exposures to crystalline silica during

  14. Underwater photosynthesis and respiration in leaves of submerged wetland plants: gas films improve CO2 and O2 exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmer, Timothy David; Pedersen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Many wetland plants have gas films on submerged leaf surfaces. We tested the hypotheses that leaf gas films enhance CO(2) uptake for net photosynthesis (P(N)) during light periods, and enhance O(2) uptake for respiration during dark periods. Leaves of four wetland species that form gas films, and two species that do not, were used. Gas films were also experimentally removed by brushing with 0.05% (v/v) Triton X. Net O(2) production in light, or O(2) consumption in darkness, was measured at various CO(2) and O(2) concentrations. When gas films were removed, O(2) uptake in darkness was already diffusion-limited at 20.6 kPa (critical O(2) pressure for respiration, COP(R)>/= 284 mmol O(2) m(-3)), whereas for some leaves with gas films, O(2) uptake declined only at approx. 4 kPa (COP(R) 54 mmol O(2) m(-3)). Gas films also improved CO(2) uptake so that, during light periods, underwater P(N) was enhanced up to sixfold. Gas films on submerged leaves enable continued gas exchange via stomata and thus bypassing of cuticle resistance, enhancing exchange of O(2) and CO(2) with the surrounding water, and therefore underwater P(N) and respiration.

  15. Patterns of root respiration rates and morphological traits in 13 tree species in a tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Naoki; Kosugi, Yoshiko; Dannoura, Masako; Takanashi, Satoru; Niiyama, Kaoru; Kassim, Abd Rahman; Nik, Abdul Rahim

    2012-03-01

    The root systems of forest trees are composed of different diameters and heterogeneous physiological traits. However, the pattern of root respiration rates from finer and coarser roots across various tropical species remains unknown. To clarify how respiration is related to the morphological traits of roots, we evaluated specific root respiration and its relationships to mean root diameter (D) of various diameter and root tissue density (RTD; root mass per unit root volume; gcm(-3)) and specific root length (SRL; root length per unit root mass; mg(-1)) of the fine roots among and within 14 trees of 13 species from a primary tropical rainforest in the Pasoh Forest Reserve in Peninsular Malaysia. Coarse root (2-269mm) respiration rates increased with decreasing D, resulting in significant relationships between root respiration and diameter across species. A model based on a radial gradient of respiration rates of coarse roots simulated the exponential decrease in respiration with diameter. The respiration rate of fine roots (diameter roots. For fine roots, the mean respiration rates for each species increased with decreasing D. The respiration rates of fine roots declined markedly with increasing RTD and increased with increasing SRL, which explained a significant portion of the variation in the respiration among the 14 trees from 13 species examined. Our results indicate that coarse root respiration in tree species follows a basic relationship with D across species and that most of the variation in fine root respiration among species is explained by D, RTD and SRL. We found that the relationship between root respiration and morphological traits provides a quantitative basis for separating fine roots from coarse roots and that the pattern holds across different species.

  16. Cisplatin cytotoxicity is dependent on mitochondrial respiration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhipriya Inapurapu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: To understand the role of mitochondrial respiration in cisplatin sensitivity, we have employed wild-type and mitochondrial DNA depleted Rho0 yeast cells. Materials and Methods: Wild type and Rho0 yeast cultured in fermentable and non-fermentable sugar containing media, were studied for their sensitivity against cisplatin by monitoring growth curves, oxygen consumption, pH changes in cytosol/mitochondrial compartments, reactive oxygen species production and respiratory control ratio. Results: Wild-type yeast grown on glycerol exhibited heightened sensitivity to cisplatin than yeast grown on glucose. Cisplatin (100 μM, although significantly reduced the growth of wild- type cells, only slightly altered the growth rate of Rho0 cells. Cisplatin treatment decreased both pHcyt and pHmit to a similar extent without affecting the pH difference. Cisplatin dose-dependently increased the oxidative stress in wild-type, but not in respiration-deficient Rho0 strain. Cisplatin decreased the respiratory control ratio. Conclusion: These results suggest that cisplatin toxicity is influenced by the respiratory capacity of the cells and the intracellular oxidative burden. Although cisplatin per se slightly decreased the respiration of yeast cells grown in glucose, it did not disturb the mitochondrial chemiosmotic gradient.

  17. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Icksoo, E-mail: icksoolee@dankook.ac.kr

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Betaine enhances cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial respiration. • Betaine increases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular energy levels. • Betaine’s anti-tumorigenic effect might be due to a reversal of the Warburg effect. - Abstract: Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect.

  18. A New Compendium of Soil Respiration Data for Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence Epule Epule

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present to the scientific community a new dataset derived from existing literature on soil respiration in Africa. The data has thus been obtained by searching for records in peer review papers and grey literature. The main search engines used are: Scientific Citation Index (SCI database, ISI Science web and Google scholar. This data description paper has greatly advanced the number of data points on soil respiration in Africa from 4 in 2010 to 62 in 2014. The new data points are culled from 47 peer review publications and grey literature reports. The data lends its self to a lot of possible analytical methods such as correlation analysis, multiple linear regressions, artificial neural network analysis and process base modeling. The overall conclusion that can be drawn here is that this paper has greatly advanced the availability of soil respiration data in Africa by presenting all the available records that before now were only reported in different studies.

  19. [The knowledge of animal respiration as a combustion phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The different stages leading to knowledge of the phenomenon of animal breathing are going from some writings in Corpus Hippocraticum to Aristoteles' and Galen's works, who considered the heart as the source of the animal heat. Later, Miguel Servet suggested that the inspired air can achieve other functions besides cooling the blood. After that, different explications of the animal heat were raised. About 1770, due to progress of knowledge in the chemistry field, first Mayow and later Black began to consider the animal respiration as a combustion. The important treatise Méthode de nomenclature chimique, published by Guyton de Morveau et al. in 1787 and soon after the Traité élémentaire de chimie de Lavoisier (1789) provided a solid support to Lavoisier's thought. This way on arrived to consider analogous the respiration and combustion phenomena. Studies on the animal respiration phenomenon continued in xix century and in the following century it was possible to apply thermodynamic principles to biology: "generalized thermodynamics". Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. Miniaturized test system for soil respiration induced by volatile pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, Karin; Chapman, Stephen J.; Campbell, Colin D.; Harms, Hauke; Hoehener, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    A miniaturized method based on 96-well microtitre plates was developed and used to study respiration in pristine and contaminated soils following addition of volatile substrates. Small soil samples were exposed to fuel components, which were volatilized from spatially separate reservoirs of 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN) as an organic carrier. Respiration was determined as CO 2 production by means of a pH-indicator and bicarbonate-containing agar, or as 14 CO 2 evolution from 14 C-labelled substrates. Substrate concentrations inducing maximum microbial activity or inhibition were determined and CO 2 production profiles examined by multivariate analysis. When high concentrations of fuel components were applied, distinction of hydrocarbon exposed soils from unexposed soil was achieved within 6 h of incubation. With low concentrations, adequate distinction was achieved after 24 h, probably as a result of community adaptation. Nutrient limitation was identified with the 14 C method for toluene, and the optimal N and P amendment determined. Further potential applications of this rapid and inexpensive method are outlined. - A new method to study soil respiration is used when volatile organic contaminants are added

  1. Investigating the relationship between cognitive failures and workload among nurses of Imam Khomeini and Vali-e-Asr hospitals in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsalan Yousef Zade

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: High level of workload and its consequent cognitive failures are among factors which impact nurses’ behavior, performance, and efficiency. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between nurses’ cognitive failures and perceived workload. Material and Method: This cross-sectional and descriptive-analytical study was carried out among 150 male and female nurses, working in different units of Emam Khomeini and Vali-e-Asr hospitals in Tehran in 2013. NASA task load index (NASA-TlX and Cognitive Failure Questionnaire (CFQ were used to assess workload and cognitive failures, respectively. Data were analyzed using Pearson Correlation, Independent sample t-test, and one-way ANOVA statistical tests with SPSS software version 20. Result: Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients test results showed a significant relationship between nurses’ mental workload and their memory for names (P-value<0.001. Moreover, there was significant association between physical workload and memory, attention and total cognitive failures (CFQ total (P-value<0.05. Perceived frustration mong nurses was significantly correlated with memory, attention, motor functions and total cognitive failures (P-value<0.05. Conclusion: The results showed a high level of workload among study nurses. Furthermore, the relationships between some dimensions of mental workload and cognitive failures were confirmed, so that an increase in workload dimension can lead to more cognitive failures while doing task.

  2. Content Validity of the ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD RS-IV and Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS in Phenylketonuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen W. Wyrwich PhD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD RS-IV; parent report and Adult ADHD Self-Rating Scale (ASRS; self-report are validated instruments for measuring symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. The objectives of this study were to elicit descriptions of phenylketonuria (PKU symptoms and assess content validity of these instruments in PKU. Parents (N = 15 of children with PKU (≥8 years old and adults with PKU (N=13 described PKU-related symptoms and commented on the scale’s clarity, comprehensiveness, and relevance to their experience with PKU. Most of the adults (84.6% and all of the children were on a phenylalanine-restricted diet, according to respondent report. The inattentiveness symptoms reported by participants mapped to the inattentive items of the questionnaires. Most participants felt the inattentive items were clear and relevant to their experience. Despite study design limitations, these results demonstrate the relevance of assessing inattentiveness in PKU, and both instruments achieved content validity for inattentive subscale items.

  3. Ternary CaCu4P2-type pnictides AAg4Pn2 (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Khatun, Mansura; Scott Mullen, C.; Mar, Arthur

    2012-08-01

    Four ternary pnictides AAg4Pn2 (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb) were prepared by reactions of the elements at 850 °C and their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. These silver-containing pnictides AAg4Pn2 adopt the trigonal CaCu4P2-type structure (Pearson symbol hR21, space group R3¯m, Z=3; a=4.5555(6) Å, c=24.041(3) Å for SrAg4As2; a=4.5352(2) Å, c=23.7221(11) Å for EuAg4As2; a=4.7404(4) Å, c=25.029(2) Å for SrAg4Sb2; a=4.7239(3) Å, c=24.689(2) Å for EuAg4Sb2), which can be derived from the trigonal CaAl2Si2-type structure of the isoelectronic zinc-containing pnictides AZn2Pn2 by insertion of additional Ag atoms into trigonal planar sites within [M2Pn2]2- slabs built up of edge-sharing tetrahedra. Band structure calculations on SrAg4As2 and SrAg4Sb2 revealed that these charge-balanced Zintl phases actually exhibit no gap at the Fermi level and are predicted to be semimetals.

  4. Laboratory evaluation to reduce respirable crystalline silica dust when cutting concrete roofing tiles using a masonry saw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Rebecca V; Sheehy, John; Feng, H Amy; Sieber, William K

    2010-04-01

    Respirable crystalline silica dust exposure in residential roofers is a recognized hazard resulting from cutting concrete roofing tiles. Roofers cutting tiles using masonry saws can be exposed to high concentrations of respirable dust. Silica exposures remain a serious threat for nearly two million U.S. construction workers. Although it is well established that respiratory diseases associated with exposure to silica dust are preventable, they continue to occur and cause disability or death. The effectiveness of both a commercially available local exhaust ventilation (LEV) system and a water suppression system in reducing silica dust was evaluated separately. The LEV system exhausted 0.24, 0.13, or 0.12 m(3)/sec of dust laden air, while the water suppression system supplied 0.13, 0.06, 0.03, or 0.02 L/sec of water to the saw blade. Using a randomized block design, implemented under laboratory conditions, the aforementioned conditions were evaluated independently on two types of concrete roofing tiles (s-shape and flat) using the same saw and blade. Each engineering control (LEV or water suppression) was replicated eight times, or four times for each type of tile. Analysis of variance was performed by comparing the mean airborne respirable dust concentrations generated during each run and engineering control treatment. The use of water controls and ventilation controls compared with the "no control" treatment resulted in a statistically significant (p tile cut. The percent reduction for respirable dust concentrations was 99% for the water control and 91% for the LEV. Results suggest that water is an effective method for reducing crystalline silica exposures. However, water damage potential, surface discolorations, cleanup, slip hazards, and other requirements may make the use of water problematic in many situations. Concerns with implementing an LEV system to control silica dust exposures include sufficient capture velocity, additional weight of the saw with the LEV

  5. The effects of pH and pCO2on photosynthesis and respiration in the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Johanna A L; Bender, Michael L; Morel, François M M

    2017-04-01

    The response of marine phytoplankton to the ongoing increase in atmospheric pCO 2 reflects the consequences of both increased CO 2 concentration and decreased pH in surface seawater. In the model diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, we explored the effects of varying pCO 2 and pH, independently and in concert, on photosynthesis and respiration by incubating samples in water enriched in H 2 18 O. In long-term experiments (~6-h) at saturating light intensity, we observed no effects of pH or pCO 2 on growth rate, photosynthesis or respiration. This absence of a measurable response reflects the very small change in energy used by the carbon concentrating mechanism (CCM) compared to the energy used in carbon fixation. In short-term experiments (~3 min), we also observed no effects of pCO 2 or pH, even under limiting light intensity. We surmise that in T. weissflogii, it is the photosynthetic production of NADPH and ATP, rather than the CO 2 -saturation of Rubisco that controls the rate of photosynthesis at low irradiance. In short-term experiments, we observed a slightly higher respiration rate at low pH at the onset of the dark period, possibly reflecting the energy used for exporting H + and maintaining pH homeostasis. Based on what is known of the biochemistry of marine phytoplankton, our results are likely generalizable to other diatoms and a number of other eukaryotic species. The direct effects of ocean acidification on growth, photosynthesis and respiration in these organisms should be small over the range of atmospheric pCO 2 predicted for the twenty-first century.

  6. Diffusive boundary layers, photosynthesis, and respiration of the colony-forming plankton algae, Phaeocystis sp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Stolte, W.; Epping, EHG

    1999-01-01

    heterotrophic communities at light intensities up to 10 mu mol photons m(-2) s(-1). A week later, colonies were net heterotrophic at light intensities up to 80 mu mol photons m(-2) s(-1). The effective diffusion coefficient for oxygen in the gelatinous colonies was not significantly different from that in sea......Diffusive boundary layers, photosynthesis, and respiration in Phaeocystis colonies were studied by the use of microelectrodes for oxygen and pH during a bloom in the Barents Sea, 1993, and in the Marsdiep, Dutch North Sea, 1994. The oxygen microenvironment of a Phaeocystis colony with a mean...... diameter of 1.4 mm was mapped from 346 O-2 measurements and showed gradients of oxygen concentration in the water phase up to 1 mm distance from the colony surface. The effective diffusive boundary layer was 0.4-0.9 mm thick. Oxygen concentrations inside colonies reached 180% of the bulk water, and p...

  7. Multi-Year Lags between Forest Browning and Soil Respiration at High Northern Latitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Bunn, Andrew G.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2012-11-26

    High-latitude northern ecosystems are experiencing rapid climate changes, and represent a large potential climate feedback because of their high soil carbon densities and shifting disturbance regimes. A significant carbon flow from these ecosystems is soil respiration (RS, the flow of carbon dioxide, generated by plant roots and soil fauna, from the soil surface to atmosphere), and any change in the high-latitude carbon cycle might thus be reflected in RS observed in the field. This study used two variants of a machine-learning algorithm and least squares regression to examine how remotely-sensed canopy greenness (NDVI), climate, and other variables are coupled to annual RS based on 105 observations from 64 circumpolar sites in a global database. The addition of NDVI roughly doubled model performance, with the best-performing models explaining ~62% of observed RS variability

  8. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and tissue respiration of pea leaves under clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brykov, Vasyl

    2016-07-01

    Respiration is essential for growth, maintenance, and carbon balance of all plant cells. Mitochondrial respiration in plants provides energy for biosynthesis, and its balance with photosynthesis determines the rate of plant biomass accumulation (production). Mitochondria are not only the energetic organelles in a cell but they play an essential regulatory role in many basic cellular processes. As plants adapt to real and simulated microgravity, it is very important to understand the state of mitochondria in these conditions. Disturbance of respiratory metabolism can significantly affect the productivity of plants in long-term space flights. We have established earlier that the rate of respiration in root apices of pea etiolated seedlings rose after 7 days of clinorotation. These data indicate the oxygen increased requirement by root apices under clinorotation, that confirms the necessity of sufficient substrate aeration in space greenhouses to provide normal respiratory metabolism and supply of energy for root growth. In etiolated seedlings, substrate supply of mitochondria occurs at the expense of the mobilization of cotyledon nutrients. A goal of our work was to study the ultrastructure and respiration of mitochondria in pea leaves after 12 days of clinorotation during (2 rpm/min). Plants grew at a light level of 180 μµmol m ^{-2} s ^{-1} PAR and a photoperiod of 16 h light/4 h dark. It was showed an essential increase in the mitochondrion area on 53% in palisade parenchyma cells at the sections. Such phenomenon can not be described as swelling of mitochondria, since enlarged mitochondria contained a more quantity of crista 1.76 times. In addition, the cristae total area per organelle also increased in comparison with that in control. An increase in a size of mitochondria in the experimental conditions is supposed to occur by a partial alteration of the chondriom. Thus, a size of 49% mitochondria in control was 0.1 - 0.3 μµm ^{2}, whereas only 26

  9. Respirator studies for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Protection factors for supplied-air respirators. Progress report, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hack, A.; Bradley, O.D.; Trujillo, A.

    1977-12-01

    This report describes the work performed during FY 1977 for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The Protection Factors (efficiency) provided by 25 NIOSH approved supplied-air respirators were determined while the devices were worn by a panel of anthropometrically selected test subjects. The major recommendation was that demand-type respirators should neither be used nor approved

  10. Contribution of bacterial respiration to plankton respiration from 50°N to 44°S in the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martín, E. E.; Aranguren-Gassis, M.; Hartmann, M.; Zubkov, M. V.; Serret, P.

    2017-11-01

    Marine bacteria play an important role in the global cycling of carbon and therefore in climate regulation. However, the paucity of direct measurements means that our understanding of the magnitude and variability of bacterial respiration in the ocean is poor. Estimations of respiration in the 0.2-0.8 μm size-fraction (considered as bacterial respiration), total plankton community respiration, and the contribution of bacterial respiration to total plankton community respiration were made along two latitudinal transects in the Atlantic Ocean (ca. 50°N-44°S) during 2010 and 2011. Two different methodologies were used: determination of changes in dissolved O2 concentration after standard 24 h dark bottle incubations, and measurements of in vivo reduction of 2-(ρ-iodophenyl)-3-(ρ-nitrophenyl)-5phenyl tetrazolium salt (INT). There was an overall significant correlation (r = 0.44, p < 0.0001, n = 90) between the rates of community respiration estimated by both methods. Depth-integrated community respiration varied as much as threefold between regions. Maximum rates occurred in waters of the western European shelf and Patagonian shelf, and minimum rates in the North and South oligotrophic gyres. Depth-integrated bacterial respiration followed the same pattern as community respiration. There was a significantly higher cell-specific bacterial respiration in the northern subtropical gyre than in the southern subtropical gyre which suggests that bacterial carbon turnover is faster in the northern gyre. The relationships between plankton respiration and physicochemical and biological variables were different in different years. In general, INTT was correlated to both chlorophyll-a and bacterial abundance, while INT0.2-0.8 was only correlated with bacterial abundance. However, in 2010 INTT and INT0.2-0.8 were also correlated with temperature and primary production while in 2011 they were correlated with nitrate + nitrite concentration. The bacterial contribution to depth

  11. Variation of Microstructure and Area Specific Resistance with Surface Roughness of a Ferritic Stainless Steel after Long-Term Oxygen Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumm, Daniel R.; Song, Myoung Youp

    2015-01-01

    One of the candidates for metallic interconnects of solid oxide fuel cells is a ferritic stainless steel, Crofer 22 APU. By grinding with different grit SiC grinding paper, Crofer 22 APU specimens with various surface roughness were prepared. The specimens were then thermally cycled by heating them to 1,073 K at a rate of 10 K min - 1, holding at 1,073 K for 25 h, and cooling to 298 K at a rate of 10 K min‒1. Examinations of the resulting microstructures, measurements of the area specific resistances (ASRs), and analyses of the atomic percentages of elements via energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy were performed. The particle size decreased as the grit number of the grinding paper used to grind the sample surfaces increased. A polished sample exhibited the smallest particle size. Plots of ln (ASR/T ) vs. 1/T for the samples ground with grit 80 and grit 400 and the polished sample after 40 thermal cycles exhibited good linearity. At the same measuring temperature, the ASR increased as the surface of the sample became rougher. This suggests that the polished Crofer 22 APU is better than those with rougher surfaces for application as interconnect of SOFC.

  12. Microsensor studies of photosynthesis and respiration in the larger symbiont bearing foraminifera Amphistegina lobifera, and Amphisorus hemprichii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler-Rink, S.; Kühl, Michael

    2001-01-01

    ratio at the shell surface of the foraminifera was ~2 in darkness and ~6 at saturating irradiance, pointing to a large internal supply of CO2 in the host-symbiont association and the use of bicarbonate as source for inorganic carbon. The carbonate chemistry in the vicinity of symbiont-bearing larger......The photosynthesis and respiration of the larger foraminifera Amphistegina lobifera and Amphisorus hemprichii was studied with O2, CO2, and pH microsensors, and with a miniature gas exchange chamber. The diffusive transport of O2 and CO2 through both perforate (A. lobifera) and imperforate (A...

  13. Fruit removal increases root-zone respiration in cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kläring, H.-P.; Hauschild, I.; Heißner, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Many attempts have been made to avoid the commonly observed fluctuations in fruit initiation and fruit growth in crop plants, particularly in cucumber (Cucumis sativus). Weak sinks of the fruit have been assumed to result in low sink/source ratios for carbohydrates, which may inhibit photosynthesis. This study focuses on the effects of low sink–source ratios on photosynthesis and respiration, and in particular root-zone respiration. Methods Mature fruit-bearing cucumber plants were grown in an aerated nutrient solution. The root containers were designed as open chambers to allow measurement of CO2 gas exchange in the root zone. A similar arrangement in a gas-exchange cuvette enabled simultaneous measurements of CO2 exchange in the shoot and root zones. Key Results Reducing the sinks for carbohydrates by removing all fruit from the plants always resulted in a doubling of CO2 exchange in the root zone within a few hours. However, respiration of the shoot remained unaffected and photosynthesis was only marginally reduced, if at all. Conclusions The results suggest that the increased level of CO2 gas exchange in the root zone after removing the carbon sinks in the shoot is due primarily to the exudation of organic compounds by the roots and their decomposition by micro-organisms. This hypothesis must be tested in further experiments, but if proved correct it would make sense to include carbon leakage by root exudation in cucumber production models. In contrast, inhibition of photosynthesis was measurable only at zero fruit load, a situation that does not occur in cucumber production systems, and models that estimate production can therefore ignore (end-product) inhibition of photosynthesis. PMID:25301817

  14. Oxygen dependence of respiration in rat spinotrapezius muscle in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Aleksander S; Pittman, Roland N

    2012-07-01

    The oxygen dependence of respiration in striated muscle in situ was studied by measuring the rate of decrease of interstitial Po(2) [oxygen disappearance curve (ODC)] following rapid arrest of blood flow by pneumatic tissue compression, which ejected red blood cells from the muscle vessels and made the ODC independent from oxygen bound to hemoglobin. After the contribution of photo-consumption of oxygen by the method was evaluated and accounted for, the corrected ODCs were converted into the Po(2) dependence of oxygen consumption, Vo(2), proportional to the rate of Po(2) decrease. Fitting equations obtained from a model of heterogeneous intracellular Po(2) were applied to recover the parameters describing respiration in muscle fibers, with a predicted sigmoidal shape for the dependence of Vo(2) on Po(2). This curve consists of two regions connected by the point for critical Po(2) of the cell (i.e., Po(2) at the sarcolemma when the center of the cell becomes anoxic). The critical Po(2) was below the Po(2) for half-maximal respiratory rate (P(50)) for the cells. In six muscles at rest, the rate of oxygen consumption was 139 ± 6 nl O(2)/cm(3)·s and mitochondrial P(50) was k = 10.5 ± 0.8 mmHg. The range of Po(2) values inside the muscle fibers was found to be 4-5 mmHg at the critical Po(2). The oxygen dependence of respiration can be studied in thin muscles under different experimental conditions. In resting muscle, the critical Po(2) was substantially lower than the interstitial Po(2) of 53 ± 2 mmHg, a finding that indicates that Vo(2) under this circumstance is independent of oxygen supply and is discordant with the conventional hypothesis of metabolic regulation of the oxygen supply to tissue.

  15. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by the anticancer agent 2-methoxyestradiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, Thilo; D'Amico, Gabriela; Quintero, Marisol; Palacios-Callender, Miriam; Hollis, Veronica; Lam, Francis; Moncada, Salvador

    2004-01-01

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2), a naturally occurring metabolite of estradiol, is known to have antiproliferative, antiangiogenic, and proapoptotic activity. Mechanistically, 2ME2 has been shown to downregulate hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) and to induce apoptosis in tumour cells by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study we report that 2ME2 inhibits mitochondrial respiration in both intact cells and submitochondrial particles, and that this effect is due to inhibition of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). The prevention by 2ME2 of hypoxia-induced stabilisation of HIF1α in HEK293 cells was found not to be due to an effect on HIF1α synthesis but rather to an effect on protein degradation. This is in agreement with our recent observation using other inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration which bring about rapid degradation of HIF1α in hypoxia due to increased availability of oxygen and reactivation of prolyl hydroxylases. The concentrations of 2ME2 that inhibited complex I also induced the generation of ROS. 2ME2 did not, however, cause generation of ROS in 143B rho - cells, which lack a functional mitochondrial ETC. We conclude that inhibition of mitochondrial respiration explains, at least in part, the effect of 2ME2 on hypoxia-dependent HIF1α stabilisation and cellular ROS production. Since these actions of 2ME2 occur at higher concentrations than those known to inhibit cell proliferation, it remains to be established whether they contribute to its therapeutic effect

  16. Oxygen dependence of respiration in rat spinotrapezius muscle in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Roland N.

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen dependence of respiration in striated muscle in situ was studied by measuring the rate of decrease of interstitial Po2 [oxygen disappearance curve (ODC)] following rapid arrest of blood flow by pneumatic tissue compression, which ejected red blood cells from the muscle vessels and made the ODC independent from oxygen bound to hemoglobin. After the contribution of photo-consumption of oxygen by the method was evaluated and accounted for, the corrected ODCs were converted into the Po2 dependence of oxygen consumption, V̇o2, proportional to the rate of Po2 decrease. Fitting equations obtained from a model of heterogeneous intracellular Po2 were applied to recover the parameters describing respiration in muscle fibers, with a predicted sigmoidal shape for the dependence of V̇o2 on Po2. This curve consists of two regions connected by the point for critical Po2 of the cell (i.e., Po2 at the sarcolemma when the center of the cell becomes anoxic). The critical Po2 was below the Po2 for half-maximal respiratory rate (P50) for the cells. In six muscles at rest, the rate of oxygen consumption was 139 ± 6 nl O2/cm3·s and mitochondrial P50 was k = 10.5 ± 0.8 mmHg. The range of Po2 values inside the muscle fibers was found to be 4–5 mmHg at the critical Po2. The oxygen dependence of respiration can be studied in thin muscles under different experimental conditions. In resting muscle, the critical Po2 was substantially lower than the interstitial Po2 of 53 ± 2 mmHg, a finding that indicates that V̇o2 under this circumstance is independent of oxygen supply and is discordant with the conventional hypothesis of metabolic regulation of the oxygen supply to tissue. PMID:22523254

  17. Respiration of Chemodenervated Goats in Acute Metabolic Acidosis,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-02

    metabolic ) alkalosis . Furthermore, the ventilatory responses to increase in PaCO2 produced by CO2 inhalation are shifted to lower values of PaCO2 in...the presence of metabolic acidosis, and to higher PaCO2 vaiues in metabolic alkalosis (Fencl et al. [1966]). The roles played by the carotid bodies (CB...and J.A. Broch (1969). Respiration and cerebral blood flow in metabolic acidosis and alkalosis in humans. J. Appl. Physiol. 27: 67-76. Gabel, R.A

  18. Redefinition and global estimation of basal ecosystem respiration rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Wenping; Luo, Yiqi; Li, Xianglan

    2011-01-01

    use a global constant BR largely due to the lack of a functional description for BR. In this study, we redefined BR to be ecosystem respiration rate at the mean annual temperature. To test the validity of this concept, we conducted a synthesis analysis using 276 site-years of eddy covariance data....... These results confirm that ER at the mean annual temperature can be considered as BR in empirical models. A strong correlation was found between the mean annual ER and mean annual gross primary production (GPP). Consequently, GPP, which is typically more accurately modeled, can be used to estimate BR. A light...

  19. Technical note: A facility for respiration measurements in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, F S; Tomich, T R; Ferreira, A L; Cavalcanti, L F L; Campos, M M; Paiva, C A V; Ribas, M N; Pereira, L G R

    2016-06-01

    A respiration system consisting of 4 climate-controlled chambers and 1 set of flowmeters and analyzers was constructed and validated. Each chamber had volume of 21.10m(3) (3.68×2.56×2.24m) and was made from steel with double-glazed windows on either side enabling visual contact between animals. The chambers are independently climate-controlled and can maintain temperature and relative humidity in a range from 5 to 45°C and 30 to 80%, respectively. A flow generator and mass flowmeter continuously pull air from each chamber and a slight negative pressure inside the chamber is ensured. Air from all chambers and ambient air share a common gas analysis and data acquisition system for monitoring O2, CO2, and CH4 concentrations over the measurement period, with the cycle time set to 20min. Analyzers are regularly calibrated and the chambers have mean recoveries of 99.0 and 98.0% for CO2 and CH4, respectively. The chambers are equipped with infrared cameras and electronic feed and water bins for intake measurements, as well as sensors for monitoring animal position and heart rate. Data acquisition and analysis software is used to calculate the rate of consumption of O2 and production of CO2 and CH4. The dynamic respiration measurements are integrated with feed intake data and other sensors. The daily gas exchanges are estimated by integration to determine methane emission and heat production. We conducted a trial with 12 lactating 3/4 Holstein × 1/4 Gyr crossbred dairy cows (6 multiparous and 6 primiparous) under 2 feeding regimens (ad libitum or restricted) to validate the system. Two 22-h respiration measurements were obtained from each cow. Restricted-fed cows showed lower values for milk yield, methane emission, and heat production compared with ad libitum-fed animals. We found no difference between groups for CH4 produced per kilogram of dry matter intake. Repeatability for CH4 emission and heat production was high (0.97 and 0.92, respectively). The respiration

  20. Novel method for detection of Sleep Apnoea using respiration signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristine Carmes; Kempfner, Lykke; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing

    2014-01-01

    Polysomnography (PSG) studies are considered the “gold standard” for the diagnosis of Sleep Apnoea (SA). Identifying cessations of breathing from long-lasting PSG recordings manually is a labour-intensive and time-consuming task for sleep specialist, associated with inter-scorer variability...... desaturations > 3%, extracted from the thorax and abdomen respiration effort belts, and the oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2), fed to an Elastic Net classifier and validated according to American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) using the patients' AHI value. The method was applied to 109 patient recordings...

  1. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration in AMPKa2 kinase dead mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Kristensen, Jonas Møller; Stride, Nis

    2012-01-01

    ) was studied. METHODS: In tibialis anterior (almost exclusively type 2 fibers) muscle from young (12-17 weeks, n = 7) and mature (25-27 weeks, n = 12) KD and wild type (WT) (12-17 weeks, n = 9; 25-27 weeks, n = 11) littermates JO(2) was quantified in permeabilized fibers ex vivo by respirometry, using...... a substrate-uncoupler-inhibitor-titration (SUIT) protocol: malate, octanoyl-carnitine, ADP and glutamate (GMO(3) ), +succinate (GMOS(3) ), +uncoupler (U) and inhibitor (rotenone) of complex I respiration. Citrate synthase (CS) activity was measured as and index of mitochondrial content. RESULTS: CS activity...

  2. Supporting aspartate biosynthesis is an essential function of respiration in proliferating cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Lucas B.; Gui, Dan Y.; Hosios, Aaron M.; Bush, Lauren N.; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration is important for cell proliferation, however the specific metabolic requirements fulfilled by respiration to support proliferation have not been defined. Here we show that a major role of respiration in proliferating cells is to provide electron acceptors for aspartate synthesis. This finding is consistent with the observation that cells lacking a functional respiratory chain are auxotrophic for pyruvate, which serves as an exogenous electron acceptor. Further, the p...

  3. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration: are all mitochondria created equal?

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R.; Andtbacka, Robert H. I.; Trinity, Joel D.; Hyngstrom, John R.; Garten, Ryan S.; Diakos, Nikolaos A.; Ives, Stephen J.; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Drakos, Stavros; Richardson, Russell S.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration. Therefore, the present study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscles. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles were harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53 ± 6 yr), and mitochondrial respiration was assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I + II, state 3 respiration, an index...

  4. Glycolysis Is Dynamic and Relates Closely to Respiration Rate in Stored Sugarbeet Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice A. Megguer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Although respiration is the principal cause of the loss of sucrose in postharvest sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L., the internal mechanisms that control root respiration rate are unknown. Available evidence, however, indicates that respiration rate is likely to be controlled by the availability of respiratory substrates, and glycolysis has a central role in generating these substrates. To determine glycolytic changes that occur in sugarbeet roots after harvest and to elucidate relationships between glycolysis and respiration, sugarbeet roots were stored for up to 60 days, during which activities of glycolytic enzymes and concentrations of glycolytic substrates, intermediates, cofactors, and products were determined. Respiration rate was also determined, and relationships between respiration rate and glycolytic enzymes and metabolites were evaluated. Glycolysis was highly variable during storage, with 10 of 14 glycolytic activities and 14 of 17 glycolytic metabolites significantly altered during storage. Changes in glycolytic enzyme activities and metabolites occurred throughout the 60 day storage period, but were greatest in the first 4 days after harvest. Positive relationships between changes in glycolytic enzyme activities and root respiration rate were abundant, with 10 of 14 enzyme activities elevated when root respiration was elevated and 9 glycolytic activities static during periods of unchanging respiration rate. Major roles for pyruvate kinase and phosphofructokinase in the regulation of postharvest sugarbeet root glycolysis were indicated based on changes in enzymatic activities and concentrations of their substrates and products. Additionally, a strong positive relationship between respiration rate and pyruvate kinase activity was found indicating that downstream TCA cycle enzymes were unlikely to regulate or restrict root respiration in a major way. Overall, these results establish that glycolysis is not static during sugarbeet root

  5. Isolation and characterization of respiration-deficient mutants from the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatab, M A; Whittaker, P A

    1992-04-01

    The isolation of several respiration deficient mutants of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans is described. These show greatly reduced respiration rates, loss of cytochromes aa3 and b, and reduced growth rates. All of the mutants had lost the ability to assimilate a wide range of carbon sources. Ultrastructural studies showed reduced development of mitochondrial cristae in the mutants. The mutants can be divided into three classes depending on their respiration responses to the addition of cyanide.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of respiration in yeast metabolizing differently repressive carbon substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fendt Sarah-Maria

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depending on the carbon source, Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays various degrees of respiration. These range from complete respiration as in the case of ethanol, to almost complete fermentation, and thus very low degrees of respiration on glucose. While many key regulators are known for these extreme cases, we focus here on regulators that are relevant at intermediate levels of respiration. Results We address this question by linking the functional degree of respiration to transcriptional regulation via enzyme abundances. Specifically, we investigated aerobic batch cultures with the differently repressive carbon sources glucose, mannose, galactose and pyruvate. Based on 13C flux analysis, we found that the respiratory contribution to cellular energy production was largely absent on glucose and mannose, intermediate on galactose and highest on pyruvate. In vivo abundances of 40 respiratory enzymes were quantified by GFP-fusions under each condition. During growth on the partly and fully respired substrates galactose and pyruvate, several TCA cycle and respiratory chain enzymes were significantly up-regulated. From these enzyme levels and the known regulatory network structure, we determined the probability for a given transcription factor to cause the coordinated expression changes. The most probable transcription factors to regulate the different degrees of respiration were Gcr1p, Cat8p, the Rtg-proteins and the Hap-complex. For the latter three ones we confirmed their importance for respiration by quantifying the degree of respiration and biomass yields in the corresponding deletion strains. Conclusions Cat8p is required for wild-type like respiration, independent of its known activation of gluconeogenic genes. The Rtg-proteins and the Hap-complex are essential for wild-type like respiration under partially respiratory conditions. Under fully respiratory conditions, the Hap-complex, but not the Rtg-proteins are essential

  7. Transcriptional regulation of respiration in yeast metabolizing differently repressive carbon substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Sauer, Uwe

    2010-02-18

    Depending on the carbon source, Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays various degrees of respiration. These range from complete respiration as in the case of ethanol, to almost complete fermentation, and thus very low degrees of respiration on glucose. While many key regulators are known for these extreme cases, we focus here on regulators that are relevant at intermediate levels of respiration. We address this question by linking the functional degree of respiration to transcriptional regulation via enzyme abundances. Specifically, we investigated aerobic batch cultures with the differently repressive carbon sources glucose, mannose, galactose and pyruvate. Based on 13C flux analysis, we found that the respiratory contribution to cellular energy production was largely absent on glucose and mannose, intermediate on galactose and highest on pyruvate. In vivo abundances of 40 respiratory enzymes were quantified by GFP-fusions under each condition. During growth on the partly and fully respired substrates galactose and pyruvate, several TCA cycle and respiratory chain enzymes were significantly up-regulated. From these enzyme levels and the known regulatory network structure, we determined the probability for a given transcription factor to cause the coordinated expression changes. The most probable transcription factors to regulate the different degrees of respiration were Gcr1p, Cat8p, the Rtg-proteins and the Hap-complex. For the latter three ones we confirmed their importance for respiration by quantifying the degree of respiration and biomass yields in the corresponding deletion strains. Cat8p is required for wild-type like respiration, independent of its known activation of gluconeogenic genes. The Rtg-proteins and the Hap-complex are essential for wild-type like respiration under partially respiratory conditions. Under fully respiratory conditions, the Hap-complex, but not the Rtg-proteins are essential for respiration.

  8. Evaluation of the approach to respirable quartz exposure control in U.S. coal mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Gerald J

    2012-01-01

    Occupational exposure to high levels of respirable quartz can result in respiratory and other diseases in humans. The Mine Safety and Health Adminstration (MSHA) regulates exposure to respirable quartz in coal mines indirectly through reductions in the respirable coal mine dust exposure limit based on the content of quartz in the airborne respirable dust. This reduction is implemented when the quartz content of airborne respirable dust exceeds 5% by weight. The intent of this dust standard reduction is to restrict miners' exposure to respirable quartz to a time-weighted average concentration of 100 μg/m(3). The effectiveness of this indirect approach to control quartz exposure was evaluated by analyzing respirable dust samples collected by MSHA inspectors from 1995 through 2008. The performance of the current regulatory approach was found to be lacking due to the use of a variable property-quartz content in airborne dust-to establish a standard for subsequent exposures. In one situation, 11.7% (4370/37,346) of samples that were below the applicable respirable coal mine dust exposure limit exceeded 100 μg/m(3) quartz. In a second situation, 4.4% (895/20,560) of samples with 5% or less quartz content in the airborne respirable dust exceeded 100 μg/m(3) quartz. In these two situations, the samples exceeding 100 μg/m(3) quartz were not subject to any potential compliance action. Therefore, the current respirable quartz exposure control approach does not reliably maintain miner exposure below 100 μg/m(3) quartz. A separate and specific respirable quartz exposure standard may improve control of coal miners' occupational exposure to respirable quartz.

  9. Clinical outcome and cost of treatment and care for neonates less than 1000 grams admitted to Vali-e ASR Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalili, Hosein; Fallahi, Mohaddese; Moradi, Saeid; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Shariat, Mamak; Rashidian, Arash

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the cost of care and treatment for extremely low birth weight (ELBW) neonates admitted to a teaching and referral hospital. This cost estimation project can help health policy makers and planners make decisions and develop plans for perinatal service staging programs and better management of NICUs (Neonatal Intensive Care Units). This cohort study performed on 50 extremely low birth weight neonates (w ≤ 1000gr) born in Vali-e Asr Hospital, Tehran-Iran in the period of March 2012 to September 2013. This teaching and referral hospital had 15 NICU beds as well as an active neonatal growth and development follow-up clinic with a pediatric neurodevelopment specialist during the period of the study. Cases would undergo initial developmental visits and preventative measures immediately after being admitted to the ward. Also after discharge, they were followed up monthly for six months and then every two months, during first year of life. Overalls, 23 newborns -46% of ELBW and 40% of total neonatal mortality rate (that amounted 55) died during hospital stay. Beside hospitalization, the major part of expenses was related to medication and medical supplies. All neonates needing rehabilitation underwent this type of intervention for one year. The mean cost of rehabilitation in neonates with no insurance coverage was 6700 US Dollars per year, which is reduced by half (3350 US Dollars) when covered by insurance. Medication, medical supplies and equipment cost was significantly high. This is especially due to the fact that the present types of insurances do not cover such expenses very well, forcing parents to pay themselves. Insurance systems are expected to take this issue into immediate account.

  10. DOE ASR Final Report on “Use of ARM Observations to Investigate the Role of Tropical Radiative Processes and Cloud Radiative Effects in Climate Simulations”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Qiang

    2018-01-30

    The overall objective of this ASR funded project is to investigate the role of cloud radiative effects, especially those associated with tropical thin cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer, by analyzing the ARM observations combined with numerical models. In particular, we have processed and analyzed the observations from the Raman lidar at the ARM SGP and TWP sites. In the tenure of the project (8/15/2013 – 8/14/2016 and with a no-cost extension to 8/14/2017), we have been concentrating on (i) developing an automated feature detection scheme of clouds and aerosols for the ARM Raman lidar; (ii) developing an automated retrieval of cloud and aerosol extinctions for the ARM Raman lidar; (iii) investigating cloud radiative effects based on the observations on the simulated temperatures in the tropical tropopause layer using a radiative-convective model; and (iv) examining the effect of changes of atmospheric composition on the tropical lower-stratospheric temperatures. In addition, we have examined the biases in the CALIPSO-inferred aerosol direct radiative effects using ground-based Raman lidars at the ARM SGP and TWP sites, and estimated the impact of lidar detection sensitivity on assessing global aerosol direct radiative effects. We have also investigated the diurnal cycle of clouds and precipitation at the ARM site using the cloud radar observations along with simulations from the multiscale modeling framework. The main results of our research efforts are reported in the six referred journal publications that acknowledge the DOE Grant DE-SC0010557.

  11. I Hear You Eat and Speak: Automatic Recognition of Eating Condition and Food Type, Use-Cases, and Impact on ASR Performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Hantke

    Full Text Available We propose a new recognition task in the area of computational paralinguistics: automatic recognition of eating conditions in speech, i. e., whether people are eating while speaking, and what they are eating. To this end, we introduce the audio-visual iHEARu-EAT database featuring 1.6 k utterances of 30 subjects (mean age: 26.1 years, standard deviation: 2.66 years, gender balanced, German speakers, six types of food (Apple, Nectarine, Banana, Haribo Smurfs, Biscuit, and Crisps, and read as well as spontaneous speech, which is made publicly available for research purposes. We start with demonstrating that for automatic speech recognition (ASR, it pays off to know whether speakers are eating or not. We also propose automatic classification both by brute-forcing of low-level acoustic features as well as higher-level features related to intelligibility, obtained from an Automatic Speech Recogniser. Prediction of the eating condition was performed with a Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier employed in a leave-one-speaker-out evaluation framework. Results show that the binary prediction of eating condition (i. e., eating or not eating can be easily solved independently of the speaking condition; the obtained average recalls are all above 90%. Low-level acoustic features provide the best performance on spontaneous speech, which reaches up to 62.3% average recall for multi-way classification of the eating condition, i. e., discriminating the six types of food, as well as not eating. The early fusion of features related to intelligibility with the brute-forced acoustic feature set improves the performance on read speech, reaching a 66.4% average recall for the multi-way classification task. Analysing features and classifier errors leads to a suitable ordinal scale for eating conditions, on which automatic regression can be performed with up to 56.2% determination coefficient.

  12. I Hear You Eat and Speak: Automatic Recognition of Eating Condition and Food Type, Use-Cases, and Impact on ASR Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantke, Simone; Weninger, Felix; Kurle, Richard; Ringeval, Fabien; Batliner, Anton; Mousa, Amr El-Desoky; Schuller, Björn

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new recognition task in the area of computational paralinguistics: automatic recognition of eating conditions in speech, i. e., whether people are eating while speaking, and what they are eating. To this end, we introduce the audio-visual iHEARu-EAT database featuring 1.6 k utterances of 30 subjects (mean age: 26.1 years, standard deviation: 2.66 years, gender balanced, German speakers), six types of food (Apple, Nectarine, Banana, Haribo Smurfs, Biscuit, and Crisps), and read as well as spontaneous speech, which is made publicly available for research purposes. We start with demonstrating that for automatic speech recognition (ASR), it pays off to know whether speakers are eating or not. We also propose automatic classification both by brute-forcing of low-level acoustic features as well as higher-level features related to intelligibility, obtained from an Automatic Speech Recogniser. Prediction of the eating condition was performed with a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier employed in a leave-one-speaker-out evaluation framework. Results show that the binary prediction of eating condition (i. e., eating or not eating) can be easily solved independently of the speaking condition; the obtained average recalls are all above 90%. Low-level acoustic features provide the best performance on spontaneous speech, which reaches up to 62.3% average recall for multi-way classification of the eating condition, i. e., discriminating the six types of food, as well as not eating. The early fusion of features related to intelligibility with the brute-forced acoustic feature set improves the performance on read speech, reaching a 66.4% average recall for the multi-way classification task. Analysing features and classifier errors leads to a suitable ordinal scale for eating conditions, on which automatic regression can be performed with up to 56.2% determination coefficient.

  13. Additives for reducing the toxicity of respirable crystalline silica. SILIFE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfort, Eliseo; López-Lilao, Ana; Escrig, Alberto; Jesus Ibáñez, Maria; Bonvicini, Guliana; Creutzenberg, Otto; Ziemann, Christina

    2017-10-01

    Prolonged inhalation of crystalline silica particles has long been known to cause lung inflammation and development of the granulomatous and a fibrogenic lung disease known as silicosis. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified Respirable Crystalline Silica (RCS) in the form of quartz and cristobalite from occupational sources as carcinogenic for humans (category 1). In this regard, numerous studies suggest that the toxicity of quartz is conditioned by the surface chemistry of the quartz particles and by the density and abundance of silanol groups. Blocking these groups to avoid their interaction with cellular membranes would theoretically be possible in order to reduce or even to eliminate the toxic effect. In this regard, the main contribution of the presented research is the development of detoxifying processes based on coating technologies at industrial scale, since the previous studies reported on literature were carried out at lab scale. The results obtained in two European projects showed that the wet method to obtain quartz surface coatings (SILICOAT project) allows a good efficiency in inhibiting the silica toxicity, and the preliminary results obtained in an ongoing project (SILIFE) suggest that the developed dry method to coat quartz surface is also very promising. The development of both coating technologies (wet and a dry) should allow these coating technologies to be applied to a high variety of industrial activities in which quartz is processed. For this reason, a lot of end-users of quartz powders will be potentially benefited from a reduced risk associated to the exposure to RCS.

  14. Magnitude, impact, and management of respiration-induced target motion in radiotherapy treatment: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Yoganathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors in thoracic and upper abdomen regions such as lungs, liver, pancreas, esophagus, and breast move due to respiration. Respiration-induced motion introduces uncertainties in radiotherapy treatments of these sites and is regarded as a significant bottleneck in achieving highly conformal dose distributions. Recent developments in radiation therapy have resulted in (i motion-encompassing, (ii respiratory gating, and (iii tracking methods for adapting the radiation beam aperture to account for the respiration-induced target motion. The purpose of this review is to discuss the magnitude, impact, and management of respiration-induced tumor motion.

  15. Soil respiration across a permafrost transition zone: spatial structure and environmental correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegen, James C.; Anderson, Carolyn G.; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Crump, Alex R.; Chen, Xingyuan; Hess, Nancy

    2017-09-01

    Soil respiration is a key ecosystem function whereby shifts in respiration rates can shift systems from carbon sinks to sources. Soil respiration in permafrost-associated systems is particularly important given climate change driven permafrost thaw that leads to significant uncertainty in resulting ecosystem carbon dynamics. Here we characterize the spatial structure and environmental drivers of soil respiration across a permafrost transition zone. We find that soil respiration is characterized by a non-linear threshold that occurs at active-layer depths greater than 140 cm. We also find that within each season, tree basal area is a dominant driver of soil respiration regardless of spatial scale, but only in spatial domains with significant spatial variability in basal area. Our analyses further show that spatial variation (the coefficient of variation) and mean-variance power-law scaling of soil respiration in our boreal system are consistent with previous work in other ecosystems (e.g., tropical forests) and in population ecology, respectively. Comparing our results to those in other ecosystems suggests that temporally stable features such as tree-stand structure are often primary drivers of spatial variation in soil respiration. If so, this provides an opportunity to better estimate the magnitude and spatial variation in soil respiration through remote sensing. Combining such an approach with broader knowledge of thresholding behavior - here related to active layer depth - would provide empirical constraints on models aimed at predicting ecosystem responses to ongoing permafrost thaw.

  16. Surviving the flood: plastron respiration in the non-tracheate arthropod Phrynus marginemaculatus (Amblypygi: Arachnida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebets, E A.; F Chapman, R

    2000-01-01

    Specimens of Phrynus marginemaculatus can remain responsive when submerged in water for more than 24 hours. Behavioral data indicate that P. marginemaculatus utilizes dissolved oxygen from the surrounding water. Scanning electron miscroscopy and light microscope sections show cuticular modifications for plastron respiration. All previous examples of plastron respiration have involved animals with tracheal systems, but amblypygids respire through the use of two pairs of book lungs. This study provides the first example of plastron respiration not only in the order Amblypygi, but also, in any non-tracheate arthropod.

  17. Role of UCP3 in state 4 respiration during contractile activity-induced mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubicic, Vladimir; Adhihetty, Peter J; Hood, David A

    2004-09-01

    In an effort to better characterize uncoupling protein-3 (UCP3) function in skeletal muscle, we assessed basal UCP3 protein content in rat intermyofibrillar (IMF) and subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondrial subfractions in conjunction with measurements of state 4 respiration. UCP3 content was 1.3-fold (P respiration was 2.6-fold greater (P respiration by approximately 40% (P respiration in IMF mitochondria only. We used chronic electrical stimulation (3 h/day for 7 days) to investigate the relationship between changes in UCP3 protein expression and alterations in state 4 respiration during contractile activity-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. UCP3 content was increased by 1.9- and 2.3-fold in IMF and SS mitochondria, respectively, which exceeded the concurrent 40% (P respiration by 1.4-fold (P respiration in IMF mitochondria, which was independent of the induced twofold difference in UCP3 content due to chronic contractile activity. Thus modifications in UCP3 function are more important than changes in UCP3 expression in modifying state 4 respiration. This effect is evident in IMF but not SS mitochondria. We conclude that UCP3 at physiological concentrations accounts for a significant portion of state 4 respiration in both IMF and SS mitochondria, with the contribution being greater in the IMF subfraction. In addition, the contradiction between human and rat training studies with respect to UCP3 protein expression may partly be explained by the greater than twofold difference in mitochondrial UCP3 content between rat and human skeletal muscle.

  18. Comparison and significance of respiration and glycolysis of prostatic tissue from various species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müntzing, J; Varkarakis, M J; Saroff, J; Murphy, G P

    1975-01-01

    The respiration and glycolysis of prostatic tissue from baboons, rhesus monkeys, dogs and rats were compared to the respiration and glycolysis in human prostatic tissue. All the primate prostates had a high glycolytic ability and a low respiration in contrast to the rat and dog prostate. Treatment of baboons with drugs clinically effective against prostatic cancer did not change the prostatic metabolism despite a marked prostatic atrophy. In vitro the drugs reduced respiration markedly. The metabolic similarity between the human and the baboon and rhesus monkey prostate indicates that nonhuman primates should be investigated in the evaluation of chemotherapeutic agents for treatment of prostatic cancer.

  19. Effects of assimilate supply on root and microbial components of soil respiration in a mountain grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M.; Siegwolf, R.; Ekblad, A.; Pfahringer, N.; Bahn, M.

    2012-04-01

    Soil respiration is the main source of carbon emitted from terrestrial ecosystems. Soil CO2 originates from multiple processes, comprising respiration by plant roots, mycorrhizae and microbes in the rhizosphere, as well as respiration due to soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. Thus, components of soil respiration have different controls and show varying responses to changing environmental conditions and to the supply of fresh assimilates from photosynthesis. For grasslands there is still little information available as to what extent root and microbial respiration respond to reduced or enhanced assimilate supply. The aim of this study was to assess effects of assimilate supply on root and microbial components of soil respiration in a temperate mountain grassland. Root and microbial components were separated and quantified by applying the Substrate Induced Respiration method (SIR) in situ using a δ13C labelled sucrose solution, and analysing δ13C of the subsequently respired CO2. Assimilate supply was modified by clipping and shading treatments, which strongly reduced photosynthetic C supply, and by applying a sucrose solution 8 days after clipping and shading. We tested the hypotheses that (1) due to a reduction of assimilate supply, soil respiration would be lower in the clipped and shaded than in the control treatment, that (2) the microbial contribution to soil respiration would be lower in the assimilate-limited than in the control treatments, and that (3) priming effects following the addition of sucrose would be stronger in shaded and mowed treatments than in control plots. Our results showed that clipping and shading reduced soil respiration significantly. Whilst the microbial contribution to soil respiration was 61% in control plots, it amounted to only 50-48% in clipped and shaded plots, respectively. Sucrose application did not affect root respiration in any of the plots, but generally stimulated microbial respiration. The measured priming effect

  20. Anaerobic Respiration Using a Complete Oxidative TCA Cycle Drives Multicellular Swarming in Proteus mirabilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alteri, Christopher J.; Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Engstrom, Michael D.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteus mirabilis rapidly migrates across surfaces using a periodic developmental process of differentiation alternating between short swimmer cells and elongated hyperflagellated swarmer cells. To undergo this vigorous flagellum-mediated motility, bacteria must generate a substantial proton gradient across their cytoplasmic membranes by using available energy pathways. We sought to identify the link between energy pathways and swarming differentiation by examining the behavior of defined central metabolism mutants. Mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (fumC and sdhB mutants) caused altered patterns of swarming periodicity, suggesting an aerobic pathway. Surprisingly, the wild-type strain swarmed on agar containing sodium azide, which poisons aerobic respiration; the fumC TCA cycle mutant, however, was unable to swarm on azide. To identify other contributing energy pathways, we screened transposon mutants for loss of swarming on sodium azide and found insertions in the following genes that involved fumarate metabolism or respiration: hybB, encoding hydrogenase; fumC, encoding fumarase; argH, encoding argininosuccinate lyase (generates fumarate); and a quinone hydroxylase gene. These findings validated the screen and suggested involvement of anaerobic electron transport chain components. Abnormal swarming periodicity of fumC and sdhB mutants was associated with the excretion of reduced acidic fermentation end products. Bacteria lacking SdhB were rescued to wild-type pH and periodicity by providing fumarate, independent of carbon source but dependent on oxygen, while fumC mutants were rescued by glycerol, independent of fumarate only under anaerobic conditions. These findings link multicellular swarming patterns with fumarate metabolism and membrane electron transport using a previously unappreciated configuration of both aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chain components. PMID:23111869

  1. Soil carbon dynamics inferred from carbon isotope compositions of soil organic matter and soil respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koarashi, Jun; Asano, Tomohiro; Iida, Takao; Moriizumi, Jun

    2004-01-01

    To better understand 14 C cycling in terrestrial ecosystems, 14 C abundances were evaluated for fractionated soil organic matter (SOM) and soil respiration in an urban forest. In 2001 soil profile, Δ 14 C values of litter and bulk SOM increased rapidly from litter surface (62.7 per mille) to uppermost mineral soil layer (244.9 per mille), and then decreased sharply to 6 cm depth of mineral soil (125.0 per mille). Carbon enriched in 14 C by atmospheric nuclear weapons testing had penetrated to at least 16 cm depth of mineral soil. The average Δ 14 C in atmospheric CO 2 was 58.8 per mille in August 2001, suggesting recent carbon input to the topmost litter layer. Although a similar depth distribution was observed for Δ 14 C values of residual SOM after acid hydrolysis, the Δ 14 C values were slightly lower than those in bulk SOM. This indicates input of 'bomb' C into this organic fraction and higher 14 C abundance in acid-soluble SOM. The most of CO 2 may be derived from the microbial decomposition of the acid-soluble, or labile, SOM. Therefore, the labile SOM may become most influential pool for soil carbon cycling. In contrast, carbon in base-insoluble SOM remained considerably low in 14 C abundance at all depths, suggesting no or little incorporation of 'bomb' C to this fraction. Values of Δ 14 C in soil respiration ranged from 91.9 to 146.4 per mille in August 2001, showing a significant contribution from decomposition of SOM fixed over past 2-40 years. These results indicate that the use of bulk SOM as a representative of soil carbon pool would lead to severe misunderstand of the soil C dynamics on decadal and shorter time scales. (author)

  2. Spinal cord motion. Influence of respiration and cardiac cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winklhofer, S. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Schoth, F. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Stolzmann, P. [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Krings, T. [Toronto Western Hospital, ON (Canada). Div. of Neuroradiology; Mull, M.; Wiesmann, M. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Stracke, C.P. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Alfried-Krupp-Hospital, Essen (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2014-11-15

    To assess physiological spinal cord motion during the cardiac cycle compared with the influence of respiration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Anterior-posterior spinal cord motion within the spinal canal was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers (median age, 25 years) by cardiac-triggered and cardiac-gated gradient echo pulse sequence MRI. Image acquisition was performed during breath-holding, normal breathing, and forced breathing. Normal spinal cord motion values were computed using descriptive statistics. Breathing-dependent differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and compared with the cardiac-based cord motion. A normal value table was set up for the spinal cord motion of each vertebral cervico-thoracic-lumbar segment. Significant differences in cord motion were found between cardiac-based motion while breath-holding and the two breathing modalities (P < 0.01 each). Spinal cord motion was found to be highest during forced breathing, with a maximum in the lower cervical spinal segments (C5; mean, 2.1 mm ± 1.17). Image acquisition during breath-holding revealed the lowest motion. MRI permits the demonstration and evaluation of cardiac and respiration-dependent spinal cord motion within the spinal canal from the cervical to lumbar segments. Breathing conditions have a considerably greater impact than cardiac activity on spinal cord motion.

  3. Exposure to respirable crystalline silica in South African farm workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanepoel, Andrew; Rees, David; Renton, Kevin; Kromhout, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Although listed in some publications as an activity associated with silica (quartz) exposure, agriculture is not widely recognized as an industry with a potential for silica associated diseases. Because so many people work in agriculture; and because silica exposure and silicosis are associated with serious diseases such as tuberculosis (TB), particular in those immunological compromised by the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), silica exposure in agriculture is potentially very important. But in South Africa (SA) very little is known about silica exposure in this industry. The objectives of this project are: (a) to measure inhalable and respirable dust and its quartz content on two typical sandy soil farms in the Free State province of SA for all major tasks done on the farms; and (b) to characterise the mineralogy soil type of these farms. Two typical farms in the sandy soil region of the Free State province were studied. The potential health effects faced by these farm workers from exposure to respirable crystalline silica are discussed.

  4. DIAGNOSTIC COLOR DIFFERENTIATION PLATES FOR HEREDITARY RESPIRATION DEFICIENCY IN YEAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Susumu

    1963-01-01

    Nagai, Susumu (National Women's University, Nara, Japan). Diagnostic color differentiation plates for hereditary respiration deficiency in yeast. J. Bacteriol. 86:299–302. 1963.—Color differentiation between normal yeasts and their respiration-deficient mutants was improved by growing yeast colonies on nutrient agar plates containing several selected dyes and their mixtures. Magdala red (5 to 8 mg/liter) was good for single-color plates, giving deep-red sheen to the mutant colonies in contrast to the normal ones which tinted light red. A mixture of eosin (8 to 15 mg/liter, either Y or B) with trypan blue (15 to 20 mg/liter) was excellent in color and convenient to prepare, giving brilliant purple sheen to the mutant colonies contrasted to the normal ones which tinted grayish violet. These color plates were good over a broad range of Saccharomyces species, although the colony shades and suitable dye concentrations varied depending on the species and strains. Images PMID:14058956

  5. Spinal cord motion. Influence of respiration and cardiac cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winklhofer, S.; University Hospital Zurich; Schoth, F.; Stolzmann, P.; Krings, T.; Mull, M.; Wiesmann, M.; Stracke, C.P.; Alfried-Krupp-Hospital, Essen

    2014-01-01

    To assess physiological spinal cord motion during the cardiac cycle compared with the influence of respiration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Anterior-posterior spinal cord motion within the spinal canal was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers (median age, 25 years) by cardiac-triggered and cardiac-gated gradient echo pulse sequence MRI. Image acquisition was performed during breath-holding, normal breathing, and forced breathing. Normal spinal cord motion values were computed using descriptive statistics. Breathing-dependent differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and compared with the cardiac-based cord motion. A normal value table was set up for the spinal cord motion of each vertebral cervico-thoracic-lumbar segment. Significant differences in cord motion were found between cardiac-based motion while breath-holding and the two breathing modalities (P < 0.01 each). Spinal cord motion was found to be highest during forced breathing, with a maximum in the lower cervical spinal segments (C5; mean, 2.1 mm ± 1.17). Image acquisition during breath-holding revealed the lowest motion. MRI permits the demonstration and evaluation of cardiac and respiration-dependent spinal cord motion within the spinal canal from the cervical to lumbar segments. Breathing conditions have a considerably greater impact than cardiac activity on spinal cord motion.

  6. Diatoms respire nitrate to survive dark and anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Anja; de Beer, Dirk; Nitsch, Jana L.; Lavik, Gaute; Stief, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms survive in dark, anoxic sediment layers for months to decades. Our investigation reveals a correlation between the dark survival potential of marine diatoms and their ability to accumulate NO3− intracellularly. Axenic strains of benthic and pelagic diatoms that stored 11–274 mM NO3− in their cells survived for 6–28 wk. After sudden shifts to dark, anoxic conditions, the benthic diatom Amphora coffeaeformis consumed 84–87% of its intracellular NO3− pool within 1 d. A stable-isotope labeling experiment proved that 15NO3− consumption was accompanied by the production and release of 15NH4+, indicating dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). DNRA is an anaerobic respiration process that is known mainly from prokaryotic organisms, and here shown as dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathway used by a eukaryotic phototroph. Similar to large sulfur bacteria and benthic foraminifera, diatoms may respire intracellular NO3− in sediment layers without O2 and NO3−. The rapid depletion of the intracellular NO3− storage, however, implies that diatoms use DNRA to enter a resting stage for long-term survival. Assuming that pelagic diatoms are also capable of DNRA, senescing diatoms that sink through oxygen-deficient water layers may be a significant NH4+ source for anammox, the prevalent nitrogen loss pathway of oceanic oxygen minimum zones. PMID:21402908

  7. Exposure to respirable crystalline silica in South African farm workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanepoel, Andrew; Rees, David [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Public Health, Johannesburg (South Africa); Renton, Kevin [National Institute for Occupational Health, Johannesburg (South Africa); Kromhout, Hans, E-mail: andrew.swanepoel@wits.ac.z [Environmental Epidemiology Division, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, University of Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-02-01

    Although listed in some publications as an activity associated with silica (quartz) exposure, agriculture is not widely recognized as an industry with a potential for silica associated diseases. Because so many people work in agriculture; and because silica exposure and silicosis are associated with serious diseases such as tuberculosis (TB), particular in those immunological compromised by the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), silica exposure in agriculture is potentially very important. But in South Africa (SA) very little is known about silica exposure in this industry. The objectives of this project are: (a) to measure inhalable and respirable dust and its quartz content on two typical sandy soil farms in the Free State province of SA for all major tasks done on the farms; and (b) to characterise the mineralogy soil type of these farms. Two typical farms in the sandy soil region of the Free State province were studied. The potential health effects faced by these farm workers from exposure to respirable crystalline silica are discussed.

  8. Effects of temperature on photosynthesis and respiration in hermatypic corals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, S.L.; Jokiel, P.L.

    1977-01-01

    Photosynthesis and respiration rates of the reef corals Pocillopora damicornis (Linn.), Montipora verrucosa (Lamarck), Porites compressa Dana and Fungia scutaria Lamarck were measured under controlled temperatures. Results indicate that coral metabolism is closely adapted to ambient temperature conditions. Tropical corals measured at Enewetak, Marshall Islands, showed greater primary production compared to maintenance requirements at elevated temperatures than did subtropical varieties of the same species in Hawaii. Photosynthesis:respiration (P:R) ratios were significantly and negatively related with temperature between 18/sup 0/ and 31/sup 0/C for all Hawaiian corals, whereas at Enewetak this ratio generally showed a curvilinear relationship for this temperature range. Extrapolations of P:R regressions on temperatures to a value of 2.0 (estimated as a minimum required for long-term functional autotrophy) coincide for Hawaiian specimens with published upper lethal temperatures. Extrapolation of P:R regressions for Enewetak specimens at temperatures above 25/sup 0/C suggests lethal temperatures for these corals to be 2 to 5 C/sup 0/ higher than for Hawaiian corals, in good agreement with recent experimental findings. Interspecific differences in P:R temperature regressions for Hawaiian corals corelating with upper lethal temperature tolerances are described.

  9. Respirable quartz hazard associated with coal mine roof bolter dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, G.J.; Beck, T.W.; Listak, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Pneumoconiosis has been reported to be increasing among underground coal miners in the Southern Appalachian Region. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health conducted a study to examine the particle size distribution and quartz content of dust generated by the installation of roof bolts in mines. Forty-six bulk samples of roof bolting machine pre-cleaner cyclone dump dust and collector box dust were collected from 26 underground coal mines. Real-time and integrated airborne respirable dust concentrations were measured on 3 mining sections in 2 mines. The real-time airborne dust concentrations profiles were examined to identify any concentration changes that might be associated with pre-cleaner cyclone dust discharge events. The study showed that bolter dust is a potential inhalation hazard due to the fraction of dust less than 10 μm in size, and the quartz content of the dust. The pre-cleaner cyclone dust was significantly larger than the collector box dust, indicating that the pre-cleaner functioned properly in removing the larger dust size fraction from the airstream. However, the pre-cleaner dust still contained a substantial amount of respirable dust. It was concluded that in order to maintain the effectiveness of a roof bolter dust collector, periodic removal of dust is required. Appropriate work procedures and equipment are necessary to minimize exposure during this cleaning task. 13 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  10. Final DOE-ASR Report for the Project “Advancing our Understanding and the Remote Sensing of Ice Clouds”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, David [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Erfani, Ehsan [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States); Garnier, Anne [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States); Lawson, Paul [SPEC, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Morrison, Hugh [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Avery, Melody [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

    2016-12-29

    This project has evolved during its execution, and what follows are the key project findings. This project has arguably provided the first global view of how cirrus cloud (defined as having cloud base temperature T < 235 K) nucleation physics (evaluated through satellite retrievals of ice particle number concentration Ni, effective diameter De and ice water content IWC) evolves with the seasons for a given temperature, latitude zone and surface type (e.g. ocean vs. land), based on a new satellite remote sensing method developed for this project. The retrieval method is unique in that it is very sensitive to the small ice crystals that govern the number concentration Ni, allowing Ni to be retrieved. The method currently samples single-layer cirrus clouds having visible optical depth ranging from about 0.3 to 3.0, using co-located observations from the Infrared Imaging Radiometer (IIR) and from the CALIOP (Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar aboard the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) polar orbiting satellite, employing IIR channels at 10.6 μm and 12.05 μm. Retrievals of Ni are primarily used to estimate the cirrus cloud formation mechanism; that is, either homo- or heterogeneous ice nucleation (henceforth hom and het). This is possible since, in general, hom produces more than an order of magnitude more ice crystals than does het. Thus the retrievals provide insight on how these mechanisms change with the seasons for a given latitude zone or region, based on the years 2008 and 2013. Using a conservative criterion for hom cirrus, on average, the sampled cirrus clouds formed through hom occur about 43% of the time in the Arctic and 50% of the time in the Antarctic, and during winter at mid-latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, hom cirrus occur 37% of the time. Elsewhere (and during other seasons in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes), this hom cirrus fraction is lower, and it is lowest in the

  11. Glucose, Lactate and Glutamine but not Glutamate Support Depolarization-Induced Increased Respiration in Isolated Nerve Terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Andersen, Vibe H; Bak, Lasse K

    2017-01-01

    . Synaptosomal respiration using glutamate and glutamine as substrates was significantly higher compared to basal respiration, whereas oligomycin-dependent and FCCP-induced respiration was lower compared to the responses obtained in the presence of glucose as substrate. We provide evidence that synaptosomes...... are able to use besides glucose and pyruvate also the substrates lactate, glutamate and glutamine to support their basal respiration. Veratridine was found to increase respiration supported by glucose, pyruvate, lactate and glutamine and FCCP was found to increase respiration supported by glucose, pyruvate...

  12. Diel hysteresis between soil respiration and soil temperature in a biological soil crust covered desert ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Chao; Li, Xinrong; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yongle

    2018-01-01

    Soil respiration induced by biological soil crusts (BSCs) is an important process in the carbon (C) cycle in arid and semi-arid ecosystems, where vascular plants are restricted by the harsh environment, particularly the limited soil moisture. However, the interaction between temperature and soil respiration remains uncertain because of the number of factors that control soil respiration, including temperature and soil moisture, especially in BSC-dominated areas. In this study, the soil respiration in moss-dominated crusts and lichen-dominated crusts was continuously measured using an automated soil respiration system over a one-year period from November 2015 to October 2016 in the Shapotou region of the Tengger Desert, northern China. The results indicated that over daily cycles, the half-hourly soil respiration rates in both types of BSC-covered areas were commonly related to the soil temperature. The observed diel hysteresis between the half-hourly soil respiration rates and soil temperature in the BSC-covered areas was limited by nonlinearity loops with semielliptical shapes, and soil temperature often peaked later than the half-hourly soil respiration rates in the BSC-covered areas. The average lag times between the half-hourly soil respiration rates and soil temperature for both types of BSC-covered areas were two hours over the diel cycles, and they were negatively and linearly related to the volumetric soil water content. Our results highlight the diel hysteresis phenomenon that occurs between soil respiration rates and soil temperatures in BSC-covered areas and the negative response of this phenomenon to soil moisture, which may influence total C budget evaluations. Therefore, the interactive effects of soil temperature and moisture on soil respiration in BSC-covered areas should be considered in global carbon cycle models of desert ecosystems.

  13. Microsensor studies of photosynthesis and respiration in the larger symbiont bearing foraminifera Amphistegina lobifera, and Amphisorus hemprichii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler-Rink, S.; Kühl, Michael

    2001-01-01

    The photosynthesis and respiration of the larger foraminifera Amphistegina lobifera and Amphisorus hemprichii was studied with O2, CO2, and pH microsensors, and with a miniature gas exchange chamber. The diffusive transport of O2 and CO2 through both perforate (A. lobifera) and imperforate (A....... No photoinhibition was observed up to an irradiance of 2000 pmol photons m-2 s-1. Net photosynthesis (at saturating irradiance) and dark respiration rates were 3.7-22.7 and 5.6-14.3 nmol O2 foraminifer-1 h-1, respectively. Simultaneous CO2, pH and O2 measurements at the shell surface of A. hemprichii during...... experimental light-dark cycles showed rapid concentration changes of all three variables upon light-dark or dark-light shifts. The dynamics of O2 and CO2 at the shell surface of A. hemprichii showed unequal net conversion rates of O2 and CO2 during experimental light-dark cycles. The molar O2/CO2 conversion...

  14. An instrument design and sample strategy for measuring soil respiration in the coastal temperate rain forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nay, S. M.; D'Amore, D. V.

    2009-12-01

    The coastal temperate rainforest (CTR) along the northwest coast of North America is a large and complex mosaic of forests and wetlands located on an undulating terrain ranging from sea level to thousands of meters in elevation. This biome stores a dynamic portion of the total carbon stock of North America. The fate of the terrestrial carbon stock is of concern due to the potential for mobilization and export of this store to both the atmosphere as carbon respiration flux and ocean as dissolved organic and inorganic carbon flux. Soil respiration is the largest export vector in the system and must be accurately measured to gain any comprehensive understanding of how carbon moves though this system. Suitable monitoring tools capable of measuring carbon fluxes at small spatial scales are essential for our understanding of carbon dynamics at larger spatial scales within this complex assemblage of ecosystems. We have adapted instrumentation and developed a sampling strategy for optimizing replication of soil respiration measurements to quantify differences among spatially complex landscape units of the CTR. We start with the design of the instrument to ease the technological, ergonomic and financial barriers that technicians encounter in monitoring the efflux of CO2 from the soil. Our sampling strategy optimizes the physical efforts of the field work and manages for the high variation of flux measurements encountered in this difficult environment of rough terrain, dense vegetation and wet climate. Our soil respirometer incorporates an infra-red gas analyzer (LiCor Inc. LI-820) and an 8300 cm3 soil respiration chamber; the device is durable, lightweight, easy to operate and can be built for under $5000 per unit. The modest unit price allows for a multiple unit fleet to be deployed and operated in an intensive field monitoring campaign. We use a large 346 cm2 collar to accommodate as much micro spatial variation as feasible and to facilitate repeated measures for tracking

  15. Soil Respiration in Eddy Covariance Footprints using Forced Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, N.; Gabriel, C. E.; Creelman, C.

    2016-12-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) has been widely used across the globe for more than 20 years, offering researchers invaluable measurements of parameters including Net Ecosystem Exchange and ecosystem respiration. However, research suggests that EC assumptions and technical obstacles can cause biased gas exchange estimates. Measurements of soil respiration (RS) at the ground level may help alleviate these biases; for example, by allowing researchers to reconcile nocturnal EC flux data with RS or by providing a means to inform gap-filling models. RS measurements have been used sparingly alongside EC towers because of the large cost required to scale chamber systems to the EC footprint and data integration and processing burdens. Here we present the Forced Diffusion (FD) method for the measurement of RS at EC sites. The FD method allows for inexpensive and autonomous measurements, providing a scalable approach to matching the EC footprint compared to other RS systems. A pilot study at the Howland Forest AmeriFlux site was carried out from July 15, 2016 to Dec., 2016 using EC, custom-made automated chambers, and FD chambers in tandem. These results emphasize how RS measurements, like those from the eosFD, can identify decoupling of above and below canopy air masses and assist in informing and parameterizing gap-filling techniques. Uncertainty in nocturnal EC fluxes has been extensively characterized at Howland Forest with EC measurements spanning more than 20 years. Similarly, long term automated measurements of RS are also made at Howland, and have already been used to inform EC gap-filling models, making Howland the ideal site for such a study. This study has been designed to reproduce previous findings from Howland using the FD approach, aiming to demonstrate that the measurements taken using the eosFD correlate well with the existing chamber systems and can be used with equal efficacy to inform gap filling models or for other other eddy covariance QA/QC procedures, including

  16. Soil Respiration at Dominant Patch Types within a Managed Northern Wisconsin Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eug& #233; nie Euskirchen; Jiquan Chen; Eric J. Gustafson; Siyan Ma; Siyan Ma

    2003-01-01

    Soil respiration (SR), a substantial component of the forest carbon budget, has been studied extensively at the ecosystem, regional, continental, and global scales, but little progress has been made toward understanding SR over managed forest landscapes. Soil respiration is often influenced by soil temperature (Ts), soil moisture (Ms...

  17. Effect of environmental variables and stand structure on ecosystem respiration components in a Mediterranean beech forest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guidolotti, G.; Rey, A.; D'Andrea, E.; Matteucci, G.; De Angelis, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 9 (2013), s. 960-972 ISSN 0829-318X Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : ecosystem respiration * Fagus sylvatica * leaf respiration * soil CO2 efflux * stem CO2 efflux * total non-structural carbohydrates Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.405, year: 2013

  18. Soil CO2 concentration does not affect growth or root respiration in bean or citrus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.; Nielsen, K.F.; Eissenstat, D.M.; Lynch, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Contrasting effects of soil CO2 concentration on root respiration rates during short-term CO2 exposure, and on plant growth during long-term CO2 exposure, have been reported, Here we examine the effects of both short-and long-term exposure to soil CO2 on the root respiration of intact plants and on

  19. Estimation of microbial respiration rates in groundwater by geochemical modeling constrained with stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, E. M.; Schramke, J. A.

    1998-11-01

    Changes in geochemistry and stable isotopes along a well-established groundwater flow path were used to estimate in situ microbial respiration rates in the Middendorf aquifer in the southeastern United States. Respiration rates were determined for individual terminal electron acceptors including O 2, MnO 2, Fe 3+, and SO 42-. The extent of biotic reactions were constrained by the fractionation of stable isotopes of carbon and sulfur. Sulfur isotopes and the presence of sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms indicated that sulfate is produced through the oxidation of reduced sulfur species in the aquifer and not by the dissolution of gypsum, as previously reported. The respiration rates varied along the flow path as the groundwater transitioned between primarily oxic to anoxic conditions. Iron-reducing microorganisms were the largest contributors to the oxidation of organic matter along the portion of the groundwater flow path investigated in this study. The transition zone between oxic and anoxic groundwater contained a wide range of terminal electron acceptors and showed the greatest diversity and numbers of culturable microorganisms and the highest respiration rates. A comparison of respiration rates measured from core samples and pumped groundwater suggests that variability in respiration rates may often reflect the measurement scales, both in the sample volume and the time-frame over which the respiration measurement is averaged. Chemical heterogeneity may create a wide range of respiration rates when the scale of the observation is below the scale of the heterogeneity.

  20. Wet meadow ecosystems contribute the majority of overwinter soil respiration from snow-scoured alpine tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, John F.; Blanken, Peter D.; Williams, Mark W.

    2016-04-01

    We measured soil respiration across a soil moisture gradient ranging from dry to wet snow-scoured alpine tundra soils throughout three winters and two summers. In the absence of snow accumulation, soil moisture variability was principally determined by the combination of mesotopographical hydrological focusing and shallow subsurface permeability, which resulted in a patchwork of comingled ecosystem types along a single alpine ridge. To constrain the subsequent carbon cycling variability, we compared three measures of effective diffusivity and three methods to calculate gradient method soil respiration from four typical vegetation communities. Overwinter soil respiration was primarily restricted to wet meadow locations, and a conservative estimate of the rate of overwinter soil respiration from snow-scoured wet meadow tundra was 69-90% of the maximum carbon dioxide (CO2) respired by seasonally snow-covered soils within this same catchment. This was attributed to higher overwinter soil temperatures at wet meadow locations relative to fellfield, dry meadow, and moist meadow communities, which supported liquid water and heterotrophic respiration throughout the winter. These results were corroborated by eddy covariance-based measurements that demonstrated an average of 272 g C m-2 overwinter carbon loss during the study period. As a result, we updated a conceptual model of soil respiration versus snow cover to express the potential for soil respiration variability from snow-scoured alpine tundra.

  1. Measurement carbon dioxide concentration does not affect root respiration of nine tree species in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. Burton; Kurt S. Pregitzer

    2002-01-01

    Inhibition of respiration has been reported as a short-term response of tree roots to elevated measurement CO2 concentration ([CO2]), calling into question the validity of root respiration rates determined at CO2 concentrations that differ from the soil [CO2] in the rooting zone...

  2. Mitochondrial respiration is decreased in skeletal muscle of patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Sahlin, Kent; Fernström, Maria

    2007-01-01

    . Maximal ADP-stimulated respiration (state 3) with pyruvate plus malate and respiration through the electron transport chain (ETC) were reduced in type 2 diabetic patients, and the proportion of type 2X fibers were higher in type 2 diabetic patients compared with obese subjects (all P

  3. Screening and identification of respiration deficiency mutants of yeasts (Saccharomyces Cerevisiae) induced by heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Shuhong; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Jin Genming; Wei Zengquan; Xie Hongmei; Zhang Hong

    2006-01-01

    A screen of respiration deficiency mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae induced by 5.19 MeV/u 22 Ne 5- ion irradiation is studied. Some respiration deficiency mutants, which are white colony phenotype in the selective culture of TTC medium, are obtained. The mutants are effectively identified by means of a new and simplified restriction analysis method. (authors)

  4. Lung function interpolation by analysis of means of neural-network-supported respiration sounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, M

    Respiration sounds of individual asthmatic patients were analysed in the scope of the development of a method for computerised recognition of the degree of airways obstruction. Respiration sounds were recorded during laboratory sessions of allergen provoked airways obstruction, during several stages

  5. Design of climate respiration chambers, adjustable to the metabolic mass of subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heetkamp, M.J.W.; Alferink, S.J.J.; Zandstra, T.; Hendriks, P.; Brand, van den H.; Gerrits, W.J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Open-circuit respiration chambers can be used to measure gas exchange and to calculate heat production (Q) of humans and animals. When studying short-term changes in Q, the size of the respiration chamber in relation to the subject of study is a point of concern. The washout time of a chamber,

  6. 30 CFR 90.101 - Respirable dust standard when quartz is present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respirable dust standard when quartz is present... quartz is present. When the respirable dust in the mine atmosphere of the active workings to which a Part 90 miner is exposed contains more than 5 percent quartz, the operator shall continuously maintain the...

  7. Soil respiration and net N mineralization along a climate gradient in Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery A. Simmons; Ivan J. Fernandez; Russell D. Briggs

    1996-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the influence of temperature and moisture on soil respiration and net N mineralization in northeastern forests. The study consisted of sixteen deciduous stands located along a regional climate gradient within Maine. A significant portion of the variance in net N mineralization (41 percent) and respiration (33 percent) was predicted by...

  8. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist..., hood, or helmet of a dust, fume, or mist respirator mounted on a test fixture with air flowing at a...

  9. Control of Respirable Particles in Indoor Air with Portable AirCleaners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offermann, F.J.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Grimsrud, D.T.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-10-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles using in situ chamber decay tests. Following injection of cigarette smoke in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size with and without air cleaner operation. The size distribution of the tobacco smoke particles was log normal with a count median diameter of 0.15 {micro}m and a geometric standard deviation of 2.0. Without air cleaner operation, the natural mass-averaged surface deposition rate of particles was observed to be 0.1 h{sup -1}. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filter devices, a residential-sized ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. Electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters removed particles at substantial rates, and a HEPA-type filter was the most efficient air cleaner studied.

  10. Exogenous Nitrogen Addition Reduced the Temperature Sensitivity of Microbial Respiration without Altering the Microbial Community Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric nitrogen (N deposition is changing in both load quantity and chemical composition. The load effects have been studied extensively, whereas the composition effects remain poorly understood. We conducted a microcosm experiment to study how N chemistry affected the soil microbial community composition characterized by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs and activity indicated by microbial CO2 release. Surface and subsurface soils collected from an old-growth subtropical forest were supplemented with three N-containing materials (ammonium, nitrate, and urea at the current regional deposition load (50 kg ha-1 yr-1 and incubated at three temperatures (10, 20, and 30°C to detect the interactive effects of N deposition and temperature. The results showed that the additions of N, regardless of form, did not alter the microbial PLFAs at any of the three temperatures. However, the addition of urea significantly stimulated soil CO2 release in the early incubation stage. Compared with the control, N addition consistently reduced the temperature dependency of microbial respiration, implying that N deposition could potentially weaken the positive feedback of the warming-stimulated soil CO2 release to the atmosphere. The consistent N effects for the surface and subsurface soils suggest that the effects of N on soil microbial communities may be independent of soil chemical contents and stoichiometry.

  11. Assessment of Adequacy of Dialysis in Patients under Continuous Hemodialysis in Kamkar and Hazrat Vali Asr Hospitals, State of Qom, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Mousavi Movahed

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectivesHemodialysis is one of the therapeutic modalities of the end stage renal disease (ESRD. As inadequate dialysis is considered a risk factor leading to higher morbidity and mortality, determination of adequacy of dialysis is necessary. This study was conducted to determine adequacy of dialysis in continuous hemodialysis patients in Kamkar and Hazrat Vali Asr Hospitals in the state of Qom, Iran.Methods This cross sectional descriptive-analytic study was conducted in 2006. The study variables were age, gender, height, weight and duration of dialysis. Data were collected by a questionnaire and URR, dKt/V, eKt/V and pKt/V were calculated. For statistical analysis, t-test, Fisher’s exact test and Pearson correlation were employed. Results Of 238 patients, 51.7% and 48.3% were males and females respectively. The average age was 55.27 ± 16.79 years. Mean values of dKt/V, eKt/V, pKt/V and URR were 1.03 ± 0.232, 0.89 ± 0.196, 1.18 ± 0.254, and 57.46 ± 8.42 respectively. The percent of adequate dialysis in eKt/V, pKt/V and URR were 26.5%, 44.5% and 21% respectively. The mean age of insufficient eKt/V group was higher than adequate eKt/V group and t test showed a significant statistical correlation. Fisher’s exact test showed a significant correlation between adequate eKt/V and female gender, and also between eKt/V and URR. But chi-square test did not show a significant correlation between eKt/V and underling disease.Conclusion We found that hemodialysis is inadequate in a high number of patients. Further studies with larger sample numbers are recommended to determine the underlying cause of this inadequacy. Keywords: Hemodialysis, Dialysis, End Stage Renal Disease

  12. Ternary CaCu4P2-type pnictides AAg4Pn2 (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Khatun, Mansura; Scott Mullen, C.; Mar, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Four ternary pnictides AAg 4 Pn 2 (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb) were prepared by reactions of the elements at 850 °C and their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. These silver-containing pnictides AAg 4 Pn 2 adopt the trigonal CaCu 4 P 2 -type structure (Pearson symbol hR21, space group R3-bar m, Z=3; a=4.5555(6) Å, c=24.041(3) Å for SrAg 4 As 2 ; a=4.5352(2) Å, c=23.7221(11) Å for EuAg 4 As 2 ; a=4.7404(4) Å, c=25.029(2) Å for SrAg 4 Sb 2 ; a=4.7239(3) Å, c=24.689(2) Å for EuAg 4 Sb 2 ), which can be derived from the trigonal CaAl 2 Si 2 -type structure of the isoelectronic zinc-containing pnictides AZn 2 Pn 2 by insertion of additional Ag atoms into trigonal planar sites within [M 2 Pn 2 ] 2− slabs built up of edge-sharing tetrahedra. Band structure calculations on SrAg 4 As 2 and SrAg 4 Sb 2 revealed that these charge-balanced Zintl phases actually exhibit no gap at the Fermi level and are predicted to be semimetals. - Graphical abstract: SrAg 4 As 2 and related pnictides adopt a CaCu 4 P 2 -type structure in which additional Ag atoms enter trigonal planar sites within slabs built from edge-sharing tetrahedra. Highlights: ► AAg 4 Pn 2 are the first Ag-containing members of the CaCu 4 P 2 -type structure. ► Ag atoms are stuffed in trigonal planar sites within CaAl 2 Si 2 -type slabs. ► Ag–Ag bonding develops through attractive d 10 –d 10 interactions.

  13. Ternary CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Khatun, Mansura; Scott Mullen, C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada); Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2012-08-15

    Four ternary pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb) were prepared by reactions of the elements at 850 Degree-Sign C and their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. These silver-containing pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} adopt the trigonal CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure (Pearson symbol hR21, space group R3-bar m, Z=3; a=4.5555(6) A, c=24.041(3) A for SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2}; a=4.5352(2) A, c=23.7221(11) A for EuAg{sub 4}As{sub 2}; a=4.7404(4) A, c=25.029(2) A for SrAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}; a=4.7239(3) A, c=24.689(2) A for EuAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}), which can be derived from the trigonal CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure of the isoelectronic zinc-containing pnictides AZn{sub 2}Pn{sub 2} by insertion of additional Ag atoms into trigonal planar sites within [M{sub 2}Pn{sub 2}]{sup 2-} slabs built up of edge-sharing tetrahedra. Band structure calculations on SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2} and SrAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2} revealed that these charge-balanced Zintl phases actually exhibit no gap at the Fermi level and are predicted to be semimetals. - Graphical abstract: SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2} and related pnictides adopt a CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure in which additional Ag atoms enter trigonal planar sites within slabs built from edge-sharing tetrahedra. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} are the first Ag-containing members of the CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag atoms are stuffed in trigonal planar sites within CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type slabs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-Ag bonding develops through attractive d{sup 10}-d{sup 10} interactions.

  14. Effect of biochar produced at different pyrolysis temperature on the soil respiration of abandoned mine soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Seong; Kim, Juhee; Hwang, Wonjae; Hyun, Seunghun

    2015-04-01

    infrared gas sensor, and these data were sent to a data logger. During the measuring periods, the cumulative CO2 emission were similar between the control (516.8 mg-CO2 kg-1-soil) and BC4 5% mixture (519.3 mg-CO2 kg-1-soil), while BC7 5% mixture was significantly decreased (356.1 mg-CO2 kg-1-soil) compared to other treatment and control. Because the degradation rate of biochar generally increased with decreasing pyrolysis temperature, this result suggest that the soil respiration rates of biochar amended soils are affected by physico-chemical properties of biochar during early incubation periods (about 1 weeks), For example, surface properties of used biochars, which are related to adsorption of soil organic matter and CO2, have different properties with pyrolysis temperature such as specific surface area (BC4=5.08 m2g-1; BC7=260.75 m2 g-1, respectively), average pore diameter (BC4=4,673 nm; BC7=2,606 nm, respectively), and functional groups of biochar surface. However, there was not clear evidence of biochar-mine soil interaction process, because of the short observation periods. Future work should focus on the adsorption of CO2 and soil organic matter of biochar and soil-biochar interaction with long time periods and various biological test.

  15. Influence of forced respiration on nonlinear dynamics in heart rate variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, J K; Højgaard, M V; Agner, E

    1997-01-01

    expressed as the nonlinear prediction error did not differ between spontaneous respiration, 32.3 +/- 3.4 ms, and forced respiration, 31.9 +/- 5.7. It is concluded that the origin of the nonlinear dynamics in heart rate variability is not a nonlinear input from the respiration into the cardiovascular...... of this study was to test whether the known nonlinear input from spontaneous respiration is a source for the nonlinearities in heart rate variability. Twelve healthy subjects were examined in supine position with 3-h electrocardiogram recordings during both spontaneous and forced respiration in accordance...... oscillator. Additional studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms behind the nonlinear dynamics in heart rate variability....

  16. Statistical methods applied to the study of respirable dust concentrations in uranium mines in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makepeace, C.E.

    1982-03-01

    Statistical analysis of gravimetric dust sampling observations of respirable quartz and respirable dust and the statistical evaluation of konimeter observations in uranium mines assist in determining worker exposure. This report describes the techniques used to calculate the mean, standard deviation and the coefficient of variation of both the raw data and the logarithms of the individual observations. Log-normal theory is used to calculate the best estimate of the means and standard deviations of grouped data. The results of a computer program are presented to demonstrate the log-normality of respirable quartz, respirable dust and konimeter observations obtained during the period 1974-1980 in Ontario uranium mines. The confidence limits for the means of data obtained for nine uranium mine occupations are calculated to demonstrate graphically the relative exposures to respirable quartz and dust

  17. CO2 Inhibits Respiration in Leaves of Rumex crispus L. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, Jeffrey S.; Koch, George W.; Bloom, Arnold J.

    1992-01-01

    Curly dock (Rumex crispus L.) was grown from seed in a glasshouse at an ambient CO2 partial pressure of about 35 pascals. Apparent respiration rate (CO2 efflux in the dark) of expanded leaves was then measured at ambient CO2 partial pressure of 5 to 95 pascals. Calculated intercellular CO2 partial pressure was proportional to ambient CO2 partial pressure in these short-term experiments. The CO2 level strongly affected apparent respiration rate: a doubling of the partial pressure of CO2 typically inhibited respiration by 25 to 30%, whereas a decrease in CO2 elicited a corresponding increase in respiration. These responses were readily reversible. A flexible, sensitive regulatory interaction between CO2 (a byproduct of respiration) and some component(s) of heterotrophic metabolism is indicated. PMID:16668707

  18. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene Mark

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrifica......Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic...... and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results...... suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100%) in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein....

  19. Carcinogenic oestrogens induce respiration deficiency mutation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopper, H; Metzler, M

    1991-01-01

    In addition to hormonal activity, genetic damage has been proposed as an important factor in oestrogen-mediated carcinogenesis. However, as short-term tests for oestrogens usually fail to show DNA mutations, lesions other than classic nuclear DNA mutation have to be considered. Oestrogen-induced mitochondrial damage was studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Stilbene-type, but not steroidal, oestrogens were found to induce respiration-deficient petite mutation. The effect was inversely correlated with cytotoxicity and required aromatic hydroxyl groups at the stilbene molecule. It only occurred under growth conditions and apparently was not due to the ATPase inhibitory qualities of stilbene oestrogens. Other studies have shown that petite mutation clones, which can be induced by a variety of substances, contain altered mitochondrial DNA. The mechanism of petite mutation induction might be important in tumorigenesis by also acting on nuclear DNA or facilitating carcinogenesis by disturbance of mitochondrial function.

  20. Relationships between respiration, ethylene, and aroma production in ripening banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, J B; Shearer, D; McGlasson, W B; Wyllie, S G

    1999-04-01

    Mature green bananas were treated with the ethylene antagonist 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) at intervals during the 24 h period after initiation of ripening with propylene. Following 1-MCP treatment, the fruits were ripened in either air or propylene while ethylene, carbon dioxide, and volatile production and composition were monitored at regular intervals. The application of 1-MCP significantly delayed and suppressed the onset and magnitude of fruit respiration and volatile production. The 1-MCP treatments also caused a quantitative change in the composition of the aroma volatiles, resulting in a substantial increase in the concentration of alcohols and a decrease in their related esters. The results showed that ethylene has a continuing role in integrating many of the biochemical processes that take place during the ripening of bananas.