WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface reaction mechanism

  1. Reaction mechanisms for on-surface synthesis of covalent nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Björk, J

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, on-surface synthesis has become an increasingly popular strategy to form covalent nanostructures. The approach has great prospects for facilitating the manufacture of a range of fascinating materials with atomic precision. However, the on-surface reactions are enigmatic to control, currently restricting its bright perspectives and there is a great need to explore how the reactions are governed. The objective of this topical review is to summarize theoretical work that has focused on comprehending on-surface synthesis protocols through studies of reaction mechanisms. (topical review)

  2. Theoretical Study of Sodium-Water Surface Reaction Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR).

  3. Theoretical study of sodium-water surface reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    2012-01-01

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). (author)

  4. Reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Anh

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Reaction Mechanisms laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The research topics are: the valence bond methods, the radical chemistry, the modelling of the transition states by applying geometric constraints, the long range interactions (ion - molecule) in gaseous phase, the reaction sites in gaseous phase and the mass spectroscopy applications. The points of convergence between the investigations of the mass spectroscopy and the theoretical chemistry teams, as well as the purposes guiding the research programs, are discussed. The published papers, the conferences, the congress communications and the thesis, are also reported [fr

  5. Prediction of Tetraoxygen Reaction Mechanism with Sulfur Atom on the Singlet Potential Energy Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Khademzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of S+O4 (D2h reaction has been investigated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df and CCSD levels on the singlet potential energy surface. One stable complex has been found for the S+O4 (D2h reaction, IN1, on the singlet potential energy surface. For the title reaction, we obtained four kinds of products at the B3LYP level, which have enough thermodynamic stability. The results reveal that the product P3 is spontaneous and exothermic with −188.042 and −179.147 kcal/mol in Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of reaction, respectively. Because P1 adduct is produced after passing two low energy level transition states, kinetically, it is the most favorable adduct in the 1S+1O4 (D2h atmospheric reactions.

  6. Stochastic surface walking reaction sampling for resolving heterogeneous catalytic reaction network: A revisit to the mechanism of water-gas shift reaction on Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jie; Shang, Cheng; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2017-10-01

    Heterogeneous catalytic reactions on surface and interfaces are renowned for ample intermediate adsorbates and complex reaction networks. The common practice to reveal the reaction mechanism is via theoretical computation, which locates all likely transition states based on the pre-guessed reaction mechanism. Here we develop a new theoretical method, namely, stochastic surface walking (SSW)-Cat method, to resolve the lowest energy reaction pathway of heterogeneous catalytic reactions, which combines our recently developed SSW global structure optimization and SSW reaction sampling. The SSW-Cat is automated and massively parallel, taking a rough reaction pattern as input to guide reaction search. We present the detailed algorithm, discuss the key features, and demonstrate the efficiency in a model catalytic reaction, water-gas shift reaction on Cu(111) (CO + H2O → CO2 + H2). The SSW-Cat simulation shows that water dissociation is the rate-determining step and formic acid (HCOOH) is the kinetically favorable product, instead of the observed final products, CO2 and H2. It implies that CO2 and H2 are secondary products from further decomposition of HCOOH at high temperatures. Being a general purpose tool for reaction prediction, the SSW-Cat may be utilized for rational catalyst design via large-scale computations.

  7. Effect of atmospheric oxidative plasma treatments on polypropylenic fibers surface: Characterization and reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisticò, Roberto; Magnacca, Giuliana; Faga, Maria Giulia; Gautier, Giovanna; D’Angelo, Domenico; Ciancio, Emanuele; Lamberti, Roberta; Martorana, Selanna

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma-dielectric barrier discharge (APP-DBD, open chamber configuration) was used to functionalize polypropylene (PP) fibers surface in order to generate oxidized-reactive groups such as hydroperoxides, alcohols and carbonyl species (i.e. ketones and others). Such a species increased the surface polarity, without causing material degradation. Three different types of plasma mixture (He, He/O 2 , He/O 2 /H 2 O) under three different values of applied power (750, 1050, 1400 W) were investigated. The formed plasma species (O 2 + , O single atom and OH radical) and their distribution were monitored via optical emission spectrometry (OES) measurements, and the plasma effects on PP surface species formation were followed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Results allowed to better understand the reaction pathways between plasma phase and PP fibers. In fact, two reaction mechanisms were proposed, the first one concerning the plasma phase reactions and the second one involving material surface modifications.

  8. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low temperature combustion and the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in earth’s atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization make characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, while master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  9. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, David L.

    2017-05-01

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low-temperature combustion and in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in Earth's atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization makes characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, and master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  10. Understanding the mechanisms of solid-water reactions through analysis of surface topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandstra, Joel Z; Brantley, Susan L

    2015-12-01

    The topography of a reactive surface contains information about the reactions that form or modify the surface and, therefore, it should be possible to characterize reactivity using topography parameters such as surface area, roughness, or fractal dimension. As a test of this idea, we consider a two-dimensional (2D) lattice model for crystal dissolution and examine a suite of topography parameters to determine which may be useful for predicting rates and mechanisms of dissolution. The model is based on the assumption that the reactivity of a surface site decreases with the number of nearest neighbors. We show that the steady-state surface topography in our model system is a function of, at most, two variables: the ratio of the rate of loss of sites with two neighbors versus three neighbors (d(2)/d(3)) and the ratio of the rate of loss of sites with one neighbor versus three neighbors (d(1)/d(3)). This means that relative rates can be determined from two parameters characterizing the topography of a surface provided that the two parameters are independent of one another. It also means that absolute rates cannot be determined from measurements of surface topography alone. To identify independent sets of topography parameters, we simulated surfaces from a broad range of d(1)/d(3) and d(2)/d(3) and computed a suite of common topography parameters for each surface. Our results indicate that the fractal dimension D and the average spacing between steps, E[s], can serve to uniquely determine d(1)/d(3) and d(2)/d(3) provided that sufficiently strong correlations exist between the steps. Sufficiently strong correlations exist in our model system when D>1.5 (which corresponds to D>2.5 for real 3D reactive surfaces). When steps are uncorrelated, surface topography becomes independent of step retreat rate and D is equal to 1.5. Under these conditions, measures of surface topography are not independent and any single topography parameter contains all of the available mechanistic

  11. Surface reaction mechanisms during ozone and oxygen plasma assisted atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Vikrant R; Vandalon, Vincent; Agarwal, Sumit

    2010-09-07

    We have elucidated the reaction mechanism and the role of the reactive intermediates in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide from trimethyl aluminum in conjunction with O(3) and an O(2) plasma. In situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data show that both -OH groups and carbonates are formed on the surface during the oxidation cycle. These carbonates, once formed on the surface, are stable to prolonged O(3) exposure in the same cycle. However, in the case of plasma-assisted ALD, the carbonates decompose upon prolonged O(2) plasma exposure via a series reaction kinetics of the type, A (CH(3)) --> B (carbonates) --> C (Al(2)O(3)). The ratio of -OH groups to carbonates on the surface strongly depends on the oxidizing agent, and also the duration of the oxidation cycle in plasma-assisted ALD. However, in both O(3) and O(2) plasma cycles, carbonates are a small fraction of the total number of reactive sites compared to the hydroxyl groups.

  12. Theoretical study on the initial reaction mechanisms of ansa-metallocene zirconium precursor on hydroxylated Si(1 0 0) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangfen; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Shaowen

    2016-05-01

    The initial reaction mechanisms for depositing ZrO2 thin films using ansa-metallocene zirconium (Cp2CMe2)ZrMe2 precursor were studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The (Cp2CMe2)ZrMe2 precursor could be absorbed on the hydroxylated Si(1 0 0) surface via physisorption. Possible reaction pathways of (Cp2CMe2)ZrMe2 were proposed. For each reaction, the activation energies and reaction energies were compared, and stationary points along the reaction pathways were shown. In addition, the influence of dispersion effects on the reactions was evaluated by non-local dispersion corrected DFT calculations.

  13. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on the Mechanisms of Reactions of Organometallic Compounds with Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, J

    1989-01-01

    A NATO Advanced Research Workshop on the "Mechanisms of Reactions of Organometallic Compounds with Surfaces" was held in St. Andrews, Scotland in June 1988. Many of the leading international researchers in this area were present at the workshop and all made oral presentations of their results. In addition, significant amounts of time were set aside for Round Table discussions, in which smaller groups considered the current status of mechanistic knowledge, identified areas of dispute or disagreement, and proposed experiments that need to be carried out to resolve such disputes so as to advance our understanding of this important research area. All the papers presented at the workshop are collected in this volume, together with summaries of the conclusions reached at the Round Table discussions. The workshop could not have taken place without financial support from NATO, and donations were also received from Associated Octel, Ltd., STC Ltd., and Epichem Ltd., for which the organisers are very grateful. The orga...

  14. Ultralow friction induced by tribochemical reactions: a novel mechanism of lubrication on steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Amann, Tobias; Walter, Michael; Moseler, Michael; Kailer, Andreas; Rühe, Jürgen

    2013-04-30

    The tribological properties of two steel surfaces rubbing against each other are measured while they are in contact with 1,3-diketones of varying structure. Such systems show after a short running-in period ultralow friction properties with a coefficient of friction of as low as μ = 0.005. It is suggested that the extremely favorable friction properties are caused by a tribochemical reaction between the 1,3-diketones and the steel surfaces, leading to formation of a chelated iron-diketo complex. The influence of temperature and the molecular structure of the 1,3 diketo-lubricants onto the friction properties of the system is elucidated under both static and dynamic conditions. With progression of the tribochemical reaction, the sliding surfaces become very conformal and smooth, so that the pressure is greatly reduced and further wear is strongly reduced. All iron particles potentially generated by wear during the initial running-in period are completely dissolved through complex formation. It is proposed that the tribochemical polishing reaction causes a transition from boundary lubrication to fluid lubrication.

  15. ORGANIC REACTION MECHANISM CONTROVERSY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    However, there are so many chemical reactions notably in organic chemistry where reactions may not directly lead to products. ... There are concepts that support these ideas but can they be proven to the ... Reaction mechanism is one such issue in organic chemistry that has attracted a lot of controversial comments from ...

  16. The exchange reaction between hydrogen and deuterium. I. Importance of surface reactions in the steady-state mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marteau, Chantal; Gaillard-Cusin, Francoise; James, H.

    1978-01-01

    Investigation of heterogeneous initiation process of gas phase linear chain reactions is carried out through the study of H 2 -D 2 exchange reaction. Experimental data under study concern mainly the stationary rate of HD formation and the prestationary proceeding. Steady-state method accounts for the first one of these data; it allows to clearly compare the wall process part to the part played by the homogeneous chain reaction towards HD formation. Activation energy of exchange elementary step between chemisorbed hydrogen (on silica) and gaseous deuterium has been evaluated: Esub(e1)=52+-1 Kcal/mole [fr

  17. Investigation of silicate surface chemistry and reaction mechanisms associated with mass transport in geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.F.; Perry, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    The concentration and rate of transport of radionuclides through geologic media can be strongly influenced by the extent of sorption on aquifer surfaces. Over time intervals relevant to such transport processes, rock and mineral surfaces cannot be considered as inert, unreactive substrates but rather as groundwater/solidphase interfaces which are commonly in a state of natural or artificially induced disequilibrium. The goal of the present research is to define experimentally the type of water/rock interactions that will influence surface chemistry and hence sorption characteristics and capacities of natural aquifers. As wide a range of silicate minerals as possible was selected for study to represent rock-forming minerals in basalt, tuff, and granite. The minerals include K-feldspar, plagioclase feldspar, olivine, hornblende, biotite, and volcanic glass

  18. Ab initio R1 mechanism of photostimulated oxygen isotope exchange reaction on a defect TiO2 surface: The case of terminal oxygen atom exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkyants, Ruslan; Sboev, Mikhail. N.; Chizhov, Yuri V.

    2017-05-01

    Based on density functional theory we propose R1 mechanism of photostimulated oxygen isotope exchange (POIEx) reaction between 16O18O and terminal oxygen atom of a defect TiO2 surface, which is modeled by amorphous Ti8O16 nanocluster in excited S1 electronic state. The proposed mechanism involves four adsorption intermediates and five transition states. The computed activation energy of the POIEx equals 0.24 eV. The computed g-tensors of the predicted ozonide O3- chemisorption species match well EPR data on O2 adsorption on UV-irradiated nanocrystalline TiO2. This match serves a mean of justification of the proposed R1 mechanism of the POIEx reaction. In addition, it is found that the proposed R1 POIEx reaction's mechanism differs from R1 mechanism of thermo-assisted OIEx reaction on a surface of supported vanadium oxide catalyst VOx/TiO2 reported earlier.

  19. Surface structure-dependent pyrite oxidation in relatively dry and moist air: Implications for the reaction mechanism and sulfur evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianxi; Xian, Haiyang; Lin, Xiaoju; Tang, Hongmei; Du, Runxiang; Yang, Yiping; Zhu, Runliang; Liang, Xiaoliang; Wei, Jingming; Teng, H. Henry; He, Hongping

    2018-05-01

    Pyrite oxidation not only is environmentally significant in the formation of acid mine (or acid rock) drainage and oxidative acidification of lacustrine sediment but also is a critical stage in geochemical sulfur evolution. The oxidation process is always controlled by the reactivity of pyrite, which in turn is controlled by its surface structure. In this study, the oxidation behavior of naturally existing {1 0 0}, {1 1 1}, and {2 1 0} facets of pyrite was investigated using a comprehensive approach combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry with periodic density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations. The experimental results show that (i) the initial oxidation rates of both pyrite {1 1 1} and {2 1 0} are much greater than that of pyrite {1 0 0}; (ii) the initial oxidation rate of pyrite {2 1 0} is greater than that of pyrite {1 1 1} in low relative humidity, which is reversed in high relative humidity; and (iii) inner sphere oxygen-bearing sulfur species are originally generated from surface reactions and then converted to outer sphere species. The facet dependent rate law can be expressed as: r{hkl} =k{hkl}haP0.5(t + 1) - 0.5 , where r{hkl} is the orientation dependent reaction rate, k{hkl} is the orientation dependent rate constant, h is the relative humidity, P is the oxygen partial pressure, and t is the oxidation time in seconds. {1 1 1} is the most sensitive facet for pyrite oxidation. Combined with DFT theoretical investigations, water catalyzed electron transfer is speculated as the rate-limiting step. These findings disclose the structure-reactivity dependence of pyrite, which not only presents new insight into the mechanism of pyrite oxidation but also provides fundamental data to evaluate sulfur speciation evolution, suggesting that the surface structure sensitivity should be considered to estimate the reactivity at the mineral

  20. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  1. Degradation of Reactive Yellow X-RG by O3/Fenton system: response surface approach, reaction mechanism, and degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yongjun; Xu, Qihui; Liang, Jun; Xu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    O 3 /Fenton for the treatment of effluent containing Reactive Yellow X-RG is investigated. The response surface methodology is applied to study the main and interactive effects of the parameters. With the initial dye concentration being controlled at 300 mg L -1 , the optimized conditions for wastewater treatment are 3.68, 29.19 and 18.49 mg min -1 for initial pH, mole ratio of [H 2 O 2 ]/[Fe 2+ ] and ozone dosage, respectively. The regression quadratic model well describing the degradation efficiency of O 3 /Fenton process is developed and validated by the analysis of variances, respectively. In addition, a possible pathway for Reactive Yellow X-RG degradation is proposed by detecting the temporal evolution of intermediates in the solution, with the use of some techniques including ultraviolet spectrophotometric method (UV-Vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Meanwhile, every reaction step is given to explain the degradation mechanisms.

  2. Surface-induced reactions and dissociations of small acetone, acetonitrile and ethanol cluster ions: competitive chemical reactions, dissociation mechanisms and determination of dissociation energy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mair, C.; Fedor, J.; Lezius, M.; Scheier, P.; Probst, M.; Herman, Zdeněk; Märk, T. D.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 5, - (2003), s. 9.1-9.18 ISSN 1367-2630 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0632 Grant - others:Czech-Austria Cooperation Programme in Science and Technology 2000-01 No. 6 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Source of funding: O - operačné programy Keywords : physical chemistry * surface-induced reactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.480, year: 2003

  3. Ab initio R1 mechanism of photostimulated oxygen isotope exchange reaction on a defect TiO{sub 2} surface: The case of terminal oxygen atom exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevorkyants, Ruslan, E-mail: ruslan.kevorkyants@gmail.com; Sboev, Mikhail N.; Chizhov, Yuri V.

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • DFT R1 mechanism of photostimulated oxygen isotope exchange between {sup 16}O{sup 18}O and terminal oxygen atom of a defect surface of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} is proposed. • The mechanism involves four adsorption intermediates and five transition states. • Activation energy of the reaction is 0.24 eV. • G-tensors of O{sub 3}{sup −} intermediates match EPR data on O{sub 2} adsorbed on UV-irradiated TiO{sub 2} surface. - Abstract: Based on density functional theory we propose R1 mechanism of photostimulated oxygen isotope exchange (POIEx) reaction between {sup 16}O{sup 18}O and terminal oxygen atom of a defect TiO{sub 2} surface, which is modeled by amorphous Ti{sub 8}O{sub 16} nanocluster in excited S{sup 1} electronic state. The proposed mechanism involves four adsorption intermediates and five transition states. The computed activation energy of the POIEx equals 0.24 eV. The computed g-tensors of the predicted ozonide O{sub 3}{sup −} chemisorption species match well EPR data on O{sub 2} adsorption on UV-irradiated nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2}. This match serves a mean of justification of the proposed R1 mechanism of the POIEx reaction. In addition, it is found that the proposed R1 POIEx reaction’s mechanism differs from R1 mechanism of thermo-assisted OIEx reaction on a surface of supported vanadium oxide catalyst VO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} reported earlier.

  4. Morphing of the Dissipative Reaction Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, W.U.; Toke, J.; Gawlikowicz, W.; Houck, M.A.; Lu, J.; Pienkowski, L.

    2003-01-01

    Important trends in the evolution of heavy-ion reaction mechanisms with bombarding energy and impact parameter are reviewed. Essential features of dissipative reactions appear preserved at E/A = 50-62 MeV, such as dissipative orbiting and multi-nucleon exchange. The relaxation of the A/Z asymmetry with impact parameter is slow. Non-equilibrium emission of light particles and clusters is an important process accompanying the evolution of the mechanism. Evidence is presented for a new mechanism of statistical cluster emission from hot, metastable primary reaction products, driven by surface entropy. These results suggest a plausible reinterpretation of multi-fragmentation. (authors)

  5. Analysis of kinetic reaction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Turányi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Chemical processes in many fields of science and technology, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, environmental modelling, process engineering, and systems biology, can be described by detailed reaction mechanisms consisting of numerous reaction steps. This book describes methods for the analysis of reaction mechanisms that are applicable in all these fields. Topics addressed include: how sensitivity and uncertainty analyses allow the calculation of the overall uncertainty of simulation results and the identification of the most important input parameters, the ways in which mechanisms can be reduced without losing important kinetic and dynamic detail, and the application of reduced models for more accurate engineering optimizations. This monograph is invaluable for researchers and engineers dealing with detailed reaction mechanisms, but is also useful for graduate students of related courses in chemistry, mechanical engineering, energy and environmental science and biology.

  6. The multichannel n-propyl + O2 reaction surface: Definitive theory on a model hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Marcus A.; Liang, Tao; Pu, Liang; Schaefer, Henry F.; Allen, Wesley D.

    2018-03-01

    The n-propyl + O2 reaction is an important model of chain branching reactions in larger combustion systems. In this work, focal point analyses (FPAs) extrapolating to the ab initio limit were performed on the n-propyl + O2 system based on explicit quantum chemical computations with electron correlation treatments through coupled cluster single, double, triple, and perturbative quadruple excitations [CCSDT(Q)] and basis sets up to cc-pV5Z. All reaction species and transition states were fully optimized at the rigorous CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory, revealing some substantial differences in comparison to the density functional theory geometries existing in the literature. A mixed Hessian methodology was implemented and benchmarked that essentially makes the computations of CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ vibrational frequencies feasible and thus provides critical improvements to zero-point vibrational energies for the n-propyl + O2 system. Two key stationary points, n-propylperoxy radical (MIN1) and its concerted elimination transition state (TS1), were located 32.7 kcal mol-1 and 2.4 kcal mol-1 below the reactants, respectively. Two competitive β-hydrogen transfer transition states (TS2 and TS2') were found separated by only 0.16 kcal mol-1, a fact unrecognized in the current combustion literature. Incorporating TS2' in master equation (ME) kinetic models might reduce the large discrepancy of 2.5 kcal mol-1 between FPA and ME barrier heights for TS2. TS2 exhibits an anomalously large diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction (ΔDBOC = 1.71 kcal mol-1), which is indicative of a nearby surface crossing and possible nonadiabatic reaction dynamics. The first systematic conformational search of three hydroperoxypropyl (QOOH) intermediates was completed, uncovering a total of 32 rotamers lying within 1.6 kcal mol-1 of their respective lowest-energy minima. Our definitive energetics for stationary points on the n-propyl + O2 potential energy surface provide key benchmarks for future studies

  7. Mechanisms and energetics of surface reactions at the copper-water interface. A critical literature review with implications for the debate on corrosion of copper in anoxic water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Adam Johannes; Brinck, Tore [Applied Physical Chemistry, KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    hydroxide ML on top of an oxide ML would give 7.2 ng cm{sup -2} copper surface. Another factor that determines the amount of H{sub 2} that could be formed is the roughness of the copper surface. Mechanically polished copper surfaces has roughly twice the surface area of an ideally planar surface (on which the estimates above are based) and could thus form up to about 14 ng H{sub 2} per cm{sup 2} macroscopic copper surface. This amount is less than six times lower than the largest amount of hydrogen gas detected per surface area in any published experimental study. Possibly, the water cleavage/ hydrogen-formation reaction could proceed even further via diffusion of the adsorbed species into the bulk metal, or through extensive surface reconstruction.

  8. Organic Reaction Mechanism Controversy: Pedagogical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper investigated the pedagogical implications of the controversy generated by the nature of reaction mechanism in organic chemistry as to whether it can be proven or not. A conference of a chemist, chemical educator, a graduate chemistry teacher and a graduate assistant was organized. The conference lasted for ...

  9. Mechanics of active surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbreux, Guillaume; Jülicher, Frank

    2017-09-01

    We derive a fully covariant theory of the mechanics of active surfaces. This theory provides a framework for the study of active biological or chemical processes at surfaces, such as the cell cortex, the mechanics of epithelial tissues, or reconstituted active systems on surfaces. We introduce forces and torques acting on a surface, and derive the associated force balance conditions. We show that surfaces with in-plane rotational symmetry can have broken up-down, chiral, or planar-chiral symmetry. We discuss the rate of entropy production in the surface and write linear constitutive relations that satisfy the Onsager relations. We show that the bending modulus, the spontaneous curvature, and the surface tension of a passive surface are renormalized by active terms. Finally, we identify active terms which are not found in a passive theory and discuss examples of shape instabilities that are related to active processes in the surface.

  10. Quantum Tunneling in Testosterone 6β-Hydroxylation by Cytochrome P450: Reaction Dynamics Calculations Employing Multiconfiguration Molecular-Mechanical Potential Energy Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Lin, Hai

    2009-05-01

    Testosterone hydroxylation is a prototypical reaction of human cytochrome P450 3A4, which metabolizes about 50% of oral drugs on the market. Reaction dynamics calculations were carried out for the testosterone 6β-hydrogen abstraction and the 6β-d1-testosterone 6β-duterium abstraction employing a model that consists of the substrate and the active oxidant compound I. The calculations were performed at the level of canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling and were based on a semiglobal full-dimensional potential energy surface generated by the multiconfiguration molecular mechanics technique. The tunneling coefficients were found to be around 3, indicating substantial contributions by quantum tunneling. However, the tunneling made only modest contributions to the kinetic isotope effects. The kinetic isotope effects were computed to be about 2 in the doublet spin state and about 5 in the quartet spin state.

  11. Isomerization Reaction Surfaces: Quantum Mechanical Studies of Triplet C2H2, Singlet AlHO and Singlet C2H2O

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vacek, George

    1995-01-01

    High-level ab initio molecular electronic structure theory has been utilized to investigate specific isomerization reaction surfaces including the triplet acetylene and vinylidene potential energy (PE...

  12. Hydrodesulfurization of thiophenic compounds: the reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwart, H.; Schuit, G.C.A.; Gates, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    It has often been assumed that catalytic hydrodesulfurization of thiophene and related compounds proceeds via a one-point end-on adsorption involving bonding of the sulfur atom with Mo ions at an anion vacancy on the catalyst surface. This interpretation is inadequate, failing to account for hydrogen-deuterium exchange results, the reactivities of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene, and the small steric effects of methyl substituents on the adsorption and reaction of compounds in the thiophene, benzothiopene, and dibenzothiophene families of homologs. An alternative mechanism, presented here, involves a multipoint adsorption of the reactant, with a C=C bond interacting with a Mo cation, and the S atom of the reactant interacting with an S ion on the surface. The new mechanism accounts for the observed deuterium exchange and hydrodesulfurization reactions and is consistent with the observed steric effects. 24 references, 5 figures

  13. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms Part II: Homogeneous Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests several mechanisms for catalysis by metal ion complexes. Discusses the principal factors of importance in these catalysis reactions and suggests reactions suitable for laboratory study. (MLH)

  14. Studies of valence-bond based quantum mechanical potential-energy surfaces. I. H2 + D2 exchange reaction. II. LiH + H → Li + H2 and LiH + D → LiD + H reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freihaut, B.H.

    1975-01-01

    The first phase of this investigation involved the construction of a perfect pairing valence-bond (VB) quantum mechanical potential-energy surfaces for the (H 2 D 2 ) system to compare its results for various geometries to the other prior formulations of such. A plausible four-body pathway for the H 2 --D 2 exchange reaction as shown by a semiempirical Huckel method was explored by the current valence-bond procedure. The second phase of the present investigation involves the formation of a VB based potential-energy surface for the LiH + H → Li + H 2 and LiH + D → LiD + H reaction systems for geometries compatible for a three-center reaction mechanism. No energy acceptable four-body reaction pathway was found for the H 2 --D 2 exchange system. Good agreement was demonstrated with previous ''ab initio'' configuration interaction (CI) studies for the various geometries tested. The square configuration for the H 4 system yielded the lowest barrier height of all the four-body geometries tested although it was still considerably higher than the experimental activation energy for the (H 2 ,D 2 ) system. The barrier height energy for the linear LiH--H configuration agreed well with the one previous work on this system. The barrier height for the LiH--H system increases as the Li--H--H bond angle decreases from 180 0 to 90 0 as well as the Li--H distance at the saddle point. The VB method used herein showed markedly good comparison with recent full CI calculations on the lithium-hydrogen system especially in view of the very limited basis set used in the VB procedure

  15. Elementary Chemical Reactions in Surface Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Zhou, Chuanyao; Ma, Zhibo; Ren, Zefeng; Fan, Hongjun; Yang, Xueming

    2018-02-28

    Photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and organic degradation on oxide materials have been extensively investigated in the last two decades. Great efforts have been dedicated to the study of photocatalytic reaction mechanisms of a variety of molecules on TiO 2 surfaces by using surface science methods under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions, providing fundamental understanding of surface chemical reactions in photocatalysis. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the study of photocatalysis of several important species (water, methanol, and aldehydes) on different TiO 2 surfaces. The results of these studies have provided us deep insights into the elementary processes of surface photocatalysis and stimulated a new frontier of research in this area. Based on the results of these studies, a new dynamics-based photocatalysis model is also discussed. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Physical Chemistry Volume 69 is April 20, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  16. Potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, H.F. III.

    1976-01-01

    Research into potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 is described. Topics covered include: the fuzzy interface between surface chemistry catalysis and organometallic chemistry; potential energy surfaces for elementary fluorine hydrogen reactions; structure, energetics, and reactivity of carbenes; and the theory of self-consistent electron pairs

  17. Reaction Mechanisms for the Electrochemical Reduction of CO2to CO and Formate on the Cu(100) Surface at 298K from Quantum Mechanics Free Energy Calculations with Explicit Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Xiao, Hai; Goddard, William A

    2016-10-11

    Copper is the only elemental metal that reduces a significant fraction of CO 2 to hydrocarbons and alcohols, but the atomistic reaction mechanism that controls the product distributions are not known because it has not been possible to detect the reaction intermediates on the electrode surface experimentally, or carry out Quantum Mechanics (QM) calculations with a realistic description of the electrolyte (water). Here, we carry out Quantum Mechanics (QM) calculations with an explicit description of water on the Cu(100) surface (experimentally shown to be stable under CO2RR conditions) to examine the initial reaction pathways to form CO and formate (HCOO - ) from CO 2 through free energy calculations at 298K and pH 7. We find that CO formation proceeds from physisorbed CO 2 to chemisorbed CO 2 (*CO 2 δ- ), with a free energy barrier of ΔG ‡ =0.43 eV, the rate determining step (RDS). The subsequent barriers of protonating *CO 2 δ- to form COOH* and then dissociating COOH* to form *CO are 0.37 eV and 0.30 eV, respectively. HCOO - formation proceeds through a very different pathway in which physisorbed CO 2 reacts directly with a surface H* (along with electron transfer), leading to ΔG ‡ = 0.80 eV. Thus, the competition between CO formation and HCOO - formation occurs in the first electron transfer step. On Cu(100), the RDS for CO formation is lower, making CO the predominant product. Thus, to alter the product distribution we need to control this first step of CO 2 binding, which might involve alloying or changing the structure at the nanoscale.

  18. Theoretical aspects of surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørskov, J. K.; Stoltze, P.

    1987-10-01

    A short review is given of our present understanding of the trends in the chemisorption energies and activation energies for dissociation of simple gas molecules on the transition metals. The effect of adsorbed alkali atoms on the activation energy for dissociation is also discussed. This is then used to explain the trends in activity along the transition metal rows and the promoting effect of K for the ammonia synthesis reaction. The basis for the description is the development of a kinetic model for the ammonia synthesis which can describe quantitatively the macroscopic kinetics of a commercial catalyst under industrial conditions. The model relates the reaction rate directly to the properties of the chemisorbed reactants, intermediates and product as measured for model single crystal systems under ultrahigh vacuum conditions.

  19. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    A new global potential energy surface (PES) is being generated for O(P-3) + H2 yields OH + H. This surface is being fit using the rotated Morse oscillator method, which was used to fit the previous POL-CI surface. The new surface is expected to be more accurate and also includes a much more complete sampling of bent geometries. A new study has been undertaken of the reaction N + O2 yields NO + O. The new studies have focused on the region of the surface near a possible minimum corresponding to the peroxy form of NOO. A large portion of the PES for this second reaction has been mapped out. Since state to state cross sections for the reaction are important in the chemistry of high temperature air, these studies will probably be extended to permit generation of a new global potential for reaction.

  20. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    applications of isotopic substitution for studying reaction mechanisms and dynamic structures. Suggested Reading. • B K Carpenter. Determination of Organic Reaction Mechanisms. John. Wiley. New York, 1984. • F A Carey and R J Sundberg. Advanced Organic Chemistry. Part A. 3rd. Ed. Plenum Press. New York, 1990.

  1. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Study of the Sialyltransferase Reaction Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yojiro; Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2016-10-11

    The sialyltransferase is an enzyme that transfers the sialic acid moiety from cytidine 5'-monophospho-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (CMP-NeuAc) to the terminal position of glycans. To elucidate the catalytic mechanism of sialyltransferase, we explored the potential energy surface along the sialic acid transfer reaction coordinates by the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method on the basis of the crystal structure of sialyltransferase CstII. Our calculation demonstrated that CstII employed an S N 1-like reaction mechanism via the formation of a short-lived oxocarbenium ion intermediate. The computational barrier height was 19.5 kcal/mol, which reasonably corresponded with the experimental reaction rate. We also found that two tyrosine residues (Tyr156 and Tyr162) played a vital role in stabilizing the intermediate and the transition states by quantum mechanical interaction with CMP.

  2. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, Hans-Joachim [Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany). Fritz-Haber-Inst.

    2003-02-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Holiday Inn, Ventura, California, 2/16-21/03. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  3. Screened Thermonuclear Reaction Rates on Magnetar Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong-Lin, Liu; Zhi-Quan, Luo; Jing-Jing, Liu; Xiang-Jun, Lai

    2008-01-01

    Improving Salpeter's method, we discuss the effect of superstrong magnetic fields (such as those of magnetars) on thermonuclear reaction rates. These most interesting reactions, including the hydrogen burning by the CNO cycle and the helium burning by the triple alpha reaction, are investigated as examples on the magnetar surfaces. The obtained result shows that the superstrong magnetic fields can increase the thermonuclear reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. The enhancement may have significant influence for further study research of the magnetars, especially for the x-ray luminosity observation and the evolution of magnetars. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  4. Statistical mechanics of random surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, J.

    1984-01-01

    The statistical mechanics of random surfaces has proven to be of growing importance in quantum field theory (string theory, random surface representations of gauge theory) and condensed matter physics (domain walls and interfaces, incommensurate phases, spin glasses, crystal surfaces, surface phenomena such as wetting, etc.). Various applications to quantum field theory and condensed matter physics are outlined. (Auth.)

  5. Controlling Reaction Selectivity through the Surface Termination of Perovskite Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polo-Garzon, Felipe [Chemical Sciences Division and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Yang, Shi-Ze [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Fung, Victor [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside CA 92521 USA; Foo, Guo Shiou [Chemical Sciences Division and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Bickel, Elizabeth E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville TN 38505 USA; Chisholm, Matthew F. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Jiang, De-en [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside CA 92521 USA; Wu, Zili [Chemical Sciences Division and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA

    2017-07-19

    Although well known in the material science field, surface reconstruction of perovskites has not been implemented in heterogeneous catalysis. In this work, we employ multiple surface sensitive techniques to characterize the surface reconstruction of SrTiO3 (STO) after thermal pretreatment (Sr-enrichment) and chemical etching (Ti-enrichment). We show, using the conversion of 2-propanol as a probe reaction, that the surface reconstruction of STO can be controlled to greatly tune catalytic acid/base properties and consequently the reaction selectivities in a wide range, which are inaccessible using single metal oxides, either SrO or TiO2. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations well explain the selectivity tuning and reaction mechanism on differently reconstructed surfaces of STO. Similar catalytic tunability is also observed on BaZrO3, highlighting the generality of the finding from this work.

  6. Bimolecular reactions of carbenes: Proton transfer mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Saleh, Abd Al-Aziz A.; Almatarneh, Mansour H.; Poirier, Raymond A.

    2018-04-01

    Here we report the bimolecular reaction of trifluoromethylhydroxycarbene conformers and the water-mediated mechanism of the 1,2-proton shift for the unimolecular trans-conformer by using quantum chemical calculations. The CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//MP2/cc-pVDZ potential-energy profile of the bimolecular reaction of cis- and trans-trifluoromethylhydroxycarbene, shows the lowest gas-phase barrier height of 13 kJ mol-1 compared to the recently reported value of 128 kJ mol-1 for the unimolecular reaction. We expect bimolecular reactions of carbene's stereoisomers will open a valuable field for new and useful synthetic strategies.

  7. Difference in surface reactions between titanium and zirconium in Hanks' solution to elucidate mechanism of calcium phosphate formation on titanium using XPS and cathodic polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, Y.; Nishimura, D.; Doi, H.; Nomura, N.; Hanawa, T.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium were immersed in Hanks' solution with and without calcium and phosphate ions, and the surfaces were characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine the mechanism of calcium phosphate formation on titanium in simulated body fluids and in a living body. In addition, they were cathodically polarized in the above solutions. XPS characterization and cathodic polarization revealed differences in the surface properties in the ability of calcium phosphate formation between titanium and zirconium. The surface oxide film on titanium is not completely oxidized and is relatively reactive; that on zirconium is more passive and protective than that on titanium. Neither calcium nor phosphate stably exists alone on titanium, and calcium phosphate is naturally formed on it; calcium phosphate formed on titanium is stable and protective. On the other hand, calcium is never incorporated on zirconium, while zirconium phosphate, which is easily formed on zirconium, is highly stable and protective. Our study presents new information regarding the surface property of titanium and demonstrates that the characteristics of titanium and zirconium may be applied to various medical devices and new surface modification techniques.

  8. Review of heavy ion reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, C.

    1986-04-01

    We review some of the many aspects of heavy-ion reaction mechanisms observed at bombarding energies smaller than approximately 50 MeV/u that is to say in what is called the low bombarding energy domain and the intermediate bombarding energy domain. We emphasize the results concerning the use of very heavy projectiles which has led to the observation of new mechanisms

  9. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum energy path for the addition of a hydrogen atom to N2 is characterized in CASSCF/CCI calculations using the (4s3p2d1f/3s2p1d) basis set, with additional single point calculations at the stationary points of the potential energy surface using the (5s4p3d2f/4s3p2d) basis set. These calculations represent the most extensive set of ab initio calculations completed to date, yielding a zero point corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation of approx. 8.5 kcal mol/1. The lifetime of the HN2 species is estimated from the calculated geometries and energetics using both conventional Transition State Theory and a method which utilizes an Eckart barrier to compute one dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling effects. It is concluded that the lifetime of the HN2 species is very short, greatly limiting its role in both termolecular recombination reactions and combustion processes.

  10. Mechanisms of inorganic and organometallic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    The purpose of this series is to provide a continuing critical review of the literature concerned with mechanistic aspects of inorganic and organo­ metallic reactions in solution, with coverage being complete in each volume. The papers discussed are selected on the basis of relevance to the elucidation of reaction mechanisms and many include results of a nonkinetic nature when useful mechanistic information can be deduced. The period of literature covered by this volume is July 1982 through December 1983, and in some instances papers not available for inclusion in the previous volume are also included. Numerical results are usually reported in the units used by the original authors, except where data from different papers are com­ pared and conversion to common units is necessary. As in previous volumes material included covers the major areas of redox processes, reactions of the nonmetallic elements, reaction of inert and labile metal complexes and the reactions of organometallic compounds. While m...

  11. Photogenerated carrier-induced reactions on uhv semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osgood, R.M. Jr.

    1992-05-28

    The objective for this experimental work was to examine the reaction mechanisms, half-collision dynamics, and other optically induced chemical effects, that are operable on a well characterized single-crystal semiconductor surface. Of particular interest were reactions induced by charge transfer from the semiconductor surface including hot carrier and thermalized carrier processes. The primary technique to measure the desorbed fragment translational energies was time-of-flight mass-spectroscopy, used in conjunction with a pulsed tunable laser source. The work was carried out in ultrahigh vacuum, thus other surface spectroscopies such as temperature-programmed desorption, (TPD), (LEED), etc. were used as needed. In the project, the photoreactions of several halogen-containing molecules on GaAs(110) surfaces have been investigated. The studies have made the first observations of several new photochemical processes on uhv prepared surfaces including intermolecular charge transfer; desorption by thermal-carrier-induced reactions (including the measurement of coverage-dependent changes in the translational energies of the desorbed products); interferometric oscillation of photoinduced reactions; and self-quenching of thermal carrier reactions on surfaces.

  12. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction. Mechanisms. 3. Secondary Kinetic Isotope Effect. Uday Maitra and. J Chandrasekhar are members of the Organic. Chemistry faculty in. Indian Institute of. Science at Bangalore. The previous articles of this series were: 1. Isotopes as markers, May. 1997. 2. Primary kinetic isotope effect.

  13. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 10. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms Distinguishing between Single Minima and Rapidly Equilibrating Structures. Uday Maitra J Chandrasekhar. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 10 October 1997 pp 29-37 ...

  14. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms Isotopes as Markers. Uday Maitra J Chandrasekhar. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 23-28. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms - Distinguishing between Single Mimima and Rapidly Equilibrating Structures. Uday Maitra J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1315-1323 ...

  16. Ozone-surface reactions in five homes: surface reaction probabilities, aldehyde yields, and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Morrison, G

    2010-06-01

    Field experiments were conducted in five homes during three seasons (summer 2005, summer 2006 and winter 2007) to quantify ozone-initiated secondary aldehyde yields, surface reaction probabilities, and trends any temporal over a 1.5-year interval. Surfaces examined include living room carpets, bedroom carpets, kitchen floors, kitchen counters, and living room walls. Reaction probabilities for all surfaces for all seasons ranged from 9.4 x 10(-8) to 1.0 x 10(-4). There were no significant temporal trends in reaction probabilities for any surfaces from summer 2005 to summer 2006, nor over the entire 1.5-year period, indicating that it may take significantly longer than this period for surfaces to exhibit any 'ozone aging' or lowering of ozone-surface reactivity. However, all surfaces in three houses exhibited a significant decrease in reaction probabilities from summer 2006 to winter 2007. The total yield of aldehydes for the summer of 2005 were nearly identical to that for summer of 2006, but were significantly higher than for winter 2007. We also observed that older carpets were consistently less reactive than in newer carpets, but that countertops remained consistently reactive, probably because of occupant activities such as cooking and cleaning. Ozone reactions taking place at indoor surfaces significantly influence personal exposure to ozone and volatile reaction products. These field studies show that indoor surfaces only slowly lose their ability to react with ozone over several year time frames, and that this is probably because of a combination of large reservoirs of reactive coatings and periodic additions of reactive coatings in the form of cooking, cleaning, and skin-oil residues. When considering exposure to ozone and its reaction products and in the absence of dramatic changes in occupancy, activities or furnishings, indoor surface reactivity is expected to change very slowly.

  17. Chemical reaction on solid surface observed through isotope tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ken-ichi

    1983-01-01

    In order to know the role of atoms and ions on solid surfaces as the partners participating in elementary processes, the literatures related to the isomerization and hydrogen exchanging reaction of olefines, the hydrogenation of olefines, the metathesis reaction and homologation of olefines based on solid catalysts were reviewed. Various olefines, of which the hydrogen atoms were substituted with deuterium at desired positions, were reacted using various solid catalysts such as ZnO, K 2 CO 3 on C, MoS 2 (single crystal and powder) and molybdenum oxide (with various carriers), and the infra-red spectra of adsorbed olefines on catalysts, the isotope composition of reaction products and the production rate of the reaction products were measured. From the results, the bonding mode of reactant with the atoms and ions on solid surfaces, and the mechanism of the elementary process were considered. The author emphasized that the mechanism of the chemical reaction on solid surfaces and the role of active points or catalysts can be made clear to the considerable extent by combining isotopes suitably. (Yoshitake, I.)

  18. Reaction Mechanism Generator: Automatic construction of chemical kinetic mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Connie W.; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.; West, Richard H.

    2016-06-01

    Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) constructs kinetic models composed of elementary chemical reaction steps using a general understanding of how molecules react. Species thermochemistry is estimated through Benson group additivity and reaction rate coefficients are estimated using a database of known rate rules and reaction templates. At its core, RMG relies on two fundamental data structures: graphs and trees. Graphs are used to represent chemical structures, and trees are used to represent thermodynamic and kinetic data. Models are generated using a rate-based algorithm which excludes species from the model based on reaction fluxes. RMG can generate reaction mechanisms for species involving carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen. It also has capabilities for estimating transport and solvation properties, and it automatically computes pressure-dependent rate coefficients and identifies chemically-activated reaction paths. RMG is an object-oriented program written in Python, which provides a stable, robust programming architecture for developing an extensible and modular code base with a large suite of unit tests. Computationally intensive functions are cythonized for speed improvements.

  19. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-07-18

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources.

  20. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M.; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources. PMID:28674011

  1. The dynamics of the Hg + Br2 reaction: elucidation of the reaction mechanism for the Br exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina, P G; Menéndez, M; Aoiz, F J

    2017-06-28

    In spite of its importance in the Hg atmospheric chemistry, the dynamics of the Hg + Br 2 → HgBr + Br reaction is poorly understood. In this article, we have carried out a comprehensive study of the reaction mechanism of this reaction by means of quasiclassical trajectories (QCTs) on an existing ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The reaction has a non trivial dynamics, as a consequence of its large endothermicity, the presence of a deep potential well, and the competition between the Br exchange and the collision induced dissociation processes. Our calculations demonstrate that insertion is only relevant at energies just above the reaction threshold and that, at energies above 2.3 eV, HgBr formation typically takes place via a sort of frustrated dissociation. In order to compare directly with the results obtained in extensive cross molecular beam experiments for the homologous reaction with I 2 , angular distributions in the laboratory frame for Hg + Br 2 have been simulated under similar experimental conditions. The lack of agreement at the highest energies considered suggests that either the two reactions have substantially different mechanisms or that calculations on a single PES cannot account for the dynamics at those energies.

  2. Reaction mechanisms in heavy ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubian J.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the reaction mechanisms involved in heavy ion fusion. We begin with collisions of tightly bound systems, considering three energy regimes: energies above the Coulomb barrier, energies just below the barrier and deep sub-barrier energies. We show that channel coupling effects may influence the fusion process at above-barrier energies, increasing or reducing the cross section predicted by single barrier penetration model. Below the Coulomb barrier, it enhances the cross section, and this effect increases with the system’s size. It is argued that this behavior can be traced back to the increasing importance of Coulomb coupling with the charge of the collision partners. The sharp drop of the fusion cross section observed at deep sub-barrier energies is addressed and the theoretical approaches to this phenomenon are discussed. We then consider the reaction mechanisms involved in fusion reactions of weakly bound systems, paying particular attention to the calculations of complete and incomplete fusion available in the literature.

  3. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, Brian P [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  4. Computational analysis of the mechanism of chemical reactions in terms of reaction phases: hidden intermediates and hidden transition States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2010-05-18

    Computational approaches to understanding chemical reaction mechanisms generally begin by establishing the relative energies of the starting materials, transition state, and products, that is, the stationary points on the potential energy surface of the reaction complex. Examining the intervening species via the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) offers further insight into the fate of the reactants by delineating, step-by-step, the energetics involved along the reaction path between the stationary states. For a detailed analysis of the mechanism and dynamics of a chemical reaction, the reaction path Hamiltonian (RPH) and the united reaction valley approach (URVA) are an efficient combination. The chemical conversion of the reaction complex is reflected by the changes in the reaction path direction t(s) and reaction path curvature k(s), both expressed as a function of the path length s. This information can be used to partition the reaction path, and by this the reaction mechanism, of a chemical reaction into reaction phases describing chemically relevant changes of the reaction complex: (i) a contact phase characterized by van der Waals interactions, (ii) a preparation phase, in which the reactants prepare for the chemical processes, (iii) one or more transition state phases, in which the chemical processes of bond cleavage and bond formation take place, (iv) a product adjustment phase, and (v) a separation phase. In this Account, we examine mechanistic analysis with URVA in detail, focusing on recent theoretical insights (with a variety of reaction types) from our laboratories. Through the utilization of the concept of localized adiabatic vibrational modes that are associated with the internal coordinates, q(n)(s), of the reaction complex, the chemical character of each reaction phase can be identified via the adiabatic curvature coupling coefficients, A(n,s)(s). These quantities reveal whether a local adiabatic vibrational mode supports (A(n,s) > 0) or resists

  5. Toluene and benzyl decomposition mechanisms: elementary reactions and kinetic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derudi, Marco; Polino, Daniela; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2011-12-28

    The high temperature decomposition kinetics of toluene and benzyl were investigated by combining a kinetic analysis with the ab initio/master equation study of new reaction channels. It was found that similarly to toluene, which decomposes to benzyl and phenyl losing atomic hydrogen and methyl, also benzyl decomposition proceeds through two channels with similar products. The first leads to the formation of fulvenallene and hydrogen and has already been investigated in detail in recent publications. In this work it is proposed that benzyl can decompose also through a second decomposition channel to form benzyne and methyl. The channel specific kinetic constants of benzyl decomposition were determined by integrating the RRKM/master equation over the C(7)H(7) potential energy surface. The energies of wells and saddle points were determined at the CCSD(T) level on B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) structures. A kinetic mechanism was then formulated, which comprises the benzyl and toluene decomposition reactions together with a recently proposed fulvenallene decomposition mechanism, the decomposition kinetics of the fulvenallenyl radical, and some reactions describing the secondary chemistry originated by the decomposition products. The kinetic mechanism so obtained was used to simulate the production of H atoms measured in a wide pressure and temperature range using different experimental setups. The calculated and experimental data are in good agreement. Kinetic constants of the new reaction channels here examined are reported as a function of temperature at different pressures. The mechanism here proposed is not compatible with the assumption often used in literature kinetic mechanisms that benzyl decomposition can be effectively described through a lumped reaction whose products are the cyclopentadienyl radical and acetylene.

  6. Magneto-Mechanical Surfaces Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galera, Andrés C; San Miguel, Verónica; Baselga, Juan

    2018-02-23

    Magneto-mechanically active surfaces (MMAS) represent a new family of nano/micro-structured surfaces in which motion is induced by an external magnetic field. Under the name of "artificial cilia", "biomimetic cilia", "magnetic actuated patterns", "nanopillars", etc., published works in this area continue their quick growth in number. Notwithstanding their potential application in microfluidic, chemical sensors, catalytic processes and microelectronics to increase device perfomances, there is still a lot to do in the development of these materials. Improvement and optimization of the performance of these structures are essential tasks in order to fulfil their complete development. Along this article, a critical review involving the main aspects in the design of the patterned nanocomposites will be presented. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. KINETICS AND MECHANISM OF REACTION OF ACIDIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For both Nile blue and Meldola\\'s blue reactions the rates have first-order dependence on each substrate, chlorite and acid. Both reactions showed negative salt effect indicating the reaction is between the oppositely charged species, likely the substrate cation and chlorite anion. The acidic chlorite reaction with MB+ was ...

  8. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    would help us optimize reaction conditions to effect higher yields, minimize reaction times, etc. The transformation ... effect of the isotope on the reaction rate. In the following. Uday Maitra and. J Chandrasekhar .... to the reaction, the rate of isotope exchange was unaltered, but the rate of racemization (of the reactant) became ...

  9. Electron transfer and reaction mechanism of laccases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephen M; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-03-01

    Laccases are part of the family of multicopper oxidases (MCOs), which couple the oxidation of substrates to the four electron reduction of O2 to H2O. MCOs contain a minimum of four Cu's divided into Type 1 (T1), Type 2 (T2), and binuclear Type 3 (T3) Cu sites that are distinguished based on unique spectroscopic features. Substrate oxidation occurs near the T1, and electrons are transferred approximately 13 Å through the protein via the Cys-His pathway to the T2/T3 trinuclear copper cluster (TNC), where dioxygen reduction occurs. This review outlines the electron transfer (ET) process in laccases, and the mechanism of O2 reduction as elucidated through spectroscopic, kinetic, and computational data. Marcus theory is used to describe the relevant factors which impact ET rates including the driving force, reorganization energy, and electronic coupling matrix element. Then, the mechanism of O2 reaction is detailed with particular focus on the intermediates formed during the two 2e(-) reduction steps. The first 2e(-) step forms the peroxide intermediate, followed by the second 2e(-) step to form the native intermediate, which has been shown to be the catalytically relevant fully oxidized form of the enzyme.

  10. Surface chemical reactions probed with scanning force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werts, M.P L; van der Vegte, E.W.; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    In this letter we report the study of surface chemical reactions with scanning force microscopy (SFM) with chemical specificity. Using chemically modified SFM probes, we can determine the local surface reaction conversion during a chemical surface modification. The adhesion forces between a

  11. The mechanism of the modified Ullmann reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperotto, Elena; Klink, Gerard P.M. van; Koten, Gerard van; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2010-01-01

    The copper-mediated aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions developed by Fritz Ullmann and Irma Goldberg required stoichiometric amounts of copper and very high reaction temperatures. Recently, it was found that addition of relatively cheap ligands (diamines, aminoalcohols, diketones, diols)

  12. Carbonitriding reactions of diatomaceous earth: phase evolution and reaction mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANKO MATOVIC

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using diatomaceous earth as Si precursor for low temperature synthesis of non-oxide powders by carbothermal reduction-nitridation was studied. It was found that carbonitriding reactions produce phases of the Si–Al–O–N system. Already at 1300 °C, nanosized, non-oxide powders were obtained. The comparatively low reaction temperatures is attributred to the nano-porous nature of the raw material. The evolution of crystalline phases proceeded via many intermediate stages. The powders were characterized by X-ray and SEM investigations. The results showed that diatomaceous earth can be a very effective source for obtaining non-oxide powders.

  13. Electronic dissipation processes during chemical reactions on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Stella, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Hauptbeschreibung Every day in our life is larded with a huge number of chemical reactions on surfaces. Some reactions occur immediately, for others an activation energy has to be supplied. Thus it happens that though a reaction should thermodynamically run off, it is kinetically hindered. Meaning the partners react only to the thermodynamically more stable product state within a mentionable time if the activation energy of the reaction is supplied. With the help of catalysts the activation energy of a reaction can be lowered. Such catalytic processes on surfaces are widely used in industry. A

  14. The oxygen reduction reaction mechanism on Pt(111) from density functional theory calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Skulason, Egill; Siahrostami, Samira

    2010-01-01

    We study the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanism on a Pt(1 1 1) surface using density functional theory calculations We find that at low overpotentials the surface is covered with a half dissociated water layer We estimate the barrier for proton transfer to this surface and the barrier...

  15. CHEMICAL REACTIONS ON ADSORBING SURFACE: KINETIC LEVEL OF DESCRIPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P.Kostrobii

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the effective Hubbard model we suggest a statistical description of reaction-diffusion processes for bimolecular chemical reactions of gas particles adsorbed on the metallic surface. The system of transport equations for description of particles diffusion as well as reactions is obtained. We carry out the analysis of the contributions of all physical processes to the formation of diffusion coefficients and chemical reactions constants.

  16. Chemical reactions on platinum-group metal surfaces studied by synchrotron-radiation-based spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Hiroshi; Nakai, Ikuyo; Nagasaka, Masanari; Amemiya, Kenta; Ohta, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    A new version of synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray spectroscopy, wave-length-dispersive near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (dispersive-NEXAFS), and fast x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been applied to mechanistic studies on several surface catalytic reactions on platinum-group-metal surfaces. In this review, our approach using above techniques to understand the reaction mechanism and actual application studies on three well-known catalytic surface reactions, CO oxidation on Pt(111) and Pd(111), NO reduction on Rh(111), and H 2 O formation on Pt(111), are introduced. Spectroscopic monitoring of the progress of the surface reactions enabled us to detect reaction intermediates and analyze the reaction kinetics quantitatively which provides information on reaction order, rate constant, pre-exponential factor, activation energy and etc. Such quantitative analyses combined with scanning tunneling microscopy and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations revealed significant contribution of the adsorbate configurations and their dynamic changes to the reaction mechanisms of the above fundamental catalytic surface reactions. (author)

  17. nonlinear kinetics and mechanism of nile blue reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. S.B. Jonnalagadda

    A 11-step mechanism, consistent with the overall reaction dynamics and supported by simulations, is ... been designed based on the chemistry of BZ reactions, the role of bromide ion under various concentration ... dynamics of nile blue - acidic bromate reaction arises from the extremely slow depletion rate of nile blue in the ...

  18. Mechanisms of free-radical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dneprovskij, A.S.; Iz''yurov, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Values of primary kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen in reactions of bromination of substituted toluenoes ethyl benzene and cumene in 15-95 deg C range were obtained. Temperature dependence of KIE in the reaction of bromination of substituted toluenes testifies to the absence of sufficient contribution of tunnel transport of hydrogen atom. Substrates with high reactivity are characterized by KIE values, independenct of temperature. This fact can't be explained in the framework of available theoretical concepts. Qualitative relationship between reactivity and KIE changes may be interpreted in the framework of marcus equation

  19. Deducing Reaction Mechanism: A Guide for Students, Researchers, and Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Simon J.; Pitman, Catherine L.; Miller, Alexander J. M.

    2016-01-01

    An introductory guide to deducing the mechanism of chemical reactions is presented. Following a typical workflow for probing reaction mechanism, the guide introduces a wide range of kinetic and mechanistic tools. In addition to serving as a broad introduction to mechanistic analysis for students and researchers, the guide has also been used by…

  20. Atherton–Todd reaction: mechanism, scope and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Le Corre, Stéphanie S; Berchel, Mathieu; Couthon, Hélène; Haelters, Jean-Pierre; Jaffres, Paul-Alain

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Initially, the Atherton–Todd (AT) reaction was applied for the synthesis of phosphoramidates by reacting dialkyl phosphite with a primary amine in the presence of carbon tetrachloride. These reaction conditions were subsequently modified with the aim to optimize them and the reaction was extended to different nucleophiles. The mechanism of this reaction led to controversial reports over the past years and is adequately discussed. We also present the scope of the AT rea...

  1. Nonlinear Kinetics and Mechanism of Nile Blue Reaction with Acidic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After an induction period, a swift reaction occurs. The overall reaction is NB+ + BrO3- react to P + CH3COOH + H+ + Br-, where P is the de-ethylated N-oxide derivative of nile blue. The rapid kinetics of the reaction of bromine direct with nile blue were also reported. A 11-step mechanism, consistent with the overall reaction ...

  2. Theoretical insights into the cycloaddition reaction mechanism ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cSchool of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qufu Normal University, Qufu, Shandong, 273165,. People's Republic of China e-mail: chem.2001@163.com; lpsdu@sdu.edu.cn .... are both interstellar molecules.20. Accordingly, we postulate that the reaction of keten- imine and methyleneimine may be one of the forma-.

  3. Mechanism of electron transfer reaction of ternary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    )(OX)(H2O)]− (DPA = dipicolinate and OX = oxalate) by periodate in aqueous acidic medium has been studied spectrophotometrically over the pH range of 4.45-5.57 at different temperatures. The reaction is first order with respect to both [IO 4 ...

  4. Reliable and efficient reaction path and transition state finding for surface reactions with the growing string method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mina; Zimmerman, Paul M

    2017-04-15

    The computational challenge of fast and reliable transition state and reaction path optimization requires new methodological strategies to maintain low cost, high accuracy, and systematic searching capabilities. The growing string method using internal coordinates has proven to be highly effective for the study of molecular, gas phase reactions, but difficulties in choosing a suitable coordinate system for periodic systems has prevented its use for surface chemistry. New developments are therefore needed, and presented herein, to handle surface reactions which include atoms with large coordination numbers that cannot be treated using standard internal coordinates. The double-ended and single-ended growing string methods are implemented using a hybrid coordinate system, then benchmarked for a test set of 43 elementary reactions occurring on surfaces. These results show that the growing string method is at least 45% faster than the widely used climbing image-nudged elastic band method, which also fails to converge in several of the test cases. Additionally, the surface growing string method has a unique single-ended search method which can move outward from an initial structure to find the intermediates, transition states, and reaction paths simultaneously. This powerful explorative feature of single ended-growing string method is demonstrated to uncover, for the first time, the mechanism for atomic layer deposition of TiN on Cu(111) surface. This reaction is found to proceed through multiple hydrogen-transfer and ligand-exchange events, while formation of H-bonds stabilizes intermediates of the reaction. Purging gaseous products out of the reaction environment is the driving force for these reactions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Mechanisms available for cooling plants’ surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokhorov Alexey Anatolievich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The essay briefly touches upon the main mechanisms to cool down the plats’ surfaces that lead to condensation of atmospheric moisture; methods for experimental verification of these mechanisms are presented therein.

  6. Reaction kinetics: mechanisms and isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    This chapter emphasized how the isotope effects are obtained, and the factors that govern their magnitude. Most of the discussion concerned hydrogen isotope effects. Of the other isotopes much work has been done on carbon. Less extensive studies were reported using the isotopes of chlorine ( 35 Cl, 37 Cl), sulfur ( 32 S, 34 S), nitrogen ( 14 N, 15 N), and oxygen ( 16 O, 17 O). The customary way of altering the symmetry of the transition state is to vary the strength of the base B. Very large primary kinetic hydrogen isotope effects have also been observed for nitrocompounds. Some hydrogen alien reactions which may also be characterized by small solvation changes exhibit extremely large K/sup H//K/sup D/ values. Recently the main application of secondary hydrogen isotope effects has been in the study of the ability of neighboring groups to alter the energetics of organic reactions. 1 figure, 5 tables

  7. Bond-selective control of a gas-surface reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Daniel R.

    The prospect of using light to selectively control chemical reactions has tantalized chemists since the development of the laser. Unfortunately, the realization of laser-directed chemistry is frequently thwarted by the randomization of energy within the molecule through intramolecular vibrational energy distribution (IVR). However, recent results showing vibrational mode-specific reactivity on metal surfaces suggest that IVR may not always be complete for gas-surface reactions. Here, we combine molecular beam techniques and direct laser excitation to characterize the bond-specific reactivity of trideuteromethane on a Ni(111) surface. Our results reveal important details about how vibrational energy is distributed in the reactive molecule. We use a molecular beam to direct state-selected trideuteromethane (CHD 3) molecules onto a nickel single crystal sample and use the results we obtain to describe the flow of vibrational energy in the methane-surface reaction complex. We show that CHD3 molecules initially excited to v=1, J=2, K=0 of the v 1 symmetric C-H stretching mode will dissociate exclusively via C-H cleavage on Ni(111). This result highlights the localization of vibrational energy in the reaction complex, despite the presence of many energy exchange channels with the high state-density surface. We demonstrate, for the first time, highly parallel bond-selective control of a heterogeneously catalyzed reaction. We place our results in the context of recent experiments investigating IVR for molecules in both the gas phase and liquid solutions. If IVR is fast on the reaction timescale, vibrational energy would be randomly distributed throughout the nascent methane-surface reaction complex and vibrational mode-specific behavior would not occur. The short timescale of a direct gas-surface collision may explain how the exchange of energy via IVR is limited to only a small subset of the energetic configurations available to the reaction complex. This framework

  8. Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Elnaggar, Mariam S

    2013-07-16

    A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

  9. Control of Maillard Reactions in Foods: Strategies and Chemical Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Marianne N; Ray, Colin A

    2017-06-14

    Maillard reactions lead to changes in food color, organoleptic properties, protein functionality, and protein digestibility. Numerous different strategies for controlling Maillard reactions in foods have been attempted during the past decades. In this paper, recent advances in strategies for controlling the Maillard reaction and subsequent downstream reaction products in food systems are critically reviewed. The underlying mechanisms at play are presented, strengths and weaknesses of each strategy are discussed, and reasonable reaction mechanisms are proposed to reinforce the evaluations. The review includes strategies involving addition of functional ingredients, such as plant polyphenols and vitamins, as well as enzymes. The resulting trapping or modification of Maillard targets, reactive intermediates, and advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are presented with their potential unwanted side effects. Finally, recent advances in processing for control of Maillard reactions are discussed.

  10. 2011 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Stair

    2011-02-11

    The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is dedicated to promoting and advancing the fundamental science of interfacial chemistry and physics by providing surface scientists with the foremost venue for presentation and discussion of research occurring at the frontiers of their fields.

  11. Supersonic molecular beam experiments on surface chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Michio

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of a molecule and a surface is important in various fields, and in particular in complex systems like biomaterials and their related chemistry. However, the detailed understanding of the elementary steps in the surface chemistry, for example, stereodynamics, is still insufficient even for simple model systems. In this Personal Account, I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams demonstrate a significant role of the translational energy of the incident molecules. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths specific for the hyperthermal energy region, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. On the other hand, oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility of understanding surface chemical reactions in detail by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for finely monitoring the elementary step of the surface chemical reactions and creating new materials on surfaces. Copyright © 2014 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Kinetics and mechanisms of some atomic oxygen reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovic, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Mechanisms and kinetics of some reactions of the ground state of oxygen atoms, O(3P), are briefly summarized. Attention is given to reactions of oxygen atoms with several different types of organic and inorganic compounds such as alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, and some oxygen, nitrogen, halogen and sulfur derivatives of these compounds. References to some recent compilations and critical evaluations of reaction rate constants are given.

  13. Sugarcane bagasse gasification: Global reaction mechanism of syngas evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.I.; Gupta, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Gasification of sugarcane bagasse has been investigated using a semi batch reactor. ► Global reaction mechanism combining pyrolysis and gasification reactions is presented. ► High flow rates of syngas supported fragmentation and secondary reactions. ► CO flow rate increased at higher heating rates at the expense of CO 2 production. ► At high temperatures merger between pyrolysis and char gasification occurs. -- Abstract: Steam gasification of sugarcane bagasse has been investigated. A semi batch reactor with a fixed amount of sugarcane bagasse sample placed in steady flow of high temperature steam at atmospheric pressure has been used. The gasification of bagasse was examined at reactor and steam temperatures of 800, 900 and 1000 °C. The evolution of syngas flow rate and chemical composition has been monitored. The evolution of chemical composition and total flow rate of the syngas has been used to formulate a global reaction mechanism. The mechanism combines pyrolysis reaction mechanisms from the literature and steam gasification/reforming reactions. Steam gasification steps include steam–hydrocarbons reforming, char gasification and water gas shift reactions. Evidence of fragmentation, secondary ring opening reactions and tertiary reactions resulting in formation of gaseous hydrocarbons is supported by higher flow rates of syngas and hydrogen at high heating rates and high reactor temperatures. Increase in carbon monoxide flow rate at the expense of carbon dioxide flow rate with the increase in reactor temperature has been observed. This increase in the ratio of CO/CO 2 flow rate confirms the production of CO and CO 2 from the competing reaction routes. At 1000 °C gasification a total merging between the pyrolysis step and the char gasification step has been observed. This is attributed to acceleration of char gasification reactions and acceleration of steam–hydrocarbons reforming reactions. These hydrocarbons are the precursors to

  14. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Explore the reaction mechanism of the Maillard reaction: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ge-Rui; Zhao, Li-Jiang; Sun, Qiang; Xie, Hu-Jun; Lei, Qun-Fang; Fang, Wen-Jun

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of Maillard reaction has been investigated by means of density functional theory calculations in the gaseous phase and aqueous solution. The Maillard reaction is a cascade of consecutive and parallel reaction. In the present model system study, glucose and glycine were taken as the initial reactants. On the basis of previous experimental results, the mechanisms of Maillard reaction have been proposed, and the possibility for the formation of different compounds have been evaluated through calculating the relative energy changes for different steps of reaction under different pH conditions. Our calculations reveal that the TS3 in Amadori rearrangement reaction is the rate-determining step of Maillard reaction with the activation barriers of about 66.7 and 68.8 kcal mol(-1) in the gaseous phase and aqueous solution, respectively. The calculation results are in good agreement with previous studies and could provide insights into the reaction mechanism of Maillard reaction, since experimental evaluation of the role of intermediates in the Maillard reaction is quite complicated.

  16. A comprehensive review of the heavy ion reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermaz, M.C.

    1980-09-01

    A general survey of the various heavy ion reaction mechanisms used to very high incident energy is given at an introductory level. The French heavy ion program centered for the eighties around the laboratory GANIL is outlined

  17. Reaction mechanisms for barite dissolution and growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stack, Andrew G.

    2010-07-26

    In Stack and Rustad (2007), the reactive flux method (Rey and Hynes, 1996) and molecular dynamics (MD) were used to simulate the {001} barite-water interface structure and water exchange rate of aqueous barium ions and barium surface species. Atomic-level mineralwater interfacial structure and kinetics are being studied with increasing precision due to advances in spectroscopic methods at synchrotron x-ray sources as well as improved computational capacity. Better characterization of these interfaces in turn is leading to advances in the understanding of many macroscopic geochemical properties. Overall the barite-water interfacial structure was found to compare well to that estimated using X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements (Fenter et al., 2001), but there was an important difference: the MD predicted an intricate water structure present at the interface with one major peak and several minor peaks whereas the XRR found only a single layer of water. This discrepancy is thought to result from a limited resolution in the Fenter et al. (2001) study as well as over-coordination of surface sulfates by the MD model.

  18. Ultrafast Coherent Control and Characterization of Surface Reactions using FELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogasawara, Hirohito

    2005-01-01

    The microscopic understanding of reactions at surfaces requires an in-depth knowledge of the dynamics of elementary processes on an ultrafast timescale. This can be accomplished using an ultrafast excitation to initiate a chemical reaction and then probe the progression of the reaction with an ultrashort x-ray pulse from the FEL. There is a great potential to use atom-specific spectroscopy involving core levels to probe the chemical nature, structure and bonding of species on surfaces. The ultrashort electron pulse obtained in the linear accelerator to feed the X-ray FEL can also be used for generation of coherent synchrotron radiation in the low energy THz regime to be used as a pump. This radiation has an energy close to the thermal excitations of low-energy vibrational modes of molecules on surfaces and phonons in substrates. The coherent THz radiation will be an electric field pulse with a certain direction that can collectively manipulate atoms or molecules on surfaces. In this respect a chemical reaction can be initiated by collective atomic motion along a specific reaction coordinate. If the coherent THz radiation is generated from the same source as the X-ray FEL radiation, full-time synchronization for pump-probe experiments will be possible. The combination of THz and X-ray spectroscopy could be a unique opportunity for FEL facilities to conduct ultrafast chemistry studies at surfaces

  19. Mechanism and kinetics of LiX(X=H, D, T) + H2O reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Hongjie; Duan Hao; Xing Pifeng; Tang Yongjian

    2011-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of LiX(X=H, D, T) with H 2 O was investigated at MP2/6-311G (d) level using ab initio quantum chemistry in Gaussian 03 software. The equilibrium geometries, harmonic frequencies and energy of various stationary points on the potential energy surfaces were calculated in the lowest singlet states. Considering the quantum correction, the reaction rate constants were calculated using classical transition state theory. The results show the reaction of LiH (LiD, LiT) with H 2 O was considerably dependent on temperature that it is lower, the reaction rate constants are smaller. (authors)

  20. Elemental Mercury Oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn Spinel: Performance, Mechanism, and Reaction Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shangchao; Xiao, Xin; Huang, Nan; Dang, Hao; Liao, Yong; Zou, Sijie; Yang, Shijian

    2017-01-03

    The design of a high-performance catalyst for Hg 0 oxidation and predicting the extent of Hg 0 oxidation are both extremely limited due to the uncertainties of the reaction mechanism and the reaction kinetics. In this work, Fe-Ti-Mn spinel was developed as a high-performance catalyst for Hg 0 oxidation, and the reaction mechanism and the reaction kinetics of Hg 0 oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel were studied. The reaction orders of Hg 0 oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel with respect to gaseous Hg 0 concentration and gaseous HCl concentration were approximately 1 and 0, respectively. Therefore, Hg 0 oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel mainly followed the Eley-Rideal mechanism (i.e., the reaction of gaseous Hg 0 with adsorbed HCl), and the rate of Hg 0 oxidation mainly depended on Cl • concentration on the surface. As H 2 O, SO 2 , and NO not only inhibited Cl • formation on the surface but also interfered with the interface reaction between gaseous Hg 0 and Cl • on the surface, Hg 0 oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel was obviously inhibited in the presence of H 2 O, SO 2 , and NO. Furthermore, the extent of Hg 0 oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel can be predicted according to the kinetic parameter k E-R , and the predicted result was consistent with the experimental result.

  1. Reaction of water vapor with a clean liquid uranium surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siekhaus, W.

    1985-01-01

    To study the reaction of water vapor with uranium, we have exposed clean liquid uranium surfaces to H 2 O under UHV conditions. We have measured the surface concentration of oxygen as a function of exposure, and determined the maximum attainable surface oxygen concentration X 0 /sup s/ as a function of temperature. We have used these measurements to estimate, close to the melting point, the solubility of oxygen (X 0 /sup b/, -4 ) and its surface segregation coefficient β/sup s/(> 10 3 ). 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  2. The Role of Electronic Excitations on Chemical Reaction Dynamics at Metal, Semiconductor and Nanoparticle Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tully, John C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-06-10

    Chemical reactions are often facilitated and steered when carried out on solid surfaces, essential for applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, solar energy conversion, corrosion, materials processing, and many others. A critical factor that can determine the rates and pathways of chemical reactions at surfaces is the efficiency and specificity of energy transfer; how fast does energy move around and where does it go? For reactions on insulator surfaces energy transfer generally moves in and out of vibrations of the adsorbed molecule and the underlying substrate. By contrast, on metal surfaces, metallic nanoparticles and semiconductors, another pathway for energy flow opens up, excitation and de-excitation of electrons. This so-called “nonadiabatic” mechanism often dominates the transfer of energy and can directly impact the course of a chemical reaction. Conventional computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation do not account for this nonadiabatic behavior. The current DOE-BES funded project has focused on developing the underlying theoretical foundation and the computational methodology for the prediction of nonadiabatic chemical reaction dynamics at surfaces. The research has successfully opened up new methodology and new applications for molecular simulation. In particular, over the last three years, the “Electronic Friction” theory, pioneered by the PI, has now been developed into a stable and accurate computational method that is sufficiently practical to allow first principles “on-the-fly” simulation of chemical reaction dynamics at metal surfaces.

  3. Low Energy Electrons as Probing Tool for Astrochemical Reaction Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrik Bredehöft, Jan; Swiderek, Petra; Hamann, Thorben

    The complexity of molecules found in space varies widely. On one end of the scale of molecular complexity is the hydrogen molecule H2 . Its formation from H atoms is if not understood than at least thoroughly investigated[1]. On the other side of said spectrum the precursors to biopolymers can be found, such as amino acids[2,3], sugars[4], lipids, cofactors[5], etc, and the kerogen-like organic polymer material in carbonaceous meteorites called "black stuff" [6]. These have also received broad attention in the last decades. Sitting in the middle between these two extremes are simple molecules that are observed by radio astronomy throughout the Universe. These are molecules like methane (CH4 ), methanol (CH3 OH), formaldehyde (CH2 O), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and many many others. So far more than 40 such species have been identified.[7] They are often used in laboratory experiments to create larger complex molecules on the surface of simulated interstellar dust grains.[2,8] The mechanisms of formation of these observed starting materials for prebiotic chemistry is however not always clear. Also the exact mechanisms of formation of larger molecules in photochemical experiments are largely unclear. This is mostly due to the very complex chemistry going on which involves many different radicals and ions. The creation of radicals and ions can be studied in detail in laboratory simulations. They can be created in a setup mimicking interstellar grain chemistry using slow electrons. There is no free electron radiation in space. What can be found though is a lot of radiation of different sorts. There is electromagnetic radiation (UV light, X-Rays, rays, etc.) and there is particulate radiation as well in the form of high energy ions. This radiation can provide energy that drives chemical reactions in the ice mantles of interstellar dust grains. And while the multitude of different kinds of radiation might be a little confusing, they all have one thing in common: Upon

  4. Mechanism of the CO2-Ca(OH)2 reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, V.S.; Cheh, C.H.; Glass, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Recent studies clearly showed the importance of moisture in achieving high Ca(OH) 2 absorbent utilization for removing CO 2 from gas streams at ambient temperatures. However, the role of moisture and the mechanism of the reaction was not well understood. This paper summarizes the results of a study of the mechanism of the CO 2 -Ca(OH) 2 reaction with emphasis on the role of moisture. The reaction between Ca(OH) 2 and CO 2 in moist N 2 was found to be first order with respect to the reactants with a rate constant of about 100 min -1 . At high humidities, the rate of reaction was chemically controlled, but at low humidities, the reaction rate was limited by the diffusion through the carbonate layer formed by the reaction. Calculations showed that capillary condensation could have occurred only in about 2% of the pore volume and was unlikely to have affected the reaction rate significantly by allowing the reaction to occur in the liquid phase. It was, therefore, concluded that the main role of moisture was to improve the Ca(OH) 2 utilization by lowering the resistance to diffusion through the carbonate layer

  5. Photoelectron spectroscopy: a strategy for the study of reactions at solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, C. T.; Carley, A. F.; Roberts, M. W.

    The development of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for the study of the nature of chemisorbed species and the mechanisms of surface reactions is described. The methodology of data analysis and the establishment of data banks which enable photoelectron spectra to be assigned to specific surface species is discussed by reference to examples from recent studies. Although in the first instance the primary aim was to establish a qualitative logic in a well defined area of surface chemistry, this was then developed quantitatively and extended to studies of the mechanism of surface catalysed reactions. Emphasis is given here to the activation of molecules at metal surfaces either by surface modification or through chemical specificity which is associated with coadsorbed molecules. As illustration we discuss the activation of O-H and N-H bonds by `oxygen' resulting in reaction pathways being followed which would not have been predicted on the basis of the known reactivities of the individual molecules. The examples chosen also illustrate the severe limitations of mechanistic studies in surface chemistry based (a) on the study of the individual reactants separately; (b) on a post-mortem type of analysis of the surface and (c) on just a gaseous product analysis. An important concept that has emerged is the dual role of surface `oxygen'. It may either act as a promoter in activating an otherwise unreactive adsorbate molecule, or it may form an unreactive oxide overlayer. Parallel studies of metal oxides per se provide information on the defect nature of both oxide overlayers at metal surfaces and also bulk oxide surfaces. Close similarities are shown to exist between the `oxygen' activation of molecules at metal surfaces and the catalytic reactivity of defective bulk oxides. A common theme is that the dominant mechanism involves hydrogen abstraction by oxygen adatoms, which are assigned as O-(s) both at metal surfaces (by XPS) and at bulk oxide surfaces (by E.P.R. and XPS).

  6. Ultrafast Coherent Control and Characterization of Surface Reactions using FELs

    CERN Document Server

    Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nordlund, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    The microscopic understanding of surface chemistry requires a detailed understanding of the dynamics of elementary processes at surfaces. The ultrashort electron pulse obtained in the linear accelerator to feed the FEL can be used for generation of coherent synchrotron radiation in the low energy THz regime. With the current parameters for LCLS this corresponds to radiation with energy corresponding to excitations of low-energy vibrational modes of molecules on surfaces or phonons in substrates. The coherent radiation can coherently manipulate atoms or molecules on surfaces. In this respect a chemical reaction can be initiated by coherent atomic motion along a specific reaction coordinate. Since the THz radiation is generated from the same source as the FEL radiation full-time synchronization for pump-probe experiments will be possible. The possibility to perform time-resolved X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements as a probe of chemical dynamics is an exciti...

  7. The Electronic Flux in Chemical Reactions. Insights on the Mechanism of the Maillard Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Patricio; Gutiérrez-Oliva, Soledad; Herrera, Bárbara; Silva, Eduardo; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2007-11-01

    The electronic transfer that occurs during a chemical process is analysed in term of a new concept, the electronic flux, that allows characterizing the regions along the reaction coordinate where electron transfer is actually taking place. The electron flux is quantified through the variation of the electronic chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate and is used, together with the reaction force, to shed light on reaction mechanism of the Schiff base formation in the Maillard reaction. By partitioning the reaction coordinate in regions in which different process might be taking place, electronic reordering associated to polarization and transfer has been identified and found to be localized at specific transition state regions where most bond forming and breaking occur.

  8. Quantum mechanics of chemical reactions: Recent developments in reactive scattering and in reaction path Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.

    1988-12-01

    Two recent developments in the theory of chemical reaction dynamics are reviewed. First, it has recently been discovered that the S- matrix version of the Kohn variational principle is free of the ''Kohn anomalies'' that have plagued other versions and prevented its general use. This has considerably simplified quantum mechanical reactive scattering calculations, which provide the rigorous characterizations of bimolecular reactions. Second, a new kind of reaction path Hamiltonian has been developed, one based on the ''least motion'' path that interpolates linearly between the reactant and product geometry of the molecule (rather than the previously used minimum energy, or ''intrinsic'' reaction path). The form of Hamiltonian which results is much simpler than the original reaction path Hamiltonian, but more important is the fact that it provides a more physically correct description of hydrogen atom transfer reactions. 44 refs., 4 figs

  9. Reaction mechanisms of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehaug, Astrid Elisabeth

    1995-12-31

    This thesis reports a study of the mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of saturated hydrocarbons, ethers, alkenes and alcohols. Several methods were used. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidations of adamantane and cis-decalin were studied in CCl{sub 4}-CH{sub 3}CN-H{sub 2}O and in acetone-water. The rate of reaction was found to be moderately influenced by the polarity of the solvent. Solvent properties other than the polarity were also found to influence the reaction rates. From the oxidations of adamantane and adamantane-1,3,5,7-d{sub 4} two primary kinetic deuterium isotope effects were found. These were comparable with the deuterium isotope effects found for the analogous oxidations of cis-decalin and cis-decalin-d{sub 18}. The results seem to exclude both a one step hydride abstraction reaction mechanism and a one step concerted mechanism, as well as a scheme where two such mechanisms compete. The observations may be explained by a two step reaction mechanism consisting of a pre-equilibrium with formation of a substrate-RuO{sub 4} complex followed by a concerted rate determining reaction. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidation of ethers was of kinetic second order with a small enthalpy of activation and a large negative entropy of activation. Oxidation of cyclopropylmethyl methyl ether gave methyl cyclopropanecarboxylate, no rearranged products were observed. On RuO{sub 4} oxidations in CCl{sub 4} with NaIO{sub 4} as stoichiometric oxidant, no chlorinated products were observed. Several observations not in agreement with a hydride or a hydrogen abstraction mechanism may be explained by assuming that the reaction proceeds by either a concerted reaction or by a reversible oxidative addition of the ether to RuO{sub 4} followed by a slow concerted step. 228 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  10. Reaction mechanisms in cellulose pyrolysis: a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molton, P.M.; Demmitt, T.F.

    1977-08-01

    A bibliographic review of 195 references is presented outlining the history of the research into the mechanisms of cellulose pyrolysis. Topics discussed are: initial product identification, mechanism of initial formation of levoglucosan, from cellulose and from related compounds, decomposition of cellulose to other compounds, formation of aromatics, pyrolysis of levoglucosan, crosslinking of cellulose, pyrolytic reactions of cellulose derivatives, and the effects of inorganic salts on the pyrolysis mechanism. (JSR)

  11. The mechanism of the chlorine reaction at oxide anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consonni, V.; Trasatti, S.; Pollak, F.; O'Grady, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report new results for electrode materials, in particular polycrystalline IrO/sub 2/ and the face of RuO/sub 2/ single crystals. The reason for this study is that the chlorine reaction has been essentially ''facile'' and little affected by the structure of the electrode surface. Conversely, it has been shown that oxygen evolution is a ''demanding'' reaction and it is expected that the overlapping of the two reactions (and therefore the pH dependence of the parameters of chlorine evolution) may depend on the nature of the electrode material

  12. Atherton–Todd reaction: mechanism, scope and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie S. Le Corre

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Initially, the Atherton–Todd (AT reaction was applied for the synthesis of phosphoramidates by reacting dialkyl phosphite with a primary amine in the presence of carbon tetrachloride. These reaction conditions were subsequently modified with the aim to optimize them and the reaction was extended to different nucleophiles. The mechanism of this reaction led to controversial reports over the past years and is adequately discussed. We also present the scope of the AT reaction. Finally, we investigate the AT reaction by means of exemplary applications, which mainly concern three topics. First, we discuss the activation of a phenol group as a phosphate which allows for subsequent transformations such as cross coupling and reduction. Next, we examine the AT reaction applied to produce fire retardant compounds. In the last section, we investigate the use of the AT reaction for the production of compounds employed for biological applications. The selected examples to illustrate the applications of the Atherton–Todd reaction mainly cover the past 15 years.

  13. Reactions between monolayer Fe and Si(001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, M.; Kobayashi, N.; Hayashi, N. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Reactions between 1.5 monolayer(ML) Fe deposited on Si(001)-2x1 and -dihydride surfaces were studied in situ by reflection high-energy electron diffraction and time-of-flight ion scattering spectrometry with the use of 25 keV H ions. The reactions between Fe and Si which were successively deposited on Si(001)-dihydride surface were also studied. After the room temperature deposition Fe reacted with Si(001)-2x1 substrate resulting in the formation of polycrystalline Fe5Si3. By annealing to 560-650degC composite heteroepitaxial layer of both type A and type B {beta}-FeSi2 was formed. On the dihydride surface polycrystalline Fe was observed after 1.5ML Fe deposition at room temperature, and reaction between Fe and Si(001)-dihydride surface is not likely at room temperature. We observed 3D rough surface when we deposited only Fe layer on the dihydride surface and annealed above 700degC. The hydrogen termination of Si(001) surface prevents the deposited Fe from diffusing into the substrate below 500degC, however the annealing above 710degC leads to the diffusion. We obtained 2D ordered surface, which showed 3x3 RHEED pattern as referenced to the primitive unreconstructed Si(001) surface net, when we deposited 2.5ML Fe and 5.8ML Si successively onto Si(001)-dihydride surface and annealed to 470degC. (author)

  14. The chemistry of peroxynitrite. Reaction mechanisms and kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobachev, Vladimir L; Rudakov, Elisei S [L.M. Litvinenko Institute of Physical Organic Chemistry and Coal Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    2006-05-31

    Methods for the preparation of peroxynitrite and its physical and chemical properties are considered. The pathways, mechanisms and kinetics of the decomposition and best-studied reactions with hydrocarbons, dimethyl sulfoxide and other substrates are analysed. The emphasis is placed on the nature of reactive species in peroxynitrite reactions and on the reasons for its high and polyfunctional reactivity. The biochemical role of this important inorganic oxidant formed in vivo is outlined.

  15. The chemistry of peroxynitrite. Reaction mechanisms and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobachev, Vladimir L.; Rudakov, Elisei S.

    2006-05-01

    Methods for the preparation of peroxynitrite and its physical and chemical properties are considered. The pathways, mechanisms and kinetics of the decomposition and best-studied reactions with hydrocarbons, dimethyl sulfoxide and other substrates are analysed. The emphasis is placed on the nature of reactive species in peroxynitrite reactions and on the reasons for its high and polyfunctional reactivity. The biochemical role of this important inorganic oxidant formed in vivo is outlined.

  16. Surface reactivity and layer analysis of chemisorbed reaction films in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Studies on surface reactivity of substrate iron (Fe-particles) were made in the tribo-chemical environment of alkyl octadecenoates. Two alkyl octadecenoates namely ethyl octadecenoate and methyl. 12-hydroxy octadecenoate, slightly different in their chemical nature, were taken for preparing the chemisorbed reaction films ...

  17. Evidence concerning oxidation as a surface reaction in Baltic amber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide evidence about oxidation as a surface reaction during degradation of Baltic amber. A clear understanding of the amber-oxygen interaction modalities is essential to develop conservation techniques for museum collections of amber objects. Pellet-shaped samples...

  18. Canard Phenomena in Oscillations of a Surface Oxidation Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Han, Maoan; Zhang, Weijiang

    2005-12-01

    In this paper we investigate canard phenomena occurring in oscillations of a surface oxidation reaction which can be modeled by a three-dimensional singularly perturbed system of ordinary differential equations with two fast variables. By using asymptotic methods, we prove the existence of the maximal canard of the mentioned model, and provide sufficient conditions for the existence of stable canard cycles.

  19. Cyclodextrin-Catalyzed Organic Synthesis: Reactions, Mechanisms, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Cai Bai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrins are well-known macrocyclic oligosaccharides that consist of α-(1,4 linked glucose units and have been widely used as artificial enzymes, chiral separators, chemical sensors, and drug excipients, owing to their hydrophobic and chiral interiors. Due to their remarkable inclusion capabilities with small organic molecules, more recent interests focus on organic reactions catalyzed by cyclodextrins. This contribution outlines the current progress in cyclodextrin-catalyzed organic reactions. Particular emphases are given to the organic reaction mechanisms and their applications. In the end, the future directions of research in this field are proposed.

  20. Reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, W.M.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to bring together and to correlate the wide variety of experimental studies that provide information on the reaction products and reaction mechanisms involved in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins (including chromosomal proteins) in both aqueous and solid-state systems. The comparative radiation chemistry of these systems is developed in terms of specific reactions of the peptide main-chain and the aliphatic, aromatic-unsaturated and sulfur-containing side-chains. Information obtained with the various experimental techniques of product analysis, competition kinetics, spin-trapping, pulse radiolysis and ESR spectroscopy is included. 147 refs

  1. Reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, W.M.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to bring together and to correlate the wide variety of experimental studies that provide information on the reaction products and reaction mechanisms involved in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins (including chromosomal proteins) in both aqueous and solid-state systems. The comparative radiation chemistry of these systems is developed in terms of specific reactions of the peptide main-chain and the aliphatic, aromatic-unsaturated and sulfur-containing side-chains. Information obtained with the various experimental techniques of product analysis, competition kinetics, spin-trapping, pulse radiolysis and ESR spectroscopy is included. 147 refs.

  2. Cyclodextrin-Catalyzed Organic Synthesis: Reactions, Mechanisms, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chang Cai; Tian, Bing Ren; Zhao, Tian; Huang, Qing; Wang, Zhi Zhong

    2017-09-07

    Cyclodextrins are well-known macrocyclic oligosaccharides that consist of α-(1,4) linked glucose units and have been widely used as artificial enzymes, chiral separators, chemical sensors, and drug excipients, owing to their hydrophobic and chiral interiors. Due to their remarkable inclusion capabilities with small organic molecules, more recent interests focus on organic reactions catalyzed by cyclodextrins. This contribution outlines the current progress in cyclodextrin-catalyzed organic reactions. Particular emphases are given to the organic reaction mechanisms and their applications. In the end, the future directions of research in this field are proposed.

  3. Chain reaction mechanism in hydrogen/fluorine combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsugi, Akira; Shiina, Hiroumi; Tsuchiya, Kentaro; Miyoshi, Akira

    2013-12-27

    Vibrationally excited species have been considered to play significant roles in H2/F2 reaction systems. In the present study, in order to obtain further understanding of the chain reaction mechanism in the combustion of mixtures containing H2 and F2, burning velocities for H2/F2/O2/N2 flames were measured and compared to that obtained from kinetic simulations using a detailed kinetic model, which involves the vibrationally excited species, HF(ν) and H2(ν), and the chain-branching reactions, HF(ν > 2) + F2 = HF + F + F (R1) and H2(ν = 1) + F2 = HF + H + F (R2). The results indicated that reaction R1 is not responsible for chain branching, whereas reaction R2 plays a dominant role in the chain reaction mechanism. The kinetic model reproduced the experimental burning velocities with the presumed rate constant of k2 = 6.6 × 10(-10) exp(-59 kJ mol(-1)/RT) cm(3) s(-1) for R2. The suggested chain-branching reaction was also investigated by quantum chemical calculations at the MRCI-F12+CV+Q/cc-pCVQZ-F12 level of theory.

  4. Systematic development of reduced reaction mechanisms for dynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, M.; Kailasanath, K.; Oran, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    A method for systematically developing a reduced chemical reaction mechanism for dynamic modeling of chemically reactive flows is presented. The method is based on the postulate that if a reduced reaction mechanism faithfully describes the time evolution of both thermal and chain reaction processes characteristic of a more complete mechanism, then the reduced mechanism will describe the chemical processes in a chemically reacting flow with approximately the same degree of accuracy. Here this postulate is tested by producing a series of mechanisms of reduced accuracy, which are derived from a full detailed mechanism for methane-oxygen combustion. These mechanisms were then tested in a series of reactive flow calculations in which a large-amplitude sinusoidal perturbation is applied to a system that is initially quiescent and whose temperature is high enough to start ignition processes. Comparison of the results for systems with and without convective flow show that this approach produces reduced mechanisms that are useful for calculations of explosions and detonations. Extensions and applicability to flames are discussed.

  5. Competitive reactions of organophosphorus radicals on coke surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catak, Saron; Hemelsoet, Karen; Hermosilla, Laura; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2011-10-17

    The efficacy of organophosphorus radicals as anticoking agents was subjected to a computational study in which a representative set of radicals derived from industrially relevant organophosphorus additives was used to explore competitive reaction pathways on the graphene-like coke surface formed during thermal cracking. The aim was to investigate the nature of the competing reactions of different organophosphorus radicals on coke surfaces, and elucidate their mode of attack and inhibiting effect on the forming coke layer by use of contemporary computational methods. Density functional calculations on benzene and a larger polyaromatic hydrocarbon, namely, ovalene, showed that organophosphorus radicals have a high propensity to add to the periphery of the coke surface, inhibiting methyl radical induced hydrogen abstraction, which is known to be a key step in coke growth. Low addition barriers reported for a phosphatidyl radical suggest competitive aptitude against coke formation. Moreover, organophosphorus additives bearing aromatic substituents, which were shown to interact with the coke surface through dispersive π-π stacking interactions, are suggested to play a nontrivial role in hindering further stacking among coke surfaces. This may be the underlying rationale behind experimental observation of softer coke in the presence of organophosphorus radicals. The ultimate goal is to provide information that will be useful in building single-event microkinetic models. This study presents pertinent information on potential reactions that could be taken up in these models. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Mechanism of the Hydrosilylation Reaction of Alkenes at Porous Silicon: Experimental and Computational Deuterium Labeling Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smet, de L.C.P.M.; Zuilhof, H.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Lie, L.H.; Houlton, A.; Horrocks, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of the formation of Si-C bonded monolayers on silicon by reaction of 1-alkenes with hydrogen-terminated porous silicon surfaces has been studied by both experimental and computational means. We propose that monolayer formation occurs via the same radical chain process as at

  7. Reaction mechanism and reaction coordinates from the viewpoint of energy flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenjin; Ma, Ao, E-mail: aoma@uic.edu [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 South Morgan Street, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Reaction coordinates are of central importance for correct understanding of reaction dynamics in complex systems, but their counter-intuitive nature made it a daunting challenge to identify them. Starting from an energetic view of a reaction process as stochastic energy flows biased towards preferred channels, which we deemed the reaction coordinates, we developed a rigorous scheme for decomposing energy changes of a system, both potential and kinetic, into pairwise components. The pairwise energy flows between different coordinates provide a concrete statistical mechanical language for depicting reaction mechanisms. Application of this scheme to the C{sub 7eq} → C{sub 7ax} transition of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum revealed novel and intriguing mechanisms that eluded previous investigations of this well studied prototype system for biomolecular conformational dynamics. Using a cost function developed from the energy decomposition components by proper averaging over the transition path ensemble, we were able to identify signatures of the reaction coordinates of this system without requiring any input from human intuition.

  8. Nicotiana tabacum as model for ozone - plant surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain; Canaval, Eva; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. The ensuing injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through the stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. A striking question of current research is the environment and plant specific partitioning of ozone loss between gas phase, stomatal or plant surface sink terms. Here we show results from ozone fumigation experiments using various Nicotiana Tabacum varieties, whose surfaces are covered with different amounts of unsaturated diterpenoids exuded by their glandular trichomes. Exposure to elevated ozone levels (50 to 150 ppbv) for 5 to 15 hours in an exceptionally clean cuvette system did neither result in a reduction of photosynthesis nor caused any visible leaf damage. Both these ozone induced stress effects have been observed previously in ozone fumigation experiments with the ozone sensitive tobacco line Bel-W3. In our case ozone fumigation was accompanied by a continuous release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be clearly associated to their condensed phase precursors for the first time. Gas phase reactions of ozone were avoided by choosing a high enough gas exchange rate of the plant cuvette system. In the case of the Ambalema variety, that is known to exude only the diterpenoid cis-abienol, ozone fumigation experiments yield the volatiles formaldehyde and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK). The latter could be unequivocally separated from isomeric methacrolein (MACR) by the aid of a Selective Reagent Ion Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SRI-ToF-MS), which was switched every six minutes from H3O+ to NO+ primary ion mode and vice versa. Consistent with the picture of an ozone protection mechanism caused by reactive diterpenoids at the leaf surface are the results from dark-light experiments. The ozone loss obtained from the

  9. Studies of the surface of titanium dioxide. IV. The hydrogen-deuterium equilibration reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaki, T.; Katsuta, K.; Miura, M.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of hydrogen with the surface of titanium dioxide has been studied in connection with the hydrogen-reduction mechanism of titanium dioxide, by means of such measurements as weight decrease, magnetic susceptibility, hydrogen uptake, and electrical conductance. It was postulated in the previous study that the rate-determining step of the hydrogen-reduction reaction may be the formation of surface hydroxyl groups, followed by the rapid removal of water molecules from the surface. In this study, the interactions between hydrogen and the surface of titanium dioxide were investigated by measuring the hydrogen-deuterium equilibration reaction, H 2 + D 2 = 2HD, at temperatures above 200 0 C on both surfaces before and after hydrogen reduction to compare the differences in the reactivities

  10. Mechanical and chemical decontamination of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienhoefer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Decontamination does not mean more than a special technique of cleaning surfaces by methods well known in the industry. The main difference consists in the facts that more than just the visible dirt is to be removed and that radioactive contamination cannot be seen. Especially, intensive mechanical and chemical carry-off methods are applied to attack the surfaces. In order to minimize damages caused to the surfaces, the decontamination method is to adapt to the material and the required degree of decontamination. The various methods, their advantages and disadvantages are described, and the best known chemical solutions are shown. (orig./RW)

  11. Polymer surface engineering via thiol-mediated reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensarling, Ryan Matthew

    Synthesis of polymer brushes to decorate a surface with desired functionality typically involves surface-initiated polymerization (SIP) of functional, but non-reactive monomers. This approach suffers major drawbacks associated with synthesizing sufficiently thick polymer brushes containing surface-attached polymer chains of high molecular weight at high grafting density (i.e. cost, synthetic effort and functional group intolerance during polymerization). The research herein seeks to circumvent these limitations by the decoration of surfaces with polymer chains bearing specific pendent functional groups amenable to post-polymerization modification (PPM). In particular, this dissertation leverages PPM via a specific class of click reactions - thiol-click - that 1) enables the rapid generation of a diverse library of functional surfaces from a single substrates precursor, 2) utilizes a structurally diverse range of commercially available or easily attainable reagents, 3) proceeds rapidly to quantitative conversions under mild conditions and 4) opens the door to orthogonal and site-selective functionalization. In the first two studies, radical-mediated thiol-yne and base-catalyzed thiol-isocyanate reactions are demonstrated as modular platforms for the rapid and practical fabrication of highly functional, multicomponent surfaces under ambient conditions. Brush surfaces expressing a three-dimensional configuration of alkyne or isocyanate functionalities were modified with high efficiency and short reaction times using a library of commercially available thiols. In the third study, two routes to multifunctional brush surfaces were demonstrated utilizing orthogonal thiol-click reactions. In the first approach, alkyne-functionalized homopolymer brushes were modified with multiple thiols via a statistical, radical-mediated thiol-yne co-click reaction; and in the second approach, statistical copolymer brushes carrying two distinctly-addressable reactive moieties were

  12. Study of the mechanism of hydroformylation at industrial reaction conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alemdaroğlu, Naim H.; Penninger, Johannes M.L.; Oltay, Ernst

    1976-01-01

    With a newly developed analytical technique, i.e. high temperature/pressure IR cell coupled to the reactor, it was possible to study the mechanism of hydroformylation at reaction conditions. It has been conclusively found that the hydrogenolysis of the acyl cobalt complex is performed by HCo(CO)4

  13. Ab initio potential energy surfaces and quantum dynamics for polyatomic bimolecular reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bina; Zhang, Donghui

    2018-03-26

    There has been great progress in the development of potential energy surfaces (PESs) and quantum dynamics calculations in the gas phase. The establishment of fitting procedure for highly accurate PESs and new developments in quantum reactive scattering on reliable PESs allow accurate characterization of reaction dynamics beyond triatomic systems. This review will give the recent development in our group in constructing ab initio PESs based on the neural networks, and the time-dependent wave packet calculations for bimolecular reactions beyond three atoms. Bimolecular reactions of current interest to the community, namely, OH+H2, H+H2O, OH+CO, H+CH4 and Cl+CH4 are focused on. Quantum mechanical characterization of these reactions uncovers interesting dynamical phenomena with an unprecedented level of sophistication, and has greatly advanced our understanding of polyatomic reaction dynamics.

  14. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külah, Elçin; Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; Romanyuk, Andriy; Jung, Thomas A; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Meyer, Ernst

    2017-03-22

    Rare-earth (RE) oxide surfaces are of significant importance for catalysis and were recently reported to possess intrinsic hydrophobicity. The surface chemistry of these oxides in the low temperature regime, however, remains to a large extent unexplored. The reactions occurring at RE surfaces at room temperature (RT) in real air environment, in particular, in presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were not addressed until now. Discovering these reactions would shed light onto intermediate steps occurring in automotive exhaust catalysts before reaching the final high operational temperature and full conversion of organics. Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide surfaces, exemplified by tetracene (C 18 H 12 ) on a Gd 2 O 3 . Our study evidences a novel effect - oxidation of higher hydrocarbons at significantly lower temperatures (~300 K) than previously reported (>500 K). The evolution of the surface chemical composition of RE compounds in ambient air is investigated and correlated with the surface wetting. Our surprising results reveal the complex behavior of RE surfaces and motivate follow-up studies of reactions between PAH and catalytic surfaces at the single molecule level.

  15. Reaction mechanism of dimethyl ether carbonylation to methyl acetate over mordenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dominik Bjørn; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Temel, B.

    2017-01-01

    concentrations in CO between 0.2 and 2.0%, and at a temperature of 438 K. The theoretical study showed that the reaction of CO with surface methyl groups, the rate-limiting step, is faster in the eight-membered side pockets than in the twelve-membered main channel of the zeolite; the subsequent reaction......The reaction mechanism of dimethyl ether carbonylation to methyl acetate over mordenite was studied theoretically with periodic density functional theory calculations including dispersion forces and experimentally in a fixed bed flow reactor at pressures between 10 and 100 bar, dimethyl ether...... of dimethyl ether with surface acetyl to form methyl acetate was demonstrated to occur with low energy barriers in both the side pockets and in the main channel. The present analysis has thus identified a path, where the entire reaction occurs favourably on a single site within the side pocket, in good...

  16. Benzoxazinone-Mediated Triazine Degradation: A Proposed Reaction Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, C D; Lerch, R N; Lin, C-H; Goyne, K W; Leigh, N D; Roberts, C A

    2016-06-22

    The role of benzoxazinones (Bx, 2-hydroxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one) in triazine resistance in plants has been studied for over half a century. In this research, fundamental parameters of the reaction between DIBOA-Glc (2-β-d-glucopyranosyloxy-4-hydroxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one) and atrazine (ATR, 6-chloro-N-ethyl-N'-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) were examined. Through a series of experiments employing a variety of chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques, the DIBOA-Glc/ATR reaction was characterized in terms of reactant and product kinetics, stoichiometry, identification of a reaction intermediate, and reaction products formed. Results of these experiments demonstrated that the reaction mechanism proceeds via nucleophilic attack of the hydroxamic acid moiety of DIBOA-Glc at the C-2 position of the triazine ring to form hydroxyatrazine (HA, 2-hydroxy-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine), with associated degradation of DIBOA-Glc. Degradation of reactants followed first-order kinetics with a noncatalytic role of DIBOA-Glc. A reaction intermediate was identified as a DIBOA-Glc-HA conjugate, indicating a 1:1 DIBOA-Glc:ATR stoichiometry. Reaction products included HA and Cl(-), but definitive identification of DIBOA-Glc reaction product(s) was not attained. With these reaction parameters elucidated, DIBOA-Glc can be evaluated in terms of its potential for a myriad of applications, including its use to address the problem of widespread ATR contamination of soil and water resources.

  17. Recyclable surfaces for amine conjugation chemistry via redox reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Inseong; Yeo, Woon Seok [Dept. of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio/Molecular Informatics Center, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Se Won [Green Materials and Process Group, Research Institute of Sustainable Manufacturing System, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In this study, we extended this strategy to present a switchable surface that allows surface functionalization and removal of functional groups repeatedly. The substrate presenting a benzoquinone acid group is first used to immobilize with an amine-containing (bio)molecule using well-known conjugation chemistry. The benzoquinone group is then converted to the corresponding hydroquinone by treating with a reducing agent. We have described a strategy for the dynamic control of surface properties with recyclability via a simple reduction/ oxidation reaction. A stimuli-responsive quinone derivative was harnessed for the repeated immobilization and release of (bio)molecules, and thus, for the repeated dynamic change of the surface properties according to the characteristics of the immobilized (bio)molecules.

  18. Elucidation of the Reaction Mechanism of ortho ->alpha Transmetalation Reactions of Alkyl Aryl Sulfone Carbanions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řehová, Lucie; Jahn, Ullrich

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2014, č. 21 (2014), s. 4610-4623 ISSN 1434-193X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/1598 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : reaction mechanisms * transmetalation * lithiation * kinetic s * isotopic labeling Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.065, year: 2014

  19. Structure and Reaction Mechanism of Pyrrolysine Synthase (PylD)

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix

    2013-05-29

    The final step in the biosynthesis of the 22nd genetically encoded amino acid, pyrrolysine, is catalyzed by PylD, a structurally and mechanistically unique dehydrogenase. This catalyzed reaction includes an induced-fit mechanism achieved by major structural rearrangements of the N-terminal helix upon substrate binding. Different steps of the reaction trajectory are visualized by complex structures of PylD with substrate and product. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Revealing the reaction mechanisms of Li–O2 batteries using environmental transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Langli; Liu, Bin; Song, Shidong; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chongmin

    2017-03-27

    The capacity, Coulombic efficiency, rate, and cyclability of a Li-O2 battery critically depend on the electrode reaction mechanism and the structure/morphology of the reaction product as well as their spatial and temporal evolution1-8, which are all further complicated by the choice of different electrolyte. For the case of aprotic cell, the discharge product, Li2O2, is formed through solution and surface mechanisms9,10, but little is known on the formation mechanism of the perplexing morphology of the reaction product11-15. For the case of Li-O2 battery using solid electrolyte, neither electrode reaction mechanism nor the nature of the reaction production is known. Herein, we reveal the full cycle reaction pathway for Li-O2 batteries and its correlation with the nature of the reaction product. Using an aberration-corrected environmental TEM under oxygen environment, we captured, for the first time, the morphology and phase evolution on the carbon nanotube (CNT) cathode of a working solid-state Li-O2 nano-battery16 and directly correlated these features with electrochemical reaction. We found that the oxygen reduction reaction on CNTs initially produces LiO2, which subsequently evolves to Li2O2 and O2 through disproportionation reaction. Surprisingly it is just the releasing of O2 that inflates the particles to a hollow structure with a Li2O outer surface layer and Li2O2 inner-shell, demonstrating that, in general, accommodation of the released O2 coupled with the Li+ ion diffusion and electron transport paths across both spatial and temporal scales critically governs the morphology of the discharging/charging product in Li-O2 system. We anticipate that the direct observation of Li-O2 reaction mechanisms and their correlation with the morphology of the reaction product set foundation for quantitative understanding/modeling of the electrochemical processes in the Li-O2 system, enabling rational design of both solid-state and aprotic Li-O2 batteries.

  1. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25977746

  2. Effect of surface structure on catalytic reactions: A sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCrea, Keith Ryan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    In the results discussed above, it is clear that Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) is a unique tool that allows the detection of vibrational spectra of adsorbed molecules present on single crystal surfaces under catalytic reaction conditions. Not only is it possible to detect active surface intermediates, it is also possible to detect spectator species which are not responsible for the measured turnover rates. By correlating high-pressure SFG spectra under reaction conditions and gas chromatography (GC) kinetic data, it is possible to determine which species are important under reaction intermediates. Because of the flexibility of this technique for studying surface intermediates, it is possible to determine how the structures of single crystal surfaces affect the observed rates of catalytic reactions. As an example of a structure insensitive reaction, ethylene hydrogenation was explored on both Pt(111) and Pt(100). The rates were determined to be essentially the same. It was observed that both ethylidyne and di-σ bonded ethylene were present on the surface under reaction conditions on both crystals, although in different concentrations. This result shows that these two species are not responsible for the measured turnover rate, as it would be expected that one of the two crystals would be more active than the other, since the concentration of the surface intermediate would be different on the two crystals. The most likely active intermediates are weakly adsorbed molecules such as π-bonded ethylene and ethyl. These species are not easily detected because their concentration lies at the detection limit of SFG. The SFG spectra and GC data essentially show that ethylene hydrogenation is structure insensitive for Pt(111) and Pt(100). SFG has proven to be a unique and excellent technique for studying adsorbed species on single crystal surfaces under high-pressure catalytic reactions. Coupled with kinetic data obtained from gas chromatography measurements, it can give

  3. Characterization, preparation, and reaction mechanism of hemp stem based activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji; Gao, Jianmin; Chen, Yao; Hao, Xinmin; Jin, Xiaojuan

    In this study, hemp stem was used to prepare high surface area activated carbon (AC) by KOH activation. The structure, characterization, thermal and structure analysis on reaction mechanisms of AC were investigated via N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric-mass (TG-MS) spectrometry. Results show that when the impregnation ratio is 4.5:1 (KOH/char), the activation temperature is 800 °C, and the activation time is 1.5 h, AC has the highest specific surface area of 2388 m2·g-1 and exhibits narrow pore size distributions with maxima in the micropore areas. The reaction mechanism of AC from hemp stems by KOH activation is as follows: In the first carbonization stage, it is primarily because of the substitution, scission, and oxidization reactions of methylene. Then in the second activation stage, it is mainly related to polycyclic reactions, reactions between carbon and KOH, and reactions between intermediate potassium oxide species and carbon.

  4. Catalytic coupling reaction mechanism of 4-nitrobenzenethiol on silver clusters: a density functional theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Wei, Wei; Li, Laicai; Liu, Liuxie; Pan, Rui; Tian, Anmin

    2017-10-23

    The catalytic coupling reaction mechanism of the transformation from 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4-NBT) to 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene (4,4'-DMAB) on a silver cluster was studied by density functional theory. Reactants, intermediates, transition states and products were optimized with the B3LYP method using the 6-311 + G(d,p) basis set (Ag using the pseudo potential basis set of LanL2DZ). Transition states and intermediates were confirmed by the corresponding vibration analysis and intrinsic reaction coordinates (IRC). Consistent with literature reports, the key point of the transformation from 4-NBT absorbed on the surface of Ag 5 clusters to 4,4'-DMAB is the elimination of two O atoms on the amino group. Meanwhile, the catalytic coupling reaction of 4-nitrobenzenethiol on a silver cluster is easy to carry out under irradiation. The possibility of "inter system channeling" (ISC) between different potential energy surfaces in the coupling reaction of 4-NBT is further discussed. The irradiation has an auxiliary catalytic effect on the coupling reaction. Our research results can explain the observed experimental phenomena. Graphical abstract Catalytic coupling reaction mechanism of the transformation from 4-nitrothiophenol (4-NBT) to 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene (4,4'-DMAB) on silver clusters studied by density functional theory.

  5. Mechanism of catalytic action of oxide systems in reactions of aldehyde oxidation to carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrushkevich, T.V.

    1997-01-01

    Mechanism of selective action of oxide catalysts (on the base of V 2 O 4 , MoO 3 ) of aldehyde oxidation to acids is considered, reaction acrolein oxidation to acrylic acid is taken as an example. Multistage mechanism of the process is established; it involves consequent transformation of coordination-bonded aldehyde into carbonyl-bonded aldehyde and symmetric carboxylate. Principles of active surface construction are formulated, they take into account the activity of stabilization center of concrete intermediate compound and bond energy of oxygen with surface. (author)

  6. Reaction mechanisms of CO2 activation and catalytic reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Niklas von

    2016-01-01

    The use of CO 2 as a C1 chemical feedstock for the fine chemical industry is interesting both economically and ecologically, as CO 2 is non-toxic, abundant and cheap. Nevertheless, transformations of CO 2 into value-added products is hampered by its high thermodynamic stability and its inertness toward reduction. In order to design new catalysts able to overcome this kinetic challenge, a profound understanding of the reaction mechanisms at play in CO 2 reduction is needed. Using novel N/Si+ frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), the influence of CO 2 adducts and different hydro-borane reducing agents on the reaction mechanism in the catalytic hydroboration of CO 2 were investigated, both by DFT calculations and experiments. In a second step, the reaction mechanism of a novel reaction for the creation of C-C bonds from CO 2 and pyridyl-silanes (C 5 H 4 N-SiMe 3 ) was analyzed by DFT calculations. It was shown that CO 2 plays a double role in this transformation, acting both as a catalyst and a C1-building block. The fine understanding of this transformation then led to the development of a novel approach for the synthesis of sulfones and sulfonamides. Starting from SO 2 and aromatic silanes/amine silanes, these products were obtained in a single step under metal-free conditions. Noteworthy, sulfones and sulfonamides are common motifs in organic chemistry and found in a variety of highly important drugs. Finally, this concept was extended to aromatic halides as coupling partners, and it was thus shown for the first time that a sulfonylative Hiyama reaction is a possible approach to the synthesis of sulfones. (author) [fr

  7. Mechanism of Triplet Energy Transfer in Photosynthetic Bacterial Reaction Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sarthak; Carey, Anne-Marie; Locsin, Joshua; Gao, Bing-Rong; Williams, JoAnn C; Allen, James P; Lin, Su; Woodbury, Neal W

    2017-07-13

    In purple bacterial reaction centers, triplet excitation energy transfer occurs from the primary donor P, a bacteriochlorophyll dimer, to a neighboring carotenoid to prevent photodamage from the generation of reactive oxygen species. The B B bacteriochlorophyll molecule that lies between P and the carotenoid on the inactive electron transfer branch is involved in triplet energy transfer between P and the carotenoid. To expand the high-resolution spectral and kinetic information available for describing the mechanism, we investigated the triplet excited state formation and energy transfer pathways in the reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides using pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy over a broad spectral region on the nanosecond to microsecond time scale at both room temperature and at 77 K. Wild-type reaction centers were compared with a reaction center mutant (M182HL) in which B B is replaced by a bacteriopheophytin (Φ), as well as to reaction centers that lack the carotenoid. In wild-type reaction centers, the triplet energy transfer efficiency from P to the carotenoid was essentially unity at room temperature and at 77 K. However, in the M182HL mutant reaction centers, both the rate and efficiency of triplet energy transfer were decreased at room temperature, and at 77 K, no triplet energy transfer was observed, attributable to a higher triplet state energy of the bacteriopheophytin that replaces bacteriochlorophyll in this mutant. Finally, detailed time-resolved spectral analysis of P, carotenoid, and B B (Φ in the M182HL mutant) reveals that the triplet state of the carotenoid is coupled fairly strongly to the bridging intermediate B B in wild-type and Φ in the M182HL mutant, a fact that is probably responsible for the lack of any obvious intermediate 3 B B / 3 Φ transient formation during triplet energy transfer.

  8. Reaction pathways and mechanisms of photodegradation of pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, H D; Canle L, M; Santaballa, J A; Steenken, S

    2002-06-01

    The photodegradation of pesticides is reviewed, with particular reference to the studies that describe the mechanisms of the processes involved, the nature of reactive intermediates and final products. Potential use of photochemical processes in advanced oxidation methods for water treatment is also discussed. Processes considered include direct photolysis leading to homolysis or heterolysis of the pesticide, photosensitized photodegradation by singlet oxygen and a variety of metal complexes, photolysis in heterogeneous media and degradation by reaction with intermediates generated by photolytic or radiolytic means.

  9. A Practical Quantum Mechanics Molecular Mechanics Method for the Dynamical Study of Reactions in Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I; Marcos-Alcalde, Iñigo; Trabada, Daniel G; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Ortega, José; Mendieta, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods are excellent tools for the modeling of biomolecular reactions. Recently, we have implemented a new QM/MM method (Fireball/Amber), which combines an efficient density functional theory method (Fireball) and a well-recognized molecular dynamics package (Amber), offering an excellent balance between accuracy and sampling capabilities. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the Fireball method and Fireball/Amber implementation. We also discuss how this tool can be used to analyze reactions in biomolecules using steered molecular dynamics simulations. The potential of this approach is shown by the analysis of a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM). The conformational space and energetic landscape for this reaction are analyzed without a priori assumptions about the protonation states of the different residues during the reaction. The results offer a detailed description of the reaction and reveal some new features of the catalytic mechanism. In particular, we find a new reaction mechanism that is characterized by the intramolecular proton transfer from O1 to O2 and the simultaneous proton transfer from Glu 165 to C2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Transglycosylation reactions, a main mechanism of phenolics incorporation in coffee melanoidins: Inhibition by Maillard reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ana S P; Nunes, Fernando M; Simões, Cristiana; Maciel, Elisabete; Domingues, Pedro; Domingues, M Rosário M; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2017-07-15

    Under roasting conditions, polysaccharides depolymerize and also are able to polymerize, forming new polymers through non-enzymatic transglycosylation reactions (TGRs). TGRs can also occur between carbohydrates and aglycones, such as the phenolic compounds present in daily consumed foods like coffee. In this study, glycosidically-linked phenolic compounds were quantified in coffee melanoidins, the polymeric nitrogenous brown-colored compounds formed during roasting, defined as end-products of Maillard reaction. One third of the phenolics present were in glycosidically-linked form. In addition, the roasting of solid-state mixtures mimicking coffee beans composition allowed the conclusion that proteins play a regulatory role in TGRs extension and, consequently, modulate melanoidins composition. Overall, the results obtained showed that TGRs are a main mechanism of phenolics incorporation in melanoidins and are inhibited by amino groups through Maillard reaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular resonances, fusion reactions and surface transparency of interaction between heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yasuhisa.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the Band Crossing Model is given, including recent results on the 16 O + 16 O system. Surface Transparency is discussed in the light of the recent development in our understanding of the fusion reaction mechanisms and by calculating the number of open channels available to direct reactions. The existence of the Molecular Resonance Region is suggested in several systems by the fact that Band Crossing Region overlaps with the Transparent Region. A systematic study predicts molecular resonances in the 14 C + 14 C and 12 C + 14 C systems as prominent as those observed in the 16 O + 16 O and 12 C + 16 O systems

  12. Methanol synthesis on ZnO(0001¯). IV. Reaction mechanisms and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenzel, Johannes; Marx, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Methanol synthesis from CO and H 2 over ZnO, which requires high temperatures and high pressures giving rise to a complex interplay of physical and chemical processes over this heterogeneous catalyst surface, is investigated using ab initio simulations. The redox properties of the surrounding gas phase are known to directly impact on the catalyst properties and thus, set the overall catalytic reactivity of this easily reducible oxide material. In Paper III of our series [J. Kiss, J. Frenzel, N. N. Nair, B. Meyer, and D. Marx, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 064710 (2011)] we have qualitatively shown that for the partially hydroxylated and defective ZnO(0001 ¯ ) surface there exists an intricate network of surface chemical reactions. In the present study, we employ advanced molecular dynamics techniques to resolve in detail this reaction network in terms of elementary steps on the defective surface, which is in stepwise equilibrium with the gas phase. The two individual reduction steps were investigated by ab initio metadynamics sampling of free energy landscapes in three-dimensional reaction subspaces. By also sampling adsorption and desorption processes and thus molecular species that are in the gas phase but close to the surface, our approach successfully generated several alternative pathways of methanol synthesis. The obtained results suggest an Eley-Rideal mechanism for both reduction steps, thus involving “near-surface” molecules from the gas phase, to give methanol preferentially over a strongly reduced catalyst surface, while important side reactions are of Langmuir-Hinshelwood type. Catalyst re-reduction by H 2 stemming from the gas phase is a crucial process after each reduction step in order to maintain the catalyst's activity toward methanol formation and to close the catalytic cycle in some reaction channels. Furthermore, the role of oxygen vacancies, side reactions, and spectator species is investigated and mechanistic details are discussed based on

  13. Iron Contamination Mechanism and Reaction Performance Research on FCC Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracking catalyst iron poisoning would not only influence units’ product slate; when the poisoning is serious, it could also jeopardize FCC catalysts’ fluidization in reaction-regeneration system and further cause bad influences on units’ stable operation. Under catalytic cracking reaction conditions, large amount of iron nanonodules is formed on the seriously iron contaminated catalyst due to exothermic reaction. These nodules intensify the attrition between catalyst particles and generate plenty of fines which severely influence units’ smooth running. A dense layer could be formed on the catalysts’ surface after iron contamination and the dense layer stops reactants to diffuse to inner structures of catalyst. This causes extremely negative effects on catalyst’s heavy oil conversion ability and could greatly cut down gasoline yield while increasing yields of dry gas, coke, and slurry largely. Research shows that catalyst’s reaction performance would be severely deteriorated when iron content in E-cat (equilibrium catalyst exceeds 8000 μg/g.

  14. Iron Contamination Mechanism and Reaction Performance Research on FCC Catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Yang, C.; Liu, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Liu, P.; Zhai, J.

    2015-01-01

    FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracking) catalyst iron poisoning would not only influence units’ product slate; when the poisoning is serious, it could also jeopardize FCC catalysts’ fluidization in reaction-regeneration system and further cause bad influences on units’ stable operation. Under catalytic cracking reaction conditions, large amount of iron nano nodules is formed on the seriously iron contaminated catalyst due to exothermic reaction. These nodules intensify the attrition between catalyst particles and generate plenty of fines which severely influence units’ smooth running. A dense layer could be formed on the catalysts’ surface after iron contamination and the dense layer stops reactants to diffuse to inner structures of catalyst. This causes extremely negative effects on catalyst’s heavy oil conversion ability and could greatly cut down gasoline yield while increasing yields of dry gas, coke, and slurry largely. Research shows that catalyst’s reaction performance would be severely deteriorated when iron content in E-cat (equilibrium catalyst) exceeds 8000 μg/g.

  15. Probing the Surface of Platinum during the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey A. [Physical; Favaro, Marco [Advanced; Joint; Chemical; Ross, Philip N. [Materials; Yano, Junko [Joint; Molecular; Liu, Zhi [State; Division; Hussain, Zahid [Advanced; Crumlin, Ethan J. [Advanced; Joint Center

    2017-11-02

    Understanding the surface chemistry of electrocatalysts in operando can bring insight into the reaction mechanism, and ultimately the design of more efficient materials for sustainable energy storage and conversion. Recent progress in synchrotron based X-ray spectroscopies for in operando characterization allows us to probe the solid/liquid interface directly while applying an external potential, applied here to the model system of Pt in alkaline electrolyte for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We employ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) to identify the oxidation and reduction of Pt-oxides and hydroxides on the surface as a function of applied potential, and further assess the potential for hydrogen adsorption and absorption (hydride formation) during and after the HER. This new window into the surface chemistry of Pt in alkaline brings insight into the nature of the rate limiting step, the extent of H ad/absorption and it’s persistence at more anodic potentials.

  16. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, S.K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  17. Reaction Mechanisms of Magnesium Potassium Phosphate Cement and its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Fei

    Magnesium potassium phosphate cement (MKPC) is a kind of cementitious binder in which the chemical bond is formed via a heterogeneous acid-base reaction between dead burned magnesia powder and potassium phosphate solution at room temperature. Small amount of boron compounds can be incorporated in the cement as a setting retarder. The final reaction product of MgO-KH2PO4-H 2O ternary system is identified as magnesium potassium phosphate hexahydrate, MgKPO4·6H2O. However, the mechanisms and procedures through which this crystalline product is formed and the conditions under which the crystallization process would be influenced are not yet clear. Understanding of the reaction mechanism of the system is helpful for developing new methodologies to control the rapid reaction process and furthermore, to adjust the phase assemblage of the binder, and to enhance the macroscopic properties. This study is mainly focused on the examination of the reaction mechanism of MKPC. In addition, the formulation optimization, microstructure characterization and field application in rapid repair are also systematically studied. The chemical reactions between magnesia and potassium dihydrogen phosphate are essentially an acid-base reaction with strong heat release, the pH and temperature variation throughout the reaction process could provide useful information to disclose the different stages in the reaction. However, it would be very difficult to conduct such tests on the cement paste due to the limited water content and fast setting. In the current research, the reaction mechanism of MKPC is investigated on the diluted MKPC system through monitoring the pH and temperature development, identification of the solid phase formed, and measurement of the ionic concentration of the solution. The reaction process can be explained as follows: when magnesia and potassium phosphate powder are mixed with water, phosphate is readily dissolved, which is instantly followed by the dissociation of

  18. Potential energy surface of the reaction of imidazole with peroxynitrite: Density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogonea, Valentin

    This article presents a theoretical investigation of the reaction mechanism of imidazole nitration by peroxynitrite using density functional theory calculations. Understanding this reaction mechanism will help in elucidating the mechanism of guanine nitration by peroxynitrite, which is one of the assumed chemical pathways for damaging DNA in cells. This work focuses on the analysis of the potential energy surface (PES) for this reaction in the gas phase. Calculations were carried out using Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) Hamiltonians with double-zeta basis sets ranging from 6-31G(d) to 6-31++G(d,p), and the triple-zeta basis set 6-311G(d). The computational results reveal that the reaction of imidazole with peroxynitrite in gas phase produces the following species: (i) hydroxide ion and 2-nitroimidazole, (ii) hydrogen superoxide ion and 2-nitrosoimidazole, and (iii) water and 2-nitroimidazolide. The rate-determining step is the formation of a short-lived intermediate in which the imidazole C2 carbon is covalently bonded to peroxynitrite nitrogen. Three short-lived intermediates were found in the reaction path. These intermediates are involved in a proton-hopping transport from C2 carbon to the terminal oxygen of the OO moiety of peroxynitrite via the nitroso (ON) oxygen. Both HF and DFT calculations (using the Becke3-Lee-Yang-Parr functional) lead to similar reaction paths for proton transport, but the landscape details of the PES for HF and DFT calculations differ. This investigation shows that the reaction of imidazole with peroxynitrite produces essentially the same types of products (nitro- and nitroso-) as observed experimentally in the reaction of guanine with peroxynitrite, which makes the former reaction a good model to study by computation the essential characteristics of the latter reaction. Nevertheless, the computationally determined activation energy for imidazole nitration by peroxynitrite in the gas phase is 84.1 kcal

  19. Revealing the reaction mechanisms of Li-O2 batteries using environmental transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Langli; Liu, Bin; Song, Shidong; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chongmin

    2017-07-01

    The performances of a Li-O2 battery depend on a complex interplay between the reaction mechanism at the cathode, the chemical structure and the morphology of the reaction products, and their spatial and temporal evolution; all parameters that, in turn, are dependent on the choice of the electrolyte. In an aprotic cell, for example, the discharge product, Li2O2, forms through a combination of solution and surface chemistries that results in the formation of a baffling toroidal morphology. In a solid electrolyte, neither the reaction mechanism at the cathode nor the nature of the reaction product is known. Here we report the full-cycle reaction pathway for Li-O2 batteries and show how this correlates with the morphology of the reaction products. Using aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy (TEM) under an oxygen environment, we image the product morphology evolution on a carbon nanotube (CNT) cathode of a working solid-state Li-O2 nanobattery and correlate these features with the electrochemical reaction at the electrode. We find that the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) on CNTs initially produces LiO2, which subsequently disproportionates into Li2O2 and O2. The release of O2 creates a hollow nanostructure with Li2O outer-shell and Li2O2 inner-shell surfaces. Our findings show that, in general, the way the released O2 is accommodated is linked to lithium-ion diffusion and electron-transport paths across both spatial and temporal scales; in turn, this interplay governs the morphology of the discharging/charging products in Li-O2 cells.

  20. The exchange reaction between hydrogen and deuterium. II - Proposal for an heterogeneous initiation mechanism of gaseous phase reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marteau, Chantal; Gaillard-Cusin, Francoise; James, Henri

    1978-01-01

    Investigation of experimental data related to evolution period exhibited by H 2 -D 2 exchange process requires to take into account the variation against time of every atomic species -adsorbed or not- implied in the reaction mechanism. The formation of first chain carriers involves: - chemisorption of either gaseous reactant on the surface active centres (Σ), e.g.: Σ + 1/2 H 2 reversible ΣH; - consecutive generation of atomic species through hetero-homogeneous transfer between chemisorbed species (ΣH) and gaseous molecules: ΣH+H 2 →Σ+H 2 +H 0 , ΣH+D 2 →Σ+HD+D 0 . Therefore, it can be shown that the heterogeneous initiation process of a gas phase reaction identifies to a chain linear mechanism. Such an heterogeneous sequence conditions the further proceeding of the homogeneous chain reaction; both evolutions being kinematically connected. Rate constant of hydrogen adsorption on silica glass: ksub(a1) approximately 10 14 exp(-47/RT)Isup(0,5).molesup(-0,5).S -1 has been evaluated [fr

  1. Steric Effects in the Reaction of Aryl Radicals on Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combellas, Catherine [CNRS-ESPCI; Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Kanoufi, Frederic [CNRS-ESPCI; Pinson, Jean [Alchimer; Podvorica, Fetah [University of Prishtina, Kosovo

    2009-01-01

    Steric effects are investigated in the reaction of aryl radicals with surfaces. The electrochemical reduction of 2-, 3-, 4-methyl, 2-methoxy, 2-ethyl, 2,6-, 2,4-, and 3,5-dimethyl, 4-tert-butyl, 3,5-bis-tert-butyl benzenediazonium, 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl), and pentafluoro benzenediazonium tetrafluoroborates is examined in acetonitrile solutions. It leads to the formation of grafted layers only if the steric hindrance at the 2- or 2,6-position(s) is small. When the 3,5-positions are crowded with tert-butyl groups, the growth of the organic layer is limited by steric effects and a monolayer is formed. The efficiency of the grafting process is assessed by cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared, and ellipsometry. These experiments, together with density functional computations of bonding energies of substituted phenyl groups on a copper surface, are discussed in terms of the reactivity of aryl radicals in the electrografting reaction and in the growth of the polyaryl layer.

  2. Nucleation of reaction-diffusion waves on curved surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneer, Frederike; Schöll, Eckehard; Dahlem, Markus A

    2014-01-01

    We study reaction-diffusion waves on curved two-dimensional surfaces, and determine the influence of curvature upon the nucleation and propagation of spatially localized waves in an excitable medium modelled by the generic FitzHugh–Nagumo model. We show that the stability of propagating wave segments depends crucially on the curvature of the surface. As they propagate, they may shrink to the uniform steady state, or expand, depending on whether they are smaller or larger, respectively, than a critical nucleus. This critical nucleus for wave propagation is modified by the curvature acting like an effective space-dependent local spatial coupling, similar to diffuson, thus extending the regime of propagating excitation waves beyond the excitation threshold of flat surfaces. In particular, a negative gradient of Gaussian curvature Γ, as on the outside of a torus surface (positive Γ), when the wave segment symmetrically extends into the inside (negative Γ), allows for stable propagation of localized wave segments remaining unchanged in size and shape, or oscillating periodically in size. (paper)

  3. Non-thermal desorption from interstellar dust grains via exothermic surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrod, R. T.; Wakelam, V.; Herbst, E.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:The gas-phase abundance of methanol in dark quiescent cores in the interstellar medium cannot be explained by gas-phase chemistry. In fact, the only possible synthesis of this species appears to be production on the surfaces of dust grains followed by desorption into the gas. Yet, evaporation is inefficient for heavy molecules such as methanol at the typical temperature of 10 K. It is necessary then to consider non-thermal mechanisms for desorption. But, if such mechanisms are considered for the production of methanol, they must be considered for all surface species. Methods: Our gas-grain network of reactions has been altered by the inclusion of a non-thermal desorption mechanism in which the exothermicity of surface addition reactions is utilized to break the bond between the product species and the surface. Our estimated rate for this process derives from a simple version of classical unimolecular rate theory with a variable parameter only loosely constrained by theoretical work. Results: Our results show that the chemistry of dark clouds is altered slightly at times up to 106 yr, mainly by the enhancement in the gas-phase abundances of hydrogen-rich species such as methanol that are formed on grain surfaces. At later times, however, there is a rather strong change. Instead of the continuing accretion of most gas-phase species onto dust particles, a steady-state is reached for both gas-phase and grain-surface species, with significant abundances for the former. Nevertheless, most of the carbon is contained in an undetermined assortment of heavy surface hydrocarbons. Conclusions: The desorption mechanism discussed here will be better constrained by observational data on pre-stellar cores, where a significant accretion of species such as CO has already occurred.

  4. A discrete model to study reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Louis D; Nash, Martyn P; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD) processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects.

  5. A discrete model to study reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis D Weise

    Full Text Available This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material. Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects.

  6. Detection of submonolayer oxygen-18 on a gold surface by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L.S.; Kenny, M.J.; Wieczorek, L. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1993-12-31

    A gold substrate is the preferred solid surface for formation of an organic self-assembled monolayer ( SAM ). Device fabrication process may require the gold film to be exposed to photolithographic processing and plasma treatment prior to molecular assembly. It has been observed that oxygen plasma treatment prevents the formation of SAMs; however, subsequent treatment with an argon plasma allows assembly of the organic monolayers. To understand the mechanisms involved, a plasma containing 98% {sup 18}O was used and the film surface was analysed using the {sup 18}O (p,{alpha}){sup 15}N nuclear reaction. 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  7. Peptide Bond Synthesis by a Mechanism Involving an Enzymatic Reaction and a Subsequent Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Zhuang, Ye; Ge, Yin; Kumano, Takuto; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that an amide bond is unexpectedly formed by an acyl-CoA synthetase (which catalyzes the formation of a carbon-sulfur bond) when a suitable acid and l-cysteine are used as substrates. DltA, which is homologous to the adenylation domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetase, belongs to the same superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes, which includes many kinds of enzymes, including the acyl-CoA synthetases. Here, we demonstrate that DltA synthesizes not only N-(d-alanyl)-l-cysteine (a dipeptide) but also various oligopeptides. We propose that this enzyme catalyzes peptide synthesis by the following unprecedented mechanism: (i) the formation of S-acyl-l-cysteine as an intermediate via its "enzymatic activity" and (ii) subsequent "chemical" S → N acyl transfer in the intermediate, resulting in peptide formation. Step ii is identical to the corresponding reaction in native chemical ligation, a method of chemical peptide synthesis, whereas step i is not. To the best of our knowledge, our discovery of this peptide synthesis mechanism involving an enzymatic reaction and a subsequent chemical reaction is the first such one to be reported. This new process yields peptides without the use of a thioesterified fragment, which is required in native chemical ligation. Together with these findings, the same mechanism-dependent formation of N-acyl compounds by other members of the above-mentioned superfamily demonstrated that all members most likely form peptide/amide compounds by using this novel mechanism. Each member enzyme acts on a specific substrate; thus, not only the corresponding peptides but also new types of amide compounds can be formed. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Development and validation of a reduced combined biodiesel–diesel reaction mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Jo-Han

    2013-01-01

    of the component mechanisms, parametric adjustments to the Arrhenius rate constants of pertinent chemical reactions are performed for better ignition delay (ID) prediction. The final mechanism developed comprises 80 species and 299 reactions. The compact-sized CBD mechanism is validated against 234 test conditions......In this study, a compact combined biodiesel–diesel (CBD) reaction mechanism for diesel engine simulations is proposed through the combination of three component mechanisms using a chemical class-based approach. The proposed mechanism comprises the reaction mechanisms of methyl crotonate (MC...... and MB are methodologically reduced. The MC mechanism by Gail et al. with 301 species and 1516 reactions is reduced to 47 species and 210 reactions, while the MB mechanism by Brakora et al. with 41 species and 150 reactions is reduced to 33 species and 105 reactions. The mechanisms are reduced from...

  9. Reaction mechanism and spectroscopy of transfer reactions induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, M.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The specific features displayed by data on heavy ion elastic and inelastic angular distributions are discussed, and their physical origin is pointed out from semi-classical calculations in counterpart ambiguities in the phenomenological description of the optical potential appear. Two nucleon transfer reactions induced by heavy ions successfully point out important contributions of a two-step process where the transfer is proceeding via target and residual nucleus inelastic excitation. At incident energies not too high above the Coulomb barrier, such process produces clear shape changes between different final state angular distributions. At higher incident energy, the angular distributions are forward peaked and display oscillations for both mechanisms. As for four-nucleon transfer reactions, the existing data suggest that the nucleons are well transferred into a Os relative

  10. Pattern formation mechanisms in reaction-diffusion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanag, Vladimir K; Epstein, Irving R

    2009-01-01

    In systems undergoing chemical reaction and diffusion, a remarkable variety of spatially structured patterns, stationary or moving, local or global, can arise, many of them reminiscent of forms and phenomena seen in living systems. Chemical systems offer the advantage that one can often control the parameters that determine the patterns formed and can thereby probe fundamental issues about pattern formation, with possible insights into biologically relevant phenomena. We present experimental examples and discuss several mechanisms by which such spatiotemporal structure may arise, classifying the mechanisms according to the type of instability that results in pattern formation. In some systems, the pattern that emerges depends not only on the chemical and physical parameters but also on the initial state of the system. Interactions between instabilities can result in particularly complex patterns.

  11. Mechanical stability of surface architecture--consequences for superhydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyett, Brendan P; Wu, Alex H; Lamb, Robert N

    2014-11-12

    Wet chemistry methods such as sol-gel provide a facile means of preparing coatings with controlled surface chemistry and architecture. The manipulation of colloidal "building blocks," film constituents, and reaction conditions makes it a promising method for simple, scalable, and routine production of superhydrophobic coatings. Despite all of this, the practical application of superhydrophobic coatings remains limited by low mechanical durability. The translation of chemistry to mechanical strength within superhydrophobic films is severely hindered by the requisite physical structure. More specifically, porosity and the surface architecture of roughness in sol-gel-derived films contribute significantly to poor mechanical properties. These physical effects emphasize that collective structure and chemistry-based strategies are required. This challenge is not unique to superhydrophobics, and there are many principles that can be drawn upon to greatly improve performance. The delicate interplay between chemistry and physical structure has been highlighted through theory and characterization of porous and rough interfaces within and outside the framework of superhydrophobics. Insights can further be drawn from biology. Nature's capacity for self-repair remains extremely challenging to mimic in materials. However, nature does demonstrate strategies for structuring nano- and microbuilding blocks to achieve generally mutually exclusive properties. Difficulties with characterization and example mechanical characterization methods have also been emphasized.

  12. Mechanisms of polyphosphate glucokinase and polyphosphate kinase reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepin, C.A.; Robinson, N.A.; Wood, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    Polyphosphate glucokinase [poly(P)GK] catalyzes the following reaction: poly(P)/sub n/ + glucose → poly(P)/sub n-1/ + G-6-P. With long chain poly(P) [n=750 to 400] the mechanism appeared to be processive, in which there is phosphorylation of glucose without release of intermediate sizes of the poly(P) until the chain is about 100, thereafter there were intermediate sizes formed apparently by a non-processive process. Poly(P) kinase catalyzes the following reaction: ATP + poly(P)/sub n/ ↔ ADP + poly(P)/sub n + 1/. Using short chain 32 [P] poly(P) as a primer and non-radioactive ATP, long chain poly(P) is formed processively. The resulting chain has a short length labeled with 32 [P] contributed by the primer on one end and the remainder is made up of unlabeled (P) from the ATP. The authors have used this 32 [P] poly(P) as a substrate with poly(P)GK. If the mechanism of the poly(P)GK were initially processive, there would be a 50% chance the phosphate would be utilized from the unlabeled end and 50% of the 32 [P] would remain in the shortened chain. However, all the 32 [P] was lost when 20% of the poly(P) was converted to G-6-P. In contrast, with poly(P) kinase, the % of poly(P) utilized was equivalent to the % of 32 [P] converted to ATP, which is consistent with a strictly processive mechanism. Even though the mechanism of poly(P)GK appeared to be processive with long chains, the on and off rate of poly(P) from the enzyme is such that there is random removal of (P) from both ends of the poly(P) chain

  13. Electrode reaction mechanisms in molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selman, J.R.; Nishina, T.; Lin, Y.P.; Yeager, E.B.; Tryk, D.A.

    1989-07-01

    This report describes the results of a joint research effort at Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) to elucidate the reaction mechanism of oxygen reduction at the cathode of the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). This research project was aimed at developing novel experimental approaches to the chemistry and electrode kinetics of oxygen reduction under MCFC conditions, and improving our fundamental understanding of the reaction mechanism as it applies to the MCFC. IIT's contribution was focused on developing and using rotating electrodes with well-defined mass-transfer properties, to characterize the electrode kinetics of oxygen reduction in molten carbonate. CWRU's contribution was focused on developing and using micro-electrodes for the same purpose, and also on developing spectroscopic cells and carrying out various types of spectroscopic measurements to characterize the oxygen species in molten carbonate under MCFC conditions. This report is divided into two main parts. Part 1 provides the technical background of the questions concerning oxygen reduction in molten carbonate as they apply to the MCFC system. The methodological approach and the objectives of the research are also presented. The second part describes the development of the rotating electrodes, micro-electrodes and spectroscopic cells and the results of measurements, as well as the interpretation of the data. Conclusions of this project, including some recommendations for further research, are also given in this part. 111 refs., 69 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. The Reaction Mechanism of Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) is a nickel tetrahydrocorphinoid (coenzyme F430) containing enzyme involved in the biological synthesis and anaerobic oxidation of methane. MCR catalyzes the conversion of methyl-2-mercaptoethanesulfonate (methyl-SCoM) and N-7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine phosphate (CoB7SH) to CH4 and the mixed disulfide CoBS-SCoM. In this study, the reaction of MCR from Methanothermobacter marburgensis, with its native substrates was investigated using static binding, chemical quench, and stopped-flow techniques. Rate constants were measured for each step in this strictly ordered ternary complex catalytic mechanism. Surprisingly, in the absence of the other substrate, MCR can bind either substrate; however, only one binary complex (MCR·methyl-SCoM) is productive whereas the other (MCR·CoB7SH) is inhibitory. Moreover, the kinetic data demonstrate that binding of methyl-SCoM to the inhibitory MCR·CoB7SH complex is highly disfavored (Kd = 56 mm). However, binding of CoB7SH to the productive MCR·methyl-SCoM complex to form the active ternary complex (CoB7SH·MCR(NiI)·CH3SCoM) is highly favored (Kd = 79 μm). Only then can the chemical reaction occur (kobs = 20 s−1 at 25 °C), leading to rapid formation and dissociation of CH4 leaving the binary product complex (MCR(NiII)·CoB7S−·SCoM), which undergoes electron transfer to regenerate Ni(I) and the final product CoBS-SCoM. This first rapid kinetics study of MCR with its natural substrates describes how an enzyme can enforce a strictly ordered ternary complex mechanism and serves as a template for identification of the reaction intermediates. PMID:25691570

  15. Mechanism of chimera formation during the Multiple Displacement Amplification reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stockwell Timothy B

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Displacement Amplification (MDA is a method used for amplifying limiting DNA sources. The high molecular weight amplified DNA is ideal for DNA library construction. While this has enabled genomic sequencing from one or a few cells of unculturable microorganisms, the process is complicated by the tendency of MDA to generate chimeric DNA rearrangements in the amplified DNA. Determining the source of the DNA rearrangements would be an important step towards reducing or eliminating them. Results Here, we characterize the major types of chimeras formed by carrying out an MDA whole genome amplification from a single E. coli cell and sequencing by the 454 Life Sciences method. Analysis of 475 chimeras revealed the predominant reaction mechanisms that create the DNA rearrangements. The highly branched DNA synthesized in MDA can assume many alternative secondary structures. DNA strands extended on an initial template can be displaced becoming available to prime on a second template creating the chimeras. Evidence supports a model in which branch migration can displace 3'-ends freeing them to prime on the new templates. More than 85% of the resulting DNA rearrangements were inverted sequences with intervening deletions that the model predicts. Intramolecular rearrangements were favored, with displaced 3'-ends reannealing to single stranded 5'-strands contained within the same branched DNA molecule. In over 70% of the chimeric junctions, the 3' termini had initiated priming at complimentary sequences of 2–21 nucleotides (nts in the new templates. Conclusion Formation of chimeras is an important limitation to the MDA method, particularly for whole genome sequencing. Identification of the mechanism for chimera formation provides new insight into the MDA reaction and suggests methods to reduce chimeras. The 454 sequencing approach used here will provide a rapid method to assess the utility of reaction modifications.

  16. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  17. Self-activated, self-limiting reactions on Si surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Per; Hvam, Jeanette; Bahari, Ali

    , and the temperatures vary from room temperature to 10000C.The growth is in these cases self-limiting, with the optimal oxide thickness around 0.7-0.8 nm, at 5000C, and up to a few nm for nitride. The self-limiting oxide case was recently predicted by Alex Demkov in a structural optimization to minimise the total...... energy of an oxide system, which happened for an ordered structure, at a thickness of 0.7-0.8 nm. Thus this thin oxide structure has definite crystalline features. We have closely monitored the reaction kinetics with normal x-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopies, and also the structure, composition...... and electrical properties of the system, with surface sensitive, high resolution core level photoelectron spectroscopy. The growth kinetics is well fitted by a Hill function, with parameters, which give information about the character of the process. This function describes a self-activated process. Thus...

  18. Heavy ion reactions: an experimental vista. [Review, angular momentum, compound-nucleus decay, reaction mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokstad, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    Examples of recent experiments in the areas of fusion and deep-inelastic scattering are presented and discussed. Emphasis is placed on the importance of individual nucleons in the fusion process, the effects of high angular momentum, and the understanding of compound nuclear decay. Experiments on deep inelastic scattering are entering a new stage in which important parameters of the reaction mechanism are now open to investigation. Primarily through coincidence measurements, direct information on the angular momentum transferred in a collision and on the time scale of decay is being obtained.

  19. A quantum-mechanical test for a LiHCl semi-empirical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, L.; Garcia, E.; Laganà, A.

    1985-09-01

    A study of the Li+CIH collinear reaction has been carried out on a semi-empirical surface in order to assess the suitability of this potential energy surface for further quantum-mechanical calculations and to investigate the reactive dynamics of an asymmetric exchange of a heavy atom.

  20. Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Solvation Scheme for Computing Free Energies of Reactions at Metal-Water Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faheem, Muhammad; Heyden, Andreas

    2014-08-12

    We report the development of a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics free energy perturbation (QM/MM-FEP) method for modeling chemical reactions at metal-water interfaces. This novel solvation scheme combines planewave density function theory (DFT), periodic electrostatic embedded cluster method (PEECM) calculations using Gaussian-type orbitals, and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain a free energy description of a complex metal-water system. We derive a potential of mean force (PMF) of the reaction system within the QM/MM framework. A fixed-size, finite ensemble of MM conformations is used to permit precise evaluation of the PMF of QM coordinates and its gradient defined within this ensemble. Local conformations of adsorbed reaction moieties are optimized using sequential MD-sampling and QM-optimization steps. An approximate reaction coordinate is constructed using a number of interpolated states and the free energy difference between adjacent states is calculated using the QM/MM-FEP method. By avoiding on-the-fly QM calculations and by circumventing the challenges associated with statistical averaging during MD sampling, a computational speedup of multiple orders of magnitude is realized. The method is systematically validated against the results of ab initio QM calculations and demonstrated for C-C cleavage in double-dehydrogenated ethylene glycol on a Pt (111) model surface.

  1. Reaction dynamics of small molecules at metal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Samson, P A

    1999-01-01

    directed angular distributions suggest the influence of a trapping mechanism, recombining molecules scattering through a molecularly adsorbed state, with a transition state of large d sub N sub N responsible for the product vibrational excitation. Although N sub 2 dissociation on Fe(100) forms a simple overlayer structure, on Fe(110), molecular chemisorption does not occur at or above room temperature and the sticking is extremely small (approx 10 sup - sup 6 to 10 sup - sup 7). Activated nitrogen bombardment can be used to prepare a 'surface nitride' with a structure related to the geometry of bulk Fe sub 4 N. Scanning tunnelling microscopy yields atomic scale features that cannot be explained by simple overlayers. It is proposed that the uppermost iron layer reconstructs to generate quasi-octahedral sites between the top two layers, with sub-surface nitrogen in these sites forming a model for the 'surface nitride' structure. The dissociation-desorption dynamics of D sub 2 upon the Sn/Pt(111) surface alloy a...

  2. Operando Phonon Studies of the Protonation Mechanism in Highly Active Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Pentlandite Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Zendegani, Ali; Sinev, Ilya; Kunze, Sebastian; Mistry, Hemma; Jeon, Hyo Sang; Zhao, Jiyong; Hu, Michael Y; Alp, E Ercan; Piontek, Stefan; Smialkowski, Mathias; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Körmann, Fritz; Neugebauer, Jörg; Hickel, Tilmann; Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz

    2017-10-18

    Synthetic pentlandite (Fe 4.5 Ni 4.5 S 8 ) is a promising electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution, demonstrating high current densities, low overpotential, and remarkable stability in bulk form. The depletion of sulfur from the surface of this catalyst during the electrochemical reaction has been proposed to be beneficial for its catalytic performance, but the role of sulfur vacancies and the mechanism determining the reaction kinetics are still unknown. We have performed electrochemical operando studies of the vibrational dynamics of pentlandite under hydrogen evolution reaction conditions using 57 Fe nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. Comparing the measured Fe partial vibrational density of states with density functional theory calculations, we have demonstrated that hydrogen atoms preferentially occupy substitutional positions replacing pre-existing sulfur vacancies. Once all vacancies are filled, the protonation proceeds interstitially, which slows down the reaction. Our results highlight the beneficial role of sulfur vacancies in the electrocatalytic performance of pentlandite and give insights into the hydrogen adsorption mechanism during the reaction.

  3. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdW(surf) method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  4. Centripetal Acceleration Reaction: An Effective and Robust Mechanism for Flapping Flight in Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Hedrick, Tyson L; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-01-01

    Despite intense study by physicists and biologists, we do not fully understand the unsteady aerodynamics that relate insect wing morphology and kinematics to lift generation. Here, we formulate a force partitioning method (FPM) and implement it within a computational fluid dynamic model to provide an unambiguous and physically insightful division of aerodynamic force into components associated with wing kinematics, vorticity, and viscosity. Application of the FPM to hawkmoth and fruit fly flight shows that the leading-edge vortex is the dominant mechanism for lift generation for both these insects and contributes between 72-85% of the net lift. However, there is another, previously unidentified mechanism, the centripetal acceleration reaction, which generates up to 17% of the net lift. The centripetal acceleration reaction is similar to the classical inviscid added-mass in that it depends only on the kinematics (i.e. accelerations) of the body, but is different in that it requires the satisfaction of the no-slip condition, and a combination of tangential motion and rotation of the wing surface. Furthermore, the classical added-mass force is identically zero for cyclic motion but this is not true of the centripetal acceleration reaction. Furthermore, unlike the lift due to vorticity, centripetal acceleration reaction lift is insensitive to Reynolds number and to environmental flow perturbations, making it an important contributor to insect flight stability and miniaturization. This force mechanism also has broad implications for flow-induced deformation and vibration, underwater locomotion and flows involving bubbles and droplets.

  5. Centripetal Acceleration Reaction: An Effective and Robust Mechanism for Flapping Flight in Insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    Full Text Available Despite intense study by physicists and biologists, we do not fully understand the unsteady aerodynamics that relate insect wing morphology and kinematics to lift generation. Here, we formulate a force partitioning method (FPM and implement it within a computational fluid dynamic model to provide an unambiguous and physically insightful division of aerodynamic force into components associated with wing kinematics, vorticity, and viscosity. Application of the FPM to hawkmoth and fruit fly flight shows that the leading-edge vortex is the dominant mechanism for lift generation for both these insects and contributes between 72-85% of the net lift. However, there is another, previously unidentified mechanism, the centripetal acceleration reaction, which generates up to 17% of the net lift. The centripetal acceleration reaction is similar to the classical inviscid added-mass in that it depends only on the kinematics (i.e. accelerations of the body, but is different in that it requires the satisfaction of the no-slip condition, and a combination of tangential motion and rotation of the wing surface. Furthermore, the classical added-mass force is identically zero for cyclic motion but this is not true of the centripetal acceleration reaction. Furthermore, unlike the lift due to vorticity, centripetal acceleration reaction lift is insensitive to Reynolds number and to environmental flow perturbations, making it an important contributor to insect flight stability and miniaturization. This force mechanism also has broad implications for flow-induced deformation and vibration, underwater locomotion and flows involving bubbles and droplets.

  6. [Influencing factors and reaction mechanism of chloroacetic acid reduction by cast iron].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shun; Yang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Mao; Xie, Yue-Feng

    2014-03-01

    The chloroacetic acids are ubiquitous present as a class of trace chlorinated organic pollutants in surface and drinking water. Most of chloroacetic acids are known or suspected carcinogens and, when at high concentrations, are of great concern to human health. In order to economically remove chloroacetic acids, the degradation of chloroacetic acids by cast iron was investigated. Moreover, the effect of iron style, pretreatment process, shocking mode and dissolved oxygen on chloroacetic acids reduced by cast iron was discussed. Compared to iron source and acid pretreatment, mass transfer was more important to chloroacetic acid removal. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and monochloroacetic acid (MCAA) were the main products of anoxic and oxic degradation of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) by cast iron during the researched reaction time, respectively. With longtitudinal shock, the reaction kinetics of chloroaectic acid removal by cast iron conformed well to the pseudo first order reaction. The anoxic reaction constants of TCAA, DCAA and MCAA were 0.46 h(-1), 0.03 h(-1) and 0, and their oxic constants were 1.24 h(-1), 0.79 h(-1) and 0.28 h(-1), respectively. The removal mechanisms of chloroacetic acids were different under various oxygen concentrations, including sequential hydrogenolysis for anoxic reaction and sequential hydrogenolysis and direct transformation possible for oxic reaction, respectively.

  7. Reactions of substituted aromatic molecules on the silicon(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutler, Sarah Kathryn

    Organic molecules possess unique physical and electronic properties that could be incorporated as components in new technologies, such as molecular electronics, biosensors and DNA chip arrays. While the properties of individual molecules often can be measured and predicted, the technological value of organic molecules for these types of applications requires the ability to understand and manipulate how physical and electronic properties are affected by bonding to a surface. Consequently, integration of organic systems with existing silicon-based technology necessitates a thorough investigation of the interfacial chemistry involved in adsorption processes. On a molecular scale, the delocalized electrons of a conjugated system could be used to carry charge from one point to another. Therefore, the interaction of pi-conjugated molecules with the technologically important Si(001) surface is of particular interest. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy were used to investigate the bonding selectivity of several model aromatic molecules. Analysis of the infrared spectra of benzene, toluene and xylene suggest that these simple aromatic molecules covalently bond with the Si(001) surface, resulting in a loss of aromaticity. Studies of aromatic rings with other, more reactive substituent groups containing sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen, iodine or carbon atoms, indicate that the majority of these molecules preferentially adsorb to the surface through the substituent group. Careful consideration of the role played by both the electron-rich substituent groups and the silicon dimers in controlling selectivity leads to new insights regarding adsorption mechanisms. This knowledge, in turn, provides a method for selecting and designing molecules that will preferentially chemisorb on the Si(001) surface in a highly predictable manner. Preliminary studies correlating the chemical identity of the

  8. Optimized reaction mechanism rate rules for ignition of normal alkanes

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming

    2016-08-11

    The increasing demand for cleaner combustion and reduced greenhouse gas emissions motivates research on the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and their surrogates. Accurate detailed chemical kinetic models are an important prerequisite for high fidelity reacting flow simulations capable of improving combustor design and operation. The development of such models for many new fuel components and/or surrogate molecules is greatly facilitated by the application of reaction classes and rate rules. Accurate and versatile rate rules are desirable to improve the predictive accuracy of kinetic models. A major contribution in the literature is the recent work by Bugler et al. (2015), which has significantly improved rate rules and thermochemical parameters used in kinetic modeling of alkanes. In the present study, it is demonstrated that rate rules can be used and consistently optimized for a set of normal alkanes including n-heptane, n-octane, n-nonane, n-decane, and n-undecane, thereby improving the predictive accuracy for all the considered fuels. A Bayesian framework is applied in the calibration of the rate rules. The optimized rate rules are subsequently applied to generate a mechanism for n-dodecane, which was not part of the training set for the optimized rate rules. The developed mechanism shows accurate predictions compared with published well-validated mechanisms for a wide range of conditions.

  9. Tc1-mediated contact sensitivity reaction, its mechanism and regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Zemelka-Wiącek

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The contact hypersensitivity reaction (CHS to haptens is a classic example of cell-mediated immune response. In the effector phase, two stages can be distinguished: an early component, that appears only 2 hours after subsequent contact with the hapten, and the late component that develops approximately 24 hours later which is mediated by TCRαβ+ cells. The effector lymphocytes may be CD4+ T helper 1 (Th1 cells or CD8+ T cytotoxic 1 (Tc1 cells, which depends on the employed hapten and/or mice strain. NKT lymphocytes play the crucial role in the CHS initiation, by supporting B1 cells in the antigen-specific IgM antibodies production. The development of an early component is essential for the recruitment of T effector (Teff cells to the side of hapten deposition and for the complete expansion of inflammatory reaction. The CHS reaction is under T regulatory (Treg cells control, both in the induction phase as well as in the effector phase. A new view of a negative regulation of the Tc1 mediated CHS response is based on the suppression induced by epicutaneous (EC application of protein antigen. The DNP-BSA skin application, on a gauze patch, leads to a state of immunosuppression. This maneuver results in rising the population of Treg cells with TCRαβ+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ phenotype. The mechanism of suppression requires direct contact between Treg cells and Teff cells and the participation of CTLA-4 molecule is also necessary. The described method of evoking immune tolerance via EC immunization may contribute to elaborate a new method of allergic contact dermatitis therapy. This is because of its effectiveness, ease of induction and non-invasive protein antigen application.

  10. Revisiting the Kinetics and Mechanism of Bromate-Bromide Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Côrtes Carlos Eduardo S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The bromate-bromide reaction was investigated in an acidity range not studied yet. The reaction was followed at the Br2/Br3- isosbestic point (lambda = 446 nm. It was observed a first-order behavior for bromate and bromide ions and a second-order behavior for H+ ion that results in the rate law nu = k[BrO3-][Br- ][H+]². This rate law suggests a mechanism involving two successive protonation of bromate followed by the interaction of the intermediate species H2BrO3+ with bromide. These results disagree with the obtained by other authors who observed a second-order behavior for the bromide and first-order for H+, and have proposed intermediate species like H2Br2O3 and HBr2O3-. The second-order for [H+] observed in the range 0.005 <= [H+] <= 2.77 mol L-1 sets down that the pKa of bromic acid, HBrO3, must be lower than -0.5 (T = 25 °C, different from all other values for this pKa proposed in the literature.

  11. BlenX-based compositional modeling of complex reaction mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Zámborszky

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular interactions are wired in a fascinating way resulting in complex behavior of biological systems. Theoretical modeling provides a useful framework for understanding the dynamics and the function of such networks. The complexity of the biological networks calls for conceptual tools that manage the combinatorial explosion of the set of possible interactions. A suitable conceptual tool to attack complexity is compositionality, already successfully used in the process algebra field to model computer systems. We rely on the BlenX programming language, originated by the beta-binders process calculus, to specify and simulate high-level descriptions of biological circuits. The Gillespie's stochastic framework of BlenX requires the decomposition of phenomenological functions into basic elementary reactions. Systematic unpacking of complex reaction mechanisms into BlenX templates is shown in this study. The estimation/derivation of missing parameters and the challenges emerging from compositional model building in stochastic process algebras are discussed. A biological example on circadian clock is presented as a case study of BlenX compositionality.

  12. Reaction mechanisms and staggering in S+Ni collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agostino, M.; Bruno, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Morelli, L.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Barlini, S.; Cannata, F.; Casini, G.; Geraci, E.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V.L.; Marchi, T.; Moroni, A.; Ordine, A.; Raduta, Ad.R.

    2011-01-01

    The reactions 32 S+ 58 Ni and 32 S+ 64 Ni are studied at 14.5 A MeV. After a selection of the collision mechanism, we show that important even-odd effects are present in the isotopic fragment distributions when the excitation energy is small. Close to the multifragmentation threshold this staggering appears hidden by the rapid variation of the production yields with the fragment size. Once this effect is accounted for, the staggering appears to be a universal feature of fragment production, slightly enhanced when the emission source is neutron poor. A closer look at the behavior of the production yields as a function of the neutron excess N-Z, reveals that odd-even effects cannot be explained by pairing effects in the nuclear masses alone, but depend in a more complex way on the de-excitation chain.

  13. On the mechanism of effective chemical reactions with turbulent mixing of reactants and finite rate of molecular reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorotilin, V. P.

    2017-01-01

    A generalization of the theory of chemical transformation processes under turbulent mixing of reactants and arbitrary values of the rate of molecular reactions is presented that was previously developed for the variant of an instantaneous reaction [13]. The use of the features of instantaneous reactions when considering the general case, namely, the introduction of the concept of effective reaction for the reactant volumes and writing a closing conservation equation for these volumes, became possible due to the partition of the whole amount of reactants into “active” and “passive” classes; the reactants of the first class are not mixed and react by the mechanism of instantaneous reactions, while the reactants of the second class approach each other only through molecular diffusion, and therefore their contribution to the reaction process can be neglected. The physical mechanism of reaction for the limit regime of an ideal mixing reactor (IMR) is revealed and described. Although formally the reaction rate in this regime depends on the concentration of passive fractions of the reactants, according to the theory presented, the true (hidden) mechanism of the reaction is associated only with the reaction of the active fractions of the reactants with vanishingly small concentration in the volume of the reactor. It is shown that the rate constant of fast chemical reactions can be evaluated when the mixing intensity of reactants is much less than that needed to reach the mixing conditions in an IMR.

  14. Gas-phase thermolysis reaction of formaldehyde diperoxide. Kinetic study and theoretical mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, Nelly Lidia; Romero, Jorge Marcelo; Grand, André; Hernández-Laguna, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Kinetic and mechanism of the gas-phase thermolysis of tetroxane were determined. ► Gas chromatography and computational potential energy surfaces were performed. ► A mechanism in steps looked like the most probable mechanism. ► A spin–orbit coupling appeared at the singlet and triple diradical open structures. ► A non-adiabatic crossing from the singlet to the triplet state occurred. - Abstract: Gas-phase thermolysis reaction of formaldehyde diperoxide (1,2,4,5-tetroxane) was performed in an injection chamber of a gas chromatograph at a range of 463–503 K. The average Arrhenius activation energy and pre-exponential factor were 29.3 ± 0.8 kcal/mol and 5.2 × 10 13 s −1 , respectively. Critical points and reaction paths of the ground singlet and first triplet potential energy surfaces (PES) were calculated, using DFT method at BHANDHLYP/6-311+G ∗∗ level of the theory. Also, G3 calculations were performed on the reactant and products. Reaction by the ground-singlet and first-triplet states turned out to be endothermic and exothermic, respectively. The mechanism in three steps seemed to be the most probable one. An electronically non-adiabatic process appeared, in which a crossing, at an open diradical structure, from the singlet to the triplet state PES occurred, due to a spin–orbit coupling, yielding an exothermic reaction. Theoretical kinetic constant coming from the non- adiabatic transition from the singlet to the triplet state agrees with the experimental values.

  15. Gas-phase thermolysis reaction of formaldehyde diperoxide. Kinetic study and theoretical mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, Nelly Lidia [Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra, CSIC-Universidad de Granada, Av. Las Palmeras 4, 18100 Armilla, Granada (Spain); Area de Quimica Fisica Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura, UNNE, Avda. Libertad 5460, 3400 Corrientes (Argentina); Romero, Jorge Marcelo [Area de Quimica Fisica Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura, UNNE, Avda. Libertad 5460, 3400 Corrientes (Argentina); Grand, Andre [INAC, SCIB, Laboratoire ' Lesions des Acides Nucleiques' , UMR CEA-UJF E3, CEA-Grenoble, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Hernandez-Laguna, Alfonso, E-mail: ahlaguna@ugr.es [Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra, CSIC-Universidad de Granada, Av. Las Palmeras 4, 18100 Armilla, Granada (Spain)

    2012-01-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinetic and mechanism of the gas-phase thermolysis of tetroxane were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gas chromatography and computational potential energy surfaces were performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mechanism in steps looked like the most probable mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A spin-orbit coupling appeared at the singlet and triple diradical open structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A non-adiabatic crossing from the singlet to the triplet state occurred. - Abstract: Gas-phase thermolysis reaction of formaldehyde diperoxide (1,2,4,5-tetroxane) was performed in an injection chamber of a gas chromatograph at a range of 463-503 K. The average Arrhenius activation energy and pre-exponential factor were 29.3 {+-} 0.8 kcal/mol and 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} s{sup -1}, respectively. Critical points and reaction paths of the ground singlet and first triplet potential energy surfaces (PES) were calculated, using DFT method at BHANDHLYP/6-311+G{sup Asterisk-Operator Asterisk-Operator} level of the theory. Also, G3 calculations were performed on the reactant and products. Reaction by the ground-singlet and first-triplet states turned out to be endothermic and exothermic, respectively. The mechanism in three steps seemed to be the most probable one. An electronically non-adiabatic process appeared, in which a crossing, at an open diradical structure, from the singlet to the triplet state PES occurred, due to a spin-orbit coupling, yielding an exothermic reaction. Theoretical kinetic constant coming from the non- adiabatic transition from the singlet to the triplet state agrees with the experimental values.

  16. The synthesis of PdPt/carbon paper via surface limited redox replacement reactions for oxygen reduction reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motsoeneng, RG

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface-limited redox replacement reactions using the electrochemical atomic layer deposition (EC-ALD) technique were used to synthesize PdPt bimetallic electrocatalysts on carbon paper substrate. Electrocatalysts having different Pd:Pt ratio were...

  17. Rationalizing the mechanism of HMDS degradation in air and effective control of the reaction byproducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Kevin; Dallas, Andrew J.; Weineck, Gerald

    2008-03-01

    The concern over molecular contamination on the surfaces of optics continues to grow. Most recently, this concern has focused on siloxane contamination resulting from hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) which is commonly used as a wafer treatment to improve photoresist adhesion onto wafers. From this process, HMDS vapor can be found within FABs and process tools where it has been linked to issues related to lens hazing. This type of surface contamination is significantly detrimental to the imaging process and is generally corrected by extensive surface cleaning or even lens replacement. Additionally, this type of repair also requires adjustment of the optical axis, thereby contributing to an extended downtime. HMDS is known to be very sensitive to the presence of water and is therefore believed to degrade in humid airstreams. This research focuses on rationalizing the reaction mechanisms of HMDS in dry and humid airstreams and in the presence of several adsorbent surfaces. It is shown that HMDS hydrolyzes in humid air to trimethylsilanol (TMS) and ammonia (NH 3). Furthermore, it is shown that TMS can dimerize in air, or on specific types of adsorption media, to form hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO). Additionally, we report on the relative impact of these reaction mechanisms on the removal of both HMDS and its hydrolysis products (TMS, HMDSO and NH 3).

  18. Chemical Recognition of Active Oxygen Species on the Surface of Oxygen Evolution Reaction Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunzhen; Fontaine, Olivier; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Grimaud, Alexis

    2017-07-17

    Owing to the transient nature of the intermediates formed during the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on the surface of transition metal oxides, their nature remains largely elusive by the means of simple techniques. The use of chemical probes is proposed, which, owing to their specific affinities towards different oxygen species, unravel the role played by these species on the OER mechanism. For that, tetraalkylammonium (TAA) cations, previously known for their surfactant properties, are introduced, which interact with the active oxygen sites and modify the hydrogen bond network on the surface of OER catalysts. Combining chemical probes with isotopic and pH-dependent measurements, it is further demonstrated that the introduction of iron into amorphous Ni oxyhydroxide films used as model catalysts deeply modifies the proton exchange properties, and therefore the OER mechanism and activity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Product distributions, rate constants, and mechanisms of LiH +H reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defazio, Paolo; Petrongolo, Carlo; Gamallo, Pablo; González, Miguel

    2005-06-01

    We present a quantum-mechanical investigation of the LiH depletion reaction LiH +H→Li+H2 and of the H exchange reaction LiH +H'→LiH'+H. We report product distributions, rate constant, and mechanism of the former, and rate constant and mechanism of the latter reaction. We use the potential-energy surface by Dunne et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 336, 1 (2001)], the real-wave-packet method by Gray and Balint-Kurti [J. Chem. Phys. 108, 950 (1998)], and the J-shifting approximation. The H21 nuclear-spin statistics and progressions of vib-rotational states (v',j') rule both initial-state-resolved and thermal product distributions, which have saw-toothed shapes with odd j' preferred with respect to even j'. At high collision energies and temperatures, we obtain a regular 3-to-1 intensity alternation of rotational states. At low collision energies and temperatures, the degeneracy and density of many H2 levels can, however, give more irregular distributions. During the collision, the energy flows from the reactant translational mode to the product vibration and recoil ones. The rate constants of both reactions are not Arrhenius type because the reactions are barrier-less. The low-temperature, LiH depletion rate constant is larger than the H exchange one, whereas the contrary holds at high temperature. The real-time mechanisms show the nuclear rearrangements of the nonreactive channel and of the reactive ones, and point out that the LiH depletion is preferred over the H exchange at short times. This confirms the rate-constant results.

  20. Modifing the Surface Layers of Mechanical Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Slanec

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the creation of thin surface layers prepared by the Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition Method (PACVD. Polished sample surfaces made of tool steel were used. An investigation of the dependence of layer thickness on process duration was carried out. The structure of the original surface and the structure of the coated surface were evaluated and compared. The microhardness of the surface areas was also measured.

  1. Pd-catalyzed coupling reaction on the organic monolayer: Sonogashira reaction on the silicon (1 1 1) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Mengnan; Zhang Yuan; He Jinmei; Cao Xiaoping; Zhang Junyan

    2008-01-01

    Iodophenyl-terminated organic monolayers were prepared by thermally induced hydrosilylation on hydrogen-terminated silicon (1 1 1) surfaces. The films were characterized by ellipsometry, contact-angle goniometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). To modify the surface chemistry and the structure of the monolayers, the Sonogashira coupling reaction was performed on the as-prepared monolayers. The iodophenyl groups on the film surfaces reacted with 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene or the 1-chloro-4-ethynylbenzene under the standard Sonogashira reaction conditions for attaching conjugated molecules via the formation of C-C bonds. It is expected that this surface coupling reaction will present a new method to modify the surface chemistry and the structure of monolayers

  2. Surface mechanics design by cavitation peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Soyama

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Although impacts at cavitation bubble collapses cause severe damage in hydraulic machineries, the cavitation impacts can be utilised for surface mechanics design such as introduction of compressive residual stress and/or improvement of fatigue strength. The peening method using the cavitation impacts was called as cavitation peening. In order to reveal the peening intensity of hydrodynamic cavitation and laser cavitation, the arc height of Almen strip and duralumin plate were measured. In the case of hydrodynamic cavitation, cavitation was generated by injecting a high speed water jet into water with a pressurised chamber and an open chamber, and the cavitating jet in air was also examined. The laser cavitation was produced by a pulse laser, and a high speed observation using a high speed video camera was carried out to clarify laser abrasion and laser cavitation with detecting noise by a hydrophone. It was concluded that the peening intensity by using the cavitating jet in water with the pressurized chamber was most aggressive, and the impact induced by the laser cavitation was larger than that of the laser abrasion at the present condition.

  3. Geometry of surfaces a practical guide for mechanical engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Radzevich, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    Presents an in-depth analysis of geometry of part surfaces and provides the tools for solving complex engineering problems Geometry of Surfaces: A Practical Guide for Mechanical Engineers is a comprehensive guide to applied geometry of surfaces with focus on practical applications in various areas of mechanical engineering. The book is divided into three parts on Part Surfaces, Geometry of Contact of Part Surfaces and Mapping of the Contacting Part Surfaces. Geometry of Surfaces: A Practical Guide for Mechanical Engineers combines differential geometry and gearing theory and presents new developments in the elementary theory of enveloping surfaces. Written by a leading expert of the field, this book also provides the reader with the tools for solving complex engineering problems in the field of mechanical engineering. Presents an in-depth analysis of geometry of part surfaces Provides tools for solving complex engineering problems in the field of mechanical engineering Combines differential geometry an...

  4. Mechanochemistry at Solid Surfaces: Polymerization of Adsorbed Molecules by Mechanical Shear at Tribological Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Jejoon; He, Xin; Martini, Ashlie; Kim, Seong H

    2017-01-25

    Polymerization of allyl alcohol adsorbed and sheared at a silicon oxide interface is studied using tribo-tests in vapor phase lubrication conditions and reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The load dependences of product formation obtained from experiments and simulations were consistent, indicating that the atomic-scale processes observable in the simulations were relevant to the experiments. Analysis of the experimental results in the context of mechanically assisted thermal reaction theory, combined with the atomistic details available from the simulations, suggested that the association reaction pathway of allyl alcohol molecules induced by mechanical shear is quite different from chemically induced polymerization reactions. Findings suggested that some degree of distortion of the molecule from its equilibrium state is necessary for mechanically induced chemical reactions to occur and such a distortion occurs during mechanical shear when molecules are covalently anchored to one of the sliding surfaces.

  5. Adsorption and reaction of CO and H2O on WC(0001) surface: A first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yu-Jhe; Wu, Shiuan-Yau; Chen, Hsin-Tsung

    2018-01-01

    We have performed a spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT) study for understanding the detailed reaction mechanism of CO and H2O on WC (0001) surface. The adsorption properties and vibrational frequencies of H2O, OH, O, H, CO and CO2 on the WC (0001) surface were illustrated. These results are well in consistent with the experimental observations studied by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Based on the adsorption results, potential energy profiles of H2O and OH dehydrogenation and HCO, COH, COOH, and CO2 formation on the WC (0001) surface were predicted. The calculation results demonstrated that the WC (0001) surface as Fe (110) surface exhibits significantly reaction activity toward the dehydrogenation of H2O and OH but less activity toward the formation of HCO, COH, COOH and CO2 compared to the Cu (111) and Pt (111) surfaces.

  6. Mechanisms of neptunium redox reactions in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sayandev; Bryan, Samuel A.; Casella, Amanda J.; Peterson, James M.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2017-01-01

    First transuranium element neptunium (Np) exhibits complicated behavior in acidic solutions because it can adopt wide range of oxidation states typically from +3 to +6 and coordinate large variety of ligands. In particular, accurate determination of Np redox potentials in nitric acid solutions is challenging due to overlapping chemical and electrochemical reactions leading to significant experimental uncertainties. Furthermore, over past decades spectrophotometry has been extensively applied to identify and characterize Np solution species in different oxidation states. However, relevant spectral database of Np in nitric acid solutions that can serve for the reference purposes has yet to be established due to the experimental difficulty to isolate and stabilize Np species in pure oxidation states without compromising solution optical properties. This work demonstrates that combination of voltammetry and controlled-potential in situ thin-layer spectropotentiometry overcomes these challenges so that Np species in pure +3, +4, +5, or +6 oxidation states were electrochemically generated in the systematically varied 0.1 – 5 M nitric acid solutions, and corresponding vis-NIR spectral signatures were obtained. In situ optical monitoring of the interconversion between adjacent Np oxidation states resulted in elucidation of the mechanisms of the involved redox reactions, in-depth understanding of the relative stability of the Np oxidation states, and allowed benchmarking of the redox potentials of the NpO22+/NpO2+, NpO2+/Np4+ and Np4+/Np3+ couples. Notably, the NpO2+/Np4+ couple was distinguished from the proximal Np4+/Np3+ process overcoming previous concerns and challenges encountered in accurate determination of the respective potentials.

  7. DFT study of the 1-octene metathesis reaction mechanism with WCl6/C catalytic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Dilek; Düz, Bülent; Sevin, Fatma

    2008-05-22

    A catalytic system consisting of tungsten carbene generated from WCl(6) and an atomic carbon is investigated theoretically for the metathesis of 1-octene at B3LYP/extended LANL2DZ level of DFT. The ground-state geometries and charge distributions of the structures belonging to the reaction mechanism are located. Energetics for the complete set of reactions, involving the formation of the tungsten carbene precatalyst, Cl(4)WCCl(2), the formation of tungsten methylidene and tungsten heptylidene with this precatalyst, and finally productive and degenerative metathesis steps with these alkylidene species are calculated in terms of total electronic energy and thermal energies. The free-energy (ΔG(298)) surfaces of the structures involved in the related reactions are constructed. In addition, solvent effects on the single point energies of the structures are investigated for two different solvents, namely, cyclohexane and chloroform. The results indicate that the formation of the catalytically active heptylidene is energetically favored in comparison to the formation of methylidene, while the degenerative and productive metathesis steps are competitive. In the catalytic cycle, the formation of ethylene is exothermic, while the formation of 7-tetradecene is endothermic. As expected, solvent effects on the metathesis reactions are minor and solvation does not cause any change in the directions of the overall metathesis reactions.

  8. Harnessing surface-bound enzymatic reactions to organize microcapsules in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Oleg E; Shum, Henry; Sen, Ayusman; Balazs, Anna C

    2016-03-01

    By developing new computational models, we examine how enzymatic reactions on an underlying surface can be harnessed to direct the motion and organization of reagent-laden microcapsules in a fluid-filled microchannel. In the presence of appropriate reagents, surface-bound enzymes can act as pumps, which drive large-scale fluid flows. When the reagents diffuse through the capsules' porous shells, they can react with enzymatic sites on the bottom surface. The ensuing reaction generates fluid density variations, which result in fluid flows. These flows carry the suspended microcapsules and drive them to aggregate into "colonies" on and near the enzyme-covered sites. This aggregation continues until the reagent has been depleted and the convection stops. We show that the shape of the assembled colonies can be tailored by patterning the distribution of enzymes on the surface. This fundamental physicochemical mechanism could have played a role in the self-organization of early biological cells (protocells) and can be used to regulate the autonomous motion and targeted delivery of microcarriers in microfluidic devices.

  9. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Ligand Exchange Reaction Between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    Visible spectrophotometry is used to study the kinetics of ligand exchange in the system Ni(salpn)/H2salen with or without triethylamine ... rate of the ligand exchange reaction was accelerated by adding NEt3 to the reaction mixture. However, the ..... 0.05 M. The increase of the reaction rate at low [H2O] could be due to the ...

  10. Thermal analysis experiment for elucidating sodium-water chemical reaction mechanism in steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of elucidating the mechanism of the sodium-water surface reaction in a steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactors, kinetic study of the sodium (Na)-sodium hydroxide (NaOH) reaction has been carried out by using Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) technique. The parameters, including melting points of Na and NaOH, phase transition temperature of NaOH, Na-NaOH reaction temperature, and decomposition temperature of sodium hydride (NaH) have been identified from DTA curves. Based on the measured reaction temperature, rate constant of sodium monoxide (Na 2 O) generation was obtained. Thermal analysis results indicated that Na 2 O generation at the secondary overall reaction should be considered during the sodium-water reaction. (author)

  11. Palladium-atom catalyzed formic acid decomposition and the switch of reaction mechanism with temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Nan; Li, Zhen Hua

    2016-04-21

    Formic acid decomposition (FAD) reaction has been an innovative way for hydrogen energy. Noble metal catalysts, especially palladium-containing nanoparticles, supported or unsupported, perform well in this reaction. Herein, we considered the simplest model, wherein one Pd atom is used as the FAD catalyst. With high-level theoretical calculations of CCSD(T)/CBS quality, we investigated all possible FAD pathways. The results show that FAD catalyzed by one Pd atom follows a different mechanism compared with that catalyzed by surfaces or larger clusters. At the initial stage of the reaction, FAD follows a dehydration route and is quickly poisoned by CO due to the formation of very stable PdCO. PdCO then becomes the actual catalyst for FAD at temperatures approximately below 1050 K. Beyond 1050 K, there is a switch of catalyst from PdCO to Pd atom. The results also show that dehydration is always favoured over dehydrogenation on either the Pd-atom or PdCO catalyst. On the Pd-atom catalyst, neither dehydrogenation nor dehydration follows the formate mechanism. In contrast, on the PdCO catalyst, dehydrogenation follows the formate mechanism, whereas dehydration does not. We also systematically investigated the performance of 24 density functional theory methods. We found that the performance of the double hybrid mPW2PLYP functional is the best, followed by the B3LYP, B3PW91, N12SX, M11, and B2PLYP functionals.

  12. Kinetics and Mechanism of Iodide Oxidation by Iron(III): A Clock Reaction Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jurica; Tomisic, Vladislav; Vrkljan, Petar B. A.

    2008-01-01

    A simple method for studying the kinetics of a chemical reaction is described and the significance of reaction orders in deducing reaction mechanisms is demonstrated. In this student laboratory experiment, oxidation of iodide by iron(III) ions in an acidic medium is transformed into a clock reaction. By means of the initial rates method, it is…

  13. A coupled mechanical and chemical damage model for concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pignatelli, Rossella, E-mail: rossellapignatelli@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lombardi Ingegneria S.r.l., Via Giotto 36, 20145 Milano (Italy); Comi, Claudia, E-mail: comi@stru.polimi.it [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Monteiro, Paulo J.M., E-mail: monteiro@ce.berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    To model the complex degradation phenomena occurring in concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR), we formulate a poro-mechanical model with two isotropic internal variables: the chemical and the mechanical damage. The chemical damage, related to the evolution of the reaction, is caused by the pressure generated by the expanding ASR gel on the solid concrete skeleton. The mechanical damage describes the strength and stiffness degradation induced by the external loads. As suggested by experimental results, degradation due to ASR is considered to be localized around reactive sites. The effect of the degree of saturation and of the temperature on the reaction development is also modeled. The chemical damage evolution is calibrated using the value of the gel pressure estimated by applying the electrical diffuse double-layer theory to experimental values of the surface charge density in ASR gel specimens reported in the literature. The chemo-damage model is first validated by simulating expansion tests on reactive specimens and beams; the coupled chemo-mechanical damage model is then employed to simulate compression and flexure tests results also taken from the literature. -- Highlights: •Concrete degradation due to ASR in variable environmental conditions is modeled. •Two isotropic internal variables – chemical and mechanical damage – are introduced. •The value of the swelling pressure is estimated by the diffuse double layer theory. •A simplified scheme is proposed to relate macro- and microscopic properties. •The chemo-mechanical damage model is validated by simulating tests in literature.

  14. A coupled mechanical and chemical damage model for concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignatelli, Rossella; Comi, Claudia; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2013-01-01

    To model the complex degradation phenomena occurring in concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR), we formulate a poro-mechanical model with two isotropic internal variables: the chemical and the mechanical damage. The chemical damage, related to the evolution of the reaction, is caused by the pressure generated by the expanding ASR gel on the solid concrete skeleton. The mechanical damage describes the strength and stiffness degradation induced by the external loads. As suggested by experimental results, degradation due to ASR is considered to be localized around reactive sites. The effect of the degree of saturation and of the temperature on the reaction development is also modeled. The chemical damage evolution is calibrated using the value of the gel pressure estimated by applying the electrical diffuse double-layer theory to experimental values of the surface charge density in ASR gel specimens reported in the literature. The chemo-damage model is first validated by simulating expansion tests on reactive specimens and beams; the coupled chemo-mechanical damage model is then employed to simulate compression and flexure tests results also taken from the literature. -- Highlights: •Concrete degradation due to ASR in variable environmental conditions is modeled. •Two isotropic internal variables – chemical and mechanical damage – are introduced. •The value of the swelling pressure is estimated by the diffuse double layer theory. •A simplified scheme is proposed to relate macro- and microscopic properties. •The chemo-mechanical damage model is validated by simulating tests in literature

  15. Photogenerated carrier-induced reactions on uhv semiconductor surfaces. Technical progress report, December 15, 1989--December 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osgood, R.M. Jr.

    1992-05-28

    The objective for this experimental work was to examine the reaction mechanisms, half-collision dynamics, and other optically induced chemical effects, that are operable on a well characterized single-crystal semiconductor surface. Of particular interest were reactions induced by charge transfer from the semiconductor surface including hot carrier and thermalized carrier processes. The primary technique to measure the desorbed fragment translational energies was time-of-flight mass-spectroscopy, used in conjunction with a pulsed tunable laser source. The work was carried out in ultrahigh vacuum, thus other surface spectroscopies such as temperature-programmed desorption, (TPD), (LEED), etc. were used as needed. In the project, the photoreactions of several halogen-containing molecules on GaAs(110) surfaces have been investigated. The studies have made the first observations of several new photochemical processes on uhv prepared surfaces including intermolecular charge transfer; desorption by thermal-carrier-induced reactions (including the measurement of coverage-dependent changes in the translational energies of the desorbed products); interferometric oscillation of photoinduced reactions; and self-quenching of thermal carrier reactions on surfaces.

  16. Interfacial Cu+ promoted surface reactivity: Carbon monoxide oxidation reaction over polycrystalline copper-titania catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Pappoe, Naa Adokaley; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Luo, Si; Li, Yuanyuan; Xu, Wenqian; Liu, Zongyuan; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Heckler, Ilana; Stacchiola, Dario; Rodriguez, José A.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the catalytic carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation (CO + 0.5O2 → CO2) reaction using a powder catalyst composed of both copper (5 wt.% loading) and titania (CuOx-TiO2). Our study was focused on revealing the role of Cu, and the interaction between Cu and TiO2, by systematic comparison between two nanocatalysts, CuOx-TiO2 and pure CuOx. We interrogated these catalysts under in situ conditions using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to probe the structure and electronic properties of the catalyst at all stages of the reaction and simultaneously probe the surface states or intermediates of this reaction. With the aid of several ex situ characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the local catalyst morphology and structure were also studied. Our results show that a CuOx-TiO2 system is more active than bulk CuOx for the CO oxidation reaction due to its lower onset temperature and better stability at higher temperatures. Our results also suggest that surface Cu+ species observed in the CuOx-TiO2 interface are likely to be a key player in the CO oxidation mechanism, while implicating that the stabilization of this species is probably associated with the oxide-oxide interface. Both in situ DRIFTS and XAFS measurements reveal that there is likely to be a Cu(Ti)-O mixed oxide at this interface. We discuss the nature of this Cu(Ti)-O interface and interpret its role on the CO oxidation reaction.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen evolution reaction on cobalt silicides in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kichigin, V.I.; Shein, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Cathodic polarisation curves and impedance spectra for cobalt silicides Co 2 Si and CoSi 2 in 0.5–2 M KOH at ambient temperature were obtained. It was shown that electrocatalytic activity of both silicides in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is higher than that of cobalt. The dependences of equivalent circuit elements on the electrode potential were analysed. The conclusion was made that the atomic hydrogen adsorption on the surface of cobalt silicides is described by the Langmuir isotherm, and hydrogen evolution proceeds through the Volmer–Heyrovsky mechanism (at α 1 ≠ α 2 for Co 2 Si and α 1 = α 2 for CoSi 2 ; α 1 and α 2 are the transfer coefficients for the Volmer and Heyrovsky steps respectively). The Heyrovsky reaction is probably the rate-determining step. The values of the kinetic parameters of HER on Co 2 Si and CoSi 2 in 1 M KOH were estimated

  18. Probing reaction mechanisms with time resolved infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jina, Omar S.

    2002-01-01

    Chapter 1 Introduction. A brief introduction to the study of reactive intermediates at both low and ambient temperatures is given. This includes a description of the techniques commonly employed to probe these intermediates, with a particular emphasis on TRIR spectroscopy. Many reactions investigated in this thesis have been performed in supercritical fluids, allowing the opportunity to study reactive species in solution at room temperature. Therefore, a brief explanation of supercritical fluids has been given. The experimental methods used within this thesis are also briefly described. Chapter 2 The Characterisation of Organometallic Noble Gas Complexes. A review of the previous studies concerning transition metal noble gas complexes is presented. A combination of TRIR spectroscopy and supercritical noble gas solvents has allowed the characterisation of the complexes, Cp'Rh(CO)(L) (Cp' = Cp or Cp*; L = Xe or Kr) in solution at room temperature. The decay rates of these complexes have been measured and compared with similar noble gas complexes. The activation parameters have been calculated and provide an insight into the reaction mechanism. These suggest that the reaction of the xenon complexes with CO proceeds with associative behaviour. Chapter 3 The Formation of Transition Metal Alkane Complexes. The co-ordination of an alkane to a transition metal complex is thought to be the key intermediate in the C-H activation reaction. This chapter introduces previous work reported on alkane complexes, including detailed investigations into the factors governing the reactivity of these complexes. Using supercritical fluids, the complexes, CpRe(CO) 2 (alkane) (alkane = CH 4 or C 2 H 6 ) have been characterised in solution at room temperature. The interaction of cyclopropane with the CpRe(CO) 2 fragment is investigated, where C-C bond cleavage is thought to occur. Chapter 4 An Investigation into the C-H Activation of Methane and Ethane in Solution at Room Temperature. The C

  19. Surface Chemistry Dependence of Mechanochemical Reaction of Adsorbed Molecules-An Experimental Study on Tribopolymerization of α-Pinene on Metal, Metal Oxide, and Carbon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Kim, Seong H

    2018-02-20

    Mechanochemical reactions between adsorbate molecules sheared at tribological interfaces can induce association of adsorbed molecules, forming oligomeric and polymeric products often called tribopolymers). This study revealed the role or effect of surface chemistry of the solid substrate in mechanochemical polymerization reactions. As a model reactant, α-pinene was chosen because it was known to readily form tribopolymers at the sliding interface of stainless steel under vapor-phase lubrication conditions. Eight different substrate materials were tested-palladium, nickel, copper, stainless steel, gold, silicon oxide, aluminum oxide, and diamond-like carbon (DLC). All metal substrates and DLC were initially covered with surface oxide species formed naturally in air or during the oxidative sample cleaning. It was found that the tribopolymerization yield of α-pinene is much higher on the substrates that can chemisorb α-pinene, compared to the ones on which only physisorption occurs. From the load dependence of the tribopolymerization yield, it was found that the surfaces capable of chemisorption give a smaller critical activation volume for the mechanochemical reaction, compared to the ones capable of physisorption only. On the basis of these observations and infrared spectroscopy analyses of the adsorbed molecules and the produced polymers, it was concluded that the mechanochemical reaction mechanisms might be different between chemically reactive and inert surfaces and that the chemical reactivity of the substrate surface greatly influences the tribochemical polymerization reactions of adsorbed molecules.

  20. The Morita-Baylis-Hillman Reaction: Insights into Asymmetry and Reaction Mechanisms by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Carrasco-Sanchez

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This short review presents new insights on the mechanism and online monitoring using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI–MS/MS of Morita–Baylis–Hillman (MBH reactions. MBH reactions are versatile carbon-carbon organocatalyzed bond forming reactions, making them environmentally friendly due to general organocatalysts employed. The organocatalyst behavior, which controls the transition state and thus the enantioselectivities in the obtained products, is very important in the performance of asymmetric MBH transformations. Some recent techniques and advances in asymmetric transformations are reviwed, as well as online reaction monitoring and analysis of the reaction intermediates. The mechanism accepted nowadays is also review through the insights gained from the use of ESI–MS/MS techniques.

  1. Mechanisms in adverse reactions to food. The nose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, A

    1995-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common symptom in food allergic patients, but rhinitis is rarely the only symptom. Rhinitis due to adverse reactions to preservatives and colorants is very rare. In anaphylactic systemic reactions to foods the rhinitis symptoms are caused by inflammatory mediators transported...... by the circulation. In non-anaphylactic reactions, the nasal inflammation and symptoms are probably induced by interaction with food allergens transported to the nasal mucosa via the blood circulation....

  2. Reaction of ethane with deuterium over platinum(111) single-crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaera, F.; Somorhai, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Deuterium exchange and hydrogenolysis of ethane were studied over (111) platinum surfaces under atmospheric pressures and a temperature range of 475-625 K. Activation energies of 19 kcal/mol for exchange and 34 kcal/mol for hydrogenolysis were obtained. The exchange reaction rates displayed kinetic orders with respect to deuterium and ethane partial pressures of -0.55 and 1.2, respectively. The exchange production distribution was U-shaped, peaking at one and six deuterium atoms per ethane molecule, similar to results reported for other forms of platinum, e.g., supported, films, and foils. The pressure of ethylidyne moieties on the surface was inferred from low-energy electron diffraction and thermal desorption spectroscopy. A mechanism is proposed to explain the experimental results, in which ethylidyne constitutes an intermediate in one of two competitive pathways. 31 references, 9 figures, 3 tables

  3. Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides with hydrogen chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Jonathan D; Njegic, Bosiljka; Chang, Wayne L; Gordon, Mark S; Dabdub, Donald; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2009-08-18

    Gaseous HCl generated from a variety of sources is ubiquitous in both outdoor and indoor air. Oxides of nitrogen (NO(y)) are also globally distributed, because NO formed in combustion processes is oxidized to NO(2), HNO(3), N(2)O(5) and a variety of other nitrogen oxides during transport. Deposition of HCl and NO(y) onto surfaces is commonly regarded as providing permanent removal mechanisms. However, we show here a new surface-mediated coupling of nitrogen oxide and halogen activation cycles in which uptake of gaseous NO(2) or N(2)O(5) on solid substrates generates adsorbed intermediates that react with HCl to generate gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) and nitryl chloride (ClNO(2)), respectively. These are potentially harmful gases that photolyze to form highly reactive chlorine atoms. The reactions are shown both experimentally and theoretically to be enhanced by water, a surprising result given the availability of competing hydrolysis reaction pathways. Airshed modeling incorporating HCl generated from sea salt shows that in coastal urban regions, this heterogeneous chemistry increases surface-level ozone, a criteria air pollutant, greenhouse gas and source of atmospheric oxidants. In addition, it may contribute to recently measured high levels of ClNO(2) in the polluted coastal marine boundary layer. This work also suggests the potential for chlorine atom chemistry to occur indoors where significant concentrations of oxides of nitrogen and HCl coexist.

  4. Quantum mechanical determinations of reaction mechanisms, acid base, and redox properties of nitrogen oxides and their donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Andrew S; Fukuto, Jon M; Houk, K N

    2005-01-01

    This chapter reviews computational methods based on quantum mechanics and commonly used commercial programs for the exploration of chemical phenomena, particularly in the field of nitrogen oxides. Examples from the literature are then used to demonstrate the application of these methods to the chemistry and biochemistry of various nitrogen oxides. These examples include determining reaction mechanisms using computed reaction energies, predicting rates of reactions using transition state theory, and determining chemical properties such as hydration equilibria, pKa's, and reduction potentials.

  5. Mathematically Reduced Chemical Reaction Mechanism Using Neural Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson Butuk

    2006-09-21

    This is an annual technical report for the work done over the last year (period ending 9/30/2005) on the project titled ''Mathematically Reduced Chemical Reaction Mechanism Using Neural Networks''. The aim of the project is to develop an efficient chemistry model for combustion simulations. The reduced chemistry model will be developed mathematically without the need of having extensive knowledge of the chemistry involved. To aid in the development of the model, Neural Networks (NN) will be used via a new network topology know as Non-linear Principal Components Analysis (NPCA). We report on the significant development made in developing a truly meshfree computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow solver to be coupled to NPCA. First, the procedure of obtaining nearly analytic accurate first order derivatives using the complex step method (CSM) is extended to include computation of accurate meshfree second order derivatives via a theorem described in this report. Next, boosted generalized regression neural network (BGRNN), described in our previous report is combined with CSM and used to obtain complete solution of a hard to solve wave dominated sample second order partial differential equation (PDE): the cubic Schrodinger equation. The resulting algorithm is a significant improvement of the meshfree technique of smooth particle hydrodynamics method (SPH). It is suggested that the demonstrated meshfree technique be termed boosted smooth particle hydrodynamics method (BSPH). Some of the advantages of BSPH over other meshfree methods include; it is of higher order accuracy than SPH; compared to other meshfree methods, it is completely meshfree and does not require any background meshes; It does not involve any construction of shape function with their associated solution of possibly ill conditioned matrix equations; compared to some SPH techniques, no equation for the smoothing parameter is required; finally it is easy to program.

  6. Spectroscopic studies of the cytochrome P450 reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Piotr J; Denisov, Ilia G

    2018-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are thiolate heme proteins that can, often under physiological conditions, catalyze many distinct oxidative transformations on a wide variety of molecules, including relatively simple alkanes or fatty acids, as well as more complex compounds such as steroids and exogenous pollutants. They perform such impressive chemistry utilizing a sophisticated catalytic cycle that involves a series of consecutive chemical transformations of heme prosthetic group. Each of these steps provides a unique spectral signature that reflects changes in oxidation or spin states, deformation of the porphyrin ring or alteration of dioxygen moieties. For a long time, the focus of cytochrome P450 research was to understand the underlying reaction mechanism of each enzymatic step, with the biggest challenge being identification and characterization of the powerful oxidizing intermediates. Spectroscopic methods, such as electronic absorption (UV-Vis), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR), Mössbauer, X-ray absorption (XAS), and resonance Raman (rR), have been useful tools in providing multifaceted and detailed mechanistic insights into the biophysics and biochemistry of these fascinating enzymes. The combination of spectroscopic techniques with novel approaches, such as cryoreduction and Nanodisc technology, allowed for generation, trapping and characterizing long sought transient intermediates, a task that has been difficult to achieve using other methods. Results obtained from the UV-Vis, rR and EPR spectroscopies are the main focus of this review, while the remaining spectroscopic techniques are briefly summarized. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cytochrome P450 biodiversity and biotechnology, edited by Erika Plettner, Gianfranco Gilardi, Luet Wong, Vlada Urlacher, Jared Goldstone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantitative surface analysis using deuteron-induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afarideh, Hossein

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique consists of looking at the energies of the reaction products which uniquely define the particular elements present in the sample and it analysis the yield/energy distribution to reveal depth profiles. A summary of the basic features of the nuclear reaction analysis technique is given, in particular emphasis is placed on quantitative light element determination using (d,p) and (d,alpha) reactions. The experimental apparatus is also described. Finally a set of (d,p) spectra for the elements Z=3 to Z=17 using 2 MeV incident deutrons is included together with example of more applications of the (d,alpha) spectra. (author)

  8. kinetics and mechanism of reaction of acidic chlorite with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    overall third order rate constants for the reaction of acidic chlorite with Nile blue and Meldola's blue were (0.363 ... of interest to investigate, how these differences affect the reaction rates of these dyes with acidic chlorite. .... To establish the order with respect to chlorite and acid, the effect of initial concentration of chlorite and ...

  9. Qualitative sensing of mechanical damage by a fluorogenic "click" reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döhler, Diana; Rana, Sravendra; Rupp, Harald; Bergmann, Henrik; Behzadi, Shahed; Crespy, Daniel; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2016-09-25

    A simple and unique damage-sensing tool mediated by a Cu(i)-catalyzed [3+2] cycloaddition reaction is reported, where a fluorogenic "click"-reaction highlights physical damage by a strong fluorescence increase accompanied by in situ monitoring of localized self-healing.

  10. Energy Accommodation from Surface Catalyzed Reactions in Air Plasmas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Understanding energy transport at the gas-surface interface between catalytic/reacting surfaces exposed to highly dissociated plasmas remains a significant research...

  11. Mechanisms of Surface-Mediated DNA Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy was employed in conjunction with resonance energy transfer (RET) to observe the dynamic behavior of donor-labeled ssDNA at the interface between aqueous solution and a solid surface decorated with complementary acceptor-labeled ssDNA. At least 100 000 molecular trajectories were determined for both complementary strands and negative control ssDNA. RET was used to identify trajectory segments corresponding to the hybridized state. The vast majority of molecules from solution adsorbed nonspecifically to the surface, where a brief two-dimensional search was performed with a 7% chance of hybridization. Successful hybridization events occurred with a characteristic search time of ∼0.1 s, and unsuccessful searches resulted in desorption from the surface, ultimately repeating the adsorption and search process. Hybridization was reversible, and two distinct modes of melting (i.e., dehybridization) were observed, corresponding to long-lived (∼15 s) and short-lived (∼1.4 s) hybridized time intervals. A strand that melted back onto the surface could rehybridize after a brief search or desorb from the interface. These mechanistic observations provide guidance for technologies that involve DNA interactions in the near-surface region, suggesting a need to design surfaces that both enhance the complex multidimensional search process and stabilize the hybridized state. PMID:24708278

  12. Capability of LEP-type surfaces to describe noncollinear reactions 2 - Polyatomic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Espinosa-Garcia, Joaquin

    2001-01-01

    In this second article of the series, the popular LEP-type surface for collinear reaction paths and a "bent" surface, which involves a saddle point geometry with a nonlinear central angle, were used to examine the capacity of LEP-type surfaces to describe the kinetics and dynamics of noncollinear reaction paths in polyatomic systems. Analyzing the geometries, vibrational frequencies, curvature along the reaction path (to estimate the tunneling effect and the reaction coordinate-bound modes coupling), and the variational transition- state theory thermal rate constants for the NH//3 + O(**3P) reaction, we found that the "collinear" LEP-type and the "bent" surfaces for this polyatomic system show similar behavior, thus allowing a considerable saving in time and computational effort. This agreement is especially encouraging for this polyatomic system because in the Cs symmetry the reaction proceeds via two electronic states of symmetries **3A prime and **3A double prime , which had to be independently calibrated....

  13. New mechanism of spiral wave initiation in a reaction-diffusion-mechanics system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis D Weise

    Full Text Available Spiral wave initiation in the heart muscle is a mechanism for the onset of dangerous cardiac arrhythmias. A standard protocol for spiral wave initiation is the application of a stimulus in the refractory tail of a propagating excitation wave, a region that we call the "classical vulnerable zone." Previous studies of vulnerability to spiral wave initiation did not take the influence of deformation into account, which has been shown to have a substantial effect on the excitation process of cardiomyocytes via the mechano-electrical feedback phenomenon. In this work we study the effect of deformation on the vulnerability of excitable media in a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM model. The dRDM model combines FitzHugh-Nagumo type equations for cardiac excitation with a discrete mechanical description of a finite-elastic isotropic material (Seth material to model cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and stretch activated depolarizing current. We show that deformation alters the "classical," and forms a new vulnerable zone at longer coupling intervals. This mechanically caused vulnerable zone results in a new mechanism of spiral wave initiation, where unidirectional conduction block and rotation directions of the consequently initiated spiral waves are opposite compared to the mechanism of spiral wave initiation due to the "classical vulnerable zone." We show that this new mechanism of spiral wave initiation can naturally occur in situations that involve wave fronts with curvature, and discuss its relation to supernormal excitability of cardiac tissue. The concept of mechanically induced vulnerability may lead to a better understanding about the onset of dangerous heart arrhythmias via mechano-electrical feedback.

  14. From Sound to Significance: Exploring the Mechanisms Underlying Emotional Reactions to Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juslin, Patrik N; Barradas, Gonçalo; Eerola, Tuomas

    2015-01-01

    A common approach to studying emotional reactions to music is to attempt to obtain direct links between musical surface features such as tempo and a listener's responses. However, such an analysis ultimately fails to explain why emotions are aroused in the listener. In this article we explore an alternative approach, which aims to account for musical emotions in terms of a set of psychological mechanisms that are activated by different types of information in a musical event. This approach was tested in 4 experiments that manipulated 4 mechanisms (brain stem reflex, contagion, episodic memory, musical expectancy) by selecting existing musical pieces that featured information relevant for each mechanism. The excerpts were played to 60 listeners, who were asked to rate their felt emotions on 15 scales. Skin conductance levels and facial expressions were measured, and listeners reported subjective impressions of relevance to specific mechanisms. Results indicated that the target mechanism conditions evoked emotions largely as predicted by a multimechanism framework and that mostly similar effects occurred across the experiments that included different pieces of music. We conclude that a satisfactory account of musical emotions requires consideration of how musical features and responses are mediated by a range of underlying mechanisms.

  15. Further theoretical insight into the reaction mechanism of the hepatitis C NS3/NS4A serine protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, José Ángel; Rodríguez, Alex; Puyuelo, María Pilar; González, Miguel; Martínez, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    The main reactions of the hepatitis C virus NS3/NS4A serine protease are studied using the second-order Møller-Plesset ab initio method and rather large basis sets to correct the previously reported AM1/CHARMM22 potential energy surfaces. The reaction efficiencies measured for the different substrates are explained in terms of the tetrahedral intermediate formation step (the rate-limiting process). The energies of the barrier and the corresponding intermediate are so close that the possibility of a concerted mechanism is open (especially for the NS5A/5B substrate). This is in contrast to the suggested general reaction mechanism of serine proteases, where a two-step mechanism is postulated.

  16. Mechanisms in adverse reactions to food. The sinuses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, A

    1995-01-01

    Food allergy is an extremely rare cause of chronic sinusitis. Mucosal inflammation in chronic sinusitis is rarely caused by allergic reactions to foods but rather viral infections in the upper respiratory tract.......Food allergy is an extremely rare cause of chronic sinusitis. Mucosal inflammation in chronic sinusitis is rarely caused by allergic reactions to foods but rather viral infections in the upper respiratory tract....

  17. Chemical dynamics simulations of X- + CH3Y → XCH3 + Y- gas-phase S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution reactions. Nonstatistical dynamics and nontraditional reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Paranjothy; Zhang, Jiaxu; Hase, William L

    2012-03-29

    Extensive classical chemical dynamics simulations of gas-phase X(-) + CH(3)Y → XCH(3) + Y(-) S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution reactions are reviewed and discussed and compared with experimental measurements and predictions of theoretical models. The primary emphasis is on reactions for which X and Y are halogen atoms. Both reactions with the traditional potential energy surface (PES), which include pre- and postreaction potential energy minima and a central barrier, and reactions with nontraditional PESs are considered. These S(N)2 reactions exhibit important nonstatistical atomic-level dynamics. The X(-) + CH(3)Y → X(-)---CH(3)Y association rate constant is less than the capture model as a result of inefficient energy transfer from X(-)+ CH(3)Y relative translation to CH(3)Y rotation and vibration. There is weak coupling between the low-frequency intermolecular modes of the X(-)---CH(3)Y complex and higher frequency CH(3)Y intramolecular modes, resulting in non-RRKM kinetics for X(-)---CH(3)Y unimolecular decomposition. Recrossings of the [X--CH(3)--Y](-) central barrier is important. As a result of the above dynamics, the relative translational energy and temperature dependencies of the S(N)2 rate constants are not accurately given by statistical theory. The nonstatistical dynamics results in nonstatistical partitioning of the available energy to XCH(3) +Y(-) reaction products. Besides the indirect, complex forming atomic-level mechanism for the S(N)2 reaction, direct mechanisms promoted by X(-) + CH(3)Y relative translational or CH(3)Y vibrational excitation are possible, e.g., the roundabout mechanism.

  18. Superhydrophobic surfaces: from fluid mechanics to optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rathgen, H.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis optical diraction was used to study the static and dynamic properties of microscopic liquid-gas interfaces that span between adjacent ridges of a superhydrophobic surface. An observed interference phenomenon at grazing incident angle led to the development of optical gratings with a

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of the IO + IO reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    The flash photolysis-absorption technique has been used to measure the rate constant for the reaction IO + IO over the temperature range 250-373 K and pressure range 20-700 torr of N2. The rate constant for the overall reaction was found to be independent of pressure and equal to 1.73 x 10 to the -12th exp (1020 + or - 200)/T cu cm/molecule s. Branching ratios for the reaction channels forming 2I + O2, I2 + O2, and I2O2, were found to be pressure dependent, with the I2 channel accounting for less than 5 percent of the total reaction over the observed pressure range. A stable reaction product was observed between 230 and 300 nm which was formed on a long time scale compared to IO disappearance. The rate constant for the reaction I + O3 + yields to IO + O2 was measured at 298 K and found to be (9.5 + or - 1.5) x 10 to the -13th cu cm/molecule s.

  20. The Kabachnik–Fields Reaction: Mechanism and Synthetic Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György Keglevich

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Kabachnik–Fields (phospha-Mannich reaction involving the condensation of primary or secondary amines, oxo compounds (aldehydes and ketones and >P(OH species, especially dialkyl phosphites, represents a good choice for the synthesis of α-aminophosphonates that are of significant importance due to their biological activity. In general, these three-component reactions may take place via an imine or an α-hydroxy-phosphonate intermediate. The monitoring of a few Kabachnik–Fields reactions by in situ Fourier transform IR spectroscopy has indicated the involvement of the imine intermediate that was also justified by theoretical calculations. The Kabachnik–Fields reaction was extended to >P(OH species, comprising cyclic phosphites, acyclic and cyclic H-phosphinates, as well as secondary phosphine oxides. On the other hand, heterocyclic amines were also used to prepare new α-amino phosphonic, phosphinic and phosphine oxide derivatives. In most cases, the synthesis under solvent-free microwave (MW conditions is the method of choice. It was proved that, in the cases studied by us, there was no need for the use of any catalyst. Moreover, it can be said that sophisticated and environmentally unfriendly catalysts suggested are completely unnecessary under MW conditions. Finally, the double Kabachnik–Fields reaction has made available bis(phosphonomethylamines, bis(phosphinoxidomethylamines and related species. The bis(phosphinoxidomethylamines serve as precursors for bisphosphines that furnish ring platinum complexes on reaction with dichlorodibenzonitriloplatinum.

  1. From Mechanism to Mouse: A Tale of Two Bioorthogonal Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Bioorthogonal reactions are chemical reactions that neither interact with nor interfere with a biological system. The participating functional groups must be inert to biological moieties, must selectively reactive with each other under biocompatible conditions, and, for in vivo applications, must be nontoxic to cells and organisms. Additionally, it is helpful if one reactive group is small and therefore minimally perturbing of a biomolecule into which it has been introduced either chemically or biosynthetically. Examples from the past decade suggest that a promising strategy for bioorthogonal reaction development begins with an analysis of functional group and reactivity space outside those defined by Nature. Issues such as stability of reactants and products (particularly in water), kinetics, and unwanted side reactivity with biofunctionalities must be addressed, ideally guided by detailed mechanistic studies. Finally, the reaction must be tested in a variety of environments, escalating from aqueous media to biomolecule solutions to cultured cells and, for the most optimized transformations, to live organisms. Work in our laboratory led to the development of two bioorthogonal transformations that exploit the azide as a small, abiotic, and bioinert reaction partner: the Staudinger ligation and strain-promoted azide–alkyne cycloaddition. The Staudinger ligation is based on the classic Staudinger reduction of azides with triarylphosphines first reported in 1919. In the ligation reaction, the intermediate aza-ylide undergoes intramolecular reaction with an ester, forming an amide bond faster than aza-ylide hydrolysis would otherwise occur in water. The Staudinger ligation is highly selective and reliably forms its product in environs as demanding as live mice. However, the Staudinger ligation has some liabilities, such as the propensity of phosphine reagents to undergo air oxidation and the relatively slow kinetics of the reaction. The Staudinger ligation takes

  2. Dynamical barrier and isotope effects in the simplest substitution reaction via Walden inversion mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Zhaojun; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H.

    2017-02-01

    Reactions occurring at a carbon atom through the Walden inversion mechanism are one of the most important and useful classes of reactions in chemistry. Here we report an accurate theoretical study of the simplest reaction of that type: the H+CH4 substitution reaction and its isotope analogues. It is found that the reaction threshold versus collision energy is considerably higher than the barrier height. The reaction exhibits a strong normal secondary isotope effect on the cross-sections measured above the reaction threshold, and a small but reverse secondary kinetic isotope effect at room temperature. Detailed analysis reveals that the reaction proceeds along a path with a higher barrier height instead of the minimum-energy path because the umbrella angle of the non-reacting methyl group cannot change synchronously with the other reaction coordinates during the reaction due to insufficient energy transfer from the translational motion to the umbrella mode.

  3. Performing chemical reactions in virtual capillary of surface tension ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article, we report for the first time the performance of a few common laboratory chemical reactions inside such capillaries of STCM. The substrate is of glass slides with lines of ink of permanent marker pen (colored) or clear nail polish. Two such slides placed one against the other and separated by a spacer makes the.

  4. Performing chemical reactions in virtual capillary of surface tension ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The flow paths were fabricated by making parallel lines using permanent marker pen ink or other polymer on glass surfaces. Two mirror image patterned glass plates were then sandwiched one on top of the other, separated by a thin gap - created using a spacer. The aqueous liquid moves between the surfaces by capillary ...

  5. 2013 Chemical reactions at surfaces. Surfaces in Energy and the Environment. Gordon Research Conference and Gordon Research Seminar (April 28 - May 3, 2013 - Les Diablerets, Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stair, Peter C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2013-02-03

    presentations on chemistry at solid and liquid surfaces of relevance to catalysis, synthesis, photochemistry, environmental science, and tribology. Topics include: Fundamental Surface Chemistry; Catalysis; Solid Liquid and Aerosol Interfaces; Surface Photochemistry; Synthesis of Surfaces; Environmental Interfaces; Hot Topics in Surface Chemical Reactions; Tribology; Gas-Surface Scattering and Reactions; Novel Materials and Environments.

  6. Surface renewal as a significant mechanism for dust emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wind tunnel experiments of dust emissions from different soil surfaces are carried out to better understand dust emission mechanisms. The effects of surface renewal on aerodynamic entrainment and saltation bombardment are analyzed in detail. It is found that flow conditions, surface particle motions (saltation and creep, soil dust content and ground obstacles all strongly affect dust emission, causing its rate to vary over orders of magnitude. Aerodynamic entrainment is highly effective, if dust supply is unlimited, as in the first 2–3 min of our wind tunnel runs. While aerodynamic entrainment is suppressed by dust supply limits, surface renewal through the motion of surface particles appears to be an effective pathway to remove the supply limit. Surface renewal is also found to be important to the efficiency of saltation bombardment. We demonstrate that surface renewal is a significant mechanism affecting dust emission and recommend that this mechanism be included in future dust models.

  7. [Mechanism of the reaction of glutaraldehyde with chitosan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil'deeva, N R; Perminov, P A; Vladimirov, L V; Novikov, V V; Mikhaĭlov, S N

    2009-01-01

    The regularities of the reaction of aminopolysaccharide chitosan with glutaraldehyde (GA) have been considered. The equilibrium forms of GA in water have been thoroughly studied by NMR spectroscopy. It has been established that at pH 5.6, the exchange of the protons of O=CHCH2 groups for deuterium occurs, indicating the presence of an anion, a product of the first stage of the aldol reaction; at pH > 7.2, the formation of the products of an aldol reaction and aldol condensation takes place. The kinetics of the reaction between the amino groups of chitosan and GA, the kinetics of gel formation in chitosan solutions in the presence of GA, and the kinetics of changes in the rigidity of gels formed have been studied by UV spectroscopy. IR spectra of cross-linked chitosan have been obtained. It has been shown that chitosan catalyzes the polymerization of GA to form inhomogeneous products; in this process, the length of oligomeric chains in modified or cross-linked chitosan and the concentration of coupled bonds increase with the GA concentration and pH of the reaction medium.

  8. High-pressure catalytic reactions over single-crystal metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, JoséA.; Wayne Goodman, D.

    1991-11-01

    Studies dealing with high-pressure catalytic reactions over single-crystal surfaces are reviewed. The coupling of an apparatus for the measurement of reaction kinetics at elevated pressures with an ultrahigh vacuum system for surface analysis allows detailed study of structure sensitivity, the effects of promoters and inhibitors on catalytic activity, and, in certain cases, identification of reaction intermediates by post-reaction surface analysis. Examples are provided which demonstrate the relevance of single-crystal studies for modeling the behaviour of high-surface-area supported catalysts. Studies of CO methanation and CO oxidation over single-crystal surfaces provide convincing evidence that these reactions are structure insensitive. For structure-sensitive reactions (ammonia synthesis, alkane hydrogenolysis, alkane isomerization, water-gas shift reaction, etc.) model single-crystal studies allow correlations to be established between surface structure and catalytic activity. The effects of both electronegative (S and P) and electropositive (alkali metals) impurities upon the catalytic activity of metal single crystals for ammonia synthesis, CO methanation, alkane hydrogenolysis, ethylene epoxidation and water-gas shift are discussed. The roles of "ensemble" and "ligand" effects in bimetallic catalysts are examined in light of data obtained using surfaces prepared by vapor-depositing one metal onto a crystal face of a dissimilar metal.

  9. Reversible redox reaction and water configuration on a positively charged platinum surface: first principles molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeshoji, Tamio; Otani, Minoru; Hamada, Ikutaro; Okamoto, Yasuharu

    2011-12-07

    The water dissociation reaction and water molecule configuration on a positively charged platinum (111) surface were investigated by means of first principles molecular dynamics under periodic boundary conditions. Water molecules on the Pt surface were mostly in the O-down orientation but some H-down structures were also found. OH(-) ion, generated by removing H from H(2)O in the bulk region, moved to the Pt surface, on which a positive charge is induced, by a Grotthuss-like proton-relay mechanism and adsorbed on it as OH(Pt). Hydrogen atom exchange between OH(Pt) and a near-by water molecule frequently occurred on the Pt surface and had a low activation energy of the same order as room temperature energy. When a positive charge (7 μC cm(-2)) was added to the Pt surface, H(3)O(+) and OH(Pt) were generated from 2H(2)O on the Pt. This may be coupled with an electron transfer to the Pt electrode [2H(2)O → H(3)O(+) + OH(Pt) + e(-)]. The opposite reaction was also observed on the same charged surface during a simulation of duration about 10 ps; it is a reversible redox reaction. When further positive charge (14 μC cm(-2)) was added, the reaction shifted to the right hand side completely. Thus, this one-electron transfer reaction, which is a part of the oxygen electrode reaction in fuel cells and water electrolysis, was confirmed to be a low activation energy process.

  10. Dynamics of Surface Exchange Reactions Between Au and Pt for HER and HOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, Billie; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard; Bonde, Jacob Lindner

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric analysis of the Pt-on-Au system for hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER/HOR) indicates that dynamic surface exchange reactions occur between Pt and Au. HER/HOR activities depend on the dominant surface species present, which is controllable by the potential applied...... to the system. Bulk Au is not very active for HER/HOR; however, when Pt is deposited onto the Au surface, the system becomes active. The Pt-on-Au system can subsequently be deactivated by cycling to potentials cathodic of the OH-adsorption and Pt-dissolution potentials (~+1.18 V vs normal hydrogen electrode...... reaction is attributed to the lower surface energy of Au relative to Pt causing Au to migrate to the surface. When the system is deactivated, Au is present at the surface. However, Pt migrates back to the surface at higher positive potentials, where PtOx/PtOHx is formed, leading to adsorbate...

  11. Abrasive wear mechanisms and surface layer structure of refractory materials after mechanical working

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milman, Y.V.; Lotsko, D.V.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms of abrasive wear and surface layer structure formation after different kinds of mechanical working are considered in terms of fracture and plastic deformation mechanisms for various refractory materials. The principles for classification of abrasive wear mechanisms are proposed, the four types of wear mechanisms are distinguished for various combinations of fractures and plastic deformation types. The concept of characteristic deformation temperature t * (knee temperature) is used. Detailed examples are given of investigating the surface layer structures in grinded crystals of sapphire and molybdenum. The amorphisation tendency of the thinnest surface layer while mechanical polishing is discussed separately. 19 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  12. Laser Induced Reaction for Prebond Surface Preparation of Aluminum Alloys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rotel, M

    1994-01-01

    .... These adhesives are normally used in bonding and repairing processes for aerospace application. Surface treatment for bonding Al adherends with structural adhesives involve the sue of harsh chemicals such as acids bases and organic solvents...

  13. Fundamental Studies of Diamond Growth and Surface Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    deposition ( PACVD ) have been observed as a function of growth temperature, substrate identity and surface condition. Our highest microwave PACVD growth...The rate of growth of PACVD diamond films is intimately tied to the availability of low energy growth sites. Such low energy sites will be associated...oriented diamond film. m Fig. I Scanning electron micrograph of a random polycrystalline diamond film surface grown at 1000°C by micro- wave PACVD

  14. Reaction chemistry and ligand exchange at cadmium selenide nanocrystal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Jonathan; Park, Jungwon; Trudeau, Paul-Emile; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-02

    Chemical modification of nanocrystal surfaces is fundamentally important to their assembly, their implementation in biology and medicine, and greatly impacts their electrical and optical properties. However, it remains a major challenge owing to a lack of analytical tools to directly determine nanoparticle surface structure. Early nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (1) and tri-n-octylphosphine (2), suggested these coordinating solvents are datively bound to the particle surface. However, assigning the broad NMR resonances of surface-bound ligands is complicated by significant concentrations of phosphorus-containing impurities in commercial sources of 1, and XPS provides only limited information about the nature of the phosphorus containing molecules in the sample. More recent reports have shown the surface ligands of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in technical grade 1, and in the presence of alkylphosphonic acids, include phosphonic and phosphinic acids. These studies do not, however, distinguish whether these ligands are bound datively, as neutral, L-type ligands, or by X-type interaction of an anionic phosphonate/phosphinate moiety with a surface Cd{sup 2+} ion. Answering this question would help clarify why ligand exchange with such particles does not proceed generally as expected based on a L-type ligand model. By using reagents with reactive silicon-chalcogen and silicon-chlorine bonds to cleave the ligands from the nanocrystal surface, we show that our CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystal surfaces are likely terminated by X-type binding of alkylphosphonate ligands to a layer of Cd{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} ions, rather than by dative interactions. Further, we provide spectroscopic evidence that 1 and 2 are not coordinated to our purified nanocrystals.

  15. Parallel and series-reaction mechanisms of wood and char combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Branca Carmen; di Blasi Colomba

    2004-01-01

    Thermo gravimetric curves in air of beech wood and char, obtained from conventional pyrolysis of beech wood at a laboratory scale, have been re-examined using different kinetic models. Multi-step reaction mechanisms consisting of either four (wood) or two (char) reactions are needed for accurate predictions of weight loss curves. In the case of wood, three reactions are linear in the reactant mass fraction whereas the fourth step presents a power-law dependence. A linear reaction for devolati...

  16. Reactions of a stable dialkylsilylene and their mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    synthetic methods for the organosilicon compounds that are difficult to be synthesized by other methods, and are important as silylene trapping reactions to prove the generation and existence of transient silylenes in diffe- rent systems. Although much attention has been focused on the mechanistic aspects of the unique sily-.

  17. Tris(Cyclopentadienyl)Uranium-t-Butyl: Synthesis, reactions, and mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weydert, Marc [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Compounds (RC5H4)3U(t-Bu) were prepared for R = H, Me, Et. Their decomposition products in aromatic solvents are consistent with a radical decomposition pathway induced by solvent-assisted U-C bond homolysis. NMR was used to study the reactions of (RC5H4)3UCl with t-BuLi (R = t-Bu, Me3Si). Reactions of (MeC5H4)3U(t-Bu) with Lewis bases and fluorocarbons were studied. Analogous reaction chemistry between (RC5H4)3ThX systems and t-BuLi was also studied, and reactivity differences between U and Th are discussed. Synthesis of sterically crowded (RC5H4)4U compounds is next considered. Reaction of the trivalent (RC5H4)3U with (RC5H4)2Hg results in formation of (RC5H4)4U. Steric congestion, cyclopentadienyl ligand exchange, and electron transfer are discussed. (DLC)

  18. Tris(Cyclopentadienyl)Uranium-t-Butyl: Synthesis, reactions, and mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weydert, M.

    1993-04-01

    Compounds (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]U(t-Bu) were prepared for R = H, Me, Et. Their decomposition products in aromatic solvents are consistent with a radical decomposition pathway induced by solvent-assisted U-C bond homolysis. NMR was used to study the reactions of (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]UCl with t-BuLi (R = t-Bu, Me[sub 3]Si). Reactions of (MeC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]U(t-Bu) with Lewis bases and fluorocarbons were studied. Analogous reaction chemistry between (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]ThX systems and t-BuLi was also studied, and reactivity differences between U and Th are discussed. Synthesis of sterically crowded (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 4]U compounds is next considered. Reaction of the trivalent (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]U with (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 2]Hg results in formation of (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 4]U. Steric congestion, cyclopentadienyl ligand exchange, and electron transfer are discussed. (DLC)

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of the ligand substitution reaction of di- ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The kinetics of the interaction between diethyldithiocarbamate (Et2DTC) and the title complex has been studied spectrophotometrically in aqueous medium as a function of nucleophile concentration, temperature and pH at constant ionic strength. The reaction is a two-step process in which the first step is liganddependent, ...

  20. Coupling Effect between Mechanical Loading and Chemical Reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klika, Václav; Maršík, František

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 44 (2009), s. 14689-14697 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/08/0557 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : coupling * dynamic loading * reaction kinetics Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics Impact factor: 3.471, year: 2009

  1. On mechanism of water-hydrogen isotope exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Itsuo

    1982-01-01

    The catalyst for water-hydrogen isotope exchange reaction for heavy water concentration, such as Pt-charcoal and Ni-chromia, has not been sufficient in the activity at low temperature. However, the catalyst of platinum carried by hydrophobic polymers was highly active in the water-hydrogen isotope exchange reaction at room temperature, and the fact that the catalyst is not wet has an important significance for the activity in low temperature region. However, the physical and chemical meanings of ''not wet'' in this system are not necessarily clear. In this study, hydrophilic catalyst with alumina carrier and hydrophobic catalysts with PTFE and other carriers were tested in hydrogen-steam isotope exchange reaction and the adsorption of water, and the physical and chemical meanings of ''not wet'' in isotope exchange reaction were examined. The experiment and its results are reported. Since water is adsorbed intensely on alumina, multi-molecular layer adsorption occurs, and platinum particles are buried under water, and lose the activity. In case of the platinum catalyst carried by hydrophobic carriers, only the water of single molecule layer is adsorbed on platinum, therefore, the activity is not lost. (Kako, I.)

  2. Mechanisms in adverse reactions to food. The ear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, A

    1995-01-01

    Otitis media with effusion is rarely caused by allergy to food. Allergic inflammation in the nasal mucosa, mainly due to IgE-mediated reactions to foods, may cause eustachian tube dysfunction and subsequent otitis media with effusion. Inflammatory mediators from the nasal mucosa transported via...

  3. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms -RE ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    qualitative considerations. For a highly exothermic reaction, the transition state resembles the reactants. SERIES I ARTICLE are they. It is clear from our discussion that if the H or the D atom is completely transferred to the X (halogen) atom the zero point energy difference at the transition state will be maximum. This will lead ...

  4. Visualization of reaction mechanism by CG based on quantum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visualization by computer graphics is great help for students to have images in the molecular level. In this work, the change in the molecular configuration in fundamental chemical reactions such as, F + HCl ¨ HF + Cl, I + H2¨ HI + H, OH- + CH3Cl ¨ CH3OH + Cl-, and esterification of acetic acid and ethyl alcohol were ...

  5. visualization of reaction mechanism by cg based on quantum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    ABSTRACT. Visualization by computer graphics is great help for students to have images in the molecular level. In this work, the change in the molecular configuration in fundamental chemical reactions such as, F + HCl → HF + Cl, I + H2→ HI + H, OH- + CH3Cl → CH3OH + Cl-, and esterification of acetic acid and ethyl ...

  6. Reactions of a stable dialkylsilylene and their mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    5. The photochemical addition of 1 to various aromatic and aliphatic C=C bonds occurs smoothly if the dou- ble bond is not sterically hindered (eqs 6–8). Silylene 1 reacts with (E)-2-butene stereospecifically under irradi- ation to afford the corresponding silirane 13 in the quan- titative yield, while the thermal reaction of 1 with ...

  7. Olefin metathesis reaction on GaN (0 0 0 1) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowski, Matthew S.; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2011-01-01

    Proof-of-concept reactions were performed on GaN (0 0 0 1) surfaces to demonstrate surface termination with desired chemical groups using an olefin cross-metathesis reaction. To prepare the GaN surfaces for olefin metathesis, the surfaces were hydrogen terminated with hydrogen plasma, chlorine terminated with phosphorous pentachloride, and then terminated with an alkene group via a Grignard reaction. The olefin metathesis reaction then bound 7-bromo-1-heptene. The modified surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, and water contact angle measurements following each step in the reaction scheme. The XPS data was used to qualitatively identify surface chemical species and to quantitatively determine molecular surface coverage. The bromine atom in 7-bromo-1-heptene served as a heteroatom for identification with XPS. The reaction scheme resulted in GaN substrates with a surface coverage of 0.10 monolayers and excellent stability towards oxidation when exposed to oxygen plasma.

  8. Olefin metathesis reaction on GaN (0 0 0 1) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowski, Matthew S. [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y. [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Ivanisevic, Albena, E-mail: albena@purdue.edu [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Proof-of-concept reactions were performed on GaN (0 0 0 1) surfaces to demonstrate surface termination with desired chemical groups using an olefin cross-metathesis reaction. To prepare the GaN surfaces for olefin metathesis, the surfaces were hydrogen terminated with hydrogen plasma, chlorine terminated with phosphorous pentachloride, and then terminated with an alkene group via a Grignard reaction. The olefin metathesis reaction then bound 7-bromo-1-heptene. The modified surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, and water contact angle measurements following each step in the reaction scheme. The XPS data was used to qualitatively identify surface chemical species and to quantitatively determine molecular surface coverage. The bromine atom in 7-bromo-1-heptene served as a heteroatom for identification with XPS. The reaction scheme resulted in GaN substrates with a surface coverage of 0.10 monolayers and excellent stability towards oxidation when exposed to oxygen plasma.

  9. Effects of alpha-amylase reaction mechanisms on analysis of resistant-starch contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Samuel A; Ai, Yongfeng; Chang, Fengdan; Jane, Jay-lin

    2015-01-22

    This study aimed to understand differences in the resistant starch (RS) contents of native and modified starches obtained using two standard methods of RS content analysis: AOAC Method 991.43 and 2002.02. The largest differences were observed in native potato starch, cross-linked wheat distarch phosphate, and high-amylose corn starch stearic-acid complex (RS5) between using AOAC Method 991.43 with Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase (BL) and AOAC Method 2002.02 with porcine pancreatic α-amylase (PPA). To determine possible reasons for these differences, we hydrolyzed raw-starch granules with BL and PPA with equal activity at pH 6.9 and 37°C for up to 84 h and observed the starch granules displayed distinct morphological differences after the hydrolysis. Starches hydrolyzed by BL showed erosion on the surface of the granules; those hydrolyzed by PPA showed pitting on granule surfaces. These results suggested that enzyme reaction mechanisms, including the sizes of the binding sites and the reaction patterns of the two enzymes, contributed to the differences in the RS contents obtained using different methods of RS analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Unified connected theory of few-body reaction mechanisms in N-body scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzou, W. N.; Redish, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    A unified treatment of different reaction mechanisms in nonrelativistic N-body scattering is presented. The theory is based on connected kernel integral equations that are expected to become compact for reasonable constraints on the potentials. The operators T/sub +-//sup ab/(A) are approximate transition operators that describe the scattering proceeding through an arbitrary reaction mechanism A. These operators are uniquely determined by a connected kernel equation and satisfy an optical theorem consistent with the choice of reaction mechanism. Connected kernel equations relating T/sub +-//sup ab/(A) to the full T/sub +-//sup ab/ allow correction of the approximate solutions for any ignored process to any order. This theory gives a unified treatment of all few-body reaction mechanisms with the same dynamic simplicity of a model calculation, but can include complicated reaction mechanisms involving overlapping configurations where it is difficult to formulate models.

  11. Characterization of polymer surface structure and surface mechanical behaviour by sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opdahl, Aric; Koffas, Telly S; Amitay-Sadovsky, Ella; Kim, Joonyeong; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2004-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used to study polymer surface structure and surface mechanical behaviour, specifically to study the relationships between the surface properties of polymers and their bulk compositions and the environment to which the polymer is exposed. The combination of SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM has been used to study surface segregation behaviour of polyolefin blends at the polymer/air and polymer/solid interfaces. SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM experiments have also been performed to characterize the properties of polymer/liquid and polymer/polymer interfaces, focusing on hydrogel materials. A method was developed to study the surface properties of hydrogel contact lens materials at various hydration conditions. Finally, the effect of mechanical stretching on the surface composition and surface mechanical behaviour of phase-separated polyurethanes, used in biomedical implant devices, has been studied by both SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM. (topical review)

  12. Aromatic C-Nitroso Compounds and Their Dimers: A Model for Probing the Reaction Mechanisms in Crystalline Molecular Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Biljan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on the dimerization and dissociation of aromatic C-nitroso compounds and their dimers, the reactions that could be used as a convenient model for studying the thermal organic solid-state reaction mechanisms. This molecular model is simple because it includes formation or breaking of only one covalent bond between two nitrogen atoms. The crystalline molecular solids of nitroso dimers (azodioxides dissociate by photolysis under the cryogenic conditions, and re-dimerize by slow warming. The thermal re-dimerization reaction is examined under the different topotactic conditions in crystals: disordering, surface defects, and phase transformations. Depending on the conditions, and on the molecular structure, aromatic C-nitroso compounds can associate to form one-dimensional polymeric structures and are able to self-assemble on gold surfaces.

  13. Reaction dynamics of molecular hydrogen on silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratu, P.; Brenig, W.; Gross, A.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results on the dynamics of dissociative adsorption and recombinative desorption of hydrogen on silicon are presented. Using optical second-harmonic generation, extremely small sticking probabilities in the range 10(-9)-10(-5) could be measured for H-2 and D-2 on Si(111......)7X7 and Si(100)2X1. Strong phonon-assisted sticking was observed for gases at 300 K and surface temperatures between 550 K and 1050 K. The absolute values as well as the temperature variation of the adsorption and desorption rates show surprisingly little isotope effect, and they differ only little...... between the two surfaces. These results indicate that tunneling, molecular vibrations, and the structural details of the surface play only a minor role for the adsorption dynamics. Instead, they appear to be governed by the localized H-Si bonding and Si-Si lattice vibrations. Theoretically, an effective...

  14. Characterization of surface electrochemical reactions used in electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy and digital etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Thomas Allen

    Surface analytical techniques have been used to characterize electrochemical reactions to be used in semiconductor processing technologies. Studies have been performed using UHV-EC methodology to determine conditions for the surface limited dissolution of CdTe(100). Electrochemical conditions were identified which resulted in the reduction of the top layer of tellurium atoms, leaving behind a cadmium enriched surface. Attempts to find an electrochemical potential for the oxidative dissolution of the cadmium surface were complicated by the simultaneous oxidation of the compound CdTe. In situ scanning tunneling microscopy has also been used to characterize the formation of tellurium atomic layers formed on Au(111) and Au(100) by underpotential deposition. On Au(100), the following sequence of surface structures was observed prior to bulk electrodeposition: a p(2x2), a (2x✓10), a (2x4), and a (✓2x✓5). The transitions between these structures was observed by STM and mechanisms for the phase transitions are presented. The results are correlated to UHV-EC studies of tellurium UPD on Au(100). On Au(111), the following sequence of structures was observeḑ: a (✓3 x✓3), a (✓7x✓13), and a (3x3). The (✓3x✓3) was shown to exist with a network of domain walls, forming long range triangular and diamond shaped superstructures. Conversion of the (✓3x✓3) to higher coverage structure resulted in roughening of the underlying Au surface and a mechanism is hypothesized to explain this transition. The STM results are also correlated to low energy electron diffraction (LEED) results obtained by UHV-EC studies. The surface structures formed by reductive UPD of the chalcogenide elements and Se on both Au(100) and Au(111) are compared. Both elements initially resulted in structures consisting of isolated atoms separated by distances close to the reported van der Waals diameter. Higher coverage structures resulted in interatomic chalcogenide bonding and the structures

  15. Multilevel Quantum Mechanics Theories and Molecular Mechanics Calculations of the Cl-+ CH3I Reaction in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chen; Wang, Dunyou

    2017-10-19

    The Cl - + CH 3 I → CH 3 Cl + I - reaction in water was studied using combined multilevel quantum mechanism theories and molecular mechanics with an explicit water solvent model. The study shows a significant influence of aqueous solution on the structures of the stationary points along the reaction pathway. A detailed, atomic-level evolution of the reaction mechanism shows a concerted one-bond-broken and one-bond-formed mechanism, as well as a synchronized charge-transfer process. The potentials of mean force calculated with the CCSD(T) and DFT treatments of the solute produce a free activation barrier at 24.5 and 19.0 kcal/mol, respectively, which agrees with the experimental one at 22.0 kcal/mol. The solvent effects have also been quantitatively analyzed: in total, the solvent effects raise the activation energy by 20.2 kcal/mol, which shows a significant impact on this reaction in water.

  16. Reaction between Chromium(III) and EDTA Ions: an Overlooked Mechanism of Case Study Reaction of Chemical Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerar, Janez

    2015-01-01

    Widely cited and accepted explanation of reaction mechanism of the case study reaction of chemical kinetics between Cr(III) ions and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) contradicts modern chromium(III) coordination chemistry data. Absorption UV and visible light spectra were recorded during the reaction between aqueous solution of Cr(NO(3))(3) and EDTA in order to obtain new information about this reaction. Analysis of the spectra showed that only very small fraction of intermediates may be present in solution during the course of the reaction. The reaction scheme was established and according to it calculations based on a simplified model were carried out. Literature data for constants were used if known, otherwise, adjusted values of their sound estimates were applied. Reasonable agreement of the model calculations with the experimental data was obtained for pH values 3.8 and 4.5 but the model failed to reproduce measured rate of reaction at pH 5.5, probably due to the use of the oversimplified model.

  17. Reaction Kinetic Parameters and Surface Thermodynamic Properties of Cu2O Nanocubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cuprous oxide (Cu2O nanocubes were synthesized by reducing Cu(OH2 in the presence of sodium citrate at room temperature. The samples were characterized in detail by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and N2 absorption (BET specific surface area. The equations for acquiring reaction kinetic parameters and surface thermodynamic properties of Cu2O nanocubes were deduced by establishment of the relations between thermodynamic functions of Cu2O nanocubes and these of the bulk Cu2O. Combined with thermochemical cycle, transition state theory, basic theory of chemical thermodynamics, and in situ microcalorimetry, reaction kinetic parameters, specific surface enthalpy, specific surface Gibbs free energy, and specific surface entropy of Cu2O nanocubes were successfully determined. We also introduced a universal route for gaining reaction kinetic parameters and surface thermodynamic properties of nanomaterials.

  18. Alcali-silica reactions: Mechanisms for crack formations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per

    2006-01-01

    Alkali-silica reactions (ASR) are found all over the world and cause a large number of damage, which have lead to different sets of requirements in the different countries for the aggregates, the cements and the admixtures. One of the reasons for the damage and the different requirements is that ......, paste and concrete; the critical concentrations of reactive aggregates and alkali; critical aggregate sizes; the critical exposure time and predicts the potential crack patterns....

  19. Chlorination of tramadol: Reaction kinetics, mechanism and genotoxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hanyang; Song, Dean; Chang, Yangyang; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-12-01

    Tramadol (TRA) is one of the most detected analgesics in environmental matrices, and it is of high significance to study the reactivity of TRA during chlorination considering its potential toxicity to the environment. The chlorine/TRA reaction is first order with respect to the TRA concentration, and a combination of first-order and second-order with respect to chlorine concentration. The pH dependence of the observed rate constants (kobs) showed that the TRA oxidation reactivity increased with increasing pH. kobs can be quantitatively described by considering all active species including Cl2, Cl2O and HOCl, and the individual rate constants of HOCl/TRA(0), HOCl/TRAH(+), Cl2/TRA and Cl2O/TRA reactions were calculated to be (2.61±0.29)×10(3)M(-1)s(-1), 14.73±4.17M(-1)s(-1), (3.93±0.34)×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) and (5.66±1.83)×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. Eleven degradation products were detected with UPLC-Q-TOF-MS, and the corresponding structures of eight products found under various pH conditions were proposed. The amine group was proposed to be the initial attack site under alkaline pH conditions, where reaction of the deprotonated amine group with HOCl is favorable. Under acidic and neutral pH conditions, however, two possible reaction pathways were proposed. One is an electrophilic substitution on the aromatic ring, and another is an electrophilic substitution on the nitrogen, leading to an N-chlorinated intermediate, which can be further oxidized. Finally, the SOS/umu test showed that the genotoxicity of TRA chlorination products increased with increasing dosage of chlorine, which was mostly attributed to the formation of some chlorine substitution products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Kinetics and mechanism of the redox reaction between catechol and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetics of the reduction of [Co(Ox)3]3- with catechol has been studied in aqueous acid (HClO4) medium at I = 1.00moldm-3(NaClO4) and T=26.3±0.1°C. Two moles of oxidant were consumed by one mole of reductant. The reaction is second order overall, first order in both oxidant and reductant and shows a first order ...

  1. Systematic exploration of the mechanism of chemical reactions: the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy using the ADDF and AFIR methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Satoshi; Ohno, Koichi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2013-03-21

    Global reaction route mapping (GRRM), a fully-automated search for all important reaction pathways relevant to a given purpose, on the basis of quantum chemical calculations enables systematic elucidation of complex chemical reaction mechanisms. However, GRRM had previously been limited to very simple systems. This is mainly because such calculations are highly demanding even in small systems when a brute-force sampling is considered. Hence, we have developed two independent but complementary methods: anharmonic downward distortion following (ADDF) and artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) methods. ADDF can follow reaction pathways starting from local minima on the potential energy surface (PES) toward transition structures (TSs) and dissociation channels. AFIR can find pathways starting from two or more reactants toward TSs for their associative reactions. In other words, ADDF searches for A → X type isomerization and A → X + Y type dissociation pathways, whereas AFIR finds A + B → X (+ Y) type associative pathways. Both follow special paths called the ADDF path and the AFIR path, and these tend to pass through near TSs of corresponding reaction pathways, giving approximate TSs. Such approximate TSs can easily be re-optimized to corresponding true TSs by standard geometry optimizations. On the basis of these two methods, we have proposed practical strategies of GRRM. The GRRM strategies have been applied to a variety of chemical systems ranging from thermal- and photochemical-reactions in small systems to organometallic- and enzyme-catalysis, on the basis of quantum chemical calculations. In this perspective, we present an overview of the GRRM strategies and some results of applications. Their practical usage for systematic prediction is also discussed.

  2. Surface reactivity and layer analysis of chemisorbed reaction films in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Studies on surface reactivity of substrate iron (Fe-particles) were made in the tribo-chemical environment of alkyl octadecenoates. Two alkyl octadecenoates namely ethyl octadecenoate and methyl. 12-hydroxy octadecenoate, slightly different in their chemical nature, were taken for preparing the chemisorbed ...

  3. Performing chemical reactions in virtual capillary of surface tension ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Two mirror image patterned glass plates were then sandwiched one on top of the other, separated by a thin gap - created using a spacer. The aqueous liquid moves between the surfaces by capillary forces, confined to the hydrophilic areas without wetting the hydrophobic lines, achieving liquid confinement without physical ...

  4. Development of a robust and compact kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism for diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, Kun Lin; Yang, Wenming; Mohan, Balaji; An, Hui; Zhou, Dezhi; Yu, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An approach is used to develop a robust kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism. • Ignition delay of the kerosene sub-mechanism is well validated with experiments. • The kerosene sub-mechanism reproduces the flame lift-off lengths of Jet-A reasonably well. • The kerosene sub-mechanism performs reasonably well under engine conditions. - Abstract: The use of kerosene fuels in internal combustion engines is getting more widespread. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization military is pushing for the use of a single fuel on the battlefield in order to reduce logistical issues. Moreover, in some countries, fuel adulteration is a serious matter where kerosene is blended with diesel and used in diesel engines. So far, most investigations done regarding the use of kerosene fuels in diesel engines are experimental and there is negligible simulation work done in this area possibly because of the lack of a robust and compact kerosene reaction mechanism. This work focuses on the development of a small but reliable kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism, suitable to be used for diesel engine simulations. The new kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism consists only of 48 species and 152 reactions. Furthermore, the kerosene sub-mechanism in this new mechanism is well validated for its ignition delay times and has proven to replicate kerosene combustion well in a constant volume combustion chamber and an optical engine. Overall, this new kerosene–diesel reaction mechanism is proven to be robust and practical for diesel engine simulations.

  5. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH 2 ) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  6. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing, E-mail: shisq@nwu.edu.cn; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH{sub 2}) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  7. Reaction mechanism study of 7Li(7Li,6He) reaction at above ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The elastic scattering and the 6He angular distributions were measured in. 7Li + 7Li reaction at two energies, Elab = 20 and 25 MeV. FRDWBA calculations have been performed to explain the measured 6He data. The calculations were very sensitive to the choice of the optical model potentials in entrance and exit channels ...

  8. Reaction mechanism study of 7Li (7Li, 6He) reaction at above ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Li reaction at two energies, lab = 20 and 25 MeV. FRDWBA calculations have been performed to explain the measured 6He data. The calculations were very sensitive to the choice of the optical model potentials in entrance and exit channels ...

  9. Reaction mechanism study of 7Li(7Li,6He) reaction at above ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    production in 7Li(7Li,6He) reaction in detail, measurements have been performed at two energies, Elab = 20 and 25 MeV in the present work. 2. Experimental details. The experiment was performed using the 7Li beam at energies Elab = 20 and 25. MeV, from the 14UD BARC-TIFR Pelletron accelerator, Mumbai. The target.

  10. Thermodynamic chemical energy transfer mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Heui-Seol

    2015-01-01

    Chemical energy transfer mechanisms at finite temperature are explored by a chemical energy transfer theory which is capable of investigating various chemical mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium. Gibbs energy fluxes are obtained as a function of chemical potential, time, and displacement. Diffusion, convection, internal convection, and internal equilibrium chemical energy fluxes are demonstrated. The theory reveals that there are chemical energy flux gaps and broken discrete symmetries at the activation chemical potential, time, and displacement. The statistical, thermodynamic theory is the unification of diffusion and internal convection chemical reactions which reduces to the non-equilibrium generalization beyond the quasi-equilibrium theories of migration and diffusion processes. The relationship between kinetic theories of chemical and electrochemical reactions is also explored. The theory is applied to explore non-equilibrium chemical reactions as an illustration. Three variable separation constants indicate particle number constants and play key roles in describing the distinct chemical reaction mechanisms. The kinetics of chemical energy transfer accounts for the four control mechanisms of chemical reactions such as activation, concentration, transition, and film chemical reactions. - Highlights: • Chemical energy transfer theory is proposed for non-, quasi-, and equilibrium. • Gibbs energy fluxes are expressed by chemical potential, time, and displacement. • Relationship between chemical and electrochemical reactions is discussed. • Theory is applied to explore nonequilibrium energy transfer in chemical reactions. • Kinetics of non-equilibrium chemical reactions shows the four control mechanisms

  11. Nanostructured Materials for Heterogeneous Electrocatalytic CO2 Reduction and their Related Reaction Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Zhi-Jian; Gong, Jinlong

    2017-09-11

    The gradually increased concentration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in the atmosphere has been recognized as the primary culprit for the rise of the global mean temperature. In recent years, development of routes for highly efficient conversion of CO 2 has received much attention. This Review describes recent progress on the design and synthesis of solid-state catalysts for the electrochemical reduction of CO 2 . The significance of this catalytic conversion is presented, followed by the general parameters for CO 2 electroreduction and a summary of the reaction apparatus. We also discuss various types of solid catalysts based on their CO 2 conversion mechanisms. We summarize the crucial factors (particle size, surface structure, composition, etc.) determining the performance for electroreduction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A New Method for Describing the Mechanism of a Chemical Reaction Based on the Unified Reaction Valley Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wenli; Sexton, Thomas; Kraka, Elfi; Freindorf, Marek; Cremer, Dieter

    2016-02-09

    The unified reaction valley approach (URVA) used for a detailed mechanistic analysis of chemical reactions is improved in three different ways: (i) Direction and curvature of path are analyzed in terms of internal coordinate components that no longer depend on local vibrational modes. In this way, the path analysis is no longer sensitive to path instabilities associated with the occurrences of imaginary frequencies. (ii) The use of third order terms of the energy for a local description of the reaction valley allows an extension of the URVA analysis into the pre- and postchemical regions of the reaction path, which are typically characterized by flat energy regions. (iii) Configurational and conformational processes of the reaction complex are made transparent even in cases where these imply energy changes far less than a kcal/mol by exploiting the topology of the potential energy surface. As examples, the rhodium-catalyzed methanol carbonization, the Diels-Alder reaction between 1,3-butadiene and ethene, and the rearrangement of HCN to CNH are discussed.

  13. C-H activation on rhodium: reaction mechanism and the role of carbonaceous residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogen, J.M.; Maier, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence for two C-H activation mechanisms, the oxidative addition of a single C-H bond and the concerted oxidative addition of two adjacent C-H bonds, is presented. The two mechanisms show different sensitivity to surface structure or particle size. While the first process (E/sub a/ ∼ 21 kcal/mol) is insensitive to the hydrocarbon structure, the second process (E/sub a/ ∼ 5-9 kcal/mol) is sensitive to the hydrocarbon structure. C-H activation is found to be 0.6 order in hexane and zero order in deuterium, which is consistent with oxidative addition as the rate-determining step. The d 2 maximum obtained by H/D exchange of linear alkanes on Rh results from surface olefins, as indicated by high-resolution deuterium NMR. Evidence against the participation of carbonaceous residues in the H/D exchange process is presented, indicating that carbonaceous material is not part of the active site. Two types of carbonaceous residues are detected. One forms at lower temperatures and does not interfere with the reaction; the other forms at higher temperatures and acts to poison the catalyst

  14. Program Helps To Determine Chemical-Reaction Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittker, D. A.; Radhakrishnan, K.

    1995-01-01

    General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis (LSENS) computer code developed for use in solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase, chemical-kinetics problems. Provides for efficient and accurate chemical-kinetics computations and provides for sensitivity analysis for variety of problems, including problems involving honisothermal conditions. Incorporates mathematical models for static system, steady one-dimensional inviscid flow, reaction behind incident shock wave (with boundary-layer correction), and perfectly stirred reactor. Computations of equilibrium properties performed for following assigned states: enthalpy and pressure, temperature and pressure, internal energy and volume, and temperature and volume. Written in FORTRAN 77 with exception of NAMELIST extensions used for input.

  15. Conciliating surface superhydrophobicities and mechanical strength of porous silicon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuguo; Zhao, Kun; Cheng, Jinchun; Zhang, Junyan

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobic surfaces on Mechanical stable macroporous silicon films were prepared by electrochemical etching with subsequent octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) modification. The surface morphologies were controlled by current densities and the mechanical properties were adjusted by their corresponding porosities. Contrast with the smooth macroporous silicon films with lower porosities (34.1%) and microporous silicon with higher porosities (97%), the macroporous film with a rough three-dimension (3D) surface and a moderate pore to cross-section area ratio (37.8%, PSi2‧) exhibited both good mechanical strength (Yong' modulus, shear modulus and collapse strength are 64.2, 24.1 and 0.32 GPa, respectively) and surface superhydrophobicity (water contact angle is 158.4 ± 2° and sliding angle is 2.7 ± 1°). This result revealed that the surface hydrophobicities (or the surface roughness) and mechanical strength of porous films could be conciliated by pore to cross-section area ratios control and 3D structures construction. Thus, the superhydrophobic surfaces on mechanical stable porous films could be obtained by 3D structures fabrication on porous film with proper pore to cross-section area ratios.

  16. One-pot reaction for the preparation of biofunctionalized self-assembled monolayers on gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raigoza, Annette F.; Fies, Whitney; Lim, Amber; Onyirioha, Kristeen; Webb, Lauren J., E-mail: lwebb@cm.utexas.edu

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • One-pot synthesis of α-helical-terminated self-assembled monolayers on Au(111). • Synthesis of high density, structured, and covalently bound α-helices on Au(111). • Characterization by surface-averaged and single molecule techniques. • Peptide-terminated surfaces for fabrication of biomaterials and sensors. - Abstract: The Huisgen cycloaddition reaction (“click” chemistry) has been used extensively to functionalize surfaces with macromolecules in a straightforward manner. We have previously developed a procedure using the copper(I)-catalyzed click reaction to tether synthetic α-helical peptides carrying two alkyne groups to a well-ordered azide-terminated alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a Au(111) surface. While convenient, click-based strategies potentially pose significant problems from reagents, solvents, and reaction temperatures that may irreversibly damage some molecules or substrates. Tuning click chemistry conditions would allow individual optimization of reaction conditions for a wide variety of biomolecules and substrate materials. Here, we explore the utility of simultaneous SAM formation and peptide-attachment chemistry in a one-pot reaction. We demonstrate that a formerly multistep reaction can be successfully carried out concurrently by mixing azide-terminated alkanethiols, CuCl, and a propargylglycine-containing peptide over a bare gold surface in ethanol and reacting at 70 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface infrared spectroscopy, surface circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) were used to determine that this one-pot reaction strategy resulted in a high density of surface-bound α-helices without aggregation. This work demonstrates the simplicity and versatility of a SAM-plus-click chemistry strategy for functionalizing Au surfaces with structured biomolecules.

  17. Reaction rates of ozone and terpenes adsorbed to model indoor surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springs, M; Wells, J R; Morrison, G C

    2011-08-01

    Reaction rates and reaction probabilities have been quantified on model indoor surfaces for the reaction of ozone with two monoterpenes (Δ(3) -carene and d-limonene). Molar surface loadings were obtained by performing breakthrough experiments in a plug-flow reactor (PFR) packed with beads of glass, polyvinylchloride or zirconium silicate. Reaction rates and probabilities were determined by equilibrating the PFR with both the terpene and the ozone and measuring the ozone consumption rate. To mimic typical indoor conditions, temperatures of 20, 25, and 30°C were used in both types of experiments along with a relative humidity ranging from 10% to 80%. The molar surface loading decreased with increased relative humidity, especially on glass, suggesting that water competed with the terpenes for adsorption sites. The ozone reactivity experiments indicate that higher surface loadings correspond with higher ozone uptake. The reaction probability for Δ(3) -carene with ozone ranged from 2.9 × 10(-6) to 3.0 × 10(-5) while reaction probabilities for d-limonene ranged from 2.8 × 10(-5) to 3.0 × 10(-4) . These surface reaction probabilities are roughly 10-100 times greater than the corresponding gas-phase values. Extrapolation of these results to typical indoor conditions suggests that surface conversion rates may be substantial relative to gas-phase rates, especially for lower volatility terpenoids. At present, it is unclear how important heterogeneous reactions will be in influencing indoor concentrations of terpenes, ozone and their reaction products. We observe that surface reaction probabilities were 10 to 100 times greater than their corresponding gas-phase values. Thus indoor surfaces do enhance effective reaction rates and adsorption of terpenes will increase ozone flux to otherwise low-reactivity surfaces. Extrapolation of these results to typical indoor conditions suggests that surface conversion rates may be substantial relative to gas-phase rates, especially

  18. Reaction-diffusion mechanisms and quantum spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Gunter M.

    We present a brief tutorial introduction into the quantum Hamiltonian formalism for stochastic many-body systems defined in terms of a master equation for their time evolution. These models describe interacting classical particle systems where particles hop on a lattice and may undergo reactions such as A+A→0. The quantum Hamiltonian formalism for the master equation provides a convenient general framework for the treatment of such models which, by various mappings, are capable of describing a wide variety of phenomena in non-equilibrium physics and in random media. The formalism is particularly useful if the quantum Hamiltonian has continuous global symmetries or if it is integrable, i.e. has an infinite set of conservation laws. This is demonstrated in the case of the exclusion process and for a toy model of tumor growth. Experimental applications of other integrable reaction-diffusion models in various areas of polymer physics (gel electrophoresis of DNA, exciton dynamics on polymers and the kinetics of biopolymerization on RNA) are pointed out.

  19. Charge-dependent non-bonded interaction methods for use in quantum mechanical modeling of condensed phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuechler, Erich R.

    Molecular modeling and computer simulation techniques can provide detailed insight into biochemical phenomena. This dissertation describes the development, implementation and parameterization of two methods for the accurate modeling of chemical reactions in aqueous environments, with a concerted scientific effort towards the inclusion of charge-dependent non-bonded non-electrostatic interactions into currently used computational frameworks. The first of these models, QXD, modifies interactions in a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular (QM/MM) mechanical framework to overcome the current limitations of 'atom typing' QM atoms; an inaccurate and non-intuitive practice for chemically active species as these static atom types are dictated by the local bonding and electrostatic environment of the atoms they represent, which will change over the course of the simulation. The efficacy QXD model is demonstrated using a specific reaction parameterization (SRP) of the Austin Model 1 (AM1) Hamiltonian by simultaneously capturing the reaction barrier for chloride ion attack on methylchloride in solution and the solvation free energies of a series of compounds including the reagents of the reaction. The second, VRSCOSMO, is an implicit solvation model for use with the DFTB3/3OB Hamiltonian for biochemical reactions; allowing for accurate modeling of ionic compound solvation properties while overcoming the discontinuous nature of conventional PCM models when chemical reaction coordinates. The VRSCOSMO model is shown to accurately model the solvation properties of over 200 chemical compounds while also providing smooth, continuous reaction surfaces for a series of biologically motivated phosphoryl transesterification reactions. Both of these methods incorporate charge-dependent behavior into the non-bonded interactions variationally, allowing the 'size' of atoms to change in meaningful ways with respect to changes in local charge state, as to provide an accurate, predictive and

  20. The reaction mechanism and selectivity of acetylene hydrogenation over Ni-Ga intermetallic compound catalysts: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, De-Ming; Zhang, Shi-Tong; Li, Chang-Ming; Chen, Yu-Di; Pu, Min; Yan, Hong; Wei, Min

    2018-03-28

    Intermetallic compounds (IMCs) have shown excellent catalytic performance toward the selective hydrogenation of acetylene, but the theoretical understanding on this reaction over Ni-based IMCs is rather limited. In this work, the adsorptions of the C 2 species, Bader charge, projected density of states (PDOS) and the reaction pathways were calculated by the density functional theory (DFT) method to investigate the mechanism and selectivity for the acetylene hydrogenation on the (111) surface of Ni n Ga (n = 1, 3) IMCs, with a comparative study on the pristine Ni(111) surface. The results indicate that the adsorption energy of acetylene increased along with the Ni/Ga ratio, therefore a feasible acetylene adsorption on the Ga-rich surface guaranteed a low effective barrier, leading to the best activity for the NiGa(111) surface among three surfaces. Bader charge analysis shows that electrons transferred from Ga atoms to Ni atoms and further delivered to C 2 species, decreasing the adsorption capacity of C 2 species on NiGa(111) in comparison with those on Ni(111) and Ni 3 Ga(111). The reaction pathway of acetylene hydrogenation to ethylene via vinyl or even over-hydrogenation to ethane via ethyl is more favorable than the pathway involving the ethylidene intermediate on all surfaces. Moreover, the ethylene selectivity has a positive correlation with the gallium content by comparing the desorption barrier with the hydrogenation barrier of ethylene, thus the NiGa(111) surface also exhibits the best selectivity. Therefore, the NiGa(111) surface demonstrates to be an excellent reaction facet for the semihydrogenation of acetylene, which agreed with the experimental findings, and would provide helpful instructions for designing and preparing highly-selective and noble-substitute catalysts of alkyne semihydrogenation.

  1. Age influences the skin reaction pattern to mechanical stress and its repair level through skin care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouboulis, Christos C; Elewa, Rana; Ottaviani, Monica; Fluhr, Joachim; Picardo, Mauro; Bernois, Armand; Heusèle, Catherine; Camera, Emanuela

    2018-03-01

    Skin aging is associated with alterations of surface texture, sebum composition and immune response. Mechanical stress induces repair mechanisms, which may be dependent on the age and quality of the skin. The response to mechanical stress in young and aged individuals, their subjective opinion and the objective effectiveness of skin care products were evaluated by biophysical skin quality parameters (stratum corneum hydration, transepidermal water loss, skin pH, pigmentation and erythema) at baseline, 1, 6, 24h and 7days at the forearms of 2 groups of healthy volunteers, younger than 35 years (n=11) and older than 60 years (n=13). In addition, casual surface lipid composition was studied under the same conditions at the baseline and day 7 after mechanical stress induction. Evaluations were also performed in stressed skin areas treated daily with skin care products and the subjective opinion of the volunteers was additionally documented. The tested groups exhibited age-associated baseline skin functions as well as casual surface lipid composition and different reaction patterns to mechanical stress. Skin care was more effective in normalizing skin reaction to stress in the young than in the aged group. The subjective volunteer opinion correlated with the objective measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn Charles [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    -7, 10-5, and 10-5 respectively. To understand how internal surface area influences the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet, a model of ozone diffusion into and reaction with internal carpet components was developed. This was then used to predict apparent reaction probabilities for carpet. He combines this with a modified model of turbulent mass transfer developed by Liu, et al. to predict deposition rates and indoor ozone concentrations. The model predicts that carpet should have an equivalent reaction probability of about 10-5, matching laboratory measurements of the reaction probability. For both carpet and duct materials, surfaces become progressively quenched (aging), losing the ability to react or otherwise take up ozone. He evaluated the functional form of aging and find that the reaction probability follows a power function with respect to the cumulative uptake of ozone. To understand ozone aging of surfaces, he developed several mathematical descriptions of aging based on two different mechanisms. The observed functional form of aging is mimicked by a model which describes ozone diffusion with internal reaction in a solid. He shows that the fleecy nature of carpet materials in combination with the model of ozone diffusion below a fiber surface and internal reaction may explain the functional form and the magnitude of power function parameters observed due to ozone interactions with carpet. The ozone induced aldehyde emissions, measured from duct materials, were combined with an indoor air quality model to show that concentrations of aldehydes indoors may approach odorous levels. He shows that ducts are unlikely to be a significant sink for ozone due to the low reaction probability in combination with the short residence time of air in ducts.

  3. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying adverse reactions associated with a kinase inhibitor using systems toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, Takahiro; Honma, Masashi; Kariya, Yoshiaki; Ghosh, Samik; Kitano, Hiroaki; Kurachi, Yoshihisa; Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Homma, Yukio; Abernethy, Darrel R; Kume, Haruki; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Targeted kinase inhibitors are an important class of agents in anticancer therapeutics, but their limited tolerability hampers their clinical performance. Identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of adverse reactions will be helpful in establishing a rational method for the management of clinically adverse reactions. Here, we selected sunitinib as a model and demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms underlying the adverse reactions associated with kinase inhibitors can efficiently be identified using a systems toxicological approach. First, toxicological target candidates were short-listed by comparing the human kinase occupancy profiles of sunitinib and sorafenib, and the molecular mechanisms underlying adverse reactions were predicted by sequential simulations using publicly available mathematical models. Next, to evaluate the probability of these predictions, a clinical observation study was conducted in six patients treated with sunitinib. Finally, mouse experiments were performed for detailed confirmation of the hypothesized molecular mechanisms and to evaluate the efficacy of a proposed countermeasure against adverse reactions to sunitinib. In silico simulations indicated the possibility that sunitinib-mediated off-target inhibition of phosphorylase kinase leads to the generation of oxidative stress in various tissues. Clinical observations of patients and mouse experiments confirmed the validity of this prediction. The simulation further suggested that concomitant use of an antioxidant may prevent sunitinib-mediated adverse reactions, which was confirmed in mouse experiments. A systems toxicological approach successfully predicted the molecular mechanisms underlying clinically adverse reactions associated with sunitinib and was used to plan a rational method for the management of these adverse reactions.

  4. Tuning Acoustic Wave Properties by Mechanical Resonators on a Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    Vibrations generated by high aspects ratio electrodes are studied by the finite element method. It is found that the modes are combined of a surface wave and vibration in the electrodes. For increasing aspect ratio most of the mechanical energy is confined to the electrodes which act as mechanical...

  5. DIFFUSION MECHANISM OF CU ADATOMS ON A CU(001) SURFACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BARKEMA, GT; BREEMAN, M; PASQUARELLO, A; CAR, R

    1994-01-01

    Ab initio calculations on surface diffusion of Cu adatoms on Cu(001) are presented. The hopping mechanism with a calculated energy barrier of 0.69 eV is found to be favorable over the exchange mechanism with 0.97 eV. We find from the geometry relaxations that adatoms are significantly attracted to

  6. Reaction kinetics and mechanism of magnetic field effects in cryptochrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Creatures as varied as mammals, fish, insects, reptiles, and birds have an intriguing sixth sense that allows them to orient themselves in the Earth's magnetic field. Despite decades of study, the physical basis of this magnetic sense remains elusive. A likely mechanism is furnished by magnetically...

  7. Nuclear and hadronic reaction mechanisms producing spin asymmetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    naka

    This may be possible in the framework of the QRC model by considering an annihilation and creation mechanism, as shown in figure 2, where the initial valence u quark, which carries the proton's spin information, annihilates with u in the target proton and then ss pair is created through the gluon propagation, and the s ...

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of the reactions of hexaaqua rhodium (III ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Department of Chemistry, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar 751 004, India e-mail: ... of the aqua cation. On this basis, they proposed a dissociative interchange mechanism for the aqua ligand substitution of Rh(OH2)6. 3+. Recent theoretical studies6 and ...... Chem. 39 2452. 6. Vito D D, Sidorenkova H, Rotzinger F P, Weber J.

  9. Analysis of reaction products formed in the gas phase reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with atmospheric oxidants: Reaction mechanisms and atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenar, I.; Martin, P.; Cabañas, B.; Salgado, S.; Martinez, E.

    2018-03-01

    An analysis of reaction products for the reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with chlorine atoms (Cl) and OH and NO3 radicals has been carried out at the first time with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the tropospheric reactivity of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with a Time of Flight detector (GC-TOFMS) were used to carry out the qualitative and/or quantitative analyses. Reaction products in gas and particulate phase were observed from the reactions of E,E-2,4- hexadienal with all oxidants. E/Z-Butenedial and maleic anhydride were the main products identified in gas phase. E-butenedial calculated molar yield ranging from 4 to 10%. A significant amount of multifunctional compounds (chloro and hydroxy carbonyls) was identified. These compounds could be formed in particulate phase explaining the ∼90% of unaccounted carbon in gas phase. The reaction with Cl atoms in the presence of NOx with a long reaction time gave Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate (PAN) as an additional product, which is known for being an important specie in the generation of the photochemical smog. Nitrated compounds were the major organic products from the reaction with the NO3 radical. Based on the identified products, the reaction mechanisms have been proposed. In these mechanisms a double bond addition of the atmospheric oxidant at C4/C5 of E,E-2,4-hexadienal is the first step for tropospheric degradation.

  10. Reaction mechanism of O-acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    The IRC cal- culations definitely connect two minima on the poten- tial energy surface by a path passing through the ... The (IRC) calculations connect the transition state between R-INT1, INT1-P1 and INT1-. P2, but it ...... (Theochem) 169 41; (Gledening E D, Reed A E, Car- penter J A and Weinhold F NBO Version 3.1). 17.

  11. Surface chemistry of tribochemical reactions explored in ultrahigh vacuum conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara-Romero, Javier; Maya-Yescas, Rafael; Rico-Cerda, Jose Luis; Rivera-Rojas, Jose Luis; Castillo, Fernando Chinas; Kaltchev, Matey; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of model extreme-pressure lubricant additives on clean iron was studied in ultrahigh vacuum conditions using molecular beam strategies. Methylene chloride and chloroform react to deposit a solid film consisting of FeCl 2 and carbon, and evolve only hydrogen into the gas phase. No gas-phase products and less carbon on the surface are detected in the case of carbon tetrachloride. Dimethyl and diethyl disulfide react on clean iron to deposit a saturated sulfur plus carbon layer at low temperatures (∼600 K) and an iron sulfide film onto a Fe + C underlayer at higher temperatures (∼950 K). Methane is the only gas-phase product when dimethyl disulfide reacts with iron. Ethylene and hydrogen are detected when diethyl disulfide is used

  12. Production of specific structured lipids by enzymatic interesterification: optimization of the reaction by response surface design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Skands, Anja Rebecca Havegaard; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Rapeseed oil and capric acid were interesterified in solvent-free media catalyzed by Lipozyme IM (Rhizomucor miehei) to produce specific-structured lipids (SSLs). The process was optimized by response surface design concerning the effects of acyl migration and the by-products of diacylglycerols...... (DAGs). A five-factor response surface design was used to evaluate the influences of five major factors and their relationships. The five factors were water content (Wc, wt% based on enzyme used), reaction temperature (Te,°C), enzyme load (El, wt% based on substrates), reaction time (Tr, hour....... Thus we conclude that the quadratic response models adequately expressed the reaction. Based on the models, the reaction was optimized for the maximum net incorporation and minimum DAG content. The reaction and the control of water content or water activity (Aw) was also discussed....

  13. Study on the surface reaction of uranium metal in hydrogen atmosphere with XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Zuo Changming; Zhao Chunpei; Chen Hong

    1998-01-01

    The surface reactions of uranium metal in hydrogen atmosphere at 25 degree C and 200 degree C and effects of temperature and carbon monoxide to the hydriding reaction have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The reaction between H 2 and uranium metal at 25 degree C leads to the further oxidation of surface layer of metal due to traces of water vapor. At 200 degree C, it may lead to the hydriding reaction of uranium and the hydriding increases with increasing exposure to H 2 in the initial stages. The U4f 7/2 binding energy of UH 3 has been found to be 378.6 eV. Investigation indicates carbon monoxide inhibits both the hydriding reaction and oxidation on the condition of H 2 -CO atmosphere

  14. Production of specific structured lipids by enzymatic interesterification: optimization of the reaction by response surface design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Skands, Anja Rebecca Havegaard; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    (DAGs). A five-factor response surface design was used to evaluate the influences of five major factors and their relationships. The five factors were water content (Wc, wt% based on enzyme used), reaction temperature (Te,°C), enzyme load (El, wt% based on substrates), reaction time (Tr, hour....... Thus we conclude that the quadratic response models adequately expressed the reaction. Based on the models, the reaction was optimized for the maximum net incorporation and minimum DAG content. The reaction and the control of water content or water activity (Aw) was also discussed.......Rapeseed oil and capric acid were interesterified in solvent-free media catalyzed by Lipozyme IM (Rhizomucor miehei) to produce specific-structured lipids (SSLs). The process was optimized by response surface design concerning the effects of acyl migration and the by-products of diacylglycerols...

  15. The Deteriorating Impact of Alkali-Silica Reaction on Concrete: Expansion and Mechanical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, R.

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of concrete structures affected by alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a complex problem due to the multiscale nature of this long-term phenomenon. The reaction starts within the concrete constituents with the formation of an expansive alkali-silica gel at reaction products level. Being the expansive gel confined within the concrete micro-structure, an internal pressure is built up that induces damage at aggregate level. This micro-cracking affects the mechanical characteristics of...

  16. Heterogeneous reaction mechanisms and kinetics relevant to the CVD of semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creighton, J.R.; Coltrin, M.E.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the state of the art in experimental and theoretical techniques for determining reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions relevant to the chemical vapor deposition of semiconductor materials. It summarizes the most common ultra-high vacuum experimental techniques that are used and the types of rate information available from each. Several case studies of specific chemical systems relevant to the microelectronics industry are described. Theoretical methods for calculating heterogeneous reaction rate constants are also summarized.

  17. Reaction pathways and mechanisms of photodegradation of pesticides

    OpenAIRE

    Burrows, H. D.; Canle L, M.; Santaballa, J. A.; Steenken, S.

    2002-01-01

    The photodegradation of pesticides is reviewed, with particular reference to the studies that describe the mechanisms of the processes involved, the nature of reactive intermediates and final products. Potential use of photochemical processes in advanced oxidation methods for water treatment is also discussed. Processes considered include direct photolysis leading to homolysis or heterolysis of the pesticide, photosensitized photodegradation by singlet oxygen and a variety of metal complexes,...

  18. Sorption of oxygen on Cu(111)-Ni surfaces and its reaction with hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesters, C.M.A.M.; Koster, A. de; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Geus, John W.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of O2 with a Cu(111)-Ni alloy and the reaction of sorbed oxygen with H2 has been investigated with ellipsometry and AES. The surface alloys were prepared by dissociation of nickel carbonyl on a clean Cu(111) surface. Sorption of O2 can be described by a precursor state model for

  19. Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations on reactions of molecules with metal surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nattino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Reactions on metal surfaces are of scientific interest due to the tremendous relevance of heterogeneous catalysis. Single crystal surfaces under controlled physical conditions are generally employed as a model for the real catalysts, with the aim of improving the fundamental understanding of the

  20. Infrared thermoimages display of body surface temperature reaction in experimental cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Zhu, Yuan-Gen; Wang, Shu-You; Ma, Hui-Min; Ye, Yan-Yan; Fu, Wei-Xing; Hu, Wei-Guo

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To display the thermoimages of the body surface in experimental cholecystitis, to observe the body surface temperature reaction in visceral disorders, and to study if the theory of body surface-viscera correlation is true and the mechanism of temperature changes along the meridians. METHODS: By injecting bacteria suspension into the stricture bile duct and gallbladder, 21 rabbits were prepared as acute pyogenic cholangiocholecystitis models, with another 8 rabbits prepared by the same process except without injection of bacteria suspension as control. The body surface infrared thermoimages were continuously observed on the hair shaven rabbit skin with AGA-782 thermovision 24 h before, 1-11 d after and (2, 3 wk) 4 wk after the operation with a total of over 10 records of thermoimages. RESULTS: Twelve cases out of 21 rabbits with cholecystitis revealed bi-lateral longitudinal high temperature lines in its trunk; with negative findings in the control group. The high-temperature line appeared on d1-d2, first in the right trunk, after the preparation of the model, about 7 d after the model preparation, the lines appeared at the left side too, persisting for 4 wk. The hyper-temperature line revealed 1.1-2.7 °C higher than before the model preparation, 0.7-2.5 °C higher than the surrounding skin. The length of the high temperature line might reach a half length of the body trunk, or as long as the whole body itself. CONCLUSION: The appearance of the longitudinal high temperature lines at the lateral aspects of the trunk in the experimental group is directly bound up with the experimental animals pyogenic cholecystitis, with its running course quite similar to that of the Gallbladder Channel of Foot Shaoyang, but different to the zones of hyperalgesia and site of referred pain in cholecystitis. PMID:11925617

  1. Organometallic Bonding in an Ullmann-Type On-Surface Chemical Reaction Studied by High-Resolution Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shigeki; Sadeghi, Ali; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Pawlak, Rémy; Meier, Tobias; Takeya, Jun; Goedecker, Stefan; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-10-01

    The on-surface Ullmann-type chemical reaction synthesizes polymers by linking carbons of adjacent molecules on solid surfaces. Although an organometallic compound is recently identified as the reaction intermediate, little is known about the detailed structure of the bonded organometallic species and its influence on the molecule and the reaction. Herein atomic force microscopy at low temperature is used to study the reaction with 3,9-diiododinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-d]thiophene (I-DNT-VW), which is polymerized on Ag(111) in vacuum. Thermally sublimated I-DNT-VW picks up a Ag surface atom, forming a CAg bond at one end after removing an iodine. The CAg bond is usually short-lived, and a CAgC organometallic bond immediately forms with an adjacent molecule. The existence of the bonded Ag atoms strongly affects the bending angle and adsorption height of the molecular unit. Density functional theory calculations reveal the bending mechanism, which reveals that charge from the terminus of the molecule is transferred via the Ag atom into the organometallic bond and strengths the local adsorption to the substrate. Such deformations vanish when the Ag atoms are removed by annealing and CC bonds are established. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Iodine-Azide Reaction: A Videotaped Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, Gilbert P.; Jones, Loretta L.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some difficulties presented by the use of clock reactions with large numbers of students in illustrating the determination of rate laws and the deduction of a mechanism. Suggests the videotaping of a clock reaction without narration to be used with students in stages so that observations can be recorded. (TW)

  3. Degradation of quinoline by wet oxidation - kinetic aspects and reaction mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    of succinic acid is suggested to be a result of a coupling reaction of the acetic acid radical A reaction mechanism is suggested for the degradation of quinoline: it involves hydroxyl radicals and the possible interaction with autoclave walls is discussed. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Development of a skeletal multi-component fuel reaction mechanism based on decoupling methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Balaji; Tay, Kun Lin; Yang, Wenming; Chua, Kian Jon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A compact multi-component skeletal reaction mechanism was developed. • Combined bio-diesel and PRF mechanism was proposed. • The mechanism consists of 68 species and 183 reactions. • Well validated against ignition delay times, flame speed and engine results. - Abstract: A new coupled bio-diesel surrogate and primary reference fuel (PRF) oxidation skeletal mechanism has been developed. The bio-diesel surrogate sub-mechanism consists of oxidation sub-mechanisms of Methyl decanoate (MD), Methyl 9-decenoate (MD9D) and n-Heptane fuel components. The MD and MD9D are chosen to represent the saturated and unsaturated methyl esters respectively in bio-diesel fuels. Then, a reduced iso-Octane oxidation sub-mechanism is added to the bio-diesel surrogate sub-mechanism. Then, all the sub-mechanisms are integrated to a reduced C 2 –C 3 mechanism, detailed H 2 /CO/C 1 mechanism and reduced NO x mechanism based on decoupling methodology. The final mechanism consisted of 68 species and 183 reactions. The mechanism was well validated with shock-tube ignition delay times, laminar flame speed and 3D engine simulations.

  5. Computational studies of atmospherically-relevant chemical reactions in water clusters and on liquid water and ice surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, R Benny; Varner, Mychel E; Hammerich, Audrey D; Riikonen, Sampsa; Murdachaew, Garold; Shemesh, Dorit; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Reactions on water and ice surfaces and in other aqueous media are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, but the microscopic mechanisms of most of these processes are as yet unknown. This Account examines recent progress in atomistic simulations of such reactions and the insights provided into mechanisms and interpretation of experiments. Illustrative examples are discussed. The main computational approaches employed are classical trajectory simulations using interaction potentials derived from quantum chemical methods. This comprises both ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and semiempirical molecular dynamics (SEMD), the latter referring to semiempirical quantum chemical methods. Presented examples are as follows: (i) Reaction of the (NO(+))(NO3(-)) ion pair with a water cluster to produce the atmospherically important HONO and HNO3. The simulations show that a cluster with four water molecules describes the reaction. This provides a hydrogen-bonding network supporting the transition state. The reaction is triggered by thermal structural fluctuations, and ultrafast changes in atomic partial charges play a key role. This is an example where a reaction in a small cluster can provide a model for a corresponding bulk process. The results support the proposed mechanism for production of HONO by hydrolysis of NO2 (N2O4). (ii) The reactions of gaseous HCl with N2O4 and N2O5 on liquid water surfaces. Ionization of HCl at the water/air interface is followed by nucleophilic attack of Cl(-) on N2O4 or N2O5. Both reactions proceed by an SN2 mechanism. The products are ClNO and ClNO2, precursors of atmospheric atomic chlorine. Because this mechanism cannot result from a cluster too small for HCl ionization, an extended water film model was simulated. The results explain ClNO formation experiments. Predicted ClNO2 formation is less efficient. (iii) Ionization of acids at ice surfaces. No ionization is found on ideal crystalline surfaces, but the process is efficient on

  6. Multiple reaction pathways operating in the mechanism of vinylogous Mannich-type reaction activated by a water molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Ryohei; Maeda, Satoshi; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    A systematic search for reaction pathways for the vinylogous Mannich-type reaction was performed by the artificial force induced reaction method. This reaction affords δ-amino-γ-butenolide in one pot by mixing 2-trimethylsiloxyfuran, imine, and water under solvent-free conditions. Surprisingly, the search identified as many as five working pathways. Among them, two concertedly produce anti and syn isomers of the product. Another two give an intermediate, which is a regioisomer of the main product. This intermediate can undergo a retro-Mannich reaction to give a pair of intermediates: an imine and 2-furanol. The remaining pathway directly generates this intermediate pair. The imine and 2-furanol easily react with each other to afford the product. Thus, all of these stepwise pathways finally converge to give the main product. The rate-determining step of all five (two concerted and three stepwise) pathways have a common mechanism: concerted Si-O bond formation through the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule on the silicon atom followed by proton transfer from the water molecule to the imine. Therefore, these five pathways have comparable barriers and compete with each other. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Isotopic evidence suggests different initial reaction mechanisms for anaerobic benzene biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Silvia A; Devine, Cheryl E; Elsner, Martin; Nandi, Monisha E; Ulrich, Ania C; Edwards, Elizabeth A; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood

    2008-11-15

    The initial metabolic reactions for anaerobic benzene biodegradation remain uncharacterized. Isotopic data for carbon and hydrogen fractionation from nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic benzene-degrading enrichment cultures and phylogenic information were used to investigate the initial reaction step in anaerobic benzene biodegradation. Dual parameter plots of carbon and hydrogen isotopic data (deltadelta2H/ deltadelta13C) from each culture were linear, suggesting a consistent reaction mechanism as degradation proceeded. Methanogenic and sulfate-reducing cultures showed consistently higher slopes (m = 29 +/- 2) compared to nitrate-reducing cultures (m = 13 +/- 2) providing evidence for different initial reaction mechanisms. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed that culture conditions were strictly anaerobic, precluding any involvement of molecular oxygen in the observed differences. Using published kinetic data, we explored the possibility of attributing such slopes to reaction mechanisms. The higher slopes found under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions suggest against an alkylation mechanism for these cultures. Observed differences between the methanogenic and nitrate-reducing cultures may not represent distinct reactions of different bonds, but rather subtle differences in relative reaction kinetics. Additional mechanistic conclusions could not be made because kinetic isotope effect data for carboxylation and other putative mechanisms are not available.

  8. The effect of Fermi energy on reaction of water with oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, W. M.

    1989-07-01

    The experimental relationship found between oxide Fermi level and aqueous point of zero charge (pzc) is modeled by the generalized Lewis acid-base theory. This model describes a nearly linear relationship between the position of the Fermi level in the band gap and the net charge transferred in a surface acid-base reaction. The situation of a water molecule adsorbed onto an uncharged, insulator (alumina) surface is examined. The charge in the reaction is assumed to shift the dissociation equilibrium of the water molecule, resulting in a net surface charge on the insulator. The pzc of the surface is calculated as a function of insulator Fermi level from these equilibria. This model predicts very strong effects of doping, surface states and surface space charges on pzc of insulators but possibly small effects of structure and stoichiometry.

  9. Reaction mechanisms in 24.3 MeV/nucleon 238U induced reactions through a comprehensive study of fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chbihi, A.; Galin; Guerreau, D.; Lewitowicz, M.; Morjean, M.; Pouthas, J.; Piasecki, E.; Kordyasz, A.; Iwanicki, J.; Jastrzebski, J.; Pienkowski, L.; Crema, E.; Gatty, B.; Jacquet, D.; Muchorowska, M.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear reaction mechanisms for system characterized by very different asymmetries (U+C, Si, Ni, Au) have been investigated at 24.3 MeV/nucleon, using as observables both the fission products and the neutron multiplicity. It is clearly observed that the fusion process-whatever its completeness- can only occur with rather light target nuclei, indicating the persistence of potential energy effects much above the interaction barrier. (authors). 22 refs., 1 fig

  10. The significance of surface complexation reactions in hydrologic systems: a geochemist's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretsky, C.

    2000-05-01

    Complexation reactions at the mineral-water interface affect the transport and transformation of metals and organic contaminants, nutrient availability in soils, formation of ore deposits, acidification of watersheds and the global cycling of elements. Such reactions can be understood by quantifying speciation reactions in homogeneous aqueous solutions, characterizing reactive sites at mineral surfaces and developing models of the interactions between aqueous species at solid surfaces. In this paper, the application of thermodynamic principles to quantify aqueous complexation reactions is described. This is followed by a brief overview of a few of the methods that have been used to characterize reactive sites on mineral surfaces. Next, the application of empirical and semi-empirical models of adsorption at the mineral-water interface, including distribution coefficients, simple ion exchange models, and Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the limitations of such models in providing an adequate representation of adsorption in hydrological systems. These limitations arise because isotherms do not account for the structure of adsorbed species, nor do they account for the development of surface charge with adsorption. This is contrasted with more sophisticated models of adsorption, termed 'surface complexation models', which include the constant capacitance model, the diffuse layer model, the triple layer model and the MUSIC model. In these models, speciation reactions between surface functional groups and dissolved species control the variable surface charge build-up and the specific adsorption properties of minerals in aqueous solutions. Next, the influence of mineral surface speciation on the reactivity of adsorbed species and on far from equilibrium dissolution rates of minerals is discussed. Finally, the applicability of microscopic models of surface complexation to field-scale systems is explored and the need to integrate

  11. Formation of multiscale surface structures on nickel via above surface growth and below surface growth mechanisms using femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhlke, Craig A; Anderson, Troy P; Alexander, Dennis R

    2013-04-08

    The formation of self-organized micro- and nano-structured surfaces on nickel via both above surface growth (ASG) and below surface growth (BSG) mechanisms using femtosecond laser pulse illumination is reported. Detailed stepped growth experiments demonstrate that conical mound-shaped surface structure development is characterized by a balance of growth mechanisms including scattering from surface structures and geometric effects causing preferential ablation of the valleys, flow of the surface melt, and redeposition of ablated material; all of which are influenced by the laser fluence and the number of laser shots on the sample. BSG-mound formation is dominated by scattering, while ASG-mound formation is dominated by material flow and redeposition. This is the first demonstration to our knowledge of the use of femtosecond laser pulses to fabricate metallic surface structures that rise above the original surface. These results are useful in understanding the details of multi-pulse femtosecond laser interaction with metals.

  12. The dynamics of molecular interactions and chemical reactions at metal surfaces: testing the foundations of theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Bartels, Nils; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M

    2015-04-01

    We review studies of molecular interactions and chemical reactions at metal surfaces, emphasizing progress toward a predictive theory of surface chemistry and catalysis. For chemistry at metal surfaces, a small number of central approximations are typically made: (a) the Born-Oppenheimer approximation of electronic adiabaticity, (b) the use of density functional theory at the generalized gradient approximation level, (c) the classical approximation for nuclear motion, and (d) various reduced-dimensionality approximations. Together, these approximations constitute a provisional model for surface chemical reactivity. We review work on some carefully studied examples of molecules interacting at metal surfaces that probe the validity of various aspects of the provisional model.

  13. Site-selective reversible Diels-Alder reaction between a biphenylene-based polyarene and a semiconductor surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewski, Szymon; Engelund, Mads; Peña, Diego; Zuzak, Rafał; Kawai, Hiroyo; Kolmer, Marek; Caeiro, Jorge; Guitián, Enrique; Vollhardt, K Peter C; Sánchez-Portal, Daniel; Szymonski, Marek; Pérez, Dolores

    2018-04-12

    Understanding the mechanisms involved in the covalent attachment of organic molecules to surfaces is a major challenge for nanotechnology and surface science. On the basis of classical organic chemistry mechanistic considerations, key issues such as selectivity and reactivity of the organic adsorbates could be rationalized and exploited for the design of molecular-scale circuits and devices. Here we use tris(benzocyclobutadieno)triphenylene, a singular Y-shaped hydrocarbon containing antiaromatic cyclobutadienoid rings, as a molecular probe to study the reaction of polycyclic conjugated molecules with atomic scale moieties, dangling-bond (DB) dimers on a hydrogen-passivated Ge(001):H surface. By combining molecular design, synthesis, scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) and computational modeling, we show that the attachment involves a concerted [4+2] cycloaddition reaction that is completely site-selective and fully reversible. This selectivity, governed by the bond alternation induced by the presence of the cyclobutadienoid rings, allows for the control of the orientation of the molecules with respect to the surface DB-patterning. We also demonstrate that by judicious modification of the electronic levels of the polycyclic benzenoid through substituents, the reaction barrier height can be modified. Finally, we show that after deliberate tip-induced covalent bond cleavage, adsorbed molecules can be used to fine tune the electronic states of the DB dimer. This power to engineer deliberately the bonding configuration and electronic properties opens new perspectives for creating prototypical nanoscale circuitry.

  14. Phenylazopyridine as Switch in Photochemical Reactions. A Detailed Computational Description of the Mechanism of Its Photoisomerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Casellas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Azo compounds are organic photochromic systems that have the possibility of switching between cis and trans isomers under irradiation. The different photochemical properties of these isomers make azo compounds into good light-triggered switches, and their significantly different geometries make them very interesting as components in molecular engines or mechanical switches. For instance, azo ligands are used in coordination complexes to trigger photoresponsive properties. The light-induced trans-to-cis isomerization of phenylazopyridine (PAPy plays a fundamental role in the room-temperature switchable spin crossover of Ni-porphyrin derivatives. In this work, we present a computational study developed at the SA-CASSCF/CASPT2 level (State Averaged Complete Active Space Self Consistent Field/CAS second order Perturbation Theory to elucidate the mechanism, up to now unknown, of the cis–trans photoisomerization of 3-PAPy. We have analyzed the possible reaction pathways along its lowest excited states, generated by excitation of one or two electrons from the lone pairs of the N atoms of the azo group (nazoπ*2 and nazo2π*2 states, from a π delocalized molecular orbital (ππ* state, or from the lone pair of the N atom of the pyridine moiety (npyπ* state. Our results show that the mechanism proceeds mainly along the rotation coordinate in both the nazoπ* and ππ* excited states, although the nazo2π*2 state can also be populated temporarily, while the npyπ* does not intervene in the reaction. For rotationally constrained systems, accessible paths to reach the cis minimum along planar geometries have also been located, again on the nazoπ* and ππ* potential energy surfaces, while the nazo2π*2 and npyπ* states are not involved in the reaction. The relative energies of the different paths differ from those found for azobenzene in a previous work, so our results predict some differences between the reactivities of both compounds.

  15. Reaction mechanism of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons by the crossed molecular beams method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, R.J.; Baseman, R.J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  16. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of the gas phase reaction of Cl atoms with iodobenzene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Ponomarev, DA; Nielsen, OJ

    2001-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of Cl atoms with iodobenzene (C6H5I) in 20-700 Torr of N-2, air, or O-2 diluent at 296 K. The reaction proceeds with a rate constant k(Cl + QH(5)I) = (3.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) to give...... chlorobenzene (C6H5Cl) in a yield which is indistinguishable from 100 The title reaction proceeds via a displacement mechanism (probably addition followed by elimination). (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  18. Kinetic modeling and determination of reaction constants of Alzheimer's beta-amyloid fibril extension and dissociation using surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito; Naiki, Hironobu

    2002-11-19

    To establish the kinetic model of the extension and dissociation of beta-amyloid fibrils (f(A)beta) in vitro, we analyzed these reactions using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. Sonicated f(A)beta were immobilized on the surface of the SPR sensor chip as seeds. The SPR signal increased linearly as a function of time after amyloid beta-peptides (Abeta) were injected into the f(A)beta-immobilized chips. The extension of f(A)beta was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. When flow cells were washed with running buffer, the SPR signal decreased with time after the extension reaction. The curve fitting resolved the dissociation reaction into the fast exponential and slow linear decay phases. Kinetic analysis of the effect of Abeta/f(A)beta concentrations on the reaction rate indicated that both the extension reaction and the slow linear phase of the dissociation were consistent with a first-order kinetic model; i.e., the extension/dissociation reactions proceed via consecutive association/dissociation of Abeta onto/from the end of existing fibrils. On the basis of this model, the critical monomer concentration ([M](e)) and the equilibrium association constant (K) were calculated, for the first time, to be 20 nM and 5 x 10(7) M(-1), respectively. Alternatively, [M](e) was directly measured as 200 nM, which may represent the equilibrium between the extension reaction and the fast phase of the dissociation. The SPR biosensor is a useful quantitative tool for the kinetic and thermodynamic study of the molecular mechanisms of f9A)beta formation in vitro.

  19. Parallel and series-reaction mechanisms of wood and char combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branca Carmen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermo gravimetric curves in air of beech wood and char, obtained from conventional pyrolysis of beech wood at a laboratory scale, have been re-examined using different kinetic models. Multi-step reaction mechanisms consisting of either four (wood or two (char reactions are needed for accurate predictions of weight loss curves. In the case of wood, three reactions are linear in the reactant mass fraction whereas the fourth step presents a power-law dependence. A linear reaction for devolatilization and a non-linear reaction for combustion are used for the weight loss curves of char. It has been found that activation energies and pre-exponential factors are in variant with series or parallel reactions, providing changes in the stoichiometric coefficients. Further more, the activation energies of the two reactions occurring at higher temperatures in the four-step mechanism (wood and those of the two-step mechanism (char are the same. Thus pre-exponential factors and reaction order take into account variations in the char reactivity derived from different pyrolysis conditions.

  20. 2013 Gordon Research Conference, Inorganic reaction mechanisms, Galveston, TX, March 3-8 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Omar, Mahdi M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2012-12-08

    The 2013 Gordon Conference on Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms will present cutting-edge research on the molecular aspects of inorganic reactions involving elements from throughout the periodic table and state-of-the art techniques that are used in the elucidation of reaction mechanisms. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, such as homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, metallobiochemistry, electron-transfer in energy reactions, polymerization, nitrogen fixation, green chemistry, oxidation, solar conversion, alkane functionalization, organotransition metal chemistry, and computational chemistry. The talks will cover themes of current interest including energy, materials, and bioinorganic chemistry. Sections cover: Electron-Transfer in Energy Reactions; Catalytic Polymerization and Oxidation Chemistry; Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Heterogeneous Catalysts; Metal-Organic Chemistry and its Application in Synthesis; Green Energy Conversion;Organometallic Chemistry and Activation of Small Molecules; Advances in Kinetics Modeling and Green Chemistry; Metals in Biology and Disease; Frontiers in Catalytic Bond Activation and Cleavage.

  1. Theory of the reaction dynamics of small molecules on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Bret [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2016-09-09

    The objective of this project has been to develop realistic theoretical models for gas-surface interactions, with a focus on processes important in heterogeneous catalysis. The dissociative chemisorption of a molecule on a metal is a key step in many catalyzed reactions, and is often the rate-limiting step. We have explored the dissociative chemisorption of H2, H2O and CH4 on a variety of metal surfaces. Most recently, our extensive studies of methane dissociation on Ni and Pt surfaces have fully elucidated its dependence on translational energy, vibrational state and surface temperature, providing the first accurate comparisons with experimental data. We have explored Eley-Rideal and hot atom reactions of H atoms with H- and C-covered metal surfaces. H atom interactions with graphite have also been explored, including both sticking and Eley-Rideal recombination processes. Again, our methods made it possible to explain several experiments studying these reactions. The sticking of atoms on metal surfaces has also been studied. To help elucidate the experiments that study these processes, we examine how the reaction dynamics depend upon the nature of the molecule-metal interaction, as well as experimental variables such as substrate temperature, beam energy, angle of impact, and the internal states of the molecules. Electronic structure methods based on Density Functional Theory are used to compute each molecule-metal potential energy surface. Both time-dependent quantum scattering techniques and quasi-classical methods are used to examine the reaction or scattering dynamics. Much of our effort has been directed towards developing improved quantum methods that can accurately describe reactions, as well as include the effects of substrate temperature (lattice vibration).

  2. Isotope effects on product polarization and reaction mechanism in the Li + HF(v = 0, j = 0) → LiF + H reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xian-Fang; Wang, Mei-Shan

    2012-09-01

    Isotope effects on product polarization and reaction mechanism in the title reaction and its isotopic variants are investigated by employing the quasiclassical trajectory method. At a collision energy of 363 meV, the calculated differential cross sections display a strongly forward scattering in the Li + HF(v = 0, j = 0) → LiF + H reaction, but both the forward and sideways scatterings in the Li + DF(v = 0, j = 0) → LiF + D and Li + TF(v = 0, j = 0) → LiF + T reactions. Analysis of trajectories propagation along the time reveals that the Li + HF and Li + DF reactions proceed predominantly by the direct reaction mechanism. This is consistent with the experimental results of Becker et al. however, the Li + TF reaction undergoes both the direct and indirect reaction mechanisms. The product polarization shows a monotonically decreasing behavior with increasing the mass of the hydrogen isotopes.

  3. Contact mechanics for layered materials with randomly rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, B N J

    2012-03-07

    The contact mechanics model of Persson is applied to layered materials. We calculate the M function, which relates the surface stress to the surface displacement, for a layered material, where the top layer (thickness d) has different elastic properties than the semi-infinite solid below. Numerical results for the contact area as a function of the magnification are presented for several cases. As an application, we calculate the fluid leak rate for laminated rubber seals.

  4. Tuning Mechanisms in a Corrugated Origami Frequency Selective Surface (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-09

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0298 TUNING MECHANISMS IN A CORRUGATED ORIGAMI FREQUENCY SELECTIVE SURFACE (PREPRINT) Kazuko Fuchi UDRI... SURFACE (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-15-D-5405-0002 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 1) Kazuko Fuchi...Clearance Date: 12 Jan 2017. This document contains color. The U.S. Government is joint author of the work and has the right to use, modify, reproduce

  5. Oxygen reduction reaction over silver particles with various morphologies and surface chemical states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Junya; Okata, Yui; Watabe, Noriyuki; Katagiri, Makoto; Nakamura, Ayaka; Arikawa, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Ken-ichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Ueda, Wataru; Satsuma, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an alkaline solution was carried out using Ag powders having various particle morphologies and surface chemical states (Size: ca. 40-110 nm in crystalline size. Shape: spherical, worm like, and angular. Surface: smooth with easily reduced AgOx, defective with AgOx, and Ag2CO3 surface layer). The various Ag powders were well characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and stripping voltammetry of underpotential-deposited lead. Defective and oxidized surfaces enhanced the Ag active surface area during the ORR. The ORR activity was affected by the morphology and surface chemical state: Ag particles with defective and angular surfaces showed smaller electron exchange number between three and four but showed higher specific activity compared to Ag particles with smooth surfaces.

  6. On the mechanics of thin films and growing surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Holland, M. A.

    2013-05-24

    Many living structures are coated by thin films, which have distinct mechanical properties from the bulk. In particular, these thin layers may grow faster or slower than the inner core. Differential growth creates a balanced interplay between tension and compression and plays a critical role in enhancing structural rigidity. Typical examples with a compressive outer surface and a tensile inner core are the petioles of celery, caladium, or rhubarb. While plant physiologists have studied the impact of tissue tension on plant rigidity for more than a century, the fundamental theory of growing surfaces remains poorly understood. Here, we establish a theoretical and computational framework for continua with growing surfaces and demonstrate its application to classical phenomena in plant growth. To allow the surface to grow independently of the bulk, we equip it with its own potential energy and its own surface stress. We derive the governing equations for growing surfaces of zero thickness and obtain their spatial discretization using the finite-element method. To illustrate the features of our new surface growth model we simulate the effects of growth-induced longitudinal tissue tension in a stalk of rhubarb. Our results demonstrate that different growth rates create a mechanical environment of axial tissue tension and residual stress, which can be released by peeling off the outer layer. Our novel framework for continua with growing surfaces has immediate biomedical applications beyond these classical model problems in botany: it can be easily extended to model and predict surface growth in asthma, gastritis, obstructive sleep apnoea, brain development, and tumor invasion. Beyond biology and medicine, surface growth models are valuable tools for material scientists when designing functionalized surfaces with distinct user-defined properties. © The Author(s) 2013.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of New Surface Active Azo Initiators for Radical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Tauer

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of a water soluble azo initiators from 2,2’-azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN was performed in three steps: reaction of dinitrile with aromatic alcohols in the presence of HCl to form bisiminoesters hydrochlorides which are hydrolyzed to the esters and final regioselective sulfonation of the aromatic esters. The thermal decomposition of the azo initiators obtained leads to formation of two surface active radicals which can start the chain reaction.

  8. Surface layer softing in mechanically polished molybdenum monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivashchenko, R.K.; Kostyuchenko, V.G.; Lotsko, D.V.; Lukinov, I.V.; Mil'man, Yu.V.; Novikov, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Softening of the surface layer together with growth of dislocation density is found in molybdenum single crystals mechanically polished with diamond suspension in water solution of CuSO 4 . The penetration of small amount of copper into molybdenum is observed by SIMS. A supposition has been made about molybdenum solid solution softening influenced by copper penetrating into molybdenum by means of a dynamic dislocation mechanism

  9. Thermomechanical Mechanisms of Reducing Ice Adhesion on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, N; Dotan, A; Dodiuk, H; Kenig, S

    2016-09-20

    Superhydrophobic (SH) coatings have been shown to reduce freezing and ice nucleation rates, by means of low surface energy chemistry tailored with nano/micro roughness. Durability enhancement of SH surfaces is a crucial issue. Consequently, the present research on reducing ice adhesion is based on radiation-induced radical reaction for covalently bonding SiO2 nanoparticles to polymer coatings to obtain durable roughness. Results indicated that the proposed approach resulted in SH surfaces having high contact angles (>155°) and low sliding angles (reduction of shear adhesion to a variety of SH treated substrates having low thermal expansion coefficient (copper and aluminum) and high thermal expansion coefficient (polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate)). It was concluded that the thermal mismatch between the adhering ice and the various substrates and its resultant interfacial thermal stresses affect the adhesion strength of the ice to the respective substrate.

  10. Material, Mechanical, and Tribological Characterization of Laser-Treated Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Kumar, Aditya; Bhushan, Bharat; Aleem, B. J. Abdul

    2014-10-01

    Laser treatment under nitrogen assisting gas environment of cobalt-nickel-chromium-tungsten-based superalloy and high-velocity oxygen-fuel thermal spray coating of nickel-chromium-based superalloy on carbon steel was carried out to improve mechanical and tribological properties. Superalloy surface was preprepared to include B4C particles at the surface prior to the laser treatment process. Material and morphological changes in the laser-treated samples were examined using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Residual stresses present at the surface region of the laser-treated layer were determined from the XRD data. The microhardness of the laser-treated surface was measured by indentation tests. Fracture toughness of the coating surfaces before and after laser treatment were also measured using overload indentation tests. Macrowear and macrofriction characterization were carried out using pin-on-disk tests.

  11. Optimization of Maillard Reaction in Model System of Glucosamine and Cysteine Using Response Surface Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchi, Shanika Jeewantha Thewarapperuma; Kim, Ye-Joo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Oh, Sang-Chul; Lee, Yang-Bong

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids play important roles in good flavor generation in Maillard reaction of non-enzymatic browning, so aqueous model systems of glucosamine and cysteine were studied to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, initial pH, reaction time, and concentration ratio of glucosamine and cysteine. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the independent reaction parameters of cysteine and glucosamine in Maillard reaction. Box-Behnken factorial design was used with 30 runs of 16 factorial levels, 8 axial levels and 6 central levels. The degree of Maillard reaction was determined by reading absorption at 425 nm in a spectrophotometer and Hunter’s L, a, and b values. ΔE was consequently set as the fifth response factor. In the statistical analyses, determination coefficients (R2) for their absorbance, Hunter’s L, a, b values, and ΔE were 0.94, 0.79, 0.73, 0.96, and 0.79, respectively, showing that the absorbance and Hunter’s b value were good dependent variables for this model system. The optimum processing parameters were determined to yield glucosamine-cysteine Maillard reaction product with higher absorbance and higher colour change. The optimum estimated absorbance was achieved at the condition of initial pH 8.0, 111°C reaction temperature, 2.47 h reaction time, and 1.30 concentration ratio. The optimum condition for colour change measured by Hunter’s b value was 2.41 h reaction time, 114°C reaction temperature, initial pH 8.3, and 1.26 concentration ratio. These results can provide the basic information for Maillard reaction of aqueous model system between glucosamine and cysteine. PMID:28401086

  12. Optimization of Maillard Reaction in Model System of Glucosamine and Cysteine Using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchi, Shanika Jeewantha Thewarapperuma; Kim, Ye-Joo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Oh, Sang-Chul; Lee, Yang-Bong

    2017-03-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids play important roles in good flavor generation in Maillard reaction of non-enzymatic browning, so aqueous model systems of glucosamine and cysteine were studied to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, initial pH, reaction time, and concentration ratio of glucosamine and cysteine. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the independent reaction parameters of cysteine and glucosamine in Maillard reaction. Box-Behnken factorial design was used with 30 runs of 16 factorial levels, 8 axial levels and 6 central levels. The degree of Maillard reaction was determined by reading absorption at 425 nm in a spectrophotometer and Hunter's L, a, and b values. ΔE was consequently set as the fifth response factor. In the statistical analyses, determination coefficients (R 2 ) for their absorbance, Hunter's L, a, b values, and ΔE were 0.94, 0.79, 0.73, 0.96, and 0.79, respectively, showing that the absorbance and Hunter's b value were good dependent variables for this model system. The optimum processing parameters were determined to yield glucosamine-cysteine Maillard reaction product with higher absorbance and higher colour change. The optimum estimated absorbance was achieved at the condition of initial pH 8.0, 111°C reaction temperature, 2.47 h reaction time, and 1.30 concentration ratio. The optimum condition for colour change measured by Hunter's b value was 2.41 h reaction time, 114°C reaction temperature, initial pH 8.3, and 1.26 concentration ratio. These results can provide the basic information for Maillard reaction of aqueous model system between glucosamine and cysteine.

  13. Mechanical and tribological properties of ion beam-processed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodali, Padma [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The intent of this work was to broaden the applications of well-established surface modification techniques and to elucidate the various wear mechanisms that occur in sliding contact of ion-beam processed surfaces. The investigation included characterization and evaluation of coatings and modified surfaces synthesized by three surface engineering methods; namely, beam-line ion implantation, plasma-source ion implantation, and DC magnetron sputtering. Correlation among measured properties such as surface hardness, fracture toughness, and wear behavior was also examined. This dissertation focused on the following areas of research: (1) investigating the mechanical and tribological properties of mixed implantation of carbon and nitrogen into single crystal silicon by beam-line implantation; (2) characterizing the mechanical and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings processed by plasma source ion implantation; and (3) developing and evaluating metastable boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) compound coatings for mechanical and tribological properties. The surface hardness of a mixed carbon-nitrogen implant sample improved significantly compared to the unimplanted sample. However, the enhancement in the wear factor of this sample was found to be less significant than carbon-implanted samples. The presence of nitrogen might be responsible for the degraded wear behavior since nitrogen-implantation alone resulted in no improvement in the wear factor. DLC coatings have low friction, low wear factor, and high hardness. The fracture toughness of DLC coatings has been estimated for the first time. The wear mechanism in DLC coatings investigated with a ruby slider under a contact stress of 1 GPa was determined to be plastic deformation. The preliminary data on metastable BCN compound coatings indicated high friction, low wear factor, and high hardness.

  14. Mechanical and tribological properties of ion beam-processed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodali, P.

    1998-01-01

    The intent of this work was to broaden the applications of well-established surface modification techniques and to elucidate the various wear mechanisms that occur in sliding contact of ion-beam processed surfaces. The investigation included characterization and evaluation of coatings and modified surfaces synthesized by three surface engineering methods; namely, beam-line ion implantation, plasma-source ion implantation, and DC magnetron sputtering. Correlation among measured properties such as surface hardness, fracture toughness, and wear behavior was also examined. This dissertation focused on the following areas of research: (1) investigating the mechanical and tribological properties of mixed implantation of carbon and nitrogen into single crystal silicon by beam-line implantation; (2) characterizing the mechanical and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings processed by plasma source ion implantation; and (3) developing and evaluating metastable boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) compound coatings for mechanical and tribological properties. The surface hardness of a mixed carbon-nitrogen implant sample improved significantly compared to the unimplanted sample. However, the enhancement in the wear factor of this sample was found to be less significant than carbon-implanted samples. The presence of nitrogen might be responsible for the degraded wear behavior since nitrogen-implantation alone resulted in no improvement in the wear factor. DLC coatings have low friction, low wear factor, and high hardness. The fracture toughness of DLC coatings has been estimated for the first time. The wear mechanism in DLC coatings investigated with a ruby slider under a contact stress of 1 GPa was determined to be plastic deformation. The preliminary data on metastable BCN compound coatings indicated high friction, low wear factor, and high hardness

  15. Reaction of water vapour with a clean liquid uranium surface. Revised 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, W. II; Siekhaus, W.

    1986-01-01

    To study the reaction of water vapour with uranium, we have exposed clean liquid uranium surfaces to H 2 O under UHV conditions. We have measured the surface concentration of oxygen as a function of exposure, and determined the maximum attainable surface oxygen concentration X/sup s//sub O/ as a function of temperature. We have used these measurements to estimate, close to the melting point, the solubility of oxygen (X/sup b//sub O/, -4 ) and its surface segregation coefficient β/sup s/(> 10 3 ). 11 refs., 5 figs

  16. XPS study on the surface reaction of uranium metal with carbon monoxide at 200 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoling; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Huang Ruiliang

    1996-12-01

    The surface reaction of uranium metal with carbon monoxide at 200 degree C has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The carbon monoxide adsorption on the surface oxide layer resulted in U4f peak shifting to the lower binding energy and the content of oxygen in the oxide is decreased. O/U radio decreases with increasing the exposure of carbon monoxide to the surface layer. The investigation indicated the surface layer of uranium metal was further reduced in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide at high temperature. (3 refs., 5 figs.)

  17. Interest of uranium complexes for the mechanism study of the McMurry reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maury, O.

    1997-01-01

    The reducing coupling reactions of ketones in diols and olefins are generally carried out with titanium or samarium compounds. In this work uranium complexes have been used. They have allowed to study the chemical reaction mechanism. This thesis is divided into three parts: 1) the reduction mechanism of uranium tetrachloride by cyclic voltametry has been studied at first. It has been shown that this reduction is followed by a transfer reaction of chlorides between the reduced specie of the higher electronic density and UCl . 2) In the second part is described: the synthesis, the crystal structure, the reactivity of the chemical agents, the stereochemistry of diols and alkenes formation and the pinacolisation reaction catalysis. 3) In the last part, the limits of the McMurry reaction are given by the study of the aromatic ketones pinacolisation reaction by-products. The obtained results show that the complexes of the metals which present a high reducing and oxo-philic (Ti, Sm, U..) character react in a similar way with the carbonyl compounds. If the uranium compounds are less used than those of the titanium in the field of the organic synthesis applications, they are precious auxiliaries and excellent models for reactions mechanisms study and for the synthesis methods optimization. (O.M.)

  18. Synergetic mechanism of methanol–steam reforming reaction in a catalytic reactor with electric discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taegyu; Jo, Sungkwon; Song, Young-Hoon; Lee, Dae Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Methanol–steam reforming was performed on Cu catalysts under an electric discharge. • Discharge had a synergetic effect on the catalytic reaction for methanol conversion. • Discharge lowered the temperature for catalyst activation or light off. • Discharge controlled the yield and selectivity of species in a reforming process. • Adsorption triggered by a discharge was a possible mechanism for a synergetic effect. - Abstract: Methanol–steam reforming was performed on Cu/ZnO/Al 2 O 3 catalysts under an electric discharge. The discharge occurred between the electrodes where the catalysts were packed. The electric discharge was characterized by the discharge voltage and electric power to generate the discharge. The existence of a discharge had a synergetic effect on the catalytic reaction for methanol conversion. The electric discharge provided modified reaction paths resulting in a lower temperature for catalyst activation or light off. The discharge partially controlled the yield and selectivity of species in a reforming process. The aspect of control was examined in view of the reaction kinetics. The possible mechanisms for the synergetic effect between the catalytic reaction and electric discharge on methanol–steam reforming were addressed. A discrete reaction path, particularly adsorption triggered by an electric discharge, was suggested to be the most likely mechanism for the synergetic effect. These results are expected to provide a guide for understanding the plasma–catalyst hybrid reaction

  19. Quantum mechanical investigations on the role of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates in organocatalyzed reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubin, Pierre O., E-mail: pierre.hubin@unamur.be [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Informatique (PCI), Unité de Chimie Physique Théorique et Structurale, University of Namur, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Jacquemin, Denis [Laboratoire CEISAM – UMR CNRS 6230, Université de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP92208, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Institut Universitaire de France 103, Boulevard St Michel, 75005 Paris Cedex 5 (France); Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Informatique (PCI), Unité de Chimie Physique Théorique et Structurale, University of Namur, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • M06-2X functional is suitable to model key steps of proline-catalyzed reactions. • Investigation of the proline-catalyzed aldol reaction mechanism. • Influence of water molecules on the C–C bond formation step. • Mechanism for the reaction of proline-derived enamines with benzhydrylium cations. - Abstract: The proline-catalyzed aldol reaction is the seminal example of asymmetric organocatalysis. Previous theoretical and experimental studies aimed at identifying its mechanism in order to rationalize the outcome of this reaction. Here, we focus on key steps with modern first principle methods, i.e. the M06-2X hybrid exchange–correlation functional combined to the solvation density model to account for environmental effects. In particular, different pathways leading to the formation of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates are investigated, and their reactivity towards two electrophiles, i.e. an aldehyde and a benzhydrylium cation, are compared. Regarding the self-aldol reaction, our calculations confirm that the neutral enamine intermediate is more reactive than the negatively charged one. For the reaction with benzhydrylium cations however, the negatively charged enamine intermediate is more reactive.

  20. Mechanisms regulating osteoblast response to surface microtopography and vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Bryan Frederick, Jr.

    A comprehensive understanding of the interactions between orthopaedic and dental implant surfaces with the surrounding host tissue is essential in the design of advanced biomaterials that better promote bone growth and osseointegration of implants. Dental implants with roughened surfaces and high surface energy are well known to promote osteoblast differentiation in vitro and promote increased bone-to-implant contact in vivo. In addition, increased surface roughness increases osteoblasts response to the vitamin D metabolite 1alpha,25(OH)2D3. However, the exact mechanisms mediating cell response to surface properties and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 are still being elucidated. The central aim of the thesis is to investigate whether integrin signaling in response to rough surface microtopography enhances osteoblast differentiation and responsiveness to 1alpha,25(OH)2D3. The hypothesis is that the integrin alpha5beta1 plays a role in osteoblast response to surface microtopography and that 1alpha,25(OH) 2D3 acts through VDR-independent pathways involving caveolae to synergistically enhance osteoblast response to surface roughness and 1alpha,25(OH) 2D3. To test this hypothesis the objectives of the studies performed in this thesis were: (1) to determine if alpha5beta 1 signaling is required for osteoblast response to surface microstructure; (2) to determine if increased responsiveness to 1alpha,25(OH)2D 3 requires the vitamin D receptor, (3) to determine if rough titanium surfaces functionalized with the peptides targeting integrins (RGD) and transmembrane proteoglycans (KRSR) will enhance both osteoblast proliferation and differentiation, and (4) to determine whether caveolae, which are associated with integrin and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 signaling, are required for enhance osteogenic response to surface microstructure and 1alpha,25(OH)2D 3. The results demonstrate that integrins, VDR, and caveolae play important roles in mediating osteoblast response to surface properties and 1alpha,25

  1. Spectroscopic Study of the Surface Oxidation of Mechanically Activated Sulphides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Godočíková, E.; Baláž, P.; Bastl, Zdeněk; Brabec, Libor

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 200, č. 1 (2002), s. 36-47 ISSN 0169-4332 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : mechanical activation * surface oxidation * sulphide minerals Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.295, year: 2002

  2. Study on the mechanism of surface modification of magnesium oxysulfate whisker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Li [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Nai, Xueying; Zhu, Donghai [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China); Jing, Yanwei [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Xin; Dong, Yaping [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China); Li, Wu, E-mail: driverlaoli@163.com [Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining 810008 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Physisorbed lauric acid was ruled out by FT-IR spectroscopy. • The inexistence of physisorbed magnesium laurate was proved by DSC analyses. • {sup 13}C NMR further verified the formation of COO–Mg< bonds on the surface of MOSw. • “Acid-base neutralization” was proved by the pH meter monitoring synchronously. • The type of surface modification of MOSw was proved to be chemical adsorption only. - Abstract: Hydrophobic-lipophilic magnesium oxysulfate whisker (MOSw) was prepared by surface modification with lauric acid and the surface morphology of MOSw was examined with field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was used to characterize the crystalline degree of MOSw and modified MOSw (MOSw-LA). Both FESEM and XRD suggested that modification occurred on the surface of MOSw exclusively. The inexistence of physisorbed lauric acid was proved by Fouier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric analyses ruled out the possibility that magnesium laurate (LA-Mg) physisorbed on the surface of MOSw-LA. Solid state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 13}C NMR) further verified the formation of COO–Mg< bonds based on the significant changes of chemical shift and decrease in intensity. Hence, we confirmed that the type of surface modification of MOSw with lauric acid was chemical adsorption taken place between lauric acid and Mg<. In order to study the dynamic state approach of this reaction, a pH meter was employed to monitor the reaction process synchronously, and then we proposed a reaction mechanism which was similar to the “acid-base neutralization”. This research provides a detailed explanation for a kind of surface modification, which may be further used in the performance of whisker/polymer matrix composites.

  3. Mechanisms of subthreshold atomic emission from solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiv, A.E.; Elango, M.A.; Britavskaya, E.P.; Zaharchenko, I.G.

    1994-01-01

    Computer simulation of the dynamics of ions and atoms on the surfaces of solids has been carried out. The Coulomb, Pauli, exchange and Van der Waals potentials have been taken into account. The semi-empirical quantum-chemical method has been used also. In the case of alkali halide surfaces it is shown that if recharge of an anion (X - → X + ) occurs in two surface layers, it may initiate the ejection of positive metal ions (M + ) and, assisted by the capture of an electron by a departing M + , of metal atoms M 0 . Besides the Coulomb repulsion the Pauli shock is shown to play an essential role in the driving of the ejection process. This mechanism of desorption has large efficiency when the excitation of a core electron occurs in case of alkali halide crystals and has a strong dependence on the crystal ionicity. We obtained the energy distribution of ejected particles for different mechanisms of electron-ion emission. (orig.)

  4. Is a proposed reaction mechanism free from unnecessary assumptions? Occam's razor applied in a mathematical way to complex first-order reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergson, Göran; Linderberg, Jan

    2008-05-08

    Following Occam's principle, a proposed reaction mechanism should not contain assumptions about the existence of reactive intermediates and reaction paths that are unnecessary for a full description and interpretation of the available facts. A mechanism refers, in this paper, to a proposed reaction scheme or network that represents the reactions supposed to be going on in a complex reaction system with observable species as well as unobservable reactive intermediates. The scope is limited here to (pseudo) first-order reactions and the steady-state approximation is invoked in order to relate unknown mechanistic rate constants to experimentally determined ones, and, when available, theoretically calculated quantities. When the resulting, nonlinear system of equations admits a unique solution within a physically reasonable domain, it is concluded that the reaction mechanism fulfills Occam's principle. Otherwise, there are many or no solutions. No subjective or qualitative arguments enter the procedure and the outcome is not negotiable.

  5. Computational organic chemistry: bridging theory and experiment in establishing the mechanisms of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gui-Juan; Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Xu, Liping; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2015-02-11

    Understanding the mechanisms of chemical reactions, especially catalysis, has been an important and active area of computational organic chemistry, and close collaborations between experimentalists and theorists represent a growing trend. This Perspective provides examples of such productive collaborations. The understanding of various reaction mechanisms and the insight gained from these studies are emphasized. The applications of various experimental techniques in elucidation of reaction details as well as the development of various computational techniques to meet the demand of emerging synthetic methods, e.g., C-H activation, organocatalysis, and single electron transfer, are presented along with some conventional developments of mechanistic aspects. Examples of applications are selected to demonstrate the advantages and limitations of these techniques. Some challenges in the mechanistic studies and predictions of reactions are also analyzed.

  6. Reaction mechanisms and rate constants of waste degradation in landfill bioreactor systems with enzymatic-enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, P A; Hettiaratchi, J P A; Mehrotra, A K; Kumar, S

    2014-06-01

    Augmenting leachate before recirculation with peroxidase enzymes is a novel method to increase the available carbon, and therefore the food supply to microorganisms at the declining phase of the anaerobic landfill bioreactor operation. In order to optimize the enzyme-catalyzed leachate recirculation process, it is necessary to identify the reaction mechanisms and determine rate constants. This paper presents a kinetic model developed to ascertain the reaction mechanisms and determine the rate constants for enzyme catalyzed anaerobic waste degradation. The maximum rate of reaction (Vmax) for MnP enzyme-catalyzed reactors was 0.076 g(TOC)/g(DS).day. The catalytic turnover number (k(cat)) of the MnP enzyme-catalyzed was 506.7 per day while the rate constant (k) of the un-catalyzed reaction was 0.012 per day. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reaction of chlorine radical with tetrahydrofuran: a theoretical investigation on mechanism and reactivity in gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Samiyara; Subramanian, Ranga

    2014-06-01

    Reaction of chlorine (Cl) radical with heterocyclic saturated ether, tetrahydrofuran has been studied. The detailed reactivity and mechanism of this reaction is analyzed using hybrid density functional theory (DFT), B3LYP and BB1K methods, and aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. To explore the mechanism of the reaction of tetrahydrofuran with Cl radical, four possible sites of hydrogen atom (H) abstraction pathways in tetrahydrofuran were analyzed. The barrier height and rate constants are calculated for the four H-abstraction channels. The BB1K calculated rate constant for α-axial H-abstraction is comparable with the experimentally determined rate constant. It reflects that α-axial H-abstraction is the main degradation pathway of tetrahydrofuran with Cl radical. DFT-based reactivity descriptors are also calculated and these values describe α-axial H-abstraction as the main reaction channel.

  8. Understanding reaction mechanisms in organic chemistry from catastrophe theory applied to the electron localization function topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Victor; Andres, Juan; Berski, Slawomir; Domingo, Luis R; Silvi, Bernard

    2008-08-07

    Thom's catastrophe theory applied to the evolution of the topology of the electron localization function (ELF) gradient field constitutes a way to rationalize the reorganization of electron pairing and a powerful tool for the unambiguous determination of the molecular mechanisms of a given chemical reaction. The identification of the turning points connecting the ELF structural stability domains along the reaction pathway allows a rigorous characterization of the sequence of electron pair rearrangements taking place during a chemical transformation, such as multiple bond forming/breaking processes, ring closure processes, creation/annihilation of lone pairs, transformations of C-C multiple bonds into single ones. The reaction mechanism of some relevant organic reactions: Diels-Alder, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and Cope rearrangement are reviewed to illustrate the potential of the present approach.

  9. New insight into the ZnO sulfidation reaction: mechanism and kinetics modeling of the ZnS outward growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveux, Laure; Chiche, David; Pérez-Pellitero, Javier; Favergeon, Loïc; Gay, Anne-Sophie; Pijolat, Michèle

    2013-02-07

    Zinc oxide based materials are commonly used for the final desulfurization of synthesis gas in Fischer-Tropsch based XTL processes. Although the ZnO sulfidation reaction has been widely studied, little is known about the transformation at the crystal scale, its detailed mechanism and kinetics. A model ZnO material with well-determined characteristics (particle size and shape) has been synthesized to perform this study. Characterizations of sulfided samples (using XRD, TEM and electron diffraction) have shown the formation of oriented polycrystalline ZnS nanoparticles with a predominant hexagonal form (wurtzite phase). TEM observations also have evidenced an outward development of the ZnS phase, showing zinc and oxygen diffusion from the ZnO-ZnS internal interface to the surface of the ZnS particle. The kinetics of ZnO sulfidation by H(2)S has been investigated using isothermal and isobaric thermogravimetry. Kinetic tests have been performed that show that nucleation of ZnS is instantaneous compared to the growth process. A reaction mechanism composed of eight elementary steps has been proposed to account for these results, and various possible rate laws have been determined upon approximation of the rate-determining step. Thermogravimetry experiments performed in a wide range of H(2)S and H(2)O partial pressures have shown that the ZnO sulfidation reaction rate has a nonlinear variation with H(2)S partial pressure at the same time no significant influence of water vapor on reaction kinetics has been observed. From these observations, a mixed kinetics of external interface reaction with water desorption and oxygen diffusion has been determined to control the reaction kinetics and the proposed mechanism has been validated. However, the formation of voids at the ZnO-ZnS internal interface, characterized by TEM and electron tomography, strongly slows down the reaction rate. Therefore, the impact of the decreasing ZnO-ZnS internal interface on reaction kinetics has been

  10. Molecular beam study of the mechanism of catalyzed hydrogen--deuterium exchange on platinum single crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernasek, S.L.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    The hydrogen--deuterium exchange reaction was studied by molecular beam scattering on low and high Miller index crystal faces of platinum in the surface temperature range of 300--1300degreeK. Under the condition of the experiments which put strict limitation on the residence time of the detected molecules, the reaction product, HD, was readily detectable from the high Miller index, stepped surfaces (integrated reaction probability, defined as total desorbed HD flux divided by D 2 flux, is approx.10/sup -1/) while HD formation was below the limit of detectability on the Pt(111) low Miller index surface (reaction probability 2 beam pressure and half-order in H 2 background pressure. The absence of beam kinetic energy dependence of the rate indicates that the molecular adsorption does not require activation energy. The surface is able to store a sufficiently large concentration of atoms which react with the molecules by a two-branch mechanism. The rate constants for this two-branch mechanism were determined under conditions of constant H atom coverage, reducing the bimolecular reaction to a pseudo-first-order reaction. At lower temperatures ( 1 = (2plus-or-minus1) times10 5 exp(-4.5plus-or-minus0.5 kcal/RT) sec/sup -1/. The rate determining step appears to be the diffusion of the D 2 molecule on the surface to a step site where HD is formed via a three-center (atom--molecule) reaction, or via a two-center (atom--atom) reaction subsequent to D 2 dissociation at the step. At higher temperatures (>600degreeK) the reaction between an adsorbed H atom and an incident D 2 gas molecule competes with the low temperature branch. The rate constant for this branch is k 2 = (1plus-or-minus2) times10 2 exp(-0.6plus-or-minus0.3 kcal/RT) sec/sup -1/

  11. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathways for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such parameters as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. For some dynamics methods, global potential energy surfaces are required. In this case, it is necessary to obtain the energy at a complete sampling of all the possible arrangements of the nuclei, which are energetically accessible, and then a fitting function must be obtained to interpolate between the computed points. In other cases, characterization of the stationary points and the reaction pathway connecting them is sufficient. These properties may be readily obtained using analytical derivative methods. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method to obtain accurate energetics, gives usefull results for a number of chemically important systems. The talk will focus on a number of applications including global potential energy surfaces, H + O2, H + N2, O(3p) + H2, and reaction pathways for complex reactions, including reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion.

  12. Hydrogen abstraction mechanisms and reaction rates of toluene+NO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yongmei; Su, Kehe; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yan

    2015-08-01

    The hydrogen abstraction reaction mechanisms of toluene molecule by NO3 radical were investigated theoretically with quantum chemistry and reaction kinetics. All the molecular structures, vibrational properties, and the intrinsic reaction coordinates were determined with B3LYP/6-311G(d,p). The non-dynamic electronic correlations were examined with the CASSCF dominant configurations. The energies and the potential energy profiles were refined with accurate model chemistry G3(MP2). Rate constants were determined using the CVT method over the temperature range 200-2000 K. It was found that in addition to the side chain H-abstraction, the ring H-abstraction reactions are also possible. The side chain H-abstraction rate constant is in very good agreement with the available experiments and has a non-Arrhenius characteristic. Nevertheless, all the ring H-abstractions follow the Arrhenius behavior well. The over-all reaction was found to have a complex reaction mechanism in which the side chain H-abstraction is dominant below 700 K while the ring H-abstractions are competitive above 800 K. The approximate apparent activation energies E app are 15.5 and 66.4 kJ mol(-1) at 300-700 K and 800-2000 K, respectively. Graphical Abstract The calculation of the reaction rate indicates that the over-all reaction has a complex mechanism. The reaction proceeds mainly by the side chain H-abstraction at temperatures lower than 700 K and is nearly irreversible, while the competition of the ring H-abstractions becomes observable at higher temperatures and is reversible.

  13. Effects of surface orientation, fluid chemistry and mechanical polishing on the variability of dolomite dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Voltolini, Marco; Knauss, Kevin G.

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies of carbonate surface reactivity have underscored the fundamental variability of dissolution rates and the heterogeneous distribution of the reaction over the mineral surface due to the inhomogeneous distribution of surface energy. Dolomite dissolution rates relative to different cleavage planes (r-planes) and surfaces cut approximately perpendicular to the c-axis (c-planes) were studied at 50 °C as a function of pH (3.4 ≤ pH ≤ 9.0) and solution composition by vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), with the aim of providing an estimate of the intrinsic rate variation of dolomite single crystals and describing the surface reaction distribution and the rate controlling mechanisms. Surface normal retreat rates measured under acidic conditions increased linearly with time and were not visibly affected by the parallel increase of surface roughness. Mean total dissolution rates of r-planes decreased by over 200 times from pH 3.4 to pH 9.0 and CO32--rich solutions, whereas corresponding rate variations spanned over 3 orders of magnitude when also c-plane rate distributions were included in the analysis. At acid to near neutral pH, c-planes dissolved ∼ three times faster than the adjoining r-planes but slower at basic pH and high total carbon concentration, displaying a distinctive morphologic evolution in these two regimes. The comparison of polished and unpolished crystals showed that polished cleavage planes dissolved about three times faster than the unpolished counterpart at near neutral to basic conditions, whereas no significant difference in reactivity was observed at pH < 5. Although experimental data and observations indicate a tendency of dolomite faces to reach a low-energy topography over the course of the reaction, the evolution of the entire crystal morphology depends also on the reactivity of edge and corner regions, whose contribution to measured rates is not generally taken into account by laboratory

  14. Memorable Experiences with Sad Music?Reasons, Reactions and Mechanisms of Three Types of Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Eerola, Tuomas; Peltola, Henna-Riikka

    2016-01-01

    Reactions to memorable experiences of sad music were studied by means of a survey administered to a convenience (N = 1577), representative (N = 445), and quota sample (N = 414). The survey explored the reasons, mechanisms, and emotions of such experiences. Memorable experiences linked with sad music typically occurred in relation to extremely familiar music, caused intense and pleasurable experiences, which were accompanied by physiological reactions and positive mood changes in about a third...

  15. Kinetics and mechanism of the gas phase reaction of Cl atoms with iodobenzene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Ponomarev, DA; Nielsen, OJ

    2001-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of Cl atoms with iodobenzene (C6H5I) in 20-700 Torr of N-2, air, or O-2 diluent at 296 K. The reaction proceeds with a rate constant k(Cl + QH(5)I) = (3.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) to give...

  16. Understanding organometallic reaction mechanisms and catalysis experimental and computational tools computational and experimental tools

    CERN Document Server

    Ananikov, Valentin P

    2014-01-01

    Exploring and highlighting the new horizons in the studies of reaction mechanisms that open joint application of experimental studies and theoretical calculations is the goal of this book. The latest insights and developments in the mechanistic studies of organometallic reactions and catalytic processes are presented and reviewed. The book adopts a unique approach, exemplifying how to use experiments, spectroscopy measurements, and computational methods to reveal reaction pathways and molecular structures of catalysts, rather than concentrating solely on one discipline. The result is a deeper

  17. Surface chemical reactions induced by molecules electronically-excited in the gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrunin, Victor V.

    2011-01-01

    and alignment are taking place, guiding all the molecules towards the intersections with the ground state PES, where transitions to the ground state PES will occur with minimum energy dissipation. The accumulated kinetic energy may be used to overcome the chemical reaction barrier. While recombination chemical...... beams inducing the reaction can be used to distinguish the new process we try to investigate from chemical reactions induced by photoexcitation within adsorbed molecules and/or gas phase photolysis.......We present a model suggesting high chemical activity of electronically-excited molecules colliding with an isolator surface. Initial photochemical event is accounted for as the result of molecular evolution on the electronically-excited potential energy surface (PES), where acceleration...

  18. Surface concentration nonuniformities resulting from chronoamperometry of a reversible reaction at an ultramicrodisk electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Britz, Dieter H.; Strutwolf, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The chronoamperometric experiment at a disk electrode was simulated, assuming a reversible reaction. When the diffusion coefficients of the two substances involved are different, there appears a surface concentration non- uniformity in the radial direction, exhibiting a maximum effect in time...

  19. Chemical reaction of hexagonal boron nitride and graphite nanoclusters in mechanical milling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Y.; Grush, M.; Callcott, T.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Synthesis of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN) hybrid alloys has been attempted extensively by many researchers because the BCN alloys are considered an extremely hard material called {open_quotes}super diamond,{close_quotes} and the industrial application for wear-resistant materials is promising. A mechanical alloying (MA) method of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with graphite has recently been studied to explore the industrial synthesis of the BCN alloys. To develop the MA method for the BCN alloy synthesis, it is necessary to confirm the chemical reaction processes in the mechanical milling systems and to identify the reaction products. Therefore, the authors have attempted to confirm the chemical reaction process of the h-BN and graphite in mechanical milling systems using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) methods.

  20. Chemical reaction of hexagonal boron nitride and graphite nanoclusters in mechanical milling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Y.; Grush, M.; Callcott, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Synthesis of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN) hybrid alloys has been attempted extensively by many researchers because the BCN alloys are considered an extremely hard material called open-quotes super diamond,close quotes and the industrial application for wear-resistant materials is promising. A mechanical alloying (MA) method of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with graphite has recently been studied to explore the industrial synthesis of the BCN alloys. To develop the MA method for the BCN alloy synthesis, it is necessary to confirm the chemical reaction processes in the mechanical milling systems and to identify the reaction products. Therefore, the authors have attempted to confirm the chemical reaction process of the h-BN and graphite in mechanical milling systems using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) methods

  1. Investigation of the CH3Cl + CN(-) reaction in water: Multilevel quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yulong; Zhang, Jingxue; Wang, Dunyou

    2015-06-28

    The CH3Cl + CN(-) reaction in water was studied using a multilevel quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (MM) method with the multilevels, electrostatic potential, density functional theory (DFT) and coupled-cluster single double triple (CCSD(T)), for the solute region. The detailed, back-side attack SN2 reaction mechanism was mapped along the reaction pathway. The potentials of mean force were calculated under both the DFT and CCSD(T) levels for the reaction region. The CCSD(T)/MM level of theory presents a free energy activation barrier height at 20.3 kcal/mol, which agrees very well with the experiment value at 21.6 kcal/mol. The results show that the aqueous solution has a dominant role in shaping the potential of mean force. The solvation effect and the polarization effect together increase the activation barrier height by ∼11.4 kcal/mol: the solvation effect plays a major role by providing about 75% of the contribution, while polarization effect only contributes 25% to the activation barrier height. Our calculated potential of mean force under the CCSD(T)/MM also has a good agreement with the one estimated using data from previous gas-phase studies.

  2. Fluid Shearing for Accelerated Chemical Reactions - Fluid Mechanics in the VFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leivadarou, Evgenia; Dalziel, Stuart; G. K. Batchelor Laboratory, Department of Applied Mathematics; Theoretical Physics Team

    2016-11-01

    The Vortex Fluidic Device (VFD) is a rapidly rotating tube that can operate under continuous flow with a jet feeding liquid reactants to the tube's hemispherical base. It is a new 'green' approach to the organic synthesis with many industrial applications in cosmetics, protein folding and pharmaceutical production. The rate of reaction in the VFD is enhanced when the collision rate is increased. The aim of the project is to explain the fluid mechanics and optimize the performance of the device. One contribution to the increased yield is believed to be the high levels of shear stress. We attempt to enhance the shear stress by achieving high velocity gradients in the boundary layers. Another factor is the uncontrolled vibrations due to imperfections in the bearings and therefore it is important to assess their influence in the initial spreading. The surface area of the film should be maximized with respect to the rotation rate, geometry and orientation of the tube, flow rate, wettability and contact line dynamics. Experiments are presented for a flat disk and a curved bowl, establishing the optimum height of release, rotation rate and tube orientation. Vibrations were imposed to investigate the changes in the film formation. We discuss the implications of our results in the VFD.

  3. Surface scattering mechanisms of tantalum nitride thin film resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huey-Ru; Chen, Ying-Chung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chu, Tian-Jian; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Chuang, Nai-Chuan; Wang, Kao-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, we utilize an electrical analysis method to develop a TaN thin film resistor with a stricter spec and near-zero temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) for car-used electronic applications. Simultaneously, we also propose a physical mechanism mode to explain the origin of near-zero TCR for the TaN thin film resistor (TFR). Through current fitting, the carrier conduction mechanism of the TaN TFR changes from hopping to surface scattering and finally to ohmic conduction for different TaN TFRs with different TaN microstructures. Experimental data of current-voltage measurement under successive increasing temperature confirm the conduction mechanism transition. A model of TaN grain boundary isolation ability is eventually proposed to influence the carrier transport in the TaN thin film resistor, which causes different current conduction mechanisms.

  4. Surface and mechanical properties of polypropylene/clay nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibaei Asl Husein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Huge consumption of polypropylene in the industries like automotive motivates academic and industrial R&Ds to find new and excellent approaches to improve the mechanical properties of this polymer, which has no degradation effect on other required performance properties like impact resistance, controlled crystallinity, toughness and shrinkage. Nowadays, nanoparticles play a key role in improving the mechanical and surface properties of polypropylene. In this study, three compositions of "Polypropylene/nanoclay", containing 0%, 2% and 5% of nanoclay were prepared in internal mixer. For characterizing the nanoclay dispersion in polymer bulk, TEM and XRD tests were used. For scratch resistance test, scratch lines were created on the load of 900 grain on sheets and SEM images were taken and compared with neat PP scratch image. Crystallinity and mechanical behavior were studied. The results showed that mechanical properties and scratch resistance of the composites have been improved.

  5. Overview on the Surface Functionalization Mechanism and Determination of Surface Functional Groups of Plasma Treated Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Cafer

    2018-01-02

    The use of carbon materials for many applications is due to the unique diversity of structures and properties ranging from chemical bonds between the carbon atoms of the materials to nanostructures, crystallite alignment, and microstructures. Carbon nanotubes and other nanoscale carbonaceous materials draw much attention due to their physical and chemical properties, such as high strength, high resistance to corrosion, electrical and thermal conductivity, stability and a qualified adsorbent. Carbon-based nanomaterials, which have a relatively large specific area and layered structure, can be used as an adsorbent for efficient removal of organic and inorganic contaminants. However, one of the biggest obstacles to the development of carbon-based nanomaterials adsorbents is insolubility and the lack of functional groups on the surface. There are several approaches to introduce functional groups on carbon nanotubes. One of these approaches, plasma applications, now has an important place in the creation of surface functional groups as a flexible, fast, and environmentally friendly method. This review focuses on recent information concerning the surface functionalization and modification of plasma treated carbon nanotube. This review considers the surface properties, advantages, and disadvantages of plasma-applied carbon nanotubes. It also examines the reaction mechanisms involved in the functional groups on the surface.

  6. WNT and DKK Determine Hair Follicle Spacing Through a Reaction-Diffusion Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sick, Stefanie; Reinker, Stefan; Timmer, Jens; Schlake, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    Mathematical reaction-diffusion models have been suggested to describe formation of animal pigmentation patterns and distribution of epidermal appendages. However, the crucial signals and in vivo mechanisms are still elusive. Here we identify WNT and its inhibitor DKK as primary determinants of murine hair follicle spacing, using a combined experimental and computational modeling approach. Transgenic DKK overexpression reduces overall appendage density. Moderate suppression of endogenous WNT signaling forces follicles to form clusters during an otherwise normal morphogenetic program. These results confirm predictions of a WNT/DKK-specific mathematical model and provide in vivo corroboration of the reaction-diffusion mechanism for epidermal appendage formation.

  7. Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munir, Zuhair A [Davis, CA; Woolman, Joseph N [Davis, CA; Petrovic, John J [Los Alamos, NM

    2003-09-02

    Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

  8. Identification of mechanisms in heavy ion reactions by measurement of angular correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlin Filho, N.

    1987-01-01

    The identification of reaction mechanisms in light heavy-ion collisions has been performed within the framework of the three body kinematics, by means of angular correlation measurements. The 16 O+ 27 Al, 16 +O+ 28 Si and 10 B+ 27 Al reactions were investigated at Laboratory bombarding energies of 64 MeV, 64 and 48 MeV, respectively. Contributions of transfer-reemission and projectile sequential decay mechanisms were identified by the analysis of the relative kinetic energy of the final state components, excitation energies of the system at the intermediate stages, and also by means of fits to theoretical predictions for the angular correlations. (author) [pt

  9. Reaction Heterogeneity in LiNi 0.8 Co 0.15 Al 0.05 O 2 Induced by Surface Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenier, Antonin [X-ray; Liu, Hao [X-ray; Wiaderek, Kamila M. [X-ray; Lebens-Higgins, Zachary W. [Department; Borkiewicz, Olaf J. [X-ray; Piper, Louis F. J. [Department; Chupas, Peter J. [Energy; Chapman, Karena W. [X-ray

    2017-08-15

    Through operando synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of layered transition metal oxide electrodes of composition LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA), we decouple the intrinsic bulk reaction mechanism from surface-induced effects. For identically prepared and cycled electrodes stored in different environments, we demonstrate that the intrinsic bulk reaction for pristine NCA follows solid-solution mechanism, not a two-phase as suggested previously. By combining high resolution powder X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and surface sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we demonstrate that adventitious Li2CO3 forms on the electrode particle surface during exposure to air, through reaction with atmospheric CO2. This surface impedes ionic and electronic transport to the underlying electrode, with progressive erosion of this layer during cycling giving rise to different reaction states in particles with an intact vs an eroded Li2CO3 surface-coating. This reaction heterogeneity, with a bimodal distribution of reaction states, has previously been interpreted as a “two-phase” reaction mechanism for NCA, as an activation step that only occurs during the first cycle. Similar surface layers may impact the reaction mechanism observed in other electrode materials using bulk probes such as operando powder XRD.

  10. Micropatterned Azopolymer Surfaces Modulate Cell Mechanics and Cytoskeleton Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianna, Carmela; Ventre, Maurizio; Cavalli, Silvia; Radmacher, Manfred; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-09-30

    Physical and chemical characteristics of materials are important regulators of cell behavior. In particular, cell elasticity is a fundamental parameter that reflects the state of a cell. Surface topography finely modulates cell fate and function via adhesion mediated signaling and cytoskeleton generated forces. However, how topographies alter cell mechanics is still unclear. In this work we have analyzed the mechanical properties of peripheral and nuclear regions of NIH-3T3 cells on azopolymer substrates with different topographic patterns. Micrometer scale patterns in the form of parallel ridges or square lattices of surface elevations were encoded on light responsive azopolymer films by means of contactless optical methods. Cell mechanics was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cells and consequently the cell cytoskeleton were oriented along the linear patterns affecting cytoskeletal structures, e.g., formation of actin stress fibers. Our data demonstrate that topographic substrate patterns are recognized by cells and mechanical information is transferred by the cytoskeleton. Furthermore, cytoskeleton generated forces deform the nucleus, changing its morphology that appears to be related to different mechanical properties in the nuclear region.

  11. Neutralization mechanisms in He+-Al surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajales, N.; Ferron, J.; Goldberg, E.C.

    2007-01-01

    From a quantum mechanical calculation where the populations of He ground and first excited states are properly taken into account, we can identify for the first time the neutralization to the He first excited state as an operative mechanism in He + -Al surface collisions. This identification allows us to understand the presence of high energy electrons in the ion induced electron emission spectra, through the inclusion of Auger deexcitation as an electron emission source, as well as to suggest a possible cause for the disagreement still found between theory and experiments in low energy ion scattering (LEIS) for this system

  12. QM/MM study of the reaction mechanism of sulfite oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldararu, Octav; Feldt, Milica; Cioloboc, Daniela; van Severen, Marie-Céline; Starke, Kerstin; Mata, Ricardo A; Nordlander, Ebbe; Ryde, Ulf

    2018-03-16

    Sulfite oxidase is a mononuclear molybdenum enzyme that oxidises sulfite to sulfate in many organisms, including man. Three different reaction mechanisms have been suggested, based on experimental and computational studies. Here, we study all three with combined quantum mechanical (QM) and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods, including calculations with large basis sets, very large QM regions (803 atoms) and QM/MM free-energy perturbations. Our results show that the enzyme is set up to follow a mechanism in which the sulfur atom of the sulfite substrate reacts directly with the equatorial oxo ligand of the Mo ion, forming a Mo-bound sulfate product, which dissociates in the second step. The first step is rate limiting, with a barrier of 39-49 kJ/mol. The low barrier is obtained by an intricate hydrogen-bond network around the substrate, which is preserved during the reaction. This network favours the deprotonated substrate and disfavours the other two reaction mechanisms. We have studied the reaction with both an oxidised and a reduced form of the molybdopterin ligand and quantum-refinement calculations indicate that it is in the normal reduced tetrahydro form in this protein.

  13. Oxidation of elemental mercury by chlorine: Gas phase, Surface,and Photo-induced reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2004-10-22

    Accurate oxidation rate constants of mercury gas are needed for determining its dispersion and lifetime in the atmosphere. They would also help in developing a technology for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, it is difficult to establish the accurate rate constants primarily due to the fact that mercury easily adsorbs on solid surface and its reactions can be catalyzed by the surface. We have demonstrated a procedure that allows the determination of gas phase, surface-induced, and photo-induced contributions in the kinetic study of the oxidation of mercury by chlorine gas. The kinetics was studied using reactors with various surface to volume ratios. The effect of the surface and the photo irradiation on the reaction was taken into consideration. The pressure dependent study revealed that the gas phase oxidation was a three-body collision process. The third order rate constant was determined to be 7.5({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -39} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -2}s{sup -1} with N{sub 2} as the third body at 297 {+-} 1 K. The surface induced reaction on quartz window was second order and the rate constant was 2.7 x 10{sup -17} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -1} cm{sup -2} sec. Meanwhile, the 253.7 nm photon employed for mercury detection was found to accelerate the reaction. The utilization efficiency of 253.7 nm photon for Hg{sup 0} oxidation was 6.7 x 10{sup -4} molecules photon{sup -1} under the conditions employed in this study.

  14. Sub-discretized surface model with application to contact mechanics in multi-body simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, S; Williams, J

    2008-02-28

    The mechanics of contact between rough and imperfectly spherical adhesive powder grains are often complicated by a variety of factors, including several which vary over sub-grain length scales. These include several traction factors that vary spatially over the surface of the individual grains, including high energy electron and acceptor sites (electrostatic), hydrophobic and hydrophilic sites (electrostatic and capillary), surface energy (general adhesion), geometry (van der Waals and mechanical), and elasto-plastic deformation (mechanical). For mechanical deformation and reaction, coupled motions, such as twisting with bending and sliding, as well as surface roughness add an asymmetry to the contact force which invalidates assumptions for popular models of contact, such as the Hertzian and its derivatives, for the non-adhesive case, and the JKR and DMT models for adhesive contacts. Though several contact laws have been offered to ameliorate these drawbacks, they are often constrained to particular loading paths (most often normal loading) and are relatively complicated for computational implementation. This paper offers a simple and general computational method for augmenting contact law predictions in multi-body simulations through characterization of the contact surfaces using a hierarchically-defined surface sub-discretization. For the case of adhesive contact between powder grains in low stress regimes, this technique can allow a variety of existing contact laws to be resolved across scales, allowing for moments and torques about the contact area as well as normal and tangential tractions to be resolved. This is especially useful for multi-body simulation applications where the modeler desires statistical distributions and calibration for parameters in contact laws commonly used for resolving near-surface contact mechanics. The approach is verified against analytical results for the case of rough, elastic spheres.

  15. Use of molecular beams for kinetic measurements of chemical reactions on solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaera, Francisco

    2017-05-01

    In this review we survey the contributions that molecular beam experiments have provided to our understanding of the dynamics and kinetics of chemical interactions of gas molecules with solid surfaces. First, we describe the experimental details of the different instrumental setups and approaches available for the study of these systems under the ultrahigh vacuum conditions and with the model planar surfaces often used in modern surface-science experiments. Next, a discussion is provided of the most important fundamental aspects of the dynamics of chemical adsorption that have been elucidated with the help of molecular beam experiments, which include the development of potential energy surfaces, the determination of the different channels for energy exchange between the incoming molecules and the surface, the identification of adsorption precursor states, the understanding of dissociative chemisorption, the determination of the contributions of corrugation, steps, and other structural details of the surface to the adsorption process, the effect to molecular steering, the identification of avenues for assisting adsorption, and the molecular details associated with the kinetics of the uptake of adsorbates as a function of coverage. We follow with a summary of the work directed at the determination of kinetic parameters and mechanistic details of surface reactions associated with catalysis, mostly those promoted by late transition metals. This discussion we initiate with an overview of what has been learned about simple bimolecular reactions such as the oxidation of CO and H2 with O2 and the reaction of CO with NO, and continue with the review of the studies of more complex systems such as the oxidation of alcohols, the conversion of organic acids, the hydrogenation and isomerization of olefins, and the oxidative activation of alkanes under conditions of short contact times. Sections 6 and 7 of this review deal with the advances made in the use of molecular beams with

  16. Optical, chemical and mechanical modifications induced by ion implantation on glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinellato, V.; Nicoletti, F.; Polato, P.; Gottardi, V.

    1982-01-01

    Soda-lime glasses have been implanted with 50 keV Ar ions. Modifications induced on the glass surface have been studied as a function of implanted dose, with particular regard to optical, chemical, and mechanical properties. Optical measurements indicate a reduction of the refractive index, connected to the surface sodium content. The sodium profile has been measured using the Na 23 (p,α)Ne 20 nuclear reaction. An improvement of the mechanical resistance has been observed at low implantation dose, together with a change of the chemical durability. An expansion of glass has been observed by S.E.M. and interferometric microscopy for 80 keV implantation energy. (author)

  17. Photoelectrochemical etching of gallium nitride surface by complexation dissolution mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Miao-Rong [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 215123 Suzhou (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049 Beijing (China); Hou, Fei; Wang, Zu-Gang; Zhang, Shao-Hui [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 215123 Suzhou (China); Changchun University of Science and Technology, 130022 Changchun (China); Pan, Ge-Bo, E-mail: gbpan2008@sinano.ac.cn [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 215123 Suzhou (China)

    2017-07-15

    Graphical abstract: GaN surface was etched by 0.3 M EDTA-2Na. The proposed complexation dissolution mechanism can be applicable to almost all neutral etchants under the prerequisite of strong light and electric field. - Highlights: • GaN surface was etched by EDTA-2Na. • GaN may be dissolved into EDTA-2Na by forming Ga–EDTA complex. • We propose the complexation dissolution mechanism for the first time. - Abstract: Gallium nitride (GaN) surface was etched by 0.3 M ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid disodium (EDTA-2Na) via photoelectrochemical etching technique. SEM images reveal the etched GaN surface becomes rough and irregular. The pore density is up to 1.9 × 10{sup 9} per square centimeter after simple acid post-treatment. The difference of XPS spectra of Ga 3d, N 1s and O 1s between the non-etched and freshly etched GaN surfaces can be attributed to the formation of Ga–EDTA complex at the etching interface between GaN and EDTA-2Na. The proposed complexation dissolution mechanism can be broadly applicable to almost all neutral etchants under the prerequisite of strong light and electric field. From the point of view of environment, safety and energy, EDTA-2Na has obvious advantages over conventionally corrosive etchants. Moreover, as the further and deeper study of such nearly neutral etchants, GaN etching technology has better application prospect in photoelectric micro-device fabrication.

  18. Photoelectrochemical etching of gallium nitride surface by complexation dissolution mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Miao-Rong; Hou, Fei; Wang, Zu-Gang; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Pan, Ge-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: GaN surface was etched by 0.3 M EDTA-2Na. The proposed complexation dissolution mechanism can be applicable to almost all neutral etchants under the prerequisite of strong light and electric field. - Highlights: • GaN surface was etched by EDTA-2Na. • GaN may be dissolved into EDTA-2Na by forming Ga–EDTA complex. • We propose the complexation dissolution mechanism for the first time. - Abstract: Gallium nitride (GaN) surface was etched by 0.3 M ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid disodium (EDTA-2Na) via photoelectrochemical etching technique. SEM images reveal the etched GaN surface becomes rough and irregular. The pore density is up to 1.9 × 10 9 per square centimeter after simple acid post-treatment. The difference of XPS spectra of Ga 3d, N 1s and O 1s between the non-etched and freshly etched GaN surfaces can be attributed to the formation of Ga–EDTA complex at the etching interface between GaN and EDTA-2Na. The proposed complexation dissolution mechanism can be broadly applicable to almost all neutral etchants under the prerequisite of strong light and electric field. From the point of view of environment, safety and energy, EDTA-2Na has obvious advantages over conventionally corrosive etchants. Moreover, as the further and deeper study of such nearly neutral etchants, GaN etching technology has better application prospect in photoelectric micro-device fabrication.

  19. Small leak detection by measuring surface oscillation during sodium-water reaction in steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nei, Hiromichi; Hori, Masao

    1977-01-01

    Small leak sodium-water reaction tests were conducted to develop various kinds of leak detectors for the sodium-heated steam generator in FBR. The super-heated steam was injected into sodium in a reaction vessel having a sodium free surface, simulating the steam generator. The level gauge in the reaction vessel generated the most reliable signal among detectors, as long as the leak rates were relatively high. The level gauge signal was estimated to be the sodium surface oscillation caused by hydrogen bubbles produced in sodium-water reaction. Experimental correlation was derived, predicting the amplitude as a function of leak rate, hydrogen dissolution ratio, bubble rise velocity and other parameters concerned, assuming that the surface oscillation is in proportion to the gas hold-up. The noise amplitude under normal operation without water leak was increased with sodium flow rate and found to be well correlated with Froud number. These two correlations predict that a water leak in a ''MONJU'' class (300 MWe) steam generator could possibly be detected by level gauges at a leak rate above 2 g/sec. (auth.)

  20. Surface photo reaction processes using synchrotron radiation; Hoshako reiki ni yoru hyomenko hanno process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaizumi, Y. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute for Materials Research; Yoshigoe, A. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan); Urisu, T. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan). Institute for Molecular Science

    1997-08-20

    This paper introduces the surface photo reaction processes using synchrotron radiation, and its application. A synchrotron radiation process using soft X-rays contained in electron synchrotron radiated light as an excited light source has a possibility of high-resolution processing because of its short wave length. The radiated light can excite efficiently the electronic state of a substance, and can induce a variety of photochemical reactions. In addition, it can excite inner shell electrons efficiently. In the aspect of its application, it has been found that, if radiated light is irradiated on surfaces of solids under fluorine-based reaction gas or Cl2, the surfaces can be etched. This technology is utilized practically. With regard to radiated light excited CVD process, it may be said that anything that can be deposited by the ordinary plasma CVD process can be deposited. Its application to epitaxial crystal growth may be said a nano processing application in thickness direction, such as forming an ultra-lattice structure, the application being subjected to expectation. In micromachine fabricating technologies, a possibility is searched on application of a photo reaction process of the radiated light. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Electro-deposition of Pd on Carbon paper and Ni foam via surface limited redox-replacement reaction for oxygen reduction reaction: Presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available during the catalyst preparation process, Pd nanosturctures are grown directly on fuel cell gas diffusion layers and evaluated for the ORR. Pd nanostructures were synthesized via surface-limited redox replacement (SLRR) reaction employing...

  2. Electro-deposition of Pd on carbon paper and Ni foam via surface limited redox-replacement reaction for oxygen reduction reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pd nanostructured catalysts were electrodeposited by surface-limited redox replacement reactions usingthe electrochemical atomic layer deposition technique. Carbon paper and Ni foam were used as substratesfor the electrodeposition of the metal...

  3. The three transglycosylation reactions catalyzed by cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Bacillus circulans (strain 251) proceed via different kinetic mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Bart A. van der; Alebeek, Gert-Jan W.M. van; Uitdehaag, Joost C.M.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    Cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) catalyzes three transglycosylation reactions via a double displacement mechanism involving a covalent enzyme-intermediate complex (substituted-enzyme intermediate). Characterization of the three transglycosylation reactions, however, revealed that they

  4. Surface reaction and transport in mixed conductors with electrochemically-active surfaces: a 2-D numerical study of ceria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciucci, Francesco; Chueh, William C; Goodwin, David G; Haile, Sossina M

    2011-02-14

    A two-dimensional, small-bias model has been developed for describing transport through a mixed ionic and electronic conductor (MIEC) with electrochemically-active surfaces, a system of particular relevance to solid oxide fuel cells. Utilizing the h-adaptive finite-element method, we solve the electrochemical potential and flux for both ionic and electronic species in the MIEC, taking the transport properties of Sm(0.15)Ce(0.85)O(1.925-δ) (SDC15). In addition to the ionic flux that flows between the two sides of the cell, there are two types of electronic fluxes: (1) cross-plane current that flows in the same general direction as the ionic current, and (2) in-plane current that flows between the catalytically-active MIEC surface and the metal current collectors. From an evaluation of these fluxes, the macroscopic interfacial resistance is decomposed into an electrochemical reaction resistance and an electron diffusion-drift resistance, the latter associated with the in-plane electronic current. Analysis of the experimental data for the interfacial resistance for hydrogen electro-oxidation on SDC15 having either Pt or Au current collectors (W. Lai and S. M. Haile, J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 2005, 88, 2979-2997; W. C. Chueh, W. Lai and S. M. Haile, Solid State Ionics, 2008, 179, 1036-1041) indicates that surface reaction rather than electron migration is the overall rate-limiting step, and suggests furthermore that the surface reaction rate, which has not been directly measured in the literature, scales with pO2(-1/4). The penetration depth for the in-plane electronic current is estimated at 0.6 μm for the experimental conditions of interest to SDC15, and is found to attain a value as high as 4 μm within the broader range of computational conditions.

  5. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathway for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such observables as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method with the Dunning correlation consistent basis sets to obtain accurate energetics, gives useful results for a number of chemically important systems. Applications to complex reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion are discussed.

  6. Surface Modification Reaction of Photocatalytic Titanium Dioxide with Triethoxysilane for Improving Dispersibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Jin; Kim, Ji Ho; Park, Young Tae

    2010-01-01

    We have carried out the surface modification of photocatalytic TiO 2 with triethoxysilane through dehydrogenation reaction and characterized the modified photocatalyst by spectroscopic methods, such as FT-IR, solid-state 29 Si MAS NMR, XPS, and XRF, etc. We also examined photocatalytic activity of the immobilized photocatalytic titanium dioxide with triethoxysilane by decolorization reaction of dyes such as cong red and methylene blue under visible light. Dispersion test showed that the photocatalytic titanium dioxide immobilized with triethoxysilane group has kept higher dispersibility than titanium dioxide itself. No appreciable precipitation takes place even after standing for 24 h in the 4:6 mixture ratio of ethanol and water

  7. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Free Energy Maps and Nonadiabatic Simulations for a Photochemical Reaction in DNA: Cyclobutane Thymine Dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I; Trabada, Daniel G; Mendieta, Jesús; Lewis, James P; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Ortega, José

    2016-11-03

    The absorption of ultraviolet radiation by DNA may result in harmful genetic lesions that affect DNA replication and transcription, ultimately causing mutations, cancer, and/or cell death. We analyze the most abundant photochemical reaction in DNA, the cyclobutane thymine dimer, using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) techniques and QM/MM nonadiabatic molecular dynamics. We find that, due to its double helix structure, DNA presents a free energy barrier between nonreactive and reactive conformations leading to the photolesion. Moreover, our nonadiabatic simulations show that most of the photoexcited reactive conformations return to standard B-DNA conformations after an ultrafast nonradiative decay to the ground state. This work highlights the importance of dynamical effects (free energy, excited-state dynamics) for the study of photochemical reactions in biological systems.

  8. Mechanisms of branching reactions in melanin formation - Ab initio quantum engineering approach -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Ryo; Menez Aspera, Susan; Kasai, Hideaki

    Melanin, a pigment found in animals, consists of two types of oligomeric unit: eumelanin and pheomelanin. The color of the skin, the hair, and the eyes is controlled by the ratio of eumelanin/pheomelanin production. Especially, dopachrome and dopaquinone are the precursor molecules of melanin which directly affect the composition of melanin through their branching reactions. Dopachrome is converted into two possible monomers of eumelanin. Dopaquinone can undergo both eumelanin and pheomelanin synthesis. To understand the mechanisms and controlling factors that govern the conversions, reactions of the two molecules are investigated using density functional theory-based first-principles calculations. Our results deepen mechanistic understanding of the reactions and open possibilities to design properties and functions of melanin. In this talk, we will discuss about the competitions of the branching reactions.

  9. Modified reaction mechanism of aerated n-dodecane liquid flowing over heated metal tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K. T.; Cernansky, N. P.; Cohen, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    The degradation mechanism of the n-dodecane was studied using a modified jet fuel thermal oxidation tester containing a sample withdrawal system as a reaction vessel. The reaction products were identified using gas chromatography and mass spectorometry. The soluble products were found to consist mainly of C5-C10 n-alkanes and 1-alkenes, C7-C10 aldehydes, tetrahydrofuran derivatives, dodecanol and dodecanone isomers, dodecyl hydroperoxide (ROOH) decomposition products, and C24 alkane isomers. The data from the experiments agreed with those of Hazlett et al. (1977). It was found that alkyl peroxide radical reactions dominate in the autooxidation temperature regime (at T not above 300 C); the dominant path is for the alkyl peroxyl radical to react bimolecularly with fuel to yield primarily alkyl hydroperoxides. The alkyl peroxide radical also undergoes self-termination and unimolecular isomerization and decomposition reactions, to yield smaller amounts of C12 alcohol plus ketone products and tetrahydrofuran derivatives, respectively.

  10. Formation of degradation compounds from lignocellulosic biomass in the biorefinery: sugar reaction mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helena; Sørensen, Hanne R.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    -(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde (HMF) and/or levulinic acid, formic acid and different phenolics at elevated temperatures. Correspondingly, xylose can follow different reaction mechanisms resulting in the formation of furan-2-carbaldehyde (furfural) and/or various C-1 and C-4 compounds. At least four routes......The degradation compounds formed during pretreatment when lignocellulosic biomass is processed to ethanol or other biorefinery products include furans, phenolics, organic acids, as well as mono- and oligomeric pentoses and hexoses. Depending on the reaction conditions glucose can be converted to 5......, several aldehydes and ketones and many different organic acids and aromatic compounds may be generated during hydrothermal treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. The reaction mechanisms are of interest because the very same compounds that are possible inhibitors for biomass processing enzymes...

  11. Expanding the Enzyme Universe: Accessing Non-Natural Reactions by Mechanism-Guided Directed Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renata, Hans; Wang, Z. Jane

    2015-01-01

    High selectivities and exquisite control over reaction outcomes entice chemists to use biocatalysts in organic synthesis. However, many useful reactions are not accessible because they are not in nature’s known repertoire. We will use this review to outline an evolutionary approach to engineering enzymes to catalyze reactions not found in nature. We begin with examples of how nature has discovered new catalytic functions and how such evolutionary progressions have been recapitulated in the laboratory starting from extant enzymes. We then examine non-native enzyme activities that have been discovered and exploited for chemical synthesis, emphasizing reactions that do not have natural counterparts. The new functions have mechanistic parallels to the native reaction mechanisms that often manifest as catalytic promiscuity and the ability to convert from one function to the other with minimal mutation. We present examples of how non-natural activities have been improved by directed evolution, mimicking the process used by nature to create new catalysts. Examples of new enzyme functions include epoxide opening reactions with non-natural nucleophiles catalyzed by a laboratory-evolved halohydrin dehalogenase, cyclopropanation and other carbene transfer reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P450 variants, and non-natural modes of cyclization by a modified terpene synthase. Lastly, we describe discoveries of non-native catalytic functions that may provide future opportunities for expanding the enzyme universe. PMID:25649694

  12. Mechanism and reactivity in the Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction: the challenge of accurate computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Patel, Chandan; Harvey, Jeremy N; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2017-11-22

    A systematic density functional theory exploration of various reactive steps together with benchmark coupled cluster results are used to propose an accurate model of the mechanism of the Morita-Baylis-Hillman (MBH) reaction in organic chemistry. This reaction has attracted considerable interest from the synthetic and mechanistic points of view in recent years, with both computational and experimental mechanistic studies. It has recently (R. E. Plata and D. A. Singleton, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2015, 137, 3811-3826) been correctly pointed out that previous computational studies failed to reproduce known mechanistic features of the reaction. The same study argued that computation is simply not able at the present time to provide accurate models for such reactions. This second claim is shown by our present work to overstate the problem: by using current 'state of the art' methodology, our results are fully consistent with observed behavior within the expected error bars of 1-5 kcal mol -1 , far smaller than the errors reported in Plata and Singleton's study. On the basis of exhaustive calculations reported here, we suggest that our proposed approaches for modeling electronic structure, solvation, and entropy should be able to provide accurate predictions for many more reactions. We also suggest that reactions like the MBH reaction, where solvation and entropy effects are particularly large, are among the hardest for computational mechanistic studies.

  13. Mechanical stress-controlled tunable active frequency-selective surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo-Cin; Hong, Jian-Wei; Lo, Cheng-Yao

    2017-01-01

    This study proposes a tunable active frequency-selective surface (AFSS) realized by mechanically expanding or contracting a split-ring resonator (SRR) array. The proposed AFSS transfers mechanical stress from its elastic substrate to the top of the SRR, thereby achieving electromagnetic (EM) modulation without the need for an additional external power supply, meeting the requirements for the target application: the invisibility cloak. The operating mechanism of the proposed AFSS differs from those of other AFSSs, supporting modulations in arbitrary frequencies in the target range. The proposed stress-controlled or strain-induced EM modulation proves the existence of an identical and linear relationship between the strain gradient and the frequency shift, implying its suitability for other EM modulation ranges and applications.

  14. Mechanism of glucose electrochemical oxidation on gold surface

    KAUST Repository

    Pasta, Mauro

    2010-08-01

    The complex oxidation of glucose at the surface of gold electrodes was studied in detail in different conditions of pH, buffer and halide concentration. As observed in previous studies, an oxidative current peak occurs during the cathodic sweep showing a highly linear dependence on glucose concentration, when other electrolyte conditions are unchanged. The effect of the different conditions on the intensity of this peak has stressed the limitations of the previously proposed mechanisms. A mechanism able to explain the presence of this oxidative peak was proposed. The mechanism takes into account ion-sorption and electrochemical adsorption of OH-, buffer species (K2HPO4/KH2PO4) and halides. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) on microhardness, surface roughness and wettability of AISI 316L

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arifvianto, B.; Suyitno, [No Value; Mahardika, M.; Dewo, P.; Iswanto, P. T.; Salim, U. A.

    2011-01-01

    Surface roughness and wettability are among the surface properties which determine the service lifetime of materials. Mechanical treatments subjected to the surface layer of materials are often performed to obtain the desired surface properties and to enhance the mechanical strength of materials. In

  16. Chemical surface reactions by click chemistry: coumarin dye modification of 11-bromoundecyltrichlorosilane monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haensch, Claudia; Hoeppener, Stephanie; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2008-01-01

    The functionalization of surfaces and the ability to tailor their properties with desired physico-chemical functions is an important field of research with a broad spectrum of applications. These applications range from the modification of wetting properties, over the alteration of optical properties, to the fabrication of molecular electronic devices. In each of these fields, it is of specific importance to be able to control the quality of the layers with high precision. The present study demonstrates an approach that utilizes the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of terminal acetylenes to prepare triazole-terminated monolayers on different substrates. The characterization of the precursor monolayers, the optimization of the chemical surface reactions as well as the clicking of a fluorescent dye molecule on such azide-terminated monolayers was carried out. A coumarin 343 derivative was utilized to discuss the aspects of the functionalization approach. Based on this approach, a number of potential surface reactions, facilitated via the acetylene-substituted functional molecules, for a broad range of applications is at hand, thus leading to numerous possibilities where surface modifications are concerned. These modifications can be applied on non-structured surfaces of silicon or glass or can be used on structured surfaces. Various possibilities are discussed

  17. Ego Defenses and Reaction to Stress: A Validation Study of the Defense Mechanisms Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleser, Goldine C.; Sacks, Marilyn

    1973-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between scores on the Defense Mechanisms Inventory and reaction to an experimental conflict situation in which Ss (85 undergraduate college students) were led to believe that their performance was deficient on a new test of scholastic ability. The pattern of defenses predicted residual posttest estimates of…

  18. Mechanism for the Reaction of a Tungsten-Germylyne Complex with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this report we present results of theoretical analysis for the reaction mechanism involving a tungsten-germylyne complex with α, β-unsaturated ketones. Three different substituents, namely H, Me and. CF3 in α-position of the unsaturated ketones have been selected to account for a variety of experimental obser-.

  19. Asymmetric hydrogenation with highly active IndolPhos-Rh catalysts: kinetics and reaction mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenaar, J.; Kuil, M.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; Reek, J.N.H.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of the IndolPhos-Rh-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of prochiral olefins has been investigated by means of X-ray crystal structure determination, kinetic measurements, high-pressure NMR spectroscopy, and DFT calculations. The mechanistic study indicates that the reaction follows an

  20. Effect of ferrous/ferric ions molar ratio on reaction mechanism for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    the reaction mechanism for the formation of magnetite nanoparticles. The magnetite nanoparticles ... gressed rapidly in an initial stage of the hydrothermal synthesis, resulting in formation of the magnetite nanoparticles having a smaller size ... -mixed salt solution in an alkaline medium (Wang et al. 2007), are useful among ...

  1. Effect of ferrous/ferric ions molar ratio on reaction mechanism for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis under various initial ferrous/ferric molar ratios without adding any oxidizing and reducing agents in order to clarify effects of the molar ratio on the reaction mechanism for the formation of magnetite nanoparticles. The magnetite nanoparticles prepared were ...

  2. Reaction mechanism and influence factors analysis for calcium sulfide generation in the process of phosphogypsum decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Liping, E-mail: lpma2522@hotmail.com [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Niu, Xuekui; Hou, Juan; Zheng, Shaocong; Xu, Wenjuan [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2011-11-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reusing phosphogypsum is to decompose and recycle Ca and sulfur. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FactSage6.1 software was used to simulate the decomposition reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experiments had been taken with high sulfur concentration coal as reducing agent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reaction mechanism of CaS generation had been analysis, 1100 Degree-Sign C could be the best temperature for PG decomposition. - Abstract: FactSage6.1 software simulation and experiments had been used to analysis the reaction mechanism and influence factors for CaS generation during the process of phosphogypsum decomposition. Thermodynamic calculation showed that the reaction for CaS generation was very complex and CaS was generated mainly through solid-solid reaction and gas-solid reaction. The proper CO and CO{sub 2} have benefit for improving the decomposition effects of phosphogypsum and reducing the generation of CaS at 1100 Degree-Sign C. Using high sulfur concentration coal as reducer, the proper reaction conditions to control the generation of CaS were: the coal particle size was between 60 mesh and 100 mesh, reaction temperature was above 1100 Degree-Sign C and the heating rate was 5 Degree-Sign C/min. Experimental and theoretical calculation indicated that the concentration of CaS was only ten percents in the solid product at 1100 Degree-Sign C, which is favorable for the further cement producing using solid production.

  3. Comparison of a two-body threshold (π,2π) reaction mechanism with the usual one-body mechanism in the deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockmore, R.

    1984-01-01

    A two-body threshold (π +- ,π +- π -+ ) reaction mechanism is suggested in direct analogy with pion absorption. The mechanism involves boson rescattering via Δ excitation. The relative importance of this mechanism and the ordinary one-body mechanism in nuclei is studied in the particular case of S-wave deuteron targets. The contribution of the two-body mechanism to the threshold reaction cross section is found to be less than 1% of the simple one-body estimate

  4. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-01-01

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  5. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-04-20

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  6. Theoretical study on the reaction mechanism of CH4 with CaO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Huawqing; Hu Changwei; Qin Song

    2006-01-01

    The reaction pathways and energetics for the reaction of methane with CaO are discussed on the singlet spin state potential energy surface at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2p) and QCISD/6-311++G(3df,3pd)//B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2p) levels of theory. The reaction of methane with CaO is proposed to proceed in the following reaction pathways: CaO + CH 4 → CaOCH 4 → [TS] → CaOH + CH 3 , CaO + CH 4 → OCaCH 4 → [TS] → HOCaCH 3 → CaOH + CH 3 or [TS] → CaCH 3 OH → Ca + CH 3 OH, and OCaCH 4 → [TS] → HCaOCH 3 → CaOCH 3 + H or [TS] → CaCH 3 OH → Ca + CH 3 OH. The gas-phase methane-methanol conversion by CaO is suggested to proceed via two kinds of important reaction intermediates, HOCaCH 3 and HCaOCH 3 , and the reaction pathway via the hydroxy intermediate (HOCaCH 3 ) is energetically more favorable than the other one via the methoxy intermediate (HCaOCH 3 ). The hydroxy intermediate HOCaCH 3 is predicted to be the energetically most preferred configuration in the reaction of CaO + CH 4 . Meanwhile, these three product channels (CaOH + CH 3 , CaOCH 3 + H and Ca + CH 3 OH) are expected to compete with each other, and the formation of methyl radical is the most preferable pathway energetically. On the other hand, the intermediates HCaOCH 3 and HOCaCH 3 are predicted to be the energetically preferred configuration in the reaction of Ca + CH 3 OH, which is precisely the reverse reaction of methane hydroxylation

  7. Fluid Mechanics of Biological Surfaces and their Technological Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechert, D. W.; Bruse, M.; Hage, W.; Meyer, R.

    A survey is given on fluid-dynamic effects caused by the structure and properties of biological surfaces. It is demonstrated that the results of investigations aiming at technological applications can also provide insights into biophysical phenomena. Techniques are described both for reducing wall shear stresses and for controlling boundary-layer separation. (a) Wall shear stress reduction was investigated experimentally for various riblet surfaces including a shark skin replica. The latter consists of 800 plastic model scales with compliant anchoring. Hairy surfaces are also considered, and surfaces in which the no-slip condition is modified. Self-cleaning surfaces such as that of lotus leaves represent an interesting option to avoid fluid-dynamic deterioration by the agglomeration of dirt. An example of technological implementation is discussed for riblets in long-range commercial aircraft. (b) Separation control is also an important issue in biology. After a few brief comments on vortex generators, the mechanism of separation control by bird feathers is described in detail. Self-activated movable flaps (=artificial bird feathers) represent a high-lift system enhancing the maximum lift of airfoils by about 20%. This is achieved without perceivable deleterious effects under cruise conditions. Finally, flight experiments on an aircraft with laminar wing and movable flaps are presented.

  8. A study of catalysts and mechanisms in synthesis reactions. Progress report, January 1994--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunsford, J.H.

    1994-08-01

    Surface-generated gas-phase radicals, which are the subject of this study, may function as important intermediates in several important partial and complete oxidation reactions. Two examples are the role of CH{sub 3} radicals in the oxidative coupling of CH{sub 4} and the role of OH radicals in the catalytic combustion of CH{sub 4}. Although the gas phase chemistry of simple hydrocarbon radicals is reasonably well understood, very little is known about the reactions that occur between these radicals and metal oxide surfaces. Moreover, the formation of hydroxyl radicals over oxides is a largely unexplored area of catalysis. Recent work in the laboratory has been devoted to the reactions of methyl radicals with reactive metal oxides, and the production of hydroxyl radicals under rate limiting conditions. This paper describes reactions of CH{sub 3} radicals with metal oxides; catalytic conversion of CH{sub 3} radicals to CH{sub 3}OH and HCHO; identification of surface-generated benzyl radicals; and formation of OH radicals under rate limiting conditions.

  9. The coupling of mechanical dynamics and induced currents in plates and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenburger, D.W.; Bialek, J.M.

    1986-10-01

    Significant mechanical reactions and deflections may be produced when electrical eddy currents induced in a conducting structure by transformer-like electromotive forces interact with background magnetic fields. Additional eddy currents induced by structural motion through the background fields modify both the mechanical and electrical dynamic behavior of the system. The observed effects of these motional eddy currents are sometimes referred to as magnetic damping and magnetic stiffness. This paper addresses the coupled structural deformation and eddy currents in flat plates and simple two-dimensional surfaces in three-space. A coupled system of equations has been formulated using finite element techniques for the mechanical aspects and a mesh network method for the electrical aspects of the problem

  10. Automated Prediction of Catalytic Mechanism and Rate Law Using Graph-Based Reaction Path Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott

    2016-04-12

    In a recent article [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 143 , 094106 ], we introduced a novel graph-based sampling scheme which can be used to generate chemical reaction paths in many-atom systems in an efficient and highly automated manner. The main goal of this work is to demonstrate how this approach, when combined with direct kinetic modeling, can be used to determine the mechanism and phenomenological rate law of a complex catalytic cycle, namely cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation of ethene. Our graph-based sampling scheme generates 31 unique chemical products and 32 unique chemical reaction pathways; these sampled structures and reaction paths enable automated construction of a kinetic network model of the catalytic system when combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations of free energies and resultant transition-state theory rate constants. Direct simulations of this kinetic network across a range of initial reactant concentrations enables determination of both the reaction mechanism and the associated rate law in an automated fashion, without the need for either presupposing a mechanism or making steady-state approximations in kinetic analysis. Most importantly, we find that the reaction mechanism which emerges from these simulations is exactly that originally proposed by Heck and Breslow; furthermore, the simulated rate law is also consistent with previous experimental and computational studies, exhibiting a complex dependence on carbon monoxide pressure. While the inherent errors of using DFT simulations to model chemical reactivity limit the quantitative accuracy of our calculated rates, this work confirms that our automated simulation strategy enables direct analysis of catalytic mechanisms from first principles.

  11. XPS study on the surface reaction of uranium metal in H2 and H2-CO atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou

    1996-04-01

    The surface reactions of uranium metal in H 2 and H 2 -CO atmospheres and the effects of temperature and CO on the hydriding reaction have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The reaction between commercial H 2 and uranium metal at 25 degree C leads mainly to the further oxidation of surface layer of metal due to traces of water vapour. At 200 degree C, it may lead to the hydriding reaction of uranium and the hydriding increases with increasing the exposure of H 2 . Investigation indicates CO inhibits both the hydriding reaction and oxidation on the condition of H 2 -CO atmospheres. (13 refs., 10 figs.)

  12. Superhydrophobic NiTi shape memory alloy surfaces fabricated by anodization and surface mechanical attrition treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Shih-Fu; Wang, Kuang-Kuo; Hsu, Yen-Chi

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of superhydrophobic NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) surfaces using an environmentally friendly method based on an economical anodizing process. Perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane was used to reduce the surface energy of the anodized surfaces. The wettability, morphology, composition, and microstructure of the surfaces were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface of the treated NiTi SMA exhibited superhydrophobicity, with a water contact angle of 150.6° and sliding angle of 8°. The anodic film on the NiTi SMA comprised of TiO2 and NiO, as well as traces of TiCl3. In addition, before the NiTi SMA was anodized, it underwent a surface mechanical attrition treatment to grain-refine its surface. This method efficiently enhanced the growth rate of the anodic oxide film, and improved the hydrophobic uniformity of the anodized NiTi-SMA-surface.

  13. Versatile gas-phase reactions for surface to bulk esterification of cellulose microfibrils aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Matthieu; Ouhab, Djamila; Boisseau, Sonia Molina; Heux, Laurent

    2013-09-09

    Aqueous suspensions of microfibrillated cellulose obtained by a high pressure homogenization process were freeze-dried after solvent exchange into tert-butanol. The resulting aerogels, which displayed a remarkable open morphology with a surface area reaching 100 m(2)/g, were subjected to a gas-phase esterification with palmitoyl chloride. Under these conditions, variations of the reaction temperature from 100 to 200 °C, of the reaction time from 0.5 to 2 h, and of the initial quantity of reagent, led to the preparation of a library of cellulose palmitates with DS varying from zero to 2.36. These products were characterized by gravimetry, FTIR, and (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Of special interest were the cellulose palmitate samples of low DS in the range of 0.1-0.4, which corresponded to hydrophobic cellulose microfibrils exclusively esterified at their surface while keeping intact their inner structure.

  14. Mechanism for cyclization reaction by clavaminic acid synthase. Insights from modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Tomasz; de Marothy, Sven; Broclawik, Ewa; Schofield, Christopher J; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2007-03-27

    The mechanism of the oxidative cyclization reaction catalyzed by clavaminic acid synthase (CAS) was studied in silico. First, a classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed to obtain a realistic structure of the CAS-Fe(IV)=O-succinate-substrate complex; then potential of mean force (PMF) was calculated to assess the feasibility of the beta-lactam ring, more specifically its C4' corner, approaching the oxo atom. Based on the MD structure, a relatively large model of the active site region was selected and used in the B3LYP investigation of the reaction mechanism. The computational results suggest that once the oxoferryl species is formed, the oxidative cyclization catalyzed by CAS most likely involves either a mechanism involving C4'(S)-H bond cleavage of the monocyclic beta-lactam ring, or a biosynthetically unprecedented mechanism comprising (1) oxidation of the hydroxyl group of PCA to an O-radical, (2) retro-aldol-like decomposition of the O-radical to an aldehyde and a C-centered radical, which is stabilized by the captodative effect, (3) abstraction of a hydrogen atom from the C4'(S) position of the C-centered radical by the Fe(III)-OH species yielding an azomethine ylide, and (4) 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition to the ylide with aldehyde acting as a dipolarophile. Precedent for the new proposed mechanism comes from the reported synthesis of oxapenams via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions of aldehydes and ketones.

  15. Deuterium isotopic exchange reaction on the surface of promoted nickel catalysts+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou EL-Nour, F.; Abdel-Badei, M.M.; Belacy, N.

    1987-01-01

    Nickel catalysts promoted with different metal oxides proved to be efficient for the isotopic exchange of deuterium between hydrogen and water in the vapour phase. Estimation of the surface properties of this type of catalysts led to the correlation of the specific catalytic activity with their surface characteristics. The particle size of nickel content of the catalysts under investigation was determined from the surface area measurements. The equation used for particle size determination is a corrected one. The correction is based on the probability of sharing the 6-faces of cubic nickel crystals, present in the promoted catalyst, in the isotopic exchange process. It may be also due to the increased porosity of the components of the catalyst mixture. The results demonstrate the probability of migration of nickel crystals during the isotopic exchange reaction of deuterium between hydrogen and water in the vapour state on the surface of nickel catalysis promoted with different metal oxides

  16. Modeling of Transmittance Degradation Caused by Optical Surface Contamination by Atomic Oxygen Reaction with Adsorbed Silicones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Aaron; Banks, Bruce; Miller, Sharon; Stueber, Thomas; Sechkar, Edward

    2001-01-01

    A numerical procedure is presented to calculate transmittance degradation caused by contaminant films on spacecraft surfaces produced through the interaction of orbital atomic oxygen (AO) with volatile silicones and hydrocarbons from spacecraft components. In the model, contaminant accretion is dependent on the adsorption of species, depletion reactions due to gas-surface collisions, desorption, and surface reactions between AO and silicone producing SiO(x), (where x is near 2). A detailed description of the procedure used to calculate the constituents of the contaminant layer is presented, including the equations that govern the evolution of fractional coverage by specie type. As an illustrative example of film growth, calculation results using a prototype code that calculates the evolution of surface coverage by specie type is presented and discussed. An example of the transmittance degradation caused by surface interaction of AO with deposited contaminant is presented for the case of exponentially decaying contaminant flux. These examples are performed using hypothetical values for the process parameters.

  17. Measuring the Electrode Kinetics of Surface Confined Electrode Reactions at a Constant Scan Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Guziejewski, Dariusz; Mirceski, Valentin; Jadresko, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: The kinetics of surface confined electrode reactions of alizarin, vitamin B12, and vitamin K2 is measured with square-wave voltammetry over a wide pH interval, by applying the recent methodology for kinetic analysis at a constant scan rate [V. Mirceski, D. Guziejewski, K. Lisichkov, Electrochim. Acta 2013, 114, 667–673]. The reliability and the simplicity of the recent methodology is confirmed. The methodology requires analysis of the peak potential separation o...

  18. Grafting methyl acrylic onto carbon fiber via Diels-Alder reaction for excellent mechanical and tribological properties of phenolic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Jie; Duan, Xiao; Luo, Lan; Zhang, Chao; Qi, Ying; Li, Hejun; Feng, Yongqiang; Huang, Jianfeng

    2018-03-01

    Carbon fibers (CFs) were grafted with methyl acrylic via Diels-Alder reaction at the different oil bath temperature effectively creating a carboxyl functionalized surface. The effect of grafting temperature on the surface morphology and functional groups of carbon fibers were investigated by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and SEM respectively. The results showed that the optimal grafting temperature was 80 °C, and the relative surface coverage by carboxylic acid groups increased from an initial 5.16% up to 19.30% significantly improved the chemical activity without damaging the skin and core region of the carbon fibers. Mechanical property tests indicated that the shear and tensile strength of the sample with the grafting temperature of 80 °C (CFRP-3) increased obviously by 90.3% and 78.7%, respectively, compared with the pristine carbon fibers reinforced composite. Further, the sample CFRP-3 exhibited higher and more stable friction coefficient and improved wear resistance, while the wear rate decreased 52.7%, from 10.8 × 10-6 to 5.1 × 10-6 mm3/N m. The present work shows that grafting methyl acrylic via Diels-Alder reaction could be a highly efficient and facile method to functionalize carbon fibers for advanced composites.

  19. Insight into the reaction mechanism of lipoyl synthase: a QM/MM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Geng; Cao, Lili; Ryde, Ulf

    2018-03-01

    Lipoyl synthase (LipA) catalyses the final step of the biosynthesis of the lipoyl cofactor by insertion of two sulfur atoms at the C6 and C8 atoms of the protein-bound octanoyl substrate. In this reaction, two [4Fe4S] clusters and two molecules of S-adenosyl-L-methionine are used. One of the two FeS clusters is responsible for the generation of a powerful oxidant, the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical (5'-dA • ). The other (the auxiliary cluster) is the source of both sulfur atoms that are inserted into the substrate. In this paper, the spin state of the FeS clusters and the reaction mechanism is investigated by the combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanics approach. The calculations show that the ground state of the two FeS clusters, both in the [4Fe4S] 2+ oxidation state, is a singlet state with antiferromagnetically coupled high-spin Fe ions and that there is quite a large variation of the energies of the various broken-symmetry states, up to 40 kJ/mol. For the two S-insertion reactions, the highest energy barrier is found for the hydrogen-atom abstraction from the octanoyl substrate by 5'-dA • . The formation of 5'-dA • is very facile for LipA, with an energy barrier of 6 kJ/mol for the first S-insertion reaction and without any barrier for the second S-insertion reaction. In addition, the first S ion attack on the C6 radical of octanoyl was found to take place directly by the transfer of the H6 from the substrate to 5'-dA • , whereas for the second S-insertion reaction, a C8 radical intermediate was formed with a rate-limiting barrier of 71 kJ/mol.

  20. Generating Converged Accurate Free Energy Surfaces for Chemical Reactions with a Force-Matched Semiempirical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P; Pietrucci, Fabio; Saitta, Antonino Marco; Goldman, Nir

    2018-03-22

    We demonstrate the capability of creating robust density functional tight binding (DFTB) models for chemical reactivity in prebiotic mixtures through force matching to short time scale quantum free energy estimates. Molecular dynamics using density functional theory (DFT) is a highly accurate approach to generate free energy surfaces for chemical reactions, but the extreme computational cost often limits the time scales and range of thermodynamic states that can feasibly be studied. In contrast, DFTB is a semiempirical quantum method that affords up to a thousandfold reduction in cost and can recover DFT-level accuracy. Here, we show that a force-matched DFTB model for aqueous glycine condensation reactions yields free energy surfaces that are consistent with experimental observations of reaction energetics. Convergence analysis reveals that multiple nanoseconds of combined trajectory are needed to reach a steady-fluctuating free energy estimate for glycine condensation. Predictive accuracy of force-matched DFTB is demonstrated by direct comparison to DFT, with the two approaches yielding surfaces with large regions that differ by only a few kcal mol -1 .

  1. Potassium-promoted synthesis of surface formate and reactions of formic acid on Co{10 overline10}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomes, R. L.; King, D. A.

    1996-03-01

    A detailed study is presented, using reflection-absorption IR spectroscopy (RAIRS) and thermal desportion spectroscopy (TDS), of the synthesis of surface formate from CO, O 2 and H 2 and of the structure and the reactions of HCOOH with K predosed Co{10 overline10}. The surface formate is readily synthesised at 300 K by exposing a hydrogen and K mixed adlayer to 0.75 L O 2, and then to 2.5 L CO. Using 13C 16O, 18O 2 and D 2 a range of isotopically labelled formates were synthesised. These are used to help identify possible reaction mechanisms: it is shown that one atom from O 2 and one CO molecule contribute to the formation of each surface formate species. The isotopic species also aid in assigning multiple bands observed in the C-H (and C-D) stretching regions of the IR spectra. The adsorption of HCOOH onto multilayer K on Co{10 overline10} at 160 K produces formate, bridge-bound via the O atoms to K, with multiple orientations of the formate ion in a solid formate film. At a K coverage of 0.5 ML, however, the formate is not tilted from the surface normal within the molecular plane. At high HCOOH exposures, undissociated HCOOH is adsorbed, with its molecular plane close to the surface normal. Above 250 K on first layer K HCOOH is desorbed and the formate decomposes to CO, H 2 and atomic O. On the multilayer, a tetradendate oxalate species is formed at ˜ 450 K, and carbonate is formed above 500 K; both decompose to CO and O as the temperature is raised to 660 K.

  2. Mechanism and kinetics in reactions of caffeic acid with radicals by pulse radiolysis and calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xifeng; Cai, Zhongli; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of caffeic acid with e aq - , (CH 3 ) 2 (OH) CCH 2 · , CO 2 ·- , H · , ·OH and N 3 · radicals were studied by γ-, pulse radiolysis and molecular orbital calculation. UV-visible spectra of electron/·OH adducts, semi-quinone radicals of caffeic ions, and the stable products from the reactions were derived. The rate constants were determined. The attacked sites and the most favorable structures of the transient radicals were predicted. Reaction mechanisms were proposed. (author)

  3. Biogenesis of Triterpene Dimers from Orthoquinones Related to Quinonemethides: Theoretical Study on the Reaction Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Quesadas-Rojas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The biogenetic origin of triterpene dimers from the Celastraceae family has been proposed as assisted hetero-Diels-Alder reaction (HDA. In this work, computational calculation of HDA between natural quinonemethides (tingenone and isopristimerol and hypothetical orthoquinones has been performed at the M06-2X/6-31G(d level of theory. We have located all the HDA transition states supporting the biogenetic route via HDA cycloadditions. We found that all reactions take place through a concerted inverse electron demand and asynchronous mechanism. The enzymatic assistance for dimer formation was analyzed in terms of the calculated transition state energy barrier.

  4. Microstructure and surface mechanical properties of pulse electrodeposited nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ul-Hamid, A., E-mail: anwar@kfupm.edu.sa [Center of Research Excellence in Corrosion (CoRE-C), Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1073, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Dafalla, H.; Quddus, A.; Saricimen, H.; Al-Hadhrami, L.M. [Center of Research Excellence in Corrosion (CoRE-C), Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1073, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-09-01

    The surface of carbon steel was modified by electrochemical deposition of Ni in a standard Watt's bath using dc and pulse plating electrodeposition. The aim was to compare the microstructure and surface mechanical properties of the deposit obtained by both techniques. Materials characterization was conducted using field emission scanning electron microscope fitted with scanning transmission electron detector, atomic force microscope and X-ray diffractometer. Nanoindentation hardness, elastic modulus, adhesion, coefficients of friction and wear rates were determined for both dc and pulse electrodeposits. Experimental results indicate that pulse electrodeposition produced finer Ni grains compared to dc plating. Size of Ni grains increased with deposition. Both dc and pulse deposition resulted in grain growth in preferred (2 0 0) orientation. However, presence of Ni (1 1 1) grains increased in deposits produced by pulse deposition. Pulse plated Ni exhibited higher hardness, creep and coefficient of friction and lower modulus of elasticity compared to dc plated Ni.

  5. Kinetics and Mechanism of Deoxygenation Reactions over Proton-Form and Molybdenum-Modified Zeolite Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Jeremy William

    The depletion of fossil fuel resources and the environmental consequences of their use have dictated the development of new sources of energy that are both sustainable and economical. Biomass has emerged as a renewable carbon feedstock that can be used to produce chemicals and fuels traditionally obtained from petroleum. The oxygen content of biomass prohibits its use without modification because oxygenated hydrocarbons are non-volatile and have lower energy content. Chemical processes that eliminate oxygen and keep the carbon backbone intact are required for the development of biomass as a viable chemical feedstock. This dissertation reports on the kinetic and mechanistic studies conducted on high and low temperature catalytic processes for deoxygenation of biomass precursors to produce high-value chemicals and fuels. Low temperature, steady state reaction studies of acetic acid and ethanol were used to identify co-adsorbed acetic acid/ethanol dimers as surface intermediates within specific elementary steps involved in the esterification of acetic acid with ethanol on zeolites. A reaction mechanism involving two dominating surface species, an inactive ethanol dimeric species adsorbed on Bronsted sites inhibiting ester formation and a co-adsorbed complex of acetic acid and ethanol on the active site reacting to produce ethyl acetate, is shown to describe the reaction rate as a function of temperature (323 -- 383 K), acetic acid (0.5 -- 6.0 kPa), and ethanol (5.0 -- 13.0 kPa) partial pressure on proton-form BEA, FER, MFI, and MOR zeolites. Measured differences in rates as a function of zeolite structure and the rigorous interpretation of these differences in terms of esterification rate and equilibrium constants is presented to show that the intrinsic rate constant for the activation of the co-adsorbed complex increases in the order FER < MOR < MFI < BEA. High temperature co-processing of acetic acid, formic acid, or carbon dioxide with methane (CH3COOH/CH4 = 0

  6. Heterogeneous Reactions of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons on Atmospheric and Terrestrial Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonich, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of five higher molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzo[a]pyrene-d12 (BaP-d12), benzo(k)fluoranthene-d12 (BkF-d12), benzo[g,h,i]perylene-d12 (BghiP-d12), dibenzo(a,i)pyrene-d14 (DBaiP-d14), and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DalP), with NO2, NO3/N2O5, O3, and OH radicals were investigated in a 7000 L indoor Teflon chamber. Quartz fiber filters (QFF) were used as the reaction surface and substrate and the analyses of parent PAHs and Nitro-PAH (NPAH) products was conducted using electron impact gas chromatographic mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and negative chemical ionization GC/MS. In parallel to the laboratory experiments, a theoretical study was conducted to assist in determining the formation of NPAH isomers based on the OH-radical initiated reaction. The thermodynamic stability of OH-PAH intermediates was used to indicate the position of highest electron density and the most stable NPAH products were synthesized to confirm their identity. NO2 and NO3/N2O5 were the most effective oxidizing agents in transforming PAHs deposited on filters to NPAHs, under the experimental conditions. Reaction of BaP-d12, BkF-d12 and BghiP-d12 resulted in the formation of several mono-nitro PAH isomer product, while the reaction of DalP and DaiP-d14 resulted in the formation of only one mono-nitro PAH isomer product. The direct-acting mutagenicity of the products increased the most after NO3/N2O5 exposure, particularly for BkF-d12 in which the formation of dinitro- PAHs was observed. In addition, the degradation of particulate matter (PM)-bound PAHs by heterogeneous reaction with OH radicals, O3, NO3/N2O5 was also studied. Ambient PM samples collected from Beijing, China and Riverside, California were exposed in an indoor chamber under simulated trans-Pacific atmospheric transport conditions and the formation of NPAHs was studied. NPAHs were most effectively formed during the NO3/N2O5 exposure and, for all exposures, there was no significant

  7. C-13 isotopic studies of the surface catalysed reactions of methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, M.A.; He, S.J.X.; Adebajo, M.

    1997-01-01

    The ability of methane to methylate aromatic compounds, which are considered to be models for coal, is being studied. Related to this reaction, but at higher temperatures, is the direct formation of benzene from methane in the presence of these catalysts. Controversy exists in the literature on the former reaction, and 13 C isotope studies are being used to resolve the question. The interest in this reaction arises because the utilisation of methane, in the form of natural gas, in place of hydrogen for direct coal liquefaction would have major economic advantage. For this reason Isotope studies in this area have contributed significantly to an understanding of the methylation reactions. The paper describes experiments utilising methane 13 C, which show that methylation of aromatics such as naphthalene by the methane 13 C is catalysed by microporous, Cu-exchanged SAPO-5, at elevated pressures (6.8 MPa) and temperatures around 400 degree C. The mass spectrometric analysis and n.m.r. study of the isotopic composition of the products of the methylation reaction demonstrate unequivocally that methane provides the additional carbon atom for the methylated products. Thermodynamic calculations predict that the reaction is favourable at high methane pressures under these experimental conditions. The mechanism as suggested by the isotope study is discussed. The catalysts which show activity for the activation of methane for direct methylation of organic compounds, such as naphthalene, toluene, phenol and pyrene, are substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves, EIAPO-5 (where El=Pb, Cu, Ni and Si) and a number of metal substituted zeolites. Our earlier tritium studies had shown that these catalysts will activate alkanes, at least as far as isotope hydrogen exchange reactions are concerned

  8. Non-adiabatic effects in elementary reaction processes at metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alducin, M.; Díez Muiño, R.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2017-12-01

    Great success has been achieved in the modeling of gas-surface elementary processes by the use of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. However, in metal surfaces low energy electronic excitations are generated even by thermal and hyperthermal molecules due to the absence of band gaps in the electronic structure. This shows the importance of performing dynamical simulations that incorporate non-adiabatic effects to analyze in which way they affect most common gas-surface reactions. Here we review recent theoretical developments in this problem and their application to the study of the effect of electronic excitations in the adsorption and relaxation of atoms and molecules in metal surfaces, in scattering processes, and also in recombinative processes between impinging atoms and adsorbates at the surface. All these studies serve us to establish what properties of the gas-surface interaction favor the excitation of low-energy electron-hole pairs. A general observation is that the nature of these excitations usually requires long lasting interactions at the surface in order to observe deviations from the adiabatic behaviour. We also provide the basis of the local density friction approximation (LDFA) that have been used in all these studies, and show how it has been employed to perform ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction (AIMDEF). As a final remark, we will shortly review on recent applications of the LDFA to successfully simulate desorption processes induced by intense femtosecond laser pulses.

  9. Nanoparticle-Programmed Surface for Drug Release and Cell Regulation via Reversible Hybridization Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pinliang; Li, Shihui; Lai, Jinping; Zheng, Hong; Lin, Changjian; Shi, Peng; Wang, Yong

    2017-02-08

    A surface directly connects the bulk of a material to its surroundings. The ability to dynamically regulate the surface without affecting the bulk of a material holds great potential for new applications. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate that the surface can be dynamically changed using nanoparticles and oligonucleotides (ODNs) in a reversible and reiterative manner. A dual-functional nanogel was synthesized as the model of nanoparticles using miniemulsion polymerization and click chemistry. The nanogel can not only adsorb drugs for sustained drug release but also bind a surface functionalized with complementary ODNs. Importantly, hybridization reaction and ODN degradation can drive reversible and reiterative nanogel binding to the surface for dynamic change, which in principle is unlimited. Moreover, nanogel-mediated dynamic change offers the surface with the drug-releasing function for inhibiting the growth of surrounding cells. Because nanogels can be replaced by any functional nanoparticles with a diverse array of properties, nanoparticle-programmed surface change constitutes a promising platform for various applications such as drug delivery and stent implantation.

  10. Reactions of BBr(n)(+) (n = 0--2) at fluorinated and hydrocarbon self-assembled monolayer surfaces: observations of chemical selectivity in ion--surface scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, N; Shen, J; Koskinen, J; Cooks, R G

    2001-07-01

    Ion-surface reactions involving BBr(n)(+) (n = 0--2) with a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer (F-SAM) surface were investigated using a multi-sector scattering mass spectrometer. Collisions of the B(+) ion yield BF(2)(+) at threshold energy with the simpler product ion BF(+)* appearing at higher collision energies and remaining of lower abundance than BF(2)(+) at all energies examined. In addition, the reactively sputtered ion CF(+) accompanies the formation of BF(2)(+) at low collision energies. These results stand in contrast with previous data on the ion-surface reactions of atomic ions with the F-SAM surface in that the threshold and most abundant reaction products in those cases involved the abstraction of a single fluorine atom. Gas-phase enthalpy data are consistent with BF(2)(+) being the thermodynamically favored product. The fact that the abundance of BF(2)(+) is relatively low and relatively insensitive to changes in collision energy suggests that this reaction proceeds through an entropically demanding intermediate at the vacuum--surface interface, one which involves interaction of the B(+) ion simultaneously with two fluorine atoms. By contrast with the reaction of B(+), the odd-electron species BBr(+)* reacts with the F-SAM surface to yield an abundant single-fluorine abstraction product, BBrF(+). Corresponding gas-phase ion--molecule experiments involving B(+) and BBr(+)* with C(6)F(14) also yield the products BF(+)* and BF(2)(+), but only in extremely low abundances and with no preference for double fluorine abstraction. Ion--surface reactions were also investigated for BBr(n)(+) (n = 0-2) with a hydrocarbon self-assembled monolayer (H-SAM) surface. Reaction of the B(+) ion and dissociative reactions of BBr(+)* result in the formation of BH(2)(+), while the thermodynamically less favorable product BH(+)* is not observed. Collisions of BBr(2)(+) with the H-SAM surface yield the dissociative ion-surface reaction products, BBrH(+) and BBrCH(3

  11. A reaction mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels for large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet

    2012-02-01

    This work aims to develop a reaction mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels (n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene) with an emphasis on the formation of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Starting from an existing base mechanism for gasoline surrogate fuels with the largest chemical species being pyrene (C 16H 10), this new mechanism is generated by adding PAH sub-mechanisms to account for the formation and growth of PAHs up to coronene (C 24H 12). The density functional theory (DFT) and the transition state theory (TST) have been adopted to evaluate the rate constants for several PAH reactions. The mechanism is validated in the premixed laminar flames of n-heptane, iso-octane, benzene and ethylene. The characteristics of PAH formation in the counterflow diffusion flames of iso-octane/toluene and n-heptane/toluene mixtures have also been tested for both the soot formation and soot formation/oxidation flame conditions. The predictions of the concentrations of large PAHs in the premixed flames having available experimental data are significantly improved with the new mechanism as compared to the base mechanism. The major pathways for the formation of large PAHs are identified. The test of the counterflow diffusion flames successfully predicts the PAH behavior exhibiting a synergistic effect observed experimentally for the mixture fuels, irrespective of the type of flame (soot formation flame or soot formation/oxidation flame). The reactions that lead to this synergistic effect in PAH formation are identified through the rate-of-production analysis. © 2011 The Combustion Institute.

  12. Mechanism of drag reduction for circular cylinders with patterned surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, U.; Jehring, L.; Egbers, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Reduced drag of patterned cylinders over a wide range of Re numbers. • Hexagonal patterns cannot be characterized as roughness structures. • Hexagonal bumps affect the flow like spherical dimples of smaller k/d ratio do. • Main separation is delayed caused by a partial separation. • Angle of a separation line is not constant over the length of cylinder. -- Abstract: In this paper, the flow over cylinders with a patterned surface (k/d = 1.98 × 10 −2 ) is investigated in a subsonic wind tunnel over Reynolds numbers ranging from 3.14 × 10 4 to 2.77 × 10 5 by measuring drag, flow visualization and measuring velocity profiles above the surface of the cylinders, to observe the effect of hexagonal patterns on the flow of air. These patterns can also be referred as hexagonal dimples or bumps depending on their configuration. The investigations revealed that a patterned cylinder with patterns pressed outwards has a drag coefficient of about 0.65 times of a smooth one. Flow visualization techniques including surface oil-film technique and velocity profile measurement were employed to elucidate this effect, and hence present the mechanism of drag reduction. The measurement of velocity profiles using hot-wire anemometry above the surface reveal that a hexagonal bump cause local separation generating large turbulence intensity along the separating shear layer. Due to this increased turbulence, the flow reattaches to the surface with higher momentum and become able to withstand the pressure gradient delaying the main separation significantly. Besides that, the separation does not appear to occur in a straight line along the length of the cylinder as in case of most passive drag control methods, but follow exactly the hexagonal patterns forming a wave with its crest at 115° and trough at 110°, in contrast to the laminar separation line at 85° for a smooth cylinder

  13. The reversible consecutive mechanism for the reaction of trinitroanisole with methoxide ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Vernon D; Li, Zhao; Handoo, Kishan L; Hao, Weifang; Cheng, Jin-Pei

    2011-03-04

    Although the competitive mechanism for Meisenheimer complex formation during the reaction of 2,4,6-trinitroanisole with methoxide ion in methanol is generally accepted, no kinetic evidence has been presented to rule out a reversible consecutive mechanism. Simulation of the competitive mechanism revealed that a fractional order in [MeO(-)] is predicted by the latter. Conventional pseudo-first-order analysis of the kinetics resulted in cleanly first-order in [MeO(-)], which rules out the competitive mechanism. The kinetic data are consistent with the reversible consecutive mechanism, which is proposed for this important reaction. An intermediate is required for this mechanism, and we propose that a dianion complex (III) is formed reversibly from the initial 1,3-σ complex (I). The trimethoxy complex (III), the (1)H NMR spectrum of which was observed earlier by Servis (Servis, K. L. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1965, 87, 5495; 1967, 89, 1508), then eliminates methoxide ion reversibly to form the 1,1-σ complex product (II).

  14. Effect of Reaction Conditions on the Surface Modification of Cellulose Nanofibrils with Aminopropyl Triethoxysilane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Robles

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nine different surface modifications of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (ATS by using three different solvent systems (water, ethanol, and a mixture of both were investigated. The effect of reaction conditions, such as silane to cellulose ratio and solvent type were evaluated to determine their contribution to the extent of the silane modification. Nanofibril properties were evaluated by infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, surface free energy, thermogravimetry, 13C and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance, and electronic microscopy. The influence of the solvent in the solvolysis of the silane was reflected in the presence or absence of ethoxy groups in the silane. On the other hand, whereas the surface modification was increased directly proportionally to silane ratio on the reaction, the aggregation of nanofibrils was also increased, which can play a negative role in certain applications. The increment of silane modification also had substantial repercussions on the crystallinity of the nanofibrils by the addition of amorphous components to the crystalline unit; moreover, silane surface modifications enhanced the hydrophobic character of the nanofibrils.

  15. [Mechanism of reaction catalyzed by RNA-ligase from bacteriophage T4].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrebel'nyĭ, S N; Zernov, Iu P

    1987-01-01

    The dissociation constants of the complexes of RNA-ligase with acceptors, donors and the adenylylated donor A(5')ppAp have been determined on the basis of the inhibition of ATP-pyrophosphate exchange reaction. The dissociation constants of the complexes of the enzyme with "poor" acceptors (oligouridilates) have been shown to be slightly different from those with "good" acceptors (oligoadenylates). The dependence of the reaction velocity of the formation of ligation products on the concentration of acceptors (pA)4, (pU)4 and the adenylylated donor A(5)ppAp has been studied. On the basis of the data obtained the conclusion about the random addition mechanism has been drawn. The reaction takes place in the steady-state conditions in the case of (pA)4 and in the equilibrium conditions--in the case of (pU)4.

  16. The Reaction Mechanism and Rate Constants in the Radiolysis of Fe2+-Cu2+ Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbakke, Erling; Sehested, Knud; Rasmussen, O. Lang

    1976-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis and gamma radiolysis have been used to study the reaction mechanism in the radiolysis of aqueous solutions of Fe2+ and Cu2+. A reaction scheme has been developed and confirmed by computation of the corresponding complete set of differential equations. The rate constants for some...... of the reactions have been determined at different pH's. $k_{{\\rm Cu}^{+}+{\\rm O}_{2}}=4.6\\times 10^{5}$ and $1.0\\times 10^{6}\\ {\\rm mol}^{-1}\\ {\\rm sec}^{-1}$, $k_{{\\rm Cu}^{+}+{\\rm Fe}^{3+}}=5.5\\times 10^{6}$ and $1.3\\times 10^{7}\\ {\\rm mol}^{-1}\\ {\\rm sec}^{-1}$, $k_{{\\rm Cu}({\\rm III)}+{\\rm Fe}^{2+}}=3.3\\times...

  17. Development of the Automatic Modeling System for Reaction Mechanisms Using REX+JGG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takahiro; Kawai, Kohei; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Ema, Yoshinori

    The identification of appropriate reaction models is very helpful for developing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. In this study, we developed an automatic modeling system that analyzes experimental data on the cross- sectional shapes of films deposited on substrates with nanometer- or micrometer-sized trenches. The system then identifies a suitable reaction model to describe the film deposition. The inference engine used by the system to model the reaction mechanism was designed using real-coded genetic algorithms (RCGAs): a generation alternation model named "just generation gap" (JGG) and a real-coded crossover named "real-coded ensemble crossover" (REX). We studied the effect of REX+JGG on the system's performance, and found that the system with REX+JGG was the most accurate and reliable at model identification among the algorithms that we studied.

  18. Role of graphene on the surface chemical reactions of BiPO4-rGO with low OH-related defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Erping; Wang, Wenzhong

    2013-11-21

    Graphene has been widely introduced into photocatalysis to enhance photocatalytic performance due to its unique physical and chemical properties. However, the effect of graphene on the surface chemical reactions of photocatalysis has not been clearly researched, which is important for photocatalysis because photocatalytic reactions ultimately occur on the catalyst surface. Herein, a two-step solution-phase reaction has been designed to synthesize quasi-core-shell structured BiPO4-rGO cuboids and the role of graphene on the surface chemical reactions was investigated in detail. It was found that the introduced graphene modified the process and the mechanism of the surface chemical reactions. The change mainly originates from the interaction between graphene and the adsorbed O2 molecule. Due to the electron transfer from graphene to adsorbed O2, graphene could tune the interfacial charge transport and efficiently activate molecular oxygen to form O2˙(-) anions as the major oxidation species instead of ˙OH. In addition, the two-step synthesis approach could efficiently suppress the formation of OH-related defects in the lattice. As a result, the BiPO4-rGO composite exhibited superior photocatalytic activity to BiPO4 and P25, about 4.3 times that of BiPO4 and 6.9 times that of P25.

  19. CO adsorption, dissociation and coupling formation mechanisms on Fe2C(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaohu; Zhang, Xuemei; Meng, Yan; Zhao, Yaoping; Li, Yuan; Xu, Wei; Liu, Zhong

    2018-03-01

    By means of density functional theory calculations and atomic thermodynamics, we systematically investigated the CO adsorption on the Fe2C(001) surface at different coverage. It has been found that CO prefers to adsorb on the surface iron atom at low coverage (1-8 CO); CO prefers to adsorb at the bridge site of Fe and C atoms at high coverage (9-12 CO). Eight CO molecules binding on the Fe2C(001) surface is favorable thermodynamically as indicated by the stepwise adsorption energy. The phase diagram shows that addition of more CO molecules up to a number of 8 is thermodynamically favorable, and that the incremental energy gained by adding one more CO molecule is almost constant up to 4 CO molecules, decreases up to 8 CO molecules, after which it becomes thermodynamically unfavorable to add more CO molecules. Probability distribution of different singe-CO adsorbed states on the Fe2C(001) surface as function of temperature shows that CO dissociation and coupling are least preferred, indicating that carbide mechanism is not dominant in the iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reaction. The projected density of states (PDOS) was used to analyze the CO adsorption mechanism.

  20. Theoretical studies on thermal degradation reaction mechanism of model compound of bisphenol A polycarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinbao; He, Chao; Li, Xinsheng; Pan, Guiying; Tong, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Density functional theory methods (DFT) M062X have been used to investigate the thermal degradation processes of model compound of bisphenol A polycarbonate (MPC) and to identify the optimal reaction paths in the thermal decomposition of bisphenol A polycarbonate (PC). The bond dissociation energies of main bonds in MPC were calculated, and it is found that the weakest bond in MPC is the single bond between the methylic carbon and carbon atom and the second weakest bond in MPC is the single bond between oxygen atom and the carbonyl carbon. On the basis of computational results of kinetic parameters, a mechanism is proposed where the hydrolysis (or alcoholysis) reaction is the main degradation pathways for the formation of the evolved products, and the homolytic cleavage and rearrangement reactions are the competitive reaction pathways in the thermal degradation of PC. The proposed mechanism is consistent with experimental observations of CO 2 , bisphenol A and 1,1-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethane as the main degradation products, together with a small amount of CO, alkyl phenol and diphenyl carbonate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Transition path sampling with quantum/classical mechanics for reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräter, Frauke; Li, Wenjin

    2015-01-01

    Predicting rates of biochemical reactions through molecular simulations poses a particular challenge for two reasons. First, the process involves bond formation and/or cleavage and thus requires a quantum mechanical (QM) treatment of the reaction center, which can be combined with a more efficient molecular mechanical (MM) description for the remainder of the system, resulting in a QM/MM approach. Second, reaction time scales are typically many orders of magnitude larger than the (sub-)nanosecond scale accessible by QM/MM simulations. Transition path sampling (TPS) allows to efficiently sample the space of dynamic trajectories from the reactant to the product state without an additional biasing potential. We outline here the application of TPS and QM/MM to calculate rates for biochemical reactions, by means of a simple toy system. In a step-by-step protocol, we specifically refer to our implementation within the MD suite Gromacs, which we have made available to the research community, and include practical advice on the choice of parameters.

  2. A programmable soft chemo-mechanical actuator exploiting a catalyzed photochemical water-oxidation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, P; McCracken, J M; Gross, D E; Braun, P V; Moore, J S; Nuzzo, R G

    2017-10-18

    We describe a composite hydrogel containing an embedding coupled chemistry for light-sensitized catalytic reactions that enables chemo-mechanical actuation of poly(acrylic acid)-based gels. In these materials, a photosensitizer and catalyst-ruthenium trisbipyridine and iridium dioxide nanoparticles, respectively-are incorporated into the hydrogel where together, with visible light irradiation, they undergo a catalytic water-oxidation reaction that lowers the pH and induces a dissipative/chemically-driven strain change in the gel. To demonstrate the capacity for 3D chemo-mechanical actuation, a layer of non-pH responsive poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) is added to the photo-active composite gel to create a model bimorph actuator. Triggering and terminating the water-oxidation reaction leads to a programmatic expansion and contraction of the active layer, which induces different modes of biomimetic curling motions in the bimorph actuator in light and dark environments. The efficiency of this system is fundamentally limited by the system-level design, which provides no capacity to sustain a local pH gradient against diffusive mixing. Even so, if the initial pH of the background solution is reestablished either actively or passively between each reaction cycle, it is possible to realize multiple cycles of reversible actuation. We describe a thermodynamic analysis of this system which identifies specific features mediating efficiency losses and conceptual requirements for mesoscopic design rules for optimization of this system and for advancing soft actuation systems in general.

  3. Study of multilayer packaging delamination mechanisms using different surface analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-López, Álvaro; Tena, María Teresa

    2010-04-01

    Multilayer packaging, consisting of different layers joined by using an adhesive or an extrusion process, is widely used to promote different products, such as food, cosmetics, etc. The main disadvantage in using this form of packaging is the delamination process. In this work, different surface techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) are used to analyse the delaminated surfaces in order to study the mechanisms that cause delamination of multilayer packaging. According to our results, the reaction of migrated molecules with adhesive-aluminium bonds is the main cause of the chemical delamination process. In contrast, the delamination of extruded materials would seem to be caused by the breaking of Van der Waals bonds.

  4. Light particle emission as a probe of reaction mechanism and nuclear excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1989-01-01

    The central part of these lectures will be dealing with the problem of energy dissipation. A good understanding of the mechanisms for the dissipation requires to study both peripheral and central collisions or, in other words, to look at the impact paramenter dependence. This should also provide valuable information on the time scale. In order to probe the reaction mechanism and nuclear excitation, one of the most powerful tool is unquestionably the observation of light particle emission, including neutrons and charged particles. Several examples will be discussed related to peripheral collisions (the fate of transfer reactions, the excitation energy generation, the production of projectile-like fragments) as well as inner collisions for which extensive studies have demonstrated the strength of intermediate energy heavy ions for the production of very hot nuclei and detailed study of their decay properties

  5. Elucidation of reaction mechanism for m -cresol hydrodeoxygenation over Fe based catalysts: A kinetic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Yongchun; Wang, Yong

    2017-09-01

    Fe based catalysts are promising for hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of lignin derived phenolics due to their high selectivity for aromatics. In this work, the reaction mechanism of m-cresol HDO on Fe catalysts and the kinetic consequence with Pd addition were elucidated by examining the effect of H2, H2O and m-cresol pressures on toluene formation rate on Fe and PdFe catalysts. A direct CO bond cleavage mechanism is proposed for HDO catalysis on both Fe and PdFe catalysts, while Pd provides a facilitated reaction pathway at the PdFe interface and therefore promotes the catalysis on Fe without changing the high selectivity towards aromatics.

  6. Reaction kinetics and mechanisms of organosilicon fungicide flusilazole with sulfate and hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, D Fabio; Bracco, Larisa L B; Arques, Antonio; Gonzalez, Mónica C; Caregnato, Paula

    2018-01-01

    Flusilazole is an organosilane fungicide used for treatments in agriculture and horticulture for control of diseases. The reaction kinetics and mechanism of flusilazole with sulfate and hydroxyl radicals were studied. The rate constant of the radicals with the fungicide were determined by laser flash photolysis of peroxodisulfate and hydrogen peroxide. The results were 2.0 × 10 9 s -1 M -1 for the reaction of the fungicide with HO and 4.6 × 10 8  s -1  M -1 for the same reaction with SO 4 - radicals. The absorption spectra of organic intermediates detected by laser flash photolysis of S 2 O 8 2- with flusilazole, were identified as α-aminoalkyl and siloxyl radicals and agree very well with those estimated employing the time-dependent density functional theory with explicit account for bulk solvent effects. In the continuous photolysis experiments, performed by photo-Fenton reaction of the fungicide, the main degradation products were: (bis(4-fluorophenyl)-hydroxy-methylsilane) and the non-toxic silicic acid, diethyl bis(trimethylsilyl) ester, in ten and twenty minutes of reaction, respectively. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Investigation of organometallic reaction mechanisms with one and two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoon, James Francis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    One and two dimensional time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy has been used to investigate the elementary reactions of several prototypical organometallic complexes in room temperature solution. The electron transfer and ligand substitution reactions of photogenerated 17-electron organometallic radicals CpW(CO)3 and CpFe(CO)2 have been examined with one dimensional spectroscopy on the picosecond through microsecond time-scales, revealing the importance of caging effects and odd-electron intermediates in these reactions. Similarly, an investigation of the photophysics of the simple Fischer carbene complex Cr(CO)5[CMe(OMe)] showed that this class of molecule undergoes an unusual molecular rearrangement on the picosecond time-scale, briefly forming a metal-ketene complex. Although time-resolved spectroscopy has long been used for these types of photoinitiated reactions, the advent of two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) opens the possibility to examine the ultrafast dynamics of molecules under thermal equilibrium conditions. Using this method, the picosecond fluxional rearrangements of the model metal carbonyl Fe(CO)5 have been examined, revealing the mechanism, time-scale, and transition state of the fluxional reaction. The success of this experiment demonstrates that 2D-IR is a powerful technique to examine the thermally-driven, ultrafast rearrangements of organometallic molecules in solution.

  8. Reaction mechanism for the free-edge oxidation of soot by O 2

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet

    2012-11-01

    The reaction pathways for the oxidation by O 2 of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in soot particles are investigated using density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. For this, pyrene radical (4-pyrenyl) is chosen as the model molecule, as most soot models present in the literature employ the reactions involving the conversion of 4-pyrenyl to 4-phenanthryl by O 2 and OH to account for soot oxidation. Several routes for the formation of CO and CO 2 are proposed. The addition of O 2 on a radical site to form a peroxyl radical is found to be barrierless and exothermic with reaction energy of 188kJ/mol. For the oxidation reaction to proceed further, three pathways are suggested, each of which involve the activation energies of 104, 167 and 115kJ/mol relative to the peroxyl radical. The effect of the presence of H atom on a carbon atom neighboring the radical site on the energetics of carbon oxidation is assessed. Those intermediate species formed during oxidation with seven-membered rings or with a phenolic group are found to be highly stable. The rate constants evaluated using transition state theory in the temperature range of 300-3000K for the reactions involved in the mechanism are provided. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  9. Reaction mechanism of hydroxymaleimide induced by γ-irradiation in alcohol solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Seiko

    2010-01-01

    Methanol and 2-propanol solutions of hydroxymaleimide were irradiated with γ-ray and mechanism of its γ-irradiation-induced reactions was investigated through final-product analyses using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with mass spectroscopy. An addition reaction of a solvent radical toward hydroxymaleimide was dominant among its oxygen-free γ-irradiation-induced reactions in its alcohol solutions while it is known that electron attachment toward hydroxyphthalimide or hydroxysuccinimide is dominant among their γ-irradiation-induced reactions. The radical adduct abstracts hydrogen from solvent molecule to re-produce a solvent radical. Therefore, the degradation efficiency of hydroxymaleimide was more than ten times larger than that of hydroxyphthalimide and hydroxysuccinimide. Dimer was also produced through electron attachment process in the solutions of hydroxymaleimide. In addition, it was found that the degradation efficiency increased with decrease in dose rate. An additional reaction of a solvent radical toward hydroxymaleimide competes with a radical-radical recombination. The latter was reduced, with the former leading to efficient degradation of hydroxymaleimide increased by irradiation at lower dose rate. On the contrary, the production yield of the adduct radical as well as the degradation efficiency of hydroxymaleimide was inhibited in the presence of oxygen.

  10. Reaction mechanism of hydroxymaleimide induced by γ-irradiation in alcohol solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Seiko

    2010-01-01

    Methanol and 2-propanol solutions of hydroxymaleimide were irradiated with γ-ray and mechanism of its γ-irradiation-induced reactions was investigated through final-product analyses using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with mass spectroscopy. An addition reaction of a solvent radical toward hydroxymaleimide was dominant among its oxygen-free γ-irradiation-induced reactions in its alcohol solutions while it is known that electron attachment toward hydroxyphthalimide or hydroxysuccinimide is dominant among their γ-irradiation-induced reactions. The radical adduct abstracts hydrogen from solvent molecule to re-produce a solvent radical. Therefore, the degradation efficiency of hydroxymaleimide was more than 10 times larger than that of hydroxyphthalimide and hydroxysuccinimide. Dimer was also produced through electron attachment process in the solutions of hydroxymaleimide. In addition, it was found that the degradation efficiency increased with decreasing the dose rate. An addition reaction of a solvent radical toward hydroxymaleimide competes with a radical-radical recombination. The latter was reduced and the former leading to efficient degradation of hydroxymaleimide increased by irradiation at lower dose rate. On the contrary, the production yield of the adduct radical as well as the degradation efficiency of hydroxymaleimide was inhibited in the presence of oxygen.

  11. How have new bearing surfaces altered the local biological reactions to byproducts of wear and modularity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Thomas W; Campbell, Patricia A; Hallerberg, Gretchen

    2014-12-01

    The biologic reactions to byproducts of wear or corrosion can involve innate and adaptive processes and are dependent on many factors, including the composition, size, surface properties, shape, and concentration of debris. We used a systematic literature review to compare the reported patterns of inflammation in tissues around total hip implants with the goal of identifying whether there are unique or characteristic patterns associated with the newer bearing options or modular components. A search of the Ovid Medline database between 1996 and early December 2013 identified articles that compared the histology around six implant groups: (1) metal-on-metal; (2) ceramic-on-ceramic; (3) metal-on-crosslinked polyethylene; (4) metal-on-conventional polyethylene with or (5) without modularity; and (6) tissue obtained at primary arthroplasty. Our initial search yielded 865 citations. After excluding articles that lacked a quantitative or semiquantitative description of histologic findings in periprosthetic tissue, we reviewed 34 articles. No pattern of inflammation is specific for any given bearing combination. Histologic features suggestive of an adaptive immune response appear to be more frequent and of greater magnitude in failed metal-on-metal implants, but tissues around many failed metal-on-metal implants show features of an "innate" foreign body reaction without lymphocytes. Occasional nonmetal-on-metal implants show features of an immune reaction, possibly associated with metal particles. Modular connections are one source of metal debris in nonmetal-on-metal implants. Features of an immune reaction appear rare in ceramic-on-ceramic implants that lack corrosion. Insufficient reports are available to characterize the biologic response to crosslinked polyethylene. All total hip bearing combinations will wear in vivo, and modular interfaces are a likely source of metal that may be associated with a biological response regardless of the composition of the bearing

  12. Surface area-burnoff correlation for the steam--graphite reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, W.A. Jr.; Malinauskas, A.P.

    1977-01-01

    The oxidation of core graphite by steam of air represents a problem area of significant concern in safety analyses for the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). Core and core-support graphite integrity and strength deteriorate with oxidation of the graphite, and oxidation furthermore could affect the rate of fission product release under upset conditions. Consequently, modeling of core response during steam or air ingress conditions requires an expression for the rate of graphite interaction with those impurities. The steam--graphite reaction in particular is a complex interaction of mass transport within the graphite with chemi-sorption and reaction on accessible surfaces; experimental results from graphite to graphite are highly variable, and the description of the reaction is not yet completely consistent. A simple etch pit model relating surface area to burnoff has been proposed and shown to provide reasonable correlation with experimental data obtained from steam oxidation studies of nuclear grade H-327 graphite. Unaccounted differences between theory and experiment arise at burnoffs exceeding 3 to 5 percent. The model, while not complete nor comprehensive, is consistent with experimental observations of graphite oxidation by O 2 (air), CO 2 , or H 2 O, and could have some utility in safety analysis

  13. Noise-and delay-induced phase transitions of the dimer–monomer surface reaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Chunhua; Wang Hua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We study the dimer–monomer surface reaction model. ► We show that noise induces first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT). ► Combination of noise and time-delayed feedback induce first- and second-order IPT. ► First- and second-order IPT is viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions. - Abstract: The effects of noise and time-delayed feedback in the dimer–monomer (DM) surface reaction model are investigated. Applying small delay approximation, we construct a stochastic delayed differential equation and its Fokker–Planck equation to describe the state evolution of the DM reaction model. We show that the noise can only induce first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT) characteristic of the DM model, however the combination of the noise and time-delayed feedback can simultaneously induce first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model. Therefore, it is shown that the well-known first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model may be viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions.

  14. Dust Tolerant Commodity Transfer Interface Mechanisms for Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ivan I.; Mueller, Robert P.; Tamasy, Gabor J.

    2014-01-01

    Regolith is present on most planetary surfaces such as Earth's moon, Mars, and Asteroids. If human crews and robotic machinery are to operate on these regolith covered surfaces, they must face the consequences of interacting with regolith fines which consist of particles below 100 microns in diameter down to as small as submicron scale particles. Such fine dust will intrude into mechanisms and interfaces causing a variety of problems such as contamination of clean fluid lines, jamming of mechanisms and damaging connector seals and couplings. Since multiple elements must be assembled in space for system level functionality, it will be inevitable that interfaces will be necessary for structural connections, and to pass commodities such as cryogenic liquid propellants, purge and buffer gases, water, breathing air, pressurizing gases, heat exchange fluids, power and data. When fine regolith dust is present in the environment it can be lofted into interfaces where it can compromise the utility of the interface by preventing the connections from being successfully mated, or by inducing fluid leaks or degradation of power and data transmission. A dust tolerant, hand held "quick-disconnect" cryogenic fluids connector housing has been developed at NASA KSC which can be used by astronaut crews to connect flex lines that will transfer propellants and other useful fluids to the end user. In addition, a dust tolerant, automated, cryogenic fluid, multiple connector, power and data interface mechanism prototype has been developed, fabricated and demonstrated by NASA at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The design and operation of these prototypes are explained and discussed.

  15. Clays causing adhesion with tool surfaces during mechanical tunnel driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, G.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Stanjek, H.; Feinendegen, M.; Post, C.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    During mechanical excavation with a tunnel boring machine (TBM) it is possible that clays stick to the cutting wheel and to other metal parts. The resulting delays in the progress of construction work, cause great economic damage and often disputes between the public awarding authorities and executing companies. One of the most important factors to reduce successfully the clay adhesion is the use of special polymers and foams. But why does the clay stick to the metal parts? A first step is to recognize which kind of clay mineralogy shows serious adhesion problems. The mechanical properties of clay and clay suspensions are primarily determined by surface chemistry and charge distribution at the interfaces, which in turn affect the arrangement of the clay structure. As we know, clay is a multi-phase material and its behaviour depends on numerous parameters such as: clay mineralogy, clay fraction, silt fraction, sand fraction, water content, water saturation, Atterberg limits, sticky limit, activity, cation exchange capacity, degree of consolidation and stress state. It is therefore likely that adhesion of clay on steel is also affected by these clay parameters. Samples of clay formations, which caused problems during tunnel driving, will be analyzed in laboratory. Mineralogical analyses (diffractometry, etc.) will be carried out to observe which minerals are responsible for adherence problems. To manipulate the physical properties, batch tests will be carried out in order to eliminate or reduce the adhesion on tool surfaces through variation of the zeta potential. Second step is the performance of vane shear tests on clay samples. Different pore fluid (distilled water, pure NaCl solution, ethanol and methanol) will be used to study the variation of the mechanical behaviour of clay depending on the dielectric constant of the fluids. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the DFG (German Research Foundation) in the

  16. Computational study of ethanol adsorption and reaction over rutile TiO2 (110) surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Muir, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the modes of adsorption and the associated changes in electronic structures of renewable organic compounds are needed in order to understand the fundamentals behind surface reactions of catalysts for future energies. Using planewave density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the adsorption of ethanol on perfect and O-defected TiO 2 rutile (110) surfaces was examined. On both surfaces the dissociative adsorption mode on five-fold coordinated Ti cations (Ti 4+ 5c) was found to be more favourable than the molecular adsorption mode. On the stoichiometric surface E ads was found to be equal to 0.85 eV for the ethoxide mode and equal to 0.76 eV for the molecular mode. These energies slightly increased when adsorption occurred on the Ti 4+ 5c closest to the O-defected site. However, both considerably increased when adsorption occurred at the removed bridging surface O; interacting with Ti 3+ cations. In this case the dissociative adsorption becomes strongly favoured (E ads = 1.28 eV for molecular adsorption and 2.27 eV for dissociative adsorption). Geometry and electronic structures of adsorbed ethanol were analysed in detail on the stoichiometric surface. Ethanol does not undergo major changes in its structure upon adsorption with its C-O bond rotating nearly freely on the surface. Bonding to surface Ti atoms is a σ type transfer from the O2p of the ethanol-ethoxide species. Both ethanol and ethoxide present potential hole traps on O lone pairs. Charge density and work function analyses also suggest charge transfer from the adsorbate to the surface, in which the dissociative adsorptions show a larger charge transfer than the molecular adsorption mode. This journal is © 2012 the Owner Societies.

  17. Computational study of ethanol adsorption and reaction over rutile TiO2 (110) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, J M R; Muir, J N; Choi, Y; Idriss, H

    2012-09-14

    Studies of the modes of adsorption and the associated changes in electronic structures of renewable organic compounds are needed in order to understand the fundamentals behind surface reactions of catalysts for future energies. Using planewave density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the adsorption of ethanol on perfect and O-defected TiO(2) rutile (110) surfaces was examined. On both surfaces the dissociative adsorption mode on five-fold coordinated Ti cations (Ti(4+)(5c)) was found to be more favourable than the molecular adsorption mode. On the stoichiometric surface E(ads) was found to be equal to 0.85 eV for the ethoxide mode and equal to 0.76 eV for the molecular mode. These energies slightly increased when adsorption occurred on the Ti(4+)(5c) closest to the O-defected site. However, both considerably increased when adsorption occurred at the removed bridging surface O; interacting with Ti(3+) cations. In this case the dissociative adsorption becomes strongly favoured (E(ads) = 1.28 eV for molecular adsorption and 2.27 eV for dissociative adsorption). Geometry and electronic structures of adsorbed ethanol were analysed in detail on the stoichiometric surface. Ethanol does not undergo major changes in its structure upon adsorption with its C-O bond rotating nearly freely on the surface. Bonding to surface Ti atoms is a σ type transfer from the O2p of the ethanol-ethoxide species. Both ethanol and ethoxide present potential hole traps on O lone pairs. Charge density and work function analyses also suggest charge transfer from the adsorbate to the surface, in which the dissociative adsorptions show a larger charge transfer than the molecular adsorption mode.

  18. Fragment emission mechanism for 16O (116 MeV) + 27 Al reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, C; Mullick, K.; Bhattacharjee, T.; Das, K.; Banerjee, S.R.; Basu, D.N.; Ray, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Krishan, K.; Basu, S.K

    2001-01-01

    The distinction between different mechanisms of fragment emission in low energy light heavy-ion collisions, in particular between the deep-inelastic (DI) and fusion-fission (FF), is experimentally very difficult. The present, work aims to estimate the DI and FF components present in the reaction 16 O (E lab = 116 MeV) + 27 Al by studying the inclusive fragment emission spectra

  19. Biomimetic self-cleaning surfaces: synthesis, mechanism and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Quan; Zhang, Wenwen; Dong, Chenbo; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil Sreenivasan; Xia, Zhenhai

    2016-09-01

    With millions of years of natural evolution, organisms have achieved sophisticated structures, patterns or textures with complex, spontaneous multifunctionality. Among all the fascinating characteristics observed in biosystems, self-cleaning ability is regarded as one of the most interesting topics in biomimicry because of its potential applications in various fields such as aerospace, energy conversion and biomedical and environmental protection. Recently, in-depth studies have been carried out on various compelling biostructures including lotus leaves, shark skins, butterfly wings and gecko feet. To understand and mimic their self-cleaning mechanisms in artificial structures, in this article, recent progress in self-cleaning techniques is discussed and summarized. Based on the underlying self-cleaning mechanisms, the methods are classified into two categories: self-cleaning with water and without water. The review gives a succinct account of the detailed mechanisms and biomimetic processes applied to create artificial self-cleaning materials and surfaces, and provides some examples of cutting-edge applications such as anti-reflection, water repellence, self-healing, anti-fogging and micro-manipulators. The prospectives and directions of future development are also briefly proposed. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. The oxidative response and viable reaction mechanism of the textile dyes by fenton reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masooda, Q.; Hijira, T.; Sitara, M.; Sehar, M.; Sundus, A.; Mohsin, A.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of the degradation of the Reactive Red 239 and Reactive Blue 19 by Fenton reagent was studied by advanced oxidation process in aqueous medium. The spectroscopic technique was adopted for the measurements of dye concentration. Moreover they were determined at 540 nm and 590 nm, respectively. Kinetics of the reaction was studied under the effect of concentration of reactive dyes, concentration of oxidant were followed under pseudo first order condition and found to influence the catalytic mechanism. The pH of the medium, vibrant response of several cations and anions and influence of ionic strength on the reaction kinetics were also monitored. Physical evidences for the degradation and mineralization of the dyes were evaluated by Lime water test, Ring Test and TLC test also confirmed the degradation of dye. Inhibitory effects of dyes were observed by CO3-, HCO3-, HPO42-, Cl-, I- Al3+ and Na+. Thermodynamic activation parameters in the oxidation reaction were studied and mode of mechanism was suggested on the basic of these parameters. This study explored the safe and eco friendly degradation of the textile dyes under Pseudo first order rate constant. It was observed that Fenton assisted degradation of the dyes under controlled conditions was found to be favorable for the treatment of textile wastewater. Moreover compared to other chemical methods it is effective and harmless to the environment. (author)

  1. Breakage mechanics for granular materials in surface-reactive environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yida; Buscarnera, Giuseppe

    2018-03-01

    It is known that the crushing behaviour of granular materials is sensitive to the state of the fluids occupying the pore space. Here, a thermomechanical theory is developed to link such macroscopic observations with the physico-chemical processes operating at the microcracks of individual grains. The theory relies on the hypothesis that subcritical fracture propagation at intra-particle scale is the controlling mechanism for the rate-dependent, water-sensitive compression of granular specimens. First, the fracture of uniaxially compressed particles in surface-reactive environments is studied in light of irreversible thermodynamics. Such analysis recovers the Gibbs adsorption isotherm as a central component linking the reduction of the fracture toughness of a solid to the increase of vapour concentration. The same methodology is then extended to assemblies immersed in wet air, for which solid-fluid interfaces have been treated as a separate phase. It is shown that this choice brings the solid surface energy into the dissipation equations of the granular matrix, thus providing a pathway to (i) integrate the Gibbs isotherm with the continuum description of particle assemblies and (ii) reproduce the reduction of their yield strength in presence of high relative humidity. The rate-effects involved in the propagation of cracks and the evolution of breakage have been recovered by considering non-homogenous dissipation potentials associated with the creation of surface area at both scales. It is shown that the proposed model captures satisfactorily the compression response of different types of granular materials subjected to varying relative humidity. This result was achieved simply by using parameters based on the actual adsorption characteristics of the constituting minerals. The theory therefore provides a physically sound and thermodynamically consistent framework to study the behaviour of granular solids in surface-reactive environments.

  2. A Cross-Cultural Approach to Psychological Mechanisms Underlying Emotional Reactions to Music

    OpenAIRE

    Barradas, Gonçalo

    2017-01-01

    Music plays a crucial role in everyday life by enabling listeners to seek individual emotional experiences. To explain why such emotions occur, we must understand the underlying process that mediates between surface-level features of the music and aroused emotions. This thesis aimed to investigate how musical emotions are mediated by psychological mechanisms from a cross-cultural perspective. Study I manipulated four mechanisms by selecting ecologically valid pieces of music that featured inf...

  3. Self-cleaning and surface chemical reactions during hafnium dioxide atomic layer deposition on indium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Rainer; Head, Ashley R; Yngman, Sofie; Knutsson, Johan V; Hjort, Martin; McKibbin, Sarah R; Troian, Andrea; Persson, Olof; Urpelainen, Samuli; Knudsen, Jan; Schnadt, Joachim; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2018-04-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables the ultrathin high-quality oxide layers that are central to all modern metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits. Crucial to achieving superior device performance are the chemical reactions during the first deposition cycle, which could ultimately result in atomic-scale perfection of the semiconductor-oxide interface. Here, we directly observe the chemical reactions at the surface during the first cycle of hafnium dioxide deposition on indium arsenide under realistic synthesis conditions using photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the widely used ligand exchange model of the ALD process for the removal of native oxide on the semiconductor and the simultaneous formation of the first hafnium dioxide layer must be significantly revised. Our study provides substantial evidence that the efficiency of the self-cleaning process and the quality of the resulting semiconductor-oxide interface can be controlled by the molecular adsorption process of the ALD precursors, rather than the subsequent oxide formation.

  4. Oxidation and metal-insertion in molybdenite surfaces: evaluation of charge-transfer mechanisms and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutthanandan V

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2, a layered transition-metal dichalcogenide, has been of special importance to the research community of geochemistry, materials and environmental chemistry, and geotechnical engineering. Understanding the oxidation behavior and charge-transfer mechanisms in MoS2 is important to gain better insight into the degradation of this mineral in the environment. In addition, understanding the insertion of metals into molybdenite and evaluation of charge-transfer mechanism and dynamics is important to utilize these minerals in technological applications. Furthermore, a detailed investigation of thermal oxidation behavior and metal-insertion will provide a basis to further explore and model the mechanism of adsorption of metal ions onto geomedia. The present work was performed to understand thermal oxidation and metal-insertion processes of molybdenite surfaces. The analysis was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS, and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA. Structural studies using SEM and TEM indicate the local-disordering of the structure as a result of charge-transfer process between the inserted lithium and the molybdenite layer. Selected area electron diffraction measurements indicate the large variations in the diffusivity of lithium confirming that the charge-transfer is different along and perpendicular to the layers in molybdenite. Thermal heating of molybenite surface in air at 400°C induces surface oxidation, which is slow during the first hour of heating and then increases significantly. The SEM results indicate that the crystals formed on the molybdenite surface as a result of thermal oxidation exhibit regular thin-elongated shape. The average size and density of the crystals on the surface is dependent on the time of annealing; smaller size and high density during the first one-hour and

  5. Quantum-Mechanical Study of the Reaction Mechanism for 2π-2π Cycloaddition of Fluorinated Methylene Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motz, Andrew R; Herring, Andrew M; Vyas, Shubham; Maupin, C Mark

    2017-07-07

    Perfluorocyclobutyl polymers are thermally and chemically stable, may be produced without a catalyst via thermal 2π-2π cycloaddition, and can form block structures, making them suitable for commercialization of specialty polymers. Thermal 2π-2π cycloaddition is a rare reaction that begins in the singlet state and proceeds through a triplet intermediate to form an energetically stable four-membered ring in the singlet state. This reaction involves two changes in spin state and, thus, two spin-crossover transitions. Presented here are density functional theory calculations that evaluate the energetics and reaction mechanisms for the dimerizations of two different polyfluorinated precursors, 1,1,2-trifluoro-2-(trifluoromethoxy)ethane and hexafluoropropylene. The spin-crossover transition states are thoroughly investigated, revealing important kinetics steps and an activation energy for the gas-phase cycloaddition of two hexafluoropropene molecules of 36.9 kcal/mol, which is in good agreement with the experimentally determined value of 34.3 kcal/mol. It is found that the first carbon-carbon bond formation is the rate-limiting step, followed by a rotation about the newly formed bond in the triplet state that results in the formation of the second carbon-carbon bond. Targeting the rotation of the C-C bond, a set of parameters were obtained that best produce high molecular weight polymers using this chemistry.

  6. Facile fabrication of hydrophobic surfaces on mechanically alloyed-Mg/HA/TiO{sub 2}/MgO bionanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalajabadi, Shahrouz Zamani [Medical Devices and Technology Group (MEDITEG), Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq, E-mail: rafiq@biomedical.utm.my [Medical Devices and Technology Group (MEDITEG), Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Izman, Sudin; Mohd Yusop, Mohd Zamri [Department of Materials, Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Mg/HA/TiO{sub 2}-based nanocomposite was produced using mechanical alloying. • The hydrophobic surface coverage was fabricated on the mechanical alloyed samples by annealing. • The morphological characteristics, phase evolution and wettability of nanocomposites and the hydrophobic surface coverage were investigated. • The activation energies and reaction kinetic of the powder mixture of nanocomposites were calculated. - Abstract: The effect of mechanical alloying and post-annealing on the phase evolution, microstructure, wettability and thermal stability of Mg–HA–TiO{sub 2}–MgO composites was investigated in this study. Phase evolution and microstructure analysis were performed using X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, as well as the wettability determined by contact angle measurements with SBF. The 16-h mechanical alloying resulted in the formation of MgTiO{sub 3}, CaTiO{sub 3}, Mg{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and Mg(OH){sub 2} phases and a decrease in wettability of the nanocomposites. A hydrophobic film with hierarchical structures comprising nanoflakes of MgTiO{sub 3}, nano-cuboids of CaTiO{sub 3}, microspheres of Mg{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and Mg(OH){sub 2} was successfully constructed on the surface of the Mg-based nanocomposites substrates as a result of the post-annealing process. After 1-h annealing at 630 °C, the synthesized hydrophobic surface on the nanocomposite substrates decreased the wettability, as the 8-h-mechanically alloyed samples exhibited a contact angle close to 93°. The formation activation energies and reaction kinetics of the powder mixture were investigated using differential thermal analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis. The released heat, weight loss percentage and reaction kinetics increased, while the formation activation energies of the exothermic reactions decreased following an increase in the milling time.

  7. Kinetic modeling for thermal dehydration of ferrous oxalate dihydrate polymorphs: a combined model for induction period-surface reaction-phase boundary reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Haruka; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2014-04-03

    In this study, ferrous oxalate dihydrate polymorph particles, α- and β-phases, with square bipyramidal and quadratic prismatic shapes, respectively, were synthesized. Thermal dehydration of the samples was subjected to kinetic study as a typical reaction that indicates a significant induction period and a sigmoidal mass-loss behavior. On the basis of the formal kinetic analysis of the mass-loss traces recorded under isothermal, nonisothermal, and constant transformation rate conditions and the morphological observations of the surface textures of the partially reacted sample particles, a combined kinetic model for the induction period-surface reaction-phase boundary reaction was developed. The sigmoidal mass-loss behavior after the significant induction period under isothermal conditions was satisfactorily simulated by the combined kinetic model. The kinetic parameters for the component processes of induction period, surface reaction, and phase boundary reaction were separately determined from the kinetic simulation. The differences in the kinetic behaviors of the induction period and the phase boundary reaction between α- and β-phase samples were well described by the kinetic parameters. The applicability of the combined kinetic model to practical systems was demonstrated through characterizing the physicogeometrical kinetics of the thermal dehydration of ferrous oxalate dihydrate polymorphs.

  8. The Surface Reactions of Ethanol over UO2(100) Thin Film

    KAUST Repository

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.

    2015-10-08

    The study of the reactions of oxygenates on well-defined oxide surfaces is important for the fundamental understanding of heterogeneous chemical pathways that are influenced by atomic geometry, electronic structure and chemical composition. In this work, an ordered uranium oxide thin film surface terminated in the (100) orientation is prepared on a LaAlO3 substrate and studied for its reactivity with a C-2 oxygenate, ethanol (CH3CH2OH). With the use of synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we have probed the adsorption and desorption processes observed in the valence band, C1s, O1s and U4f to investigate the bonding mode, surface composition, electronic structure and probable chemical changes to the stoichiometric-UO2(100) [smooth-UO2(100)] and Ar+-sputtered UO2(100) [rough-UO2(100)] surfaces. Unlike UO2(111) single crystal and UO2 thin film, Ar-ion sputtering of this UO2(100) did not result in noticeable reduction of U cations. The ethanol molecule has C-C, C-H, C-O and O-H bonds, and readily donates the hydroxyl H while interacting strongly with the UO2 surfaces. Upon ethanol adsorption (saturation occurred at 0.5 ML), only ethoxy (CH3CH2O-) species is formed on smooth-UO2(100) whereas initially formed ethoxy species are partially oxidized to surface acetate (CH3COO-) on the Ar+-sputtered UO2(100) surface. All ethoxy and acetate species are removed from the surface between 600 and 700 K.

  9. The Effectiveness of Surface Coatings on Preventing Interfacial Reaction During Ultrasonic Welding of Aluminum to Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteli, Alexandria; Robson, Joseph D.; Chen, Ying-Chun; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2013-12-01

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (USW) is a solid-state joining process that is advantageous for welding difficult dissimilar material couples, like magnesium to aluminum. USW is also a useful technique for testing methods of controlling interfacial reaction in welding as the interface is not greatly displaced by the process. However, the high strain rate deformation in USW has been found to accelerate intermetallic compound (IMC) formation and a thick Al12Mg17 and Al3Mg2 reaction layer forms after relatively short welding times. In this work, we have investigated the potential of two approaches for reducing the IMC reaction rate in dissimilar Al-Mg ultrasonic welds, both involving coatings on the Mg sheet surface to (i) separate the join line from the weld interface, using a 100- μm-thick Al cold spray coating, and (ii) provide a diffusion barrier layer, using a thin manganese physical vapor deposition (PVD) coating. Both methods were found to reduce the level of reaction and increase the failure energy of the welds, but their effectiveness was limited due to issues with coating attachment and survivability during the welding cycle. The effect of the coatings on the joint's interface microstructure, and the fracture behavior have been investigated in detail. Kinetic modeling has been used to show that the benefit of the cold spray coating can be attributed to the reaction rate reverting to that expected under static conditions. This reduces the IMC growth rate by over 50 pct because at the weld line, the high strain rate dynamic deformation in USW normally enhances diffusion through the IMC layer. In comparison, the thin PVD barrier coating was found to rapidly break up early in USW and become dispersed throughout the deformation layer reducing its effectiveness.

  10. Controllable Surface Reorganization Engineering on Cobalt Phosphide Nanowire Arrays for Efficient Alkaline Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Cheng, Han; Lv, Haifeng; Wang, Jingyu; Liu, Linqi; Liu, Si; Wu, Xiaojun; Chu, Wangsheng; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Developing highly efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts in alkaline media is considered significant and valuable for water splitting. Herein, it is demonstrated that surface reorganization engineering by oxygen plasma engraving on electocatalysts successfully realizes a dramatically enhanced alkaline HER activity. Taking CoP nanowire arrays grown on carbon cloth (denoted as CoP NWs/CC) as an example, the oxygen plasma engraving can trigger moderate CoO x species formation on the surface of the CoP NWs/CC, which is visually verified by the X-ray absorption fine structure, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) mapping. Benefiting from the moderate CoO x species formed on the surface, which can promote the water dissociation in alkaline HER, the surface reorganization of the CoP NWs/CC realizes almost fourfold enhanced alkaline HER activity and a 180 mV decreased overpotential at 100 mA cm -2 , compared with the pristine ones. More interestingly, this surface reorganization strategy by oxygen plasma engraving can also be effective to other electrocatalysts such as free-standing CoP, Co 4 N, O-CoSe 2 , and C-CoSe 2 nanowires, which verifies the universality of the strategy. This work thus opens up new avenues for designing alkaline HER electrocatalysts based on oxygen plasma engraving. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Induced Superaerophobicity onto a Non-superaerophobic Catalytic Surface for Enhanced Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Kamran; Hussain, Sajjad; Truong, Linh; Roy, Sanjib Baran; Jeon, Jae Ho; Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Kim, Minsoo; Yi, Yeonjin; Jung, Jongwan; Chun, Seung-Hyun

    2017-12-20

    Despite tremendous progress in the development of novel electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), the accumulation of hydrogen gas bubbles produced on the catalyst surface has been rather poorly addressed. The bubbles block the surface of the electrode, thus resulting in poor performance even when excellent electrocatalysts are used. In this study, we show that vertically grown graphene nanohills (VGNHs) possess an excellent capability to quickly disengage the produced hydrogen gas bubbles from the electrode surface, and thus exhibit superaerophobic properties. To compensate for the poor electrolytic properties of graphene toward HER, the graphene surface was modified with WS 2 nanoparticles to accelerate the water-splitting process by using this hybrid catalyst (VGNHs-WS 2 ). For comparison purposes, WS 2 nanoparticles were also deposited on the flat graphene (FG) surface. Because of its superior superaerophobic properties, VGNHs-WS 2 outperformed FG-WS 2 in terms of both catalytic activity toward the HER and superaerophobicity. Furthermore, VGNHs-WS 2 exhibited a low onset potential (36 mV compared to 288 mV for FG-WS 2 ) and long-term stability in the HER over an extended period of 20 h. This study provides an efficient way to utilize highly conductive and superaerophobic VGNHs as support materials for intrinsic semiconductors, such as WS 2 , to simultaneously achieve superaerophobicity and high catalytic activity.

  12. Identifying the Active Surfaces of Electrochemically Tuned LiCoO2 for Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Zhiyi; Chen, Guangxu; Li, Yanbin; Wang, Haotian; Xie, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Identification of active sites for catalytic processes has both fundamental and technological implications for rational design of future catalysts. Herein, we study the active surfaces of layered lithium cobalt oxide (LCO) for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) using the enhancement effect of electrochemical delithiation (De-LCO). Our theoretical results indicate that the most stable (0001) surface has a very large overpotential for OER independent of lithium content. In contrast, edge sites such as the nonpolar (1120) and polar (0112) surfaces are predicted to be highly active and dependent on (de)lithiation. The effect of lithium extraction from LCO on the surfaces and their OER activities can be understood by the increase of Co 4+ sites relative to Co 3+ and by the shift of active oxygen 2p states. Experimentally, it is demonstrated that LCO nanosheets, which dominantly expose the (0001) surface show negligible OER enhancement upon delithiation. However, a noticeable increase in OER activity (~0.1 V in overpotential shift at 10 mA cm –2 ) is observed for the LCO nanoparticles, where the basal plane is greatly diminished to expose the edge sites, consistent with the theoretical simulations. In addition, we find that the OER activity of De-LCO nanosheets can be improved if we adopt an acid etching method on LCO to create more active edge sites, which in turn provides a strong evidence for the theoretical indication.

  13. Mechanisms for formation and disruption of surface oxides: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumsden, J.B.

    1987-08-01

    Mill-annealed alloys 600, 690 and 800 were exposed to 10 and 50% caustic solutions containing 1% Na 2 CO 3 to initiate IGA. IGA reproducibly occurred in all three alloys in the 10% caustic solution at 350 0 C after a 240 h exposure and in the 50% caustic solution at 320 0 C after a 120 h exposure. Reproducible IGA did not occur in the 10% caustic solution at 320 0 C after a 120 h exposure. IGA was not observed in mill annealed plus thermally treated alloys 600 and 690 after exposure to any of the test conditions. IGA initiation was correlated with a dealloying mechanism in which the more active alloying metals, iron and chromium, selectively dissolve. Boric acid and calcium hydroxide additives were found to slow or prevent IGA by inhibiting dealloying. Titanates prevented IGA in alloys 600, 690 and 800, passivating the surface with a nickel titanate film

  14. (3He,α) reaction mechanism at high energy and neutron inner shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiele, J. van de.

    1980-01-01

    The ( 3 He,α) reaction on 12 C, 16 O, 28 Si, 58 Ni, 90 Zr, 118 Sn, 124 Sn and 208 Pb targets has been studied at Esub( 3 He) = 217 MeV (or 205 MeV) in order to investigate the reaction mechanism at high energy and large momentum transfer. The reaction yields large cross sections at very forward angles and strongly enhances the largest orbital momentum transfer. The angular distribution shapes are well reproduced in the frame-work of the Z-R- D.W.B.A. analysis if we use a unique empirical α-potential: Vsub(α)(Esub(α)) = Vsub( 3 He)(3/4 Esub(α)) + Vsub(n)(1/4 Esub(α)). The excitation energy spectra have been measured up to 100 MeV in the residual light and medium nuclei and up to about 16 MeV in heavy nuclei. In addition to the well-known low-lying levels, peaks or broad structures are observed for each nucleus at higher excitation energies. They are attributed to pick up from inner shells: 1s( 11 C and 15 O), 1p( 27 Si), 1d5/2 + 1p( 57 Ni), 1f7/2( 89 Zr) 1g9/2 117 Sn, 123 Sn and 1h11/2( 207 Pb). Selectivity and localization of direct and indirect pick up ( 3 He,α) reactions were studied. Finite range calculations show that this reaction is not very sensitive to the details of the range from function but only to D 0 coefficient and range R. A microscopic α-nucleus optical potential calculated with n-n dependent and independent density forces is able to reproduce both elastic scattering and pick up reaction angular distributions [fr

  15. Unsteady flow of a Maxwell fluid over a stretching surface in presence of chemical reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Mukhopadhyay

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is presented for unsteady two-dimensional flow of a Maxwell fluid over a stretching surface in presence of a first order constructive/destructive chemical reaction. Using suitable transformations, the governing partial differential equations are converted to ordinary one and are then solved numerically by shooting method. The flow fields and mass transfer are significantly influenced by the governing parameters. Fluid velocity initially decreases with increasing unsteadiness parameter and concentration decreases significantly due to unsteadiness. The effect of increasing values of the Maxwell parameter is to suppress the velocity field. But the concentration is enhanced with increasing Maxwell parameter.

  16. Kinetics studies of the F + HCl → HF + Cl reaction on an accurate potential energy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dandan; Zhang, Ying; Li, Jun

    2018-02-01

    A full-dimensional electronic ground state potential energy surface for the hydrogen abstraction reaction F + HCl → HF + Cl is developed by using the permutation invariant polynomial neural network approach based on 6509 points computed at the level of CCSD(T)-F12a/AVTZ. Spin-orbit correction is also taken into account at the complete active space self-consistent field level. Theoretical thermal rate coefficients determined by the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) approach agree well with experiment, validating the accuracy of the PES. Kinetic isotope effect is also investigated.

  17. Studies of reaction mechanism in 12C + 12C system at intermediate energy of 28.7 MeV/N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magiera, A.

    1996-01-01

    The reaction mechanism in 12 C + 12 C system at intermediate energy of about 30 MeV/nucleon was studied. The contribution of various reaction mechanisms (inelastic scattering, transfer reactions, compound nucleus reactions, sequential decay following inelastic excitation and transfer) to the total reaction cross section were found. The analysis of inclusive and coincidence spectra shows that sequential fragmentation processes dominate

  18. Nutrients and Hydrology Indicate the Driving Mechanisms of Peatland Surface Patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eppinga, M.B.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Wassen, M.J.; Rietkerk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Peatland surface patterning motivates studies that identify underlying structuring mechanisms. Theoretical studies so far suggest that different mechanisms may drive similar types of patterning. The long time span associated with peatland surface pattern formation, however, limits possibilities for

  19. Reaction mechanisms of phosphate with Al(OH)3 and a sandy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    1979-01-01

    Al(OH) 3 is a very effective sorbent for orthophosphate especially at low pH. At low phosphate concentration c p , phosphate is adsorbed by an exchange mechanism with singly coordinated OH(H) groups residing on the surface of the Al(OH)

  20. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction of Hydoxyl Radicals with Acetonitrile under Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, A. J.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    scheme to extract kinetic information about the adduct reations with O2 and branching ratios for OH regeneration. A plausible mechanism for OH regeneration in (2) involves OH addition to the nitrogen atom followed by O2 addition to the cyano carbon atom, isomeriazation and decomposition to D2CO + DOCN + OH. Our results suggest that the OH + CH3CN reaction occurs via a complex mechanism involving both bimolecular and termolecular pathways, analogous to the mechanisms for the the important atmospheric reactions of OH with CO and HNO3.