WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface reaction dynamics

  1. Reaction dynamics of molecular hydrogen on silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratu, P.; Brenig, W.; Gross, A.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results on the dynamics of dissociative adsorption and recombinative desorption of hydrogen on silicon are presented. Using optical second-harmonic generation, extremely small sticking probabilities in the range 10(-9)-10(-5) could be measured for H-2 and D-2 on Si(111......)7X7 and Si(100)2X1. Strong phonon-assisted sticking was observed for gases at 300 K and surface temperatures between 550 K and 1050 K. The absolute values as well as the temperature variation of the adsorption and desorption rates show surprisingly little isotope effect, and they differ only little...... between the two surfaces. These results indicate that tunneling, molecular vibrations, and the structural details of the surface play only a minor role for the adsorption dynamics. Instead, they appear to be governed by the localized H-Si bonding and Si-Si lattice vibrations. Theoretically, an effective...

  2. Reaction dynamics of small molecules at metal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Samson, P A

    1999-01-01

    directed angular distributions suggest the influence of a trapping mechanism, recombining molecules scattering through a molecularly adsorbed state, with a transition state of large d sub N sub N responsible for the product vibrational excitation. Although N sub 2 dissociation on Fe(100) forms a simple overlayer structure, on Fe(110), molecular chemisorption does not occur at or above room temperature and the sticking is extremely small (approx 10 sup - sup 6 to 10 sup - sup 7). Activated nitrogen bombardment can be used to prepare a 'surface nitride' with a structure related to the geometry of bulk Fe sub 4 N. Scanning tunnelling microscopy yields atomic scale features that cannot be explained by simple overlayers. It is proposed that the uppermost iron layer reconstructs to generate quasi-octahedral sites between the top two layers, with sub-surface nitrogen in these sites forming a model for the 'surface nitride' structure. The dissociation-desorption dynamics of D sub 2 upon the Sn/Pt(111) surface alloy a...

  3. Ab initio potential energy surfaces and quantum dynamics for polyatomic bimolecular reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bina; Zhang, Donghui

    2018-03-26

    There has been great progress in the development of potential energy surfaces (PESs) and quantum dynamics calculations in the gas phase. The establishment of fitting procedure for highly accurate PESs and new developments in quantum reactive scattering on reliable PESs allow accurate characterization of reaction dynamics beyond triatomic systems. This review will give the recent development in our group in constructing ab initio PESs based on the neural networks, and the time-dependent wave packet calculations for bimolecular reactions beyond three atoms. Bimolecular reactions of current interest to the community, namely, OH+H2, H+H2O, OH+CO, H+CH4 and Cl+CH4 are focused on. Quantum mechanical characterization of these reactions uncovers interesting dynamical phenomena with an unprecedented level of sophistication, and has greatly advanced our understanding of polyatomic reaction dynamics.

  4. The Role of Electronic Excitations on Chemical Reaction Dynamics at Metal, Semiconductor and Nanoparticle Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tully, John C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-06-10

    Chemical reactions are often facilitated and steered when carried out on solid surfaces, essential for applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, solar energy conversion, corrosion, materials processing, and many others. A critical factor that can determine the rates and pathways of chemical reactions at surfaces is the efficiency and specificity of energy transfer; how fast does energy move around and where does it go? For reactions on insulator surfaces energy transfer generally moves in and out of vibrations of the adsorbed molecule and the underlying substrate. By contrast, on metal surfaces, metallic nanoparticles and semiconductors, another pathway for energy flow opens up, excitation and de-excitation of electrons. This so-called “nonadiabatic” mechanism often dominates the transfer of energy and can directly impact the course of a chemical reaction. Conventional computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation do not account for this nonadiabatic behavior. The current DOE-BES funded project has focused on developing the underlying theoretical foundation and the computational methodology for the prediction of nonadiabatic chemical reaction dynamics at surfaces. The research has successfully opened up new methodology and new applications for molecular simulation. In particular, over the last three years, the “Electronic Friction” theory, pioneered by the PI, has now been developed into a stable and accurate computational method that is sufficiently practical to allow first principles “on-the-fly” simulation of chemical reaction dynamics at metal surfaces.

  5. Dynamics of Surface Exchange Reactions Between Au and Pt for HER and HOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, Billie; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard; Bonde, Jacob Lindner

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric analysis of the Pt-on-Au system for hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER/HOR) indicates that dynamic surface exchange reactions occur between Pt and Au. HER/HOR activities depend on the dominant surface species present, which is controllable by the potential applied...... to the system. Bulk Au is not very active for HER/HOR; however, when Pt is deposited onto the Au surface, the system becomes active. The Pt-on-Au system can subsequently be deactivated by cycling to potentials cathodic of the OH-adsorption and Pt-dissolution potentials (~+1.18 V vs normal hydrogen electrode...... reaction is attributed to the lower surface energy of Au relative to Pt causing Au to migrate to the surface. When the system is deactivated, Au is present at the surface. However, Pt migrates back to the surface at higher positive potentials, where PtOx/PtOHx is formed, leading to adsorbate...

  6. Theory of the reaction dynamics of small molecules on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Bret [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2016-09-09

    The objective of this project has been to develop realistic theoretical models for gas-surface interactions, with a focus on processes important in heterogeneous catalysis. The dissociative chemisorption of a molecule on a metal is a key step in many catalyzed reactions, and is often the rate-limiting step. We have explored the dissociative chemisorption of H2, H2O and CH4 on a variety of metal surfaces. Most recently, our extensive studies of methane dissociation on Ni and Pt surfaces have fully elucidated its dependence on translational energy, vibrational state and surface temperature, providing the first accurate comparisons with experimental data. We have explored Eley-Rideal and hot atom reactions of H atoms with H- and C-covered metal surfaces. H atom interactions with graphite have also been explored, including both sticking and Eley-Rideal recombination processes. Again, our methods made it possible to explain several experiments studying these reactions. The sticking of atoms on metal surfaces has also been studied. To help elucidate the experiments that study these processes, we examine how the reaction dynamics depend upon the nature of the molecule-metal interaction, as well as experimental variables such as substrate temperature, beam energy, angle of impact, and the internal states of the molecules. Electronic structure methods based on Density Functional Theory are used to compute each molecule-metal potential energy surface. Both time-dependent quantum scattering techniques and quasi-classical methods are used to examine the reaction or scattering dynamics. Much of our effort has been directed towards developing improved quantum methods that can accurately describe reactions, as well as include the effects of substrate temperature (lattice vibration).

  7. Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations on reactions of molecules with metal surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nattino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Reactions on metal surfaces are of scientific interest due to the tremendous relevance of heterogeneous catalysis. Single crystal surfaces under controlled physical conditions are generally employed as a model for the real catalysts, with the aim of improving the fundamental understanding of the

  8. The dynamics of molecular interactions and chemical reactions at metal surfaces: testing the foundations of theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Bartels, Nils; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M

    2015-04-01

    We review studies of molecular interactions and chemical reactions at metal surfaces, emphasizing progress toward a predictive theory of surface chemistry and catalysis. For chemistry at metal surfaces, a small number of central approximations are typically made: (a) the Born-Oppenheimer approximation of electronic adiabaticity, (b) the use of density functional theory at the generalized gradient approximation level, (c) the classical approximation for nuclear motion, and (d) various reduced-dimensionality approximations. Together, these approximations constitute a provisional model for surface chemical reactivity. We review work on some carefully studied examples of molecules interacting at metal surfaces that probe the validity of various aspects of the provisional model.

  9. Reversible redox reaction and water configuration on a positively charged platinum surface: first principles molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeshoji, Tamio; Otani, Minoru; Hamada, Ikutaro; Okamoto, Yasuharu

    2011-12-07

    The water dissociation reaction and water molecule configuration on a positively charged platinum (111) surface were investigated by means of first principles molecular dynamics under periodic boundary conditions. Water molecules on the Pt surface were mostly in the O-down orientation but some H-down structures were also found. OH(-) ion, generated by removing H from H(2)O in the bulk region, moved to the Pt surface, on which a positive charge is induced, by a Grotthuss-like proton-relay mechanism and adsorbed on it as OH(Pt). Hydrogen atom exchange between OH(Pt) and a near-by water molecule frequently occurred on the Pt surface and had a low activation energy of the same order as room temperature energy. When a positive charge (7 μC cm(-2)) was added to the Pt surface, H(3)O(+) and OH(Pt) were generated from 2H(2)O on the Pt. This may be coupled with an electron transfer to the Pt electrode [2H(2)O → H(3)O(+) + OH(Pt) + e(-)]. The opposite reaction was also observed on the same charged surface during a simulation of duration about 10 ps; it is a reversible redox reaction. When further positive charge (14 μC cm(-2)) was added, the reaction shifted to the right hand side completely. Thus, this one-electron transfer reaction, which is a part of the oxygen electrode reaction in fuel cells and water electrolysis, was confirmed to be a low activation energy process.

  10. Quantum dynamical study of the O(1D)+HCl reaction employing three electronic state potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Han, Ke-Li; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Nakamura, Hiroki; Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G.; Zhang, Hong; Smith, Sean C.; Hankel, Marlies

    2008-01-01

    Quantum dynamical calculations are reported for the title reaction, for both product arrangement channels and using potential energy surfaces corresponding to the three electronic states, 1A'1, 2A'1, and 1A″1, which correlate with both reactants and products. The calculations have been performed for J =0 using the time-dependent real wavepacket approach by Gray and Balint-Kurti [J. Chem. Phys. 108, 950 (1998)]. Reaction probabilities for both product arrangement channels on all three potential energy surfaces are presented for total energies between 0.1 and 1.1eV. Product vibrational state distributions at two total energies, 0.522 and 0.722eV, are also presented for both channels and all three electronic states. Product rotational quantum state distributions are presented for both product arrangement channels and all three electronic states for the first six product vibrational states.

  11. Dynamics of surface-migration: Electron-induced reaction of 1,2-dihaloethanes on Si(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai; MacLean, Oliver; Guo, Si Yue; McNab, Iain R.; Ning, Zhanyu; Wang, Chen-Guang; Ji, Wei; Polanyi, John C.

    2016-10-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy was used to investigate the electron-induced reaction of 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) and 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) on Si(100).We observed a long-lived physisorbed molecular state of DBE at 75 K and of DCE at 110 K. As a result we were able to characterize by experiment and also by ab initio theory the dynamics of ethylene production in the electron-induced surface-reaction of these physisorbed species. For both DBE and DCE the ethylene product was observed to migrate across the surface. In the case of DBE the recoil of the ethylene favored the silicon rows, migrating by an average distance of 22 Å, and up to 100 Å. Trajectory calculations were performed for this electron-induced reaction, using an 'Impulsive Two-State' model involving an anionic excited state and a neutral ground-potential. The model agreed with experiment in reproducing both migration and desorption of the ethylene product. The computed migration exhibited a 'ballistic' launch and subsequent 'bounces', thereby accounting for the observed long-range migratory dynamics.

  12. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, B.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  13. Dynamics study of the OH + NH3 hydrogen abstraction reaction using QCT calculations based on an analytical potential energy surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge-Palacios, M; Corchado, J C; Espinosa-Garcia, J

    2013-06-07

    To understand the reactivity and mechanism of the OH + NH3 → H2O + NH2 gas-phase reaction, which evolves through wells in the entrance and exit channels, a detailed dynamics study was carried out using quasi-classical trajectory calculations. The calculations were performed on an analytical potential energy surface (PES) recently developed by our group, PES-2012 [Monge-Palacios et al. J. Chem. Phys. 138, 084305 (2013)]. Most of the available energy appeared as H2O product vibrational energy (54%), reproducing the only experimental evidence, while only the 21% of this energy appeared as NH2 co-product vibrational energy. Both products appeared with cold and broad rotational distributions. The excitation function (constant collision energy in the range 1.0-14.0 kcal mol(-1)) increases smoothly with energy, contrasting with the only theoretical information (reduced-dimensional quantum scattering calculations based on a simplified PES), which presented a peak at low collision energies, related to quantized states. Analysis of the individual reactive trajectories showed that different mechanisms operate depending on the collision energy. Thus, while at high energies (E(coll) ≥ 6 kcal mol(-1)) all trajectories are direct, at low energies about 20%-30% of trajectories are indirect, i.e., with the mediation of a trapping complex, mainly in the product well. Finally, the effect of the zero-point energy constraint on the dynamics properties was analyzed.

  14. Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wester, Roland

    2017-05-05

    We review the recent advances in the investigation of the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. During the past decade, the combination of single-collision experiments in crossed ion and neutral beams with the velocity map ion imaging detection technique has enabled a wealth of studies on ion-molecule reactions. These methods, in combination with chemical dynamics simulations, have uncovered new and unexpected reaction mechanisms, such as the roundabout mechanism and the subtle influence of the leaving group in anion-molecule nucleophilic substitution reactions. For this important class of reactions, as well as for many fundamental cation-molecule reactions, the information obtained with crossed-beam imaging is discussed. The first steps toward understanding micro-solvation of ion-molecule reaction dynamics are presented. We conclude with the presentation of several interesting directions for future research.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of sodium aluminosilicate glass structures and glass surface-water reactions using the reactive force field (ReaxFF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongol, R.; Wang, L.; Cormack, A. N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    Reactive potentials are increasingly used to study the properties of glasses and glass water reactions in a reactive molecular dynamics (MD) framework. In this study, we have simulated a ternary sodium aluminosilicate glass and investigated the initial stages of the glass surface-water reactions at 300 K using reactive force field (ReaxFF). On comparison of the simulated glass structures generated using ReaxFF and classical Buckingham potentials, our results show that the atomic density profiles calculated for the surface glass structures indicate a bond-angle distribution dependency. The atomic density profiles also show higher concentrations of non-bridging oxygens (NBOs) and sodium ions at the glass surface. Additionally, we present our results of formation of silanol species and the diffusion of water molecules at the glass surface using ReaxFF.

  16. Perspective: chemical dynamics simulations of non-statistical reaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinyou; Hase, William L

    2017-04-28

    Non-statistical chemical dynamics are exemplified by disagreements with the transition state (TS), RRKM and phase space theories of chemical kinetics and dynamics. The intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) is often used for the former two theories, and non-statistical dynamics arising from non-IRC dynamics are often important. In this perspective, non-statistical dynamics are discussed for chemical reactions, with results primarily obtained from chemical dynamics simulations and to a lesser extent from experiment. The non-statistical dynamical properties discussed are: post-TS dynamics, including potential energy surface bifurcations, product energy partitioning in unimolecular dissociation and avoiding exit-channel potential energy minima; non-RRKM unimolecular decomposition; non-IRC dynamics; direct mechanisms for bimolecular reactions with pre- and/or post-reaction potential energy minima; non-TS theory barrier recrossings; and roaming dynamics.This article is part of the themed issue 'Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Dynamics at Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylvia Ceyer, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-05-04

    The 2009 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 30th anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state dynamics, non-adiabatic interactions in molecule-metal systems, photon induced desorption from semiconductor and metal surfaces, ultrafast x-ray and electron diffraction as probes of the dynamics of ablation, ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy of water surface dynamics, dynamics of a single adsorbate, growth at nano-scale mineral surfaces, dynamics of atom recombination on interstellar dust grains and the dynamics of the interaction of water with lipid bilayers. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology and biophysics.

  18. Quantum Tunneling in Testosterone 6β-Hydroxylation by Cytochrome P450: Reaction Dynamics Calculations Employing Multiconfiguration Molecular-Mechanical Potential Energy Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Lin, Hai

    2009-05-01

    Testosterone hydroxylation is a prototypical reaction of human cytochrome P450 3A4, which metabolizes about 50% of oral drugs on the market. Reaction dynamics calculations were carried out for the testosterone 6β-hydrogen abstraction and the 6β-d1-testosterone 6β-duterium abstraction employing a model that consists of the substrate and the active oxidant compound I. The calculations were performed at the level of canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling and were based on a semiglobal full-dimensional potential energy surface generated by the multiconfiguration molecular mechanics technique. The tunneling coefficients were found to be around 3, indicating substantial contributions by quantum tunneling. However, the tunneling made only modest contributions to the kinetic isotope effects. The kinetic isotope effects were computed to be about 2 in the doublet spin state and about 5 in the quartet spin state.

  19. Quantum nonadiabatic dynamics of hydrogen exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopala Rao, T.; Jayachander Rao, B.; Mahapatra, S.

    2009-11-01

    In continuation of our earlier effort to understand the nonadiabatic coupling effects in the prototypical H + H 2 exchange reaction [Jayachander Rao et al. Chem. Phys. 333 (2007) 135], we present here further quantum dynamical investigations on its isotopic variants. The present work also corrects a technical scaling error occurred in our previous studies on the H + HD reaction. Initial state-selected total reaction cross sections and Boltzmann averaged thermal rate constants are calculated with the aid of a time-dependent wave packet approach employing the double many body expansion potential energy surfaces of the system. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental and other theoretical data whenever available. The results re-establish our earlier conclusion, on a more general perspective, that the electronic nonadiabatic effects are negligible on the important quantum dynamical observables of these reactive systems reported here.

  20. Quantum nonadiabatic dynamics of hydrogen exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopala Rao, T.; Jayachander Rao, B.; Mahapatra, S.

    2009-01-01

    In continuation of our earlier effort to understand the nonadiabatic coupling effects in the prototypical H + H 2 exchange reaction [Jayachander Rao et al. Chem. Phys. 333 (2007) 135], we present here further quantum dynamical investigations on its isotopic variants. The present work also corrects a technical scaling error occurred in our previous studies on the H + HD reaction. Initial state-selected total reaction cross sections and Boltzmann averaged thermal rate constants are calculated with the aid of a time-dependent wave packet approach employing the double many body expansion potential energy surfaces of the system. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental and other theoretical data whenever available. The results re-establish our earlier conclusion, on a more general perspective, that the electronic nonadiabatic effects are negligible on the important quantum dynamical observables of these reactive systems reported here.

  1. Dynamic effects in fragmentation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, G. F.; Esbensen, H.

    2002-01-01

    Fragmentation reactions offer a useful tool to study the spectroscopy of halo nuclei, but the large extent of the halo wave function makes the reaction theory more difficult. The simple reaction models based on the eikonal approximation for the nuclear interaction or first-order perturbation theory for the Coulomb interaction have systematic errors that they investigate here, comparing to the predictions of complete dynamical calculations. They find that stripping probabilities are underpredicted by the eikonal model, leading to extracted spectroscopy strengths that are two large. In contrast, the Coulomb excitation is overpredicted by the simple theory. They attribute this to a screening effect, as is well known in the Barkas effect on stopping powers. The errors decrease with beam energy as E(sub beam)(sup -1), and are not significant at beam energies above 50 MeV/u. At lower beam energies, the effects should be taken into account when extracting quantitative spectroscopic strengths

  2. Quantum effects in unimolecular reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gezelter, Joshua Daniel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    This work is primarily concerned with the development of models for the quantum dynamics of unimolecular isomerization and photodissociation reactions. We apply the rigorous quantum methodology of a Discrete Variable Representation (DVR) with Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABC) to these models in an attempt to explain some very surprising results from a series of experiments on vibrationally excited ketene. Within the framework of these models, we are able to identify the experimental signatures of tunneling and dynamical resonances in the energy dependence of the rate of ketene isomerization. Additionally, we investigate the step-like features in the energy dependence of the rate of dissociation of triplet ketene to form 3B1 CH2 + 1σ+ CO that have been observed experimentally. These calculations provide a link between ab initio calculations of the potential energy surfaces and the experimentally observed dynamics on these surfaces. Additionally, we develop an approximate model for the partitioning of energy in the products of photodissociation reactions of large molecules with appreciable barriers to recombination. In simple bond cleavage reactions like CH3COCl → CH3CO + Cl, the model does considerably better than other impulsive and statistical models in predicting the energy distribution in the products. We also investigate ways of correcting classical mechanics to include the important quantum mechanical aspects of zero-point energy. The method we investigate is found to introduce a number of undesirable dynamical artifacts including a reduction in the above-threshold rates for simple reactions, and a strong mixing of the chaotic and regular energy domains for some model problems. We conclude by discussing some of the directions for future research in the field of theoretical chemical dynamics.

  3. Elementary Chemical Reactions in Surface Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Zhou, Chuanyao; Ma, Zhibo; Ren, Zefeng; Fan, Hongjun; Yang, Xueming

    2018-02-28

    Photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and organic degradation on oxide materials have been extensively investigated in the last two decades. Great efforts have been dedicated to the study of photocatalytic reaction mechanisms of a variety of molecules on TiO 2 surfaces by using surface science methods under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions, providing fundamental understanding of surface chemical reactions in photocatalysis. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the study of photocatalysis of several important species (water, methanol, and aldehydes) on different TiO 2 surfaces. The results of these studies have provided us deep insights into the elementary processes of surface photocatalysis and stimulated a new frontier of research in this area. Based on the results of these studies, a new dynamics-based photocatalysis model is also discussed. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Physical Chemistry Volume 69 is April 20, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  4. Mode specificity in unimolecular reaction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, B.A.

    1982-07-01

    Theoretical studies on mode specificity in unimolecular reaction dynamics are presented, based on essentially exact quantum mechanical methods, a semi-classical multichannel branching model, and classical trajectory methods. The principal aim is to discover the relevant factors governing whether a unimolecular system exhibits mode specificity in its individual state rate constants, i.e., whether quasi-degenerate metastable states decay with significantly different rates. Model studies of two nonlinearly coupled oscillators (one of which can dissociate) demonstrate the effects of various features of potential energy surfaces on the character of the rates (e.g., degeneracy of modes, reaction path curvature, frequency modulation, etc.). These results and those obtained for the Henon-Heiles potential energy surface indicate and apparent absence of correlation between the quasi-periodic/ergodic motion of classical mechanics and the mode specific/statistical behavior of the unimolecular rate constants

  5. Modeling non-adiabatic photoexcited reaction dynamics in condensed phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coker, D.F.

    2003-01-01

    Reactions of photoexcited molecules, ions, and radicals in condensed phase environments involve non-adiabatic dynamics over coupled electronic surfaces. We focus on how local environmental symmetries can effect non-adiabatic coupling between excited electronic states and thus influence, in a possibly controllable way, the outcome of photo-excited reactions. Semi-classical and mixed quantum-classical non-adiabatic molecular dynamics methods, together with semi-empirical excited state potentials are used to probe the dynamical mixing of electronic states in different environments from molecular clusters, to simple liquids and solids, and photo-excited reactions in complex reaction environments such as zeolites

  6. Potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, H.F. III.

    1976-01-01

    Research into potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 is described. Topics covered include: the fuzzy interface between surface chemistry catalysis and organometallic chemistry; potential energy surfaces for elementary fluorine hydrogen reactions; structure, energetics, and reactivity of carbenes; and the theory of self-consistent electron pairs

  7. Effective dynamics along given reaction coordinates, and reaction rate theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Hartmann, Carsten; Schütte, Christof

    2016-12-22

    In molecular dynamics and related fields one considers dynamical descriptions of complex systems in full (atomic) detail. In order to reduce the overwhelming complexity of realistic systems (high dimension, large timescale spread, limited computational resources) the projection of the full dynamics onto some reaction coordinates is examined in order to extract statistical information like free energies or reaction rates. In this context, the effective dynamics that is induced by the full dynamics on the reaction coordinate space has attracted considerable attention in the literature. In this article, we contribute to this discussion: we first show that if we start with an ergodic diffusion process whose invariant measure is unique then these properties are inherited by the effective dynamics. Then, we give equations for the effective dynamics, discuss whether the dominant timescales and reaction rates inferred from the effective dynamics are accurate approximations of such quantities for the full dynamics, and compare our findings to results from approaches like Mori-Zwanzig, averaging, or homogenization. Finally, by discussing the algorithmic realization of the effective dynamics, we demonstrate that recent algorithmic techniques like the "equation-free" approach and the "heterogeneous multiscale method" can be seen as special cases of our approach.

  8. Dynamic Reaction Figures: An Integrative Vehicle for Understanding Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A highly flexible learning tool, referred to as a dynamic reaction figure, is described. Application of these figures can (i) yield the correct chemical equation by simply following a set of menu driven directions; (ii) present the underlying "mechanism" in chemical reactions; and (iii) help to solve quantitative problems in a number of different…

  9. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  10. Theoretical aspects of surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørskov, J. K.; Stoltze, P.

    1987-10-01

    A short review is given of our present understanding of the trends in the chemisorption energies and activation energies for dissociation of simple gas molecules on the transition metals. The effect of adsorbed alkali atoms on the activation energy for dissociation is also discussed. This is then used to explain the trends in activity along the transition metal rows and the promoting effect of K for the ammonia synthesis reaction. The basis for the description is the development of a kinetic model for the ammonia synthesis which can describe quantitatively the macroscopic kinetics of a commercial catalyst under industrial conditions. The model relates the reaction rate directly to the properties of the chemisorbed reactants, intermediates and product as measured for model single crystal systems under ultrahigh vacuum conditions.

  11. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    A new global potential energy surface (PES) is being generated for O(P-3) + H2 yields OH + H. This surface is being fit using the rotated Morse oscillator method, which was used to fit the previous POL-CI surface. The new surface is expected to be more accurate and also includes a much more complete sampling of bent geometries. A new study has been undertaken of the reaction N + O2 yields NO + O. The new studies have focused on the region of the surface near a possible minimum corresponding to the peroxy form of NOO. A large portion of the PES for this second reaction has been mapped out. Since state to state cross sections for the reaction are important in the chemistry of high temperature air, these studies will probably be extended to permit generation of a new global potential for reaction.

  12. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, Hans-Joachim [Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany). Fritz-Haber-Inst.

    2003-02-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Holiday Inn, Ventura, California, 2/16-21/03. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  13. Dynamical dipole mode in fusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierroutsakou, D.; Martin, B.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Baran, V.; Boiano, A.; Cardella, G.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; De Filippo, E.; Del Zoppo, A.; Di Toro, M.; Inglima, G.; Glodariu, T.; La Commara, M.; Maiolino, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Pagano, A.; Piattelli, P.; Pirrone, S.; Rizzo, C.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Signorini, C.

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the dynamical dipole mode, related with entrance channel charge asymmetry effects, in the 40Ar+92Zr and 36Ar+96Zr fusion reactions at Elab = 15.1 A and 16 A MeV, respectively. These reactions populate, through entrance channels having different charge asymmetries, a compound nucleus in the A = 126 mass energy region, identical spin distribution at an average excitation energy of about 280 MeV. The compound nucleus average excitation energy and average mass were deduced by the analysis of the light charged particle energy spectra. By studying the γ-ray energy spectra and the γ-ray angular distributions of the considered reactions, the dynamical nature of the prompt radiation related to the dynamical dipole mode was evidenced. The data are compared with calculations based on a collective bremsstrahlung analysis of the reaction dynamics.

  14. Dynamical dipole mode in fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierroutsakou, D.; Boiano, A.; Romoli, M.; Martin, B.; Inglima, G.; La Commara, M.; Sandoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Coniglione, R.; Zoppo, A. Del; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Baran, V.; Glodariu, T.; Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the dynamical dipole mode, related with entrance channel charge asymmetry effects, in the 40 Ar+ 92 Zr and 36 Ar+ 96 Zr fusion reactions at E lab = 15.1 A and 16 A MeV, respectively. These reactions populate, through entrance channels having different charge asymmetries, a compound nucleus in the A = 126 mass energy region, identical spin distribution at an average excitation energy of about 280 MeV. The compound nucleus average excitation energy and average mass were deduced by the analysis of the light charged particle energy spectra. By studying the γ-ray energy spectra and the γ-ray angular distributions of the considered reactions, the dynamical nature of the prompt radiation related to the dynamical dipole mode was evidenced. The data are compared with calculations based on a collective bremsstrahlung analysis of the reaction dynamics.

  15. Dynamics of traveling reaction pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovzhenko, A. Yu.; Rumanov, E. N.

    2007-01-01

    The growth of activator losses is accompanied by the decay of a traveling reaction pulse. In a ring reactor, this propagation threshold is present simultaneously with a threshold related to the ring diameter. The results of numerical experiments with pulses of an exothermal reaction reveal the transition from pulse propagation to a homogeneous hot regime, established regimes with periodic variations of the pulse velocity, and oscillatory decay of the pulse. When the medium becomes 'bistable' as a result of the variation in parameters, this factor does not prevent the propagation of pulses, but leads to changes in the pulse structure

  16. Quasiclassical trajectory study of the Cl +CH4 reaction dynamics on a quadratic configuration interaction with single and double excitation interpolated potential energy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, J. F.; Aoiz, F. J.; Bañares, L.

    2006-09-01

    An ab initio interpolated potential energy surface (PES) for the Cl +CH4 reactive system has been constructed using the interpolation method of Collins and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 102, 5647 (1995); 108, 8302 (1998); 111, 816 (1999); Theor. Chem. Acc. 108, 313 (2002)]. The ab initio calculations have been performed using quadratic configuration interaction with single and double excitation theory to build the PES. A simple scaling all correlation technique has been used to obtain a PES which yields a barrier height and reaction energy in good agreement with high level ab initio calculations and experimental measurements. Using these interpolated PESs, a detailed quasiclassical trajectory study of integral and differential cross sections, product rovibrational populations, and internal energy distributions has been carried out for the Cl +CH4 and Cl +CD4 reactions, and the theoretical results have been compared with the available experimental data. It has been shown that the calculated total reaction cross sections versus collision energy for the Cl +CH4 and Cl +CD4 reactions is very sensitive to the barrier height. Besides, due to the zero-point energy (ZPE) leakage of the CH4 molecule to the reaction coordinate in the quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations, the reaction threshold falls below the barrier height of the PES. The ZPE leakage leads to CH3 and HCl coproducts with internal energy below its corresponding ZPEs. We have shown that a Gaussian binning (GB) analysis of the trajectories yields excitation functions in somehow better agreement with the experimental determinations. The HCl(v'=0) and DCl(v'=0) rotational distributions are as well very sensitive to the ZPE problem. The GB correction narrows and shifts the rotational distributions to lower values of the rotational quantum numbers. However, the present QCT rotational distributions are still hotter than the experimental distributions. In both reactions the angular distributions shift from

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of a chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorecki, J.; Gryko, J.

    1988-06-01

    Molecular dynamics is used to study the chemical reaction A+A→B+B. It is shown that the reaction rate constant follows the Arrhenius law both for Lennard-Jones and hard sphere interaction potentials between substrate particles. A. For the denser systems the reaction rate is proportional to the value of the radial distribution function at the contact point of two hard spheres. 10 refs, 4 figs

  18. Screened Thermonuclear Reaction Rates on Magnetar Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong-Lin, Liu; Zhi-Quan, Luo; Jing-Jing, Liu; Xiang-Jun, Lai

    2008-01-01

    Improving Salpeter's method, we discuss the effect of superstrong magnetic fields (such as those of magnetars) on thermonuclear reaction rates. These most interesting reactions, including the hydrogen burning by the CNO cycle and the helium burning by the triple alpha reaction, are investigated as examples on the magnetar surfaces. The obtained result shows that the superstrong magnetic fields can increase the thermonuclear reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. The enhancement may have significant influence for further study research of the magnetars, especially for the x-ray luminosity observation and the evolution of magnetars. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  19. Full-dimensional quantum dynamics study of the H{sub 2} + C{sub 2}H → H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} reaction on an ab initio potential energy surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liuyang [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, National for Magnetic Resonance in Wuhan, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Shao, Kejie; Chen, Jun [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics and Center for Theoretical Computational Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Yang, Minghui, E-mail: yangmh@wipm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, National for Magnetic Resonance in Wuhan, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Dong H. [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics and Center for Theoretical Computational Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2016-05-21

    This work performs a time-dependent wavepacket study of the H{sub 2} + C{sub 2}H → H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} reaction on a new ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The PES is constructed using neural network method based on 68 478 geometries with energies calculated at UCCSD(T)-F12a/aug-cc-pVTZ level and covers H{sub 2} + C{sub 2}H↔H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} → HCCH{sub 2}, and HCCH{sub 2} radial isomerization reaction regions. The reaction dynamics of H{sub 2} + C{sub 2}H → H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} are investigated using full-dimensional quantum dynamics method. The initial-state selected reaction probabilities are calculated for reactants in eight vibrational states. The calculated results showed that the H{sub 2} vibrational excitation predominantly enhances the reactivity while the excitation of bending mode of C{sub 2}H slightly inhibits the reaction. The excitations of two stretching modes of C{sub 2}H molecule have negligible effect on the reactivity. The integral cross section is calculated with J-shift approximation and the mode selectivity in this reaction is discussed. The rate constants over 200-2000 K are calculated and agree well with the experimental measured values.

  20. Ultrafast Coherent Control and Characterization of Surface Reactions using FELs

    CERN Document Server

    Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nordlund, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    The microscopic understanding of surface chemistry requires a detailed understanding of the dynamics of elementary processes at surfaces. The ultrashort electron pulse obtained in the linear accelerator to feed the FEL can be used for generation of coherent synchrotron radiation in the low energy THz regime. With the current parameters for LCLS this corresponds to radiation with energy corresponding to excitations of low-energy vibrational modes of molecules on surfaces or phonons in substrates. The coherent radiation can coherently manipulate atoms or molecules on surfaces. In this respect a chemical reaction can be initiated by coherent atomic motion along a specific reaction coordinate. Since the THz radiation is generated from the same source as the FEL radiation full-time synchronization for pump-probe experiments will be possible. The possibility to perform time-resolved X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements as a probe of chemical dynamics is an exciti...

  1. Accurate ab initio potential energy surface, thermochemistry, and dynamics of the Br(2P, 2P(3∕2)) + CH4 → HBr + CH3 reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czakó, Gábor

    2013-04-07

    Chemically accurate full-dimensional non-spin-orbit and spin-orbit (SO) ground-state potential energy surfaces (PESs) are obtained for the Br + CH4 → HBr + CH3 reaction by fitting 21 574 composite ab initio energy points. The composite method considers electron correlation methods up to CCSD(T), basis sets up to aug-cc-pwCVTZ-PP, correlation of the core electrons, scalar relativistic effects via an effective core potential (ECP), and SO corrections, thereby achieving an accuracy better than 0.5 kcal∕mol. Benchmark structures and relative energies are computed for the stationary points using the ab initio focal-point analysis (FPA) scheme based on both ECP and Douglas-Kroll approaches providing all-electron relativistic CCSDT(Q)∕complete-basis-set quality energies. The PESs accurately describe the saddle point of the abstraction reaction and the van der Waals complexes in the entrance and product channels. The SO-corrected PES provides a classical barrier height of 7285(7232 ± 50) cm(-1), De values of 867(799 ± 10) and 399(344 ± 10) cm(-1) for the complexes CH3-HBr and CH3-BrH, respectively, and reaction endothermicity of 7867(7857 ± 50) cm(-1), in excellent agreement with the new, FPA-based benchmark data shown in parentheses. The difference between the Br + CH4 asymptotes of the non-SO and SO PESs is 1240 cm(-1), in good agreement with the experiment (1228 cm(-1)). Quasiclassical trajectory calculations based on more than 13 million trajectories for the late-barrier Br + CH4(vk = 0, 1) [k = 1, 2, 3, 4] reactions show that the vibrational energy, especially the excitation of the stretching modes, activates the reaction much more efficiently than translational energy, in agreement with the extended Polanyi rules. Angular distributions show dominant backward scattering for the ground-state reaction and forward scattering for the stretching-excited reactions. The reactivity on the non-SO PES is about 3-5 times larger than that on the SO PES in a wide

  2. Photogenerated carrier-induced reactions on uhv semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osgood, R.M. Jr.

    1992-05-28

    The objective for this experimental work was to examine the reaction mechanisms, half-collision dynamics, and other optically induced chemical effects, that are operable on a well characterized single-crystal semiconductor surface. Of particular interest were reactions induced by charge transfer from the semiconductor surface including hot carrier and thermalized carrier processes. The primary technique to measure the desorbed fragment translational energies was time-of-flight mass-spectroscopy, used in conjunction with a pulsed tunable laser source. The work was carried out in ultrahigh vacuum, thus other surface spectroscopies such as temperature-programmed desorption, (TPD), (LEED), etc. were used as needed. In the project, the photoreactions of several halogen-containing molecules on GaAs(110) surfaces have been investigated. The studies have made the first observations of several new photochemical processes on uhv prepared surfaces including intermolecular charge transfer; desorption by thermal-carrier-induced reactions (including the measurement of coverage-dependent changes in the translational energies of the desorbed products); interferometric oscillation of photoinduced reactions; and self-quenching of thermal carrier reactions on surfaces.

  3. Effect of Si on the oxidation reaction of α-Ti(0 0 0 1) surface: ab initio molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Somesh Kr; Sahara, Ryoji; Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki

    2017-01-01

    We present our ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) study of the effect of Si on the oxidation of α-Ti(0   0   0   1) surfaces. We varied the Si concentration in the first layer of the surface from 0 to 25 at.% and the oxygen coverage ( θ ) on the surface was varied up to 1 monolayer (ML). The MD was performed at 300, 600 and 973 K. For θ  = 0.5 ML, oxygen penetration into the slab was not observed after 16 ps of MD at 973 K while for θ  > 0.5 ML, oxygen penetration into the Ti slab was observed even at 300 K. From Bader charge analysis, we confirmed the formation of the oxide layer on the surface of the Ti slab. At higher temperatures, the Si atoms diffused from the first layer to the interior of the slab, while the Ti atoms moved from second layer to the first layer. The pair correlation function shows the formation of a disordered Ti-O network during the initial stage of oxidation. Si was found to have a strong influence on the penetration of oxygen in the Ti slab at high temperatures.

  4. Global diabatic potential energy surfaces and quantum dynamical studies for the Li(2p) + H2(X(1)Σ(+)g) → LiH(X(1)Σ(+)) + H reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Di; Yuan, Jiuchuang; Li, Huixing; Chen, Maodu

    2016-04-29

    The global diabatic potential energy surfaces which are correlated with the ground state 1A' and the excited state 2A' of the Li(2p) + H2 reaction are presented in this study. The multi-reference configuration interaction method and large basis sets (aug-cc-pVQZ for H atom and cc-pwCVQZ for Li atom) were employed in the ab initio single-point energy calculations. The diabatic potential energies were generated by the diabatization scheme based on transition dipole moment operators. The neural network method was utilized to fit the matrix elements of the diabatic energy surfaces, and the root mean square errors were extremely small (3.69 meV for , 5.34 meV for and 5.06 meV for ). The topographical features of the diabatic potential energy surfaces were characterized and the surfaces were found to be sufficiently smooth for the dynamical calculation. The crossing seam of the conical intersections between the and surfaces were pinpointed. Based on this new analytical diabatic potential energy surfaces, time-dependent wave packet calculation were conducted to investigate the mechanism of the title reaction. At low collision energies, the product LiH molecule tends to forward scattering, while at high collision energies, the forward and backward scatterings exist simultaneously.

  5. Ultrafast Coherent Control and Characterization of Surface Reactions using FELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogasawara, Hirohito

    2005-01-01

    The microscopic understanding of reactions at surfaces requires an in-depth knowledge of the dynamics of elementary processes on an ultrafast timescale. This can be accomplished using an ultrafast excitation to initiate a chemical reaction and then probe the progression of the reaction with an ultrashort x-ray pulse from the FEL. There is a great potential to use atom-specific spectroscopy involving core levels to probe the chemical nature, structure and bonding of species on surfaces. The ultrashort electron pulse obtained in the linear accelerator to feed the X-ray FEL can also be used for generation of coherent synchrotron radiation in the low energy THz regime to be used as a pump. This radiation has an energy close to the thermal excitations of low-energy vibrational modes of molecules on surfaces and phonons in substrates. The coherent THz radiation will be an electric field pulse with a certain direction that can collectively manipulate atoms or molecules on surfaces. In this respect a chemical reaction can be initiated by collective atomic motion along a specific reaction coordinate. If the coherent THz radiation is generated from the same source as the X-ray FEL radiation, full-time synchronization for pump-probe experiments will be possible. The combination of THz and X-ray spectroscopy could be a unique opportunity for FEL facilities to conduct ultrafast chemistry studies at surfaces

  6. Markovian dynamics on complex reaction networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutsias, J.; Jenkinson, G.

    2013-01-01

    Complex networks, comprised of individual elements that interact with each other through reaction channels, are ubiquitous across many scientific and engineering disciplines. Examples include biochemical, pharmacokinetic, epidemiological, ecological, social, neural, and multi-agent networks. A common approach to modeling such networks is by a master equation that governs the dynamic evolution of the joint probability mass function of the underlying population process and naturally leads to Markovian dynamics for such process. Due however to the nonlinear nature of most reactions and the large size of the underlying state-spaces, computation and analysis of the resulting stochastic population dynamics is a difficult task. This review article provides a coherent and comprehensive coverage of recently developed approaches and methods to tackle this problem. After reviewing a general framework for modeling Markovian reaction networks and giving specific examples, the authors present numerical and computational techniques capable of evaluating or approximating the solution of the master equation, discuss a recently developed approach for studying the stationary behavior of Markovian reaction networks using a potential energy landscape perspective, and provide an introduction to the emerging theory of thermodynamic analysis of such networks. Three representative problems of opinion formation, transcription regulation, and neural network dynamics are used as illustrative examples

  7. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  8. The dynamics of the Hg + Br2 reaction: elucidation of the reaction mechanism for the Br exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina, P G; Menéndez, M; Aoiz, F J

    2017-06-28

    In spite of its importance in the Hg atmospheric chemistry, the dynamics of the Hg + Br 2 → HgBr + Br reaction is poorly understood. In this article, we have carried out a comprehensive study of the reaction mechanism of this reaction by means of quasiclassical trajectories (QCTs) on an existing ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The reaction has a non trivial dynamics, as a consequence of its large endothermicity, the presence of a deep potential well, and the competition between the Br exchange and the collision induced dissociation processes. Our calculations demonstrate that insertion is only relevant at energies just above the reaction threshold and that, at energies above 2.3 eV, HgBr formation typically takes place via a sort of frustrated dissociation. In order to compare directly with the results obtained in extensive cross molecular beam experiments for the homologous reaction with I 2 , angular distributions in the laboratory frame for Hg + Br 2 have been simulated under similar experimental conditions. The lack of agreement at the highest energies considered suggests that either the two reactions have substantially different mechanisms or that calculations on a single PES cannot account for the dynamics at those energies.

  9. Recyclable surfaces for amine conjugation chemistry via redox reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Inseong; Yeo, Woon Seok [Dept. of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio/Molecular Informatics Center, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Se Won [Green Materials and Process Group, Research Institute of Sustainable Manufacturing System, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In this study, we extended this strategy to present a switchable surface that allows surface functionalization and removal of functional groups repeatedly. The substrate presenting a benzoquinone acid group is first used to immobilize with an amine-containing (bio)molecule using well-known conjugation chemistry. The benzoquinone group is then converted to the corresponding hydroquinone by treating with a reducing agent. We have described a strategy for the dynamic control of surface properties with recyclability via a simple reduction/ oxidation reaction. A stimuli-responsive quinone derivative was harnessed for the repeated immobilization and release of (bio)molecules, and thus, for the repeated dynamic change of the surface properties according to the characteristics of the immobilized (bio)molecules.

  10. Single-molecule chemical reaction reveals molecular reaction kinetics and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuwei; Song, Ping; Fu, Qiang; Ruan, Mingbo; Xu, Weilin

    2014-06-25

    Understanding the microscopic elementary process of chemical reactions, especially in condensed phase, is highly desirable for improvement of efficiencies in industrial chemical processes. Here we show an approach to gaining new insights into elementary reactions in condensed phase by combining quantum chemical calculations with a single-molecule analysis. Elementary chemical reactions in liquid-phase, revealed from quantum chemical calculations, are studied by tracking the fluorescence of single dye molecules undergoing a reversible redox process. Statistical analyses of single-molecule trajectories reveal molecular reaction kinetics and dynamics of elementary reactions. The reactivity dynamic fluctuations of single molecules are evidenced and probably arise from either or both of the low-frequency approach of the molecule to the internal surface of the SiO2 nanosphere or the molecule diffusion-induced memory effect. This new approach could be applied to other chemical reactions in liquid phase to gain more insight into their molecular reaction kinetics and the dynamics of elementary steps.

  11. Ozone-surface reactions in five homes: surface reaction probabilities, aldehyde yields, and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Morrison, G

    2010-06-01

    Field experiments were conducted in five homes during three seasons (summer 2005, summer 2006 and winter 2007) to quantify ozone-initiated secondary aldehyde yields, surface reaction probabilities, and trends any temporal over a 1.5-year interval. Surfaces examined include living room carpets, bedroom carpets, kitchen floors, kitchen counters, and living room walls. Reaction probabilities for all surfaces for all seasons ranged from 9.4 x 10(-8) to 1.0 x 10(-4). There were no significant temporal trends in reaction probabilities for any surfaces from summer 2005 to summer 2006, nor over the entire 1.5-year period, indicating that it may take significantly longer than this period for surfaces to exhibit any 'ozone aging' or lowering of ozone-surface reactivity. However, all surfaces in three houses exhibited a significant decrease in reaction probabilities from summer 2006 to winter 2007. The total yield of aldehydes for the summer of 2005 were nearly identical to that for summer of 2006, but were significantly higher than for winter 2007. We also observed that older carpets were consistently less reactive than in newer carpets, but that countertops remained consistently reactive, probably because of occupant activities such as cooking and cleaning. Ozone reactions taking place at indoor surfaces significantly influence personal exposure to ozone and volatile reaction products. These field studies show that indoor surfaces only slowly lose their ability to react with ozone over several year time frames, and that this is probably because of a combination of large reservoirs of reactive coatings and periodic additions of reactive coatings in the form of cooking, cleaning, and skin-oil residues. When considering exposure to ozone and its reaction products and in the absence of dramatic changes in occupancy, activities or furnishings, indoor surface reactivity is expected to change very slowly.

  12. Theoretical studies of chemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, G.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This collaborative program with the Theoretical Chemistry Group at Argonne involves theoretical studies of gas phase chemical reactions and related energy transfer and photodissociation processes. Many of the reactions studied are of direct relevance to combustion; others are selected they provide important examples of special dynamical processes, or are of relevance to experimental measurements. Both classical trajectory and quantum reactive scattering methods are used for these studies, and the types of information determined range from thermal rate constants to state to state differential cross sections.

  13. Semiclassical methods in chemical reaction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshavamurthy, S.

    1994-12-01

    Semiclassical approximations, simple as well as rigorous, are formulated in order to be able to describe gas phase chemical reactions in large systems. We formulate a simple but accurate semiclassical model for incorporating multidimensional tunneling in classical trajectory simulations. This model is based on the existence of locally conserved actions around the saddle point region on a multidimensional potential energy surface. Using classical perturbation theory and monitoring the imaginary action as a function of time along a classical trajectory we calculate state-specific unimolecular decay rates for a model two dimensional potential with coupling. Results are in good comparison with exact quantum results for the potential over a wide range of coupling constants. We propose a new semiclassical hybrid method to calculate state-to-state S-matrix elements for bimolecular reactive scattering. The accuracy of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller propagator and the short time dynamics of the system make this method self-consistent and accurate. We also go beyond the stationary phase approximation by doing the resulting integrals exactly (numerically). As a result, classically forbidden probabilties are calculated with purely real time classical trajectories within this approach. Application to the one dimensional Eckart barrier demonstrates the accuracy of this approach. Successful application of the semiclassical hybrid approach to collinear reactive scattering is prevented by the phenomenon of chaotic scattering. The modified Filinov approach to evaluating the integrals is discussed, but application to collinear systems requires a more careful analysis. In three and higher dimensional scattering systems, chaotic scattering is suppressed and hence the accuracy and usefulness of the semiclassical method should be tested for such systems

  14. Semiclassical methods in chemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keshavamurthy, Srihari [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Semiclassical approximations, simple as well as rigorous, are formulated in order to be able to describe gas phase chemical reactions in large systems. We formulate a simple but accurate semiclassical model for incorporating multidimensional tunneling in classical trajectory simulations. This model is based on the existence of locally conserved actions around the saddle point region on a multidimensional potential energy surface. Using classical perturbation theory and monitoring the imaginary action as a function of time along a classical trajectory we calculate state-specific unimolecular decay rates for a model two dimensional potential with coupling. Results are in good comparison with exact quantum results for the potential over a wide range of coupling constants. We propose a new semiclassical hybrid method to calculate state-to-state S-matrix elements for bimolecular reactive scattering. The accuracy of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller propagator and the short time dynamics of the system make this method self-consistent and accurate. We also go beyond the stationary phase approximation by doing the resulting integrals exactly (numerically). As a result, classically forbidden probabilties are calculated with purely real time classical trajectories within this approach. Application to the one dimensional Eckart barrier demonstrates the accuracy of this approach. Successful application of the semiclassical hybrid approach to collinear reactive scattering is prevented by the phenomenon of chaotic scattering. The modified Filinov approach to evaluating the integrals is discussed, but application to collinear systems requires a more careful analysis. In three and higher dimensional scattering systems, chaotic scattering is suppressed and hence the accuracy and usefulness of the semiclassical method should be tested for such systems.

  15. Dynamic CT of tuberculous meningeal reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinkins, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The technique of intravenous dynamic cranial computed tomography has been applied to the patient population at this location in Saudi Arabia with meningeal tuberculosis. The various manifestations and sequelae including meningitis, arteritis, infarct, and true meningeal tuberculomata all have characteristic if not specific appearances. The dynamic study enhances an otherwise static examination and reveals a great deal about the pathophysiology of tuberculosis involving the cerebral meningeal surfaces. (orig.)

  16. Dynamic CT of tuberculous meningeal reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinkins, J.R.

    1987-07-01

    The technique of intravenous dynamic cranial computed tomography has been applied to the patient population at this location in Saudi Arabia with meningeal tuberculosis. The various manifestations and sequelae including meningitis, arteritis, infarct, and true meningeal tuberculomata all have characteristic if not specific appearances. The dynamic study enhances an otherwise static examination and reveals a great deal about the pathophysiology of tuberculosis involving the cerebral meningeal surfaces.

  17. Chemical Dynamics Studies of Reactions in Energetic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Donald O

    1997-01-01

    A theoretical/computational research program to develop methods, simulate complex reactions, and investigate the fundamental chemical dynamics of reactions of nitramine energetic materials occurring...

  18. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  19. Crossed beam polyatomic reaction dynamics: recent advances and new insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huilin; Liu, Kopin; Caracciolo, Adriana; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2017-12-11

    Over the past ten years or so, great advances in our understanding of the dynamics of elementary (bimolecular) polyatomic reactions in the gas-phase have occurred. This has been made possible by critical improvements (a) in crossed molecular beam (CMB) instruments with rotating mass spectrometric detection and time-of-flight analysis, especially following the implementation of soft ionization (by tunable low energy electrons or vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation) for product detection with increased sensitivity and universal detection power, and (b) in REMPI-slice velocity map ion imaging (VMI) detection techniques in pulsed CMB experiments for obtaining product pair-correlated information through high-resolution measurements directly in the center of mass system. The improved universal CMB method is permitting us to identify all primary reaction products, characterize their formation dynamics, and determine the branching ratios (BRs) for multichannel non-adiabatic reactions, such as those of ground state oxygen atoms, O( 3 P), with unsaturated hydrocarbons (alkynes, alkenes, dienes). The improved slice VMI CMB technique is permitting us to explore at an unprecedented level of detail, through pair-correlated measurements, the reaction dynamics of a prototype polyatomic molecule such as CH 4 (and isotopologues) in its ground state with a variety of important X radicals such as F, Cl, O, and OH. In this review, we highlight this recent progress in the field of CMB reaction dynamics, with an emphasis on the experimental side, but with the related theoretical work, at the level of state-of-the-art calculations of both the underlying potential energy surfaces and the reaction dynamics, noted throughout. In particular, the focus is (a) on the effect of molecular complexity and structure on product distributions, branching ratios and role of intersystem crossing for the multichannel, addition-elimination reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons with O atoms, and (b) on

  20. Quantum dynamics of fast chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, J.C. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The aims of this research are to explore, develop, and apply theoretical methods for the evaluation of the dynamics of gas phase collision processes, primarily chemical reactions. The primary theoretical tools developed for this work have been quantum scattering theory, both in time dependent and time independent forms. Over the past several years, the authors have developed and applied methods for the direct quantum evaluation of thermal rate constants, applying these to the evaluation of the hydrogen isotopic exchange reactions, applied wave packet propagation techniques to the dissociation of Rydberg H{sub 3}, incorporated optical potentials into the evaluation of thermal rate constants, evaluated the use of optical potentials for state-to-state reaction probability evaluations, and, most recently, have developed quantum approaches for electronically non-adiabatic reactions which may be applied to simplify calculations of reactive, but electronically adiabatic systems. Evaluation of the thermal rate constants and the dissociation of H{sub 3} were reported last year, and have now been published.

  1. Dynamics of H2 on Ti/Al(100) surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Jian-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    What is the catalytic role played by titanium in the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4? This thesis aims at unraveling the dynamics of an elementary reaction: H2 dissociation on Ti/Al(100) surfaces. Although this reaction is not the rate limiting step in the hydrogen storage of NaAlH4, it is an

  2. A neural network potential energy surface for the NaH2 system and dynamics studies on the H(2S) + NaH(X1Σ+) → Na(2S) + H2(X1Σg+) reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shufen; Yuan, Jiuchuang; Li, Huixing; Chen, Maodu

    2017-08-02

    In order to study the dynamics of the reaction H( 2 S) + NaH(X 1 Σ + ) → Na( 2 S) + H 2 (X 1 Σ g + ), a new potential energy surface (PES) for the ground state of the NaH 2 system is constructed based on 35 730 ab initio energy points. Using basis sets of quadruple zeta quality, multireference configuration interaction calculations with Davidson correction were carried out to obtain the ab initio energy points. The neural network method is used to fit the PES, and the root mean square error is very small (0.00639 eV). The bond lengths, dissociation energies, zero-point energies and spectroscopic constants of H 2 (X 1 Σ g + ) and NaH(X 1 Σ + ) obtained on the new NaH 2 PES are in good agreement with the experiment data. On the new PES, the reactant coordinate-based time-dependent wave packet method is applied to study the reaction dynamics of H( 2 S) + NaH(X 1 Σ + ) → Na( 2 S) + H 2 (X 1 Σ g + ), and the reaction probabilities, integral cross-sections (ICSs) and differential cross-sections (DCSs) are obtained. There is no threshold in the reaction due to the absence of an energy barrier on the minimum energy path. When the collision energy increases, the ICSs decrease from a high value at low collision energy. The DCS results show that the angular distribution of the product molecules tends to the forward direction. Compared with the LiH 2 system, the NaH 2 system has a larger mass and the PES has a larger well at the H-NaH configuration, which leads to a higher ICS value in the H( 2 S) + NaH(X 1 Σ + ) → Na( 2 S) + H 2 (X 1 Σ g + ) reaction. Because the H( 2 S) + NaH(X 1 Σ + ) → Na( 2 S) + H 2 (X 1 Σ g + ) reaction releases more energy, the product molecules can be excited to a higher vibrational state.

  3. Determination of glyphosate and AMPA in surface and waste water using high-performance ion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry (HPIC-ICP-DRC-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Maximilian; Hann, Stephan; Mentler, Axel; Fuerhacker, Maria; Stingeder, Gerhard; Koellensperger, Gunda

    2008-05-01

    A novel method employing high-performance cation chromatography in combination with inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry (ICP-DRC-MS) for the simultaneous determination of the herbicide glyphosate (N-phosphonomethylglycine) and its main metabolite aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA) is presented. P was measured as (31)P(16)O(+) using oxygen as reaction gas. For monitoring the stringent target value of 0.1 μg L(-1) for glyphosate, applicable for drinking and surface water within the EU, a two-step enrichment procedure employing Chelex 100 and AG1-X8 resins was applied prior to HPIC-ICP-MS analysis. The presented approach was validated for surface water, revealing concentrations of 0.67 μg L(-1) glyphosate and 2.8 μg L(-1) AMPA in selected Austrian river water samples. Moreover, investigations at three waste water-treatment plants showed that elimination of the compounds at the present concentration levels was not straightforward. On the contrary, all investigated plant effluents showed significant amounts of both compounds. Concentration levels ranged from 0.5-2 μg L(-1) and 4-14 μg L(-1) for glyphosate and AMPA, respectively.

  4. The quantum dynamics of electronically nonadiabatic chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    1993-01-01

    Considerable progress was achieved on the quantum mechanical treatment of electronically nonadiabatic collisions involving energy transfer and chemical reaction in the collision of an electronically excited atom with a molecule. In the first step, a new diabatic representation for the coupled potential energy surfaces was created. A two-state diabatic representation was developed which was designed to realistically reproduce the two lowest adiabatic states of the valence bond model and also to have the following three desirable features: (1) it is more economical to evaluate; (2) it is more portable; and (3) all spline fits are replaced by analytic functions. The new representation consists of a set of two coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces plus a coupling surface. It is suitable for dynamics calculations on both the electronic quenching and reaction processes in collisions of Na(3p2p) with H2. The new two-state representation was obtained by a three-step process from a modified eight-state diatomics-in-molecules (DIM) representation of Blais. The second step required the development of new dynamical methods. A formalism was developed for treating reactions with very general basis functions including electronically excited states. Our formalism is based on the generalized Newton, scattered wave, and outgoing wave variational principles that were used previously for reactive collisions on a single potential energy surface, and it incorporates three new features: (1) the basis functions include electronic degrees of freedom, as required to treat reactions involving electronic excitation and two or more coupled potential energy surfaces; (2) the primitive electronic basis is assumed to be diabatic, and it is not assumed that it diagonalizes the electronic Hamiltonian even asymptotically; and (3) contracted basis functions for vibrational-rotational-orbital degrees of freedom are included in a very general way, similar to previous prescriptions for locally

  5. Dynamics of ion/molecule reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, R.

    1992-09-01

    This review is devoted to the main advances in the investigation of ion/molecule reaction dynamics since the last International Mass Spectrometry Conference. Developments of the experimental techniques to prepare the reactants in selected internal states and well-defined collision energies and to analyse the internal state, the kinetic energy and angular distribution of the products are described. Examples of kinetic and internal energy effects on reaction dynamics are presented for simple systems such as (Ar, N2)+ and (Ar, O2)+ as well as for polyatomics: Ar+ + H2O, He+ + N2O, MH+ + MH and (COS, C2H2)+, for which state-selected or state-to-state studies have been performed. Complementarity of the various techniques is shown. Recent advances in very low temperature studies are also presented. Theoretical interpretations of the experimental results are described but no detail on the theoretical investigations is given. The need for further developments in the experimental and theoretical methods is underlined and some of the possible trends are mentioned.

  6. Dynamical modeling of surface tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackbill, J.U.; Kothe, D.B.

    1996-01-01

    In a recent review it is said that free-surface flows ''represent some of the difficult remaining challenges in computational fluid dynamics''. There has been progress with the development of new approaches to treating interfaces, such as the level-set method and the improvement of older methods such as the VOF method. A common theme of many of the new developments has been the regularization of discontinuities at the interface. One example of this approach is the continuum surface force (CSF) formulation for surface tension, which replaces the surface stress given by Laplace's equation by an equivalent volume force. Here, we describe how CSF might be made more useful. Specifically, we consider a derivation of the CSF equations from a minimization of surface energy as outlined by Jacqmin. This reformulation suggests that if one eliminates the computation of curvature in terms of a unit normal vector, parasitic currents may be eliminated For this reformulation to work, it is necessary that transition region thickness be controlled. Various means for this, in addition to the one discussed by Jacqmin are discussed

  7. Dust Dynamics Near Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Joshua; Hughes, Anna; Grund, Chris

    Observations of a lunar "horizon glow" by several Surveyor spacecraft in the 1960s opened the study of the dynamics of charged dust particles near planetary surfaces. The surfaces of the Moon and other airless planetary bodies in the solar system (asteroids, and other moons) are directly exposed to the solar wind and ionizing solar ultraviolet radiation, resulting in a time-dependent electric surface potential. Because these same objects are also exposed to bombardment by micrometeoroids, the surfaces are usually characterized by a power-law size distribution of dust that extends to sub-micron-sized particles. Individual particles can acquire a charge different from their surroundings leading to electrostatic levitation. Once levitated, particles may simply return to the surface on nearly ballistic trajectories, escape entirely from the moon or asteroid if the initial velocity is large, or in some cases be stably levitated for extended periods of time. All three outcomes have observable consequences. Furthermore, the behavior of charged dust near the surface has practical implications for planned future manned and unmanned activities on the lunar surface. Charged dust particles also act as sensitive probes of the near-surface plasma environment. Recent numerical modeling of dust levitation and transport show that charged micron-sized dust is likely to accumulate in topographic lows such as craters, providing a mechanism for the creation of dust "ponds" observed on the asteroid 433 Eros. Such deposition can occur when particles are supported by the photoelectron sheath above the dayside and drift over shadowed regions of craters where the surface potential is much smaller. Earlier studies of the lunar horizon glow are consistent with those particles being on simple ballistic trajectories following electrostatic launching from the surface. Smaller particles may be accelerated from the lunar surface to high altitudes consistent with observations of high altitude

  8. A network dynamics approach to chemical reaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaft, Abraham; Rao, S.; Jayawardhana, B.

    2016-01-01

    A treatment of chemical reaction network theory is given from the perspective of nonlinear network dynamics, in particular of consensus dynamics. By starting from the complex-balanced assumption the reaction dynamics governed by mass action kinetics can be rewritten into a form which allows for a

  9. Reaction dynamics and photochemistry of divalent systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, H. Floyd [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Results are presented of molecular beam studies of bimolecular and unimolecular reactions of Ba. Chapter 1 discusses the reaction Ba + NO2. Formation of the dominant BaO(1Σ) + NO products resulted primarily from decay of long-lived Ba+NO2- collision complexes. Secondary mechanisms led to formation of forward scattered, internally excited BaO, and BaNO + O. Do(Ba-NO) = 65±20 kcal/mol. Reactions of ground state and electronically excited Ba with water and alcohols are examined in Chapter 2. Reaction of Ba(1S) + H2O led to BaO + H2, whereas excited state Ba(1D) + H2O reacted to form BaOH + H. Collisions between Ba and CH3OH led to BaOCH3 + H. Radical channels involve H-atom migration and are promoted by excitation of the incident Ba atom. In Chapter 3, reactions of Ba(1S) with ClO22 and O3 are discussed. Again, direct and complex mechanisms were observed. Formation of BaCl + O2 from decomposition of Ba+ClO2- accounted for 10% of total reaction crass section. Although Ba + O3 → BaO + 02 occurs primarily by direct reaction mechanisms, the secondary channel Ba + 03 → BaO2 + 0 involved decay of long lived Ba1+O3- intermediates. Do(Ba-O2) = 120 ±20 kcal/mol. Photodissociation dynamics of NO3 is explored in chapter 4. Visible excitation leads to formation of NO + 02 and NO2 + O. Wavelength dependence of branching ratios is investigated. Do(O-NO2) = 48.55 kcal/mole ;and calculate ΔHf(NO3) = 17.75 kcal/mole (298K). Chapter 5 discusses the photodissociation of OClO in a molecular beam. Although ClO(2II) + O(3P) is dominant, Cl(2P) + O2

  10. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum energy path for the addition of a hydrogen atom to N2 is characterized in CASSCF/CCI calculations using the (4s3p2d1f/3s2p1d) basis set, with additional single point calculations at the stationary points of the potential energy surface using the (5s4p3d2f/4s3p2d) basis set. These calculations represent the most extensive set of ab initio calculations completed to date, yielding a zero point corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation of approx. 8.5 kcal mol/1. The lifetime of the HN2 species is estimated from the calculated geometries and energetics using both conventional Transition State Theory and a method which utilizes an Eckart barrier to compute one dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling effects. It is concluded that the lifetime of the HN2 species is very short, greatly limiting its role in both termolecular recombination reactions and combustion processes.

  11. Surface chemical reactions probed with scanning force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werts, M.P L; van der Vegte, E.W.; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    In this letter we report the study of surface chemical reactions with scanning force microscopy (SFM) with chemical specificity. Using chemically modified SFM probes, we can determine the local surface reaction conversion during a chemical surface modification. The adhesion forces between a

  12. Capability of LEP-type surfaces to describe noncollinear reactions 2 - Polyatomic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Espinosa-Garcia, Joaquin

    2001-01-01

    In this second article of the series, the popular LEP-type surface for collinear reaction paths and a "bent" surface, which involves a saddle point geometry with a nonlinear central angle, were used to examine the capacity of LEP-type surfaces to describe the kinetics and dynamics of noncollinear reaction paths in polyatomic systems. Analyzing the geometries, vibrational frequencies, curvature along the reaction path (to estimate the tunneling effect and the reaction coordinate-bound modes coupling), and the variational transition- state theory thermal rate constants for the NH//3 + O(**3P) reaction, we found that the "collinear" LEP-type and the "bent" surfaces for this polyatomic system show similar behavior, thus allowing a considerable saving in time and computational effort. This agreement is especially encouraging for this polyatomic system because in the Cs symmetry the reaction proceeds via two electronic states of symmetries **3A prime and **3A double prime , which had to be independently calibrated....

  13. Bimolecular reaction dynamics from photoelectron spectroscopy of negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradforth, S.E.

    1992-11-01

    The transition state region of a neutral bimolecular reaction may be experimentally investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy of an appropriate negative ion. The photoelectron spectrum provides information on the spectroscopy and dynamics of the short lived transition state and may be used to develop model potential energy surfaces that are semi-quantitative in this important region. The principles of bound → bound negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy are illustrated by way of an example: a full analysis of the photoelectron bands of CN - , NCO - and NCS - . Transition state photoelectron spectra are presented for the following systems Br + HI, Cl + HI, F + HI, F + CH 3 0H,F + C 2 H 5 OH,F + OH and F + H 2 . A time dependent framework for the simulation and interpretation of the bound → free transition state photoelectron spectra is subsequently developed and applied to the hydrogen transfer reactions Br + HI, F + OH → O( 3 P, 1 D) + HF and F + H 2 . The theoretical approach for the simulations is a fully quantum-mechanical wave packet propagation on a collinear model reaction potential surface. The connection between the wavepacket time evolution and the photoelectron spectrum is given by the time autocorrelation function. For the benchmark F + H 2 system, comparisons with three-dimensional quantum calculations are made

  14. Dynamical constraints and adiabatic invariants in chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorquet, J C

    2007-08-23

    For long-range electrostatic potentials and, more generally, when the topography of the potential energy surface is locally simple, the reaction path coordinate is adiabatically separable from the perpendicular degrees of freedom. For the ion-permanent dipole and ion-quadrupole interactions, the Poisson bracket of the adiabatic invariant decreases with the interfragment distance more rapidly than the electrostatic potential. The smaller the translational momentum, the moment of inertia of the neutral fragment, and the dipole or quadrupole moments are, the more reliable the adiabatic approximation is, as expected from the usual argumentation. Closed-form expressions for an effective one-dimensional potential in an adiabatic Hamiltonian are given. Connection with a model where the decoupling is exact is obtained in the limit of an infinitely heavy dipole. The dynamics is also constrained by adiabatic invariance for a harmonic valley about a curved reaction path, as shown by the reaction path Hamiltonian method. The maximum entropy method reveals that, as a result of the invariance properties of the entropy, constraints whose validity has been demonstrated locally only subsist in all parts of phase space. However, their form varies continuously, and they are not necessarily expressed in simple terms as they are in the asymptotic region. Therefore, although the influence of adiabatic invariance has been demonstrated at asymptotically large values of the reaction coordinate only, it persists in more interesting ranges.

  15. Surface dynamics using pulsed electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ally S. Y.; Jones, Robert G.

    2000-04-01

    Line of sight time of flight has been used to measure the translational energy of ethene formed by dissociative electron attachment of adsorbed dihalocarbons (XCH 2CH 2Y) on Cu(111) at 100 K. A pulsed electron beam was used to generate low energy secondary electrons at the surface, which were the active agents in initiating the decomposition, XCH 2CH 2Y(ads)+e -→XCH 2CH 2rad (ads)+Y(chem)+e -, XCH 2CH 2rad (ads)→C 2H 4(g)+X(chem). For 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) adsorbed with a spacer layer of chemisorbed chlorine between it and the Cu(111)surface, the TOF data could be fitted using three Maxwell distributions with fast (960 K), slow (180 K) and diffusion ('20 K') components. For a single monolayer of DCE adsorbed directly on the clean Cu(111) surface the fast (1230 K) and slow (225 K) components increased in temperature, indicating that the copper surface was affecting the reaction. For 1-bromo-2-chloroethane the results were the same, consistent with both molecules dissociating via a common intermediate, ClC 2H 4rad (ads). For 1,2-dibromoethane the intermediate is different, BrC 2H 4rad , and decomposition of a monolayer of this molecule on clean Cu(111) exhibited fast (1850 K) and slow (270 K) components, both higher than the corresponding temperatures for DCE. The dynamics of these reactions and the origin of the two Maxwell distributions are discussed in terms of the energy available within the radical, and from the formation of the chemisorbed halogen when the radical dissociates.

  16. Electronic dissipation processes during chemical reactions on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Stella, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Hauptbeschreibung Every day in our life is larded with a huge number of chemical reactions on surfaces. Some reactions occur immediately, for others an activation energy has to be supplied. Thus it happens that though a reaction should thermodynamically run off, it is kinetically hindered. Meaning the partners react only to the thermodynamically more stable product state within a mentionable time if the activation energy of the reaction is supplied. With the help of catalysts the activation energy of a reaction can be lowered. Such catalytic processes on surfaces are widely used in industry. A

  17. Surface-Confined Dynamic Covalent System Driven by Olefin Metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunhua; Park, Eunsol; Jin, Yinghua; Liu, Jie; Yu, Yanxia; Zhang, Wei; Lei, Shengbin; Hu, Wenping

    2018-02-12

    Understanding how the constitutional dynamics of a dynamic combinatorial library (DCL) adapts to surfaces (compared to bulk solution) is of fundamental importance to the design of adaptive materials. Submolecular resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) can provide detailed insights into olefin metathesis at the interface. Analysis of the distribution of products has revealed the important role of environmental pressure, reaction temperature, and substituent effects in surface-confined olefin metathesis. We also report an unprecedented preferred deposition and assembly of linear polymers, and some specific oligomers, on the surface that are hard to obtain otherwise. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Reaction Dynamics of O((3)P) + Propyne: II. Primary Products, Branching Ratios, and Role of Intersystem Crossing from Ab Initio Coupled Triplet/Singlet Potential Energy Surfaces and Statistical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimondi, Ilaria; Cavallotti, Carlo; Vanuzzo, Gianmarco; Balucani, Nadia; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2016-07-14

    The mechanism of the O((3)P) + CH3CCH reaction was investigated using a combined experimental/theoretical approach. Experimentally the reaction dynamics was studied using crossed molecular beams (CMB) with mass-spectrometric detection and time-of-flight analysis at 9.2 kcal/mol collision energy. Theoretically master equation (ME) simulations were performed on a potential energy surface (PES) determined using high-level ab initio electronic structure calculations. In this paper (II) the theoretical results are described and compared with experiments, while in paper (I) are reported and discussed the results of the experimental study. The PES was investigated by determining structures and vibrational frequencies of wells and transition states at the CASPT2/aug-cc-pVTZ level using a minimal active space. Energies were then determined at the CASPT2 level increasing systematically the active space and at the CCSD(T) level extrapolating to the complete basis set limit. Two separate portions of the triplet PES were investigated, as O((3)P) can add either on the terminal or the central carbon of the unsaturated propyne bond. Minimum energy crossing points (MECPs) between the triplet and singlet PESs were searched at the CASPT2 level. The calculated spin-orbit coupling constants between the T1 and S0 electronic surfaces were ∼25 cm(-1) for both PESs. The portions of the singlet PES that can be accessed from the MECPs were investigated at the same level of theory. The system reactivity was predicted integrating stochastically the one-dimensional ME using Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory to determine rate constants on the full T1/S0 PESs, accounting explicitly for intersystem crossing (ISC) using the Landau-Zener model. The computational results are compared both with the branching ratios (BRs) determined experimentally in the companion paper (I) and with those estimated in a recent kinetic study at 298 K. The ME results allow to interpret the main system reactivity: CH

  19. CHEMICAL REACTIONS ON ADSORBING SURFACE: KINETIC LEVEL OF DESCRIPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P.Kostrobii

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the effective Hubbard model we suggest a statistical description of reaction-diffusion processes for bimolecular chemical reactions of gas particles adsorbed on the metallic surface. The system of transport equations for description of particles diffusion as well as reactions is obtained. We carry out the analysis of the contributions of all physical processes to the formation of diffusion coefficients and chemical reactions constants.

  20. Development of a quantum chemical molecular dynamics tribochemical simulator and its application to tribochemical reaction dynamics of lubricant additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, T; Tsuboi, H; Hatakeyama, N; Endou, A; Miyamoto, A; Miura, R; Takaba, H; Suzuki, A; Kubo, M

    2010-01-01

    Tribology at the atomistic and molecular levels has been theoretically studied by a classical molecular dynamics (MD) method. However, this method inherently cannot simulate the tribochemical reaction dynamics because it does not consider the electrons in nature. Although the first-principles based MD method has recently been used for understanding the chemical reaction dynamics of several molecules in the tribology field, the method cannot simulate the tribochemical reaction dynamics of a large complex system including solid surfaces and interfaces due to its huge computation costs. On the other hand, we have developed a quantum chemical MD tribochemical simulator on the basis of a hybrid tight-binding quantum chemical/classical MD method. In the simulator, the central part of the chemical reaction dynamics is calculated by the tight-binding quantum chemical MD method, and the remaining part is calculated by the classical MD method. Therefore, the developed tribochemical simulator realizes the study on tribochemical reaction dynamics of a large complex system, which cannot be treated by using the conventional classical MD or the first-principles MD methods. In this paper, we review our developed quantum chemical MD tribochemical simulator and its application to the tribochemical reaction dynamics of a few lubricant additives

  1. Chemical reactions on platinum-group metal surfaces studied by synchrotron-radiation-based spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Hiroshi; Nakai, Ikuyo; Nagasaka, Masanari; Amemiya, Kenta; Ohta, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    A new version of synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray spectroscopy, wave-length-dispersive near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (dispersive-NEXAFS), and fast x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been applied to mechanistic studies on several surface catalytic reactions on platinum-group-metal surfaces. In this review, our approach using above techniques to understand the reaction mechanism and actual application studies on three well-known catalytic surface reactions, CO oxidation on Pt(111) and Pd(111), NO reduction on Rh(111), and H 2 O formation on Pt(111), are introduced. Spectroscopic monitoring of the progress of the surface reactions enabled us to detect reaction intermediates and analyze the reaction kinetics quantitatively which provides information on reaction order, rate constant, pre-exponential factor, activation energy and etc. Such quantitative analyses combined with scanning tunneling microscopy and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations revealed significant contribution of the adsorbate configurations and their dynamic changes to the reaction mechanisms of the above fundamental catalytic surface reactions. (author)

  2. Three-dimensional wave packet dynamics of H2 + D2 reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Hongwei; Lu Yunpeng; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Three-dimensional wave packet dynamics of H 2 (v 1 = high) + D 2 (v 2 = low) reaction. → Competitive processes were studied on the BMKP and ASP potential energy surfaces. → Orientation of the cold diatom did not greatly affect the reaction processes. → Orientation of the hot diatom had a significant effect on the reaction processes. → Reaction probabilities for H 2 + D 2 reaction were compared with H 2 + H 2 reaction. - Abstract: Initial state selected time-dependent wave packet calculations were carried out for the H 2 (v 1 = high) + D 2 (v 2 = low) reaction within a three degrees of freedom model. The probabilities for different competitive processes were studied on two realistic global potential energy surfaces (PESs) - BMKP and ASP. The orientation of the cold diatom did not greatly affect the reaction processes, while the orientation of the hot diatom had a significant effect. The BMKP surface generally gave lower energy thresholds than the ASP surface, except for the collision induced dissociation (CID) within the T II geometry where the hot diatom comes in head-on perpendicular to the cold diatom. Isotopic substitution effects were studied on the recent BMKP PES. The H 2 + D 2 reaction was more effective for CID and showed more structured probability curves for single exchange reaction (SE) and three-body complex formation (3BC) than the H 2 + H 2 reaction.

  3. Reaction mechanisms for on-surface synthesis of covalent nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Björk, J

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, on-surface synthesis has become an increasingly popular strategy to form covalent nanostructures. The approach has great prospects for facilitating the manufacture of a range of fascinating materials with atomic precision. However, the on-surface reactions are enigmatic to control, currently restricting its bright perspectives and there is a great need to explore how the reactions are governed. The objective of this topical review is to summarize theoretical work that has focused on comprehending on-surface synthesis protocols through studies of reaction mechanisms. (topical review)

  4. Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction To Control Wrinkle Patterns: From Dynamic Chemistry to Dynamic Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Honghao; Yin, Jie; Jiang, Xuesong

    2016-11-01

    A facile and robust strategy to produce a reversible wrinkle pattern is presented by controlling a dynamic D-A reaction between furan and maleimide. The smart surface with highly reversible morphology and tunable adhesion, wettability, self-healing, and transparency is realized by the thermoreversible generation and erasure of the wrinkle pattern, which might find broad applications in functional intelligent materials with properties that can be tuned on-demand without altering the material's intrinsic properties. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Ultrafast Dynamics of Chemical Reactions in Condensed Phase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultrafast Dynamics of Chemical Reactions in Condensed Phase: Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond. Dipak K. Palit Radaition & Photochemistry Division Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Mumbai 400 085, India.

  6. Isomerization reaction dynamics and equilibrium at the liquid-vapor interface of water. A molecular-dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Ilan; Pohorille, Andrew

    1993-01-01

    The gauche-trans isomerization reaction of 1,2-dichloroethane at the liquid-vapor interface of water is studied using molecular-dynamics computer simulations. The solvent bulk and surface effects on the torsional potential of mean force and on barrier recrossing dynamics are computed. The isomerization reaction involves a large change in the electric dipole moment, and as a result the trans/gauche ratio is considerably affected by the transition from the bulk solvent to the surface. Reactive flux correlation function calculations of the reaction rate reveal that deviation from the transition-state theory due to barrier recrossing is greater at the surface than in the bulk water. This suggests that the system exhibits non-Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus behavior due to the weak solvent-solute coupling at the water liquid-vapor interface.

  7. Electromagnetic Reactions and Few-Nucleon Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacca Sonia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an update on recent theoretical studies of electromagnetic reactions obtained by using the Lorentz integral transform method. The 4He nucleus will be the main focus of this report: results for the photo-disintegration and the electro-disintegration processes will be shown, as well as a recent calculation of polarizability effects in muonic atoms. We also discuss the exciting possibility to investigate inelastic reactions for mediummass nuclei in coupled-cluster theory, highlighted by the recent application to the 16O photo-nuclear cross section.

  8. Bond-selective control of a gas-surface reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Daniel R.

    The prospect of using light to selectively control chemical reactions has tantalized chemists since the development of the laser. Unfortunately, the realization of laser-directed chemistry is frequently thwarted by the randomization of energy within the molecule through intramolecular vibrational energy distribution (IVR). However, recent results showing vibrational mode-specific reactivity on metal surfaces suggest that IVR may not always be complete for gas-surface reactions. Here, we combine molecular beam techniques and direct laser excitation to characterize the bond-specific reactivity of trideuteromethane on a Ni(111) surface. Our results reveal important details about how vibrational energy is distributed in the reactive molecule. We use a molecular beam to direct state-selected trideuteromethane (CHD 3) molecules onto a nickel single crystal sample and use the results we obtain to describe the flow of vibrational energy in the methane-surface reaction complex. We show that CHD3 molecules initially excited to v=1, J=2, K=0 of the v 1 symmetric C-H stretching mode will dissociate exclusively via C-H cleavage on Ni(111). This result highlights the localization of vibrational energy in the reaction complex, despite the presence of many energy exchange channels with the high state-density surface. We demonstrate, for the first time, highly parallel bond-selective control of a heterogeneously catalyzed reaction. We place our results in the context of recent experiments investigating IVR for molecules in both the gas phase and liquid solutions. If IVR is fast on the reaction timescale, vibrational energy would be randomly distributed throughout the nascent methane-surface reaction complex and vibrational mode-specific behavior would not occur. The short timescale of a direct gas-surface collision may explain how the exchange of energy via IVR is limited to only a small subset of the energetic configurations available to the reaction complex. This framework

  9. Determining Equilibrium Constants for Dimerization Reactions from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Djurre H.; Schafer, Lars V.; De Vries, Alex H.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Berendsen, Herman J. C.; Grubmueller, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    With today's available computer power, free energy calculations from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations "via counting" become feasible for an increasing number of reactions. An example is the dimerization reaction of transmembrane alpha-helices. If an extended simulation of the two helices

  10. Dynamics of Wetting of Ultra Hydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan; Kavehpour, Pirouz; Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Controlling the surface wettability of hydrophobic and super hydrophobic surfaces has extensive industrial applications ranging from coating, painting and printing technology and waterproof clothing to efficiency increase in power and water plants. This requires enhancing the knowledge about the dynamics of wetting on these hydrophobic surfaces. We have done experimental investigation on the dynamics of wetting on hydrophobic surfaces by looking deeply in to the dependency of the dynamic contact angles both advancing and receding on the velocity of the three-phase boundary (Solid/Liquid/Gas interface) using the Wilhelmy plate method with different ultra-hydrophobic surfaces. Several fluids with different surface tension and viscosity are used to study the effect of physical properties of liquids on the governing laws.

  11. Controlling Reaction Selectivity through the Surface Termination of Perovskite Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polo-Garzon, Felipe [Chemical Sciences Division and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Yang, Shi-Ze [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Fung, Victor [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside CA 92521 USA; Foo, Guo Shiou [Chemical Sciences Division and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Bickel, Elizabeth E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville TN 38505 USA; Chisholm, Matthew F. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Jiang, De-en [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside CA 92521 USA; Wu, Zili [Chemical Sciences Division and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA

    2017-07-19

    Although well known in the material science field, surface reconstruction of perovskites has not been implemented in heterogeneous catalysis. In this work, we employ multiple surface sensitive techniques to characterize the surface reconstruction of SrTiO3 (STO) after thermal pretreatment (Sr-enrichment) and chemical etching (Ti-enrichment). We show, using the conversion of 2-propanol as a probe reaction, that the surface reconstruction of STO can be controlled to greatly tune catalytic acid/base properties and consequently the reaction selectivities in a wide range, which are inaccessible using single metal oxides, either SrO or TiO2. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations well explain the selectivity tuning and reaction mechanism on differently reconstructed surfaces of STO. Similar catalytic tunability is also observed on BaZrO3, highlighting the generality of the finding from this work.

  12. Causal Dynamics of Discrete Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Arrighi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We formalize the intuitive idea of a labelled discrete surface which evolves in time, subject to two natural constraints: the evolution does not propagate information too fast; and it acts everywhere the same.

  13. Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Elnaggar, Mariam S

    2013-07-16

    A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

  14. 2011 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Stair

    2011-02-11

    The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is dedicated to promoting and advancing the fundamental science of interfacial chemistry and physics by providing surface scientists with the foremost venue for presentation and discussion of research occurring at the frontiers of their fields.

  15. Supersonic molecular beam experiments on surface chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Michio

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of a molecule and a surface is important in various fields, and in particular in complex systems like biomaterials and their related chemistry. However, the detailed understanding of the elementary steps in the surface chemistry, for example, stereodynamics, is still insufficient even for simple model systems. In this Personal Account, I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams demonstrate a significant role of the translational energy of the incident molecules. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths specific for the hyperthermal energy region, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. On the other hand, oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility of understanding surface chemical reactions in detail by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for finely monitoring the elementary step of the surface chemical reactions and creating new materials on surfaces. Copyright © 2014 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Advances in Chemical Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Capellos, Christos

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the formal lectures and contributed papers presented at the NATO Advanced Study Institute on. the Advances in Chemical Reaction Dynamics. The meeting convened at the city of Iraklion, Crete, Greece on 25 August 1985 and continued to 7 September 1985. The material presented describes the fundamental and recent advances in experimental and theoretical aspects of, reaction dynamics. A large section is devoted to electronically excited states, ionic species, and free radicals, relevant to chemical sys­ tems. In addition recent advances in gas phase polymerization, formation of clusters, and energy release processes in energetic materials were presented. Selected papers deal with topics such as the dynamics of electric field effects in low polar solutions, high electric field perturbations and relaxation of dipole equilibria, correlation in picosecond/laser pulse scattering, and applications to fast reaction dynamics. Picosecond transient Raman spectroscopy which has been used for the elucidati...

  17. Quantum decoherence in low-energy nuclear reaction dynamics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    Atomic nuclei are complex, quantum many-body systems whose structure manifests itself through intrinsic quantum states associated with different excitation modes or degrees of freedom. Collective modes (vibration and/or rotation) dominate at low energy (near the ground-state). The associated states are usually employed, within a truncated model space, as a basis in (coherent) coupled channels approaches to low energy reaction dynamics. However, excluded states can be essential, and their effects on the open (nuclear) system dynamics are usually treated through complex potentials. Is this a complete description of open system dynamics? Does it include effects of quantum decoherence? Can decoherence be manifested in reaction observables? In my presentation, I will discuss these issues and the main ideas of a coupled-channels density-matrix approach that makes it possible to quantify the role and importance of quantum decoherence in low-energy nuclear reaction dynamics. Some topical applications will be highlighted. (author)

  18. Analysis of Brownian Dynamics Simulations of Reversible Bimolecular Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Lipková, Jana

    2011-01-01

    A class of Brownian dynamics algorithms for stochastic reaction-diffusion models which include reversible bimolecular reactions is presented and analyzed. The method is a generalization of the λ-bcȳ model for irreversible bimolecular reactions which was introduced in [R. Erban and S. J. Chapman, Phys. Biol., 6(2009), 046001]. The formulae relating the experimentally measurable quantities (reaction rate constants and diffusion constants) with the algorithm parameters are derived. The probability of geminate recombination is also investigated. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  19. Transverse flow reactor studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, R.G. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Radical reactions are in important in combustion chemistry; however, little state-specific information is available for these reactions. A new apparatus has been constructed to measure the dynamics of radical reactions. The unique feature of this apparatus is a transverse flow reactor in which an atom or radical of known concentration will be produced by pulsed laser photolysis of an appropriate precursor molecule. The time dependence of individual quantum states or products and/or reactants will be followed by rapid infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The reaction H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O will be studied.

  20. Quantum dynamics study of H + DBr and D + HBr reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai Jie; Jia, JianFeng; Wu, Hai Shun; He, Guo Zhong

    2014-09-01

    Time-dependent quantum wave packet calculations have been performed for the H + DBr and D + HBr reaction using the recent diabatic potential energy surfaces. Reaction probabilities, integral cross sections, and rate constants are obtained. The results show that the isotopic effects have an influence on the nonadiabatic effect which is generally inversely proportional to the atom mass. The calculated rate constants are in good overall agreement with experimental values, indicating that the ab initio surfaces are accurate to describe the isotopic effects.

  1. Dynamic Factor Models for the Volatility Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Wel, Michel; Ozturk, Sait R.; Dijk, Dick van

    The implied volatility surface is the collection of volatilities implied by option contracts for different strike prices and time-to-maturity. We study factor models to capture the dynamics of this three-dimensional implied volatility surface. Three model types are considered to examine desirable...

  2. Simulation of Gas-Surface Dynamical Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    surface. The substrate with lattice constant a is represented in a simple ball and spring picture. on the particular problem. Time-independent...παvwell , (26) Simulation of Gas-Surface Dynamical Interactions 4 - 10 RTO-EN-AVT-142 g E ad v mvc ∆ v’well vc cM Figure 4

  3. Reaction Dynamics and Dispersion of Energetic Biocides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    exterior of the aerosol particle due to surface tension forces. As the particles cool down, the molten KClO4 re-crystallizes to form a solid core that...shown in Figure 5. EDS analysis indicates that the two components form a homogeneous hollow -shell. In this case both components are behaving similar to...conditions seen for spray pyrolysis in which solvent evaporation from the droplet leads to a hollow structure. In our case the two solutes has

  4. Droplet impact dynamics on flexible superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Gorman, William; Shang, Jessica

    2017-11-01

    In this talk, we will present a series of droplet impact experiments performed on elastic superhydrophobic surfaces. A commercial superhydrophobic paint, WX2100, was sprayed on smooth PDMS surfaces that were prepared by a standard soft lithography technique. The droplet spreading and retraction dynamics, trajectory, and substrate response will be presented for different surface lengths and Weber numbers. The elasticity of the superhydrophobic surfaces was found to affect dynamics of the droplets and the substrate. The contact time of the droplet on an elastic superhydrophobic surface was reduced by as much as 22% compared to the rigid superhydrophobic surface. The reduction in the contact time was even observed at low Weber number, We 20, which was much lower than the critical Weber number reported in literature. A variety of surface deflection behavior was observed after the second impact of the rebounding droplet. When the droplet motion was in phase with the surface motion, the deflection of the surface was found to deviate and increase from the original decay of the surface deflection. However, when the droplet motion was out of phase with the surface, the displacement of the surface was reduced and dampened quickly by the droplet body force.

  5. Theoretical Study of Sodium-Water Surface Reaction Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR).

  6. Theoretical study of sodium-water surface reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    2012-01-01

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). (author)

  7. Mean field ring polymer molecular dynamics for electronically nonadiabatic reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Jessica Ryan; Ananth, Nandini

    2016-12-22

    We present a mean field ring polymer molecular dynamics method to calculate the rate of electron transfer (ET) in multi-state, multi-electron condensed-phase processes. Our approach involves calculating a transition state theory (TST) estimate to the rate using an exact path integral in discrete electronic states and continuous Cartesian nuclear coordinates. A dynamic recrossing correction to the TST rate is then obtained from real-time dynamics simulations using mean field ring polymer molecular dynamics. We employ two different reaction coordinates in our simulations and show that, despite the use of mean field dynamics, the use of an accurate dividing surface to compute TST rates allows us to achieve remarkable agreement with Fermi's golden rule rates for nonadiabatic ET in the normal regime of Marcus theory. Further, we show that using a reaction coordinate based on electronic state populations allows us to capture the turnover in rates for ET in the Marcus inverted regime.

  8. A new dynamical layout algorithm for complex biochemical reaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kummer Ursula; Wegner Katja

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background To study complex biochemical reaction networks in living cells researchers more and more rely on databases and computational methods. In order to facilitate computational approaches, visualisation techniques are highly important. Biochemical reaction networks, e.g. metabolic pathways are often depicted as graphs and these graphs should be drawn dynamically to provide flexibility in the context of different data. Conventional layout algorithms are not sufficient for every k...

  9. Chemical dynamics simulations of X- + CH3Y → XCH3 + Y- gas-phase S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution reactions. Nonstatistical dynamics and nontraditional reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Paranjothy; Zhang, Jiaxu; Hase, William L

    2012-03-29

    Extensive classical chemical dynamics simulations of gas-phase X(-) + CH(3)Y → XCH(3) + Y(-) S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution reactions are reviewed and discussed and compared with experimental measurements and predictions of theoretical models. The primary emphasis is on reactions for which X and Y are halogen atoms. Both reactions with the traditional potential energy surface (PES), which include pre- and postreaction potential energy minima and a central barrier, and reactions with nontraditional PESs are considered. These S(N)2 reactions exhibit important nonstatistical atomic-level dynamics. The X(-) + CH(3)Y → X(-)---CH(3)Y association rate constant is less than the capture model as a result of inefficient energy transfer from X(-)+ CH(3)Y relative translation to CH(3)Y rotation and vibration. There is weak coupling between the low-frequency intermolecular modes of the X(-)---CH(3)Y complex and higher frequency CH(3)Y intramolecular modes, resulting in non-RRKM kinetics for X(-)---CH(3)Y unimolecular decomposition. Recrossings of the [X--CH(3)--Y](-) central barrier is important. As a result of the above dynamics, the relative translational energy and temperature dependencies of the S(N)2 rate constants are not accurately given by statistical theory. The nonstatistical dynamics results in nonstatistical partitioning of the available energy to XCH(3) +Y(-) reaction products. Besides the indirect, complex forming atomic-level mechanism for the S(N)2 reaction, direct mechanisms promoted by X(-) + CH(3)Y relative translational or CH(3)Y vibrational excitation are possible, e.g., the roundabout mechanism.

  10. Reaction of water vapor with a clean liquid uranium surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siekhaus, W.

    1985-01-01

    To study the reaction of water vapor with uranium, we have exposed clean liquid uranium surfaces to H 2 O under UHV conditions. We have measured the surface concentration of oxygen as a function of exposure, and determined the maximum attainable surface oxygen concentration X 0 /sup s/ as a function of temperature. We have used these measurements to estimate, close to the melting point, the solubility of oxygen (X 0 /sup b/, -4 ) and its surface segregation coefficient β/sup s/(> 10 3 ). 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  11. Taking the plunge: chemical reaction dynamics in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2017-12-11

    The dynamics of chemical reactions in liquid solutions are now amenable to direct study using ultrafast laser spectroscopy techniques and advances in computer simulation methods. The surrounding solvent affects the chemical reaction dynamics in numerous ways, which include: (i) formation of complexes between reactants and solvent molecules; (ii) modifications to transition state energies and structures relative to the reactants and products; (iii) coupling between the motions of the reacting molecules and the solvent modes, and exchange of energy; (iv) solvent caging of reactants and products; and (v) structural changes to the solvation shells in response to the changing chemical identity of the solutes, on timescales which may be slower than the reactive events. This article reviews progress in the study of bimolecular chemical reaction dynamics in solution, concentrating on reactions which occur on ground electronic states. It illustrates this progress with reference to recent experimental and computational studies, and considers how the various ways in which a solvent affects the chemical reaction dynamics can be unravelled. Implications are considered for research in fields such as mechanistic synthetic chemistry.

  12. Dynamical dipole mode in heavy-ion fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parascandolo, C., E-mail: concetta.parascandolo@na.infn.i [Universita degli Studi di Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Pierroutsakou, D. [INFN - Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Martin, B. [Universita degli Studi di Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Agodi, C.; Alba, R. [INFN - LNS, via Santa Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Boiano, A. [INFN - Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Coniglione, R. [INFN - LNS, via Santa Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy); De Filippo, E. [INFN - Sezione di Catania, 95123, Catania (Italy); Del Zoppo, A. [INFN - LNS, via Santa Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Emanuele, U. [INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dip. di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Messina (Italy); Farinon, F. [GSI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291, Darmstadt (Germany); Guglielmetti, A. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Inglima, G.; La Commara, M. [Universita degli Studi di Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Maiolino, C. [INFN - LNS, via Santa Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Mazzocchi, C. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Mazzocco, M. [Dip. di Fisica and INFN, Universita di Padova, via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Romoli, M. [INFN - Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Sandoli, M. [Universita degli Studi di Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Santonocito, D. [INFN - LNS, via Santa Sofia 62, I-95125 Catania (Italy)

    2010-03-01

    The dynamical dipole mode, excited in charge asymmetric heavy-ion collisions, was investigated in the mass region of the {sup 192}Pb compound nucleus, formed by using the {sup 40,48}Ca + {sup 152,144}Sm reactions at approx11 MeV/nucleon. Preliminary results of this measurement, concerning both fusion-evaporation and fission events are presented. As a fast cooling mechanism on the fusion path, the dynamical dipole mode could be useful for the synthesis of super heavy elements through 'hot' fusion reactions.

  13. State-to-state quantum dynamics of the H + HBr reaction: competition between the abstraction and exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changjian; Jiang, Bin; Xie, Daiqian

    2011-05-14

    Quantum state-to-state dynamics for the H + HBr(υ(i) = 0, j(i) =0) reaction was studied on an accurate ab intio potential energy surface for the electronic ground state of BrH(2). Both the H + HBr → H(2) + Br abstraction reaction and the H' + HBr → H'Br + H exchange reaction were investigated up to a collision energy of 2.0 eV. It was found that the abstraction channel is dominant at lower collision energies, while the exchange channel becomes dominant at higher collision energies. The total integral cross section of the abstraction reaction at a collision energy of 1.6 eV was found to be 1.37 Å(2), which is larger than a recent quantum mechanical result (1.06 Å(2)) and still significantly smaller than the experimental value (3 ± 1 Å(2)). Meanwhile, similar to the previous theoretical study, our calculations also predicted much hotter product rotational state distributions than those from the experimental study. This suggests that further experimental investigations are highly desirable to elucidate the dynamic properties of the title reactions.

  14. Nuclear Dynamics and Electronic Effects of Hydrogen on Solid Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutani, K; Wilde, M; Ogura, S

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen is involved in a variety of chemical processes on surfaces. While hydrogen exhibits vibrational and rotational dynamics in its adsorption state, it in some cases undergoes diffusion into the substrate as well as on the surface, and participates in chemical reactions. Furthermore, hydrogen exchanges an electron with surfaces having a significant effect on the surface electronic structure. In this personal account, we review our recent studies on surface nuclear dynamics of hydrogen, hydrogen transport across surfaces, catalytic hydrogenation/isotope exchange reactions, and charge transfer between the surface and hydrogen by using a depth-resolved technique of nuclear reaction analysis and a quantum-state-selective detection of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization in combination with surface science techniques. As a future prospect, we refer to ultraslow μ spin rotation spectroscopy for a direct probe of the hydrogen charge state at surfaces. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Atomic probes of surface structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, E.J.; Jonsson, H.

    1992-01-01

    Progress for the period Sept. 15, 1992 to Sept. 14, 1993 is discussed. Semiclassical methods that will allow much faster and more accurate three-dimensional atom--surface scattering calculations, both elastic and inelastic, are being developed. The scattering of He atoms from buckyballs is being investigated as a test problem. Somewhat more detail is given on studies of He atom scattering from defective Pt surfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations of He + and Ar + ion sputtering of Pt surfaces are also being done. He atom scattering from Xe overlayers on metal surfaces and the thermalized dissociation of H 2 on Cu(110) are being studied. (R.W.R.) 64 refs

  16. Dependence of ICF reaction dynamics on target structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Kamal; Dutt, Sunil; GulI, Muntazir; Ahmad, Tauseef; Rizvi, I.A.; Ali, Sabir; Agarwal, Avinash; Kumar, R.; Chaubey, A.K.

    2016-01-01

    The projectile structure is also found responsible for the ICF reaction processes. It is found that projectile having bigger alpha cluster is more unstable towards break up. In this context, a comparative study of 12 C and 16 O ion-beams induced reactions with different targets has been done. The deduced ICF contributions for different systems have been plotted against the target charge of different targets. It is observed that target properties may also be responsible for the interplay between CF and ICF reaction dynamics

  17. Dynamics of synchrotron VUV-induced intracluster reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, J.R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) using the tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation available at the National Synchrotron Light Source is being exploited to study photoionization-induced reactions in small van der Waals mixed complexes. The information gained includes the observation and classification of reaction paths, the measurement of onsets, and the determination of relative yields of competing reactions. Additional information is obtained by comparison of the properties of different reacting systems. Special attention is given to finding unexpected features, and most of the reactions investigated to date display such features. However, understanding these reactions demands dynamical information, in addition to what is provided by PIMS. Therefore the program has been expanded to include the measurement of kinetic energy release distributions.

  18. Geometrical Models of the Phase Space Structures Governing Reaction Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    of Mathematical Sciences . Springer, Berlin. [Child & Pollak(1980)] Child, M. S. & Pollak, E. (1980). Analytical reaction dynamics: Origin and implica...state region, i.e. the phase space point at which a trajectory enters the transition state region can be mapped analytically to the phase space point...Neishtadt, A. I. (1988). Mathematical aspects of classical and celestial mechanics. In V. I. Arnol’d, editor, Dynamical Systems III, volume 3 of Encyclopaedia

  19. Application of Tube Dynamics to Non-Statistical Reaction Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabern, F.; Koon, W. S.; Marsden, J. E.; Ross, S. D.; Yanao, T.

    2006-06-01

    A technique based on dynamical systems theory is introduced for the computation of lifetime distributions and rates of chemical reactions and scattering phenomena, even in systems that exhibit non-statistical behavior. In particular, we merge invariant manifold tube dynamics with Monte Carlo volume determination for accurate rate calculations. This methodology is applied to a three-degree-of-freedom model problem and some ideas on how it might be extended to higher-degree-of-freedom systems are presented.

  20. Surfaces and polymers: The dynamics of intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Subhalakshmi; Yu, Changqian; Wong, Janet; Hong, Liang; Bae, Sung Chul; Granick, Steve

    2010-03-01

    The dynamics of a hydrophobic polymer melt, well above its glass transition, is probed when it is confined to thicknesses of a few nanometers. The ability of the surface forces apparatus to produce controlled thin films is coupled with measurements using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. Insight into the effects of degree of confinement on diffusion of the polymer molecules and heterogeneity in their dynamic behavior is sought.

  1. Reactions between monolayer Fe and Si(001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, M.; Kobayashi, N.; Hayashi, N. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Reactions between 1.5 monolayer(ML) Fe deposited on Si(001)-2x1 and -dihydride surfaces were studied in situ by reflection high-energy electron diffraction and time-of-flight ion scattering spectrometry with the use of 25 keV H ions. The reactions between Fe and Si which were successively deposited on Si(001)-dihydride surface were also studied. After the room temperature deposition Fe reacted with Si(001)-2x1 substrate resulting in the formation of polycrystalline Fe5Si3. By annealing to 560-650degC composite heteroepitaxial layer of both type A and type B {beta}-FeSi2 was formed. On the dihydride surface polycrystalline Fe was observed after 1.5ML Fe deposition at room temperature, and reaction between Fe and Si(001)-dihydride surface is not likely at room temperature. We observed 3D rough surface when we deposited only Fe layer on the dihydride surface and annealed above 700degC. The hydrogen termination of Si(001) surface prevents the deposited Fe from diffusing into the substrate below 500degC, however the annealing above 710degC leads to the diffusion. We obtained 2D ordered surface, which showed 3x3 RHEED pattern as referenced to the primitive unreconstructed Si(001) surface net, when we deposited 2.5ML Fe and 5.8ML Si successively onto Si(001)-dihydride surface and annealed to 470degC. (author)

  2. Surface-Assisted Dynamic Search Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaeoh; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B

    2018-03-01

    Many chemical and biological systems exhibit intermittent search phenomena when participating particles alternate between dynamic regimes with different dimensionalities. Here we investigate theoretically a dynamic search process of finding a small target on a two-dimensional surface starting from a bulk solution, which is an example of such an intermittent search process. Both continuum and discrete-state stochastic descriptions are developed. It is found that depending on the scanning length λ, which describes the area visited by the reacting molecule during one search cycle, the system can exhibit three different search regimes: (i) For small λ values, the reactant finds the target mostly via three-dimensional bulk diffusion; (ii) for large λ values, the reactant molecule associates to the target mostly via surface diffusion; and (iii) for intermediate λ values, the reactant reaches the target via a combination of three-dimensional and two-dimensional search cycles. Our analysis also shows that the mean search times have different scalings as a function of the size of the surface segment depending on the nature of the dynamic search regime. Search dynamics are also sensitive to the position of the target for large scanning lengths. In addition, it is argued that the continuum description underestimates mean search times and does not always correctly describe the most optimal conditions for the surface-assisted dynamic processes. The importance of our findings for real natural systems is discussed.

  3. Chemical activity induces dynamical force with global structure in a reaction-diffusion-convection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahara, Hitoshi; Okada, Koichi; Nomura, Atsushi; Miike, Hidetoshi; Sakurai, Tatsunari

    2009-07-01

    We found a rotating global structure induced by the dynamical force of local chemical activity in a thin solution layer of excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction coupled with diffusion. The surface flow and deformation associated with chemical spiral waves (wavelength about 1 mm) represents a global unidirectional structure and a global tilt in the entire Petri dish (100 mm in diameter), respectively. For these observations, we scanned the condition of hierarchal pattern selection. From this result, the bromomalonic acid has an important role to induce the rotating global structure. An interaction between a reaction-diffusion process and a surface-tension-driven effect leads to such hierarchal pattern with different scales.

  4. Chemical reaction on solid surface observed through isotope tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ken-ichi

    1983-01-01

    In order to know the role of atoms and ions on solid surfaces as the partners participating in elementary processes, the literatures related to the isomerization and hydrogen exchanging reaction of olefines, the hydrogenation of olefines, the metathesis reaction and homologation of olefines based on solid catalysts were reviewed. Various olefines, of which the hydrogen atoms were substituted with deuterium at desired positions, were reacted using various solid catalysts such as ZnO, K 2 CO 3 on C, MoS 2 (single crystal and powder) and molybdenum oxide (with various carriers), and the infra-red spectra of adsorbed olefines on catalysts, the isotope composition of reaction products and the production rate of the reaction products were measured. From the results, the bonding mode of reactant with the atoms and ions on solid surfaces, and the mechanism of the elementary process were considered. The author emphasized that the mechanism of the chemical reaction on solid surfaces and the role of active points or catalysts can be made clear to the considerable extent by combining isotopes suitably. (Yoshitake, I.)

  5. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, S.K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  6. Surface reactivity and layer analysis of chemisorbed reaction films in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Studies on surface reactivity of substrate iron (Fe-particles) were made in the tribo-chemical environment of alkyl octadecenoates. Two alkyl octadecenoates namely ethyl octadecenoate and methyl. 12-hydroxy octadecenoate, slightly different in their chemical nature, were taken for preparing the chemisorbed reaction films ...

  7. Evidence concerning oxidation as a surface reaction in Baltic amber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide evidence about oxidation as a surface reaction during degradation of Baltic amber. A clear understanding of the amber-oxygen interaction modalities is essential to develop conservation techniques for museum collections of amber objects. Pellet-shaped samples...

  8. Canard Phenomena in Oscillations of a Surface Oxidation Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Han, Maoan; Zhang, Weijiang

    2005-12-01

    In this paper we investigate canard phenomena occurring in oscillations of a surface oxidation reaction which can be modeled by a three-dimensional singularly perturbed system of ordinary differential equations with two fast variables. By using asymptotic methods, we prove the existence of the maximal canard of the mentioned model, and provide sufficient conditions for the existence of stable canard cycles.

  9. Chemical Dynamics at Surfaces of Metal Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-23

    method to determine 3D molecular structures One of the major problems in experimentally studying heterogeneous catalysis is the lack of tools...the determinations of molecular structures and dynamics on the surfaces of metal nanomaterials – the critical component of heterogeneous catalysts...for the determinations of molecular structures on the surfaces of metal nanomaterials. Practical catalysts, e.g. oxide-supported metal clusters, are

  10. Fractal sets generated by chemical reactions discrete chaotic dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gontar, V.; Grechko, O.

    2007-01-01

    Fractal sets composed by the parameters values of difference equations derived from chemical reactions discrete chaotic dynamics (DCD) and corresponding to the sequences of symmetrical patterns were obtained in this work. Examples of fractal sets with the corresponding symmetrical patterns have been presented

  11. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Suleimanov, Yu.V.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH 4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamics of Low-Energy Electron Induced Reactions in Condensed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Michael; Soe, Chanmyaemyae; Chamberlain, Kristal; Shyur, Yomay; Arumainayagam, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    We present insights into the dynamics of low-energy electron-induced reactions in thin films of methanol (CH3 OH). Low-energy electrons in matter can initiate chemical reactions though electron impact ionization of a molecule, electron impact excitation of a molecule, or through dissociation of a transient negative ion formed by electron attachment to a molecule. Our studies focus on the dynamics by which low-energy electron interaction with condensed methanol initiates chemical reactions which lead to the formation of methoxymethanol (CH3 O CH2 OH) and ethylene glycol (HO CH2 CH2 OH). The results of our post-irradiation temperature programmed desorption experiments indicate that both products can form from irradiating methanol with electrons at subionization energies. In addition, we find evidence that dissociative electron attachment plays a role in the formation of methoxymethanol but not in ethylene glycol.

  13. Dynamics of anion-molecule reactions at low energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikosch, J.

    2007-11-15

    Anion-molecule reactions must find their way through deeply bound entrance and exit channel complexes separated by a central barrier. This results in low reaction rates and rich dynamics since direct pathways compete with the formation of transient intermediates. In this thesis we examine the probability of proton transfer to a small anion and transient lifetimes of a thermoneutral bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (S{sub N}2) reaction at well defined variable temperature down to 8 Kelvin in a multipole trap. The observed strong inverse temperature dependence is attributed to the deficit of available quantum states in the entrance channel at decreasing temperature. Furthermore we investigate scattering dynamics of S{sub N}2 reactions at defined relative energy between 0.4 and 10 eV by crossed beam slice imaging. A weakly exothermic reaction with high central barrier proceeds via an indirect, complex-mediated mechanism at low relative energies featuring high internal product excitation in excellent quantitative agreement with a statistical model. In contrast, direct backward scattering prevails for higher energies with product velocities close to the kinematical cutoff. For a strongly exothermic reaction, competing S{sub N}2-, dihalide- and proton transfer-channels are explored which proceed by complex mediation for low energy and various rebound-, grazing- and collision induced bond rupture-mechanisms at higher energy. From our data and a collaboration with theory we identify a new indirect roundabout S{sub N}2 mechanism involving CH{sub 3}-rotation. (orig.)

  14. Dynamics of anion-molecule reactions at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikosch, J.

    2007-11-01

    Anion-molecule reactions must find their way through deeply bound entrance and exit channel complexes separated by a central barrier. This results in low reaction rates and rich dynamics since direct pathways compete with the formation of transient intermediates. In this thesis we examine the probability of proton transfer to a small anion and transient lifetimes of a thermoneutral bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (S N 2) reaction at well defined variable temperature down to 8 Kelvin in a multipole trap. The observed strong inverse temperature dependence is attributed to the deficit of available quantum states in the entrance channel at decreasing temperature. Furthermore we investigate scattering dynamics of S N 2 reactions at defined relative energy between 0.4 and 10 eV by crossed beam slice imaging. A weakly exothermic reaction with high central barrier proceeds via an indirect, complex-mediated mechanism at low relative energies featuring high internal product excitation in excellent quantitative agreement with a statistical model. In contrast, direct backward scattering prevails for higher energies with product velocities close to the kinematical cutoff. For a strongly exothermic reaction, competing S N 2-, dihalide- and proton transfer-channels are explored which proceed by complex mediation for low energy and various rebound-, grazing- and collision induced bond rupture-mechanisms at higher energy. From our data and a collaboration with theory we identify a new indirect roundabout S N 2 mechanism involving CH 3 -rotation. (orig.)

  15. Competitive reactions of organophosphorus radicals on coke surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catak, Saron; Hemelsoet, Karen; Hermosilla, Laura; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2011-10-17

    The efficacy of organophosphorus radicals as anticoking agents was subjected to a computational study in which a representative set of radicals derived from industrially relevant organophosphorus additives was used to explore competitive reaction pathways on the graphene-like coke surface formed during thermal cracking. The aim was to investigate the nature of the competing reactions of different organophosphorus radicals on coke surfaces, and elucidate their mode of attack and inhibiting effect on the forming coke layer by use of contemporary computational methods. Density functional calculations on benzene and a larger polyaromatic hydrocarbon, namely, ovalene, showed that organophosphorus radicals have a high propensity to add to the periphery of the coke surface, inhibiting methyl radical induced hydrogen abstraction, which is known to be a key step in coke growth. Low addition barriers reported for a phosphatidyl radical suggest competitive aptitude against coke formation. Moreover, organophosphorus additives bearing aromatic substituents, which were shown to interact with the coke surface through dispersive π-π stacking interactions, are suggested to play a nontrivial role in hindering further stacking among coke surfaces. This may be the underlying rationale behind experimental observation of softer coke in the presence of organophosphorus radicals. The ultimate goal is to provide information that will be useful in building single-event microkinetic models. This study presents pertinent information on potential reactions that could be taken up in these models. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Nanoparticle-Programmed Surface for Drug Release and Cell Regulation via Reversible Hybridization Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pinliang; Li, Shihui; Lai, Jinping; Zheng, Hong; Lin, Changjian; Shi, Peng; Wang, Yong

    2017-02-08

    A surface directly connects the bulk of a material to its surroundings. The ability to dynamically regulate the surface without affecting the bulk of a material holds great potential for new applications. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate that the surface can be dynamically changed using nanoparticles and oligonucleotides (ODNs) in a reversible and reiterative manner. A dual-functional nanogel was synthesized as the model of nanoparticles using miniemulsion polymerization and click chemistry. The nanogel can not only adsorb drugs for sustained drug release but also bind a surface functionalized with complementary ODNs. Importantly, hybridization reaction and ODN degradation can drive reversible and reiterative nanogel binding to the surface for dynamic change, which in principle is unlimited. Moreover, nanogel-mediated dynamic change offers the surface with the drug-releasing function for inhibiting the growth of surrounding cells. Because nanogels can be replaced by any functional nanoparticles with a diverse array of properties, nanoparticle-programmed surface change constitutes a promising platform for various applications such as drug delivery and stent implantation.

  17. 2011 Dynamics at Surfaces Gordon Research Conference (August 7-12, 2011, Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Sitz

    2011-08-12

    The 2011 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 32nd anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state scattering dynamics, chemical reaction dynamics, non-adiabatic effects in reactive and inelastic scattering of molecules from surfaces, single molecule dynamics at surfaces, surface photochemistry, ultrafast dynamics at surfaces, and dynamics at water interfaces. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology, biophysics, and astronomy.

  18. Phase-space geometry and reaction dynamics near index 2 saddles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezra, Gregory S; Wiggins, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We study the phase-space geometry associated with index 2 saddles of a potential energy surface and its influence on reaction dynamics for n degree-of-freedom (DoF) Hamiltonian systems. In recent years, similar studies have been carried out for index 1 saddles of potential energy surfaces, and the phase-space geometry associated with classical transition state theory has been elucidated. In this case, the existence of a normally hyperbolic invariant manifold (NHIM) of saddle stability type has been shown, where the NHIM serves as the 'anchor' for the construction of dividing surfaces having the no-recrossing property and minimal flux. For the index 1 saddle case, the stable and unstable manifolds of the NHIM are co-dimension 1 in the energy surface and have the structure of spherical cylinders, and thus act as the conduits for reacting trajectories in phase space. The situation for index 2 saddles is quite different, and their relevance for reaction dynamics has not previously been fully recognized. We show that NHIMs with their stable and unstable manifolds still exist, but that these manifolds by themselves lack sufficient dimension to act as barriers in the energy surface in order to constrain reactions. Rather, in the index 2 case there are different types of invariant manifolds, containing the NHIM and its stable and unstable manifolds, that act as co-dimension 1 barriers in the energy surface. These barriers divide the energy surface in the vicinity of the index 2 saddle into regions of qualitatively different trajectories exhibiting a wider variety of dynamical behavior than for the case of index 1 saddles. In particular, we can identify a class of trajectories, which we refer to as 'roaming trajectories', which are not associated with reaction along the classical minimum energy path (MEP). We illustrate the significance of our analysis of the index 2 saddle for reaction dynamics with two examples. The first involves isomerization on a potential energy

  19. A dynamical theory of incomplete fusion reactions: The breakup-fusion reaction approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udagawa, T.

    1984-01-01

    A dynamical theory of partial fusion reactions is presented, which may fill the gap between direct and compound nuclear reaction theories. With the new theory one can calculate partial fusion taking place in three-body (and many more) channels reached via direct reactions, e.g., breakup and knockout reactions. The authors present first the results for the cross section for such reactions, taking as an example breakup followed by fusion. They then discuss a physical picture which emerges from their theory, namely that the partial fusion reactions, particularly of the massive-transfer type, take place in a so-called deep peripheral region. It is also shown that the deep peripheral character of such processes diminishes as the mass of the fused system decreases, so that the reactions essentially evolve to the usual peripheral character. Finally, comparisons are made of results of numerical calculations with experimental data, taking as an example the /sup 159/Tb(/sup 14/N,α) reaction with E/sub lab/ = 95 MeV

  20. Dynamic air layer on textured superhydrophobic surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2013-09-03

    We provide an experimental demonstration that a novel macroscopic, dynamic continuous air layer or plastron can be sustained indefinitely on textured superhydrophobic surfaces in air-supersaturated water by a natural gas influx mechanism. This type of plastron is an intermediate state between Leidenfrost vapor layers on superheated surfaces and the equilibrium Cassie-Baxter wetting state on textured superhydrophobic surfaces. We show that such a plastron can be sustained on the surface of a centimeter-sized superhydrophobic sphere immersed in heated water and variations of its dynamic behavior with air saturation of the water can be regulated by rapid changes of the water temperature. The simple experimental setup allows for quantification of the air flux into the plastron and identification of the air transport model of the plastron growth. Both the observed growth dynamics of such plastrons and millimeter-sized air bubbles seeded on the hydrophilic surface under identical air-supersaturated solution conditions are consistent with the predictions of a well-mixed gas transport model. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  1. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25977746

  2. Polymer surface engineering via thiol-mediated reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensarling, Ryan Matthew

    Synthesis of polymer brushes to decorate a surface with desired functionality typically involves surface-initiated polymerization (SIP) of functional, but non-reactive monomers. This approach suffers major drawbacks associated with synthesizing sufficiently thick polymer brushes containing surface-attached polymer chains of high molecular weight at high grafting density (i.e. cost, synthetic effort and functional group intolerance during polymerization). The research herein seeks to circumvent these limitations by the decoration of surfaces with polymer chains bearing specific pendent functional groups amenable to post-polymerization modification (PPM). In particular, this dissertation leverages PPM via a specific class of click reactions - thiol-click - that 1) enables the rapid generation of a diverse library of functional surfaces from a single substrates precursor, 2) utilizes a structurally diverse range of commercially available or easily attainable reagents, 3) proceeds rapidly to quantitative conversions under mild conditions and 4) opens the door to orthogonal and site-selective functionalization. In the first two studies, radical-mediated thiol-yne and base-catalyzed thiol-isocyanate reactions are demonstrated as modular platforms for the rapid and practical fabrication of highly functional, multicomponent surfaces under ambient conditions. Brush surfaces expressing a three-dimensional configuration of alkyne or isocyanate functionalities were modified with high efficiency and short reaction times using a library of commercially available thiols. In the third study, two routes to multifunctional brush surfaces were demonstrated utilizing orthogonal thiol-click reactions. In the first approach, alkyne-functionalized homopolymer brushes were modified with multiple thiols via a statistical, radical-mediated thiol-yne co-click reaction; and in the second approach, statistical copolymer brushes carrying two distinctly-addressable reactive moieties were

  3. Efficient Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) simulations for diffusion-limited, reversible reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashardanesh, Zahedeh; Lötstedt, Per

    2018-03-01

    In diffusion controlled reversible bimolecular reactions in three dimensions, a dissociation step is typically followed by multiple, rapid re-association steps slowing down the simulations of such systems. In order to improve the efficiency, we first derive an exact Green's function describing the rate at which an isolated pair of particles undergoing reversible bimolecular reactions and unimolecular decay separates beyond an arbitrarily chosen distance. Then the Green's function is used in an algorithm for particle-based stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations for prediction of the dynamics of biochemical networks. The accuracy and efficiency of the algorithm are evaluated using a reversible reaction and a push-pull chemical network. The computational work is independent of the rates of the re-associations.

  4. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külah, Elçin; Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; Romanyuk, Andriy; Jung, Thomas A; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Meyer, Ernst

    2017-03-22

    Rare-earth (RE) oxide surfaces are of significant importance for catalysis and were recently reported to possess intrinsic hydrophobicity. The surface chemistry of these oxides in the low temperature regime, however, remains to a large extent unexplored. The reactions occurring at RE surfaces at room temperature (RT) in real air environment, in particular, in presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were not addressed until now. Discovering these reactions would shed light onto intermediate steps occurring in automotive exhaust catalysts before reaching the final high operational temperature and full conversion of organics. Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide surfaces, exemplified by tetracene (C 18 H 12 ) on a Gd 2 O 3 . Our study evidences a novel effect - oxidation of higher hydrocarbons at significantly lower temperatures (~300 K) than previously reported (>500 K). The evolution of the surface chemical composition of RE compounds in ambient air is investigated and correlated with the surface wetting. Our surprising results reveal the complex behavior of RE surfaces and motivate follow-up studies of reactions between PAH and catalytic surfaces at the single molecule level.

  5. Mass-Related Dynamical Barriers in Triatomic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanao, T.; Koon, W. S.; Marsden, J. E.

    2006-06-01

    A methodology is given to determine the effect of different mass distributions for triatomic reactions using the geometry of shape space. Atomic masses are incorporated into the non-Euclidean shape space metric after the separation of rotations. Using the equations of motion in this non-Euclidean shape space, an averaged field of velocity-dependent fictitious forces is determined. This force field, as opposed to the force arising from the potential, dominates branching ratios of isomerization dynamics of a triatomic molecule. This methodology may be useful for qualitative prediction of branching ratios in general triatomic reactions.

  6. Reaction dynamics of electronically excited alkali atoms with simpler molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, P.S.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Schmidt, H.; Vernon, M.F.; Covinsky, M.H.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1985-05-01

    The reactions of electronically excited sodium atoms with simple molecules have been studied in crossed molecular beams experiments. Electronically excited Na(3 2 P/sub 3/2/, 4 2 D/sub 5/2/, and 5 2 S/sub 1/2/) were produced by optical pumping using single frequency dye lasers. The effects of the symmetry, and the orientation and alignment of the excited orbital on the chemical reactivity, and detailed information on the reaction dynamics were derived from measurements of the product angular and velocity distributions. 12 refs., 9 figs

  7. SiO mass spectrometry and Si-2p photoemission spectroscopy for the study of oxidation reaction dynamics of Si(001) surface by supersonic O sub 2 molecular beams under 1000K

    CERN Document Server

    Teraoka, Y; Moritani, K

    2003-01-01

    The Si sup 1 sup 8 O desorption yield was measured in the Si(001) surface temperature region from 900K to 1300K at the sup 1 sup 8 O sub 2 incident energies of 0.7eV, 2.2eV and 3.3eV. The Si sup 1 sup 8 O desorption yield in a surface temperature region higher than 1000K increased with increasing incident energy, indicating the incident-energy-induced oxidation and the variation of angular distribution of Si sup 1 sup 8 O desorption. Inversely, the Si sup 1 sup 8 O desorption yield decreased with increasing incident energy in the region from 900K to 1000K, indicating the coexistence of the passive and the active oxidation. In order to clarify the reaction mechanisms of the later phenomenon, real-time in-situ Si-2p photoemission spectroscopy has been performed. The obtained Si-2p spectra showed the variation of the oxide-nuclei quality from the sub-oxide-rich structure to the SiO sub 2 -rich structure. The formation of the SiO sub 2 structure suppresses the SiO desorption due to the enhanced O sub 2 sticking a...

  8. An efficient multi-scale Green's function reaction dynamics scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbailò, Luigi; Noé, Frank

    2017-11-01

    Molecular Dynamics-Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (MD-GFRD) is a multiscale simulation method for particle dynamics or particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics that is suited for systems involving low particle densities. Particles in a low-density region are just diffusing and not interacting. In this case, one can avoid the costly integration of microscopic equations of motion, such as molecular dynamics (MD), and instead turn to an event-based scheme in which the times to the next particle interaction and the new particle positions at that time can be sampled. At high (local) concentrations, however, e.g., when particles are interacting in a nontrivial way, particle positions must still be updated with small time steps of the microscopic dynamical equations. The efficiency of a multi-scale simulation that uses these two schemes largely depends on the coupling between them and the decisions when to switch between the two scales. Here we present an efficient scheme for multi-scale MD-GFRD simulations. It has been shown that MD-GFRD schemes are more efficient than brute-force molecular dynamics simulations up to a molar concentration of 102 μM. In this paper, we show that the choice of the propagation domains has a relevant impact on the computational performance. Domains are constructed using a local optimization of their sizes and a minimal domain size is proposed. The algorithm is shown to be more efficient than brute-force Brownian dynamics simulations up to a molar concentration of 103 μM and is up to an order of magnitude more efficient compared with previous MD-GFRD schemes.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Predicting Surface Wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of wetting of a solid surface by a liquid provides important insights; the contact angle of a liquid droplet on a surface provides a quantitative measurement of this interaction and the degree of attraction or repulsion of that liquid type by the solid surface. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations are a useful way to examine the behavior of liquids on solid surfaces on a nanometer scale. Thus, we surveyed the state of this field, beginning with the fundamentals of wetting calculations to an examination of the different MD methodologies used. We highlighted some of the advantages and disadvantages of the simulations, and look to the future of computer modeling to understand wetting and other liquid-solid interaction phenomena.

  10. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crim, F.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  11. Chemical memory reactions induced bursting dynamics in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tianhai

    2013-01-01

    Memory is a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems in which the present system state is not entirely determined by the current conditions but also depends on the time evolutionary path of the system. Specifically, many memorial phenomena are characterized by chemical memory reactions that may fire under particular system conditions. These conditional chemical reactions contradict to the extant stochastic approaches for modeling chemical kinetics and have increasingly posed significant challenges to mathematical modeling and computer simulation. To tackle the challenge, I proposed a novel theory consisting of the memory chemical master equations and memory stochastic simulation algorithm. A stochastic model for single-gene expression was proposed to illustrate the key function of memory reactions in inducing bursting dynamics of gene expression that has been observed in experiments recently. The importance of memory reactions has been further validated by the stochastic model of the p53-MDM2 core module. Simulations showed that memory reactions is a major mechanism for realizing both sustained oscillations of p53 protein numbers in single cells and damped oscillations over a population of cells. These successful applications of the memory modeling framework suggested that this innovative theory is an effective and powerful tool to study memory process and conditional chemical reactions in a wide range of complex biological systems.

  12. Dynamic Characteristics and Model for Centralization Reaction of Acidic Tailings From Heap Leaching of Uranium Ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Dexin; Liu Yulong; Li Guangyue; Wang Youtuan

    2010-01-01

    Centralization tests were carried out on acidic tailings from heap leaching of uranium ore by using CaO, NaOH and NH 4 OH. The variations of pH with time were measured for the three centralization systems and the dynamic models for the systems were set up by regressing the measured data. The centralization process consists of the fast reaction phase representing the reaction between the centralization agent and the acid on the surface of the tailing's particles and the slow diffusion-reaction phase representing the diffusion-reaction between the centralization agent and the acid within the tailing's particles. The non-linear coupling and feedback function model for the diffusion-reaction of the centralization agent can reflect the process and mode of the centralization reaction. There is a non-linear oscillation in the variation of pH within the centralization systems. The dynamic model for the tailing's centralization reaction can fit the pH variation within the centralization systems. (authors)

  13. New Approach for Investigating Reaction Dynamics and Rates with Ab Initio Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Kelly L; Tiwary, Pratyush; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2016-01-21

    Herein, we demonstrate a convenient approach to systematically investigate chemical reaction dynamics using the metadynamics (MetaD) family of enhanced sampling methods. Using a symmetric SN2 reaction as a model system, we applied infrequent metadynamics, a theoretical framework based on acceleration factors, to quantitatively estimate the rate of reaction from biased and unbiased simulations. A systematic study of the algorithm and its application to chemical reactions was performed by sampling over 5000 independent reaction events. Additionally, we quantitatively reweighed exhaustive free-energy calculations to obtain the reaction potential-energy surface and showed that infrequent metadynamics works to effectively determine Arrhenius-like activation energies. Exact agreement with unbiased high-temperature kinetics is also shown. The feasibility of using the approach on actual ab initio molecular dynamics calculations is then presented by using Car-Parrinello MD+MetaD to sample the same reaction using only 10-20 calculations of the rare event. Owing to the ease of use and comparatively low-cost of computation, the approach has extensive potential applications for catalysis, combustion, pyrolysis, and enzymology.

  14. Mass effects and internal space geometry in triatomic reaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanao, Tomohiro; Koon, Wang S.; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    2006-05-01

    The effect of the distribution of mass in triatomic reaction dynamics is analyzed using the geometry of the associated internal space. Atomic masses are appropriately incorporated into internal coordinates as well as the associated non-Euclidean internal space metric tensor after a separation of the rotational degrees of freedom. Because of the non-Euclidean nature of the metric in the internal space, terms such as connection coefficients arise in the internal equations of motion, which act as velocity-dependent forces in a coordinate chart. By statistically averaging these terms, an effective force field is deduced, which accounts for the statistical tendency of geodesics in the internal space. This force field is shown to play a crucial role in determining mass-related branching ratios of isomerization and dissociation dynamics of a triatomic molecule. The methodology presented can be useful for qualitatively predicting branching ratios in general triatomic reactions, and may be applied to the study of isotope effects.

  15. Ultrafast Dynamics of Chemical Reactions in Condensed Phase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultrafast Dynamics of Chemical Reactions in Condensed Phase: Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics of reaction-diffusion systems: Analysis and computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmsson, H.

    1991-01-01

    Equilibria and dynamics of reaction-diffusion systems are studied by means of analysis and computations based on a central expansions method for radially symmetric as well as angularly asymmetric distributions. Effects of boundary conditions are included. The interplay between the different processes in the evolution of the system is considered. The investigation provides a unified description in one, two and three dimensions. A particular application concerns the time evolution of temperature profiles in a fusion reactor plasma. (au)

  17. Dual Control Cell Reaction Ensemble Molecular Dynamics: A Method for Simulations of Reactions and Adsorption in Porous Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lisal, Martin; Brennan, John K; Smith, William R; Siperstein, Flor R

    2006-01-01

    .... The method, termed the dual control cell reaction ensemble molecular dynamics method, allows for the calculation of both equilibrium and nonequilibrium transport properties in porous materials...

  18. Reaction dynamics studies for the system 7Be+58Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresi, D.; Mazzocco, M.; Acosta, L.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Fierro, N.; Glodariu, T.; Grilj, L.; Guglielmetti, A.; Keeley, N.; La Commara, M.; Martel, I.; Mazzocchi, C.; Molini, P.; Pakou, A.; Parascandolo, C.; Parkar, V. V.; Patronis, N.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Romoli, M.; Rusek, K.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Sandoli, M.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Strano, E.; Stroe, L.; Zerva, K.

    2015-04-01

    The study of reactions induced by exotic weakly bound nuclei at energies around the Coulomb barrier had attracted a large interest in the last decade, since the features of these nuclei can deeply affect the reaction dynamics. The discrimination between different reaction mechanisms is, in general, a rather difficult task. It can be achieved by using detector arrays covering high solid angle and with high granularity that allow to measure the reaction products and, possibly, coincidences between them, as, for example, recently done for stable weakly bound nuclei [1, 2]. We investigated the collision of the weakly bound nucleus 7Be on a 58Ni target at the beam energy of 1.1 times the Coulomb barrier, measuring the elastic scattering angular distribution and the energy and angular distributions of 3He and 4He. The 7Be radioactive ion beam was produced by the facility EXOTIC at INFN-LNL with an energy of 22 MeV and an intensity of ~3×105 pps. Results showed that the 4He yeld is about 4 times larger than 3He yield, suggesting that reaction mechanisms other than the break-up mostly produce the He isotopes. Theoretical calculations for transfer channels and compound nucleus reactions suggest that complete fusion accounts for (41±5%) of the total reaction cross section extracted from optical model analysis of the elastic scattering data, and that 3He and 4He stripping are the most populated reaction channels among direct processes. Eventually estimation of incomplete fusion contributions to the 3,4He production cross sections was performed through semi-classical calculations with the code PLATYPUS [3].

  19. Reaction dynamics studies for the system 7Be+58Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torresi, D; Mazzocco, M.; Fierro, N; Molini, P; Parascandolo, C; Acosta, L; Grilj, L; Martel, I; Parkar, V V; Boiano, A; La Commara, M; Pierroutsakou, D; Boiano, C; Guglielmetti, A; Diaz-Torres, A; Glodariu, T; Keeley, N; Mazzocchi, C; Pakou, A; Patronis, N

    2015-01-01

    The study of reactions induced by exotic weakly bound nuclei at energies around the Coulomb barrier had attracted a large interest in the last decade, since the features of these nuclei can deeply affect the reaction dynamics. The discrimination between different reaction mechanisms is, in general, a rather difficult task. It can be achieved by using detector arrays covering high solid angle and with high granularity that allow to measure the reaction products and, possibly, coincidences between them, as, for example, recently done for stable weakly bound nuclei [1, 2]. We investigated the collision of the weakly bound nucleus 7 Be on a 58 Ni target at the beam energy of 1.1 times the Coulomb barrier, measuring the elastic scattering angular distribution and the energy and angular distributions of 3 He and 4 He. The 7 Be radioactive ion beam was produced by the facility EXOTIC at INFN-LNL with an energy of 22 MeV and an intensity of ∼3×10 5 pps. Results showed that the 4 He yeld is about 4 times larger than 3 He yield, suggesting that reaction mechanisms other than the break-up mostly produce the He isotopes. Theoretical calculations for transfer channels and compound nucleus reactions suggest that complete fusion accounts for (41±5%) of the total reaction cross section extracted from optical model analysis of the elastic scattering data, and that 3 He and 4 He stripping are the most populated reaction channels among direct processes. Eventually estimation of incomplete fusion contributions to the 3,4 He production cross sections was performed through semi-classical calculations with the code PLATYPUS [3]. (paper)

  20. Dynamic signaling cascades: reversible covalent reaction-coupled molecular switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yulong; You, Lei

    2015-11-11

    The research of systems chemistry exploring complex mixtures of interacting synthetic molecules has been burgeoning recently. Herein we demonstrate for the first time the coupling of molecular switches with a dynamic covalent reaction (DCR) and the modulation of created chemical cascades with a variety of inputs, thus closely mimicking a biological signaling system. A novel Michael type DCR of 10-methylacridinium perchlorate and monothiols exhibiting excellent regioselectivity and tunable affinity was discovered. A delicate balance between the unique reactivity of the reactant and the stability of the adduct leads to the generation of a strong acid in a thermodynamically controlled system. The dynamic cascade was next created via coupling of the DCR and a protonation-induced configurational switch (E/Z isomerization) through a proton relay. Detailed examination of the interdependence of the equilibrium enabled us to rationally optimize the cascade and also shed light on the possible intermediate of the switching process. Furthermore, relative independence of the coupled reactions was verified by the identification of stimuli that are able to facilitate one reaction but suppress the other. To further enhance systematic complexity, a second DCR of electrophilic aldehydes and thiols was employed for the reversible inhibition of the binary system, thus achieving the interplay of multiple equilibria. Finally, a fluorescence switch was turned on through coupling with the DCR, showcasing the versatility of our strategy. The results described herein should pave the way for the exploitation of multifunctional dynamic covalent cascades.

  1. Combined Experimental-Theoretical Study of the OH + CO → H + CO2Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracciolo, Adriana; Lu, Dandan; Balucani, Nadia; Vanuzzo, Gianmarco; Stranges, Domenico; Wang, Xingan; Li, Jun; Guo, Hua; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2018-02-26

    A combined experimental-theoretical study is performed to advance our understanding of the dynamics of the prototypical tetra-atom, complex-forming reaction OH + CO → H + CO 2 , which is also of great practical relevance in combustion, Earth's atmosphere, and, potentially, Mars's atmosphere and interstellar chemistry. New crossed molecular beam experiments with mass spectrometric detection are analyzed together with the results from previous experiments and compared with quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations on a new, full-dimensional potential energy surface (PES). Comparisons between experiment and theory are carried out both in the center-of-mass and laboratory frames. Good agreement is found between experiment and theory, both for product angular and translational energy distributions, leading to the conclusion that the new PES is the most accurate at present in elucidating the dynamics of this fundamental reaction. Yet, small deviations between experiment and theory remain and are presumably attributable to the QCT treatment of the scattering dynamics.

  2. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathways for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such parameters as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. For some dynamics methods, global potential energy surfaces are required. In this case, it is necessary to obtain the energy at a complete sampling of all the possible arrangements of the nuclei, which are energetically accessible, and then a fitting function must be obtained to interpolate between the computed points. In other cases, characterization of the stationary points and the reaction pathway connecting them is sufficient. These properties may be readily obtained using analytical derivative methods. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method to obtain accurate energetics, gives usefull results for a number of chemically important systems. The talk will focus on a number of applications including global potential energy surfaces, H + O2, H + N2, O(3p) + H2, and reaction pathways for complex reactions, including reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion.

  3. Bioinspired, dynamic, structured surfaces for biofilm prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Alexander K.

    Bacteria primarily exist in robust, surface-associated communities known as biofilms, ubiquitous in both natural and anthropogenic environments. Mature biofilms resist a wide range of biocidal treatments and pose persistent pathogenic threats. Treatment of adherent biofilm is difficult, costly, and, in medical systems such as catheters, frequently impossible. Adding to the challenge, we have discovered that biofilm can be both impenetrable to vapors and extremely nonwetting, repelling even low surface tension commercial antimicrobials. Our study shows multiple contributing factors, including biochemical components and multiscale reentrant topography. Reliant on surface chemistry, conventional strategies for preventing biofilm only transiently affect attachment and/or are environmentally toxic. In this work, we look to Nature's antifouling solutions, such as the dynamic spiny skin of the echinoderm, and we develop a versatile surface nanofabrication platform. Our benchtop approach unites soft lithography, electrodeposition, mold deformation, and material selection to enable many degrees of freedom—material, geometric, mechanical, dynamic—that can be programmed starting from a single master structure. The mechanical properties of the bio-inspired nanostructures, verified by AFM, are precisely and rationally tunable. We examine how synthetic dynamic nanostructured surfaces control the attachment of pathogenic biofilms. The parameters governing long-range patterning of bacteria on high-aspect-ratio (HAR) nanoarrays are combinatorially elucidated, and we discover that sufficiently low effective stiffness of these HAR arrays mechanoselectively inhibits ˜40% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm attachment. Inspired by the active echinoderm skin, we design and fabricate externally actuated dynamic elastomer surfaces with active surface microtopography. We extract from a large parameter space the critical topographic length scales and actuation time scales for achieving

  4. Chemistry in interstellar space. [environment characteristics influencing reaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, B.

    1973-01-01

    The particular characteristics of chemistry in interstellar space are determined by the unique environmental conditions involved. Interstellar matter is present at extremely low densities. Large deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium are, therefore, to be expected. A relatively intense ultraviolet radiation is present in many regions. The temperatures are in the range from 5 to 200 K. Data concerning the inhibiting effect of small activation energies in interstellar clouds are presented in a table. A summary of measured activation energies or barrier heights for exothermic exchange reactions is also provided. Problems of molecule formation are discussed, taking into account gas phase reactions and surface catalyzed processes.

  5. Effect of surface structure on catalytic reactions: A sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCrea, Keith Ryan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    In the results discussed above, it is clear that Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) is a unique tool that allows the detection of vibrational spectra of adsorbed molecules present on single crystal surfaces under catalytic reaction conditions. Not only is it possible to detect active surface intermediates, it is also possible to detect spectator species which are not responsible for the measured turnover rates. By correlating high-pressure SFG spectra under reaction conditions and gas chromatography (GC) kinetic data, it is possible to determine which species are important under reaction intermediates. Because of the flexibility of this technique for studying surface intermediates, it is possible to determine how the structures of single crystal surfaces affect the observed rates of catalytic reactions. As an example of a structure insensitive reaction, ethylene hydrogenation was explored on both Pt(111) and Pt(100). The rates were determined to be essentially the same. It was observed that both ethylidyne and di-σ bonded ethylene were present on the surface under reaction conditions on both crystals, although in different concentrations. This result shows that these two species are not responsible for the measured turnover rate, as it would be expected that one of the two crystals would be more active than the other, since the concentration of the surface intermediate would be different on the two crystals. The most likely active intermediates are weakly adsorbed molecules such as π-bonded ethylene and ethyl. These species are not easily detected because their concentration lies at the detection limit of SFG. The SFG spectra and GC data essentially show that ethylene hydrogenation is structure insensitive for Pt(111) and Pt(100). SFG has proven to be a unique and excellent technique for studying adsorbed species on single crystal surfaces under high-pressure catalytic reactions. Coupled with kinetic data obtained from gas chromatography measurements, it can give

  6. A new ab initio potential energy surface of LiClH (1A') system and quantum dynamics calculation for Li + HCl (v = 0, j = 0-2) → LiCl + H reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Rui Shan; Zhai, Huan Chen; Yan, Wei; Gao, Feng; Lin, Shi Ying

    2017-04-01

    A new ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for the ground state of Li + HCl reactive system has been constructed by three-dimensional cubic spline interpolation of 36 654 ab initio points computed at the MRCI+Q/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory. The title reaction is found to be exothermic by 5.63 kcal/mol (9 kcal/mol with zero point energy corrections), which is very close to the experimental data. The barrier height, which is 2.99 kcal/mol (0.93 kcal/mol for the vibrationally adiabatic barrier height), and the depth of van der Waals minimum located near the entrance channel are also in excellent agreement with the experimental findings. This study also identified two more van der Waals minima. The integral cross sections, rate constants, and their dependence on initial rotational states are calculated using an exact quantum wave packet method on the new PES. They are also in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements.

  7. Direct single-molecule dynamic detection of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jianxin; Jia, Chuancheng; Li, Yanwei; Liu, Zitong; Wang, Jinying; Yang, Zhongyue; Gu, Chunhui; Su, Dingkai; Houk, Kendall N; Zhang, Deqing; Guo, Xuefeng

    2018-02-01

    Single-molecule detection can reveal time trajectories and reaction pathways of individual intermediates/transition states in chemical reactions and biological processes, which is of fundamental importance to elucidate their intrinsic mechanisms. We present a reliable, label-free single-molecule approach that allows us to directly explore the dynamic process of basic chemical reactions at the single-event level by using stable graphene-molecule single-molecule junctions. These junctions are constructed by covalently connecting a single molecule with a 9-fluorenone center to nanogapped graphene electrodes. For the first time, real-time single-molecule electrical measurements unambiguously show reproducible large-amplitude two-level fluctuations that are highly dependent on solvent environments in a nucleophilic addition reaction of hydroxylamine to a carbonyl group. Both theoretical simulations and ensemble experiments prove that this observation originates from the reversible transition between the reactant and a new intermediate state within a time scale of a few microseconds. These investigations open up a new route that is able to be immediately applied to probe fast single-molecule physics or biophysics with high time resolution, making an important contribution to broad fields beyond reaction chemistry.

  8. Accurate ab initio potential energy surface, thermochemistry, and dynamics of the F{sup −} + CH{sub 3}F S{sub N}2 and proton-abstraction reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabó, István; Telekes, Hajnalka; Czakó, Gábor, E-mail: czako@chem.elte.hu [Laboratory of Molecular Structure and Dynamics, Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös University, H-1518 Budapest 112, P.O. Box 32 (Hungary)

    2015-06-28

    We develop a full-dimensional global analytical potential energy surface (PES) for the F{sup −} + CH{sub 3}F reaction by fitting about 50 000 energy points obtained by an explicitly correlated composite method based on the second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation-F12 and coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples-F12a methods and the cc-pVnZ-F12 [n = D, T] basis sets. The PES accurately describes the (a) back-side attack Walden inversion mechanism involving the pre- and post-reaction (b) ion-dipole and (c) hydrogen-bonded complexes, the configuration-retaining (d) front-side attack and (e) double-inversion substitution pathways, as well as (f) the proton-abstraction channel. The benchmark quality relative energies of all the important stationary points are computed using the focal-point analysis (FPA) approach considering electron correlation up to coupled-cluster singles, doubles, triples, and perturbative quadruples method, extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, core-valence correlation, and scalar relativistic effects. The FPA classical(adiabatic) barrier heights of (a), (d), and (e) are −0.45(−0.61), 46.07(45.16), and 29.18(26.07) kcal mol{sup −1}, respectively, the dissociation energies of (b) and (c) are 13.81(13.56) and 13.73(13.52) kcal mol{sup −1}, respectively, and the endothermicity of (f) is 42.54(38.11) kcal mol{sup −1}. Quasiclassical trajectory computations of cross sections, scattering (θ) and initial attack (α) angle distributions, as well as translational and internal energy distributions are performed for the F{sup −} + CH{sub 3}F(v = 0) reaction using the new PES. Apart from low collision energies (E{sub coll}), the S{sub N}2 excitation function is nearly constant, the abstraction cross sections rapidly increase with E{sub coll} from a threshold of ∼40 kcal mol{sup −1}, and retention trajectories via double inversion are found above E{sub coll} = ∼ 30 kcal mol{sup −1}, and at E{sub coll} =

  9. Dynamics on the Double Morse Potential: A Paradigm for Roaming Reactions with no Saddle Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Barry K.; Ezra, Gregory S.; Farantos, Stavros C.; Kramer, Zeb C.; Wiggins, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a two-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian system constructed from two planar Morse potentials. The resulting potential energy surface has two potential wells surrounded by an unbounded flat region containing no critical points. In addition, the model has an index one saddle between the potential wells. We study the dynamical mechanisms underlying transport between the two potential wells, with emphasis on the role of the flat region surrounding the wells. The model allows us to probe many of the features of the "roaming mechanism" whose reaction dynamics are of current interest in the chemistry community.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of temperature effects on CF3+ etching of Si surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ning, J. P.; Lu, X. D.; Zhao, C. L.; Qin, Y. M.; He, P. N.; Bogaerts, A.; Gou, F. J.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics method was employed to investigate the effects of the reaction layer formed near the surface region on CF3+ etching of Si at different temperatures. The simulation results show that the coverages of F and C are sensitive to the surface temperature. With increasing temperature, the

  11. Use of molecular beams for kinetic measurements of chemical reactions on solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaera, Francisco

    2017-05-01

    In this review we survey the contributions that molecular beam experiments have provided to our understanding of the dynamics and kinetics of chemical interactions of gas molecules with solid surfaces. First, we describe the experimental details of the different instrumental setups and approaches available for the study of these systems under the ultrahigh vacuum conditions and with the model planar surfaces often used in modern surface-science experiments. Next, a discussion is provided of the most important fundamental aspects of the dynamics of chemical adsorption that have been elucidated with the help of molecular beam experiments, which include the development of potential energy surfaces, the determination of the different channels for energy exchange between the incoming molecules and the surface, the identification of adsorption precursor states, the understanding of dissociative chemisorption, the determination of the contributions of corrugation, steps, and other structural details of the surface to the adsorption process, the effect to molecular steering, the identification of avenues for assisting adsorption, and the molecular details associated with the kinetics of the uptake of adsorbates as a function of coverage. We follow with a summary of the work directed at the determination of kinetic parameters and mechanistic details of surface reactions associated with catalysis, mostly those promoted by late transition metals. This discussion we initiate with an overview of what has been learned about simple bimolecular reactions such as the oxidation of CO and H2 with O2 and the reaction of CO with NO, and continue with the review of the studies of more complex systems such as the oxidation of alcohols, the conversion of organic acids, the hydrogenation and isomerization of olefins, and the oxidative activation of alkanes under conditions of short contact times. Sections 6 and 7 of this review deal with the advances made in the use of molecular beams with

  12. Cellular reprogramming dynamics follow a simple 1D reaction coordinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teja Pusuluri, Sai; Lang, Alex H.; Mehta, Pankaj; Castillo, Horacio E.

    2018-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming, the conversion of one cell type to another, induces global changes in gene expression involving thousands of genes, and understanding how cells globally alter their gene expression profile during reprogramming is an ongoing problem. Here we reanalyze time-course data on cellular reprogramming from differentiated cell types to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and show that gene expression dynamics during reprogramming follow a simple 1D reaction coordinate. This reaction coordinate is independent of both the time it takes to reach the iPSC state as well as the details of the experimental protocol used. Using Monte-Carlo simulations, we show that such a reaction coordinate emerges from epigenetic landscape models where cellular reprogramming is viewed as a ‘barrier-crossing’ process between cell fates. Overall, our analysis and model suggest that gene expression dynamics during reprogramming follow a canonical trajectory consistent with the idea of an ‘optimal path’ in gene expression space for reprogramming.

  13. Nonadiabatic quantum wave packet dynamics of the H + H2 reaction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    ; nonadiabatic reaction dyanamics; coriolis coupling. 1. Introduction. The H + H2 → H2 + H exchange reaction has been and still is the cornerstone in the experimental and theo- retical research in the gas phase chemical reaction dynamics. 1.

  14. Dynamics of interface in three-dimensional anisotropic bistable reaction-diffusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhizhu; Liu, Jing

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical investigation of dynamics of interface (wave front) in three-dimensional (3D) reaction-diffusion (RD) system for bistable media with anisotropy constructed by means of anisotropic surface tension. An equation of motion for the wave front is derived to carry out stability analysis of transverse perturbations, which discloses mechanism of pattern formation such as labyrinthine in 3D bistable media. Particularly, the effects of anisotropy on wave propagation are studied. It was found that, sufficiently strong anisotropy can induce dynamical instabilities and lead to breakup of the wave front. With the fast-inhibitor limit, the bistable system can further be described by a variational dynamics so that the boundary integral method is adopted to study the dynamics of wave fronts.

  15. Pulsed laser stereophotography of plasmas and dynamically moving surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisley, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    A pulsed laser is used as a light source for illuminating the surface of a dynamic event of 3 mm//μs. At a predetermined time during the dynamic action, a stereo camera is used to record a pair of images of the dynamically moving surface. The stereoimage pair can be quantified for surface contour

  16. Crossed-beam studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this program is to characterize the detailed dynamics of elementary radical reactions and to provide a better understanding of radical reactivity in general. The radical beam is typically generated by a laser photolysis method. After colliding with the reacting molecule in a crossed-beam apparatus, the reaction product state distribution is interrogated by laser spectroscopic techniques. Several radicals of combustion significance, such as O, CH, OH, CN and NCO have been successfully generated and their collisional behavior at the state-to-state integral cross section level of detail has been studied in this manner. During the past year, the detection system has been converted from LIF to REMPI schemes, and the emphasis of this program shifted to investigate the product angular distributions. Both inelastic and reactive processes have been studied.

  17. Non-adiabatic effects in elementary reaction processes at metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alducin, M.; Díez Muiño, R.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2017-12-01

    Great success has been achieved in the modeling of gas-surface elementary processes by the use of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. However, in metal surfaces low energy electronic excitations are generated even by thermal and hyperthermal molecules due to the absence of band gaps in the electronic structure. This shows the importance of performing dynamical simulations that incorporate non-adiabatic effects to analyze in which way they affect most common gas-surface reactions. Here we review recent theoretical developments in this problem and their application to the study of the effect of electronic excitations in the adsorption and relaxation of atoms and molecules in metal surfaces, in scattering processes, and also in recombinative processes between impinging atoms and adsorbates at the surface. All these studies serve us to establish what properties of the gas-surface interaction favor the excitation of low-energy electron-hole pairs. A general observation is that the nature of these excitations usually requires long lasting interactions at the surface in order to observe deviations from the adiabatic behaviour. We also provide the basis of the local density friction approximation (LDFA) that have been used in all these studies, and show how it has been employed to perform ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction (AIMDEF). As a final remark, we will shortly review on recent applications of the LDFA to successfully simulate desorption processes induced by intense femtosecond laser pulses.

  18. Dynamics of GeV light-ion-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowski, K.; Bracken, D.S.; Foxford, E.R.; Ginger, D.S.; Hsi, W.C.; Morley, K.B.; Viola, V.E.; Wang, G.; Korteling, R.G.; Legrain, R.

    1996-09-01

    Recent results from studies of the 1.8 - 4.8 GeV 3 He + nat Ag, 197 Au reactions at LNS with the ISiS detector array have shown evidence for a saturation in deposition energy and multifragmentation from a low-density source. The collision dynamics have been examined in the context of intranuclear cascade and BUU models, while breakup phenomena have been compared with EES and SMM models. Fragment-fragment correlations and isotope ratios are also investigated. (K.A.)

  19. Dynamics of GeV light-ion-induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, K.; Bracken, D.S.; Foxford, E.R.; Ginger, D.S.; Hsi, W.C.; Morley, K.B.; Viola, V.E.; Wang, G. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Korteling, R.G. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Legrain, R. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Recent results from studies of the 1.8 - 4.8 GeV {sup 3}He + {sup nat}Ag, {sup 197}Au reactions at LNS with the ISiS detector array have shown evidence for a saturation in deposition energy and multifragmentation from a low-density source. The collision dynamics have been examined in the context of intranuclear cascade and BUU models, while breakup phenomena have been compared with EES and SMM models. Fragment-fragment correlations and isotope ratios are also investigated. (K.A.). 19 refs.

  20. Steric Effects in the Reaction of Aryl Radicals on Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combellas, Catherine [CNRS-ESPCI; Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Kanoufi, Frederic [CNRS-ESPCI; Pinson, Jean [Alchimer; Podvorica, Fetah [University of Prishtina, Kosovo

    2009-01-01

    Steric effects are investigated in the reaction of aryl radicals with surfaces. The electrochemical reduction of 2-, 3-, 4-methyl, 2-methoxy, 2-ethyl, 2,6-, 2,4-, and 3,5-dimethyl, 4-tert-butyl, 3,5-bis-tert-butyl benzenediazonium, 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl), and pentafluoro benzenediazonium tetrafluoroborates is examined in acetonitrile solutions. It leads to the formation of grafted layers only if the steric hindrance at the 2- or 2,6-position(s) is small. When the 3,5-positions are crowded with tert-butyl groups, the growth of the organic layer is limited by steric effects and a monolayer is formed. The efficiency of the grafting process is assessed by cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared, and ellipsometry. These experiments, together with density functional computations of bonding energies of substituted phenyl groups on a copper surface, are discussed in terms of the reactivity of aryl radicals in the electrografting reaction and in the growth of the polyaryl layer.

  1. Nucleation of reaction-diffusion waves on curved surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneer, Frederike; Schöll, Eckehard; Dahlem, Markus A

    2014-01-01

    We study reaction-diffusion waves on curved two-dimensional surfaces, and determine the influence of curvature upon the nucleation and propagation of spatially localized waves in an excitable medium modelled by the generic FitzHugh–Nagumo model. We show that the stability of propagating wave segments depends crucially on the curvature of the surface. As they propagate, they may shrink to the uniform steady state, or expand, depending on whether they are smaller or larger, respectively, than a critical nucleus. This critical nucleus for wave propagation is modified by the curvature acting like an effective space-dependent local spatial coupling, similar to diffuson, thus extending the regime of propagating excitation waves beyond the excitation threshold of flat surfaces. In particular, a negative gradient of Gaussian curvature Γ, as on the outside of a torus surface (positive Γ), when the wave segment symmetrically extends into the inside (negative Γ), allows for stable propagation of localized wave segments remaining unchanged in size and shape, or oscillating periodically in size. (paper)

  2. Should thermostatted ring polymer molecular dynamics be used to calculate thermal reaction rates?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hele, Timothy J. H., E-mail: tjhh2@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Suleimanov, Yury V. [Computation-based Science and Technology Research Center, Cyprus Institute, 20 Kavafi St., Nicosia 2121 (Cyprus); Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-08-21

    We apply Thermostatted Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (TRPMD), a recently proposed approximate quantum dynamics method, to the computation of thermal reaction rates. Its short-time transition-state theory limit is identical to rigorous quantum transition-state theory, and we find that its long-time limit is independent of the location of the dividing surface. TRPMD rate theory is then applied to one-dimensional model systems, the atom-diatom bimolecular reactions H + H{sub 2}, D + MuH, and F + H{sub 2}, and the prototypical polyatomic reaction H + CH{sub 4}. Above the crossover temperature, the TRPMD rate is virtually invariant to the strength of the friction applied to the internal ring-polymer normal modes, and beneath the crossover temperature the TRPMD rate generally decreases with increasing friction, in agreement with the predictions of Kramers theory. We therefore find that TRPMD is approximately equal to, or less accurate than, ring polymer molecular dynamics for symmetric reactions, and for certain asymmetric systems and friction parameters closer to the quantum result, providing a basis for further assessment of the accuracy of this method.

  3. Should thermostatted ring polymer molecular dynamics be used to calculate thermal reaction rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hele, Timothy J H; Suleimanov, Yury V

    2015-08-21

    We apply Thermostatted Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (TRPMD), a recently proposed approximate quantum dynamics method, to the computation of thermal reaction rates. Its short-time transition-state theory limit is identical to rigorous quantum transition-state theory, and we find that its long-time limit is independent of the location of the dividing surface. TRPMD rate theory is then applied to one-dimensional model systems, the atom-diatom bimolecular reactions H + H2, D + MuH, and F + H2, and the prototypical polyatomic reaction H + CH4. Above the crossover temperature, the TRPMD rate is virtually invariant to the strength of the friction applied to the internal ring-polymer normal modes, and beneath the crossover temperature the TRPMD rate generally decreases with increasing friction, in agreement with the predictions of Kramers theory. We therefore find that TRPMD is approximately equal to, or less accurate than, ring polymer molecular dynamics for symmetric reactions, and for certain asymmetric systems and friction parameters closer to the quantum result, providing a basis for further assessment of the accuracy of this method.

  4. Systematic development of reduced reaction mechanisms for dynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, M.; Kailasanath, K.; Oran, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    A method for systematically developing a reduced chemical reaction mechanism for dynamic modeling of chemically reactive flows is presented. The method is based on the postulate that if a reduced reaction mechanism faithfully describes the time evolution of both thermal and chain reaction processes characteristic of a more complete mechanism, then the reduced mechanism will describe the chemical processes in a chemically reacting flow with approximately the same degree of accuracy. Here this postulate is tested by producing a series of mechanisms of reduced accuracy, which are derived from a full detailed mechanism for methane-oxygen combustion. These mechanisms were then tested in a series of reactive flow calculations in which a large-amplitude sinusoidal perturbation is applied to a system that is initially quiescent and whose temperature is high enough to start ignition processes. Comparison of the results for systems with and without convective flow show that this approach produces reduced mechanisms that are useful for calculations of explosions and detonations. Extensions and applicability to flames are discussed.

  5. RPMDRATE: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleimanov, Yu. V.; Allen, J. W.; Green, W. H.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDRATE, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. Catalogue identifier: AENW_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: MIT license No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 94512 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1395674 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90/95, Python (version 2.6.x or later, including any version of Python 3, is recommended). Computer: Not computer specific. Operating system: Any for which Python, Fortran 90/95 compiler and the required external routines are available. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: The program can efficiently utilize 4096+ processors, depending on problem and available computer. At low temperatures, 110 processors are reasonable for a typical umbrella integration run with an analytic potential energy function and gradients on the latest x86-64 machines.

  6. Combining molecular dynamics with mesoscopic Green’s function reaction dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Bolhuis, Peter G.; Rein ten Wolde, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green’s Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. We propose a novel approach that combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesoscopic scale where particles are far apart, with a microscopic technique such as Langevin dynamics or Molecular Dynamics (MD), for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. This scheme defines the regions where the particles are close together and simulated with high microscopic resolution and those where they are far apart and simulated with lower mesoscopic resolution, adaptively on the fly. The new multi-scale scheme, called MD-GFRD, is generic and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level

  7. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solutions based upon mixed quantum-classical approximation. I. Proton transfer reaction in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Atsushi; Kojima, Hidekazu; Okazaki, Susumu

    2014-08-28

    In order to investigate proton transfer reaction in solution, mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations have been carried out based on our previously proposed quantum equation of motion for the reacting system [A. Yamada and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 044507 (2008)]. Surface hopping method was applied to describe forces acting on the solvent classical degrees of freedom. In a series of our studies, quantum and solvent effects on the reaction dynamics in solutions have been analysed in detail. Here, we report our mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations for intramolecular proton transfer of malonaldehyde in water. Thermally activated proton transfer process, i.e., vibrational excitation in the reactant state followed by transition to the product state and vibrational relaxation in the product state, as well as tunneling reaction can be described by solving the equation of motion. Zero point energy is, of course, included, too. The quantum simulation in water has been compared with the fully classical one and the wave packet calculation in vacuum. The calculated quantum reaction rate in water was 0.70 ps(-1), which is about 2.5 times faster than that in vacuum, 0.27 ps(-1). This indicates that the solvent water accelerates the reaction. Further, the quantum calculation resulted in the reaction rate about 2 times faster than the fully classical calculation, which indicates that quantum effect enhances the reaction rate, too. Contribution from three reaction mechanisms, i.e., tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing reactions, is 33:46:21 in the mixed quantum-classical calculations. This clearly shows that the tunneling effect is important in the reaction.

  8. Kinetics studies of the F + HCl → HF + Cl reaction on an accurate potential energy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dandan; Zhang, Ying; Li, Jun

    2018-02-01

    A full-dimensional electronic ground state potential energy surface for the hydrogen abstraction reaction F + HCl → HF + Cl is developed by using the permutation invariant polynomial neural network approach based on 6509 points computed at the level of CCSD(T)-F12a/AVTZ. Spin-orbit correction is also taken into account at the complete active space self-consistent field level. Theoretical thermal rate coefficients determined by the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) approach agree well with experiment, validating the accuracy of the PES. Kinetic isotope effect is also investigated.

  9. Self-activated, self-limiting reactions on Si surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Per; Hvam, Jeanette; Bahari, Ali

    , and the temperatures vary from room temperature to 10000C.The growth is in these cases self-limiting, with the optimal oxide thickness around 0.7-0.8 nm, at 5000C, and up to a few nm for nitride. The self-limiting oxide case was recently predicted by Alex Demkov in a structural optimization to minimise the total...... energy of an oxide system, which happened for an ordered structure, at a thickness of 0.7-0.8 nm. Thus this thin oxide structure has definite crystalline features. We have closely monitored the reaction kinetics with normal x-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopies, and also the structure, composition...... and electrical properties of the system, with surface sensitive, high resolution core level photoelectron spectroscopy. The growth kinetics is well fitted by a Hill function, with parameters, which give information about the character of the process. This function describes a self-activated process. Thus...

  10. Reaction dynamics. Extremely short-lived reaction resonances in Cl + HD (v = 1) → DCl + H due to chemical bond softening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tiangang; Chen, Jun; Huang, Long; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Chunlei; Sun, Zhigang; Dai, Dongxu; Yang, Xueming; Zhang, Dong H

    2015-01-02

    The Cl + H2 reaction is an important benchmark system in the study of chemical reaction dynamics that has always appeared to proceed via a direct abstraction mechanism, with no clear signature of reaction resonances. Here we report a high-resolution crossed-molecular beam study on the Cl + HD (v = 1, j = 0) → DCl + H reaction (where v is the vibrational quantum number and j is the rotational quantum number). Very few forward scattered products were observed. However, two distinctive peaks at collision energies of 2.4 and 4.3 kilocalories per mole for the DCl (v' = 1) product were detected in the backward scattering direction. Detailed quantum dynamics calculations on a highly accurate potential energy surface suggested that these features originate from two very short-lived dynamical resonances trapped in the peculiar H-DCl (v' = 2) vibrational adiabatic potential wells that result from chemical bond softening. We anticipate that dynamical resonances trapped in such wells exist in many reactions involving vibrationally excited molecules. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Static and dynamic friction of hierarchical surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costagliola, Gianluca; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M

    2016-12-01

    Hierarchical structures are very common in nature, but only recently have they been systematically studied in materials science, in order to understand the specific effects they can have on the mechanical properties of various systems. Structural hierarchy provides a way to tune and optimize macroscopic mechanical properties starting from simple base constituents and new materials are nowadays designed exploiting this possibility. This can be true also in the field of tribology. In this paper we study the effect of hierarchical patterned surfaces on the static and dynamic friction coefficients of an elastic material. Our results are obtained by means of numerical simulations using a one-dimensional spring-block model, which has previously been used to investigate various aspects of friction. Despite the simplicity of the model, we highlight some possible mechanisms that explain how hierarchical structures can significantly modify the friction coefficients of a material, providing a means to achieve tunability.

  12. Ultralow friction induced by tribochemical reactions: a novel mechanism of lubrication on steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Amann, Tobias; Walter, Michael; Moseler, Michael; Kailer, Andreas; Rühe, Jürgen

    2013-04-30

    The tribological properties of two steel surfaces rubbing against each other are measured while they are in contact with 1,3-diketones of varying structure. Such systems show after a short running-in period ultralow friction properties with a coefficient of friction of as low as μ = 0.005. It is suggested that the extremely favorable friction properties are caused by a tribochemical reaction between the 1,3-diketones and the steel surfaces, leading to formation of a chelated iron-diketo complex. The influence of temperature and the molecular structure of the 1,3 diketo-lubricants onto the friction properties of the system is elucidated under both static and dynamic conditions. With progression of the tribochemical reaction, the sliding surfaces become very conformal and smooth, so that the pressure is greatly reduced and further wear is strongly reduced. All iron particles potentially generated by wear during the initial running-in period are completely dissolved through complex formation. It is proposed that the tribochemical polishing reaction causes a transition from boundary lubrication to fluid lubrication.

  13. Generating Converged Accurate Free Energy Surfaces for Chemical Reactions with a Force-Matched Semiempirical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P; Pietrucci, Fabio; Saitta, Antonino Marco; Goldman, Nir

    2018-03-22

    We demonstrate the capability of creating robust density functional tight binding (DFTB) models for chemical reactivity in prebiotic mixtures through force matching to short time scale quantum free energy estimates. Molecular dynamics using density functional theory (DFT) is a highly accurate approach to generate free energy surfaces for chemical reactions, but the extreme computational cost often limits the time scales and range of thermodynamic states that can feasibly be studied. In contrast, DFTB is a semiempirical quantum method that affords up to a thousandfold reduction in cost and can recover DFT-level accuracy. Here, we show that a force-matched DFTB model for aqueous glycine condensation reactions yields free energy surfaces that are consistent with experimental observations of reaction energetics. Convergence analysis reveals that multiple nanoseconds of combined trajectory are needed to reach a steady-fluctuating free energy estimate for glycine condensation. Predictive accuracy of force-matched DFTB is demonstrated by direct comparison to DFT, with the two approaches yielding surfaces with large regions that differ by only a few kcal mol -1 .

  14. Proton transfer reactions and dynamics in protonated water clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao-Ngam, Charoensak; Asawakun, Prapasri; Wannarat, Sornthep; Sagarik, Kritsana

    2011-03-14

    Proton transfer reactions and dynamics were theoretically studied using the hydrogen-bond (H-bond) complexes formed from H(3)O(+) and nH(2)O, n = 1-4, as model systems. The investigations began with searching for characteristics of transferring protons in the gas phase and continuum aqueous solution using DFT method at the B3LYP/TZVP level, followed by Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations at 350 K. B3LYP/TZVP calculations revealed the threshold asymmetric O-H stretching frequencies (ν(OH)*) for the proton transfers in the Zundel complex (H(5)O) in the gas phase and continuum aqueous solution at 1984 and 1881 cm(-1), respectively. BOMD simulations suggested lower threshold frequencies (ν(OH,MD)* = 1917 and 1736 cm(-1), respectively), with two characteristic ν(OH,MD) being the IR spectral signatures of the transferring protons. The low-frequency band could be associated with the "oscillatory shuttling motion" and the high-frequency band with the "structural diffusion motion". These can be regarded as the spectroscopic evidences of the formations of the shared-proton structure (O···H(+)···O) and the H(3)O(+)-H(2)O contact structure (O-H(+)···O), respectively. Since the quasi-dynamic equilibrium between the Zundel and Eigen complexes was suggested to be the rate-determining step, in order to achieve an "ideal" maximum efficiency of proton transfer, a concerted reaction pathway should be taken. The most effective interconversion between the two proton states, the shared-proton structure and the H(3)O(+)-H(2)O contact structure, can be reflected from comparable intensities of the oscillatory shuttling and structural diffusion bands. The present results iterated the previous conclusions that static proton transfer potentials cannot provide complete description of the structural diffusion process and it is essential to incorporate thermal energy fluctuations and dynamics in the model calculations.

  15. Multiscale Reaction-Diffusion Algorithms: PDE-Assisted Brownian Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Franz, Benjamin

    2013-06-19

    Two algorithms that combine Brownian dynami cs (BD) simulations with mean-field partial differential equations (PDEs) are presented. This PDE-assisted Brownian dynamics (PBD) methodology provides exact particle tracking data in parts of the domain, whilst making use of a mean-field reaction-diffusion PDE description elsewhere. The first PBD algorithm couples BD simulations with PDEs by randomly creating new particles close to the interface, which partitions the domain, and by reincorporating particles into the continuum PDE-description when they cross the interface. The second PBD algorithm introduces an overlap region, where both descriptions exist in parallel. It is shown that the overlap region is required to accurately compute variances using PBD simulations. Advantages of both PBD approaches are discussed and illustrative numerical examples are presented. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  16. Spectroscopy and reaction dynamics of collision complexes containing hydroxyl radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lester, M.I. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The DOE supported work in this laboratory has focused on the spectroscopic characterization of the interaction potential between an argon atom and a hydroxyl radical in the ground X{sup 2}II and excited A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +} electronic states. The OH-Ar system has proven to be a test case for examining the interaction potential in an open-shell system since it is amenable to experimental investigation and theoretically tractable from first principles. Experimental identification of the bound states supported by the Ar + OH (X {sup 2}II) and Ar + OH(A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +}) potentials makes it feasible to derive realistic potential energy surfaces for these systems. The experimentally derived intermolecular potentials provide a rigorous test of ab initio theory and a basis for understanding the dramatically different collision dynamics taking place on the ground and excited electronic state surfaces.

  17. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdW(surf) method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  18. Quantum surface and intertwiner dynamics in loop quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Alexandre; Livine, Etera R.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce simple generic models of surface dynamics in loop quantum gravity (LQG). A quantum surface is defined as a set of elementary patches of area glued together. We provide it with an extra structure of locality (nearest neighbors), thought of as induced by the whole spin network state defining the 3d bulk geometry around the quantum surface. Here, we focus on classical surface dynamics, using a spinorial description of surface degrees of freedom. We introduce two classes of dynamics, to be thought as templates for future investigation of LQG dynamics with the dynamics of quantum black holes in mind. The first defines global dynamics of the closure defect of the surface, with two basic toy models, either a dissipative dynamics relaxing towards the closure constraint or a Hamiltonian dynamics precessing the closure defect. The second class of dynamics describes the isolated regime, when both area and closure defect are conserved throughout the evolution. The surface dynamics is implemented through U (N ) transformations and generalizes to a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian with a local quadratic potential interaction. We briefly discuss the implications of modeling the quantum black hole dynamics by a surface Bose-Hubbard model.

  19. The synthesis of PdPt/carbon paper via surface limited redox replacement reactions for oxygen reduction reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motsoeneng, RG

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface-limited redox replacement reactions using the electrochemical atomic layer deposition (EC-ALD) technique were used to synthesize PdPt bimetallic electrocatalysts on carbon paper substrate. Electrocatalysts having different Pd:Pt ratio were...

  20. DYNAMIC DEUTERIUM ENRICHMENT IN COMETARY WATER VIA ELEY–RIDEAL REACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yunxi; Giapis, Konstantinos P., E-mail: giapis@cheme.caltech.edu [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    The deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio (D/H) in water found in the coma of Jupiter family comet (JFC) 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko was reported to be (5.3 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −4}, the highest among comets and three times the value for other JFCs with an ocean-like ratio. This discrepancy suggests the diverse origins of JFCs and clouds the issue of the origin of Earth’s oceanic water. Here we demonstrate that Eley–Rideal reactions between accelerated water ions and deuterated cometary surface analogs can lead to instantaneous deuterium enrichment in water scattered from the surface. The reaction proceeds with H{sub 2}O{sup +} abstracting adsorbed D atoms, forming an excited H{sub 2}DO* state, which dissociates subsequently to produce energetic HDO. Hydronium ions are also produced readily by the abstraction of H atoms, consistent with H{sub 3}O{sup +} detection and abundance in various comets. Experiments with water isotopologs and kinematic analysis on deuterated platinum surfaces confirmed the dynamic abstraction mechanism. The instantaneous fractionation process is independent of the surface temperature and may operate on the surface of cometary nuclei or dust grains, composed of deuterium-rich silicates and carbonaceous chondrites. The requisite energetic water ions have been detected in the coma of 67P in two populations. This dynamic fractionation process may temporarily increase the water D/H ratio, especially as the comet gets closer to the Sun. The magnitude of the effect depends on the water ion energy-flux and the deuterium content of the exposed cometary surfaces.

  1. Photogenerated carrier-induced reactions on uhv semiconductor surfaces. Technical progress report, December 15, 1989--December 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osgood, R.M. Jr.

    1992-05-28

    The objective for this experimental work was to examine the reaction mechanisms, half-collision dynamics, and other optically induced chemical effects, that are operable on a well characterized single-crystal semiconductor surface. Of particular interest were reactions induced by charge transfer from the semiconductor surface including hot carrier and thermalized carrier processes. The primary technique to measure the desorbed fragment translational energies was time-of-flight mass-spectroscopy, used in conjunction with a pulsed tunable laser source. The work was carried out in ultrahigh vacuum, thus other surface spectroscopies such as temperature-programmed desorption, (TPD), (LEED), etc. were used as needed. In the project, the photoreactions of several halogen-containing molecules on GaAs(110) surfaces have been investigated. The studies have made the first observations of several new photochemical processes on uhv prepared surfaces including intermolecular charge transfer; desorption by thermal-carrier-induced reactions (including the measurement of coverage-dependent changes in the translational energies of the desorbed products); interferometric oscillation of photoinduced reactions; and self-quenching of thermal carrier reactions on surfaces.

  2. Stochastic surface walking reaction sampling for resolving heterogeneous catalytic reaction network: A revisit to the mechanism of water-gas shift reaction on Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jie; Shang, Cheng; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2017-10-01

    Heterogeneous catalytic reactions on surface and interfaces are renowned for ample intermediate adsorbates and complex reaction networks. The common practice to reveal the reaction mechanism is via theoretical computation, which locates all likely transition states based on the pre-guessed reaction mechanism. Here we develop a new theoretical method, namely, stochastic surface walking (SSW)-Cat method, to resolve the lowest energy reaction pathway of heterogeneous catalytic reactions, which combines our recently developed SSW global structure optimization and SSW reaction sampling. The SSW-Cat is automated and massively parallel, taking a rough reaction pattern as input to guide reaction search. We present the detailed algorithm, discuss the key features, and demonstrate the efficiency in a model catalytic reaction, water-gas shift reaction on Cu(111) (CO + H2O → CO2 + H2). The SSW-Cat simulation shows that water dissociation is the rate-determining step and formic acid (HCOOH) is the kinetically favorable product, instead of the observed final products, CO2 and H2. It implies that CO2 and H2 are secondary products from further decomposition of HCOOH at high temperatures. Being a general purpose tool for reaction prediction, the SSW-Cat may be utilized for rational catalyst design via large-scale computations.

  3. Effect of vibrational excitation on the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.L.

    1981-11-01

    A new experimental technique for the study of vibrational effects on ion-molecule reaction cross sections is described. Vibrational and collision energy dependent cross sections are presented for proton and H atom transfer, charge transfer and collision induced dissociation reactions in various isotopic H 2 + + H 2 systems. Charge and proton transfer cross sections are presented for the reactions of H 2 + and D 2 + with Ar, N 2 , CO, and O 2 . All the reactions are shown to be highly influenced by avoided crossings between the ground and first excited potential energy surfaces. Because of the nature of the crossings, vibrational motion of the systems can cause both adiabatic and non-adiabatic behavior of the system. This makes the vibrational dependences of the various cross sections a very sensitive probe of the dynamics of the collisions particularly, their behavior in the region of the crossings. Evidence is seen for charge transfer between reagents as they approach each other, transition to and in some cases reactions on excited potential energy surfaces, competition between different channels, and strong coupling of proton and charge transfer channels which occurs only for two of the systems studied (H 2 + + Ar, N 2 ). Oscillatory structure is observed in the collision energy dependence of the endoergic H 2 + (v = 0) + Ar charge transfer reaction for the first time, and a simple model which is commonly used for atom-atom charge transfer is used to fit the peaks. Finally a simple model is used to assess the importance of energy resonance and Franck-Condon effects on molecular charge transfer

  4. The dynamics and structures of adsorbed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, M.; Ellenson, W.D.; McTague, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    This article reviews neutron scattering work performed on films of simple gas atoms and molecules adsorbed primarily on graphite surfaces. Exfoliated graphite substrates such as Grafoil were first used in this kind of measurements about five years ago and new results have been reported at an increasing pace. Elastic neutron diffraction measurements, determining the two-dimensional structural ordering of the adsorbed films, have been performed on layers of N 2 , Ar, H 2 , D 2 , O 2 , Kr, and He. Measurements on layers of larger molecules such as CD 4 and ND 3 have been reported very recently. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements, studying the dynamics of the adsorbed films are only possible in a few especially favourable cases such as 36 Ar and D 2 films, where the coherent phonon scattering cross-sections are very large. In other cases incoherent scattering from hydrogen can give information about e.g. the mobility of molecules such as NH 3 or the internal modes of adsorbed molecules such as C 4 H 10 . Neutron scattering measurements where substrates other than graphite products are used as the adsorbents will not be reviewed here. However, the power of the technique will be demonstrated in an example of H 2 physisorbed to activated alumina and in an example where hydrogen is chemisorbed to Raney nickel. (author)

  5. Poly(lactic acid) Polymer Brushes as Dynamic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Le Bo

    Degradable Poly(lactic acid), PLA, polymer brushes, were prepared to use as a temporary protective layer on a substrate. The PLA brushes degraded under basic conditions, which distinguished from bulk PLA, as well as PLA oligomer. The underlying substrate was able to be exposed with the removal of PLA brushes, resulting in a dynamic behavior. PLA brushes were grafted from silicon and gold substrates through surface initiated ring opening polymerization, ROP, of lactide catalyzed by tin octoate. The surface silanol groups on silicon and hydroxyl-terminated thiol self-assembled monolayers, SAMs, on gold were used as immobilized initiators for the surface initiated polymerization. The surface silanol groups worked equally well as the alcohol species to serve as initiator for the ROP of lactide. Synthesis conditions, such as temperature, monomer concentration and the type of catalyst and solvent, were explored to pursue the maximum brush thickness and well controlled growth on the surface. It was highlighted the different optimized synthesis conditions between the ROP in solution and the surface initiated ROP due to the equilibrium behavior of ROP. Both molecular weight and monomer conversion were considered in solution ROP. However, monomer conversion was not that important for surface ROP given merely trace amount of polymer was grafted on the surface as brushes. It was also demonstrated that the thickness of PLA brush could be tuned by varying either growth time or grafting density. The PLA brushes with a gradient thickness were prepared by gradually filling a reaction container with reactive solution. PLA brushes were able to be removed by immersing them in basic aqueous solution. The degradation of PLA brushes was found to be unique. Bulk PLA degraded under acidic conditions. The degradation of PLA oligomer occurred under both acidic and basic conditions. While the PLA brushes only degraded under basic conditions. The base-catalyzed degradation suggests the

  6. Pd-catalyzed coupling reaction on the organic monolayer: Sonogashira reaction on the silicon (1 1 1) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Mengnan; Zhang Yuan; He Jinmei; Cao Xiaoping; Zhang Junyan

    2008-01-01

    Iodophenyl-terminated organic monolayers were prepared by thermally induced hydrosilylation on hydrogen-terminated silicon (1 1 1) surfaces. The films were characterized by ellipsometry, contact-angle goniometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). To modify the surface chemistry and the structure of the monolayers, the Sonogashira coupling reaction was performed on the as-prepared monolayers. The iodophenyl groups on the film surfaces reacted with 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene or the 1-chloro-4-ethynylbenzene under the standard Sonogashira reaction conditions for attaching conjugated molecules via the formation of C-C bonds. It is expected that this surface coupling reaction will present a new method to modify the surface chemistry and the structure of monolayers

  7. Nicotiana tabacum as model for ozone - plant surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain; Canaval, Eva; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. The ensuing injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through the stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. A striking question of current research is the environment and plant specific partitioning of ozone loss between gas phase, stomatal or plant surface sink terms. Here we show results from ozone fumigation experiments using various Nicotiana Tabacum varieties, whose surfaces are covered with different amounts of unsaturated diterpenoids exuded by their glandular trichomes. Exposure to elevated ozone levels (50 to 150 ppbv) for 5 to 15 hours in an exceptionally clean cuvette system did neither result in a reduction of photosynthesis nor caused any visible leaf damage. Both these ozone induced stress effects have been observed previously in ozone fumigation experiments with the ozone sensitive tobacco line Bel-W3. In our case ozone fumigation was accompanied by a continuous release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be clearly associated to their condensed phase precursors for the first time. Gas phase reactions of ozone were avoided by choosing a high enough gas exchange rate of the plant cuvette system. In the case of the Ambalema variety, that is known to exude only the diterpenoid cis-abienol, ozone fumigation experiments yield the volatiles formaldehyde and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK). The latter could be unequivocally separated from isomeric methacrolein (MACR) by the aid of a Selective Reagent Ion Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SRI-ToF-MS), which was switched every six minutes from H3O+ to NO+ primary ion mode and vice versa. Consistent with the picture of an ozone protection mechanism caused by reactive diterpenoids at the leaf surface are the results from dark-light experiments. The ozone loss obtained from the

  8. Dynamic Model of Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Process Based on Multizone Reaction Kinetics: Modeling of Decarburization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Bapin Kumar; Brooks, Geoffrey; Akbar Rhamdhani, M.; Li, Zushu; Schrama, Frank N. H.; Overbosch, Aart

    2018-03-01

    In a previous study by the authors (Rout et al. in Metall Mater Trans B 49:537-557, 2018), a dynamic model for the BOF, employing the concept of multizone kinetics was developed. In the current study, the kinetics of decarburization reaction is investigated. The jet impact and slag-metal emulsion zones were identified to be primary zones for carbon oxidation. The dynamic parameters in the rate equation of decarburization such as residence time of metal drops in the emulsion, interfacial area evolution, initial size, and the effects of surface-active oxides have been included in the kinetic rate equation of the metal droplet. A modified mass-transfer coefficient based on the ideal Langmuir adsorption equilibrium has been proposed to take into account the surface blockage effects of SiO2 and P2O5 in slag on the decarburization kinetics of a metal droplet in the emulsion. Further, a size distribution function has been included in the rate equation to evaluate the effect of droplet size on reaction kinetics. The mathematical simulation indicates that decarburization of the droplet in the emulsion is a strong function of the initial size and residence time. A modified droplet generation rate proposed previously by the authors has been used to estimate the total decarburization rate by slag-metal emulsion. The model's prediction shows that about 76 pct of total carbon is removed by reactions in the emulsion, and the remaining is removed by reactions at the jet impact zone. The predicted bath carbon by the model has been found to be in good agreement with the industrially measured data.

  9. Identifying Enclosed Chemical Reaction and Dynamics at the Molecular Level Using Shell-Isolated Miniaturized Plasmonic Liquid Marble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuemei; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Lee, Yih Hong; Hao, Wei; Liu, Yejing; Phang, In Yee; Li, Shuzhou; Ling, Xing Yi

    2016-04-21

    Current microscale tracking of chemical kinetics is limited to destructive ex situ methods. Here we utilize Ag nanocube-based plasmonic liquid marble (PLM) microreactor for in situ molecular-level identification of reaction dynamics. We exploit the ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) capability imparted by the plasmonic shell to unravel the mechanism and kinetics of aryl-diazonium surface grafting reaction in situ, using just a 2-μL reaction droplet. This reaction is a robust approach to generate covalently functionalized metallic surfaces, yet its kinetics remain unknown to date. Experiments and simulations jointly uncover a two-step sequential grafting process. An initial Langmuir chemisorption of sulfonicbenzene diazonium (dSB) salt onto Ag surfaces forms an intermediate sulfonicbenzene monolayer (Ag-SB), followed by subsequent autocatalytic multilayer growth of Ag-SB3. Kinetic rate constants reveal 19-fold faster chemisorption than multilayer growth. Our ability to precisely decipher molecular-level reaction dynamics creates opportunities to develop more efficient processes in synthetic chemistry and nanotechnology.

  10. Reliable and efficient reaction path and transition state finding for surface reactions with the growing string method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mina; Zimmerman, Paul M

    2017-04-15

    The computational challenge of fast and reliable transition state and reaction path optimization requires new methodological strategies to maintain low cost, high accuracy, and systematic searching capabilities. The growing string method using internal coordinates has proven to be highly effective for the study of molecular, gas phase reactions, but difficulties in choosing a suitable coordinate system for periodic systems has prevented its use for surface chemistry. New developments are therefore needed, and presented herein, to handle surface reactions which include atoms with large coordination numbers that cannot be treated using standard internal coordinates. The double-ended and single-ended growing string methods are implemented using a hybrid coordinate system, then benchmarked for a test set of 43 elementary reactions occurring on surfaces. These results show that the growing string method is at least 45% faster than the widely used climbing image-nudged elastic band method, which also fails to converge in several of the test cases. Additionally, the surface growing string method has a unique single-ended search method which can move outward from an initial structure to find the intermediates, transition states, and reaction paths simultaneously. This powerful explorative feature of single ended-growing string method is demonstrated to uncover, for the first time, the mechanism for atomic layer deposition of TiN on Cu(111) surface. This reaction is found to proceed through multiple hydrogen-transfer and ligand-exchange events, while formation of H-bonds stabilizes intermediates of the reaction. Purging gaseous products out of the reaction environment is the driving force for these reactions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effect of surface modification and hybridization on dynamic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The paper evaluates effect of fibre surface modification and hybridization on dynamic mechanical properties of Roystonea regia/epoxy composites. Surface modification involved alkali and silane treatments. Alkali treatment proved to be more effective on dynamic mechanical properties as compared to silane treatment.

  12. Ab initio dynamics of the cytochrome P450 hydroxylation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elenewski, Justin E.; Hackett, John C, E-mail: jchackett@vcu.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics and The Massey Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, 401 College Street, Richmond, Virginia 23219-1540 (United States)

    2015-02-14

    The iron(IV)-oxo porphyrin π-cation radical known as Compound I is the primary oxidant within the cytochromes P450, allowing these enzymes to affect the substrate hydroxylation. In the course of this reaction, a hydrogen atom is abstracted from the substrate to generate hydroxyiron(IV) porphyrin and a substrate-centered radical. The hydroxy radical then rebounds from the iron to the substrate, yielding the hydroxylated product. While Compound I has succumbed to theoretical and spectroscopic characterization, the associated hydroxyiron species is elusive as a consequence of its very short lifetime, for which there are no quantitative estimates. To ascertain the physical mechanism underlying substrate hydroxylation and probe this timescale, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations are performed for a model of Compound I catalysis. Semiclassical estimates based on these calculations reveal the hydrogen atom abstraction step to be extremely fast, kinetically comparable to enzymes such as carbonic anhydrase. Using an ensemble of ab initio simulations, the resultant hydroxyiron species is found to have a similarly short lifetime, ranging between 300 fs and 3600 fs, putatively depending on the enzyme active site architecture. The addition of tunneling corrections to these rates suggests a strong contribution from nuclear quantum effects, which should accelerate every step of substrate hydroxylation by an order of magnitude. These observations have strong implications for the detection of individual hydroxylation intermediates during P450 catalysis.

  13. Molecular Interactions and Reaction Dynamics in Supercritical Water Oxidation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnston, K

    1998-01-01

    ...:. UV-vis and fluorescence measurements of acid-base equilibria, fluorescence decay measurements of proton transfer reactions at the ns time frame, pulse radiolysis of reaction intermediates in organic...

  14. Detailed Molecular Dynamics of the Photochromic Reaction of Spiropyran: A Semiclassical Dynamics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaohong Zhai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A realistic semiclassical dynamics simulation study is reported for the photoinduced ring-opening reaction of spiropyran. The main simulation results show that one pathway involves hydrogen out-of-plane (HOOP torsion of phenyl ring nearby N atom in 254 fs on the excited state and the isomerization from cis- to trans-SP that is complete in about 10 ps on the ground state after the electron transition πσ*; the other dominate pathway corresponds to the ring-opening reaction of trans-SP to form the most stable merocyanine (MC product. Unlike the previous theoretical finding, one C−C bond cleavage on the real molecule rather than the C−N dissociation of the model one is more probable than the ring-opening reaction after the photoexcitation of SP. The simulation findings provide more important complementarity for interpreting experimental observations, confirming the previously theoretical studies of photochromic ring-opening process and even supplying other possible reaction mechanisms.

  15. Dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puli, Ramesh, E-mail: rameshpuli2000@gmail.com; Janaki Ram, G.D.

    2012-12-15

    Friction surfacing involves complex thermo-mechanical phenomena. In this study, the nature of dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L coatings was investigated using electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the alloy 316L undergoes discontinuous dynamic recrystallization under conditions of moderate Zener-Hollomon parameter during friction surfacing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L friction surfaced coatings is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfacing leads to discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain rates in friction surfacing exceed 400 s{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated grain size matches well with experimental observations in 316L coatings.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Chemical Reactions for Use in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian Xie; Tinker, Robert

    2006-01-01

    One of the simulation engines of an open-source program called the Molecular Workbench, which can simulate thermodynamics of chemical reactions, is described. This type of real-time, interactive simulation and visualization of chemical reactions at the atomic scale could help students understand the connections between chemical reaction equations…

  17. The Effectiveness of Surface Coatings on Preventing Interfacial Reaction During Ultrasonic Welding of Aluminum to Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteli, Alexandria; Robson, Joseph D.; Chen, Ying-Chun; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2013-12-01

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (USW) is a solid-state joining process that is advantageous for welding difficult dissimilar material couples, like magnesium to aluminum. USW is also a useful technique for testing methods of controlling interfacial reaction in welding as the interface is not greatly displaced by the process. However, the high strain rate deformation in USW has been found to accelerate intermetallic compound (IMC) formation and a thick Al12Mg17 and Al3Mg2 reaction layer forms after relatively short welding times. In this work, we have investigated the potential of two approaches for reducing the IMC reaction rate in dissimilar Al-Mg ultrasonic welds, both involving coatings on the Mg sheet surface to (i) separate the join line from the weld interface, using a 100- μm-thick Al cold spray coating, and (ii) provide a diffusion barrier layer, using a thin manganese physical vapor deposition (PVD) coating. Both methods were found to reduce the level of reaction and increase the failure energy of the welds, but their effectiveness was limited due to issues with coating attachment and survivability during the welding cycle. The effect of the coatings on the joint's interface microstructure, and the fracture behavior have been investigated in detail. Kinetic modeling has been used to show that the benefit of the cold spray coating can be attributed to the reaction rate reverting to that expected under static conditions. This reduces the IMC growth rate by over 50 pct because at the weld line, the high strain rate dynamic deformation in USW normally enhances diffusion through the IMC layer. In comparison, the thin PVD barrier coating was found to rapidly break up early in USW and become dispersed throughout the deformation layer reducing its effectiveness.

  18. A new dynamical layout algorithm for complex biochemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Katja; Kummer, Ursula

    2005-08-26

    To study complex biochemical reaction networks in living cells researchers more and more rely on databases and computational methods. In order to facilitate computational approaches, visualisation techniques are highly important. Biochemical reaction networks, e.g. metabolic pathways are often depicted as graphs and these graphs should be drawn dynamically to provide flexibility in the context of different data. Conventional layout algorithms are not sufficient for every kind of pathway in biochemical research. This is mainly due to certain conventions to which biochemists/biologists are used to and which are not in accordance to conventional layout algorithms. A number of approaches has been developed to improve this situation. Some of these are used in the context of biochemical databases and make more or less use of the information in these databases to aid the layout process. However, visualisation becomes also more and more important in modelling and simulation tools which mostly do not offer additional connections to databases. Therefore, layout algorithms used in these tools have to work independently of any databases. In addition, all of the existing algorithms face some limitations with respect to the number of edge crossings when it comes to larger biochemical systems due to the interconnectivity of these. Last but not least, in some cases, biochemical conventions are not met properly. Out of these reasons we have developed a new algorithm which tackles these problems by reducing the number of edge crossings in complex systems, taking further biological conventions into account to identify and visualise cycles. Furthermore the algorithm is independent from database information in order to be easily adopted in any application. It can also be tested as part of the SimWiz package (free to download for academic users at 1). The new algorithm reduces the complexity of pathways, as well as edge crossings and edge length in the resulting graphical representation

  19. A new dynamical layout algorithm for complex biochemical reaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kummer Ursula

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study complex biochemical reaction networks in living cells researchers more and more rely on databases and computational methods. In order to facilitate computational approaches, visualisation techniques are highly important. Biochemical reaction networks, e.g. metabolic pathways are often depicted as graphs and these graphs should be drawn dynamically to provide flexibility in the context of different data. Conventional layout algorithms are not sufficient for every kind of pathway in biochemical research. This is mainly due to certain conventions to which biochemists/biologists are used to and which are not in accordance to conventional layout algorithms. A number of approaches has been developed to improve this situation. Some of these are used in the context of biochemical databases and make more or less use of the information in these databases to aid the layout process. However, visualisation becomes also more and more important in modelling and simulation tools which mostly do not offer additional connections to databases. Therefore, layout algorithms used in these tools have to work independently of any databases. In addition, all of the existing algorithms face some limitations with respect to the number of edge crossings when it comes to larger biochemical systems due to the interconnectivity of these. Last but not least, in some cases, biochemical conventions are not met properly. Results Out of these reasons we have developed a new algorithm which tackles these problems by reducing the number of edge crossings in complex systems, taking further biological conventions into account to identify and visualise cycles. Furthermore the algorithm is independent from database information in order to be easily adopted in any application. It can also be tested as part of the SimWiz package (free to download for academic users at 1. Conclusion The new algorithm reduces the complexity of pathways, as well as edge crossings

  20. An accurate potential energy surface for the F + H2 → HF + H reaction by the coupled-cluster method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Sun, Zhigang; Zhang, Dong H

    2015-01-14

    A three dimensional potential energy surface for the F + H2 → HF + H reaction has been computed by the spin unrestricted coupled cluster method with singles, doubles, triples, and perturbative quadruples [UCCSDT(2)Q] using the augmented correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the fluorine atom and the correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the hydrogen atom. All the calculations are based on the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock orbitals, together with the frozen core approximations, and the UCCSD(T)/complete basis set (CBS) correction term was included. The global potential energy surface was calculated by fitting the sampled ab initio points without any scaling factor for the correlation energy part using a neutral network function method. Extensive dynamics calculations have been carried out on the potential energy surface. The reaction rate constants, integral cross sections, product rotational states distribution, and forward and backward scattering as a function of collision energy of the F + HD → HF + D, F + HD → DF + H, and F + H2 reaction, were calculated by the time-independent quantum dynamics scattering theory using the new surface. The satisfactory agreement with the reported experimental observations previously demonstrates the accuracy of the new potential energy surface.

  1. Quantal Study of the Exchange Reaction for N + N2 using an ab initio Potential Energy Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dunyou; Stallcop, James R.; Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Partridge, Harry; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The N + N2 exchange rate is calculated using a time-dependent quantum dynamics method on a newly determined ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for the ground A" state. This ab initio PES shows a double barrier feature in the interaction region with the barrier height at 47.2 kcal/mol, and a shallow well between these two barriers, with the minimum at 43.7 kcal/mol. A quantum dynamics wave packet calculation has been carried out using the fitted PES to compute the cumulative reaction probability for the exchange reaction of N + N2(J=O). The J - K shift method is then employed to obtain the rate constant for this reaction. The calculated rate constant is compared with experimental data and a recent quasi-classical calculation using a LEPS PES. Significant differences are found between the present and quasiclassical results. The present rate calculation is the first accurate 3D quantal dynamics study for N + N2 reaction system and the ab initio PES reported here is the first such surface for N3.

  2. Matrix photochemistry of small molecules: Influencing reaction dynamics on electronically excited hypersurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laursen, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations of chemical reactions on electronically excited reaction surfaces are presented. The role of excited-surface multiplicity is of particular interest, as are chemical reactivity and energy transfer in systems in which photochemistry is initiated through a metal atom sensitizer.'' Two approaches are employed: A heavy-atom matrix affords access to forbidden triplet reaction surfaces, eliminating the need for a potentially reactive sensitizer. Later, the role of the metal atom in the photosensitization process is examined directly.

  3. Matrix photochemistry of small molecules: Influencing reaction dynamics on electronically excited hypersurfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laursen, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations of chemical reactions on electronically excited reaction surfaces are presented. The role of excited-surface multiplicity is of particular interest, as are chemical reactivity and energy transfer in systems in which photochemistry is initiated through a metal atom ''sensitizer.'' Two approaches are employed: A heavy-atom matrix affords access to forbidden triplet reaction surfaces, eliminating the need for a potentially reactive sensitizer. Later, the role of the metal atom in the photosensitization process is examined directly

  4. Dynamics of the reaction glucose-catalase-glucose oxidase-hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Číp, M.; Schreiberová, L.; Schreiber, I.

    2011-12-01

    Glucose-catalase-glucose oxidase-hydrogen peroxide reaction is one of the few known enzymatic systems studied in vitro in the field of nonlinear chemical dynamics. This reaction belongs to the family of oscillatory enzymatic reactions, which form a natural basis of oscillations in biological systems. A parametric study of dependence on mixing, temperature and initial concentrations of components in a batch stirred reactor was carried out. A newly proposed mathematical model of the reaction conforms to the obtained experimental data. Results of our experiments and simulations hint at further directions of research of non-linear dynamics in this reaction.

  5. Effect of surface functionalisation on the interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aysan, Ayse Beyza; Knejzlík, Zdeněk; Ulbrich, Pavel; Šoltys, Marek; Zadražil, Aleš; Štěpánek, František

    2017-05-01

    The combination of nanoparticles with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can have benefits such as easier sample handling or higher sensitivity, but also drawbacks such as loss of colloidal stability or inhibition of the PCR. The present work systematically investigates the interaction of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) with the PCR in terms of colloidal stability and potential PCR inhibition due to interaction between the PCR components and the nanoparticle surface. Several types of MIONs with and without surface functionalisation by sodium citrate, dextran and 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES) were prepared and characterised by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Colloidal stability in the presence of the PCR components was investigated both at room temperature and under PCR thermo-cycling. Dextran-stabilized MIONs show the best colloidal stability in the PCR mix at both room and elevated temperatures. Citrate- and APTES-stabilised as well as uncoated MIONs show a comparable PCR inhibition near the concentration 0.1mgml -1 while the inhibition of dextran stabilized MIONs became apparent near 0.5mgml -1 . It was demonstrated that the PCR could be effectively carried out even in the presence of elevated concentration of MIONs up to 2mgml -1 by choosing the right coating approach and supplementing the reaction mix by critical components, Taq DNA polymerase and Mg 2+ ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantitative surface analysis using deuteron-induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afarideh, Hossein

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique consists of looking at the energies of the reaction products which uniquely define the particular elements present in the sample and it analysis the yield/energy distribution to reveal depth profiles. A summary of the basic features of the nuclear reaction analysis technique is given, in particular emphasis is placed on quantitative light element determination using (d,p) and (d,alpha) reactions. The experimental apparatus is also described. Finally a set of (d,p) spectra for the elements Z=3 to Z=17 using 2 MeV incident deutrons is included together with example of more applications of the (d,alpha) spectra. (author)

  7. Energy Accommodation from Surface Catalyzed Reactions in Air Plasmas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Understanding energy transport at the gas-surface interface between catalytic/reacting surfaces exposed to highly dissociated plasmas remains a significant research...

  8. Direct Dynamics Simulation of the Thermal 3CH2 + 3O2 Reaction. Rate Constant and Product Branching Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Sandhiya; Pratihar, Subha; Machado, Francisco Bolivar Correto; Hase, William Louis

    2018-04-26

    The reaction of 3CH2 with 3O2 is of fundamental importance in combustion and the reaction is complex as a result of multiple extremely exothermic product channels. In the present study, direct dynamics simulations were performed to study the reaction on both the singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces (PESs). The simulations were performed at the UM06/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Trajectories were calculated at a temperature of 300 K and all reactive trajectories proceeded through the carbonyl oxide Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, on both the singlet and triplet PESs. The triplet surface leads to only one product channel, H2CO + O(3P), while the singlet surface leads to 8 product channels with their relative importance as: CO + H2O > CO + OH + H ~ H2CO + O(1D) > HCO + OH ~ CO2 + H2 ~ CO + H2 + O(1D) > CO2 + H + H > HCO + O(1D) + H. Reaction on the singlet PES is barrierless, consistent with experiment and the total rate constant on the singlet surface is 0.93 ± 0.22 x 10-12 cm3molecule-1s-1 in comparison to the recommended experimental rate constant of 3.3 x 10-12 cm3molecule-1s-1. The simulation product yields for the singlet PES are compared with experiment and the most significant differences are for H, CO2, and H2O. Reaction on the triplet surface is also barrierless, inconsistent with experiment. A discussion is given of the need for future calculations to address the: (1) barrier on the triplet PES for 3CH2 + 3O2 → 3CH2OO; (2) temperature dependence of the 3CH2 + 3O2 reaction rate constant and product branching ratios; and (3) possible non-RRKM dynamics of the 1CH2OO Criegee intermediate.

  9. Scaling parameters for dynamic diffusion-reaction over porous catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Herz, RK

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. The effect of diffusion resistance in porous solid catalysts on reaction rate during periodic cycling of CO concentration is shown for CO oxidation over Pt/Al 2 O 3 by numerical simulation. At some cycling frequencies, the average reaction rate during cycling is higher than the steady-state rate at the mean CO concentration, as expected for this nonlinear, reactant-inhibited reaction. In order to identify major aspects of dy...

  10. Physical Chemistry of Reaction Dynamics in Ionic Liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroncelli, Mark [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2016-10-02

    Work completed over the past year mainly involves finishing studies related to solvation dynamics in ionic liquids, amplifying and extending our initial PFG-NMR work on solute diffusion, and learning how to probe rotational dynamics in ionic liquids.

  11. Nonlinear dynamical effects on reaction rates in thermally fluctuating environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2010-07-21

    A framework to calculate the rate constants of condensed phase chemical reactions of manybody systems is presented without relying on the concept of transition state. The theory is based on a framework we developed recently adopting a multidimensional underdamped Langevin equation in the region of a rank-one saddle. The theory provides a reaction coordinate expressed as an analytical nonlinear functional of the position coordinates and velocities of the system (solute), the friction constants, and the random force of the environment (solvent). Up to moderately high temperature, the sign of the reaction coordinate can determine the final destination of the reaction in a thermally fluctuating media, irrespective of what values the other (nonreactive) coordinates may take. In this paper, it is shown that the reaction probability is analytically derived as the probability of the reaction coordinate being positive, and that the integration with the Boltzmann distribution of the initial conditions leads to the exact reaction rate constant when the local equilibrium holds and the quantum effect is negligible. Because of analytical nature of the theory taking into account all nonlinear effects and their combination with fluctuation and dissipation, the theory naturally provides us with the firm mathematical foundation of the origin of the reactivity of the reaction in a fluctuating media.

  12. The Dynamics of Chemical Reactions: Atomistic Visualizations of Organic Reactions, and Homage to van 't Hoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongyue; Houk, K N

    2018-03-15

    Jacobus Henricus van 't Hoff was the first Nobel Laureate in Chemistry. He pioneered in the study of chemical dynamics, which referred at that time to chemical kinetics and thermodynamics. The term has evolved in modern times to refer to the exploration of chemical transformations in a time-resolved fashion. Chemical dynamics has been driven by the development of molecular dynamics trajectory simulations, which provide atomic visualization of chemical processes and illuminate how dynamic effects influence chemical reactivity and selectivity. In homage to the legend of van 't Hoff, we review the development of the chemical dynamics of organic reactions, our area of research. We then discuss our trajectory simulations of pericyclic reactions, and our development of dynamic criteria for concerted and stepwise reaction mechanisms. We also describe a method that we call environment-perturbed transition state sampling, which enables trajectory simulations in condensed-media using quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM). We apply the method to reactions in solvent and in enzyme. Jacobus Henricus van 't Hoff (1852, Rotterdam-1911, Berlin) received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1901 "in recognition of the extraordinary services he has rendered by the discovery of the laws of chemical dynamics and osmotic pressure in solutions". van 't Hoff was born the Netherlands, and earned his doctorate in Utrecht in 1874. In 1896 he moved to Berlin, where he was offered a position with more research and less teaching. van 't Hoff is considered one of the founders of physical chemistry. A key step in establishing this new field was the start of Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie in 1887. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Stochastic modeling and simulation of reaction-diffusion system with Hill function dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minghan; Li, Fei; Wang, Shuo; Cao, Young

    2017-03-14

    Stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems presents great challenges for spatiotemporal biological modeling and simulation. One widely used framework for stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems is reaction diffusion master equation (RDME). Previous studies have discovered that for the RDME, when discretization size approaches zero, reaction time for bimolecular reactions in high dimensional domains tends to infinity. In this paper, we demonstrate that in the 1D domain, highly nonlinear reaction dynamics given by Hill function may also have dramatic change when discretization size is smaller than a critical value. Moreover, we discuss methods to avoid this problem: smoothing over space, fixed length smoothing over space and a hybrid method. Our analysis reveals that the switch-like Hill dynamics reduces to a linear function of discretization size when the discretization size is small enough. The three proposed methods could correctly (under certain precision) simulate Hill function dynamics in the microscopic RDME system.

  14. Theoretical study of dynamics for the abstraction reaction H' + HBr(v=0, j=0) --> H'H + Br.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenqin; Cong, Shulin; Zhang, Cuihua; Xu, Xuesong; Chen, Maodu

    2009-04-23

    Theoretical studies of the dynamics of the abstraction reaction, H' + HBr (v=0,j=0) --> H'H + Br, have been performed with quasiclassical trajectory method (QCT) on a new ab initio potential energy surface (Y. Kurosaki and T. Takayanagi, private communication). The calculated QCT cross sections are in good agreement with earlier quantum wave packet results over most of the collision energy range from 0.1 to 2.6 eV, and the state-resolved rotational distributions of the product H'H molecule are quantitatively consistent with the experimental results. Comparisons of the QCT-calculated rotational-state-resolved cross sections on different potential energy surfaces show that the characteristics of the potential energy surface in the region far away from the minimum energy path have a large influence on the title abstraction reaction dynamics, and the indirect reactions that do not follow the minimum energy path have little influence on the differential cross sections (DCS). The DCSs are mainly governed by the direct reactions that do follow the minimum energy path, at both low and high collision energies. The degree of the rotational alignment of the product H'H molecule is strong at high collision energies, which means that the influence of the indirect reactions on the product rotational alignment is negligible, whereas the distribution of P(varphi(r)) is sensitive to the indirect reactions at high collision energies. With increasing collision energy, the polarization of the product rotational angular momentum decreases and the molecular rotation of the product prefers an in-plane reaction mechanism rather than the out-of-plane mechanism.

  15. Performing chemical reactions in virtual capillary of surface tension ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article, we report for the first time the performance of a few common laboratory chemical reactions inside such capillaries of STCM. The substrate is of glass slides with lines of ink of permanent marker pen (colored) or clear nail polish. Two such slides placed one against the other and separated by a spacer makes the.

  16. Performing chemical reactions in virtual capillary of surface tension ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The flow paths were fabricated by making parallel lines using permanent marker pen ink or other polymer on glass surfaces. Two mirror image patterned glass plates were then sandwiched one on top of the other, separated by a thin gap - created using a spacer. The aqueous liquid moves between the surfaces by capillary ...

  17. 2013 Chemical reactions at surfaces. Surfaces in Energy and the Environment. Gordon Research Conference and Gordon Research Seminar (April 28 - May 3, 2013 - Les Diablerets, Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stair, Peter C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2013-02-03

    presentations on chemistry at solid and liquid surfaces of relevance to catalysis, synthesis, photochemistry, environmental science, and tribology. Topics include: Fundamental Surface Chemistry; Catalysis; Solid Liquid and Aerosol Interfaces; Surface Photochemistry; Synthesis of Surfaces; Environmental Interfaces; Hot Topics in Surface Chemical Reactions; Tribology; Gas-Surface Scattering and Reactions; Novel Materials and Environments.

  18. Global dynamics and transition state theories: Comparative study of reaction rate constants for gas-phase chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Li-Ping; Han, Ke-Li; Zhang, John Z H

    2009-01-30

    In this review article, we present a systematic comparison of the theoretical rate constants for a range of bimolecular reactions that are calculated by using three different classes of theoretical methods: quantum dynamics (QD), quasi-classical trajectory (QCT), and transition state theory (TST) approaches. The study shows that the difference of rate constants between TST results and those of the global dynamics methods (QD and QCT) are seen to be related to a number of factors including the number of degrees-of-freedom (DOF), the density of states at transition state (TS), etc. For reactions with more DOF and higher density of states at the TS, it is found that the rate constants from TST calculations are systematically higher than those obtained from global dynamics calculations, indicating large recrossing effect for these systems. The physical insight of this phenomenon is elucidated in the present review. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Exciton model and quantum molecular dynamics in inclusive nucleon-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, Riccardo; Pomp, Stephan; Watanabe, Yukinobu

    2011-01-01

    We compared inclusive nucleon-induced reactions with two-component exciton model calculations and Kalbach systematics; these successfully describe the production of protons, whereas fail to reproduce the emission of composite particles, generally overestimating it. We show that the Kalbach phenomenological model needs to be revised for energies above 90 MeV; agreement improves introducing a new energy dependence for direct-like mechanisms described by the Kalbach model. Our revised model calculations suggest multiple preequilibrium emission of light charged particles. We have also compared recent neutron-induced data with quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) calculations complemented by the surface coalescence model (SCM); we observed that the SCM improves the predictive power of QMD. (author)

  20. Accelerating Calculations of Reaction Dissipative Particle Dynamics in LAMMPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-17

    the baseline performance. This level of acceleration enables the use of higher fidelity reaction mechanisms, which have a broader modeling...computationally taxing and routinely require tracking O(107-8) CG particles to examine microstructural heterogeneities. Thus, the primary goal of...Therefore, the 45S201R mechanism, even incomplete, is representative of higher fidelity reaction mechanisms and is suitable for gauging the performance

  1. High-pressure catalytic reactions over single-crystal metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, JoséA.; Wayne Goodman, D.

    1991-11-01

    Studies dealing with high-pressure catalytic reactions over single-crystal surfaces are reviewed. The coupling of an apparatus for the measurement of reaction kinetics at elevated pressures with an ultrahigh vacuum system for surface analysis allows detailed study of structure sensitivity, the effects of promoters and inhibitors on catalytic activity, and, in certain cases, identification of reaction intermediates by post-reaction surface analysis. Examples are provided which demonstrate the relevance of single-crystal studies for modeling the behaviour of high-surface-area supported catalysts. Studies of CO methanation and CO oxidation over single-crystal surfaces provide convincing evidence that these reactions are structure insensitive. For structure-sensitive reactions (ammonia synthesis, alkane hydrogenolysis, alkane isomerization, water-gas shift reaction, etc.) model single-crystal studies allow correlations to be established between surface structure and catalytic activity. The effects of both electronegative (S and P) and electropositive (alkali metals) impurities upon the catalytic activity of metal single crystals for ammonia synthesis, CO methanation, alkane hydrogenolysis, ethylene epoxidation and water-gas shift are discussed. The roles of "ensemble" and "ligand" effects in bimetallic catalysts are examined in light of data obtained using surfaces prepared by vapor-depositing one metal onto a crystal face of a dissimilar metal.

  2. Efficient and Adaptive Methods for Computing Accurate Potential Surfaces for Quantum Nuclear Effects: Applications to Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGregorio, Nicole; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2018-01-09

    We present two sampling measures to gauge critical regions of potential energy surfaces. These sampling measures employ (a) the instantaneous quantum wavepacket density, an approximation to the (b) potential surface, its (c) gradients, and (d) a Shannon information theory based expression that estimates the local entropy associated with the quantum wavepacket. These four criteria together enable a directed sampling of potential surfaces that appears to correctly describe the local oscillation frequencies, or the local Nyquist frequency, of a potential surface. The sampling functions are then utilized to derive a tessellation scheme that discretizes the multidimensional space to enable efficient sampling of potential surfaces. The sampled potential surface is then combined with four different interpolation procedures, namely, (a) local Hermite curve interpolation, (b) low-pass filtered Lagrange interpolation, (c) the monomial symmetrization approximation (MSA) developed by Bowman and co-workers, and (d) a modified Shepard algorithm. The sampling procedure and the fitting schemes are used to compute (a) potential surfaces in highly anharmonic hydrogen-bonded systems and (b) study hydrogen-transfer reactions in biogenic volatile organic compounds (isoprene) where the transferring hydrogen atom is found to demonstrate critical quantum nuclear effects. In the case of isoprene, the algorithm discussed here is used to derive multidimensional potential surfaces along a hydrogen-transfer reaction path to gauge the effect of quantum-nuclear degrees of freedom on the hydrogen-transfer process. Based on the decreased computational effort, facilitated by the optimal sampling of the potential surfaces through the use of sampling functions discussed here, and the accuracy of the associated potential surfaces, we believe the method will find great utility in the study of quantum nuclear dynamics problems, of which application to hydrogen-transfer reactions and hydrogen

  3. Laser Induced Reaction for Prebond Surface Preparation of Aluminum Alloys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rotel, M

    1994-01-01

    .... These adhesives are normally used in bonding and repairing processes for aerospace application. Surface treatment for bonding Al adherends with structural adhesives involve the sue of harsh chemicals such as acids bases and organic solvents...

  4. Fundamental Studies of Diamond Growth and Surface Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    deposition ( PACVD ) have been observed as a function of growth temperature, substrate identity and surface condition. Our highest microwave PACVD growth...The rate of growth of PACVD diamond films is intimately tied to the availability of low energy growth sites. Such low energy sites will be associated...oriented diamond film. m Fig. I Scanning electron micrograph of a random polycrystalline diamond film surface grown at 1000°C by micro- wave PACVD

  5. Reaction chemistry and ligand exchange at cadmium selenide nanocrystal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Jonathan; Park, Jungwon; Trudeau, Paul-Emile; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-02

    Chemical modification of nanocrystal surfaces is fundamentally important to their assembly, their implementation in biology and medicine, and greatly impacts their electrical and optical properties. However, it remains a major challenge owing to a lack of analytical tools to directly determine nanoparticle surface structure. Early nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (1) and tri-n-octylphosphine (2), suggested these coordinating solvents are datively bound to the particle surface. However, assigning the broad NMR resonances of surface-bound ligands is complicated by significant concentrations of phosphorus-containing impurities in commercial sources of 1, and XPS provides only limited information about the nature of the phosphorus containing molecules in the sample. More recent reports have shown the surface ligands of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in technical grade 1, and in the presence of alkylphosphonic acids, include phosphonic and phosphinic acids. These studies do not, however, distinguish whether these ligands are bound datively, as neutral, L-type ligands, or by X-type interaction of an anionic phosphonate/phosphinate moiety with a surface Cd{sup 2+} ion. Answering this question would help clarify why ligand exchange with such particles does not proceed generally as expected based on a L-type ligand model. By using reagents with reactive silicon-chalcogen and silicon-chlorine bonds to cleave the ligands from the nanocrystal surface, we show that our CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystal surfaces are likely terminated by X-type binding of alkylphosphonate ligands to a layer of Cd{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} ions, rather than by dative interactions. Further, we provide spectroscopic evidence that 1 and 2 are not coordinated to our purified nanocrystals.

  6. QUANTUM SIMULATION OF REACTION DYNAMICS BY DENSITY-MATRIX EVOLUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BERENDSEN, HJC; MAVRI, J

    1993-01-01

    A density matrix evolution(DME) method to simulate the dynamics of quantum systems embedded in a classical environment is presented. The method is applicable when the quantum dynamical degrees of freedom can be described in a Hilbert space of limited dimensionality. The method is applied to the case

  7. Riemann Surfaces: Vector Bundles, Physics, and Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikander, Shehryar

    We construct quantum representation of a subgroup of the mapping class group of a genus two surface. Our construction relies on realizing this subgroup as the orbifold fundamental group of a Teichmueller curve, pulling back the Hitchin connection to this Tecihmueller curve, and computing the mono...

  8. Olefin metathesis reaction on GaN (0 0 0 1) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowski, Matthew S.; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2011-01-01

    Proof-of-concept reactions were performed on GaN (0 0 0 1) surfaces to demonstrate surface termination with desired chemical groups using an olefin cross-metathesis reaction. To prepare the GaN surfaces for olefin metathesis, the surfaces were hydrogen terminated with hydrogen plasma, chlorine terminated with phosphorous pentachloride, and then terminated with an alkene group via a Grignard reaction. The olefin metathesis reaction then bound 7-bromo-1-heptene. The modified surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, and water contact angle measurements following each step in the reaction scheme. The XPS data was used to qualitatively identify surface chemical species and to quantitatively determine molecular surface coverage. The bromine atom in 7-bromo-1-heptene served as a heteroatom for identification with XPS. The reaction scheme resulted in GaN substrates with a surface coverage of 0.10 monolayers and excellent stability towards oxidation when exposed to oxygen plasma.

  9. Olefin metathesis reaction on GaN (0 0 0 1) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowski, Matthew S. [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y. [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Ivanisevic, Albena, E-mail: albena@purdue.edu [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Proof-of-concept reactions were performed on GaN (0 0 0 1) surfaces to demonstrate surface termination with desired chemical groups using an olefin cross-metathesis reaction. To prepare the GaN surfaces for olefin metathesis, the surfaces were hydrogen terminated with hydrogen plasma, chlorine terminated with phosphorous pentachloride, and then terminated with an alkene group via a Grignard reaction. The olefin metathesis reaction then bound 7-bromo-1-heptene. The modified surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, and water contact angle measurements following each step in the reaction scheme. The XPS data was used to qualitatively identify surface chemical species and to quantitatively determine molecular surface coverage. The bromine atom in 7-bromo-1-heptene served as a heteroatom for identification with XPS. The reaction scheme resulted in GaN substrates with a surface coverage of 0.10 monolayers and excellent stability towards oxidation when exposed to oxygen plasma.

  10. Sperm cell surface dynamics during activation and fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerke, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304822922

    2013-01-01

    Before the sperm cell can reach the oocyte it needs to be activated and to undergo a series of preparative steps. The sperm surface dynamics was studied in relation to this activation process and the modifications and removal of sperm surface components havebeen investigated. Bicarbonate-induced

  11. CF3+ etching silicon surface: A molecular dynamics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, C.; Lu, X.; He, P.; Zhang, P.; Sun, W.; Zhang, Jingwei; Chen, F.; Gou, F.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a molecular dynamics simulation method has been employed to investigate CF3 + ions, bombarding Si surface with the energy of 100, 200, 300 and 400 eV and an incident angle of 45 degrees with respect to the normal. The simulation results show that when CF3+ ions approach the Si surface

  12. Dynamic characteristics of numerical systems for induction surface heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozulina, T.; Blinov, K.; Galunin, S.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the development, investigation and optimization of induction surface heating process of a workpice taking into account its rotation by numerical simulation in a commercial package ANSYS® [1]. During the investigation it is necessary to select the optimal dynamic characteristics of the heating process in order to obtain the required temperature level and uniform temperature distribution on the surface of the workpiece.

  13. Dynamic surface properties of poly(methylalkyldiallylammonium chloride) solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novikova, A. A.; Vlasov, P. S.; Lin, S.-Y.; Sedláková, Zdeňka; Noskov, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 80, November (2017), s. 122-127 ISSN 1876-1070 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polymer solutions * dynamic surface tension * dilational surface rheology Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 4.217, year: 2016

  14. Time-resolved imaging of purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockett, Paul; Bisgaard, Christer Z.; Clarkin, Owen J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions are manifestations of the dynamics of molecular valence electrons and their couplings to atomic motions. Emerging methods in attosecond science can probe purely electronic dynamics in atomic and molecular systems(1-6). By contrast, time-resolved structural-dynamics methods......,17): in both cases, this sensitivity derives from the ionization-matrix element(18,19). Here we demonstrate a time-resolved molecular-frame photoelectron-angular-distribution (TRMFPAD) method for imaging the purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction. Specifically, the TRMFPADs measured during...

  15. Bulk water freezing dynamics on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, S.; Carpenter, J.; Nallapaneni, M.; Chen, J. Y.; Miljkovic, N.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we elucidate the mechanisms governing the heat-transfer mediated, non-thermodynamic limited, freezing delay on non-wetting surfaces for a variety of characteristic length scales, Lc (volume/surface area, 3 mm commercial superhydrophobic spray coatings, showing a monotonic increase in freezing time with coating thickness. The added thermal resistance of thicker coatings was much larger than that of the nanoscale superhydrophobic features, which reduced the droplet heat transfer and increased the total freezing time. Transient finite element method heat transfer simulations of the water slab freezing process were performed to calculate the overall heat transfer coefficient at the substrate-water/ice interface during freezing, and shown to be in the range of 1-2.5 kW/m2K for these experiments. The results shown here suggest that in order to exploit the heat-transfer mediated freezing delay, thicker superhydrophobic coatings must be deposited on the surface, where the coating resistance is comparable to the bulk water/ice conduction resistance.

  16. Dynamic interactions of Leidenfrost droplets on liquid metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yujie; Liu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Leidenfrost dynamic interaction effects of the isopentane droplets on the surface of heated liquid metal were disclosed. Unlike conventional rigid metal, such conductive and deformable liquid metal surface enables the levitating droplets to demonstrate rather abundant and complex dynamics. The Leidenfrost droplets at different diameters present diverse morphologies and behaviors like rotation and oscillation. Depending on the distance between the evaporating droplets, they attract and repulse each other through the curved surfaces beneath them and their vapor flows. With high boiling point up to 2000 °C, liquid metal offers a unique platform for testing the evaporating properties of a wide variety of liquid even solid.

  17. Dynamical analysis on heavy-ion fusion reactions near Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhaoqing; Jin Genming; Zhang Fengshou

    2008-01-01

    The shell correction is proposed in the improved isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model, which plays an important role in heavy-ion fusion reactions near Coulomb barrier. By using the ImIQMD model, the static and dynamical fusion barriers, dynamical barrier distribution in the fusion reactions are analyzed systematically. The fusion and capture excitation functions for a series of reaction systems are calculated and compared with experimental data. It is found that the fusion cross sections for neutron-rich systems increase obviously, and the strong shell effects of two colliding nuclei result in a decrease of the fusion cross sections at the sub-barrier energies. The lowering of the dynamical fusion barriers favors the enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross sections, which is related to the nucleon transfer and the neck formation in the fusion reactions

  18. Generalized Temporal Acceleration Scheme for Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Surface Catalytic Processes by Scaling the Rates of Fast Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybeck, Eric C; Plaisance, Craig P; Neurock, Matthew

    2017-04-11

    A novel algorithm is presented that achieves temporal acceleration during kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of surface catalytic processes. This algorithm allows for the direct simulation of reaction networks containing kinetic processes occurring on vastly disparate time scales which computationally overburden standard KMC methods. Previously developed methods for temporal acceleration in KMC were designed for specific systems and often require a priori information from the user such as identifying the fast and slow processes. In the approach presented herein, quasi-equilibrated processes are identified automatically based on previous executions of the forward and reverse reactions. Temporal acceleration is achieved by automatically scaling the intrinsic rate constants of the quasi-equilibrated processes, bringing their rates closer to the time scales of the slow kinetically relevant nonequilibrated processes. All reactions are still simulated directly, although with modified rate constants. Abrupt changes in the underlying dynamics of the reaction network are identified during the simulation, and the reaction rate constants are rescaled accordingly. The algorithm was utilized here to model the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reaction over ruthenium nanoparticles. This reaction network has multiple time-scale-disparate processes which would be intractable to simulate without the aid of temporal acceleration. The accelerated simulations are found to give reaction rates and selectivities indistinguishable from those calculated by an equivalent mean-field kinetic model. The computational savings of the algorithm can span many orders of magnitude in realistic systems, and the computational cost is not limited by the magnitude of the time scale disparity in the system processes. Furthermore, the algorithm has been designed in a generic fashion and can easily be applied to other surface catalytic processes of interest.

  19. Isotope yield ratios as a probe of the reaction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trautmann, W.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Lynen, U.; Mueller, W.F.J.; Rabe, H.J.; Sann, H.; Stelzer, H.; Trockel, R.; Wada, R.; Brummund, N.; Glasow, R.; Kampert, K.H.; Santo, R.; Eckert, E.M.; Pochodzalla, J.; Bock, I.; Pelte, D.

    1987-04-01

    Isotopically resolved yields of particles and complex fragments from 12 C and 18 O induced reactions on 53 Ni, 54 Ni, Ag, and 197 Au in the intermediate range of bombarding energies 30 MeV ≤ E/A ≤ 84 MeV were measured. The systematic variation of the deduced isotope yield ratios with projectile and target is used to determine the degree of N/Z equilibration achieved and to establish time scales for the reaction process. A quantum statistical model is employed in order to derive entropies of the emitting systems from the measured isotope yield ratios. (orig.)

  20. Reaction Kinetic Parameters and Surface Thermodynamic Properties of Cu2O Nanocubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cuprous oxide (Cu2O nanocubes were synthesized by reducing Cu(OH2 in the presence of sodium citrate at room temperature. The samples were characterized in detail by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and N2 absorption (BET specific surface area. The equations for acquiring reaction kinetic parameters and surface thermodynamic properties of Cu2O nanocubes were deduced by establishment of the relations between thermodynamic functions of Cu2O nanocubes and these of the bulk Cu2O. Combined with thermochemical cycle, transition state theory, basic theory of chemical thermodynamics, and in situ microcalorimetry, reaction kinetic parameters, specific surface enthalpy, specific surface Gibbs free energy, and specific surface entropy of Cu2O nanocubes were successfully determined. We also introduced a universal route for gaining reaction kinetic parameters and surface thermodynamic properties of nanomaterials.

  1. Surface reactivity and layer analysis of chemisorbed reaction films in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Studies on surface reactivity of substrate iron (Fe-particles) were made in the tribo-chemical environment of alkyl octadecenoates. Two alkyl octadecenoates namely ethyl octadecenoate and methyl. 12-hydroxy octadecenoate, slightly different in their chemical nature, were taken for preparing the chemisorbed ...

  2. Performing chemical reactions in virtual capillary of surface tension ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Two mirror image patterned glass plates were then sandwiched one on top of the other, separated by a thin gap - created using a spacer. The aqueous liquid moves between the surfaces by capillary forces, confined to the hydrophilic areas without wetting the hydrophobic lines, achieving liquid confinement without physical ...

  3. Dynamical Dipole mode in heavy-ion fusion reactions in the 192Pb mass region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parascandolo, C; Mazzocco, M; Pierroutsakou, D; Boiano, A; Alba, R; Zoppo, A Del; Maiolino, C; Santonocito, D; Agodi, C; Colonna, M; Coniglione, R; Toro, M Di; Baran, V; De Filippo, E; Emanuele, U; Farinon, F; Guglielmetti, A; Mazzocchi, C; La Commara, M; Martin, B

    2015-01-01

    The dynamical dipole mode was investigated in the mass region of the 192 Pb compound nucleus, by using the 40 Ca + 152 Sm and 48 Ca + 144 Sm reactions at E lab =11 and 10.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively. Both fusion-evaporation and fission events were studied simultaneously for the first time. Our results for evaporation and fission events (preliminary) show that the dynamical dipole mode survives in reactions involving heavier nuclei than those studied previously. (paper)

  4. Dynamical Dipole mode in heavy-ion fusion reactions in the 192Pb mass region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Alba, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.; Agodi, C.; Baran, V.; Boiano, A.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; De Filippo, E.; Di Toro, M.; Emanuele, U.; Farinon, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Martin, B.; Mazzocchi, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Rizzo, C.; Romoli, M.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Trifiró, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2015-04-01

    The dynamical dipole mode was investigated in the mass region of the 192Pb compound nucleus, by using the 40Ca + 152Sm and 48Ca + 144Sm reactions at Elab=11 and 10.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively. Both fusion-evaporation and fission events were studied simultaneously for the first time. Our results for evaporation and fission events (preliminary) show that the dynamical dipole mode survives in reactions involving heavier nuclei than those studied previously.

  5. Reactions of substituted aromatic molecules on the silicon(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutler, Sarah Kathryn

    Organic molecules possess unique physical and electronic properties that could be incorporated as components in new technologies, such as molecular electronics, biosensors and DNA chip arrays. While the properties of individual molecules often can be measured and predicted, the technological value of organic molecules for these types of applications requires the ability to understand and manipulate how physical and electronic properties are affected by bonding to a surface. Consequently, integration of organic systems with existing silicon-based technology necessitates a thorough investigation of the interfacial chemistry involved in adsorption processes. On a molecular scale, the delocalized electrons of a conjugated system could be used to carry charge from one point to another. Therefore, the interaction of pi-conjugated molecules with the technologically important Si(001) surface is of particular interest. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy were used to investigate the bonding selectivity of several model aromatic molecules. Analysis of the infrared spectra of benzene, toluene and xylene suggest that these simple aromatic molecules covalently bond with the Si(001) surface, resulting in a loss of aromaticity. Studies of aromatic rings with other, more reactive substituent groups containing sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen, iodine or carbon atoms, indicate that the majority of these molecules preferentially adsorb to the surface through the substituent group. Careful consideration of the role played by both the electron-rich substituent groups and the silicon dimers in controlling selectivity leads to new insights regarding adsorption mechanisms. This knowledge, in turn, provides a method for selecting and designing molecules that will preferentially chemisorb on the Si(001) surface in a highly predictable manner. Preliminary studies correlating the chemical identity of the

  6. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH 2 ) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  7. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing, E-mail: shisq@nwu.edu.cn; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH{sub 2}) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  8. Theoretical studies of the dynamics of chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, A.F. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Recent research effort has focussed on several reactions pertinent to combustion. The formation of the formyl radical from atomic hydrogen and carbon monoxide, recombination of alkyl radicals and halo-alkyl radicals with halogen atoms, and the thermal dissociation of hydrogen cyanide and acetylene have been studied by modeling. In addition, the inelastic collisions of NCO with helium have been investigated.

  9. Nonadiabatic quantum wave packet dynamics of the H + H2 reaction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The effect of coriolis coupling on the dynamics of H + H2 reaction is examined by calculating the initial state-selected and energy resolved reaction probabilities on the coupled manifold of its degenerate 2p (E′) ground electronic state. H3 in this state is prone to the Jahn–Teller (JT) instability and consequently the ...

  10. Reaction dynamics of inflammation proteins and T lymphocytes during radon balneotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, A.; Vulpe, B.

    1989-01-01

    During a three-week radon treatment with daily administration of baths a periodical course of reaction with antidromic dynamics of inflammation proteins and T lymphocytes could be shown. A conspicuous reaction of the organism (moment of the treatment reaction) is to be observed one week after the beginning of the treatment. At the end of the cure a decrease of the activity of inflammation as well as of individual acute-phase proteins and immunoglobulins it to be proved. (author)

  11. The Dynamics and Structures of Adsorbed Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Ellenson, W. D.; McTague, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Reviews neutron scattering work performed on films of simple gas atoms and molecules adsorbed primarily on graphite surfaces. Exfoliated graphite substrates such as Grafoil were first used in this kind of measurements about five years ago and new results have been reported at an increasing pace....... Elastic neutron diffraction measurements, determining the two-dimensional structural ordering of the adsorbed films, have been performed on layers of N2, Ar, H2, D2, O2, Kr, and He. Measurements on layers of larger molecules such as CD4 and ND3 have also been reported. Inelastic neutron scattering...... of molecules such as NH3 or the internal modes of adsorbed molecules such as C4H10. Neutron scattering measurements where substrates other than graphite products are used as the adsorbents will not be reviewed here. However, the power of the technique will be demonstrated in an example of H2 physisorbed...

  12. The Lower Extremities Exoskeleton Actuator Dynamics Research Taking into Account Support Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Vereikin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article shows high relevance of research, aimed at the robotic exoskeleton creation. It defines some problems related to the process of their designing; including a lack of power supply to provide enough autonomy, and difficulties of man-machine complex control. There is a review of literature on the walking robots with tree-like kinematic structure development. This work reflects the continuing investigations, currently conducted by the authors, and relies heavily on the results of previous works, devoted to this subject.The article presents the exoskeleton dynamics equation, taking into account the impact of external forces and torques, as well as external relations imposed. Using a model of lower extremities exoskeleton developed in SolidWorks software complex, baricentric parameters of the actuator links were found. The different types of movements, committed due to harmonic changes of generalized coordinates in exoskeleton degrees of mobility, equipped with electrohydraulic actuators, were analyzed. The laws of generalized coordinate changes in time, corresponding to the worst case loading, were found. All the necessary input data for the exoskeleton dynamics equation solution were determined.The numerical values of all components of the dynamics equation were obtained as result of the dynamics equation simulation. In this case, the exoskeleton actuator load capacity was assumed to be 50 kg. The article shows dependences of torque and power in the actuator degrees of mobility on the time, as well as a curve of total capacity of all drives both, ignoring and taking into consideration the support surface reactions. Obtained dependences are the initial data for the calculation of the drive system.The proposed method for determination of exoskeleton energy parameters allows developer to perform a prompt evaluation of various options for the actuator design in accordance with the selected criteria. As a main evaluation criterion, a minimum

  13. Early dynamics of stereoscopic surface slant perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caziot, Baptiste; Backus, Benjamin T; Lin, Esther

    2017-12-01

    Surface orientation is an important visual primitive that can be estimated from monocular or binocular (stereoscopic) signals. Changes in motor planning occur within about 200 ms after either type of signal is perturbed, but the time it takes for apparent (perceived) slant to develop from stereoscopic cues is not known. Apparent slant sometimes develops very slowly (Gillam, Chambers, & Russo, 1988; van Ee & Erkelens, 1996). However, these long durations could reflect the time it takes for the visual system to resolve conflicts between slant cues that inevitably specify different slants in laboratory displays (Allison & Howard, 2000). We used a speed-accuracy tradeoff analysis to measure the time it takes to discriminate slant, allowing us to report psychometric functions as a function of response time. Observers reported which side of a slanted surface was farther, with a temporal deadline for responding that varied block-to-block. Stereoscopic slant discrimination rose above chance starting at 200 ms after stimulus onset. Unexpectedly, observers discriminated slant from binocular disparity faster than texture, and for stereoscopic whole-field stimuli faster than stereoscopic slant contrast stimuli. However, performance after the initial deviation from chance increased more rapidly for slant-contrast stimuli than whole-field stimuli. Discrimination latencies were similar for slants about the horizontal and vertical axes, but performance increased faster for slants about the vertical axis. Finally, slant from vertical disparity was somewhat slower than slant from horizontal disparity, which may reflect cue conflict. These results demonstrate, in contradiction with the previous literature, that the perception of slant from disparity happens very quickly-in fact, more quickly than the perception of slant from texture-and in comparable time to the simple perception of brightness from luminance.

  14. Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Dynamics: Observations, Analysis and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yudong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Kumar, Sujay; Ringerud, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Land surface microwave emissivity affects remote sensing of both the atmosphere and the land surface. The dynamical behavior of microwave emissivity over a very diverse sample of land surface types is studied. With seven years of satellite measurements from AMSR-E, we identified various dynamical regimes of the land surface emission. In addition, we used two radiative transfer models (RTMs), the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and the Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform (CMEM), to simulate land surface emissivity dynamics. With both CRTM and CMEM coupled to NASA's Land Information System, global-scale land surface microwave emissivities were simulated for five years, and evaluated against AMSR-E observations. It is found that both models have successes and failures over various types of land surfaces. Among them, the desert shows the most consistent underestimates (by approx. 70-80%), due to limitations of the physical models used, and requires a revision in both systems. Other snow-free surface types exhibit various degrees of success and it is expected that parameter tuning can improve their performances.

  15. Generation of Multicomponent Molecular Cages using Simultaneous Dynamic Covalent Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drożdż, Wojciech; Bouillon, Camille; Kotras, Clément; Richeter, Sébastien; Barboiu, Mihail; Clément, Sébastien; Stefankiewicz, Artur R; Ulrich, Sébastien

    2017-12-19

    Cage compounds are very attractive structures for a wide range of applications and there is ongoing interest in finding effective ways to access such kinds of complex structures, particularly those possessing dynamic adaptive features. Here we report the accessible synthesis of new type of organic cage architectures, possessing two different dynamic bonds within one structure: hydrazones and disulfides. Implementation of three distinct functional groups (thiols, aldehydes and hydrazides) in the structure of two simple building blocks resulted in their spontaneous and selective self-assembly into aromatic cage-type architectures. These organic cages contain up to ten components linked together by twelve reversible covalent bonds. The advantage provided by the presented approach is that these cage structures can adaptively self-sort from a complex virtual mixture of polymers or macrocycles and that dynamic covalent chemistry enables their deliberate disassembly through controlled component exchange. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Resonances and reactions from mean-field dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevenson P. D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The time-dependent version of nuclear density functional theory, using functionals derived from Skyrme interactions, is able to approximately describe nuclear dynamics. We present time-dependent results of calculations of dipole resonances, concentrating on excitations of valence neutrons against a proton plus neutron core in the neutron-rich doubly-magic 132Sn nucleus, and results of collision dynamics, highlighting potential routes to ternary fusion, with the example of a collision of 48Ca+48Ca+208Pb resulting in a compound nucleus of element 120 stable against immediate fission.

  17. One-pot reaction for the preparation of biofunctionalized self-assembled monolayers on gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raigoza, Annette F.; Fies, Whitney; Lim, Amber; Onyirioha, Kristeen; Webb, Lauren J., E-mail: lwebb@cm.utexas.edu

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • One-pot synthesis of α-helical-terminated self-assembled monolayers on Au(111). • Synthesis of high density, structured, and covalently bound α-helices on Au(111). • Characterization by surface-averaged and single molecule techniques. • Peptide-terminated surfaces for fabrication of biomaterials and sensors. - Abstract: The Huisgen cycloaddition reaction (“click” chemistry) has been used extensively to functionalize surfaces with macromolecules in a straightforward manner. We have previously developed a procedure using the copper(I)-catalyzed click reaction to tether synthetic α-helical peptides carrying two alkyne groups to a well-ordered azide-terminated alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a Au(111) surface. While convenient, click-based strategies potentially pose significant problems from reagents, solvents, and reaction temperatures that may irreversibly damage some molecules or substrates. Tuning click chemistry conditions would allow individual optimization of reaction conditions for a wide variety of biomolecules and substrate materials. Here, we explore the utility of simultaneous SAM formation and peptide-attachment chemistry in a one-pot reaction. We demonstrate that a formerly multistep reaction can be successfully carried out concurrently by mixing azide-terminated alkanethiols, CuCl, and a propargylglycine-containing peptide over a bare gold surface in ethanol and reacting at 70 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface infrared spectroscopy, surface circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) were used to determine that this one-pot reaction strategy resulted in a high density of surface-bound α-helices without aggregation. This work demonstrates the simplicity and versatility of a SAM-plus-click chemistry strategy for functionalizing Au surfaces with structured biomolecules.

  18. Reaction rates of ozone and terpenes adsorbed to model indoor surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springs, M; Wells, J R; Morrison, G C

    2011-08-01

    Reaction rates and reaction probabilities have been quantified on model indoor surfaces for the reaction of ozone with two monoterpenes (Δ(3) -carene and d-limonene). Molar surface loadings were obtained by performing breakthrough experiments in a plug-flow reactor (PFR) packed with beads of glass, polyvinylchloride or zirconium silicate. Reaction rates and probabilities were determined by equilibrating the PFR with both the terpene and the ozone and measuring the ozone consumption rate. To mimic typical indoor conditions, temperatures of 20, 25, and 30°C were used in both types of experiments along with a relative humidity ranging from 10% to 80%. The molar surface loading decreased with increased relative humidity, especially on glass, suggesting that water competed with the terpenes for adsorption sites. The ozone reactivity experiments indicate that higher surface loadings correspond with higher ozone uptake. The reaction probability for Δ(3) -carene with ozone ranged from 2.9 × 10(-6) to 3.0 × 10(-5) while reaction probabilities for d-limonene ranged from 2.8 × 10(-5) to 3.0 × 10(-4) . These surface reaction probabilities are roughly 10-100 times greater than the corresponding gas-phase values. Extrapolation of these results to typical indoor conditions suggests that surface conversion rates may be substantial relative to gas-phase rates, especially for lower volatility terpenoids. At present, it is unclear how important heterogeneous reactions will be in influencing indoor concentrations of terpenes, ozone and their reaction products. We observe that surface reaction probabilities were 10 to 100 times greater than their corresponding gas-phase values. Thus indoor surfaces do enhance effective reaction rates and adsorption of terpenes will increase ozone flux to otherwise low-reactivity surfaces. Extrapolation of these results to typical indoor conditions suggests that surface conversion rates may be substantial relative to gas-phase rates, especially

  19. Gas dynamic reaction process and system for laser chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbuny, M.

    1979-01-01

    A reaction system is disclosed wherein a moving, unidirectional stream of an activatable gaseous species is produced, the individual members of which have the forward components of their velocities at least 10 times greater than the lateral components of their velocities. The stream is irradiated with substantially monochromatic light having a frequency which activates at least some of the individual members of the species. The activated members can then be reacted with another stream or otherwise utilized

  20. Thiazolidinones derived from dynamic systemic resolution of complex reversible-reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ramström, Olof

    2014-03-17

    A complex dynamic system based on a network of multiple reversible reactions has been established. The network was applied to a dynamic systemic resolution protocol based on kinetically controlled lipase-catalyzed transformations. This resulted in the formation of cyclized products, where two thiazolidinone compounds were efficiently produced from a range of potential transformations.

  1. Probing adsorption phenomena on a single crystal Pt-alloy surface under oxygen reduction reaction conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondarenko, Alexander S.; Stephens, Ifan E.L.; Bech, Lone

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption dynamics of *OH and *O species at Pt(111) and Cu/Pt(111) near-surface alloy (NSA) surfaces in oxygen-free and O2-saturated 0.1M HClO4 was investigated. Subsurface Cu modifies the electronic structure at the Pt(111) surface resulting in weaker bonding to adsorbates like *OH, *H or *...

  2. Dithioacetal Exchange: A New Reversible Reaction for Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrillo, A Gastón; Escalante, Andrea M; Furlan, Ricardo L E

    2016-05-10

    Reversibility of dithioacetal bond formation is reported under acidic mild conditions. Its utility for dynamic combinatorial chemistry was explored by combining it with orthogonal disulfide exchange. In such a setup, thiols are positioned at the intersection of both chemistries, constituting a connecting node between temporally separated networks. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of annealed ZnO surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    The effect of thermally annealing a slab of wurtzite ZnO, terminated by two surfaces, (0001) (which is oxygen-terminated) and (0001{sup ¯}) (which is Zn-terminated), is investigated via molecular dynamics simulation by using reactive force field (ReaxFF). We found that upon heating beyond a threshold temperature of ∼700 K, surface oxygen atoms begin to sublimate from the (0001) surface. The ratio of oxygen leaving the surface at a given temperature increases as the heating temperature increases. A range of phenomena occurring at the atomic level on the (0001) surface has also been explored, such as formation of oxygen dimers on the surface and evolution of partial charge distribution in the slab during the annealing process. It was found that the partial charge distribution as a function of the depth from the surface undergoes a qualitative change when the annealing temperature is above the threshold temperature.

  4. Structure and dynamics at the liquid surface of benzyl alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietter, J.; Morgner, H.

    1999-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation of a liquid layer of benzyl alcohol has been performed in order to compare the results with those obtained in experimental studies of our group. The main result of the experimental work was a strong orientational ordering of the benzyl alcohol molecules in the surface as well as an exceptionally large surface potential of ca. 0.6 V. According to the experiments the surface molecules orientate in such a way that the benzene ring points toward the vapor phase while the CH 2 group and the OH group are directed towards the bulk of the liquid. The simulation confirms this orientation of the surface molecules. The surface potential resulting from the simulation is 350 mV. The simulation reveals that the rather large surface potential can be understood as a consequence of the mean orientation of the molecular dipole moment in the surface region. The mean orientation of the molecules themselves in the surface is due to the tendency of the system to maintain the hydrogen bonding structure of the bulk in the surface region as well. The preferential orientation of the surface molecules causes a change of the dynamics of the individual components of the molecules when switching from bulk to surface which depends on the separation of these components from the polar group. This becomes most obvious in case of the reorientation dynamics of the molecular axes, e.g. the reorientation of the benzene ring is faster than the reorientation of the OH group. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Comparison of dynamical aspects of nonadiabatic electron, proton, and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, Elizabeth; Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    The dynamical aspects of a model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction in solution are analyzed with molecular dynamics simulations. The rate for nonadiabatic PCET is expressed in terms of a time-dependent probability flux correlation function. The impact of the proton donor-acceptor and solvent dynamics on the probability flux is examined. The dynamical behavior of the probability flux correlation function is dominated by a solvent damping term that depends on the energy gap correlation function. The proton donor-acceptor motion does not impact the dynamical behavior of the probability flux correlation function but does influence the magnitude of the rate. The approximations previously invoked for the calculation of PCET rates are tested. The effects of solvent damping on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion are found to be negligible, and the short-time solvent approximation, in which only equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent are considered, is determined to be valid for these types of reactions. The analysis of PCET reactions is compared to previous analyses of single electron and proton transfer reactions. The dynamical behavior is qualitatively similar for all three types of reactions, but the time scale of the decay of the probability flux correlation function is significantly longer for single proton transfer than for PCET and single electron transfer due to a smaller solvent reorganization energy for proton transfer

  6. Surface chemistry of tribochemical reactions explored in ultrahigh vacuum conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara-Romero, Javier; Maya-Yescas, Rafael; Rico-Cerda, Jose Luis; Rivera-Rojas, Jose Luis; Castillo, Fernando Chinas; Kaltchev, Matey; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of model extreme-pressure lubricant additives on clean iron was studied in ultrahigh vacuum conditions using molecular beam strategies. Methylene chloride and chloroform react to deposit a solid film consisting of FeCl 2 and carbon, and evolve only hydrogen into the gas phase. No gas-phase products and less carbon on the surface are detected in the case of carbon tetrachloride. Dimethyl and diethyl disulfide react on clean iron to deposit a saturated sulfur plus carbon layer at low temperatures (∼600 K) and an iron sulfide film onto a Fe + C underlayer at higher temperatures (∼950 K). Methane is the only gas-phase product when dimethyl disulfide reacts with iron. Ethylene and hydrogen are detected when diethyl disulfide is used

  7. Production of specific structured lipids by enzymatic interesterification: optimization of the reaction by response surface design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Skands, Anja Rebecca Havegaard; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Rapeseed oil and capric acid were interesterified in solvent-free media catalyzed by Lipozyme IM (Rhizomucor miehei) to produce specific-structured lipids (SSLs). The process was optimized by response surface design concerning the effects of acyl migration and the by-products of diacylglycerols...... (DAGs). A five-factor response surface design was used to evaluate the influences of five major factors and their relationships. The five factors were water content (Wc, wt% based on enzyme used), reaction temperature (Te,°C), enzyme load (El, wt% based on substrates), reaction time (Tr, hour....... Thus we conclude that the quadratic response models adequately expressed the reaction. Based on the models, the reaction was optimized for the maximum net incorporation and minimum DAG content. The reaction and the control of water content or water activity (Aw) was also discussed....

  8. Prediction of Tetraoxygen Reaction Mechanism with Sulfur Atom on the Singlet Potential Energy Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Khademzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of S+O4 (D2h reaction has been investigated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df and CCSD levels on the singlet potential energy surface. One stable complex has been found for the S+O4 (D2h reaction, IN1, on the singlet potential energy surface. For the title reaction, we obtained four kinds of products at the B3LYP level, which have enough thermodynamic stability. The results reveal that the product P3 is spontaneous and exothermic with −188.042 and −179.147 kcal/mol in Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of reaction, respectively. Because P1 adduct is produced after passing two low energy level transition states, kinetically, it is the most favorable adduct in the 1S+1O4 (D2h atmospheric reactions.

  9. Study on the surface reaction of uranium metal in hydrogen atmosphere with XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Zuo Changming; Zhao Chunpei; Chen Hong

    1998-01-01

    The surface reactions of uranium metal in hydrogen atmosphere at 25 degree C and 200 degree C and effects of temperature and carbon monoxide to the hydriding reaction have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The reaction between H 2 and uranium metal at 25 degree C leads to the further oxidation of surface layer of metal due to traces of water vapor. At 200 degree C, it may lead to the hydriding reaction of uranium and the hydriding increases with increasing exposure to H 2 in the initial stages. The U4f 7/2 binding energy of UH 3 has been found to be 378.6 eV. Investigation indicates carbon monoxide inhibits both the hydriding reaction and oxidation on the condition of H 2 -CO atmosphere

  10. Production of specific structured lipids by enzymatic interesterification: optimization of the reaction by response surface design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Skands, Anja Rebecca Havegaard; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    (DAGs). A five-factor response surface design was used to evaluate the influences of five major factors and their relationships. The five factors were water content (Wc, wt% based on enzyme used), reaction temperature (Te,°C), enzyme load (El, wt% based on substrates), reaction time (Tr, hour....... Thus we conclude that the quadratic response models adequately expressed the reaction. Based on the models, the reaction was optimized for the maximum net incorporation and minimum DAG content. The reaction and the control of water content or water activity (Aw) was also discussed.......Rapeseed oil and capric acid were interesterified in solvent-free media catalyzed by Lipozyme IM (Rhizomucor miehei) to produce specific-structured lipids (SSLs). The process was optimized by response surface design concerning the effects of acyl migration and the by-products of diacylglycerols...

  11. Dynamical Dipole mode in heavy-ion fusion reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parascandolo C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The excitation of the Dynamical Dipole mode along the fusion path was investigated for the first time in the formation of a heavy compound nucleus in the A~190 mass region. The compound nucleus was formed at identical conditions of excitation energy and spin from two entrance channels having different charge asymmetry: the charge asymmetric 40Ca + 152Sm and the nearly charge symmetric 48Ca + 144Sm at Elab=11 and 10.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively. Both fusion–evaporation and fission events were studied simultaneously for the first time. The Dynamical Dipole mode excitation in the charge asymmetric channel was evidenced, in a model-independent way, by comparing the γ-ray multiplicity spectra and angular distributions of the two entrance channels with each other.

  12. Dynamical Dipole mode in heavy-ion fusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Alba, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.; Agodi, C.; Baran, V.; Boiano, A.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; De Filippo, E.; Di Toro, M.; Emanuele, U.; Farinon, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Martin, B.; Mazzocchi, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Rizzo, C.; Romoli, M.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2017-11-01

    The excitation of the Dynamical Dipole mode along the fusion path was investigated for the first time in the formation of a heavy compound nucleus in the A 190 mass region. The compound nucleus was formed at identical conditions of excitation energy and spin from two entrance channels having different charge asymmetry: the charge asymmetric 40Ca + 152Sm and the nearly charge symmetric 48Ca + 144Sm at Elab=11 and 10.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively. Both fusion-evaporation and fission events were studied simultaneously for the first time. The Dynamical Dipole mode excitation in the charge asymmetric channel was evidenced, in a model-independent way, by comparing the γ-ray multiplicity spectra and angular distributions of the two entrance channels with each other.

  13. Global dynamics of a reaction-diffusion system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuncheng You

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work the existence of a global attractor for the semiflow of weak solutions of a two-cell Brusselator system is proved. The method of grouping estimation is exploited to deal with the challenge in proving the absorbing property and the asymptotic compactness of this type of coupled reaction-diffusion systems with cubic autocatalytic nonlinearity and linear coupling. It is proved that the Hausdorff dimension and the fractal dimension of the global attractor are finite. Moreover, the existence of an exponential attractor for this solution semiflow is shown.

  14. Energetic Proton Emission and Reaction Dynamics in Heavy Ion Reactions Close to the Fermi Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coniglione, R.; Sapienza, P.; Migneco, E.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Colonna, M.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Greco, V.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Ventura, P. G.; Colonna, N.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Fiandri, M. L.; Vannini, G.; Mastinu, P. F.; Gramegna, F.; Iori, I.; Fabbietti, L.; Moroni, A.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Milazzo, P. M.; Rui, R.; Tonetto, F.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Scarpaci, J. A.

    2001-11-01

    The energetic proton emission has been investigated in the 58Ni+58Ni at 30 MeV/u and 40Ar+ 51V at 44 MeV/u reactions. Information on the origin of the energetic protons and on basic ingredients of the BNV models such as the mean field interaction and the elementary nucleon-nucleon cross section was extracted. Extremely energetic protons were measured and their impact parameter dependence indicates the presence of cooperative processes.

  15. Computational studies of atmospherically-relevant chemical reactions in water clusters and on liquid water and ice surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, R Benny; Varner, Mychel E; Hammerich, Audrey D; Riikonen, Sampsa; Murdachaew, Garold; Shemesh, Dorit; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Reactions on water and ice surfaces and in other aqueous media are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, but the microscopic mechanisms of most of these processes are as yet unknown. This Account examines recent progress in atomistic simulations of such reactions and the insights provided into mechanisms and interpretation of experiments. Illustrative examples are discussed. The main computational approaches employed are classical trajectory simulations using interaction potentials derived from quantum chemical methods. This comprises both ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and semiempirical molecular dynamics (SEMD), the latter referring to semiempirical quantum chemical methods. Presented examples are as follows: (i) Reaction of the (NO(+))(NO3(-)) ion pair with a water cluster to produce the atmospherically important HONO and HNO3. The simulations show that a cluster with four water molecules describes the reaction. This provides a hydrogen-bonding network supporting the transition state. The reaction is triggered by thermal structural fluctuations, and ultrafast changes in atomic partial charges play a key role. This is an example where a reaction in a small cluster can provide a model for a corresponding bulk process. The results support the proposed mechanism for production of HONO by hydrolysis of NO2 (N2O4). (ii) The reactions of gaseous HCl with N2O4 and N2O5 on liquid water surfaces. Ionization of HCl at the water/air interface is followed by nucleophilic attack of Cl(-) on N2O4 or N2O5. Both reactions proceed by an SN2 mechanism. The products are ClNO and ClNO2, precursors of atmospheric atomic chlorine. Because this mechanism cannot result from a cluster too small for HCl ionization, an extended water film model was simulated. The results explain ClNO formation experiments. Predicted ClNO2 formation is less efficient. (iii) Ionization of acids at ice surfaces. No ionization is found on ideal crystalline surfaces, but the process is efficient on

  16. Sorption of oxygen on Cu(111)-Ni surfaces and its reaction with hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesters, C.M.A.M.; Koster, A. de; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Geus, John W.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of O2 with a Cu(111)-Ni alloy and the reaction of sorbed oxygen with H2 has been investigated with ellipsometry and AES. The surface alloys were prepared by dissociation of nickel carbonyl on a clean Cu(111) surface. Sorption of O2 can be described by a precursor state model for

  17. Development of tight-binding, chemical-reaction-dynamics simulator for combinatorial computational chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Momoji; Ando, Minako; Sakahara, Satoshi; Jung, Changho; Seki, Kotaro; Kusagaya, Tomonori; Endou, Akira; Takami, Seiichi; Imamura, Akira; Miyamoto, Akira

    2004-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed a new concept called 'combinatorial computational chemistry' to realize a theoretical, high-throughput screening of catalysts and materials. We have already applied our combinatorial, computational-chemistry approach, mainly based on static first-principles calculations, to various catalysts and materials systems and its applicability to the catalysts and materials design was strongly confirmed. In order to realize more effective and efficient combinatorial, computational-chemistry screening, a high-speed, chemical-reaction-dynamics simulator based on quantum-chemical, molecular-dynamics method is essential. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no chemical-reaction-dynamics simulator, which has an enough high-speed ability to perform a high-throughput screening. In the present study, we have succeeded in the development of a chemical-reaction-dynamics simulator based on our original, tight-binding, quantum-chemical, molecular-dynamics method, which is more than 5000 times faster than the regular first-principles, molecular-dynamics method. Moreover, its applicability and effectiveness to the atomistic clarification of the methanol-synthesis dynamics at reaction temperature were demonstrated

  18. Nanoparticles dynamics on a surface: fractal pattern formation and fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Veronika V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review our recent results on the formation and the post-growth relaxation processes of nanofractals on surface. For this study we developed a method which describes the internal dynamics of particles in a fractal and accounts for their diffusion and detachment. We demonstrate...... that these kinetic processes determine the final shape of the islands on surface after post-growth relaxation. We consider different scenarios of fractal relaxation and analyze the time evolution of the island's morphology....

  19. Measurement of Dynamic Friction Coefficient on the Irregular Free Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, S. H.; Seo, K. S.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, K. H.

    2007-01-01

    A spent fuel storage cask must be estimated for a structural integrity when an earthquake occurs because it freely stands on ground surface without a restriction condition. Usually the integrity estimation for a seismic load is performed by a FEM analysis, the friction coefficient for a standing surface is an important parameter in seismic analysis when a sliding happens. When a storage cask is placed on an irregular ground surface, measuring a friction coefficient of an irregular surface is very difficult because the friction coefficient is affected by the surface condition. In this research, dynamic friction coefficients on the irregular surfaces between a concrete cylinder block and a flat concrete slab are measured with two methods by one direction actuator

  20. Structure, biomimetics, and fluid dynamics of fish skin surfaces*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauder, George V.; Wainwright, Dylan K.; Domel, August G.; Weaver, James C.; Wen, Li; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-10-01

    The interface between the fluid environment and the surface of the body in swimming fishes is critical for both physiological and hydrodynamic functions. The skin surface in most species of fishes is covered with bony scales or toothlike denticles (in sharks). Despite the apparent importance of fish surfaces for understanding aquatic locomotion and near-surface boundary layer flows, relatively little attention has been paid to either the nature of surface textures in fishes or possible hydrodynamic effects of variation in roughness around the body surface within an individual and among species. Fish surfaces are remarkably diverse and in many bony fishes scales can have an intricate surface texture with projections, ridges, and comblike extensions. Shark denticles (or scales) are toothlike and project out of the skin to form a complexly textured surface that interacts with free-stream flow. Manufacturing biomimetic foils with fishlike surfaces allows hydrodynamic testing and we emphasize here the importance of dynamic test conditions where the effect of surface textures is assessed under conditions of self-propulsion. We show that simple two-dimensional foils with patterned cuts do not perform as well as a smooth control surface, but that biomimetic shark skin foils can swim at higher self-propelled speeds than smooth controls. When the arrangement of denticles on the foil surface is altered, we find that a staggered-overlapped pattern outperforms other arrangements. Flexible foils made of real shark skin outperform sanded controls when foils are moved with a biologically realistic motion program. We suggest that focus on the mechanisms of drag reduction by fish surfaces has been too limiting and an additional role of fish surface textures may be to alter leading edge vortices and flow patterns on moving surfaces in a way that enhances thrust. Analysis of water flow over an artificial shark skin foil under both static and dynamic conditions shows that a shear layer

  1. Electrostatic cloaking of surface structure for dynamic wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Junichiro; Nita, Satoshi; Do-Quang, Minh; Wang, Jiayu; Chen, Yu-Chung; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic wetting problems are fundamental to the understanding of the interaction between liquids and solids. Even in a superficially simple experimental situation, such as a droplet spreading over a dry surface, the result may depend not only on the liquid properties but also strongly on the substrate-surface properties; even for macroscopically smooth surfaces, the microscopic geometrical roughness can be important. In addition, as surfaces may often be naturally charged, or electric fields are used to manipulate fluids, electric effects are crucial components that influence wetting phenomena. Here we investigate the interplay between electric forces and surface structures in dynamic wetting. While surface microstructures can significantly hinder the spreading, we find that the electrostatics can ``cloak'' the microstructures, i.e. deactivate the hindering. We identify the physics in terms of reduction in contact-line friction, which makes the dynamic wetting inertial force dominant and insensitive to the substrate properties. This work was financially supported in part by, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems, and the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  2. Sub-nanometer glass surface dynamics induced by illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Illumination is known to induce stress and morphology changes in opaque glasses. Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) has a smaller bandgap than the crystal. Thus, we were able to excite with 532 nm light a 1 μm amorphous surface layer on a SiC crystal while recording time-lapse movies of glass surface dynamics by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Photoexcitation of the a-SiC surface layer through the transparent crystal avoids heating the STM tip. Up to 6 × 10 4 s, long movies of surface dynamics with 40 s time resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution were obtained. Clusters of ca. 3-5 glass forming units diameter are seen to cooperatively hop between two states at the surface. Photoexcitation with green laser light recruits immobile clusters to hop, rather than increasing the rate at which already mobile clusters hop. No significant laser heating was observed. Thus, we favor an athermal mechanism whereby electronic excitation of a-SiC directly controls glassy surface dynamics. This mechanism is supported by an exciton migration-relaxation-thermal diffusion model. Individual clusters take ∼1 h to populate states differently after the light intensity has changed. We believe the surrounding matrix rearranges slowly when it is stressed by a change in laser intensity, and clusters serve as a diagnostic. Such cluster hopping and matrix rearrangement could underlie the microscopic mechanism of photoinduced aging of opaque glasses

  3. Effect of atmospheric oxidative plasma treatments on polypropylenic fibers surface: Characterization and reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisticò, Roberto; Magnacca, Giuliana; Faga, Maria Giulia; Gautier, Giovanna; D’Angelo, Domenico; Ciancio, Emanuele; Lamberti, Roberta; Martorana, Selanna

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma-dielectric barrier discharge (APP-DBD, open chamber configuration) was used to functionalize polypropylene (PP) fibers surface in order to generate oxidized-reactive groups such as hydroperoxides, alcohols and carbonyl species (i.e. ketones and others). Such a species increased the surface polarity, without causing material degradation. Three different types of plasma mixture (He, He/O 2 , He/O 2 /H 2 O) under three different values of applied power (750, 1050, 1400 W) were investigated. The formed plasma species (O 2 + , O single atom and OH radical) and their distribution were monitored via optical emission spectrometry (OES) measurements, and the plasma effects on PP surface species formation were followed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Results allowed to better understand the reaction pathways between plasma phase and PP fibers. In fact, two reaction mechanisms were proposed, the first one concerning the plasma phase reactions and the second one involving material surface modifications.

  4. The effect of Fermi energy on reaction of water with oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, W. M.

    1989-07-01

    The experimental relationship found between oxide Fermi level and aqueous point of zero charge (pzc) is modeled by the generalized Lewis acid-base theory. This model describes a nearly linear relationship between the position of the Fermi level in the band gap and the net charge transferred in a surface acid-base reaction. The situation of a water molecule adsorbed onto an uncharged, insulator (alumina) surface is examined. The charge in the reaction is assumed to shift the dissociation equilibrium of the water molecule, resulting in a net surface charge on the insulator. The pzc of the surface is calculated as a function of insulator Fermi level from these equilibria. This model predicts very strong effects of doping, surface states and surface space charges on pzc of insulators but possibly small effects of structure and stoichiometry.

  5. Biodegradation at Dynamic Plume Fringes: Mixing Versus Reaction Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirpka, O. A.; Eckert, D.; Griebler, C.; Haberer, C.; Kürzinger, P.; Bauer, R.; Mellage, A.

    2014-12-01

    Biodegradation of continuously emitted plumes is known to be most pronounced at the plume fringe, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. Under steady-state conditions, physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion was shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation, with plume lengths scaling inversely with the bulk transverse dispersivity in quasi two-dimensional settings. Under these conditions, the presence of suitable microbes is essential but the biokinetic parameters do not play an important role. When the location of the plume shifts (caused, e.g., by a fluctuating groundwater table), however, the bacteria are no more situated at the plume fringe and biomass growth, decay, activation and deactivation determine the time lag until the fringe-controlled steady state is approached again. During this time lag, degradation is incomplete. The objective of the presented study was to analyze to which extent flow and transport dynamics diminish effectiveness of fringe-controlled biodegradation and which microbial processes and related biokinetic parameters determine the system response in overall degradation to hydraulic fluctuations. We performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth and maintenance (often subsumed as "biomass decay") microbial dormancy (that is, change into a metabolically inactive state) and

  6. Static and Dynamic Wetting Behavior of Triglycerides on Solid Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski; Saramago

    2000-07-15

    Triglyceride wetting properties on solid surfaces of different hydro-phobicities were investigated using three different methods, namely, the sessile drop method for static contact angle measurements, the Wilhelmy method for dynamic contact angle measurements, and the captive bubble method to investigate thin triglyceride film stability. For solid surfaces having a surface free energy higher than the surface tension of triglycerides (tributyrin, tricaprylin, and triolein), a qualitative correlation was observed between wetting and solid/triglyceride relative hydrophobicities. On surfaces presenting extreme hydrophobic or hydrophilic properties, medium-chain triglycerides had a behavior similar to that of long-chain unsaturated ones. On a high-energy surface (glass), tricaprylin showed an autophobic effect subsequent to molecular adsorption in trident conformation on the solid, observed with the three methods. Thin triglyceride films between an air bubble and a solid surface were stable for a short time, for solids with a surface free energy larger than the triglyceride surface tension. If the solid surface had a lower surface free energy, the thin film collapsed after a time interval which increased with triglyceride viscosity. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  7. Chaos and fractals in dynamical models of transport and reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, P; Claus, I

    2002-03-15

    This paper contains a discussion of dynamical randomness among the different methods of simulation of a fluid and its characterization by the concept of Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy per unit time. Moreover, a renormalization-group method is presented in order to construct the hydrodynamic and reactive modes of relaxation in chaotic models. The renormalization-group construction allows us to obtain the dispersion relation of these modes, i.e. their damping rate versus the wavenumber. Besides, these modes are characterized by a fractal dimension given in terms of a diffusion coefficient and a Lyapunov exponent.

  8. The significance of surface complexation reactions in hydrologic systems: a geochemist's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretsky, C.

    2000-05-01

    Complexation reactions at the mineral-water interface affect the transport and transformation of metals and organic contaminants, nutrient availability in soils, formation of ore deposits, acidification of watersheds and the global cycling of elements. Such reactions can be understood by quantifying speciation reactions in homogeneous aqueous solutions, characterizing reactive sites at mineral surfaces and developing models of the interactions between aqueous species at solid surfaces. In this paper, the application of thermodynamic principles to quantify aqueous complexation reactions is described. This is followed by a brief overview of a few of the methods that have been used to characterize reactive sites on mineral surfaces. Next, the application of empirical and semi-empirical models of adsorption at the mineral-water interface, including distribution coefficients, simple ion exchange models, and Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the limitations of such models in providing an adequate representation of adsorption in hydrological systems. These limitations arise because isotherms do not account for the structure of adsorbed species, nor do they account for the development of surface charge with adsorption. This is contrasted with more sophisticated models of adsorption, termed 'surface complexation models', which include the constant capacitance model, the diffuse layer model, the triple layer model and the MUSIC model. In these models, speciation reactions between surface functional groups and dissolved species control the variable surface charge build-up and the specific adsorption properties of minerals in aqueous solutions. Next, the influence of mineral surface speciation on the reactivity of adsorbed species and on far from equilibrium dissolution rates of minerals is discussed. Finally, the applicability of microscopic models of surface complexation to field-scale systems is explored and the need to integrate

  9. Statistical and dynamical modeling of heavy-ion fusion-fission reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamizadeh, H.; Razazzadeh, H.

    2018-02-01

    A modified statistical model and a four dimensional dynamical model based on Langevin equations have been used to simulate the fission process of the excited compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra produced in the fusion 19F + 188Os and 19F + 197Au reactions. The evaporation residue cross section, the fission cross section, the pre-scission neutron, proton and alpha multiplicities and the anisotropy of fission fragments angular distribution have been calculated for the excited compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra. In the modified statistical model the effects of spin K about the symmetry axis and temperature have been considered in calculations of the fission widths and the potential energy surfaces. It was shown that the modified statistical model can reproduce the above mentioned experimental data by using appropriate values of the temperature coefficient of the effective potential equal to λ = 0.0180 ± 0.0055, 0.0080 ± 0.0030 MeV-2 and the scaling factor of the fission barrier height equal to rs = 1.0015 ± 0.0025, 1.0040 ± 0.0020 for the compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra, respectively. Three collective shape coordinates plus the projection of total spin of the compound nucleus on the symmetry axis, K, were considered in the four dimensional dynamical model. In the dynamical calculations, dissipation was generated through the chaos weighted wall and window friction formula. Comparison of the theoretical results with the experimental data showed that two models make it possible to reproduce satisfactorily the above mentioned experimental data for the excited compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra.

  10. Statistical and dynamical modeling of heavy-ion fusion–fission reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Eslamizadeh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A modified statistical model and a four dimensional dynamical model based on Langevin equations have been used to simulate the fission process of the excited compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra produced in the fusion 19F + 188Os and 19F + 197Au reactions. The evaporation residue cross section, the fission cross section, the pre-scission neutron, proton and alpha multiplicities and the anisotropy of fission fragments angular distribution have been calculated for the excited compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra. In the modified statistical model the effects of spin K about the symmetry axis and temperature have been considered in calculations of the fission widths and the potential energy surfaces. It was shown that the modified statistical model can reproduce the above mentioned experimental data by using appropriate values of the temperature coefficient of the effective potential equal to λ=0.0180±0.0055, 0.0080±0.0030 MeV−2 and the scaling factor of the fission barrier height equal to rs=1.0015±0.0025, 1.0040±0.0020 for the compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra, respectively. Three collective shape coordinates plus the projection of total spin of the compound nucleus on the symmetry axis, K, were considered in the four dimensional dynamical model. In the dynamical calculations, dissipation was generated through the chaos weighted wall and window friction formula. Comparison of the theoretical results with the experimental data showed that two models make it possible to reproduce satisfactorily the above mentioned experimental data for the excited compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra.

  11. Nonlinear electromechanical modelling and dynamical behavior analysis of a satellite reaction wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghalari, Alireza; Shahravi, Morteza

    2017-12-01

    The present research addresses the satellite reaction wheel (RW) nonlinear electromechanical coupling dynamics including dynamic eccentricity of brushless dc (BLDC) motor and gyroscopic effects, as well as dry friction of shaft-bearing joints (relative small slip) and bearing friction. In contrast to other studies, the rotational velocity of the flywheel is considered to be controllable, so it is possible to study the reaction wheel dynamical behavior in acceleration stages. The RW is modeled as a three-phases BLDC motor as well as flywheel with unbalances on a rigid shaft and flexible bearings. Improved Lagrangian dynamics for electromechanical systems is used to obtain the mathematical model of the system. The developed model can properly describe electromechanical nonlinear coupled dynamical behavior of the satellite RW. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the presented approach.

  12. Final Report: Molecular Basis for Microbial Adhesion and Geochemical Surface Reactions: A Study Across Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

    2013-06-27

    Computational chemistry was used to help provide a molecular level description of the interactions of Gram-negative microbial membranes with subsurface materials. The goal is to develop a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in microbial metal binding, microbial attachment to mineral surfaces, and, eventually, oxidation/reduction reactions (electron transfer) that can occur at these surfaces and are mediated by the bacterial exterior surface. The project focused on the interaction of the outer microbial membrane, which is dominated by an exterior lipopolysaccharide (LPS) portion, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the mineral goethite and with solvated ions in the environment. This was originally a collaborative project with T.P. Straatsma and B. Lowery of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The University of Alabama effort used electronic structure calculations to predict the molecular behavior of ions in solution and the behavior of the sugars which form a critical part of the LPS. The interactions of the sugars with metal ions are expected to dominate much of the microscopic structure and transport phenomena in the LPS. This work, in combination with the molecular dynamics simulations of Straatsma and the experimental electrochemistry and microscopy measurements of Lowry, both at PNNL, is providing new insights into the detailed molecular behavior of these membranes in geochemical environments. The effort at The University of Alabama has three components: solvation energies and structures of ions in solution, prediction of the acidity of the critical groups in the sugars in the LPS, and binding of metal ions to the sugar anions. An important aspect of the structure of the LPS membrane as well as ion transport in the LPS is the ability of the sugar side groups such as the carboxylic acids and the phosphates to bind positively charged ions. We are studying the acidity of the acidic side groups in order to better understand the ability of

  13. Quantum Dynamics Study of the Potential Energy Minima Effect on Energy Efficiency for the F- + CH3Cl → FCH3 + Cl- Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yida; Wang, Yuping; Wang, Dunyou

    2017-04-13

    The Polanyi rules on the energy efficiency on reactivity are summarized solely from the locations of barriers on the potential energy surfaces. Here, our quantum dynamics study for the F - + CH 3 Cl → FCH 3 + Cl - reaction shows that the two potential energy minima in the entrance channel on the potential energy surface play an essential role in energy efficiency on reactivity. The reactivity of this reaction is dominated by the low collision energies where two distinctive reaction mechanisms involve the two minima in the entrance channel. Overall, the Cl-CH 3 stretching motion and C-H 3 umbrella motion both are more efficient than the translational motion in promoting this reaction. Although this reaction has a negative energy barrier, our study shows that it is the minima in the entrance channel, together with the energy barrier relative to these minima, that determine the energy efficacy on reactivity.

  14. A Modified Dynamic Surface Controller for Delayed Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibeji, Naji; Kirsch, Nicholas; Dicianno, Brad E; Sharma, Nitin

    2017-08-01

    A widely accepted model of muscle force generation during neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a second-order nonlinear musculoskeletal dynamics cascaded to a delayed first-order muscle activation dynamics. However, most nonlinear NMES control methods have either neglected the muscle activation dynamics or used an ad hoc strategies to tackle the muscle activation dynamics, which may not guarantee control stability. We hypothesized that a nonlinear control design that includes muscle activation dynamics can improve the control performance. In this paper, a dynamic surface control (DSC) approach was used to design a PID-based NMES controller that compensates for EMD in the activation dynamics. Because the muscle activation is unmeasurable, a model based estimator was used to estimate the muscle activation in realtime. The Lyapunov stability analysis confirmed that the newly developed controller achieves semi-global uniformly ultimately bounded (SGUUB) tracking for the musculoskeletal system. Experiments were performed on two able-bodied subjects and one spinal cord injury subject using a modified leg extension machine. These experiments illustrate the performance of the new controller and compare it to a previous PID-DC controller that did not consider muscle activation dynamics in the control design. These experiments support our hypothesis that a control design that includes muscle activation improves the NMES control performance.

  15. Ti and Zr surfaces studied by molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascuet, Maria I.; Passianot, Roberto C.; Monti, Ana M.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between point defects technique and the (0001), (1-210), (10-10) surfaces in Ti and Zr is studied by the molecular dynamics technique. Both of metals are in the hexagonal structure and within a temperature range of 100 to 900 K. The atomic interactions are modeled by EAM-type many-body potentials, that were used previously in static simulations. New migration mechanisms are unraveled and others are verified with respect to those already proposed in the static studies. Also included is an analysis of the vacancy stability in the sub-surface layers of the prismatic surfaces. (author)

  16. Photoelectron spectroscopy: a strategy for the study of reactions at solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, C. T.; Carley, A. F.; Roberts, M. W.

    The development of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for the study of the nature of chemisorbed species and the mechanisms of surface reactions is described. The methodology of data analysis and the establishment of data banks which enable photoelectron spectra to be assigned to specific surface species is discussed by reference to examples from recent studies. Although in the first instance the primary aim was to establish a qualitative logic in a well defined area of surface chemistry, this was then developed quantitatively and extended to studies of the mechanism of surface catalysed reactions. Emphasis is given here to the activation of molecules at metal surfaces either by surface modification or through chemical specificity which is associated with coadsorbed molecules. As illustration we discuss the activation of O-H and N-H bonds by `oxygen' resulting in reaction pathways being followed which would not have been predicted on the basis of the known reactivities of the individual molecules. The examples chosen also illustrate the severe limitations of mechanistic studies in surface chemistry based (a) on the study of the individual reactants separately; (b) on a post-mortem type of analysis of the surface and (c) on just a gaseous product analysis. An important concept that has emerged is the dual role of surface `oxygen'. It may either act as a promoter in activating an otherwise unreactive adsorbate molecule, or it may form an unreactive oxide overlayer. Parallel studies of metal oxides per se provide information on the defect nature of both oxide overlayers at metal surfaces and also bulk oxide surfaces. Close similarities are shown to exist between the `oxygen' activation of molecules at metal surfaces and the catalytic reactivity of defective bulk oxides. A common theme is that the dominant mechanism involves hydrogen abstraction by oxygen adatoms, which are assigned as O-(s) both at metal surfaces (by XPS) and at bulk oxide surfaces (by E.P.R. and XPS).

  17. Decay of surface nanostructures via long-time-scale dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voter, A.F.; Stanciu, N.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have developed a new approach for extending the time scale of molecular dynamics simulations. For infrequent-event systems, the category that includes most diffusive events in the solid phase, this hyperdynamics method can extend the simulation time by a few orders of magnitude compared to direct molecular dynamics. The trajectory is run on a potential surface that has been biased to raise the energy in the potential basins without affecting the transition state region. The method is described and applied to surface and bulk diffusion processes, achieving microsecond and millisecond simulation times. The authors have also developed a new parallel computing method that is efficient for small system sizes. The combination of the hyperdynamics with this parallel replica dynamics looks promising as a general materials simulation tool

  18. Pico-second laser spectroscopy and reaction dynamics in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    1984-01-01

    The dynamic relaxation of excited singlet states of molecules and ions in liquid solution is investigated using picosecond laser spectroscopy. The more efficient process for the deactivation of the first excited singlet state of pinacyanol is internal conversion S 1 → S 0 between iso-energetic states. At low viscosity, the rate constant is inversely proportional to the macroscopic viscosity and depends on the relaxation of the angle between the quinoline end groups around the polymethinic chain. Electron photodetachment by 265 nm excitation of the ferrocyanide and phenolate anions and photoionisation of neutral molecules, phenol, indole and tryptophan in polar solvents give rise to the solvated electron formation. The mono-or bi-photonic nature of the ejection process and the solvent relaxation around the excess electron are analyzed. (author) [fr

  19. Critical bifurcation surfaces of 3D discrete dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sonis

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the analytical representation of bifurcations of each 3D discrete dynamics depending on the set of bifurcation parameters. The procedure of bifurcation analysis proposed in this paper represents the 3D elaboration and specification of the general algorithm of the n-dimensional linear bifurcation analysis proposed by the author earlier. It is proven that 3D domain of asymptotic stability (attraction of the fixed point for a given 3D discrete dynamics is bounded by three critical bifurcation surfaces: the divergence, flip and flutter surfaces. The analytical construction of these surfaces is achieved with the help of classical Routh–Hurvitz conditions of asymptotic stability. As an application the adjustment process proposed by T. Puu for the Cournot oligopoly model is considered in detail.

  20. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low temperature combustion and the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in earth’s atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization make characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, while master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  1. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, David L.

    2017-05-01

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low-temperature combustion and in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in Earth's atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization makes characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, and master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  2. Investigation of the complex reaction coordinate of acid catalyzed amide hydrolysis from molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2004-01-01

    The rate-determining step of acid catalyzed peptide hydrolysis is the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule to the carbon atom of the amide group. Therein the addition of the hydroxyl group to the amide carbon atom involves the association of a water molecule transferring one of its protons to an adjacent water molecule. The protonation of the amide nitrogen atom follows as a separate reaction step. Since the nucleophilic attack involves the breaking and formation of several bonds, the underlying reaction coordinate is rather complex. We investigate this reaction step from path sampling Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. This approach does not require the predefinition of reaction coordinates and is thus particularly suited for investigating reaction mechanisms. From our simulations the most relevant components of the reaction coordinate are elaborated. Though the C···O distance of the oxygen atom of the water molecule performing the nucleophilic attack and the corresponding amide carbon atom is a descriptor of the reaction progress, a complete picture of the reaction coordinate must include all three molecules taking part in the reaction. Moreover, the proton transfer is found to depend on favorable solvent configurations. Thus, also the arrangement of non-reacting, i.e. solvent water molecules needs to be considered in the reaction coordinate

  3. Oxygen reduction reaction over silver particles with various morphologies and surface chemical states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Junya; Okata, Yui; Watabe, Noriyuki; Katagiri, Makoto; Nakamura, Ayaka; Arikawa, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Ken-ichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Ueda, Wataru; Satsuma, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an alkaline solution was carried out using Ag powders having various particle morphologies and surface chemical states (Size: ca. 40-110 nm in crystalline size. Shape: spherical, worm like, and angular. Surface: smooth with easily reduced AgOx, defective with AgOx, and Ag2CO3 surface layer). The various Ag powders were well characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and stripping voltammetry of underpotential-deposited lead. Defective and oxidized surfaces enhanced the Ag active surface area during the ORR. The ORR activity was affected by the morphology and surface chemical state: Ag particles with defective and angular surfaces showed smaller electron exchange number between three and four but showed higher specific activity compared to Ag particles with smooth surfaces.

  4. Studies of the surface of titanium dioxide. IV. The hydrogen-deuterium equilibration reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaki, T.; Katsuta, K.; Miura, M.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of hydrogen with the surface of titanium dioxide has been studied in connection with the hydrogen-reduction mechanism of titanium dioxide, by means of such measurements as weight decrease, magnetic susceptibility, hydrogen uptake, and electrical conductance. It was postulated in the previous study that the rate-determining step of the hydrogen-reduction reaction may be the formation of surface hydroxyl groups, followed by the rapid removal of water molecules from the surface. In this study, the interactions between hydrogen and the surface of titanium dioxide were investigated by measuring the hydrogen-deuterium equilibration reaction, H 2 + D 2 = 2HD, at temperatures above 200 0 C on both surfaces before and after hydrogen reduction to compare the differences in the reactivities

  5. Population-reaction model and microbial experimental ecosystems for understanding hierarchical dynamics of ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Kazufumi; Tsuda, Soichiro; Kadowaki, Kohmei; Nakamura, Yutaka; Nakano, Tadashi; Ishii, Kojiro

    2016-02-01

    Understanding ecosystem dynamics is crucial as contemporary human societies face ecosystem degradation. One of the challenges that needs to be recognized is the complex hierarchical dynamics. Conventional dynamic models in ecology often represent only the population level and have yet to include the dynamics of the sub-organism level, which makes an ecosystem a complex adaptive system that shows characteristic behaviors such as resilience and regime shifts. The neglect of the sub-organism level in the conventional dynamic models would be because integrating multiple hierarchical levels makes the models unnecessarily complex unless supporting experimental data are present. Now that large amounts of molecular and ecological data are increasingly accessible in microbial experimental ecosystems, it is worthwhile to tackle the questions of their complex hierarchical dynamics. Here, we propose an approach that combines microbial experimental ecosystems and a hierarchical dynamic model named population-reaction model. We present a simple microbial experimental ecosystem as an example and show how the system can be analyzed by a population-reaction model. We also show that population-reaction models can be applied to various ecological concepts, such as predator-prey interactions, climate change, evolution, and stability of diversity. Our approach will reveal a path to the general understanding of various ecosystems and organisms. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of New Surface Active Azo Initiators for Radical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Tauer

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of a water soluble azo initiators from 2,2’-azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN was performed in three steps: reaction of dinitrile with aromatic alcohols in the presence of HCl to form bisiminoesters hydrochlorides which are hydrolyzed to the esters and final regioselective sulfonation of the aromatic esters. The thermal decomposition of the azo initiators obtained leads to formation of two surface active radicals which can start the chain reaction.

  7. Photo-induced isomerization and chemical reaction dynamics in superfluid helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Jeremy; Douberly, Gary; Miller, Roger

    2008-03-01

    Near threshold photo-induced isomerization and photo-induced chemical reactions have long been sough after as sensitive probes of the underlying potential energy surface. One of the most important questions asked is how the initially bright quantum state couples to the reaction coordinate, and thus relates to energy transfer in general. Helium droplets have now allowed us to stabilize entrance channel clusters behind very small reaction barriers such that vibrational excitation may result in reaction. Through two examples, namely the isomerization of the 2 binary complexes of HF-HCN Douberly et al. PCCP 2005, 7,463, and the induced reaction of the gallium-HCN complex Merritt et al. JPCA 2007, DOI:10.1021/jp074981e we will show how the branching ratios for reaction and predissociation can determined and the influence of the superfluid He solvent.

  8. Dynamical Dipole Mode in Fusion Heavy-Ion Reactions in the Mass Region of a = 192

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Baran, V.; Boiano, A.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; de Filippo, E.; Del Zoppo, A.; di Toro, M.; Emanuele, U.; Farinon, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Maiolino, C.; Martin, B.; Mazzocco, M.; Mazzocchi, C.; Rizzo, C.; Romoli, M.; Santonocito, D.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2013-06-01

    The dynamical dipole mode was investigated in the mass region of the 192Pb compound nucleus, by using the 40Ca + 152Sm and 48Ca +144Sm reactions at Elab = 11 and 10.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively. The -ray energy spectra at various polar angles were obtained for fusion-evaporation and fission events by detecting the high energy -rays with the MEDEA experimental apparatus in coincidence with evaporation residues and fission fragments. Our results show that the dynamical dipole mode survives in reactions involving heavier nuclei than those studied previously. However, its yield is lower than that expected within BNV calculations.

  9. Optimization of Maillard Reaction in Model System of Glucosamine and Cysteine Using Response Surface Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchi, Shanika Jeewantha Thewarapperuma; Kim, Ye-Joo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Oh, Sang-Chul; Lee, Yang-Bong

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids play important roles in good flavor generation in Maillard reaction of non-enzymatic browning, so aqueous model systems of glucosamine and cysteine were studied to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, initial pH, reaction time, and concentration ratio of glucosamine and cysteine. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the independent reaction parameters of cysteine and glucosamine in Maillard reaction. Box-Behnken factorial design was used with 30 runs of 16 factorial levels, 8 axial levels and 6 central levels. The degree of Maillard reaction was determined by reading absorption at 425 nm in a spectrophotometer and Hunter’s L, a, and b values. ΔE was consequently set as the fifth response factor. In the statistical analyses, determination coefficients (R2) for their absorbance, Hunter’s L, a, b values, and ΔE were 0.94, 0.79, 0.73, 0.96, and 0.79, respectively, showing that the absorbance and Hunter’s b value were good dependent variables for this model system. The optimum processing parameters were determined to yield glucosamine-cysteine Maillard reaction product with higher absorbance and higher colour change. The optimum estimated absorbance was achieved at the condition of initial pH 8.0, 111°C reaction temperature, 2.47 h reaction time, and 1.30 concentration ratio. The optimum condition for colour change measured by Hunter’s b value was 2.41 h reaction time, 114°C reaction temperature, initial pH 8.3, and 1.26 concentration ratio. These results can provide the basic information for Maillard reaction of aqueous model system between glucosamine and cysteine. PMID:28401086

  10. Optimization of Maillard Reaction in Model System of Glucosamine and Cysteine Using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchi, Shanika Jeewantha Thewarapperuma; Kim, Ye-Joo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Oh, Sang-Chul; Lee, Yang-Bong

    2017-03-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids play important roles in good flavor generation in Maillard reaction of non-enzymatic browning, so aqueous model systems of glucosamine and cysteine were studied to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, initial pH, reaction time, and concentration ratio of glucosamine and cysteine. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the independent reaction parameters of cysteine and glucosamine in Maillard reaction. Box-Behnken factorial design was used with 30 runs of 16 factorial levels, 8 axial levels and 6 central levels. The degree of Maillard reaction was determined by reading absorption at 425 nm in a spectrophotometer and Hunter's L, a, and b values. ΔE was consequently set as the fifth response factor. In the statistical analyses, determination coefficients (R 2 ) for their absorbance, Hunter's L, a, b values, and ΔE were 0.94, 0.79, 0.73, 0.96, and 0.79, respectively, showing that the absorbance and Hunter's b value were good dependent variables for this model system. The optimum processing parameters were determined to yield glucosamine-cysteine Maillard reaction product with higher absorbance and higher colour change. The optimum estimated absorbance was achieved at the condition of initial pH 8.0, 111°C reaction temperature, 2.47 h reaction time, and 1.30 concentration ratio. The optimum condition for colour change measured by Hunter's b value was 2.41 h reaction time, 114°C reaction temperature, initial pH 8.3, and 1.26 concentration ratio. These results can provide the basic information for Maillard reaction of aqueous model system between glucosamine and cysteine.

  11. Drop impact and rebound dynamics on an inclined superhydrophobic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeong, Yong Han; Burton, James; Loth, Eric; Bayer, Ilker S

    2014-10-14

    Due to its potential in water-repelling applications, the impact and rebound dynamics of a water drop impinging perpendicular to a horizontal superhydrophobic surface have undergone extensive study. However, drops tend to strike a surface at an angle in applications. In such cases, the physics governing the effects of oblique impact are not well studied or understood. Therefore, the objective of this study was to conduct an experiment to investigate the impact and rebound dynamics of a drop at various liquid viscosities, in an isothermal environment, and on a nanocomposite superhydrophobic surface at normal and oblique impact conditions (tilted at 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60°). This study considered drops falling from various heights to create normal impact Weber numbers ranging from 6 to 110. In addition, drop viscosity was varied by decreasing the temperature for water drops and by utilizing water-glycerol mixtures, which have similar surface tension to water but higher viscosities. Results revealed that oblique and normal drop impact behaved similarly (in terms of maximum drop spread as well as rebound dynamics) at low normal Weber numbers. However, at higher Weber numbers, normal and oblique impact results diverged in terms of maximum spread, which could be related to asymmetry and more complex outcomes. These asymmetry effects became more pronounced as the inclination angle increased, to the point where they dominated the drop impact and rebound characteristics when the surface was inclined at 60°. The drop rebound characteristics on inclined surfaces could be classified into eight different outcomes driven primarily by normal Weber number and drop Ohnesorge numbers. However, it was found that these outcomes were also a function of the receding contact angle, whereby reduced receding angles yielded tail-like structures. Nevertheless, the contact times of the drops with the coating were found to be generally independent of surface inclination.

  12. Reaction of water vapour with a clean liquid uranium surface. Revised 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, W. II; Siekhaus, W.

    1986-01-01

    To study the reaction of water vapour with uranium, we have exposed clean liquid uranium surfaces to H 2 O under UHV conditions. We have measured the surface concentration of oxygen as a function of exposure, and determined the maximum attainable surface oxygen concentration X/sup s//sub O/ as a function of temperature. We have used these measurements to estimate, close to the melting point, the solubility of oxygen (X/sup b//sub O/, -4 ) and its surface segregation coefficient β/sup s/(> 10 3 ). 11 refs., 5 figs

  13. XPS study on the surface reaction of uranium metal with carbon monoxide at 200 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoling; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Huang Ruiliang

    1996-12-01

    The surface reaction of uranium metal with carbon monoxide at 200 degree C has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The carbon monoxide adsorption on the surface oxide layer resulted in U4f peak shifting to the lower binding energy and the content of oxygen in the oxide is decreased. O/U radio decreases with increasing the exposure of carbon monoxide to the surface layer. The investigation indicated the surface layer of uranium metal was further reduced in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide at high temperature. (3 refs., 5 figs.)

  14. Study of photo activation reaction of experimental graphene dental nanocomposites through dynamic laser speckle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Marianne; Yebra, Ana; Pozo, Antonio M.; Lucena, Cristina; Pérez, María. M.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the photo activation reaction of experimental graphene dental nanocomposites and to compare this reaction between commercial nanocomposite by dynamic laser speckle patterns. One commercial nanocomposite and two experimental graphene nanocomposites were used. LED curing unit was used to produce the photo activation reaction and the speckle patterns were generated by the incident light from the laser diode. These patterns were captured with the CMOS camera; later the speckle correlation was calculated. The photo activation process originates different speckle patterns between the commercial and the experimental graphene nanocomposites; having this less speckle activity.

  15. Vibrationally quantum-state-specific dynamics of the reactions of CN radicals with organic molecules in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Rebecca A.; Greaves, Stuart J.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Clark, Ian P.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Parker, Anthony W.; Towrie, Michael; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.

    2011-06-01

    The dynamics of reactions of CN radicals with cyclohexane, d12-cyclohexane, and tetramethylsilane have been studied in solutions of chloroform, dichloromethane, and the deuterated variants of these solvents using ultraviolet photolysis of ICN to initiate a reaction. The H(D)-atom abstraction reactions produce HCN (DCN) that is probed in absorption with sub-picosecond time resolution using ˜500 cm-1 bandwidth infrared (IR) pulses in the spectral regions corresponding to C-H (or C-D) and C≡N stretching mode fundamental and hot bands. Equivalent IR spectra were obtained for the reactions of CN radicals with the pure solvents. In all cases, the reaction products are formed at early times with a strong propensity for vibrational excitation of the C-H (or C-D) stretching (v3) and H-C-N (D-C-N) bending (v2) modes, and for DCN products there is also evidence of vibrational excitation of the v1 mode, which involves stretching of the C≡N bond. The vibrationally excited products relax to the ground vibrational level of HCN (DCN) with time constants of ˜130-270 ps (depending on molecule and solvent), and the majority of the HCN (DCN) in this ground level is formed by vibrational relaxation, instead of directly from the chemical reaction. The time-dependence of reactive production of HCN (DCN) and vibrational relaxation is analysed using a vibrationally quantum-state specific kinetic model. The experimental outcomes are indicative of dynamics of exothermic reactions over an energy surface with an early transition state. Although the presence of the chlorinated solvent may reduce the extent of vibrational excitation of the nascent products, the early-time chemical reaction dynamics in these liquid solvents are deduced to be very similar to those for isolated collisions in the gas phase. The transient IR spectra show additional spectroscopic absorption features centered at 2037 cm-1 and 2065 cm-1 (in CHCl3) that are assigned, respectively, to CN-solvent complexes and

  16. Memory effects in nonadiabatic molecular dynamics at metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of temporal correlation in a Langevin equation describing nonadiabatic dynamics at metal surfaces. For a harmonic oscillator, the Langevin equation preserves the quantum dynamics exactly and it is demonstrated that memory effects are needed in order to conserve the ground state......, this approach is readily extended to anharmonic potentials. Using density functional theory, we calculate representative Langevin trajectories for associative desorption of N-2 from Ru(0001) and find that memory effects lower the dissipation of energy. Finally, we propose an ab initio scheme to calculate...

  17. Proceedings of the Workshop on open problems in heavy ion reaction dynamics at VIVITRON energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    Some problems of heavy ion reaction dynamics at the VIVITRON tandem accelerator and the experimental facilities are discussed at the meeting. Topics include light dinuclear systems, collision dynamics at low energies, fission evaporation and fusion of heavy nuclei and others. Most documents consist of transparencies presented at the workshop, texts of papers are missing. All items are indexed and abstracted for the INIS database. (K.A.)

  18. Dynamics of Reactions Involving Hydrogen Atom or Proton Transfer Symmetric Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    rates; tunneling; atom and proton transfer. 20 ABSTRACT ( ContInuo an revese side It necoee.,y and idenlify by block moibor) / C_ -3 A method is... improve the understanding of the dynamics of the reaction and facilitate its computational treatment. If a quasi-constant of the motion does exist for a...neglect of nonadiabatic effects and (ii) use of polar coordinates to treat the dynamics. Each could be improved , e. g. , in (i) by including perturbatively

  19. Constrained chemical dynamics of CO dissociation/hydrogenation on Rh surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Peter; Frank, Irmgard

    2018-02-21

    Among noble metal catalysts, rhodium (Rh) is unique in its ability to perform one step synthesis of ethanol from syngas. The first steps following adsorption of syngas on Rh surfaces are assumed to be responsible for the conversion of CO and selectivity effects between C1, C2 and oxygenated species. In the current work, we have applied constrained ab initio molecular dynamics to investigate the kinetics of CO dissociation and hydrogenation over flat and stepped Rh surfaces. The obtained barriers for the Rh(111) surface are in a good agreement with the literature. On the stepped Rh(211) surface, a large site-dependent variation in barrier height is shown, with the upper terrace exhibiting behaviour comparable to the Rh(111) surface, while the barriers over the lower terrace site are generally significantly lower. We have calculated rate constants using transition state theory for both surfaces, and successfully applied them in a microkinetic model, confirming the predicted impact on CO conversion and CH4 /C1-oxygenate/C2Hn selectivity. In addition to reporting high-accuracy energetics and rate constants for CO dissociation/hydrogenation, and presenting an updated microkinetic mechanism for Rh catalysts, we have confirmed the applicability of constrained molecular dynamics for reaction barrier calculation, and we have also highlighted sensitive pathways affecting the selectivity between formaldehyde/methanol over Rh catalysts. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A Practical Quantum Mechanics Molecular Mechanics Method for the Dynamical Study of Reactions in Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I; Marcos-Alcalde, Iñigo; Trabada, Daniel G; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Ortega, José; Mendieta, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods are excellent tools for the modeling of biomolecular reactions. Recently, we have implemented a new QM/MM method (Fireball/Amber), which combines an efficient density functional theory method (Fireball) and a well-recognized molecular dynamics package (Amber), offering an excellent balance between accuracy and sampling capabilities. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the Fireball method and Fireball/Amber implementation. We also discuss how this tool can be used to analyze reactions in biomolecules using steered molecular dynamics simulations. The potential of this approach is shown by the analysis of a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM). The conformational space and energetic landscape for this reaction are analyzed without a priori assumptions about the protonation states of the different residues during the reaction. The results offer a detailed description of the reaction and reveal some new features of the catalytic mechanism. In particular, we find a new reaction mechanism that is characterized by the intramolecular proton transfer from O1 to O2 and the simultaneous proton transfer from Glu 165 to C2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fission dynamics of 240Cf* formed in 34,36S induced reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the entrance channel effects in the decay of Compound nucleus 240Cf* formed in 34S+206Pb and 36S+204Pb reactions by using energy density dependent nuclear proximity potential in the framework of dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM. At different excitation energies, the fragmentation potential and preformation probability of decaying fragments are almost identical for both the entrance channels, which seem to suggest that decay is independent of its formation and entrance channel excitation energy. It is also observed that, with inclusion of deformation effects upto quadrupole within the optimum orientation approach, the fragmentation path governing potential energy surfaces gets modified significantly. Beside this, the fission mass distribution of Cf* isotopes is also investigated. The calculated fission cross-sections using SIII force for both the channels find nice agreement with the available experimental data for deformed choice of fragments, except at higher energies. In addition to this, the comparative analysis with Blocki based nuclear attraction is also worked out. It is observed that Blocki proximity potential accounts well for the CN decay at all energies whereas the use of EDF based nuclear potential suggests the presence of some non-compound nucleus process (such as quasi-fission (qf at higher energies.

  2. Communication: Mode specific quantum dynamics of the F + CHD{sub 3} → HF + CD{sub 3} reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Ji; Song, Hongwei; Yang, Minghui, E-mail: yangmh@wipm.ac.cn, E-mail: juliana@unq.edu.ar, E-mail: uwe.manthe@uni-bielefeld.de [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, National Center for Magnetic Resonance in Wuhan, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Palma, Juliana, E-mail: yangmh@wipm.ac.cn, E-mail: juliana@unq.edu.ar, E-mail: uwe.manthe@uni-bielefeld.de [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, CONICET, Sáenz Peña 352, Bernal B1876BXD (Argentina); Manthe, Uwe, E-mail: yangmh@wipm.ac.cn, E-mail: juliana@unq.edu.ar, E-mail: uwe.manthe@uni-bielefeld.de [Theoretische Chemie, Fakultät für Chemie, Universität Bielefeld, Universitätsstr. 25, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Guo, Hua [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2016-05-07

    The mode specific reactivity of the F + CHD{sub 3} → HF + CD{sub 3} reaction is investigated using an eight-dimensional quantum dynamical model on a recently developed ab initio based full-dimensional potential energy surface. Our results indicate prominent resonance structures at low collision energies and absence of an energy threshold in reaction probabilities. It was also found that excitation of the C–D stretching or CD{sub 3} umbrella mode has a relatively small impact on reactivity. On the other hand, the excitation of the C–H vibration (v{sub 1}) in CHD{sub 3} is shown to significantly increase the reactivity, which, like several recent quasi-classical trajectory studies, is at odds with the available experimental data. Possible sources of the disagreement are discussed.

  3. Coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator: Model and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Melke A.; Nagao, Raphael; Eiswirth, Markus; Varela, Hamilton

    2014-01-01

    The co-existence of disparate time scales is pervasive in many systems. In particular for surface reactions, it has been shown that the long-term evolution of the core oscillator is decisively influenced by slow surface changes, such as progressing deactivation. Here we present an in-depth numerical investigation of the coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator. The model consists of four nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, investigated over a wide parameter range. Besides the conventional bifurcation analysis, the system was studied by means of high-resolution period and Lyapunov diagrams. It was observed that the bifurcation diagram changes considerably as the irreversible surface poisoning evolves, and the oscillatory region shrinks. The qualitative dynamics changes accordingly and the chaotic oscillations are dramatically suppressed. Nevertheless, periodic cascades are preserved in a confined region of the resistance vs. voltage diagram. Numerical results are compared to experiments published earlier and the latter reinterpreted. Finally, the comprehensive description of the time-evolution in the period and Lyapunov diagrams suggests further experimental studies correlating the evolution of the system's dynamics with changes of the catalyst structure

  4. Coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator: Model and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Melke A.; Nagao, Raphael; Eiswirth, Markus; Varela, Hamilton

    2014-12-01

    The co-existence of disparate time scales is pervasive in many systems. In particular for surface reactions, it has been shown that the long-term evolution of the core oscillator is decisively influenced by slow surface changes, such as progressing deactivation. Here we present an in-depth numerical investigation of the coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator. The model consists of four nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, investigated over a wide parameter range. Besides the conventional bifurcation analysis, the system was studied by means of high-resolution period and Lyapunov diagrams. It was observed that the bifurcation diagram changes considerably as the irreversible surface poisoning evolves, and the oscillatory region shrinks. The qualitative dynamics changes accordingly and the chaotic oscillations are dramatically suppressed. Nevertheless, periodic cascades are preserved in a confined region of the resistance vs. voltage diagram. Numerical results are compared to experiments published earlier and the latter reinterpreted. Finally, the comprehensive description of the time-evolution in the period and Lyapunov diagrams suggests further experimental studies correlating the evolution of the system's dynamics with changes of the catalyst structure.

  5. Modeling Apple Surface Temperature Dynamics Based on Weather Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed was recorded for seven hours between 11:00–18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of “Fuji” apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management.

  6. A constrained reduced-dimensionality search algorithm to follow chemical reactions on potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankau, Timm; Yu, Chin-Hui

    2013-06-01

    A constrained reduced-dimensionality algorithm can be used to efficiently locate transition states and products in reactions involving conformational changes. The search path (SP) is constructed stepwise from linear combinations of a small set of manually chosen internal coordinates, namely the predictors. The majority of the internal coordinates, the correctors, are optimized at every step of the SP to minimize the total energy of the system so that the path becomes a minimum energy path connecting products and transition states with the reactants. Problems arise when the set of predictors needs to include weak coordinates, for example, dihedral angles, as well as strong ones such as bond distances. Two principal constraining methods for the weak coordinates are proposed to mend this situation: static and dynamic constraints. Dynamic constraints are automatically activated and revoked depending on the state of the weak coordinates among the predictors, while static ones require preset control factors and act permanently. All these methods enable the successful application (4 reactions are presented involving cyclohexane, alanine dipeptide, trimethylsulfonium chloride, and azafulvene) of the reduced dimensionality method to reactions where the reaction path covers large conformational changes in addition to the formation/breaking of chemical bonds. Dynamic constraints are found to be the most efficient method as they require neither additional information about the geometry of the transition state nor fine tuning of control parameters.

  7. Evaporation dynamics of completely wetting drops on geometrically textured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhitarian, Loucine; Sobac, Benjamin; Dehaeck, Sam; Haut, Benoît; Colinet, Pierre

    2017-10-01

    This study deals with the evaporation dynamics of completely wetting and highly volatile drops deposited on geometrically textured but chemically homogeneous surfaces. The texturation consists in a cylindrical pillars array with a square pitch. The triple line dynamics and the drop shape are characterized by an interferometric method. A parametric study is realized by varying the radius and the height of the pillars (at fixed interpillar distance), allowing to distinguish three types of dynamics: i) an evaporation-dominated regime with a receding triple line; ii) a spreading-dominated regime with an initially advancing triple line; iii) a cross-over region with strong pinning effects. The overall picture is in qualitative agreement with a mathematical model showing that the selected regime mostly depends on the value of a dimensionless parameter comparing the time scales for evaporation and spreading into the substrate texture.

  8. Dynamic Surface Control and Its Application to Lateral Vehicle Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongsob Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends the design and analysis methodology of dynamic surface control (DSC in Song and Hedrick, 2011, for a more general class of nonlinear systems. When rotational mechanical systems such as lateral vehicle control and robot control are considered for applications, sinusoidal functions are easily included in the equation of motions. If such a sinusoidal function is used as a forcing term for DSC, the stability analysis faces the difficulty due to highly nonlinear functions resulting from the low-pass filter dynamics. With modification of input variables to the filter dynamics, the burden of mathematical analysis can be reduced and stability conditions in linear matrix inequality form to guarantee the quadratic stability via DSC are derived for the given class of nonlinear systems. Finally, the proposed design and analysis approach are applied to lateral vehicle control for forward automated driving and backward parallel parking at a low speed as well as an illustrative example.

  9. Dynamics and Instabilities of Free Surface and Vortex Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tophøj, Laust Emil Hjerrild

    2012-01-01

    This PhD thesis consists of two main parts. The first part describes the dynamics of an ideal fluid on a stationary free surface of a given shape. It turns out that one can formulate a set of self-contained equations of momentum conservation for the tangential flow, with no reference to the flow ......)]. Finally, an experimental work on elastic collisions of wet spheres is briefly discussed....

  10. Dynamic Melting of Freezing Droplets on Ultraslippery Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Fuqiang; Wu, Xiaomin; Wang, Lingli

    2017-03-08

    Condensed droplet freezing and freezing droplet melting phenomena on the prepared ultraslippery superhydrophobic surface were observed and discussed in this study. Although the freezing delay performance of the surface is common, the melting of the freezing droplets on the surface is quite interesting. Three self-propelled movements of the melting droplets (ice- water mixture) were found including the droplet rotating, the droplet jumping, and the droplet sliding. The melting droplet rotating, which means that the melting droplet rotates spontaneously on the superhydrophobic surface like a spinning top, is first reported in this study and may have some potential applications in various engineering fields. The melting droplet jumping and sliding are similar to those occurring during condensation but have larger size scale and motion scale, as the melting droplets have extra-large specific surface area with much more surface energy available. These self-propelled movements make all the melting droplets on the superhydrophobic surface dynamic, easily removed, which may be promising for the anti-icing/frosting applications.

  11. Dynamical Behaviors of Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion Cohen-Grossberg Neural Networks with Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates dynamical behaviors of stochastic Cohen-Grossberg neural network with delays and reaction diffusion. By employing Lyapunov method, Poincaré inequality and matrix technique, some sufficient criteria on ultimate boundedness, weak attractor, and asymptotic stability are obtained. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the correctness and effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  12. Dynamics of chemical reactions of multiply-charged cations: Information from beam scattering experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herman, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 378, FEB 2015 (2015), s. 113-126 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Multiply-charged ions * Dynamics of chemical reactions * Beam scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  13. Ab initio molecular dynamics study of the reaction of water with formaldehyde in sulfuric acid solution.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprik, M.; Meijer, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics methods have been used to study the reaction mechanism of acidcatalyzed addition of water to formaldehyde in a model system of an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid. Using the method of constraints we find that an H

  14. The European Continent : Surface Expression of Upper Mantle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondi, M. R.; Schivardi, R.; Molinari, I.; Morelli, A.

    2012-12-01

    The surface topography of Europe shows important variations, most of which are relatively well explained by isostatic compensation of density contrasts within the crust and lithosphere. However, not all of the density contrasts leading to topography reside within the lithosphere. The crucial problem is how to detect the extra topography signal, in addition to that associated with both crustal and lithospheric anomalies. Forte and Perry, 2000 estimate the amplitude of the dynamic topography by removal of the crustal isostatic topography signal from the surface of the Earth. Faccenna and Becker, 2010 infer the equivalent dynamic topography from the normal stress generated at the surface by mantle viscous flow driven by thermal anomalies. Here we consider the correlation between residual topography and mantle residual gravity anomalies. As shown by Pekeris, 1935 and Hager et al., 1985, the viscous mantle flow that is driven by the thermal density contrasts is responsible for the long-wavelength gravity anomalies observed at the surface. They have demonstrated that the gravitational effects of surface deformation caused by the flow is opposite in sign and comparable in magnitude to that of the driving density contrast. The 1°x1° recently assembled European crustal model, EPCrust (Molinari and Morelli, 2011) is used to estimate the effects of the isostatic crust and the mantle residual gravity anomalies. We calculate the correlation matrix between the residual topography and the mantle residual gravity anomalies and we define the regions where the sublithospheric mantle density, below the European continent, contributes to surface topography. To recover the residual topography, the effects of the isostatic crust is estimated with the Panasyuk and Hager (2000) algorithm and subtracted from the observed elevation (ETOPO-1). The mantle residual gravity anomalies are estimated as the differences between the produced gravity field of EPCrust and the observations. 3-D

  15. Surface chemical reactions induced by molecules electronically-excited in the gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrunin, Victor V.

    2011-01-01

    and alignment are taking place, guiding all the molecules towards the intersections with the ground state PES, where transitions to the ground state PES will occur with minimum energy dissipation. The accumulated kinetic energy may be used to overcome the chemical reaction barrier. While recombination chemical...... beams inducing the reaction can be used to distinguish the new process we try to investigate from chemical reactions induced by photoexcitation within adsorbed molecules and/or gas phase photolysis.......We present a model suggesting high chemical activity of electronically-excited molecules colliding with an isolator surface. Initial photochemical event is accounted for as the result of molecular evolution on the electronically-excited potential energy surface (PES), where acceleration...

  16. Surface concentration nonuniformities resulting from chronoamperometry of a reversible reaction at an ultramicrodisk electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Britz, Dieter H.; Strutwolf, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The chronoamperometric experiment at a disk electrode was simulated, assuming a reversible reaction. When the diffusion coefficients of the two substances involved are different, there appears a surface concentration non- uniformity in the radial direction, exhibiting a maximum effect in time...

  17. Collective modes: Dynamical dipole excitation in dissipative heavy-ion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierroutsakou, D.; Parascandolo, C.; Silvestri, R.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Baran, V.; Boiano, A.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; De Filippo, E.; Del Zoppo, A.; Di Toro, M.; Emanuele, U.; Farinon, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; Inglima, G.; La Commara, M.; Maiolino, C.; Martin, B.; Mazzocco, M.; Mazzocchi, C.; Molini, P.; Rizzo, C.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.; Santonocito, D.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2012-02-01

    The existence of the dynamical dipole mode in the 192Pb composite system was investigated, through the study of its prompt γ decay, employing the 40Ca+152Sm and 48Ca+144Sm reactions at Elab=11 and 10.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively. The γ-rays and light charged particles were detected in coincidence with evaporation residues and fission fragments. First results of this experiment show that the dynamical dipole mode survives in collisions involving heavier mass reaction partners than those studied previously. As a fast cooling mechanism on the fusion path, the prompt dipole γ radiation could be of interest for the synthesis of super-heavy elements through "hot" fusion reactions. Furthermore, by using radioactive beams and the prompt γ radiation as a probe we could get information on the symmetry energy at sub-saturation densities.

  18. Dynamical Dipole mode in heavy-ion fusion reactions by using stable and radioactive beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molini P.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The existence of the dynamical dipole mode in the 192Pb composite system was investigated through the study of its prompt γ decay employing the 40Ca + 152Sm and 48Ca + 144Sm reactions at Elab =11 and 10.1 MeV/u, respectively. The γ-rays and light charged particles were detected in coincidence with evaporation residues and fission fragments. First results of this experiment show that the dynamical dipole mode survives in collisions involving heavier mass reaction partners than those studied previously. As a fast cooling mechanism on the fusion path, the prompt dipole γ radiation could be of interest for the synthesis of super-heavy elements through ”hot” fusion reactions. Furthermore, by using radioactive beams and the prompt γ radiation as a probe we could get information on the symmetry energy at sub-saturation densities.

  19. Dynamical Dipole mode in heavy-ion fusion reactions by using stable and radioactive beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierroutsakou, D.; Parascandolo, C.; Silvestri, R.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Baran, V.; Boiano, A.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; De Filippo, E.; De Rosa, A.; Del Zoppo, A.; Di Toro, M.; Emanuele, U.; Farinon, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; Inglima, G.; La Commara, M.; Maiolino, C.; Martin, B.; Mazzocco, M.; Mazzocchi, C.; Molini, P.; Rizzo, C.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.; Santonocito, D.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2011-10-01

    The existence of the dynamical dipole mode in the 192Pb composite system was investigated through the study of its prompt γ decay employing the 40Ca + 152Sm and 48Ca + 144Sm reactions at Elab =11 and 10.1 MeV/u, respectively. The γ-rays and light charged particles were detected in coincidence with evaporation residues and fission fragments. First results of this experiment show that the dynamical dipole mode survives in collisions involving heavier mass reaction partners than those studied previously. As a fast cooling mechanism on the fusion path, the prompt dipole γ radiation could be of interest for the synthesis of super-heavy elements through "hot" fusion reactions. Furthermore, by using radioactive beams and the prompt γ radiation as a probe we could get information on the symmetry energy at sub-saturation densities.

  20. Biofilm attachment reduction on bioinspired, dynamic, micro-wrinkling surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, Alexander K; Hong, Donggyoon; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Most bacteria live in multicellular communities known as biofilms that are adherent to surfaces in our environment, from sea beds to plumbing systems. Biofilms are often associated with clinical infections, nosocomial deaths and industrial damage such as bio-corrosion and clogging of pipes. As mature biofilms are extremely challenging to eradicate once formed, prevention is advantageous over treatment. However, conventional surface chemistry strategies are either generally transient, due to chemical masking, or toxic, as in the case of leaching marine antifouling paints. Inspired by the nonfouling skins of echinoderms and other marine organisms, which possess highly dynamic surface structures that mechanically frustrate bio-attachment, we have developed and tested a synthetic platform based on both uniaxial mechanical strain and buckling-induced elastomer microtopography. Bacterial biofilm attachment to the dynamic substrates was studied under an array of parameters, including strain amplitude and timescale (1–100 mm s −1 ), surface wrinkle length scale, bacterial species and cell geometry, and growth time. The optimal conditions for achieving up to ∼ 80% Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm reduction after 24 h growth and ∼ 60% reduction after 48 h were combinatorially elucidated to occur at 20% strain amplitude, a timescale of less than ∼ 5 min between strain cycles and a topography length scale corresponding to the cell dimension of ∼ 1 μm. Divergent effects on the attachment of P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms showed that the dynamic substrate also provides a new means of species-specific biofilm inhibition, or inversely, selection for a desired type of bacteria, without reliance on any toxic or transient surface chemical treatments. (paper)

  1. Biofilm attachment reduction on bioinspired, dynamic, micro-wrinkling surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Alexander K.; Hong, Donggyoon; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    Most bacteria live in multicellular communities known as biofilms that are adherent to surfaces in our environment, from sea beds to plumbing systems. Biofilms are often associated with clinical infections, nosocomial deaths and industrial damage such as bio-corrosion and clogging of pipes. As mature biofilms are extremely challenging to eradicate once formed, prevention is advantageous over treatment. However, conventional surface chemistry strategies are either generally transient, due to chemical masking, or toxic, as in the case of leaching marine antifouling paints. Inspired by the nonfouling skins of echinoderms and other marine organisms, which possess highly dynamic surface structures that mechanically frustrate bio-attachment, we have developed and tested a synthetic platform based on both uniaxial mechanical strain and buckling-induced elastomer microtopography. Bacterial biofilm attachment to the dynamic substrates was studied under an array of parameters, including strain amplitude and timescale (1-100 mm s-1), surface wrinkle length scale, bacterial species and cell geometry, and growth time. The optimal conditions for achieving up to ˜ 80% Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm reduction after 24 h growth and ˜ 60% reduction after 48 h were combinatorially elucidated to occur at 20% strain amplitude, a timescale of less than ˜ 5 min between strain cycles and a topography length scale corresponding to the cell dimension of ˜ 1 μm. Divergent effects on the attachment of P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms showed that the dynamic substrate also provides a new means of species-specific biofilm inhibition, or inversely, selection for a desired type of bacteria, without reliance on any toxic or transient surface chemical treatments.

  2. Chiral Dynamics and Dubna-Mainz Dynamical Model for Pion Photoproduction Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shin Nan

    We demonstrate that the Dubna-Mainz-Taipei (DMT) meson-exchange dynamical model, which starts from an effective chiral Lagrangian, for pion photoproduction provides an excellent and economic framework to describe both the π0 threshold production and the Δ deformation, two features dictated by chiral dynamics.

  3. Chiral Dynamics and Dubna-Mainz-Taipei Dynamical Model for Pion-Photoproduction Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shin Nan

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that the Dubna-Mainz-Taipei (DMT) meson-exchange dynamical model, which starts from an effective chiral Lagrangian, for pion photoproduction provides an excellent and economic framework to describe both the pi^0 threshold production and the Delta deformation, two features dictated by chiral dynamics.

  4. Predictors of chronic ankle instability: Analysis of peroneal reaction time, dynamic balance and isokinetic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Guzmán, Rafael; Jiménez, Fernando; Abián-Vicén, Javier

    2018-03-06

    Previous studies have reported the factors contributing to chronic ankle instability, which could lead to more effective treatments. However, factors such as the reflex response and ankle muscle strength have not been taken into account in previous investigations. Fifty recreational athletes with chronic ankle instability and 55 healthy controls were recruited. Peroneal reaction time in response to sudden inversion, isokinetic evertor muscle strength and dynamic balance with the Star Excursion Balance Test and the Biodex Stability System were measured. The relationship between the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and performance on each test was assessed and a backward multiple linear regression analysis was conducted. Participants with chronic ankle instability showed prolonged peroneal reaction time, poor performance in the Biodex Stability System and decreased reach distance in the Star Excursion Balance Test. No significant differences were found in eversion and inversion peak torque. Moderate correlations were found between the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and the peroneal reaction time and performance on the Star Excursion Balance Test. Peroneus brevis reaction time and the posteromedial and lateral directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test accounted for 36% of the variance in the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Dynamic balance deficits and delayed peroneal reaction time are present in participants with chronic ankle instability. Peroneus brevis reaction time and the posteromedial and lateral directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test were the main contributing factors to the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score. No clear strength impairments were reported in unstable ankles. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Effect of loading rate on dynamic fracture of reaction bonded silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, B. M.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    Wedge-loaded, modified tapered double cantilever beam (WL-MTDCB) specimens under impact loading were used to determine the room temperature dynamic fracture response of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN). The crack extension history, with the exception of the terminal phase, was similar to that obtained under static loading. Like its static counterpart, a distinct crack acceleration phase, which was not observed in dynamic fracture of steel and brittle polymers, was noted. Unlike its static counterpart, the crack continued to propagate at nearly its terminal velocity under a low dynamic stress intensity factor during the terminal phase of crack propagation. These and previously obtained results for glass and RBSN show that dynamic crack arrest under a positive dynamic stress intensity factor is unlikely in static and impact loaded structural ceramics.

  6. The READY program: Building a global potential energy surface and reactive dynamic simulations for the hydrogen combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogo, César; Brandão, João

    2014-06-30

    READY (REActive DYnamics) is a program for studying reactive dynamic systems using a global potential energy surface (PES) built from previously existing PESs corresponding to each of the most important elementary reactions present in the system. We present an application to the combustion dynamics of a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen using accurate PESs for all the systems involving up to four oxygen and hydrogen atoms. Results at the temperature of 4000 K and pressure of 2 atm are presented and compared with model based on rate constants. Drawbacks and advantages of this approach are discussed and future directions of research are pointed out. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Manipulating dynamic drops using a hybrid superhydrophobic/hydrophilic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yunhe; Song, Dong; Song, Baowei; Hu, Haibao

    2016-11-01

    A hybrid surface composed of superhydrophobic patterns on hydrophilic substrate was fabricated by selective painting. The impingement of a water drop on this surface was investigated using lattice Boltzmann simulation. When a drop impinged on the boundary line between the superhydrophobic and hydrophilic area, the drop would spread preferentially to the hydrophilic area while the spreading at the superhydrophobic area was highly impeded. The maximum spreading diameters as well as the spreading time, which are extremely important for the heat transfer on solid surfaces, were analyzed in detail. By adjusting the distance between the landing point and the boundary line of the superhydrophobic/hydrophilic area, the maximum spreading diameter and spreading time could be altered precisely. The impinging velocity has been found to be important on the manipulation of the dynamic droplet as well.

  8. DNSC08 mean sea surface and mean dynamic topography models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    2009-01-01

    -2004. It is the first global MSS without a polar gap including all of the Arctic Ocean by including laser altimetry from the ICESat mission. The mean dynamic topography (MDT) is the quantity that bridges the geoid and the mean sea surface constraining large-scale ocean circulation. Here we present a new high...... models. This way a consistent modeling of the interannual sea level variability is carried out before different MSS and MDT models are compared. Altimetric derived physical MSS can be converted into an "inverse barometer corrected MSS'' by correcting the altimeter range for the inverse barometer effect......The Danish National Space Center data set DNSC08 mean sea surface (MSS) is a new enhanced mapping of the mean sea surface height of the worlds oceans, derived from a combination of 12 years of satellite altimetry from a total of eight different satellites covering the period 1993...

  9. Probing the Surface of Platinum during the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey A. [Physical; Favaro, Marco [Advanced; Joint; Chemical; Ross, Philip N. [Materials; Yano, Junko [Joint; Molecular; Liu, Zhi [State; Division; Hussain, Zahid [Advanced; Crumlin, Ethan J. [Advanced; Joint Center

    2017-11-02

    Understanding the surface chemistry of electrocatalysts in operando can bring insight into the reaction mechanism, and ultimately the design of more efficient materials for sustainable energy storage and conversion. Recent progress in synchrotron based X-ray spectroscopies for in operando characterization allows us to probe the solid/liquid interface directly while applying an external potential, applied here to the model system of Pt in alkaline electrolyte for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We employ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) to identify the oxidation and reduction of Pt-oxides and hydroxides on the surface as a function of applied potential, and further assess the potential for hydrogen adsorption and absorption (hydride formation) during and after the HER. This new window into the surface chemistry of Pt in alkaline brings insight into the nature of the rate limiting step, the extent of H ad/absorption and it’s persistence at more anodic potentials.

  10. Condensation and Wetting Dynamics on Micro/Nano-Structured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olceroglu, Emre

    -condensable gases (NCGs), a novel characterization technique has been developed based on image tracking of droplet growth rates. The full-field dynamic characterization of superhydrophobic surfaces during condensation has been achieved using high-speed microscopy coupled with image-processing algorithms. This method is able to resolve heat fluxes as low as 20 W/m 2 and heat transfer coefficients of up to 1000 kW/m2, across an array of 1000's of microscale droplets simultaneously. Nanostructured surfaces with mixed wettability have been used to demonstrate delayed flooding during superhydrophobic condensation. These surfaces have been optimized and characterized using optical and electron microscopy, leading to the observation of self-organizing microscale droplets. The self-organization of small droplets effectively delays the onset of surface flooding, allowing the superhydrophobic surfaces to operate at higher supersaturations. Additionally, hierarchical surfaces have been fabricated and characterized showing enhanced droplet growth rates as compared to existing models. This enhancement has been shown to be derived from the presence of small feeder droplets nucleating within the microscale unit cells of the hierarchical surfaces. Based on the experimental observations, a mechanistic model for growth rates has been developed for superhydrophobic hierarchical surfaces. While superhydrophobic surfaces exhibit high heat transfer rates they are inherently unstable due to the necessity to maintain a non-wetted state in a condensing environment. As an alternative condensation surface, a novel design is introduced here using ambiphilic structures to promote the formation of a thin continuous liquid film across the surface which can still provide the benefits of superhydrophobic condensation. Preliminary results show that the ambiphilic structures restrain the film thickness, thus maintaining a low thermal resistance while simultaneously maximizing the liquid-vapor interface available for

  11. Oxidation of elemental mercury by chlorine: Gas phase, Surface,and Photo-induced reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2004-10-22

    Accurate oxidation rate constants of mercury gas are needed for determining its dispersion and lifetime in the atmosphere. They would also help in developing a technology for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, it is difficult to establish the accurate rate constants primarily due to the fact that mercury easily adsorbs on solid surface and its reactions can be catalyzed by the surface. We have demonstrated a procedure that allows the determination of gas phase, surface-induced, and photo-induced contributions in the kinetic study of the oxidation of mercury by chlorine gas. The kinetics was studied using reactors with various surface to volume ratios. The effect of the surface and the photo irradiation on the reaction was taken into consideration. The pressure dependent study revealed that the gas phase oxidation was a three-body collision process. The third order rate constant was determined to be 7.5({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -39} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -2}s{sup -1} with N{sub 2} as the third body at 297 {+-} 1 K. The surface induced reaction on quartz window was second order and the rate constant was 2.7 x 10{sup -17} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -1} cm{sup -2} sec. Meanwhile, the 253.7 nm photon employed for mercury detection was found to accelerate the reaction. The utilization efficiency of 253.7 nm photon for Hg{sup 0} oxidation was 6.7 x 10{sup -4} molecules photon{sup -1} under the conditions employed in this study.

  12. Potential energy surface of the reaction of imidazole with peroxynitrite: Density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogonea, Valentin

    This article presents a theoretical investigation of the reaction mechanism of imidazole nitration by peroxynitrite using density functional theory calculations. Understanding this reaction mechanism will help in elucidating the mechanism of guanine nitration by peroxynitrite, which is one of the assumed chemical pathways for damaging DNA in cells. This work focuses on the analysis of the potential energy surface (PES) for this reaction in the gas phase. Calculations were carried out using Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) Hamiltonians with double-zeta basis sets ranging from 6-31G(d) to 6-31++G(d,p), and the triple-zeta basis set 6-311G(d). The computational results reveal that the reaction of imidazole with peroxynitrite in gas phase produces the following species: (i) hydroxide ion and 2-nitroimidazole, (ii) hydrogen superoxide ion and 2-nitrosoimidazole, and (iii) water and 2-nitroimidazolide. The rate-determining step is the formation of a short-lived intermediate in which the imidazole C2 carbon is covalently bonded to peroxynitrite nitrogen. Three short-lived intermediates were found in the reaction path. These intermediates are involved in a proton-hopping transport from C2 carbon to the terminal oxygen of the OO moiety of peroxynitrite via the nitroso (ON) oxygen. Both HF and DFT calculations (using the Becke3-Lee-Yang-Parr functional) lead to similar reaction paths for proton transport, but the landscape details of the PES for HF and DFT calculations differ. This investigation shows that the reaction of imidazole with peroxynitrite produces essentially the same types of products (nitro- and nitroso-) as observed experimentally in the reaction of guanine with peroxynitrite, which makes the former reaction a good model to study by computation the essential characteristics of the latter reaction. Nevertheless, the computationally determined activation energy for imidazole nitration by peroxynitrite in the gas phase is 84.1 kcal

  13. Small leak detection by measuring surface oscillation during sodium-water reaction in steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nei, Hiromichi; Hori, Masao

    1977-01-01

    Small leak sodium-water reaction tests were conducted to develop various kinds of leak detectors for the sodium-heated steam generator in FBR. The super-heated steam was injected into sodium in a reaction vessel having a sodium free surface, simulating the steam generator. The level gauge in the reaction vessel generated the most reliable signal among detectors, as long as the leak rates were relatively high. The level gauge signal was estimated to be the sodium surface oscillation caused by hydrogen bubbles produced in sodium-water reaction. Experimental correlation was derived, predicting the amplitude as a function of leak rate, hydrogen dissolution ratio, bubble rise velocity and other parameters concerned, assuming that the surface oscillation is in proportion to the gas hold-up. The noise amplitude under normal operation without water leak was increased with sodium flow rate and found to be well correlated with Froud number. These two correlations predict that a water leak in a ''MONJU'' class (300 MWe) steam generator could possibly be detected by level gauges at a leak rate above 2 g/sec. (auth.)

  14. Surface photo reaction processes using synchrotron radiation; Hoshako reiki ni yoru hyomenko hanno process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaizumi, Y. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute for Materials Research; Yoshigoe, A. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan); Urisu, T. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan). Institute for Molecular Science

    1997-08-20

    This paper introduces the surface photo reaction processes using synchrotron radiation, and its application. A synchrotron radiation process using soft X-rays contained in electron synchrotron radiated light as an excited light source has a possibility of high-resolution processing because of its short wave length. The radiated light can excite efficiently the electronic state of a substance, and can induce a variety of photochemical reactions. In addition, it can excite inner shell electrons efficiently. In the aspect of its application, it has been found that, if radiated light is irradiated on surfaces of solids under fluorine-based reaction gas or Cl2, the surfaces can be etched. This technology is utilized practically. With regard to radiated light excited CVD process, it may be said that anything that can be deposited by the ordinary plasma CVD process can be deposited. Its application to epitaxial crystal growth may be said a nano processing application in thickness direction, such as forming an ultra-lattice structure, the application being subjected to expectation. In micromachine fabricating technologies, a possibility is searched on application of a photo reaction process of the radiated light. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Electro-deposition of Pd on Carbon paper and Ni foam via surface limited redox-replacement reaction for oxygen reduction reaction: Presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available during the catalyst preparation process, Pd nanosturctures are grown directly on fuel cell gas diffusion layers and evaluated for the ORR. Pd nanostructures were synthesized via surface-limited redox replacement (SLRR) reaction employing...

  16. Electro-deposition of Pd on carbon paper and Ni foam via surface limited redox-replacement reaction for oxygen reduction reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pd nanostructured catalysts were electrodeposited by surface-limited redox replacement reactions usingthe electrochemical atomic layer deposition technique. Carbon paper and Ni foam were used as substratesfor the electrodeposition of the metal...

  17. Surface reaction and transport in mixed conductors with electrochemically-active surfaces: a 2-D numerical study of ceria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciucci, Francesco; Chueh, William C; Goodwin, David G; Haile, Sossina M

    2011-02-14

    A two-dimensional, small-bias model has been developed for describing transport through a mixed ionic and electronic conductor (MIEC) with electrochemically-active surfaces, a system of particular relevance to solid oxide fuel cells. Utilizing the h-adaptive finite-element method, we solve the electrochemical potential and flux for both ionic and electronic species in the MIEC, taking the transport properties of Sm(0.15)Ce(0.85)O(1.925-δ) (SDC15). In addition to the ionic flux that flows between the two sides of the cell, there are two types of electronic fluxes: (1) cross-plane current that flows in the same general direction as the ionic current, and (2) in-plane current that flows between the catalytically-active MIEC surface and the metal current collectors. From an evaluation of these fluxes, the macroscopic interfacial resistance is decomposed into an electrochemical reaction resistance and an electron diffusion-drift resistance, the latter associated with the in-plane electronic current. Analysis of the experimental data for the interfacial resistance for hydrogen electro-oxidation on SDC15 having either Pt or Au current collectors (W. Lai and S. M. Haile, J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 2005, 88, 2979-2997; W. C. Chueh, W. Lai and S. M. Haile, Solid State Ionics, 2008, 179, 1036-1041) indicates that surface reaction rather than electron migration is the overall rate-limiting step, and suggests furthermore that the surface reaction rate, which has not been directly measured in the literature, scales with pO2(-1/4). The penetration depth for the in-plane electronic current is estimated at 0.6 μm for the experimental conditions of interest to SDC15, and is found to attain a value as high as 4 μm within the broader range of computational conditions.

  18. Molecular resonances, fusion reactions and surface transparency of interaction between heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yasuhisa.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the Band Crossing Model is given, including recent results on the 16 O + 16 O system. Surface Transparency is discussed in the light of the recent development in our understanding of the fusion reaction mechanisms and by calculating the number of open channels available to direct reactions. The existence of the Molecular Resonance Region is suggested in several systems by the fact that Band Crossing Region overlaps with the Transparent Region. A systematic study predicts molecular resonances in the 14 C + 14 C and 12 C + 14 C systems as prominent as those observed in the 16 O + 16 O and 12 C + 16 O systems

  19. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathway for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such observables as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method with the Dunning correlation consistent basis sets to obtain accurate energetics, gives useful results for a number of chemically important systems. Applications to complex reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion are discussed.

  20. Surface Modification Reaction of Photocatalytic Titanium Dioxide with Triethoxysilane for Improving Dispersibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Jin; Kim, Ji Ho; Park, Young Tae

    2010-01-01

    We have carried out the surface modification of photocatalytic TiO 2 with triethoxysilane through dehydrogenation reaction and characterized the modified photocatalyst by spectroscopic methods, such as FT-IR, solid-state 29 Si MAS NMR, XPS, and XRF, etc. We also examined photocatalytic activity of the immobilized photocatalytic titanium dioxide with triethoxysilane by decolorization reaction of dyes such as cong red and methylene blue under visible light. Dispersion test showed that the photocatalytic titanium dioxide immobilized with triethoxysilane group has kept higher dispersibility than titanium dioxide itself. No appreciable precipitation takes place even after standing for 24 h in the 4:6 mixture ratio of ethanol and water

  1. Capturing Chemistry in Action with Electrons: Realization of Atomically Resolved Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ischenko, Anatoly A; Weber, Peter M; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2017-08-23

    One of the grand challenges in chemistry has been to directly observe atomic motions during chemical processes. The depiction of the nuclear configurations in space-time to understand barrier crossing events has served as a unifying intellectual theme connecting the different disciplines of chemistry. This challenge has been cast as an imaging problem in which the technical issues reduce to achieving not only sufficient simultaneous space-time resolution but also brightness for sufficient image contrast to capture the atomic motions. This objective has been met with electrons as the imaging source. The review chronicles the first use of electron structural probes to study reactive intermediates, to the development of high bunch charge electron pulses with sufficient combined spatial-temporal resolution and intensity to literally light up atomic motions, as well as the means to characterize the electron pulses in terms of temporal brightness and image reconstruction. The use of femtosecond Rydberg spectroscopy as a novel means to use internal electron scattering within the molecular reference frame to obtain similar information on reaction dynamics is also discussed. The focus is on atomically resolved chemical reaction dynamics with pertinent references to work in other areas and forms of spectroscopy that provide additional information. Effectively, we can now directly observe the far-from-equilibrium atomic motions involved in barrier crossing and categorize chemistry in terms of a power spectrum of a few dominant reaction modes. It is this reduction in dimensionality that makes chemical reaction mechanisms transferrable to seemingly arbitrarily complex (large N) systems, up to molecules as large as biological macromolecules (N > 1000 atoms). We now have a new way to reformulate reaction mechanisms using an experimentally determined dynamic mode basis that in combination with recent theoretical advances has the potential to lead to a new conceptual basis for

  2. Chemical surface reactions by click chemistry: coumarin dye modification of 11-bromoundecyltrichlorosilane monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haensch, Claudia; Hoeppener, Stephanie; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2008-01-01

    The functionalization of surfaces and the ability to tailor their properties with desired physico-chemical functions is an important field of research with a broad spectrum of applications. These applications range from the modification of wetting properties, over the alteration of optical properties, to the fabrication of molecular electronic devices. In each of these fields, it is of specific importance to be able to control the quality of the layers with high precision. The present study demonstrates an approach that utilizes the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of terminal acetylenes to prepare triazole-terminated monolayers on different substrates. The characterization of the precursor monolayers, the optimization of the chemical surface reactions as well as the clicking of a fluorescent dye molecule on such azide-terminated monolayers was carried out. A coumarin 343 derivative was utilized to discuss the aspects of the functionalization approach. Based on this approach, a number of potential surface reactions, facilitated via the acetylene-substituted functional molecules, for a broad range of applications is at hand, thus leading to numerous possibilities where surface modifications are concerned. These modifications can be applied on non-structured surfaces of silicon or glass or can be used on structured surfaces. Various possibilities are discussed

  3. Quantum dynamics of STM and laser induced desorption of atoms and molecules from surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Boendgen, G

    2001-01-01

    The manipulation of atoms and molecules at solid surfaces by electronic excitations with electrons (or holes) emitted from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or with laser radiation is both of applied and fundamental interest, e.g. for micro- and nanostructuring of materials, the clarification of elementary (catalytic) reaction mechanisms and for the question of how to treat the quantum dynamics of a laser or STM driven 'system' (the adsorbate) in contact with a dissipative (energy-withdrawing) 'bath' (the substrate). Desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) and its variant DIMET (M = multiple) are among the simplest possible 'reactions' of adsorbate-surface systems; usually involving extremely short-lived electronically excited intermediates. In this thesis, the ultra-short dynamics of directly (localised to the adsorbate-substrate complex) and indirectly (i.e., through the substrate) stimulated DIET and DIMET processes was studied for Si(100)-(2x1):H(D) and Pt(111):NO. Isotope effec...

  4. Adaptive integral dynamic surface control of a hypersonic flight vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam Butt, Waseem; Yan, Lin; Amezquita S., Kendrick

    2015-07-01

    In this article, non-linear adaptive dynamic surface air speed and flight path angle control designs are presented for the longitudinal dynamics of a flexible hypersonic flight vehicle. The tracking performance of the control design is enhanced by introducing a novel integral term that caters to avoiding a large initial control signal. To ensure feasibility, the design scheme incorporates magnitude and rate constraints on the actuator commands. The uncertain non-linear functions are approximated by an efficient use of the neural networks to reduce the computational load. A detailed stability analysis shows that all closed-loop signals are uniformly ultimately bounded and the ? tracking performance is guaranteed. The robustness of the design scheme is verified through numerical simulations of the flexible flight vehicle model.

  5. Dynamic surface fault tolerant control for underwater remotely operated vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, Alessandro; Ciabattoni, Lucio; Felicetti, Riccardo; Ferracuti, Francesco; Freddi, Alessandro; Monteriù, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we present a two stages actuator Fault Tolerant Control (FTC) strategy for the trajectory tracking of a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV). Dynamic Surface Control (DSC) is used to generate the moment and forces required by the vehicle to perform the desired motion. In the second stage of the control system, a fault tolerant thruster allocation policy is employed to distribute moment and forces among the thrusters. Exhaustive simulations have been carried out in order to compare the performance of the proposed solution with respect to different control techniques (i.e., PID, backstepping and sliding mode approaches). Saturations, actuator dynamics, sensor noises and time discretization are considered, in fault-free and faulty conditions. Furthermore, in order to provide a fair and exhaustive comparison of the control techniques, the same meta-heuristic approach, namely Artificial Bee Colony algorithm (ABC), has been employed to tune the controllers parameters. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-01-01

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  7. Investigations of the Fundamental Surface Reactions Involved in the Sorption and Desorption of Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Heske, Clemens; Moser, Duane; Misra, Mnoranjan; McMillion, Glen

    2011-04-20

    Models for describing solution- and surface-phase reactions have been used for 30 years, but only recently applicable to complex surfaces. Duff et al., using micro-XANES, found that Pu was concentrated on Mn-oxide and smectite phases of zeolitic tuff, providing an evaluation of contaminant speciation on surfaces for modeling. Experiments at Los Alamos demonstrated that actinides display varying surface residence time distributions, probably reflective of mineral surface heterogeneity. We propose to investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of radionuclides from mineral surfaces, as effected by microorganisms, employing isolates from Nevada Test Site deep alluvium as a model system. Characterizations will include surface area, particle size distribution, x-ray diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, extractions, and microbiology. Surface interactions will be assessed by electron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), X-ray emission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) researchers will collaborate to enhance scientific infrastructure and the understanding of contaminant behavior on surfaces, with broader implications for the management of DOE sites.

  8. Reactive surface organometallic complexes observed using dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Pump, Eva

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy (DNP SENS) is an emerging technique that allows access to high-sensitivity NMR spectra from surfaces. However, DNP SENS usually requires the use of radicals as an exogenous source of polarization, which has so far limited applications for organometallic surface species to those that do not react with the radicals. Here we show that reactive surface species can be studied if they are immobilized inside porous materials with suitably small windows, and if bulky nitroxide bi-radicals (here TEKPol) are used as the polarization source and which cannot enter the pores. The method is demonstrated by obtaining significant DNP enhancements from highly reactive complelxes [(equivalent to Si-O-)W(Me)(5)] supported on MCM-41, and effects of pore size (6.0, 3.0 and 2.5 nm) on the performance are discussed.

  9. XPS study on the surface reaction of uranium metal in H2 and H2-CO atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou

    1996-04-01

    The surface reactions of uranium metal in H 2 and H 2 -CO atmospheres and the effects of temperature and CO on the hydriding reaction have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The reaction between commercial H 2 and uranium metal at 25 degree C leads mainly to the further oxidation of surface layer of metal due to traces of water vapour. At 200 degree C, it may lead to the hydriding reaction of uranium and the hydriding increases with increasing the exposure of H 2 . Investigation indicates CO inhibits both the hydriding reaction and oxidation on the condition of H 2 -CO atmospheres. (13 refs., 10 figs.)

  10. Reaction Ensemble Molecular Dynamics: Direct Simulation of the Dynamic Equilibrium Properties of Chemically Reacting Mixtures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brennan, J.K.; Lísal, Martin; Gubbins, K.E.; Rice, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 6 (2004), 0611031-0611034 ISSN 1063-651X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/1588 Grant - others:NSF(US) CTS-0211792 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : reacting systems * simulation * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.352, year: 2004

  11. Electrokinetics of nanochannels and porous membranes with dynamic surface charges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo

    interesting because it relies on capillary filling, so it avoids the use of external forcing such as electric fields. Basically, during the filling of nanochannels by capillary action, the advancing electrolyte is titrated by deprotonation from the surface. This is observed using the pH-sensitive fluorescent....... Notably, we find that the conductance minimum is mainly caused by hydronium ions, and in our case almost exclusively due to carbonic acid generated from the dissolution of CO2 from the atmosphere. We carry out delicate experiments and measure the conductance of silica nanochannels as a function...... in the literature. Fourth, we use our model to predict a novel phenomenon called currentinduced membrane discharge (CIMD) to explain over-limiting current in ionexchange membranes. The model is based on dynamic surface charges in the membrane in equilibrium with the buffer. However, here we take the next step...

  12. Ring-Polymer Molecular Dynamics for the Prediction of Low-Temperature Rates: An Investigation of the C((1)D) + H2 Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Kevin M; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Guo, Hua; Suleimanov, Yury V

    2015-11-05

    Quantum mechanical calculations are important tools for predicting the rates of elementary reactions, particularly for those involving hydrogen and at low temperatures where quantum effects become increasingly important. These approaches are computationally expensive, however, particularly when applied to complex polyatomic systems or processes characterized by deep potential wells. While several approximate techniques exist, many of these have issues with reliability. The ring-polymer molecular dynamics method was recently proposed as an accurate and efficient alternative. Here, we test this technique at low temperatures (300-50 K) by analyzing the behavior of the barrierless C((1)D) + H2 reaction over the two lowest singlet potential energy surfaces. To validate the theory, rate coefficients were measured using a supersonic flow reactor down to 50 K. The experimental and theoretical rates are in excellent agreement, supporting the future application of this method for determining the kinetics and dynamics of a wide range of low-temperature reactions.

  13. Versatile gas-phase reactions for surface to bulk esterification of cellulose microfibrils aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Matthieu; Ouhab, Djamila; Boisseau, Sonia Molina; Heux, Laurent

    2013-09-09

    Aqueous suspensions of microfibrillated cellulose obtained by a high pressure homogenization process were freeze-dried after solvent exchange into tert-butanol. The resulting aerogels, which displayed a remarkable open morphology with a surface area reaching 100 m(2)/g, were subjected to a gas-phase esterification with palmitoyl chloride. Under these conditions, variations of the reaction temperature from 100 to 200 °C, of the reaction time from 0.5 to 2 h, and of the initial quantity of reagent, led to the preparation of a library of cellulose palmitates with DS varying from zero to 2.36. These products were characterized by gravimetry, FTIR, and (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Of special interest were the cellulose palmitate samples of low DS in the range of 0.1-0.4, which corresponded to hydrophobic cellulose microfibrils exclusively esterified at their surface while keeping intact their inner structure.

  14. Pseudospectral Gaussian quantum dynamics: Efficient sampling of potential energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, Charles W; Mazziotti, David A

    2016-04-28

    Trajectory-based Gaussian basis sets have been tremendously successful in describing high-dimensional quantum molecular dynamics. In this paper, we introduce a pseudospectral Gaussian-based method that achieves accurate quantum dynamics using efficient, real-space sampling of the time-dependent basis set. As in other Gaussian basis methods, we begin with a basis set expansion using time-dependent Gaussian basis functions guided by classical mechanics. Unlike other Gaussian methods but characteristic of the pseudospectral and collocation methods, the basis set is tested with N Dirac delta functions, where N is the number of basis functions, rather than using the basis function as test functions. As a result, the integration for matrix elements is reduced to function evaluation. Pseudospectral Gaussian dynamics only requires O(N) potential energy calculations, in contrast to O(N(2)) evaluations in a variational calculation. The classical trajectories allow small basis sets to sample high-dimensional potentials. Applications are made to diatomic oscillations in a Morse potential and a generalized version of the Henon-Heiles potential in two, four, and six dimensions. Comparisons are drawn to full analytical evaluation of potential energy integrals (variational) and the bra-ket averaged Taylor (BAT) expansion, an O(N) approximation used in Gaussian-based dynamics. In all cases, the pseudospectral Gaussian method is competitive with full variational calculations that require a global, analytical, and integrable potential energy surface. Additionally, the BAT breaks down when quantum mechanical coherence is particularly strong (i.e., barrier reflection in the Morse oscillator). The ability to obtain variational accuracy using only the potential energy at discrete points makes the pseudospectral Gaussian method a promising avenue for on-the-fly dynamics, where electronic structure calculations become computationally significant.

  15. Dynamic growth of slip surfaces in catastrophic landslides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanovich, Leonid N; Kim, Sihyun; Puzrin, Alexander M

    2016-01-01

    This work considers a landslide caused by the shear band that emerges along the potential slip (rupture) surface. The material above the band slides downwards, causing the band to grow along the slope. This growth may first be stable (progressive), but eventually becomes dynamic (catastrophic). The landslide body acquires a finite velocity before it separates from the substrata. The corresponding initial-boundary value problem for a dynamic shear band is formulated within the framework of Palmer & Rice's ( Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 332 , 527-548. (doi:10.1098/rspa.1973.0040)) approach, which is generalized to the dynamic case. We obtain the exact, closed-form solution for the band velocity and slip rate. This solution assesses when the slope fails owing to a limiting condition near the propagating tip of the shear band. Our results are applicable to both submarine and subaerial landslides of this type. It appears that neglecting dynamic (inertia) effects can lead to a significant underestimation of the slide size, and that the volumes of catastrophic slides can exceed the volumes of progressive slides by nearly a factor of 2. As examples, we consider the Gaviota and Humboldt slides offshore of California, and discuss landslides in normally consolidated sediments and sensitive clays. In particular, it is conceivable that Humboldt slide is unfinished and may still displace a large volume of sediments, which could generate a considerable tsunami. We show that in the case of submarine slides, the effect of water resistance on the shear band dynamics may frequently be limited during the slope failure stage. For a varying slope angle, we formulate a condition of slide cessation.

  16. Deuterium isotopic exchange reaction on the surface of promoted nickel catalysts+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou EL-Nour, F.; Abdel-Badei, M.M.; Belacy, N.

    1987-01-01

    Nickel catalysts promoted with different metal oxides proved to be efficient for the isotopic exchange of deuterium between hydrogen and water in the vapour phase. Estimation of the surface properties of this type of catalysts led to the correlation of the specific catalytic activity with their surface characteristics. The particle size of nickel content of the catalysts under investigation was determined from the surface area measurements. The equation used for particle size determination is a corrected one. The correction is based on the probability of sharing the 6-faces of cubic nickel crystals, present in the promoted catalyst, in the isotopic exchange process. It may be also due to the increased porosity of the components of the catalyst mixture. The results demonstrate the probability of migration of nickel crystals during the isotopic exchange reaction of deuterium between hydrogen and water in the vapour state on the surface of nickel catalysis promoted with different metal oxides

  17. Detection of submonolayer oxygen-18 on a gold surface by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L.S.; Kenny, M.J.; Wieczorek, L. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1993-12-31

    A gold substrate is the preferred solid surface for formation of an organic self-assembled monolayer ( SAM ). Device fabrication process may require the gold film to be exposed to photolithographic processing and plasma treatment prior to molecular assembly. It has been observed that oxygen plasma treatment prevents the formation of SAMs; however, subsequent treatment with an argon plasma allows assembly of the organic monolayers. To understand the mechanisms involved, a plasma containing 98% {sup 18}O was used and the film surface was analysed using the {sup 18}O (p,{alpha}){sup 15}N nuclear reaction. 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  18. Modeling of Transmittance Degradation Caused by Optical Surface Contamination by Atomic Oxygen Reaction with Adsorbed Silicones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Aaron; Banks, Bruce; Miller, Sharon; Stueber, Thomas; Sechkar, Edward

    2001-01-01

    A numerical procedure is presented to calculate transmittance degradation caused by contaminant films on spacecraft surfaces produced through the interaction of orbital atomic oxygen (AO) with volatile silicones and hydrocarbons from spacecraft components. In the model, contaminant accretion is dependent on the adsorption of species, depletion reactions due to gas-surface collisions, desorption, and surface reactions between AO and silicone producing SiO(x), (where x is near 2). A detailed description of the procedure used to calculate the constituents of the contaminant layer is presented, including the equations that govern the evolution of fractional coverage by specie type. As an illustrative example of film growth, calculation results using a prototype code that calculates the evolution of surface coverage by specie type is presented and discussed. An example of the transmittance degradation caused by surface interaction of AO with deposited contaminant is presented for the case of exponentially decaying contaminant flux. These examples are performed using hypothetical values for the process parameters.

  19. Dynamic and reversible surface topography influences cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Jennifer D; Wen, Jessica H; del Álamo, Juan C; Engler, Adam J

    2013-08-01

    Microscale and nanoscale surface topography changes can influence cell functions, including morphology. Although in vitro responses to static topography are novel, cells in vivo constantly remodel topography. To better understand how cells respond to changes in topography over time, we developed a soft polyacrylamide hydrogel with magnetic nickel microwires randomly oriented in the surface of the material. Varying the magnetic field around the microwires reversibly induced their alignment with the direction of the field, causing the smooth hydrogel surface to develop small wrinkles; changes in surface roughness, ΔRRMS , ranged from 0.05 to 0.70 μm and could be oscillated without hydrogel creep. Vascular smooth muscle cell morphology was assessed when exposed to acute and dynamic topography changes. Area and shape changes occurred when an acute topographical change was imposed for substrates exceeding roughness of 0.2 μm, but longer-term oscillating topography did not produce significant changes in morphology irrespective of wire stiffness. These data imply that cells may be able to use topography changes to transmit signals as they respond immediately to changes in roughness. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Slip on Curved Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross D.A.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations of liquid water confined within nanoscale geometries, including slit-like and cylindrical graphitic pores. These equilibrium results are used for calculating friction coefficients, which in turn can be used to calculate slip lengths. The slip length is a material property independent of the fluid flow rate. It is therefore a better quantity for study than the fluid velocity at the wall, also known as the slip velocity. Once the slip length has been found as a function of surface curvature, it can be used to parameterise Lattice Boltzmann (LB simulations. These larger scale simulations are able to tell us about how fluid transport is affected by slip in complex geometries; not just limited to single pores. Applications include flow and transport in nano-porous engine valve deposits and gas shales. The friction coefficient is found to be a function of curvature and is higher for fluid on convex surfaces and lower for concave surfaces. Both concave and convex surfaces approach the same value of the friction coefficient, which is constant above some critical radius of curvature, here found to be 7.4 ± 2.9 nm. The constant value of the friction coefficient is 10,000 ± 600 kg m−2 s−1, which is equivalent to a slip length of approximately 67 ± 4 nm.

  1. Can foot anthropometric measurements predict dynamic plantar surface contact area?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Natalie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have suggested that increased plantar surface area, associated with pes planus, is a risk factor for the development of lower extremity overuse injuries. The intent of this study was to determine if a single or combination of foot anthropometric measures could be used to predict plantar surface area. Methods Six foot measurements were collected on 155 subjects (97 females, 58 males, mean age 24.5 ± 3.5 years. The measurements as well as one ratio were entered into a stepwise regression analysis to determine the optimal set of measurements associated with total plantar contact area either including or excluding the toe region. The predicted values were used to calculate plantar surface area and were compared to the actual values obtained dynamically using a pressure sensor platform. Results A three variable model was found to describe the relationship between the foot measures/ratio and total plantar contact area (R2 = 0.77, p R2 = 0.76, p Conclusion The results of this study indicate that the clinician can use a combination of simple, reliable, and time efficient foot anthropometric measurements to explain over 75% of the plantar surface contact area, either including or excluding the toe region.

  2. Measuring the Electrode Kinetics of Surface Confined Electrode Reactions at a Constant Scan Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Guziejewski, Dariusz; Mirceski, Valentin; Jadresko, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: The kinetics of surface confined electrode reactions of alizarin, vitamin B12, and vitamin K2 is measured with square-wave voltammetry over a wide pH interval, by applying the recent methodology for kinetic analysis at a constant scan rate [V. Mirceski, D. Guziejewski, K. Lisichkov, Electrochim. Acta 2013, 114, 667–673]. The reliability and the simplicity of the recent methodology is confirmed. The methodology requires analysis of the peak potential separation o...

  3. Dynamical dipole mode in fusion reactions at 16 MeV/nucleon and beam energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierroutsakou, D.; Boiano, A.; Romoli, M.; Martin, B.; Inglima, G.; Commara, M. La; Parascandolo, C.; Sandoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; Zoppo, A. Del; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Baran, V.; Cardella, G.; Filippo, E. De

    2009-01-01

    High-energy γ rays and light charged particles from the 36 Ar+ 96 Zr and 40 Ar+ 92 Zr reactions at E lab =16 and 15.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively, were measured in coincidence with evaporation residues by means of the MEDEA multidetector array coupled to four parallel plate avalanche counters. The aim of this experiment was to investigate the prompt γ radiation, emitted in the decay of the dynamical dipole mode, in the ∼16 MeV/nucleon energy range and to map its beam energy dependence, comparing the present results with our previous ones obtained at lower energies. The studied reactions populate, through entrance channels having different charge asymmetries, a compound nucleus in the region of Ce under the same conditions of excitation energy and spin. Light charged particle energy spectra were used to pin down the average excitation energy and the average mass of the system. By studying the γ-ray spectra of the charge symmetric reaction 40 Ar+ 92 Zr, the statistical giant dipole resonance (GDR) parameters and angular distribution were extracted, and a comparison of the linearized 90 deg. γ-ray spectra of the two reactions revealed a 12% extra yield in the GDR energy region for the more charge asymmetric system. The center-of-mass angular distribution data of this extra γ yield, compatible with a dipole oscillating along the symmetry axis of the dinuclear system, support its dynamical nature. The experimental findings are compared with theoretical predictions performed within a Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov transport model and based on a collective bremsstrahlung analysis of the entrance channel reaction dynamics. An interesting sensitivity to the symmetry term of the equation of state and to in-medium effects on nucleon-nucleon (nn) cross sections is finally discussed.

  4. The dynamic reaction of containment structures (Sarcophagus) to seismic waves and vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemchinov Marenkov, U.I.

    1995-01-01

    This work deals with the dynamic reaction of containment structures (sarcophagus) to seismic waves and vibrations. It shows the results of experimental vibration measurements of the turbogenerators. It gives an analysis of the level of seismic and vibration effects on the load bearing structures of the sarcophagus and it puts forward recommendations relating to a permissible operating level for any vibroactive machinery which may be used during the reconstruction and transformation of the structure. (O.L.). 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzopoulos, Dimitris; Galazoulas, Christos; Patikas, Dimitrios; Kotzamanidis, Christos

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of three different stretching protocols on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time of the upper limbs. Participants were thirty one female high school athletes (age = 17.3 ± 0.5 yr.). All participants performed one of the following protocols on different days: (a) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min static stretching (SS), (b) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min dynamic stretching (DS), and (c) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min of rest (NS). After the protocols participants performed the following tests: dynamic balance, 505 agility test, reaction time (time between a sound stimulus and release of a button) and movement time (movement of the upper extremity over a 0.5 m distance). The order of stretching protocols and performance tests were counterbalanced to avoid carryover effects. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significant main effects for all variables except reaction time. The DS protocol compared to SS performed significantly better in balance, agility and movement time. Additionally, the DS protocol compared to NS performed significantly better in agility. According to the results of the study, a DS protocol is more appropriate than SS for activities that require balance, rapid change of running direction (agility) and movement time of the upper extremities. Key pointsStatic stretching has a negative effect on balance and agility performance compared to dynamic stretching.There was no effect of the stretching protocols on reaction time.Dynamic stretching was more effective than static stretching for increasing movement time of the upper extremities.

  6. Incident angle dependence of reactions between graphene and hydrogen atom by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Seiki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Ito, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Incident angle dependence of reactions between graphene and hydrogen atoms are obtained qualitatively by classical molecular dynamics simulation under the NVE condition with modified Brenner reactive empirical bond order (REBO) potential. Chemical reaction depends on two parameters, i.e., polar angle θ and azimuthal angle φ of the incident hydrogen. From the simulation results, it is found that the reaction rates strongly depend on polar angle θ. Reflection rate becomes larger with increasing θ, and the θ dependence of adsorption rate is also found. The θ dependence is caused by three dimensional structure of the small potential barrier which covers adsorption sites. φ dependence of penetration rate is also found for large θ. (author)

  7. Chemical Reaction Rate Coefficients from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics: Theory and Practical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleimanov, Yury V; Aoiz, F Javier; Guo, Hua

    2016-11-03

    This Feature Article presents an overview of the current status of ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) rate theory. We first analyze the RPMD approach and its connection to quantum transition-state theory. We then focus on its practical applications to prototypical chemical reactions in the gas phase, which demonstrate how accurate and reliable RPMD is for calculating thermal chemical reaction rate coefficients in multifarious cases. This review serves as an important checkpoint in RPMD rate theory development, which shows that RPMD is shifting from being just one of recent novel ideas to a well-established and validated alternative to conventional techniques for calculating thermal chemical rate coefficients. We also hope it will motivate further applications of RPMD to various chemical reactions.

  8. Computing the Free Energy along a Reaction Coordinate Using Rigid Body Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Peng; Sodt, Alexander J; Shao, Yihan; König, Gerhard; Brooks, Bernard R

    2014-10-14

    The calculations of potential of mean force along complex chemical reactions or rare events pathways are of great interest because of their importance for many areas in chemistry, molecular biology, and material science. The major difficulty for free energy calculations comes from the great computational cost for adequate sampling of the system in high-energy regions, especially close to the reaction transition state. Here, we present a method, called FEG-RBD, in which the free energy gradients were obtained from rigid body dynamics simulations. Then the free energy gradients were integrated along a reference reaction pathway to calculate free energy profiles. In a given system, the reaction coordinates defining a subset of atoms (e.g., a solute, or the quantum mechanics (QM) region of a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation) are selected to form a rigid body during the simulation. The first-order derivatives (gradients) of the free energy with respect to the reaction coordinates are obtained through the integration of constraint forces within the rigid body. Each structure along the reference reaction path is separately subjected to such a rigid body simulation. The individual free energy gradients are integrated along the reference pathway to obtain the free energy profile. Test cases provided demonstrate both the strengths and weaknesses of the FEG-RBD method. The most significant benefit of this method comes from the fast convergence rate of the free energy gradient using rigid-body constraints instead of restraints. A correction to the free energy due to approximate relaxation of the rigid-body constraint is estimated and discussed. A comparison with umbrella sampling using a simple test case revealed the improved sampling efficiency of FEG-RBD by a factor of 4 on average. The enhanced efficiency makes this method effective for calculating the free energy of complex chemical reactions when the reaction coordinate can be unambiguously defined by a

  9. Ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of quercetin with superoxide radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lespade, Laure, E-mail: l.lespade@ism.u-bordeaux1.fr

    2016-08-22

    Highlights: • Ab initio molecular dynamics is performed to describe the reaction of quercetin and superoxide. • The reaction occurs near the sites 4′ and 7 when the system contains sufficiently water molecules. • The difference of reactivity of superoxide compared to commonly used radicals as DPPH{sup ·} or ABTS{sup ·+} is explained. - Abstract: Superoxide plays an important role in biology but in unregulated concentrations it is implicated in a lot of diseases such as cancer or atherosclerosis. Antioxidants like flavonoids are abundant in plant and are good scavengers of superoxide radical. The modeling of superoxide scavenging by flavonoids from the diet still remains a challenge. In this study, ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of the flavonoid quercetin toward superoxide radical has been carried out using Car–Parrinello density functional theory. The study has proven different reactant solvation by modifying the number of water molecules surrounding superoxide. The reaction consists in the gift of a hydrogen atom of one of the hydroxyl groups of quercetin to the radical. When it occurs, it is relatively fast, lower than 100 fs. Calculations show that it depends largely on the environment of the hydroxyl group giving its hydrogen atom, the geometry of the first water layer and the presence of a certain number of water molecules in the second layer, indicating a great influence of the solvent on the reactivity.

  10. Heavy ion collision dynamics of 10,11B+10,11B reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh BirBikram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM of Gupta and collaborators has been applied successfully to the decay of very-light (A ∼ 30, light (A ∼ 40−80, medium, heavy and super-heavy mass compound nuclei for their decay to light particles (evaporation residues, ER, fusion-fission (ff, and quasi-fission (qf depending on the reaction conditions. We intend to extend here the application of DCM to study the extreme case of decay of very-light nuclear systems 20,21,22Ne∗ formed in 10,11B+10,11B reactions, for which experimental data is available for their binary symmetric decay (BSD cross sections, i.e., σBSD. For the systems under study, the calculations are presented for the σBSD in terms of their preformation and barrier penetration probabilities P0 and P. Interesting results are that in the decay of such lighter systems there is a competing reaction mechanism (specifically, the deep inelastic orbiting of non-compound nucleus (nCN origin together with ff. We have emipirically estimated the contribution of σnCN. Moreover, the important role of nuclear structure characteristics via P0 as well as angular momentum ℓ in the reaction dynamics are explored in the study.

  11. Ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of quercetin with superoxide radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lespade, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ab initio molecular dynamics is performed to describe the reaction of quercetin and superoxide. • The reaction occurs near the sites 4′ and 7 when the system contains sufficiently water molecules. • The difference of reactivity of superoxide compared to commonly used radicals as DPPH · or ABTS ·+ is explained. - Abstract: Superoxide plays an important role in biology but in unregulated concentrations it is implicated in a lot of diseases such as cancer or atherosclerosis. Antioxidants like flavonoids are abundant in plant and are good scavengers of superoxide radical. The modeling of superoxide scavenging by flavonoids from the diet still remains a challenge. In this study, ab initio molecular dynamics of the reaction of the flavonoid quercetin toward superoxide radical has been carried out using Car–Parrinello density functional theory. The study has proven different reactant solvation by modifying the number of water molecules surrounding superoxide. The reaction consists in the gift of a hydrogen atom of one of the hydroxyl groups of quercetin to the radical. When it occurs, it is relatively fast, lower than 100 fs. Calculations show that it depends largely on the environment of the hydroxyl group giving its hydrogen atom, the geometry of the first water layer and the presence of a certain number of water molecules in the second layer, indicating a great influence of the solvent on the reactivity.

  12. Theoretical study on the initial reaction mechanisms of ansa-metallocene zirconium precursor on hydroxylated Si(1 0 0) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangfen; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Shaowen

    2016-05-01

    The initial reaction mechanisms for depositing ZrO2 thin films using ansa-metallocene zirconium (Cp2CMe2)ZrMe2 precursor were studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The (Cp2CMe2)ZrMe2 precursor could be absorbed on the hydroxylated Si(1 0 0) surface via physisorption. Possible reaction pathways of (Cp2CMe2)ZrMe2 were proposed. For each reaction, the activation energies and reaction energies were compared, and stationary points along the reaction pathways were shown. In addition, the influence of dispersion effects on the reactions was evaluated by non-local dispersion corrected DFT calculations.

  13. Coffee-stain growth dynamics on dry and wet surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulogne, François; Ingremeau, François; Stone, Howard A.

    2017-02-01

    The drying of a drop containing particles often results in the accumulation of the particles at the contact line. In this work, we investigate the drying of an aqueous colloidal drop surrounded by a hydrogel that is also evaporating. We combine theoretical and experimental studies to understand how the surrounding vapor concentration affects the particle deposit during the constant radius evaporation mode. In addition to the common case of evaporation on an otherwise dry surface, we show that in a configuration where liquid is evaporating from a flat surface around the drop, the singularity of the evaporative flux at the contact line is suppressed and the drop evaporation is homogeneous. For both conditions, we derive the velocity field and we establish the temporal evolution of the number of particles accumulated at the contact line. We predict the growth dynamics of the stain and the drying timescales. Thus, dry and wet conditions are compared with experimental results and we highlight that only the dynamics is modified by the evaporation conditions, not the final accumulation at the contact line.

  14. Nanostructures and dynamics of macromolecules bound to attractive filler surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Tad; Barkley, Deborah; Jiang, Naisheng; Endoh, Maya; Masui, Tomomi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Michihiro; Satija, Sushil; Taniguchi, Takashi

    We report in-situ nanostructures and dynamics of polybutadiene (PB) chains bound to carbon black (CB) fillers (the so-called ``bound polymer layer (BPL)'') in a good solvent. The BPL on the CB fillers were extracted by solvent leaching of a CB-filled PB compound and subsequently dispersed in deuterated toluene to label the BPL for small-angle neutron scattering and neutron spin echo techniques. Intriguingly, the results demonstrate that the BPL is composed of two regions regardless of molecular weights of PB: the inner unswollen region of ~ 0.5 nm thick and outer swollen region where the polymer chains display a parabolic profile with a diffuse tail. This two-layer formation on the filler surface is similar to that reported for polymer chains adsorbed on planar substrates from melts. In addition, the results show that the dynamics of the swollen bound chains can be explained by the so-called ``breathing mode'' and is generalized with the thickness of the swollen BPL. Furthermore, we will discuss how the breathing collective dynamics is affected by the presence of polymer chains in a matrix solution. We acknowledge the financial support from NSF Grant No. CMMI-1332499.

  15. Proton transfer and unimolecular decay in the low-energy-reaction dynamics of H3O+ with acetone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creasy, W.R.; Farrar, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The title reaction has been studied at collision energies of 0.83 and 2.41 eV. Direct reaction dynamics have been observed at both energies and an increasingly high fraction of the total energy appears in product translation as the collision energy increases. This result is consistent with the concept of induced repulsive energy release, which becomes more effective as trajectories sample the corner of the potential energy surface. At the higher collision energy, the protonated acetone cation undergoes two unimolecular decay channels: C-C bond cleavage to CH 3 CO + and CH 4 , and C-O bond cleavagto C 3 H 5 + (presumably to allyl cation) and H 2 O. The CH 3 CO + channel, endothermic relative to ground state protonated acetone cations by 0.74 eV, appears to liberate 0.4 eV in relative product translation while the C 3 H 5 + channel, endothermic by 2.17 eV, liberates only 0.07 eV in relative translation. These results are discussed in terms of the location on the reaction coordinate and magnitudes of potential energy barriers to 1,3-hydrogen atoms shifts which must precede the bond cleavage processes

  16. Heterogeneous Reactions of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons on Atmospheric and Terrestrial Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonich, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of five higher molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzo[a]pyrene-d12 (BaP-d12), benzo(k)fluoranthene-d12 (BkF-d12), benzo[g,h,i]perylene-d12 (BghiP-d12), dibenzo(a,i)pyrene-d14 (DBaiP-d14), and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DalP), with NO2, NO3/N2O5, O3, and OH radicals were investigated in a 7000 L indoor Teflon chamber. Quartz fiber filters (QFF) were used as the reaction surface and substrate and the analyses of parent PAHs and Nitro-PAH (NPAH) products was conducted using electron impact gas chromatographic mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and negative chemical ionization GC/MS. In parallel to the laboratory experiments, a theoretical study was conducted to assist in determining the formation of NPAH isomers based on the OH-radical initiated reaction. The thermodynamic stability of OH-PAH intermediates was used to indicate the position of highest electron density and the most stable NPAH products were synthesized to confirm their identity. NO2 and NO3/N2O5 were the most effective oxidizing agents in transforming PAHs deposited on filters to NPAHs, under the experimental conditions. Reaction of BaP-d12, BkF-d12 and BghiP-d12 resulted in the formation of several mono-nitro PAH isomer product, while the reaction of DalP and DaiP-d14 resulted in the formation of only one mono-nitro PAH isomer product. The direct-acting mutagenicity of the products increased the most after NO3/N2O5 exposure, particularly for BkF-d12 in which the formation of dinitro- PAHs was observed. In addition, the degradation of particulate matter (PM)-bound PAHs by heterogeneous reaction with OH radicals, O3, NO3/N2O5 was also studied. Ambient PM samples collected from Beijing, China and Riverside, California were exposed in an indoor chamber under simulated trans-Pacific atmospheric transport conditions and the formation of NPAHs was studied. NPAHs were most effectively formed during the NO3/N2O5 exposure and, for all exposures, there was no significant

  17. Non-thermal desorption from interstellar dust grains via exothermic surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrod, R. T.; Wakelam, V.; Herbst, E.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:The gas-phase abundance of methanol in dark quiescent cores in the interstellar medium cannot be explained by gas-phase chemistry. In fact, the only possible synthesis of this species appears to be production on the surfaces of dust grains followed by desorption into the gas. Yet, evaporation is inefficient for heavy molecules such as methanol at the typical temperature of 10 K. It is necessary then to consider non-thermal mechanisms for desorption. But, if such mechanisms are considered for the production of methanol, they must be considered for all surface species. Methods: Our gas-grain network of reactions has been altered by the inclusion of a non-thermal desorption mechanism in which the exothermicity of surface addition reactions is utilized to break the bond between the product species and the surface. Our estimated rate for this process derives from a simple version of classical unimolecular rate theory with a variable parameter only loosely constrained by theoretical work. Results: Our results show that the chemistry of dark clouds is altered slightly at times up to 106 yr, mainly by the enhancement in the gas-phase abundances of hydrogen-rich species such as methanol that are formed on grain surfaces. At later times, however, there is a rather strong change. Instead of the continuing accretion of most gas-phase species onto dust particles, a steady-state is reached for both gas-phase and grain-surface species, with significant abundances for the former. Nevertheless, most of the carbon is contained in an undetermined assortment of heavy surface hydrocarbons. Conclusions: The desorption mechanism discussed here will be better constrained by observational data on pre-stellar cores, where a significant accretion of species such as CO has already occurred.

  18. Understanding the mechanisms of solid-water reactions through analysis of surface topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandstra, Joel Z; Brantley, Susan L

    2015-12-01

    The topography of a reactive surface contains information about the reactions that form or modify the surface and, therefore, it should be possible to characterize reactivity using topography parameters such as surface area, roughness, or fractal dimension. As a test of this idea, we consider a two-dimensional (2D) lattice model for crystal dissolution and examine a suite of topography parameters to determine which may be useful for predicting rates and mechanisms of dissolution. The model is based on the assumption that the reactivity of a surface site decreases with the number of nearest neighbors. We show that the steady-state surface topography in our model system is a function of, at most, two variables: the ratio of the rate of loss of sites with two neighbors versus three neighbors (d(2)/d(3)) and the ratio of the rate of loss of sites with one neighbor versus three neighbors (d(1)/d(3)). This means that relative rates can be determined from two parameters characterizing the topography of a surface provided that the two parameters are independent of one another. It also means that absolute rates cannot be determined from measurements of surface topography alone. To identify independent sets of topography parameters, we simulated surfaces from a broad range of d(1)/d(3) and d(2)/d(3) and computed a suite of common topography parameters for each surface. Our results indicate that the fractal dimension D and the average spacing between steps, E[s], can serve to uniquely determine d(1)/d(3) and d(2)/d(3) provided that sufficiently strong correlations exist between the steps. Sufficiently strong correlations exist in our model system when D>1.5 (which corresponds to D>2.5 for real 3D reactive surfaces). When steps are uncorrelated, surface topography becomes independent of step retreat rate and D is equal to 1.5. Under these conditions, measures of surface topography are not independent and any single topography parameter contains all of the available mechanistic

  19. Anomalous water dynamics at surfaces and interfaces: synergistic effects of confinement and surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Rajib; Bagchi, Biman

    2018-01-01

    In nature, water is often found in contact with surfaces that are extended on the scale of molecule size but small on a macroscopic scale. Examples include lipid bilayers and reverse micelles as well as biomolecules like proteins, DNA and zeolites, to name a few. While the presence of surfaces and interfaces interrupts the continuous hydrogen bond network of liquid water, confinement on a mesoscopic scale introduces new features. Even when extended on a molecular scale, natural and biological surfaces often have features (like charge, hydrophobicity) that vary on the scale of the molecular diameter of water. As a result, many new and exotic features, which are not seen in the bulk, appear in the dynamics of water close to the surface. These different behaviors bear the signature of both water–surface interactions and of confinement. In other words, the altered properties are the result of the synergistic effects of surface–water interactions and confinement. Ultrafast spectroscopy, theoretical modeling and computer simulations together form powerful synergistic approaches towards an understanding of the properties of confined water in such systems as nanocavities, reverse micelles (RMs), water inside and outside biomolecules like proteins and DNA, and also between two hydrophobic walls. We shall review the experimental results and place them in the context of theory and simulations. For water confined within RMs, we discuss the possible interference effects propagating from opposite surfaces. Similar interference is found to give rise to an effective attractive force between two hydrophobic surfaces immersed and kept fixed at a separation of d, with the force showing an exponential dependence on this distance. For protein and DNA hydration, we shall examine a multitude of timescales that arise from frustration effects due to the inherent heterogeneity of these surfaces. We pay particular attention to the role of orientational correlations and modification of

  20. Reactions of BBr(n)(+) (n = 0--2) at fluorinated and hydrocarbon self-assembled monolayer surfaces: observations of chemical selectivity in ion--surface scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, N; Shen, J; Koskinen, J; Cooks, R G

    2001-07-01

    Ion-surface reactions involving BBr(n)(+) (n = 0--2) with a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer (F-SAM) surface were investigated using a multi-sector scattering mass spectrometer. Collisions of the B(+) ion yield BF(2)(+) at threshold energy with the simpler product ion BF(+)* appearing at higher collision energies and remaining of lower abundance than BF(2)(+) at all energies examined. In addition, the reactively sputtered ion CF(+) accompanies the formation of BF(2)(+) at low collision energies. These results stand in contrast with previous data on the ion-surface reactions of atomic ions with the F-SAM surface in that the threshold and most abundant reaction products in those cases involved the abstraction of a single fluorine atom. Gas-phase enthalpy data are consistent with BF(2)(+) being the thermodynamically favored product. The fact that the abundance of BF(2)(+) is relatively low and relatively insensitive to changes in collision energy suggests that this reaction proceeds through an entropically demanding intermediate at the vacuum--surface interface, one which involves interaction of the B(+) ion simultaneously with two fluorine atoms. By contrast with the reaction of B(+), the odd-electron species BBr(+)* reacts with the F-SAM surface to yield an abundant single-fluorine abstraction product, BBrF(+). Corresponding gas-phase ion--molecule experiments involving B(+) and BBr(+)* with C(6)F(14) also yield the products BF(+)* and BF(2)(+), but only in extremely low abundances and with no preference for double fluorine abstraction. Ion--surface reactions were also investigated for BBr(n)(+) (n = 0-2) with a hydrocarbon self-assembled monolayer (H-SAM) surface. Reaction of the B(+) ion and dissociative reactions of BBr(+)* result in the formation of BH(2)(+), while the thermodynamically less favorable product BH(+)* is not observed. Collisions of BBr(2)(+) with the H-SAM surface yield the dissociative ion-surface reaction products, BBrH(+) and BBrCH(3

  1. Dynamical Dipole and Equation of State in N/Z Asymmetric Fusion Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giaz Agnese

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In heavy ion reactions, in the case of N/Z asymmetry between projectile and target, the process leading to complete fusion is expected to produce pre-equilibrium dipole γ-ray emission. It is generated during the charge equilibration process and it is known as Dynamical Dipole. A new measurement of the dynamical dipole emission was performed by studying 16O + 116Sn at 12 MeV/u. These data, together with those measured at 8.1 MeV/u and 15.6 MeV/u for the same reaction, provide the dependence on the Dynamical Dipole total emission yield with beam energy and they can be compared with theoretical expectations. The experimental results show a weak increase of the Dynamical Dipole total yield with beam energies and are in agreement with the prediction of a theoretical model based on the Boltzmann–Nordheim–Vlasov (BNV approach. The measured trend with beam energy does not confirm the rise and fall behavior previously reported for the same fused compound but with a much higher dipole moment.

  2. Fast and stable redox reactions of MnO₂/CNT hybrid electrodes for dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Taoli; Wei, Bingqing

    2015-07-21

    Pseudocapacitors, which are energy storage devices that take advantage of redox reactions to store electricity, have a different charge storage mechanism compared to lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), and they could realize further gains if they were used as stretchable power sources. The realization of dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors and understanding of the underlying fundamentals of their mechanical-electrochemical relationship have become indispensable. We report herein the electrochemical performance of dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors using buckled MnO2/CNT hybrid electrodes. The extremely small relaxation time constant of less than 0.15 s indicates a fast redox reaction at the MnO2/CNT hybrid electrodes, securing a stable electrochemical performance for the dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors. This finding and the fundamental understanding gained from the pseudo-capacitive behavior coupled with mechanical deformation under a dynamic stretching mode would provide guidance to further improve their overall performance including a higher power density than LIBs, a higher energy density than EDLCs, and a long-life cycling stability. Most importantly, these results will potentially accelerate the applications of stretchable pseudocapacitors for flexible and biomedical electronics.

  3. Dynamics of gas-surface interactions atomic-level understanding of scattering processes at surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Díez Muniño, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    This book gives a representative survey of the state of the art of research on gas-surface interactions. It provides an overview of the current understanding of gas surface dynamics and, in particular, of the reactive and non-reactive processes of atoms and small molecules at surfaces. Leading scientists in the field, both from the theoretical and the experimental sides, write in this book about their most recent advances. Surface science grew as an interdisciplinary research area over the last decades, mostly because of new experimental technologies (ultra-high vacuum, for instance), as well as because of a novel paradigm, the ‘surface science’ approach. The book describes the second transformation which is now taking place pushed by the availability of powerful quantum-mechanical theoretical methods implemented numerically. In the book, experiment and theory progress hand in hand with an unprecedented degree of accuracy and control. The book presents how modern surface science targets the atomic-level u...

  4. Surface hopping dynamics of direct trans --> cis photoswitching of an azobenzene derivative in constrained adsorbate geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floß, Gereon; Granucci, Giovanni; Saalfrank, Peter

    2012-12-01

    With ongoing miniaturization of electronic devices, the need for individually addressable, switchable molecules arises. An example are azobenzenes on surfaces which have been shown to be switchable between trans and cis forms. Here, we examine the "direct" (rather than substrate-mediated) channel of the trans → cis photoisomerization after ππ* excitation of tetra-tert-butyl-azobenzene physisorbed on surfaces mimicking Au(111) and Bi(111), respectively. In spirit of the direct channel, the electronic structure of the surface is neglected, the latter merely acting as a rigid platform which weakly interacts with the molecule via Van-der-Waals forces. Starting from thermal ensembles which represent the trans-form, sudden excitations promote the molecules to ππ*-excited states which are non-adiabatically coupled among themselves and to a nπ*-excited and the ground state, respectively. After excitation, relaxation to the ground state by internal conversion takes place, possibly accompanied by isomerization. The process is described here by "on the fly" semiclassical surface hopping dynamics in conjunction with a semiempirical Hamiltonian (AM1) and configuration-interaction type methods. It is found that steric constraints imposed by the substrate lead to reduced but non-vanishing, trans → cis reaction yields and longer internal conversion times than for the isolated molecule. Implications for recent experiments for azobenzenes on surfaces are discussed.

  5. Interfacial Cu+ promoted surface reactivity: Carbon monoxide oxidation reaction over polycrystalline copper-titania catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Pappoe, Naa Adokaley; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Luo, Si; Li, Yuanyuan; Xu, Wenqian; Liu, Zongyuan; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Heckler, Ilana; Stacchiola, Dario; Rodriguez, José A.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the catalytic carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation (CO + 0.5O2 → CO2) reaction using a powder catalyst composed of both copper (5 wt.% loading) and titania (CuOx-TiO2). Our study was focused on revealing the role of Cu, and the interaction between Cu and TiO2, by systematic comparison between two nanocatalysts, CuOx-TiO2 and pure CuOx. We interrogated these catalysts under in situ conditions using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to probe the structure and electronic properties of the catalyst at all stages of the reaction and simultaneously probe the surface states or intermediates of this reaction. With the aid of several ex situ characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the local catalyst morphology and structure were also studied. Our results show that a CuOx-TiO2 system is more active than bulk CuOx for the CO oxidation reaction due to its lower onset temperature and better stability at higher temperatures. Our results also suggest that surface Cu+ species observed in the CuOx-TiO2 interface are likely to be a key player in the CO oxidation mechanism, while implicating that the stabilization of this species is probably associated with the oxide-oxide interface. Both in situ DRIFTS and XAFS measurements reveal that there is likely to be a Cu(Ti)-O mixed oxide at this interface. We discuss the nature of this Cu(Ti)-O interface and interpret its role on the CO oxidation reaction.

  6. Surface conductivity dependent dynamic behaviour of an ultrafine atmospheric pressure plasma jet for microscale surface processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abuzairi, Tomy [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Okada, Mitsuru [Department of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Nagatsu, Masaaki, E-mail: nagatsu.masaaki@shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Department of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Spatio-temporal behaviors of capillary APPJs are studied for various substrates. • Plasma irradiation area depended on the substrate conductivity and permittivity. • Surface irradiation area was significantly broadened in polymer-like substrate. • Effect of applying a substrate bias on the APPJ irradiation area was investigated. - Abstract: An experimental study on the dynamic behaviour of microcapillary atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) with 5 μm tip size for surfaces of different conductivity is reported. Electrical and spatio-temporal characteristics of the APPJs are monitored using high voltage probe, current monitor and high speed intensified charge couple device camera. From these experimental results, we presented a simple model to understand the electrical discharge characteristics of the capillary APPJs with double electrodes, and estimated the velocity of the ionization fronts in the jet and the electron density to be 3.5–4.2 km/s and 2–7 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3}. By analyzing the dynamics of the microcapillary APPJs for different substrate materials, it was found that the surface irradiation area strongly depended on the substrate conductivity and permittivity, especially in the case of polymer-like substrate, surface irradiation area was significantly broadened probably due to the repelling behaviour of the plasma jets from the accumulated electrical charges on the polymer surface. The effect of applying a substrate bias in the range from −900 V to +900 V on the plasma irradiation onto the substrates was also investigated. From the knowledge of the present results, it is helpful for choosing the substrate materials for microscale surface modification.

  7. Electrochemical Dynamics of a Single Platinum Nanoparticle Collision Event for the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zhi-Peng; Deng, Hai-Qiang; Peljo, Pekka; Fu, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Su-Li; Mandler, Daniel; Sun, Gong-Quan; Liang, Zhen-Xing

    2018-03-19

    Chronoamperometry was used to study the dynamics of Pt nanoparticle (NP) collision with an inert ultramicroelectrode via electrocatalytic amplification (ECA) in the hydrogen evolution reaction. ECA and dynamic light scattering (DLS) results reveal that the NP colloid remains stable only at low proton concentrations (1.0 mm) under a helium (He) atmosphere, ensuring that the collision events occur at genuinely single NP level. Amperometry of single NP collisions under a He atmosphere shows that each discrete current profile of the collision event evolves from spike to staircase at more negative potentials, while a staircase response is observed at all of the applied potentials under hydrogen-containing atmospheres. The particle size distribution estimated from the diffusion-controlled current in He agrees well with electron microscopy and DLS observations. These results shed light on the interfacial dynamics of the single nanoparticle collision electrochemistry. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Global dynamics of a nonlocal delayed reaction-diffusion equation on a half plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenjie; Duan, Yueliang

    2018-04-01

    We consider a delayed reaction-diffusion equation with spatial nonlocality on a half plane that describes population dynamics of a two-stage species living in a semi-infinite environment. A Neumann boundary condition is imposed accounting for an isolated domain. To describe the global dynamics, we first establish some a priori estimate for nontrivial solutions after investigating asymptotic properties of the nonlocal delayed effect and the diffusion operator, which enables us to show the permanence of the equation with respect to the compact open topology. We then employ standard dynamical system arguments to establish the global attractivity of the nontrivial equilibrium. The main results are illustrated by the diffusive Nicholson's blowfly equation and the diffusive Mackey-Glass equation.

  9. Role of rotational energy component in the dynamics of 16O+198Pt reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Manoj K.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of rotational energy is investigated in reference to the dynamics of 16O+198Pt →214Rn∗ reaction using the sticking (IS and the non-sticking (INS limits of moment of inertia within the framework of dynamical cluster decay model. The decay barrier height and barrier position get significantly modified for the use of sticking or non-sticking choice, which in turn reproduce the evaporation residue and the fusion-fission cross-sections nicely by the IS approach, while the INS approach provides feasible addressal of data only for evaporation residue channel. Moreover, the fragmentation path of decaying fragments of 214Rn∗ compound nucleus gets influenced for different choices of moment of inertia. Beside this, the role of nuclear deformations i.e. static, dynamic quadurpole (β2 and higher order static deformation up to β4 are duly investigated for both choices of the moment of inertia.

  10. Harnessing surface-bound enzymatic reactions to organize microcapsules in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Oleg E; Shum, Henry; Sen, Ayusman; Balazs, Anna C

    2016-03-01

    By developing new computational models, we examine how enzymatic reactions on an underlying surface can be harnessed to direct the motion and organization of reagent-laden microcapsules in a fluid-filled microchannel. In the presence of appropriate reagents, surface-bound enzymes can act as pumps, which drive large-scale fluid flows. When the reagents diffuse through the capsules' porous shells, they can react with enzymatic sites on the bottom surface. The ensuing reaction generates fluid density variations, which result in fluid flows. These flows carry the suspended microcapsules and drive them to aggregate into "colonies" on and near the enzyme-covered sites. This aggregation continues until the reagent has been depleted and the convection stops. We show that the shape of the assembled colonies can be tailored by patterning the distribution of enzymes on the surface. This fundamental physicochemical mechanism could have played a role in the self-organization of early biological cells (protocells) and can be used to regulate the autonomous motion and targeted delivery of microcarriers in microfluidic devices.

  11. Effect of Reaction Conditions on the Surface Modification of Cellulose Nanofibrils with Aminopropyl Triethoxysilane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Robles

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nine different surface modifications of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (ATS by using three different solvent systems (water, ethanol, and a mixture of both were investigated. The effect of reaction conditions, such as silane to cellulose ratio and solvent type were evaluated to determine their contribution to the extent of the silane modification. Nanofibril properties were evaluated by infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, surface free energy, thermogravimetry, 13C and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance, and electronic microscopy. The influence of the solvent in the solvolysis of the silane was reflected in the presence or absence of ethoxy groups in the silane. On the other hand, whereas the surface modification was increased directly proportionally to silane ratio on the reaction, the aggregation of nanofibrils was also increased, which can play a negative role in certain applications. The increment of silane modification also had substantial repercussions on the crystallinity of the nanofibrils by the addition of amorphous components to the crystalline unit; moreover, silane surface modifications enhanced the hydrophobic character of the nanofibrils.

  12. Motif analysis for small-number effects in chemical reaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Nen; Sughiyama, Yuki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-09-07

    The number of molecules involved in a cell or subcellular structure is sometimes rather small. In this situation, ordinary macroscopic-level fluctuations can be overwhelmed by non-negligible large fluctuations, which results in drastic changes in chemical-reaction dynamics and statistics compared to those observed under a macroscopic system (i.e., with a large number of molecules). In order to understand how salient changes emerge from fluctuations in molecular number, we here quantitatively define small-number effect by focusing on a "mesoscopic" level, in which the concentration distribution is distinguishable both from micro- and macroscopic ones and propose a criterion for determining whether or not such an effect can emerge in a given chemical reaction network. Using the proposed criterion, we systematically derive a list of motifs of chemical reaction networks that can show small-number effects, which includes motifs showing emergence of the power law and the bimodal distribution observable in a mesoscopic regime with respect to molecule number. The list of motifs provided herein is helpful in the search for candidates of biochemical reactions with a small-number effect for possible biological functions, as well as for designing a reaction system whose behavior can change drastically depending on molecule number, rather than concentration.

  13. Investigation of the 16O+194Pt reaction: One- and two-dimensional dynamical interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, D.; Farmani, A.

    In this paper, we applied the Langevin dynamical model to investigate the different aspects of the 16O+194Pt reaction. Elongation and orientation degree of freedom (K coordinate) which are the first and second dimensions of dynamical calculations, are presented here. Fission time, fission cross-section, pre-scission neutron multiplicity, and fission probability were calculated using one- and two-dimensional Langevin equations. Also, anisotropy of fission-fragments angular distribution has been investigated based on the transition state model, one- and two-dimensional Langevin dynamical models. It was found that by adding the orientation degree of freedom to calculations, the fission time and pre-scission neutrons multiplicity increases whereas fission cross-section, and fission probability decreases. The two-dimensional dynamical calculations are a better match to the experimental data than the one-dimensional dynamical calculations, when using nominal values for the reduced dissipation coefficient and shape-dependent level density parameter. However, if model parameters are adjusted to reproduce the fission cross-section data, then both the one- and two-dimensional models give a satisfactory match to the fission fragment anisotropy data. Nonequilibrium K distributions in the dynamical model can better explain the experimental anisotropy of the angular distribution of fission-fragments with respect to the equilibrium K distribution in saddle and scission point transition state models.

  14. Hot spot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shocked HMX crystals with nanovoids: a large-scale reactive molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tingting; Lou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yangeng; Song, Huajie; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-07-14

    We report million-atom reactive molecular dynamic simulations of shock initiation of β-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (β-HMX) single crystals containing nanometer-scale spherical voids. Shock induced void collapse and subsequent hot spot formation as well as chemical reaction initiation are observed which depend on the void size and impact strength. For an impact velocity of 1 km s(-1) and a void radius of 4 nm, the void collapse process includes three stages; the dominant mechanism is the convergence of upstream molecules toward the centerline and the downstream surface of the void forming flowing molecules. Hot spot formation also undergoes three stages, and the principal mechanism is kinetic energy transforming to thermal energy due to the collision of flowing molecules on the downstream surface. The high temperature of the hot spot initiates a local chemical reaction, and the breakage of the N-NO2 bond plays the key role in the initial reaction mechanism. The impact strength and void size have noticeable effects on the shock dynamical process, resulting in a variation of the predominant mechanisms leading to void collapse and hot spot formation. Larger voids or stronger shocks result in more intense hot spots and, thus, more violent chemical reactions, promoting more reaction channels and generating more reaction products in a shorter duration. The reaction products are mainly concentrated in the developed hot spot, indicating that the chemical reactivity of the hmx crystal is greatly enhanced by void collapse. The detailed information derived from this study can aid a thorough understanding of the role of void collapse in hot spot formation and the chemical reaction initiation of explosives.

  15. Dynamics of fibronectin adsorption on TiO2 surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, S R; Brás, M Manuela; Moradas-Ferreira, P; Barbosa, M A

    2007-06-19

    In the present work we analyze the dynamics of fibronectin (FN) adsorption on two different stable titanium oxides, with varied surface roughness, and chemically similar to those used in clinical practice. The two types of titanium oxide surfaces used were TiO2 sputtered on Si (TiO2 sp) and TiO2 formed on commercially pure titanium after immersion in H2O2 (TiO2 cp). Surface characterization was previously carried out using different techniques (Sousa, S. R.; Moradas-Ferreira, P.; Melo, L. V.; Saramago, B.; Barbosa, M. A. Langmuir 2004, 20 (22), 9745-9754). Imaging and roughness analysis before and after FN adsorption used atomic force microscopy (AFM) in tapping mode, in air, and in magnetic alternating current mode, in liquid (water). FN adsorption as a function of time was followed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), by radiolabeling of FN with 125I (125I-FN), and by ellipsometry. Exchangeability studies were performed using FN and HSA. AFM roughness analysis revealed that, before FN adsorption, both TiO2 surfaces exhibited a lower root-mean-square (Rq) and maximum peak with the depth of the maximum valley (Rmax) roughness in air than in water, due to TiO2 hydration. After protein adsorption, the same behavior was observed for the TiO2 sp substrate, while Rq and Rmax roughness values in air and in water were similar in the case of the TiO2 cp substrate, for the higher FN concentration used. Surface roughness was always significantly higher on the TiO2 cp surfaces. AFM led to direct visualization of adsorbed FN on both surfaces tested, indicating that after 10 min of FN incubation the TiO2 sp surface was partially covered by FN. The adsorbed protein seems to form globular aggregates or ellipsoids, and FN aggregates coalesce, forming clusters as the time of adsorption and the concentration increase. Radiolabeling of FN revealed that a rapid adsorption occurs on both surfaces and the amount adsorbed increased with time, reaching a maximum after 60 min of

  16. Immobilizing live Escherichia coli for AFM studies of surface dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonergan, N.E.; Britt, L.D.; Sullivan, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a probe-based technique that permits high resolution imaging of live bacterial cells. However, stably immobilizing cells to withstand the probe-based lateral forces remains an obstacle in AFM mediated studies, especially those of live, rod shaped bacteria in nutrient media. Consequently, AFM has been under-utilized in the research of bacterial surface dynamics. The aim of the current study was to immobilize a less adherent Escherichia coli strain in a method that both facilitates AFM imaging in nutrient broth and preserves overall cell viability. Immobilization reagents and buffers were systematically evaluated and the cell membrane integrity was monitored in all sample preparations. As expected, the biocompatible gelatin coated surfaces facilitated stable cell attachment in lower ionic strength buffers, yet poorly immobilized cells in higher ionic strength buffers. In comparison, poly-L-lysine surfaces bound cells in both low and high ionic strength buffers. The benefit of the poly-L-lysine binding capacity was offset by the compromised membrane integrity exhibited by cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces. However, the addition of divalent cations and glucose to the immobilization buffer was found to mitigate this unfavorable effect. Ultimately, immobilization of E. coli cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces in a lower ionic strength buffer supplemented with Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ was determined to provide optimal cell attachment without compromising the overall cell viability. Cells immobilized in this method were stably imaged in media through multiple division cycles. Furthermore, permeability assays indicated that E. coli cells recover from the hypoosmotic stress caused by immobilization in low ionic strength buffers. Taken together, this data suggests that stable immobilization of viable cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces can be accomplished in lower ionic strength buffers that are supplemented with divalent cations for membrane stabilization while

  17. How have new bearing surfaces altered the local biological reactions to byproducts of wear and modularity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Thomas W; Campbell, Patricia A; Hallerberg, Gretchen

    2014-12-01

    The biologic reactions to byproducts of wear or corrosion can involve innate and adaptive processes and are dependent on many factors, including the composition, size, surface properties, shape, and concentration of debris. We used a systematic literature review to compare the reported patterns of inflammation in tissues around total hip implants with the goal of identifying whether there are unique or characteristic patterns associated with the newer bearing options or modular components. A search of the Ovid Medline database between 1996 and early December 2013 identified articles that compared the histology around six implant groups: (1) metal-on-metal; (2) ceramic-on-ceramic; (3) metal-on-crosslinked polyethylene; (4) metal-on-conventional polyethylene with or (5) without modularity; and (6) tissue obtained at primary arthroplasty. Our initial search yielded 865 citations. After excluding articles that lacked a quantitative or semiquantitative description of histologic findings in periprosthetic tissue, we reviewed 34 articles. No pattern of inflammation is specific for any given bearing combination. Histologic features suggestive of an adaptive immune response appear to be more frequent and of greater magnitude in failed metal-on-metal implants, but tissues around many failed metal-on-metal implants show features of an "innate" foreign body reaction without lymphocytes. Occasional nonmetal-on-metal implants show features of an immune reaction, possibly associated with metal particles. Modular connections are one source of metal debris in nonmetal-on-metal implants. Features of an immune reaction appear rare in ceramic-on-ceramic implants that lack corrosion. Insufficient reports are available to characterize the biologic response to crosslinked polyethylene. All total hip bearing combinations will wear in vivo, and modular interfaces are a likely source of metal that may be associated with a biological response regardless of the composition of the bearing

  18. ReaDDy--a software for particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics in crowded cellular environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Schöneberg

    Full Text Available We introduce the software package ReaDDy for simulation of detailed spatiotemporal mechanisms of dynamical processes in the cell, based on reaction-diffusion dynamics with particle resolution. In contrast to other particle-based reaction kinetics programs, ReaDDy supports particle interaction potentials. This permits effects such as space exclusion, molecular crowding and aggregation to be modeled. The biomolecules simulated can be represented as a sphere, or as a more complex geometry such as a domain structure or polymer chain. ReaDDy bridges the gap between small-scale but highly detailed molecular dynamics or Brownian dynamics simulations and large-scale but little-detailed reaction kinetics simulations. ReaDDy has a modular design that enables the exchange of the computing core by efficient platform-specific implementations or dynamical models that are different from Brownian dynamics.

  19. ReaDDy - A Software for Particle-Based Reaction-Diffusion Dynamics in Crowded Cellular Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöneberg, Johannes; Noé, Frank

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the software package ReaDDy for simulation of detailed spatiotemporal mechanisms of dynamical processes in the cell, based on reaction-diffusion dynamics with particle resolution. In contrast to other particle-based reaction kinetics programs, ReaDDy supports particle interaction potentials. This permits effects such as space exclusion, molecular crowding and aggregation to be modeled. The biomolecules simulated can be represented as a sphere, or as a more complex geometry such as a domain structure or polymer chain. ReaDDy bridges the gap between small-scale but highly detailed molecular dynamics or Brownian dynamics simulations and large-scale but little-detailed reaction kinetics simulations. ReaDDy has a modular design that enables the exchange of the computing core by efficient platform-specific implementations or dynamical models that are different from Brownian dynamics. PMID:24040218

  20. Surface area-burnoff correlation for the steam--graphite reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, W.A. Jr.; Malinauskas, A.P.

    1977-01-01

    The oxidation of core graphite by steam of air represents a problem area of significant concern in safety analyses for the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). Core and core-support graphite integrity and strength deteriorate with oxidation of the graphite, and oxidation furthermore could affect the rate of fission product release under upset conditions. Consequently, modeling of core response during steam or air ingress conditions requires an expression for the rate of graphite interaction with those impurities. The steam--graphite reaction in particular is a complex interaction of mass transport within the graphite with chemi-sorption and reaction on accessible surfaces; experimental results from graphite to graphite are highly variable, and the description of the reaction is not yet completely consistent. A simple etch pit model relating surface area to burnoff has been proposed and shown to provide reasonable correlation with experimental data obtained from steam oxidation studies of nuclear grade H-327 graphite. Unaccounted differences between theory and experiment arise at burnoffs exceeding 3 to 5 percent. The model, while not complete nor comprehensive, is consistent with experimental observations of graphite oxidation by O 2 (air), CO 2 , or H 2 O, and could have some utility in safety analysis

  1. Noise-and delay-induced phase transitions of the dimer–monomer surface reaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Chunhua; Wang Hua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We study the dimer–monomer surface reaction model. ► We show that noise induces first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT). ► Combination of noise and time-delayed feedback induce first- and second-order IPT. ► First- and second-order IPT is viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions. - Abstract: The effects of noise and time-delayed feedback in the dimer–monomer (DM) surface reaction model are investigated. Applying small delay approximation, we construct a stochastic delayed differential equation and its Fokker–Planck equation to describe the state evolution of the DM reaction model. We show that the noise can only induce first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT) characteristic of the DM model, however the combination of the noise and time-delayed feedback can simultaneously induce first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model. Therefore, it is shown that the well-known first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model may be viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions.

  2. Computational study of ethanol adsorption and reaction over rutile TiO2 (110) surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Muir, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the modes of adsorption and the associated changes in electronic structures of renewable organic compounds are needed in order to understand the fundamentals behind surface reactions of catalysts for future energies. Using planewave density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the adsorption of ethanol on perfect and O-defected TiO 2 rutile (110) surfaces was examined. On both surfaces the dissociative adsorption mode on five-fold coordinated Ti cations (Ti 4+ 5c) was found to be more favourable than the molecular adsorption mode. On the stoichiometric surface E ads was found to be equal to 0.85 eV for the ethoxide mode and equal to 0.76 eV for the molecular mode. These energies slightly increased when adsorption occurred on the Ti 4+ 5c closest to the O-defected site. However, both considerably increased when adsorption occurred at the removed bridging surface O; interacting with Ti 3+ cations. In this case the dissociative adsorption becomes strongly favoured (E ads = 1.28 eV for molecular adsorption and 2.27 eV for dissociative adsorption). Geometry and electronic structures of adsorbed ethanol were analysed in detail on the stoichiometric surface. Ethanol does not undergo major changes in its structure upon adsorption with its C-O bond rotating nearly freely on the surface. Bonding to surface Ti atoms is a σ type transfer from the O2p of the ethanol-ethoxide species. Both ethanol and ethoxide present potential hole traps on O lone pairs. Charge density and work function analyses also suggest charge transfer from the adsorbate to the surface, in which the dissociative adsorptions show a larger charge transfer than the molecular adsorption mode. This journal is © 2012 the Owner Societies.

  3. Computational study of ethanol adsorption and reaction over rutile TiO2 (110) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, J M R; Muir, J N; Choi, Y; Idriss, H

    2012-09-14

    Studies of the modes of adsorption and the associated changes in electronic structures of renewable organic compounds are needed in order to understand the fundamentals behind surface reactions of catalysts for future energies. Using planewave density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the adsorption of ethanol on perfect and O-defected TiO(2) rutile (110) surfaces was examined. On both surfaces the dissociative adsorption mode on five-fold coordinated Ti cations (Ti(4+)(5c)) was found to be more favourable than the molecular adsorption mode. On the stoichiometric surface E(ads) was found to be equal to 0.85 eV for the ethoxide mode and equal to 0.76 eV for the molecular mode. These energies slightly increased when adsorption occurred on the Ti(4+)(5c) closest to the O-defected site. However, both considerably increased when adsorption occurred at the removed bridging surface O; interacting with Ti(3+) cations. In this case the dissociative adsorption becomes strongly favoured (E(ads) = 1.28 eV for molecular adsorption and 2.27 eV for dissociative adsorption). Geometry and electronic structures of adsorbed ethanol were analysed in detail on the stoichiometric surface. Ethanol does not undergo major changes in its structure upon adsorption with its C-O bond rotating nearly freely on the surface. Bonding to surface Ti atoms is a σ type transfer from the O2p of the ethanol-ethoxide species. Both ethanol and ethoxide present potential hole traps on O lone pairs. Charge density and work function analyses also suggest charge transfer from the adsorbate to the surface, in which the dissociative adsorptions show a larger charge transfer than the molecular adsorption mode.

  4. Adaptive Dynamic Surface Control for Generator Excitation Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiu-yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the generator excitation control system which is equipped with static var compensator (SVC and unknown parameters, a novel adaptive dynamic surface control scheme is proposed based on neural network and tracking error transformed function with the following features: (1 the transformation of the excitation generator model to the linear systems is omitted; (2 the prespecified performance of the tracking error can be guaranteed by combining with the tracking error transformed function; (3 the computational burden is greatly reduced by estimating the norm of the weighted vector of neural network instead of the weighted vector itself; therefore, it is more suitable for the real time control; and (4 the explosion of complicity problem inherent in the backstepping control can be eliminated. It is proved that the new scheme can make the system semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results show the effectiveness of this control scheme.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Nanodroplets on Silica Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    and DNA microarrays technologies.4,5,6,7,8 Although extensive experimental, theoretical and computational work has been devoted to study the nature of the interaction between silica and water,2,9-16 at the molecular level a complete understanding of silica-water systems has not been reached. Contact angle...... computations of water droplets on silica surfaces offers a useful fundamental and quantitative measurement in order to study chemical and physical properties of water-silica systems.3,16,17,18 For hydrophobic systems the static and dynamic properties of the fluid-solid interface are influenced by the presence...... of air. Hence, nanobubles have been observed and proposed as the origin of long range ``hydrophobic'' forces19-30 even for hydrophilic silica-water interfaces unusual phenomena related to nanobubbles have been observed.31-33 In this work we study the role of air on the wetting of amorphous silica...

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Droplets On Hydrophilic Silica Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    of water droplets on silica surfaces offers a useful fundamental and quantitative measurement in order to study chemical and physical properties of water-silica systems. For hydrophobic systems the static and dynamic properties of the fluid-solid interface are influenced by the presence of air. Hence......Wetting is essential and ubiquitous in a variety of natural and technological processes. Silicon dioxides-water systems are abundant in nature and play fundamental roles in a vast variety of novel science and engineering activities such as silicon based devices, nanoscale lab on a chip systems...... and DNA microarrays technologies.Although extensive experimental, theoretical and computational work has been devoted to study the nature of the interaction between silica and water, at the molecular level a complete understanding of silica-water systems has not been reached. Contact angle computations...

  7. Complex integrated method of dynamic meditation with Buddhists’ breathing in case of neurotic reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Omelyanenko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to elaborate complex integrated method of psychological influence upon sport dancers in time of training on base of Buddhists’ meditation “conscious breathing” for neurotic reactions elimination, professional skill improvement and psycho emotional stability advance. Material : twenty dancers at the age of 40-50 with neurotic reactions participated in the research. At the first stage of the research all the subjects’ ability to focus attention at breathing during sports dancing performance was examined. At the second stage training in method of dynamic meditation applied for martial arts of the experimental group of 10 subjects was conducted. Both individual and group training sessions were held. At the third stage the experimental group joined dynamic meditation and breathing at dance performance. At the fourth stage the experimental group’s results were compared with the control group’s results. Results : at the first stage of the research all the subjects noted difficulties in focusing attention on Buddhists’ nasal breathing and dance technique come-down. 3-5 sessions of training in method of dynamic meditation were necessary for the subjects of the experimental group at the second stage of the research. At the third stage of the research all the subjects of the experimental group could control their nasal breathing at dance performance without dance technique come-down. At the fourth stage the comparative evaluation of the results of the experimental and control groups revealed that it was necessary 3-7 sport dance practice sessions for elimination of the neurotic reactions. No such effect was observed in the control group. Conclusions : The results of the research prove that Buddhists’ meditation “conscious breathing” may be joined with dynamic meditation successfully. It’s impossible to focus attention continuously on breathing at time of sport dance performance. The elaborated technique of the integration of

  8. Dynamic characterisation of the specific surface area for fracture networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovic, V.

    2017-12-01

    One important application of chemical transport is geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste for which crystalline rock is a prime candidate for instance in Scandinavia. Interconnected heterogeneous fractures of sparsely fractured rock such as granite, act as conduits for transport of dissolved tracers. Fluid flow is known to be highly channelized in such rocks. Channels imply narrow flow paths, adjacent to essentially stagnant water in the fracture and/or the rock matrix. Tracers are transported along channelised flow paths and retained by minerals and/or stagnant water, depending on their sorption properties; this mechanism is critical for rocks to act as a barrier and ultimately provide safety for a geological repository. The sorbing tracers are retained by diffusion and sorption on mineral surfaces, whereas non-sorbing tracers can be retained only by diffusion into stagnant water of fractures. The retention and transport properties of a sparsely fractured rock will primarily depend on the specific surface area (SSA) of the fracture network which is determined by the heterogeneous structure and flow. The main challenge when characterising SSA on the field-scale is its dependence on the flow dynamics. We first define SSA as a physical quantity and clarify its importance for chemical transport. A methodology for dynamic characterisation of SSA in fracture networks is proposed that relies on three sets of data: i) Flow rate data as obtained by a flow logging procedure; ii) transmissivity data as obtained by pumping tests; iii) fracture network data as obtained from outcrop and geophysical observations. The proposed methodology utilises these data directly as well as indirectly through flow and particle tracking simulations in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks. The methodology is exemplified using specific data from the Swedish site Laxemar. The potential impact of uncertainties is of particular significance and is illustrated for radionuclide

  9. Self-cleaning and surface chemical reactions during hafnium dioxide atomic layer deposition on indium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Rainer; Head, Ashley R; Yngman, Sofie; Knutsson, Johan V; Hjort, Martin; McKibbin, Sarah R; Troian, Andrea; Persson, Olof; Urpelainen, Samuli; Knudsen, Jan; Schnadt, Joachim; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2018-04-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables the ultrathin high-quality oxide layers that are central to all modern metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits. Crucial to achieving superior device performance are the chemical reactions during the first deposition cycle, which could ultimately result in atomic-scale perfection of the semiconductor-oxide interface. Here, we directly observe the chemical reactions at the surface during the first cycle of hafnium dioxide deposition on indium arsenide under realistic synthesis conditions using photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the widely used ligand exchange model of the ALD process for the removal of native oxide on the semiconductor and the simultaneous formation of the first hafnium dioxide layer must be significantly revised. Our study provides substantial evidence that the efficiency of the self-cleaning process and the quality of the resulting semiconductor-oxide interface can be controlled by the molecular adsorption process of the ALD precursors, rather than the subsequent oxide formation.

  10. Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides with hydrogen chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Jonathan D; Njegic, Bosiljka; Chang, Wayne L; Gordon, Mark S; Dabdub, Donald; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2009-08-18

    Gaseous HCl generated from a variety of sources is ubiquitous in both outdoor and indoor air. Oxides of nitrogen (NO(y)) are also globally distributed, because NO formed in combustion processes is oxidized to NO(2), HNO(3), N(2)O(5) and a variety of other nitrogen oxides during transport. Deposition of HCl and NO(y) onto surfaces is commonly regarded as providing permanent removal mechanisms. However, we show here a new surface-mediated coupling of nitrogen oxide and halogen activation cycles in which uptake of gaseous NO(2) or N(2)O(5) on solid substrates generates adsorbed intermediates that react with HCl to generate gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) and nitryl chloride (ClNO(2)), respectively. These are potentially harmful gases that photolyze to form highly reactive chlorine atoms. The reactions are shown both experimentally and theoretically to be enhanced by water, a surprising result given the availability of competing hydrolysis reaction pathways. Airshed modeling incorporating HCl generated from sea salt shows that in coastal urban regions, this heterogeneous chemistry increases surface-level ozone, a criteria air pollutant, greenhouse gas and source of atmospheric oxidants. In addition, it may contribute to recently measured high levels of ClNO(2) in the polluted coastal marine boundary layer. This work also suggests the potential for chlorine atom chemistry to occur indoors where significant concentrations of oxides of nitrogen and HCl coexist.

  11. Surface reaction mechanisms during ozone and oxygen plasma assisted atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Vikrant R; Vandalon, Vincent; Agarwal, Sumit

    2010-09-07

    We have elucidated the reaction mechanism and the role of the reactive intermediates in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide from trimethyl aluminum in conjunction with O(3) and an O(2) plasma. In situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data show that both -OH groups and carbonates are formed on the surface during the oxidation cycle. These carbonates, once formed on the surface, are stable to prolonged O(3) exposure in the same cycle. However, in the case of plasma-assisted ALD, the carbonates decompose upon prolonged O(2) plasma exposure via a series reaction kinetics of the type, A (CH(3)) --> B (carbonates) --> C (Al(2)O(3)). The ratio of -OH groups to carbonates on the surface strongly depends on the oxidizing agent, and also the duration of the oxidation cycle in plasma-assisted ALD. However, in both O(3) and O(2) plasma cycles, carbonates are a small fraction of the total number of reactive sites compared to the hydroxyl groups.

  12. An image-based reaction field method for electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuchun; Baumketner, Andrij; Deng, Shaozhong; Xu, Zhenli; Jacobs, Donald; Cai, Wei

    2009-10-21

    In this paper, a new solvation model is proposed for simulations of biomolecules in aqueous solutions that combines the strengths of explicit and implicit solvent representations. Solute molecules are placed in a spherical cavity filled with explicit water, thus providing microscopic detail where it is most needed. Solvent outside of the cavity is modeled as a dielectric continuum whose effect on the solute is treated through the reaction field corrections. With this explicit/implicit model, the electrostatic potential represents a solute molecule in an infinite bath of solvent, thus avoiding unphysical interactions between periodic images of the solute commonly used in the lattice-sum explicit solvent simulations. For improved computational efficiency, our model employs an accurate and efficient multiple-image charge method to compute reaction fields together with the fast multipole method for the direct Coulomb interactions. To minimize the surface effects, periodic boundary conditions are employed for nonelectrostatic interactions. The proposed model is applied to study liquid water. The effect of model parameters, which include the size of the cavity, the number of image charges used to compute reaction field, and the thickness of the buffer layer, is investigated in comparison with the particle-mesh Ewald simulations as a reference. An optimal set of parameters is obtained that allows for a faithful representation of many structural, dielectric, and dynamic properties of the simulated water, while maintaining manageable computational cost. With controlled and adjustable accuracy of the multiple-image charge representation of the reaction field, it is concluded that the employed model achieves convergence with only one image charge in the case of pure water. Future applications to pKa calculations, conformational sampling of solvated biomolecules and electrolyte solutions are briefly discussed.

  13. He atom surface scattering: Surface dynamics of insulators, overlayers and crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Investigations have focused primarily on surface structure and dynamics of ionic insulators, epitaxial growth onto alkali halide crystals and multiphoton studies. The surface dynamics of RbCl has been re-examined. We have developed a simple force constant model which provides insight into the dynamics of KBr overlayers on NaCl(001), a system with a large lattice mismatch. The KBr/NaCl(001) results are compared to Na/Cu(001) and NaCl/Ge(001). We have completed epitaxial growth experiments for KBr onto RbCl(001). Slab dynamics calculations using a shell model for this system with very small lattice mismatch are being carried out in collaboration with Professor Manson of Clemson University and with Professor Schroeder in Regensburg, Germany. Extensive experiments on multiphoton scattering of helium atoms onto NaCl and, particularly, LiF have been carried out and the theory has been developed to a rather advanced stage by Professor Manson. This work will permit the extraction of more information from time-of-flight spectra. It is shown that the theoretical model provides a very good description of the multiphoton scattering from organic films. Work has started on self-assembling organic films on gold (alkyl thiols/Au(111)). We have begun to prepare and characterize the gold crystal; one of the group members has spent two weeks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory learning the proper Au(111) preparation techniques. One of our students has carried out neutron scattering experiments on NiO, measuring both bulk phonon and magnon dispersion curves

  14. Kinetic modeling for thermal dehydration of ferrous oxalate dihydrate polymorphs: a combined model for induction period-surface reaction-phase boundary reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Haruka; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2014-04-03

    In this study, ferrous oxalate dihydrate polymorph particles, α- and β-phases, with square bipyramidal and quadratic prismatic shapes, respectively, were synthesized. Thermal dehydration of the samples was subjected to kinetic study as a typical reaction that indicates a significant induction period and a sigmoidal mass-loss behavior. On the basis of the formal kinetic analysis of the mass-loss traces recorded under isothermal, nonisothermal, and constant transformation rate conditions and the morphological observations of the surface textures of the partially reacted sample particles, a combined kinetic model for the induction period-surface reaction-phase boundary reaction was developed. The sigmoidal mass-loss behavior after the significant induction period under isothermal conditions was satisfactorily simulated by the combined kinetic model. The kinetic parameters for the component processes of induction period, surface reaction, and phase boundary reaction were separately determined from the kinetic simulation. The differences in the kinetic behaviors of the induction period and the phase boundary reaction between α- and β-phase samples were well described by the kinetic parameters. The applicability of the combined kinetic model to practical systems was demonstrated through characterizing the physicogeometrical kinetics of the thermal dehydration of ferrous oxalate dihydrate polymorphs.

  15. Future Challenges in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Understanding Catalysts under Dynamic Reaction Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalz, Kai F; Kraehnert, Ralph; Dvoyashkin, Muslim; Dittmeyer, Roland; Gläser, Roger; Krewer, Ulrike; Reuter, Karsten; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2017-01-09

    In the future, (electro-)chemical catalysts will have to be more tolerant towards a varying supply of energy and raw materials. This is mainly due to the fluctuating nature of renewable energies. For example, power-to-chemical processes require a shift from steady-state operation towards operation under dynamic reaction conditions. This brings along a number of demands for the design of both catalysts and reactors, because it is well-known that the structure of catalysts is very dynamic. However, in-depth studies of catalysts and catalytic reactors under such transient conditions have only started recently. This requires studies and advances in the fields of 1) operando spectroscopy including time-resolved methods, 2) theory with predictive quality, 3) kinetic modelling, 4) design of catalysts by appropriate preparation concepts, and 5) novel/modular reactor designs. An intensive exchange between these scientific disciplines will enable a substantial gain of fundamental knowledge which is urgently required. This concept article highlights recent developments, challenges, and future directions for understanding catalysts under dynamic reaction conditions.

  16. The Surface Reactions of Ethanol over UO2(100) Thin Film

    KAUST Repository

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.

    2015-10-08

    The study of the reactions of oxygenates on well-defined oxide surfaces is important for the fundamental understanding of heterogeneous chemical pathways that are influenced by atomic geometry, electronic structure and chemical composition. In this work, an ordered uranium oxide thin film surface terminated in the (100) orientation is prepared on a LaAlO3 substrate and studied for its reactivity with a C-2 oxygenate, ethanol (CH3CH2OH). With the use of synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we have probed the adsorption and desorption processes observed in the valence band, C1s, O1s and U4f to investigate the bonding mode, surface composition, electronic structure and probable chemical changes to the stoichiometric-UO2(100) [smooth-UO2(100)] and Ar+-sputtered UO2(100) [rough-UO2(100)] surfaces. Unlike UO2(111) single crystal and UO2 thin film, Ar-ion sputtering of this UO2(100) did not result in noticeable reduction of U cations. The ethanol molecule has C-C, C-H, C-O and O-H bonds, and readily donates the hydroxyl H while interacting strongly with the UO2 surfaces. Upon ethanol adsorption (saturation occurred at 0.5 ML), only ethoxy (CH3CH2O-) species is formed on smooth-UO2(100) whereas initially formed ethoxy species are partially oxidized to surface acetate (CH3COO-) on the Ar+-sputtered UO2(100) surface. All ethoxy and acetate species are removed from the surface between 600 and 700 K.

  17. Permutation invariant potential energy surfaces for polyatomic reactions using atomistic neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, Brian; Zhao, Bin; Guo, Hua; Li, Jun; Jiang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The applicability and accuracy of the Behler-Parrinello atomistic neural network method for fitting reactive potential energy surfaces is critically examined in three systems, H + H 2 → H 2 + H, H + H 2 O → H 2 + OH, and H + CH 4 → H 2 + CH 3 . A pragmatic Monte Carlo method is proposed to make efficient choice of the atom-centered mapping functions. The accuracy of the potential energy surfaces is not only tested by fitting errors but also validated by direct comparison in dynamically important regions and by quantum scattering calculations. Our results suggest this method is both accurate and efficient in representing multidimensional potential energy surfaces even when dissociation continua are involved.

  18. [The reaction of human surface and inside body temperature to extreme hypothermia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, O A; Onishchenko, V O; Liakh, Iu Ie

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of changes in the parameters of the surface and core body temperature under the systematic impact of ultra-low temperature is described in this article. As a source of ultra-low temperature was used (Cryo Therapy Chamber) Zimmer Medizin Systeme firm Zimmer Electromedizin (Germany) (-110 degrees C). Surface and internal body temperature was measured by infrared thermometer immediately before visiting cryochamber and immediately after exiting. In the study conducted 47,464 measurements of body temperature. It was established that the internal temperature of the human body under the influence of ultra-low temperatures in the proposed mode of exposure remains constant, and the surface temperature of the body reduces by an average of 11.57 degrees C. The time frame stabilization of adaptive processes of thermoregulation under the systematic impact of ultra-low temperature was defined in the study.

  19. Investigation of Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, Francine [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Agblevor, Foster [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Klein, Michael [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Sheikhi, Reza [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-12-31

    A collaborative effort involving experiments, kinetic modeling, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to understand co-gasification of coal-biomass mixtures. The overall goal of the work was to determine the key reactive properties for coal-biomass mixed fuels. Sub-bituminous coal was mixed with biomass feedstocks to determine the fluidization and gasification characteristics of hybrid poplar wood, switchgrass and corn stover. It was found that corn stover and poplar wood were the best feedstocks to use with coal. The novel approach of this project was the use of a red mud catalyst to improve gasification and lower gasification temperatures. An important results was the reduction of agglomeration of the biomass using the catalyst. An outcome of this work was the characterization of the chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms of the co-gasification fuels, and the development of a set of models that can be integrated into other modeling environments. The multiphase flow code, MFIX, was used to simulate and predict the hydrodynamics and co-gasification, and results were validated with the experiments. The reaction kinetics modeling was used to develop a smaller set of reactions for tractable CFD calculations that represented the experiments. Finally, an efficient tool was developed, MCHARS, and coupled with MFIX to efficiently simulate the complex reaction kinetics.

  20. Holographic otoscope for nanodisplacement measurements of surfaces under dynamic excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Moreno, J M; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J; Harrington, Ellery; Cheng, Jeffrey T; Scarpino, C; Santoyo, F Mendoza

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel holographic otoscope system for measuring nanodisplacements of objects subjected to dynamic excitation. Such measurements are necessary to quantify the mechanical deformation of surfaces in mechanics, acoustics, electronics, biology, and many other fields. In particular, we are interested in measuring the sound-induced motion of biological samples, such as an eardrum. Our holographic otoscope system consists of laser illumination delivery (IS), optical head (OH), and image processing computer (IP) systems. The IS delivers the object beam (OB) and the reference beam (RB) to the OH. The backscattered light coming from the object illuminated by the OB interferes with the RB at the camera sensor plane to be digitally recorded as a hologram. The hologram is processed by the IP using the Fresnel numerical reconstruction algorithm, where the focal plane can be selected freely. Our holographic otoscope system is currently deployed in a clinic, and is packaged in a custom design. It is mounted in a mechatronic positioning system to increase its maneuverability degrees to be conveniently positioned in front of the object to be measured. We present representative results highlighting the versatility of our system to measure deformations of complex elastic surfaces in the wavelength scale including a copper foil membrane and postmortem tympanic membrane. SCANNING 33: 342-352, 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Controllable Surface Reorganization Engineering on Cobalt Phosphide Nanowire Arrays for Efficient Alkaline Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Cheng, Han; Lv, Haifeng; Wang, Jingyu; Liu, Linqi; Liu, Si; Wu, Xiaojun; Chu, Wangsheng; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Developing highly efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts in alkaline media is considered significant and valuable for water splitting. Herein, it is demonstrated that surface reorganization engineering by oxygen plasma engraving on electocatalysts successfully realizes a dramatically enhanced alkaline HER activity. Taking CoP nanowire arrays grown on carbon cloth (denoted as CoP NWs/CC) as an example, the oxygen plasma engraving can trigger moderate CoO x species formation on the surface of the CoP NWs/CC, which is visually verified by the X-ray absorption fine structure, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) mapping. Benefiting from the moderate CoO x species formed on the surface, which can promote the water dissociation in alkaline HER, the surface reorganization of the CoP NWs/CC realizes almost fourfold enhanced alkaline HER activity and a 180 mV decreased overpotential at 100 mA cm -2 , compared with the pristine ones. More interestingly, this surface reorganization strategy by oxygen plasma engraving can also be effective to other electrocatalysts such as free-standing CoP, Co 4 N, O-CoSe 2 , and C-CoSe 2 nanowires, which verifies the universality of the strategy. This work thus opens up new avenues for designing alkaline HER electrocatalysts based on oxygen plasma engraving. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Induced Superaerophobicity onto a Non-superaerophobic Catalytic Surface for Enhanced Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Kamran; Hussain, Sajjad; Truong, Linh; Roy, Sanjib Baran; Jeon, Jae Ho; Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Kim, Minsoo; Yi, Yeonjin; Jung, Jongwan; Chun, Seung-Hyun

    2017-12-20

    Despite tremendous progress in the development of novel electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), the accumulation of hydrogen gas bubbles produced on the catalyst surface has been rather poorly addressed. The bubbles block the surface of the electrode, thus resulting in poor performance even when excellent electrocatalysts are used. In this study, we show that vertically grown graphene nanohills (VGNHs) possess an excellent capability to quickly disengage the produced hydrogen gas bubbles from the electrode surface, and thus exhibit superaerophobic properties. To compensate for the poor electrolytic properties of graphene toward HER, the graphene surface was modified with WS 2 nanoparticles to accelerate the water-splitting process by using this hybrid catalyst (VGNHs-WS 2 ). For comparison purposes, WS 2 nanoparticles were also deposited on the flat graphene (FG) surface. Because of its superior superaerophobic properties, VGNHs-WS 2 outperformed FG-WS 2 in terms of both catalytic activity toward the HER and superaerophobicity. Furthermore, VGNHs-WS 2 exhibited a low onset potential (36 mV compared to 288 mV for FG-WS 2 ) and long-term stability in the HER over an extended period of 20 h. This study provides an efficient way to utilize highly conductive and superaerophobic VGNHs as support materials for intrinsic semiconductors, such as WS 2 , to simultaneously achieve superaerophobicity and high catalytic activity.

  3. Identifying the Active Surfaces of Electrochemically Tuned LiCoO2 for Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Zhiyi; Chen, Guangxu; Li, Yanbin; Wang, Haotian; Xie, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Identification of active sites for catalytic processes has both fundamental and technological implications for rational design of future catalysts. Herein, we study the active surfaces of layered lithium cobalt oxide (LCO) for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) using the enhancement effect of electrochemical delithiation (De-LCO). Our theoretical results indicate that the most stable (0001) surface has a very large overpotential for OER independent of lithium content. In contrast, edge sites such as the nonpolar (1120) and polar (0112) surfaces are predicted to be highly active and dependent on (de)lithiation. The effect of lithium extraction from LCO on the surfaces and their OER activities can be understood by the increase of Co 4+ sites relative to Co 3+ and by the shift of active oxygen 2p states. Experimentally, it is demonstrated that LCO nanosheets, which dominantly expose the (0001) surface show negligible OER enhancement upon delithiation. However, a noticeable increase in OER activity (~0.1 V in overpotential shift at 10 mA cm –2 ) is observed for the LCO nanoparticles, where the basal plane is greatly diminished to expose the edge sites, consistent with the theoretical simulations. In addition, we find that the OER activity of De-LCO nanosheets can be improved if we adopt an acid etching method on LCO to create more active edge sites, which in turn provides a strong evidence for the theoretical indication.

  4. Unsteady flow of a Maxwell fluid over a stretching surface in presence of chemical reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Mukhopadhyay

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is presented for unsteady two-dimensional flow of a Maxwell fluid over a stretching surface in presence of a first order constructive/destructive chemical reaction. Using suitable transformations, the governing partial differential equations are converted to ordinary one and are then solved numerically by shooting method. The flow fields and mass transfer are significantly influenced by the governing parameters. Fluid velocity initially decreases with increasing unsteadiness parameter and concentration decreases significantly due to unsteadiness. The effect of increasing values of the Maxwell parameter is to suppress the velocity field. But the concentration is enhanced with increasing Maxwell parameter.

  5. The multichannel n-propyl + O2 reaction surface: Definitive theory on a model hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Marcus A.; Liang, Tao; Pu, Liang; Schaefer, Henry F.; Allen, Wesley D.

    2018-03-01

    The n-propyl + O2 reaction is an important model of chain branching reactions in larger combustion systems. In this work, focal point analyses (FPAs) extrapolating to the ab initio limit were performed on the n-propyl + O2 system based on explicit quantum chemical computations with electron correlation treatments through coupled cluster single, double, triple, and perturbative quadruple excitations [CCSDT(Q)] and basis sets up to cc-pV5Z. All reaction species and transition states were fully optimized at the rigorous CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory, revealing some substantial differences in comparison to the density functional theory geometries existing in the literature. A mixed Hessian methodology was implemented and benchmarked that essentially makes the computations of CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ vibrational frequencies feasible and thus provides critical improvements to zero-point vibrational energies for the n-propyl + O2 system. Two key stationary points, n-propylperoxy radical (MIN1) and its concerted elimination transition state (TS1), were located 32.7 kcal mol-1 and 2.4 kcal mol-1 below the reactants, respectively. Two competitive β-hydrogen transfer transition states (TS2 and TS2') were found separated by only 0.16 kcal mol-1, a fact unrecognized in the current combustion literature. Incorporating TS2' in master equation (ME) kinetic models might reduce the large discrepancy of 2.5 kcal mol-1 between FPA and ME barrier heights for TS2. TS2 exhibits an anomalously large diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction (ΔDBOC = 1.71 kcal mol-1), which is indicative of a nearby surface crossing and possible nonadiabatic reaction dynamics. The first systematic conformational search of three hydroperoxypropyl (QOOH) intermediates was completed, uncovering a total of 32 rotamers lying within 1.6 kcal mol-1 of their respective lowest-energy minima. Our definitive energetics for stationary points on the n-propyl + O2 potential energy surface provide key benchmarks for future studies

  6. He atom-surface scattering: Surface dynamics of insulators, overlayers and crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Investigations in this laboratory have focused on the surface structure and dynamics of ionic insulators and on epitaxial growth onto alkali halide crystals. In the later the homoepitaxial growth of NaCl/NaCl(001) and the heteroepitaxial growth of KBr/NaCl(001), NaCl/KBr(001) and KBr/RbCl(001) have been studied by monitoring the specular He scattering as a function of the coverage and by measuring the angular and energy distributions of the scattered He atoms. These data provide information on the surface structure, defect densities, island sizes and surface strain during the layer-by-layer growth. The temperature dependence of these measurements also provides information on the mobilities of the admolecules. He atom scattering is unique among surface probes because the low-energy, inert atoms are sensitive only to the electronic structure of the topmost surface layer and are equally applicable to all crystalline materials. It is proposed for the next year to exploit further the variety of combinations possible with the alkali halides in order to carry out a definitive study of epitaxial growth in the ionic insulators. The work completed so far, including measurements of the Bragg diffraction and surface dispersion at various stages of growth, appears to be exceptionally rich in detail, which is particularly promising for theoretical modeling. In addition, because epitaxial growth conditions over a wide range of lattice mismatches is possible with these materials, size effects in growth processes can be explored in great depth. Further, as some of the alkali halides have the CsCl structure instead of the NaCl structure, we can investigate the effects of the heteroepitaxy with materials having different lattice preferences. Finally, by using co-deposition of different alkali halides, one can investigate the formation and stability of alloys and even alkali halide superlattices

  7. Dynamics of the fusion reaction in the dtμ- system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, V.B.; Revai, J.; Zubarev, A.L.

    1988-08-01

    A dynamical scheme based on the (td,αn) two-channel model is derived for the description of the fusion reaction in the dtμ - system. Special attention is paid to the correct specification of the final states. Several possibilities are pointed out for the systematic improvement of the sudden approximation for the sticking coefficient. It seems to be useful to outline a general formulation of these processes which would allow a clear comparison of existing approaches. The lack of satisfactory agreement between experimental and theoretical values of the sticking coefficient is a further argument in favour of the programme. (R.P.) 10 refs

  8. Applications of granular-dynamics numerical simulations to asteroid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, D. C.; Michel, P.; Schwartz, S. R.; Yu, Y.; Ballouz, R.-L.; Matsumura, S.

    2014-07-01

    Spacecraft images and indirect observations including thermal inertia measurements indicate most small bodies have surface regolith. Evidence of granular flow is also apparent in the images. This material motion occurs in very low gravity, therefore in a totally different gravitational environment than on the Earth. Upcoming sample-return missions to small bodies, and possible future manned missions, will involve interaction with the surface regolith, so it is important to develop tools to predict the surface response. We have added new capabilities to the N-body gravity tree code pkdgrav [1,2] that permit the simulation of granular dynamics, including multi-contact physics and friction forces, using the soft-sphere discrete-element method [3]. The numerical approach has been validated through comparison with laboratory experiments (e.g., [3,4]). (1) We carried out impacts into granular materials using different projectile shapes under Earth's gravity [5] and compared the results to laboratory experiments [6] in support of JAXA's Hayabusa 2 asteroid sample-return mission. We tested different projectile shapes and confirmed that the 90-degree cone was the most efficient at excavating mass when impacting 5-mm-diameter glass beads. Results are sensitive to the normal coefficient of restitution and the coefficient of static friction. Preliminary experiments in micro-gravity for similar impact conditions show both the amount of ejected mass and the timescale of the impact process increase, as expected. (2) It has been found (e.g., [7,8]) that ''fresh'' (unreddened) Q-class asteroids have a high probability of recent planetary encounters (˜1 Myr; also see [9]), suggesting that surface refreshening may have occurred due to tidal effects. As an application of the potential effect of tidal interactions, we carried out simulations of Apophis' predicted 2029 encounter with the Earth to see whether regolith motion might occur, using a range of plausible material parameters

  9. A laboratory investigation of mixing dynamics between biofuels and surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxiang; Cotel, Aline

    2017-11-01

    Recently, production and usage of ethanol-blend fuels or biofuels have increased dramatically along with increasing risk of spilling into surface waters. Lack of understanding of the environmental impacts and absence of standard clean-up procedures make it crucial to study the mixing behavior between biofuels and water. Biofuels are represented by a solution of ethanol and glycol. A Plexiglas tank in conjunction with a wave generator is used to simulate the mixing of surface waters and biofuels under different natural conditions. In our previous experiments, two distinct mixing regimes were observed. One regime was driven by turbulence and the other by interfacial instabilities. However, under more realistic situations, without wind driven waves, only the first mixing regime was found. After one minute of rapid turbulent mixing, biofuels and water were fully mixed and no interface was formed. During the mixing process, chemical reactions happened simultaneously and influenced mixing dynamics. Current experiments are investigating the effect of waves on the mixing dynamics. Support from NSF CBET 1335878.

  10. Chemical Recognition of Active Oxygen Species on the Surface of Oxygen Evolution Reaction Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunzhen; Fontaine, Olivier; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; Grimaud, Alexis

    2017-07-17

    Owing to the transient nature of the intermediates formed during the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on the surface of transition metal oxides, their nature remains largely elusive by the means of simple techniques. The use of chemical probes is proposed, which, owing to their specific affinities towards different oxygen species, unravel the role played by these species on the OER mechanism. For that, tetraalkylammonium (TAA) cations, previously known for their surfactant properties, are introduced, which interact with the active oxygen sites and modify the hydrogen bond network on the surface of OER catalysts. Combining chemical probes with isotopic and pH-dependent measurements, it is further demonstrated that the introduction of iron into amorphous Ni oxyhydroxide films used as model catalysts deeply modifies the proton exchange properties, and therefore the OER mechanism and activity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Reaction of ethane with deuterium over platinum(111) single-crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaera, F.; Somorhai, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Deuterium exchange and hydrogenolysis of ethane were studied over (111) platinum surfaces under atmospheric pressures and a temperature range of 475-625 K. Activation energies of 19 kcal/mol for exchange and 34 kcal/mol for hydrogenolysis were obtained. The exchange reaction rates displayed kinetic orders with respect to deuterium and ethane partial pressures of -0.55 and 1.2, respectively. The exchange production distribution was U-shaped, peaking at one and six deuterium atoms per ethane molecule, similar to results reported for other forms of platinum, e.g., supported, films, and foils. The pressure of ethylidyne moieties on the surface was inferred from low-energy electron diffraction and thermal desorption spectroscopy. A mechanism is proposed to explain the experimental results, in which ethylidyne constitutes an intermediate in one of two competitive pathways. 31 references, 9 figures, 3 tables

  12. A time-dependent quantum dynamical study of the H + HBr reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bina; Zhang, Dong H

    2007-09-27

    Time-dependent wave packet calculations were carried out to study the exchange and abstraction processes in the title reaction on the Kurosaki-Takayanagi potential energy surface (Kurosaki, Y.; Takayanagi, T. J. Chem. Phys. 2003, 119, 7838). Total reaction probabilities and integral cross sections were calculated for the reactant HBr initially in the ground state, first rotationally excited state, and first vibrationally excited state for both the exchange and abstraction reactions. At low collision energy, only the abstraction reaction occurs because of its low barrier height. Once the collision energy exceeds the barrier height of the exchange reaction, the exchange process quickly becomes the dominant process presumably due to its larger acceptance cone. It is found that initial vibrational excitation of HBr enhances both processes, while initial rotational excitation of HBr from j(0) = 0 to 1 has essentially no effect on both processes. For the abstraction reaction, the theoretical cross section at E(c) = 1.6 eV is 1.06 A(2), which is smaller than the experimental result of 3 +/- 1 A(2) by a factor of 2-3. On the other hand, the theoretical rate constant is larger than the experimental results by about a factor of 2 in the temperature region between 220 and 550 K. It is also found that the present quantum rate constant is larger than the TST result by a factor of 2 at 200 K. However, the agreement between the present quantum rate constant and the TST result improves as the temperature increases.

  13. The coupling of mechanical dynamics and induced currents in plates and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenburger, D.W.; Bialek, J.M.

    1986-10-01

    Significant mechanical reactions and deflections may be produced when electrical eddy currents induced in a conducting structure by transformer-like electromotive forces interact with background magnetic fields. Additional eddy currents induced by structural motion through the background fields modify both the mechanical and electrical dynamic behavior of the system. The observed effects of these motional eddy currents are sometimes referred to as magnetic damping and magnetic stiffness. This paper addresses the coupled structural deformation and eddy currents in flat plates and simple two-dimensional surfaces in three-space. A coupled system of equations has been formulated using finite element techniques for the mechanical aspects and a mesh network method for the electrical aspects of the problem

  14. The exchange reaction between hydrogen and deuterium. I. Importance of surface reactions in the steady-state mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marteau, Chantal; Gaillard-Cusin, Francoise; James, H.

    1978-01-01

    Investigation of heterogeneous initiation process of gas phase linear chain reactions is carried out through the study of H 2 -D 2 exchange reaction. Experimental data under study concern mainly the stationary rate of HD formation and the prestationary proceeding. Steady-state method accounts for the first one of these data; it allows to clearly compare the wall process part to the part played by the homogeneous chain reaction towards HD formation. Activation energy of exchange elementary step between chemisorbed hydrogen (on silica) and gaseous deuterium has been evaluated: Esub(e1)=52+-1 Kcal/mole [fr

  15. Stabilization of silver nanoparticles in nonanoic acid: A temperature activated conformation reaction observed with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henneke, Dale E.; Malyavanatham, Gokul; Kovar, Desiderio; O'Brien, D.T.; Becker, M.F.; Nichols, William T.; Keto, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles were synthesized by ultraviolet (λ=248 nm) laser ablation of an aerosol of micron-sized source particles entrained in nitrogen. As a result of thermionic electron emission and photoionization, nanoparticles produced in this manner were highly charged. The resulting aerosol was primarily composed of nanometer sized particles. The charged nanoparticles were deflected by an electric field that was perpendicular to the aerosol flow. Deflected nanoparticles were deposited directly into n-nonanoic acid flowing along the negative collection electrode. Suspensions of nanoparticles collected in this manner were dark gray in color and were found to be flocculated. When the suspensions were heated to temperatures above 75 deg. C, a color change from gray to clear was observed. Ultraviolet/visible extinction spectroscopy was performed on each suspension following annealing at different temperatures and times. By modeling the absorption decrease as a first order reaction, a good fit for the data was found. Analysis by dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that the initial mean flocculent size of the gray suspensions was 602 nm. DLS analysis of the suspensions taken at different annealing intervals showed that the flocculent size decreased, but maintained a narrow size distribution until the size shrank below the instrument resolution limit. The reduction in flocculent size coincided with the observed color change, and an irreversible transition to a deflocculated primary nanoparticle suspension is observed. Surface enhanced Raman scattering is used to confirm that the reaction results from a change in the orientation of the nonanoic molecule on the surface of the nanoparticle

  16. Conformity of macroscopic behavior to local properties in the catalytic ammonia synthesis and oscillatory reactions on metal surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Cholach, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Unique catalytic potential of metal surfaces has encouraged a great number of basic and applied studies. The manuscript highlights the general regularities in a field on the grounds of strong interrelation between catalytic, kinetic and thermodynamic behaviour of the reaction system. The trials of the catalytic NH3 synthesis and the oscillatory NO+H2 reaction have revealed that the thermodynamics of the local structure determines the properties and multiplicity of the reaction intermediates e...

  17. Derivatization reaction-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of trace acetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Chengbin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Li; Tian, Yunfei

    2016-08-01

    A facile method was developed for determination of trace volatile acetone by coupling a derivatization reaction to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). With iodide modified Ag nanoparticles (Ag IMNPs) as the SERS substrate, acetone without obvious Raman signal could be converted to SERS-sensitive species via a chemical derivatization reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH). In addition, acetone can be effectively separated from liquid phase with a purge-sampling device and then any serious interference from sample matrices can be significantly reduced. The optimal conditions for the derivatization reaction and the SERS analysis were investigated in detail, and the selectivity and reproducibility of this method were also evaluated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for acetone was 5mgL(-1) or 0.09mM (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 80mgL(-1) acetone (n=9) was 1.7%. This method was successfully used for the determination of acetone in artificial urine and human urine samples with spiked recoveries ranging from 92% to 110%. The present method is convenient, sensitive, selective, reliable and suitable for analysis of trace acetone, and it could have a promising clinical application in early diabetes diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. New Combinatorial Approach for the Investigation of Kinetics and Temperature Dependence of Surface Reactions in Thin Organic Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shovsky, A.; Schönherr, Holger

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a new, simple, and reproducible method for the rapid determination of the temperature dependence of solution phase surface reactions of organic thin films on solid supports. Instead of estimating the extent of reaction for many separate samples for many different

  19. Nonlinear stochastic dynamics of mesoscopic homogeneous biochemical reaction systems—an analytical theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hong

    2011-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of biochemical reactions in a small-sized system on the order of a cell are stochastic. Assuming spatial homogeneity, the populations of n molecular species follow a multi-dimensional birth-and-death process on {Z}^n . We introduce the Delbrück-Gillespie process, a continuous-time Markov jump process, whose Kolmogorov forward equation has been known as the chemical master equation, and whose stochastic trajectories can be computed via the Gillespie algorithm. Using simple models, we illustrate that a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations on {R}^n emerges in the infinite system size limit. For finite system size, transitions among multiple attractors of the nonlinear dynamical system are rare events with exponentially long transit times. There is a separation of time scales between the deterministic ODEs and the stochastic Markov jumps between attractors. No diffusion process can provide a global representation that is accurate on both short and long time scales for the nonlinear, stochastic population dynamics. On the short time scale and near deterministic stable fixed points, Ornstein-Uhlenbeck Gaussian processes give linear stochastic dynamics that exhibit time-irreversible circular motion for open, driven chemical systems. Extending this individual stochastic behaviour-based nonlinear population theory of molecular species to other biological systems is discussed.

  20. He-atom surface scattering apparatus for studies of crystalline surface dynamics. Progress report, May 1, 1985-April 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The primary goal of this grant is the construction of a state-of-the-art He atom-crystal surface scattering apparatus which will be capable of measuring both elastic and inelastic scattering of He atoms from crystal surfaces of metals, semiconductors and insulators. First, the apparatus will be constructed and characterized, after which a program of studies on the surface dynamics of a variety of crystal surfaces will be started. 6 refs., 2 figs

  1. Probing surface distributions of α clusters in 20Ne via α -transfer reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Tokuro; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Suhara, Tadahiro; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Background: Direct evidence of the α -cluster manifestation in bound states has not been obtained yet, although a number of experimental studies were carried out to extract the information of the clustering. In particular in conventional analyses of α -transfer reactions, there exist a few significant problems on reaction models, which are insufficient to qualitatively discuss the cluster structure. Purpose: We aim to verify the manifestation of the α -cluster structure from observables. As the first application, we plan to extract the spatial information of the cluster structure of the 20Ne nucleus in its ground state through the cross section of the α -transfer reaction 16O(6Li,d )20Ne. Methods: For the analysis of the transfer reaction, we work with the coupled-channel Born approximation (CCBA) approach, in which the breakup effect of 6Li is explicitly taken into account by means of the continuum-discretized coupled-channel method based on the three-body α +d +16O model. The two methods are adopted to calculate the overlap function between 20Ne and α +16O ; one is the microscopic cluster model (MCM) with the generator coordinate method, and the other is the phenomenological two-body potential model (PM). Results: We show that the CCBA calculation with the MCM wave function gives a significant improvement of the theoretical result on the angular distribution of the transfer cross section, which is consistent with the experimental data. Employing the PM, it is discussed which region of the cluster wave function is probed on the transfer cross section. Conclusions: It is found that the surface region of the cluster wave function is sensitive to the cross section. The present work is situated as the first step in obtaining important information to systematically investigate the cluster structure.

  2. The reaction of the building structure with window unit to the explosiveimpact on the basis of dynamic equation solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doronin Fedor Leonidovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing residential buildings, additional measures for increasing the strength at dynamic effects indoors are not foreseen. The walls of the structure fixed in the framework are not designed for shock wave caused by explosion of utility gas. When designing a building, the task of the special dynamic load is often reduced to the calculation of the safe shock pressure, exceeding of which leads to the destruction of the structures. The wall with the window area under dynamic effects is a blast relief panel, which reduces the excess pressure inside the room. The proposed method of calculating a design with a window unit allows determining the dynamic reaction of the wall on explosive pulse. The proposed calculation technique of the constructions at shock loads allows tracing the changes of the inertial forces and displacements at any stage of dynamic response. The reaction to dynamic loads can be also set for non-monolithic structures, consisting of different materials with different conditions of fastening. Elastoplastic reaction of a brick wall with glass units was determined using step-by-step method of linear acceleration. The calculation of stress-strain state of brick walls with window panes determined the strength properties of the structures close to the monolithic version. The proposed technique of numerical solution of dynamic equations is applied only in the analysis of elastic systems, in which the dynamic characteristics remain unchanged throughout the reaction process.

  3. Parallel replica dynamics method for bistable stochastic reaction networks: Simulation and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Plecháč, Petr

    2017-12-21

    Stochastic reaction networks that exhibit bistable behavior are common in systems biology, materials science, and catalysis. Sampling of stationary distributions is crucial for understanding and characterizing the long-time dynamics of bistable stochastic dynamical systems. However, simulations are often hindered by the insufficient sampling of rare transitions between the two metastable regions. In this paper, we apply the parallel replica method for a continuous time Markov chain in order to improve sampling of the stationary distribution in bistable stochastic reaction networks. The proposed method uses parallel computing to accelerate the sampling of rare transitions. Furthermore, it can be combined with the path-space information bounds for parametric sensitivity analysis. With the proposed methodology, we study three bistable biological networks: the Schlögl model, the genetic switch network, and the enzymatic futile cycle network. We demonstrate the algorithmic speedup achieved in these numerical benchmarks. More significant acceleration is expected when multi-core or graphics processing unit computer architectures and programming tools such as CUDA are employed.

  4. Computation of free energy differences through nonequilibrium stochastic dynamics: The reaction coordinate case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelievre, Tony; Rousset, Mathias; Stoltz, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    The computation of free energy differences through an exponential weighting of out-of-equilibrium paths (known as the Jarzynski equality [C. Jarzynski, Equilibrium free energy differences from nonequilibrium measurements: a master equation approach, Phys. Rev. E 56 (5) (1997) 5018-5035, C. Jarzynski, Nonequilibrium equality for free energy differences, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 (14) (1997) 2690-2693]) is often used for transitions between states described by an external parameter in the Hamiltonian. An extension to transitions between states defined by different values of some reaction coordinate is presented here, using a projected Brownian dynamics. In contrast with other approaches (see e.g. [S. Park, F. Khalili-Araghi, E. Tajkhorshid, K. Schulten, Free energy calculation from steered molecular dynamics simulations using Jarzynski's equality, J. Chem. Phys. 119 (6) (2003) 3559-3566]), a projection is used rather than a constraining potential to let the constraints associated with the reaction coordinate evolve. It is shown how to use the Lagrange multipliers associated with these constraints to compute the work associated with a given trajectory. Appropriate discretizations are proposed. Some numerical results demonstrate the applicability of the method for the computation of free energy difference profiles

  5. Parallel replica dynamics method for bistable stochastic reaction networks: Simulation and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Plecháč, Petr

    2017-12-01

    Stochastic reaction networks that exhibit bistable behavior are common in systems biology, materials science, and catalysis. Sampling of stationary distributions is crucial for understanding and characterizing the long-time dynamics of bistable stochastic dynamical systems. However, simulations are often hindered by the insufficient sampling of rare transitions between the two metastable regions. In this paper, we apply the parallel replica method for a continuous time Markov chain in order to improve sampling of the stationary distribution in bistable stochastic reaction networks. The proposed method uses parallel computing to accelerate the sampling of rare transitions. Furthermore, it can be combined with the path-space information bounds for parametric sensitivity analysis. With the proposed methodology, we study three bistable biological networks: the Schlögl model, the genetic switch network, and the enzymatic futile cycle network. We demonstrate the algorithmic speedup achieved in these numerical benchmarks. More significant acceleration is expected when multi-core or graphics processing unit computer architectures and programming tools such as CUDA are employed.

  6. Surface Ocean Circulation and Dynamics in the Philippine Archipelago Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, W.; Moore, A. M.; Levin, J.; Zhang, B.; Arango, H. G.; Curchitser, E.; di Lorenzo, E.; Gordon, A. L.; Lin, J.

    2008-12-01

    The dynamics of the seasonal surface circulation in the Philippine Archipelago (117E-128E, 0N-14N) are investigated using a high-resolution Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) for the period of 2004 - March 2008. Three experiments are performed to estimate the relative importance of local, remote and tidal forcing. On annual mean, circulation in the Sulu Sea is dominated by the inflow from the South China Sea at the Mindoro and Balabac Straits, outflow into the Sulawesi Sea at the Sibutu Passage, and cyclonic circulation in the Sulu basin. A strong jet forms in the northeast Sulu Sea when currents from the Mindoro and Tablas Straits converge. Within the Archipelago, strong westward currents in the Bohol Sea carry the western Pacific (WP) Water from the Surigao Strait into the Sulu Sea via the Dipolog Strait. In the Sibuyan Sea, currents flow westward, which carry part of the WP water from the San Bernardino Strait into the Sulu Sea via the Tablas Strait. The surface circulations exhibit strong seasonal variations or reversals from winter to summer. The variations of volume transports above 40m at the Mindoro Strait, Balabac Strait and Sibutu Passage of the Sulu Sea and at the Verde Island Passage are dominated by remote forcing, although local forcing can be large sometimes. At the Tablas and Dipolog Straits, variations of transports result from both remote and local forcing. The cyclonic (anticyclonic) gyres during winter (summer) in the Sulu Sea and seasonally reversing currents in the Archipelago result mainly from local forcing. Nonlinear rectification of tides acts to reduce the mean transports at the Surigao, San Bernardino and Dipolog Straits, and it also affects the Sulu Sea circulation perhaps by tidal mixing and shifting the locations of jets and eddies.

  7. The influence of the quencher concentration on the rate of simple bimolecular reaction: molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litniewski, Marek

    2005-09-22

    The paper presents the results of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of the irreversible bimolecular reaction A+B --> C+B for the simple liquid composed of mechanically identical soft spheres. The systems with the total number of molecules corresponding to 10(7)-10(9) are considered. The influence of the concentration of a quencher (B) on the surviving probability of A and the reaction rate is analyzed for a wide range of the concentrations and for two significantly different reduced densities. It is shown that the quencher concentration dependence effect (QCDE) is, in fact, a composition of two QCDE effects: the short-time QCDE that increases the reaction rate and the long-time QCDE that decreases it. The paper also analyzes the influence of the concentration on the steady-state rate constant, k(ss), obtained by integrating the surviving probability. The excess in k(ss) due to finite quencher concentration changes the sign from negative to positive while going from low to high concentrations. Generally, the excess is extremely weak. It attains a 1% level only if the concentration is very high.

  8. Mathematical Modeling and Dynamic Simulation of Metabolic Reaction Systems Using Metabolome Time Series Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriyudthsak, Kansuporn; Shiraishi, Fumihide; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2016-01-01

    The high-throughput acquisition of metabolome data is greatly anticipated for the complete understanding of cellular metabolism in living organisms. A variety of analytical technologies have been developed to acquire large-scale metabolic profiles under different biological or environmental conditions. Time series data are useful for predicting the most likely metabolic pathways because they provide important information regarding the accumulation of metabolites, which implies causal relationships in the metabolic reaction network. Considerable effort has been undertaken to utilize these data for constructing a mathematical model merging system properties and quantitatively characterizing a whole metabolic system in toto. However, there are technical difficulties between benchmarking the provision and utilization of data. Although, hundreds of metabolites can be measured, which provide information on the metabolic reaction system, simultaneous measurement of thousands of metabolites is still challenging. In addition, it is nontrivial to logically predict the dynamic behaviors of unmeasurable metabolite concentrations without sufficient information on the metabolic reaction network. Yet, consolidating the advantages of advancements in both metabolomics and mathematical modeling remain to be accomplished. This review outlines the conceptual basis of and recent advances in technologies in both the research fields. It also highlights the potential for constructing a large-scale mathematical model by estimating model parameters from time series metabolome data in order to comprehensively understand metabolism at the systems level.

  9. Variation of reaction dynamics for OH hydrogen abstraction from glycine between ab initio levels of theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ren-Jie; Wu, Chen-Chang; Jang, Soonmin; Li, Feng-Yin

    2010-02-01

    The variation in reaction dynamics of OH hydrogen abstraction from glycine between HF, MP2, CCSD(T), M05-2X, BHandHLYP, and B3LYP levels was demonstrated. The abstraction mode shows distinct patterns between these five levels and determines the barrier height, and the spin density transfer between OH radical and glycine. These differences are mainly resulted from the spin density distribution and geometry of the alpha carbon during the abstraction. The captodative effect which is commonly believed as one of the major factors to stabilize the caron-centered radical can only be observed in DFT levels but not in HF and MP2 levels. Difference in the abstraction energy were found in these calculation levels, by using the result of CCSD(T) as reference, B3LYP, BHandHLYP, and M05-2X underestimated the reaction barrier about 5.1, 0.1, and 2.4 kcal mol(-1), while HF and MP2 overestimated 19.1 kcal mol(-1) and 1.6 kcal mol(-1), respectively. These differences can be characterized by the vibration mode of imaginary frequency of transition states, which indicates the topology around transition states and determines reaction barrier height. In this model system, BHandHLYP provides the best prediction of the energy barrier among those tested methods.

  10. The hydrophobic effect: Molecular dynamics simulations of water confined between extended hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2004-01-01

    Structural and dynamic properties of water confined between two parallel, extended, either hydrophobic or hydrophilic crystalline surfaces of n-alkane C36H74 or n-alcohol C35H71OH, are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Electron density profiles, directly compared with corresponding...... at both surfaces. The ordering is characteristically different between the surfaces and of longer range at the hydrophilic surface. Furthermore, the dynamic properties of water are different at the two surfaces and different from the bulk behavior. In particular, at the hydrophobic surface, time......-correlation functions reveal that water molecules have characteristic diffusive behavior and orientational ordering due to the lack of hydrogen bonding interactions with the surface. These observations suggest that the altered dynamical properties of water in contact with extended hydrophobic surfaces together...

  11. Surface-Induced Dissociation and Chemical Reactions of C2D4+ on Stainless Steel, Carbon (HOPG), and Two Different Diamond Surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feketeová, L.; Žabka, Ján; Zappa, F.; Grill, V.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.; Herman, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 6 (2009), s. 927-938 ISSN 1044-0305 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : surface-induced process * diamond surfaces * chemical reactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.391, year: 2009

  12. Dynamics of alkali ions-neutral molecules reactions: Radio frequency-guided beam experimental cross-sections and direct quasiclassical trajectory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, J.; Andres, J. de; Lucas, J. M.; Alberti, M.; Huarte-Larranaga, F.; Bassi, D.; Aguilar, A. [Departament de Quimica Fisica, Institut de Quimica Teorica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Trento, 38123 Povo-Trento (Italy); Departament de Quimica Fisica, Institut de Quimica Teorica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-11-27

    Different reactive processes taking place in collisions between alkali ions and neutral i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Cl molecules in the low (center of mass frame) energy range have been studied using an octopole radiofrequency guided-ion-beam apparatus developed in our laboratory. Cross-section energy dependences for all these reactions have been obtained in absolute units. Ab initio electronic structure calculations for those colliding systems evolving on the ground single potential surface have given relevant information on the main topological features of the surfaces. For some of the reactions a dynamic study by 'on the fly' trajectories has complemented the available experimental and electronic structure information.

  13. Modelling for Near-Surface Transport Dynamics of Hydrogen of Plasma Facing Materials by use of Cellular Automaton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimura, K.; Terai, T.; Yamawaki, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the kinetics of desorption of adsorbed hydrogen from an ideal metallic surface is modelled in Cellular Automaton (CA). The modelling is achieved by downgrading the surface to one dimension. The model consists of two parts that are surface migration and desorption. The former is attained by randomly sorting the particles at each time, the latter is realised by modelling the thermally-activated process. For the verification of this model, thermal desorption is simulated then the comparison with the chemical kinetics is carried out. Excellent agreement is observed from the result. The results show that this model is reasonable to express the recombinative desorption of two chemisorbed adatoms. Though, the application of this model is limited to the second-order reaction case. But it can be believed that the groundwork of modelling the transport dynamics of hydrogen through the surface under complex conditions is established

  14. Optodynamics: dynamic aspects of laser beam-surface interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Možina, J; Diaci, J

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of the results of our original research in the area of laser-material interaction and pulsed laser material processing with a special emphasis on the dynamic aspects of laser beam-surface interaction, which include the links between the laser material removal and the resulting material motion. In view of laser material processing, a laser beam is not only considered as a tool but also as a generator of information about the material transformation. The information is retained and conveyed by different kinds of optically induced mechanical waves. Several generation/detection schemes have been developed to extract this information, especially in the field of non-destructive material evaluation. Blast and acoustic waves, which propagate in the air surrounding the work-piece, have been studied using microphone detection as well as various setups of the laser beam deflection probe. Stress waves propagating through the work-piece have been studied using piezoelectric transducers and laser interferometers.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics and breakup of free-surface flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggers, J.

    1997-01-01

    Surface-tension-driven flows and, in particular, their tendency to decay spontaneously into drops have long fascinated naturalists, the earliest systematic experiments dating back to the beginning of the 19th century. Linear stability theory governs the onset of breakup and was developed by Rayleigh, Plateau, and Maxwell. However, only recently has attention turned to the nonlinear behavior in the vicinity of the singular point where a drop separates. The increased attention is due to a number of recent and increasingly refined experiments, as well as to a host of technological applications, ranging from printing to mixing and fiber spinning. The description of drop separation becomes possible because jet motion turns out to be effectively governed by one-dimensional equations, which still contain most of the richness of the original dynamics. In addition, an attraction for physicists lies in the fact that the separation singularity is governed by universal scaling laws, which constitute an asymptotic solution of the Navier-Stokes equation before and after breakup. The Navier-Stokes equation is thus continued uniquely through the singularity. At high viscosities, a series of noise-driven instabilities has been observed, which are a nested superposition of singularities of the same universal form. At low viscosities, there is rich scaling behavior in addition to aesthetically pleasing breakup patterns driven by capillary waves. The author reviews the theoretical development of this field alongside recent experimental work, and outlines unsolved problems. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  16. Library of Antifouling Surfaces Derived From Natural Amino Acids by Click Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Hu, Xin; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Ye-Min; Liu, Xiao-Jiu; Xie, Bin-Bin; Yao, Chen; Li, Yi; Li, Xin-Song

    2015-08-12

    Biofouling is of great concern in numerous applications ranging from ophthalmological implants to catheters, and from bioseparation to biosensors. In this report, a general and facile strategy to combat surface fouling is developed by grafting of amino acids onto polymer substrates to form zwitterionic structure through amino groups induced epoxy ring opening click reaction. First of all, a library of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) hydrogels with zwitterionic surfaces were prepared, resulting in the formation of pairs of carboxyl anions and protonated secondary amino cations. The analysis of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the successful immobilization of amino acids on the hydrogel surfaces. After that, the contact angle and equilibrium water content of the modified hydrogels showed that the hydrogels exhibited improved hydrophilicity compared with the parent hydrogel. Furthermore, the protein deposition was evaluated by bicinchoninic acid assay using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme as models. The results indicated that the performance of the hydrogels was determined by the nature of incorporated amino acid: the hydrogels incorporated with neutral amino acids had nonspecific antiadsorption capability to both BSA and lysozyme; the hydrogels incorporated with charged amino acids showed antiadsorption behaviors against protein with same charge and enhanced adsorption to the protein with opposite charge; the optimal antiadsorption performance was observed on the hydrogels incorporated with polar amino acids with a hydroxyl residual. The improvement of antiprotein fouling of the neutral amino acids grafted hydrogels can be ascribed to the formation of zwitterionic surfaces. Finally, a couple of soft contact lenses grafted with amino acids were fabricated having improved antifouling property and hydrophilicity. The result demonstrated the success of

  17. Field and laboratory emission cell automation and control system for investigating surface chemistry reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemmer, Michael M.; Ham, Jason E.; Wells, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    A novel system [field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) automation and control system] has been developed to deliver ozone to a surface utilizing the FLEC to simulate indoor surface chemistry. Ozone, humidity, and air flow rate to the surface were continuously monitored using an ultraviolet ozone monitor, humidity, and flow sensors. Data from these sensors were used as feedback for system control to maintain predetermined experimental parameters. The system was used to investigate the chemistry of ozone with α-terpineol on a vinyl surface over 72h. Keeping all other experimental parameters the same, volatile organic compound emissions from the vinyl tile with α-terpineol were collected from both zero and 100ppb(partsper109) ozone exposures. System stability profiles collected from sensor data indicated experimental parameters were maintained to within a few percent of initial settings. Ozone data from eight experiments at 100ppb (over 339h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.65ppb and a 95% tolerance of 3.3ppb. Humidity data from 17 experiments at 50% relative humidity (over 664h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.38% and a 95% tolerance of 2.77%. Data of the flow rate of air flowing through the FLEC from 14 experiments at 300ml/min (over 548h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 3.02ml/min and a 95% tolerance range of 6.03ml/min. Initial experimental results yielded long term emissions of ozone/α-terpineol reaction products, suggesting that surface chemistry could play an important role in indoor environments.

  18. Characterization of surface electrochemical reactions used in electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy and digital etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Thomas Allen

    Surface analytical techniques have been used to characterize electrochemical reactions to be used in semiconductor processing technologies. Studies have been performed using UHV-EC methodology to determine conditions for the surface limited dissolution of CdTe(100). Electrochemical conditions were identified which resulted in the reduction of the top layer of tellurium atoms, leaving behind a cadmium enriched surface. Attempts to find an electrochemical potential for the oxidative dissolution of the cadmium surface were complicated by the simultaneous oxidation of the compound CdTe. In situ scanning tunneling microscopy has also been used to characterize the formation of tellurium atomic layers formed on Au(111) and Au(100) by underpotential deposition. On Au(100), the following sequence of surface structures was observed prior to bulk electrodeposition: a p(2x2), a (2x✓10), a (2x4), and a (✓2x✓5). The transitions between these structures was observed by STM and mechanisms for the phase transitions are presented. The results are correlated to UHV-EC studies of tellurium UPD on Au(100). On Au(111), the following sequence of structures was observeḑ: a (✓3 x✓3), a (✓7x✓13), and a (3x3). The (✓3x✓3) was shown to exist with a network of domain walls, forming long range triangular and diamond shaped superstructures. Conversion of the (✓3x✓3) to higher coverage structure resulted in roughening of the underlying Au surface and a mechanism is hypothesized to explain this transition. The STM results are also correlated to low energy electron diffraction (LEED) results obtained by UHV-EC studies. The surface structures formed by reductive UPD of the chalcogenide elements and Se on both Au(100) and Au(111) are compared. Both elements initially resulted in structures consisting of isolated atoms separated by distances close to the reported van der Waals diameter. Higher coverage structures resulted in interatomic chalcogenide bonding and the structures

  19. Efficient Exploration of Reactive Potential Energy Surfaces Using Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Iannuzzi, Marcella; Laio, Alessandro; Parrinello, Michele

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of observing chemical reactions in ab initio molecular dynamics runs is severely hindered by the short simulation time accessible. We propose a new method for accelerating the reaction process, based on the ideas of the extended Lagrangian and coarse-grained non-Markovian metady- namics. We demonstrate that by this method it is possible to simulate reactions involving complex atomic rearrangements and very large energy barriers in runs of a few picoseconds.

  20. Ultrafast infrared studies of chemical reaction dynamics in room-temperature liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haw [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Femtosecond infrared spectroscopy provides sufficient spectral and temporal resolution to support a detailed investigation of the early events of a photochemical reaction. Previously unreported transient species that arise as intermediates during the course of a reaction may have lifetimes that are too short for conventional characterization. For these species, quantum-mechanical (density functional theoretical and ab initio) electronic structure calculations provide invaluable insight into chemical properties including molecular structure and energetic. With the combination of experimental and theoretical results, it is possible to assemble a comprehensive picture of the reaction dynamics of a system that is intricately influenced by the surrounding solvent molecules. The mechanisms of several important organometallic reactions, such as alkane C– H bond activation by η3-Tp*Rh(CO), silane Si–H bond activation by η5-CpMn(CO)2 and η5-CpRe(CO)2, as well as chlorinated methane C–Cl bond cleavage by the Re(CO)5 radical are elucidated. The results demonstrate the importance of molecular morphology change (C–H and Si–H act ivat ion), solvent rearrangement (Si–H activation), intersystem crossing (Si–H activation), and solvent caging (C–Cl cleavage) in understanding the reactivity of the organometallic species, The nature of the apparent free-energy barrier for C–H, Si–H, and C–Cl bond activation reaction is found to be- cleavage of an alkane C–H bond, rearrangement of a silane molecule HSiR3 (R = alkyl group) from a nonreactive alkyl site to the reactive Si–H bond, and Cl atom transfer from a chlorinated methane molecule to Re(CO)5, respectively. These results support previous d initio calculations for C–H and Si–H bond activation reaction profiles which suggest that cleavage of an alkane C–H bond by a transition metal center, unlike that of a silane