WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface rain rate

  1. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperature and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate in Hurricanes Earl And Karl (2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy; James, Mark; Roberts, Brent J.; Biswax, Sayak; Uhlhorn, Eric; Black, Peter; Linwood Jones, W.; Johnson, Jimmy; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem

    2012-01-01

    Ocean surface emission is affected by: a) Sea surface temperature. b) Wind speed (foam fraction). c) Salinity After production of calibrated Tb fields, geophysical fields wind speed and rain rate (or column) are retrieved. HIRAD utilizes NASA Instrument Incubator Technology: a) Provides unique observations of sea surface wind, temp and rain b) Advances understanding & prediction of hurricane intensity c) Expands Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer capabilities d) Uses synthetic thinned array and RFI mitigation technology of Lightweight Rain Radiometer (NASA Instrument Incubator) Passive Microwave C-Band Radiometer with Freq: 4, 5, 6 & 6.6 GHz: a) Version 1: H-pol for ocean wind speed, b) Version 2: dual ]pol for ocean wind vectors. Performance Characteristics: a) Earth Incidence angle: 0deg - 60deg, b) Spatial Resolution: 2-5 km, c) Swath: approx.70 km for 20 km altitude. Observational Goals: WS 10 - >85 m/s RR 5 - > 100 mm/hr.

  2. New Observations of C-band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate From the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Buckley, C. D.; Biswas, S.; May, C.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; hide

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD flew on the WB-57 during NASA's GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August September of 2010. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP campaign will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the GRIP campaign, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eyewall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  3. NESDIS Blended Rain Rate (RR) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The blended Rain Rate (RR) product is derived from multiple sensors/satellites. The blended products were merged from polar-orbiting and geostationary satellite...

  4. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) during GRIP and HS3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, C.

    2013-01-01

    HIRAD flew on high-altitude aircraft over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010, and at the time of this writing plans to fly over Atlantic tropical cyclones in September of 2012 as part of the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP and HS3 campaigns will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the campaigns, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eye-wall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  5. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Observations of Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate During NASA's GRIP and HS3 Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, C.

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD flew on high-altitude aircraft over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010, and plans to fly over Atlantic tropical cyclones in September of 2012 as part of the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain spatial resolution of approximately 2 km, out to roughly 30 km each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. The physical retrieval technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP and HS3 campaigns will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the campaigns, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eye-wall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  6. analysis of rain rate and rain attenuation for earth-space

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rain rate and rain attenuation predictions are vital when designing microwave satellite and terrestrial communication links, such as in the Ku and Ka bands. This paper presents the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of the predicted rain rate and rain attenuation for Uyo, Akwa Ibom State (AKS) (Latitude: 4.88°N, ...

  7. LBA-ECO CD-07 GOES-8 L3 Gridded Surface Radiation and Rain Rate for Amazonia: 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The LBA-Ecology CD-07 team collected and processed GOES-8 imager data over the LBA region to characterize the incoming radiation and precipitation rates at...

  8. LBA-ECO CD-07 GOES-8 L3 Gridded Surface Radiation and Rain Rate for Amazonia: 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The LBA-Ecology CD-07 team collected and processed GOES-8 imager data over the LBA region to characterize the incoming radiation and precipitation rates at regional...

  9. analysis of rain analysis of rain rate and rain attenuation for earth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    models purposely designed for designed for tropical zones, while the International Telecommunications Union Radio tropical zones, while the International Telecommunications Union Radio-wave propagation (ITU wave propagation (ITU wave propagation (ITU-R P) models were. R P) models were used for estimating rain.

  10. Estimating the exceedance probability of rain rate by logistic regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Long S.; Kedem, Benjamin

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the fraction of an area with rain intensity above a fixed threshold is highly correlated with the area-averaged rain rate. To estimate the fractional rainy area, a logistic regression model, which estimates the conditional probability that rain rate over an area exceeds a fixed threshold given the values of related covariates, is developed. The problem of dependency in the data in the estimation procedure is bypassed by the method of partial likelihood. Analyses of simulated scanning multichannel microwave radiometer and observed electrically scanning microwave radiometer data during the Global Atlantic Tropical Experiment period show that the use of logistic regression in pixel classification is superior to multiple regression in predicting whether rain rate at each pixel exceeds a given threshold, even in the presence of noisy data. The potential of the logistic regression technique in satellite rain rate estimation is discussed.

  11. TRMM Ground Validation Rain Gauge Rain Rate L2 1 month V7 (TRMM_2A56) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program rgmin generates 1-minute hourly rain rates from discrete tipping bucket rain gauge data by applying an interpolation algorithm. The interpolating routine...

  12. The Impact of Warm-Rain Microphysical Processes on Rain Rate and Polarimetric Observables at X-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Troemel, Silke; Simmer, Clemens

    2015-04-01

    Microphysical processes govern the evolution of drop size distribution (DSD) during the development of precipitating systems. Thus, an accurate knowledge on precipitating systems from a microphysical perspective is required for better quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE). Additionally, detection of microphysical processes in 3D polarimetric radar volumes paves the way for better parameterizations in numerical weather predictions (NWP). In this study, we focus on the impact of different microphysical processes on rain rate (RR) and polarimetric observables at X band. Microphysical processes during the evolution of warm-rain precipitating systems, including size sorting, evaporation, coalescence and breakup, are taken into account. Assuming that vertical rain shaft is composed of liquid spheroids distributed in a normalized Gamma size distribution, microphysical processes are reconstructed. The variation of RR governed by microphysical processes is also examined. Unique fingerprints caused by microphysical processes have been identified in polarimetric radar observations. For size sorting, large rain drops concentrating near ground surface or at leading edge induce strong Zdr (differential reflectivity) accompanied by small Zh (reflectivity). A larger mean size in DSD results in stronger Zdr during size sorting. The increasing mean size due to evaporation and coalescence enhances Zdr, while Zh during evaporation is reduced by the depletion of small rain drops. The reduction of Zh ranges between -10 dB and 0 dB considering different DSDs during evaporation. Zh, Zdr and Kdp (specific differential phase) all decrease when large rain drops break up. The evolution of DSD which depends on the ongoing microphysical processes results in a variation in RR. Though size sorting due to differential sedimentation occurs, RR approaches stable within 15 min. Suffering from vertical wind shear, RR is reduced because of the categorization of rain drops with different terminal

  13. Non-linear direct effects of acid rain on leaf photosynthetic rate of terrestrial plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dan; Du, Enzai; Sun, Zhengzhong; Zeng, Xuetong; de Vries, Wim

    2017-12-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of acid precursors have enhanced global occurrence of acid rain, especially in East Asia. Acid rain directly suppresses leaf function by eroding surface waxes and cuticle and leaching base cations from mesophyll cells, while the simultaneous foliar uptake of nitrates in rainwater may directly benefit leaf photosynthesis and plant growth, suggesting a non-linear direct effect of acid rain. By synthesizing data from literature on acid rain exposure experiments, we assessed the direct effects of acid rain on leaf photosynthesis across 49 terrestrial plants in China. Our results show a non-linear direct effect of acid rain on leaf photosynthetic rate, including a neutral to positive effect above pH 5.0 and a negative effect below that pH level. The acid rain sensitivity of leaf photosynthesis showed no significant difference between herbs and woody species below pH 5.0, but the impacts above that pH level were strongly different, resulting in a significant increase in leaf photosynthetic rate of woody species and an insignificant effect on herbs. Our analysis also indicates a positive effect of the molar ratio of nitric versus sulfuric acid in the acid solution on leaf photosynthetic rate. These findings imply that rainwater acidity and the composition of acids both affect the response of leaf photosynthesis and therefore result in a non-linear direct effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prediction Method for Rain Rate and Rain Propagation Attenuation for K-Band Satellite Communications Links in Tropical Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baso Maruddani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the prediction method using hidden Markov model (HMM for rain rate and rain propagation attenuation for K-band satellite communication link at tropical area. As is well known, the K-band frequency is susceptible of being affected by atmospheric condition, especially in rainy condition. The wavelength of K-band frequency which approaches to the size of rain droplet causes the signal strength is easily attenuated and absorbed by the rain droplet. In order to keep the quality of system performance for K-band satellite communication link, therefore a special attention has to be paid for rain rate and rain propagation attenuation. Thus, a prediction method for rain rate and rain propagation attenuation based on HMM is developed to process the measurement data. The measured and predicted data are then compared with the ITU-R recommendation. From the result, it is shown that the measured and predicted data show similarity with the model of ITU-R P.837-5 recommendation for rain rate and the model of ITU-R P.618-10 recommendation for rain propagation attenuation. Meanwhile, statistical data for measured and predicted data such as fade duration and interfade duration have insignificant discrepancy with the model of ITU-R P.1623-1 recommendation.

  15. RAIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monti, Matteo; Rasmussen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    We summarize the results and perspectives from a companion article, where we presented and evaluated an alternative architecture for data storage in distributed networks. We name the bio-inspired architecture RAIN, and it offers file storage service that, in contrast with current centralized cloud...... storage, has privacy by design, is open source, is more secure, is scalable, is more sustainable, has community ownership, is inexpensive, and is potentially faster, more efficient, and more reliable. We propose that a RAIN-style architecture could form the backbone of the Internet of Things that likely...

  16. Rain rate measurements over global oceans from IRS-P4 MSMR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    (GHRC), NASA on exabytes. These data contain. TMI derived global oceanic measurements of wind speed (with and without use of 10.65GHz chan- nel), integrated water vapour, cloud liquid water, sea surface temperature and rain rate (with and without use of 10.65 GHz channel). This product is used to find algorithm for ...

  17. RAIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monti, Matteo; Rasmussen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    We summarize the results and perspectives from a companion article, where we presented and evaluated an alternative architecture for data storage in distributed networks. We name the bio-inspired architecture RAIN, and it offers file storage service that, in contrast with current centralized clou...... will integrate multiple current and future infrastructures ranging from online services and cryptocurrency to parts of government administration....

  18. The 183-WSL Fast Rain Rate Retrieval Algorithm. Part II: Validation Using Ground Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviola, Sante; Levizzani, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The Water vapour Strong Lines at 183 GHz (183-WSL) algorithm is a method for the retrieval of rain rates and precipitation type classification (convectivestratiform), that makes use of the water vapor absorption lines centered at 183.31 GHz of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit module B (AMSU-B) and of the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) flying on NOAA-15-18 and NOAA-19Metop-A satellite series, respectively. The characteristics of this algorithm were described in Part I of this paper together with comparisons against analogous precipitation products. The focus of Part II is the analysis of the performance of the 183-WSL technique based on surface radar measurements. The ground truth dataset consists of 2.5 years of rainfall intensity fields from the NIMROD European radar network which covers North-Western Europe. The investigation of the 183-WSL retrieval performance is based on a twofold approach: 1) the dichotomous statistic is used to evaluate the capabilities of the method to identify rain and no-rain clouds; 2) the accuracy statistic is applied to quantify the errors in the estimation of rain rates.The results reveal that the 183-WSL technique shows good skills in the detection of rainno-rain areas and in the quantification of rain rate intensities. The categorical analysis shows annual values of the POD, FAR and HK indices varying in the range 0.80-0.82, 0.330.36 and 0.39-0.46, respectively. The RMSE value is 2.8 millimeters per hour for the whole period despite an overestimation in the retrieved rain rates. Of note is the distribution of the 183-WSL monthly mean rain rate with respect to radar: the seasonal fluctuations of the average rainfalls measured by radar are reproduced by the 183-WSL. However, the retrieval method appears to suffer for the winter seasonal conditions especially when the soil is partially frozen and the surface emissivity drastically changes. This fact is verified observing the discrepancy distribution diagrams where2the 183-WSL

  19. Parameterization of rain induced surface roughness and its validation study using a third generation wave model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh Kumar, R.; Prasad Kumar, B.; Bala Subrahamanyam, D.

    2009-09-01

    The effect of raindrops striking water surface and their role in modifying the prevailing sea-surface roughness is investigated. The work presents a new theoretical formulation developed to study rain-induced stress on sea-surface based on dimensional analysis. Rain parameters include drop size, rain intensity and rain duration. The influences of these rain parameters on young and mature waves were studied separately under varying wind speeds, rain intensity and rain duration. Contrary to popular belief that rain only attenuates surface waves, this study also points out rain duration under certain condition can contribute to wave growth at high wind speeds. Strong winds in conjunction with high rain intensity enhance the horizontal stress component on the sea-surface, leading to wave growth. Previous studies based on laboratory experiments and dimensional analysis do not account for rain duration when attempting to parameterize sea-surface roughness. This study signifies the importance of rain duration as an important parameter modifying sea-surface roughness. Qualitative as well quantitative support for the developed formulation is established through critical validation with reports of several researchers and satellite measurements for an extreme cyclonic event in the Indian Ocean. Based on skill assessment, it is suggested that the present formulation is superior to prior studies. Numerical experiments and validation performed by incorporating in state-of-art WAM wave model show the importance of treating rain-induced surface roughness as an essential pre-requisite for ocean wave modeling studies.

  20. Improved rain rate and drop size retrievals from airborne Doppler radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Shannon L.; Chiu, J. Christine; Hogan, Robin J.; Tian, Lin

    2017-09-01

    Satellite remote sensing of rain is important for quantifying the hydrological cycle, atmospheric energy budget, and cloud and precipitation processes; however, radar retrievals of rain rate are sensitive to assumptions about the raindrop size distribution. The upcoming EarthCARE satellite will feature a 94 GHz Doppler radar alongside lidar and radiometer instruments, presenting opportunities for enhanced retrievals of the raindrop size distribution. rain rate as a function of drop size and drop number concentration from airborne 94 GHz Doppler radar measurements using CAPTIVATE, the variational retrieval algorithm developed for EarthCARE. For a range of rain regimes observed during the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling field campaign, we explore the contributions of mean Doppler velocity and path-integrated attenuation (PIA) measurements to the retrieval of rain rate, and the retrievals are evaluated against independent measurements from an independent 9.6 GHz Doppler radar. The retrieved drop number concentrations vary over 5 orders of magnitude between very light rain from melting ice and warm rain from liquid clouds. In light rain conditions mean Doppler velocity facilitates estimates of rain rate without PIA, suggesting the possibility of EarthCARE rain rate estimates over land; in moderate warm rain, drop number concentration can be retrieved without mean Doppler velocity, with possible applications to CloudSat.

  1. AMSR-E/Aqua L2B Global Swath Rain Rate/Type GSFC Profiling Algorithm V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AMSR-E/Aqua Level-2B rain product includes instantaneous rain rate and rain type over ice-free and snow-free land and ocean between 70 degrees north and south...

  2. Sea surface freshening inferred from SMOS and ARGO salinity: impact of rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Boutin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The sea surface salinity (SSS measured from space by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission has recently been revisited by the European Space Agency first campaign reprocessing. We show that, with respect to the previous version, biases close to land and ice greatly decrease. The accuracy of SMOS SSS averaged over 10 days, 100 × 100 km2 in the open ocean and estimated by comparison to ARGO (Array for Real-Time Geostrophic Oceanography SSS is on the order of 0.3–0.4 in tropical and subtropical regions and 0.5 in a cold region. The averaged negative SSS bias (−0.1 observed in the tropical Pacific Ocean between 5° N and 15° N, relatively to other regions, is suppressed when SMOS observations concomitant with rain events, as detected from SSM/Is (Special Sensor Microwave Imager rain rates, are removed from the SMOS–ARGO comparisons. The SMOS freshening is linearly correlated to SSM/Is rain rate with a slope estimated to −0.14 mm−1 h, after correction for rain atmospheric contribution. This tendency is the signature of the temporal SSS variability between the time of SMOS and ARGO measurements linked to rain variability and of the vertical salinity stratification between the first centimeter of the sea surface layer sampled by SMOS and the 5 m depth sampled by ARGO. However, given that the whole set of collocations includes situations with ARGO measurements concomitant with rain events collocated with SMOS measurements under no rain, the mean −0.1 bias and the negative skewness of the statistical distribution of SMOS minus ARGO SSS difference are very likely the mean signature of the vertical salinity stratification. In the future, the analysis of ongoing in situ salinity measurements in the top 50 cm of the sea surface and of Aquarius satellite SSS are expected to provide complementary information about the sea surface salinity stratification.

  3. Millimeter wave attenuation prediction using a piecewise uniform rain rate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, R. R.; Stutzman, W. L.; Bostian, C. W.; Castle, R. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A piecewise uniform rain rate distribution model is introduced as a quasi-physical model of real rain along earth-space millimeter wave propagation paths. It permits calculation of the total attenuation from specific attenuation in a simple fashion. The model predications are verified by comparison with direct attenuation measurements for several frequencies, elevation angles, and locations. Also, coupled with the Rice-Holmberg rain rate model, attenuation statistics are predicated from rainfall accumulation data.

  4. Application of Statistical Methods of Rain Rate Estimation to Data From The TRMM Precipitation Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, R.; Jones, J. A.; Iguchi, T.; Okamoto, K.; Liao, L.; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The TRMM Precipitation Radar is well suited to statistical methods in that the measurements over any given region are sparsely sampled in time. Moreover, the instantaneous rain rate estimates are often of limited accuracy at high rain rates because of attenuation effects and at light rain rates because of receiver sensitivity. For the estimation of the time-averaged rain characteristics over an area both errors are relevant. By enlarging the space-time region over which the data are collected, the sampling error can be reduced. However. the bias and distortion of the estimated rain distribution generally will remain if estimates at the high and low rain rates are not corrected. In this paper we use the TRMM PR data to investigate the behavior of 2 statistical methods the purpose of which is to estimate the rain rate over large space-time domains. Examination of large-scale rain characteristics provides a useful starting point. The high correlation between the mean and standard deviation of rain rate implies that the conditional distribution of this quantity can be approximated by a one-parameter distribution. This property is used to explore the behavior of the area-time-integral (ATI) methods where fractional area above a threshold is related to the mean rain rate. In the usual application of the ATI method a correlation is established between these quantities. However, if a particular form of the rain rate distribution is assumed and if the ratio of the mean to standard deviation is known, then not only the mean but the full distribution can be extracted from a measurement of fractional area above a threshold. The second method is an extension of this idea where the distribution is estimated from data over a range of rain rates chosen in an intermediate range where the effects of attenuation and poor sensitivity can be neglected. The advantage of estimating the distribution itself rather than the mean value is that it yields the fraction of rain contributed by

  5. Rain rate measurements over global oceans from IRS-P4 MSMR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    This algorithm explained about 82 per cent correlation (r) with rain rate, and 1.61 mm h−1 of error of estimation. ... MSMR derived monthly averaged rain rates are compared with similar estimates from. TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR), and it .... A second order polynomial fit explains corre- lation for 10 GHz vertically polarized ...

  6. Non-linear direct effects of acid rain on leaf photosynthetic rate of terrestrial plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, Dan; Du, Enzai; Sun, Zhengzhong; Zeng, Xuetong; Vries, de Wim

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of acid precursors have enhanced global occurrence of acid rain, especially in East Asia. Acid rain directly suppresses leaf function by eroding surface waxes and cuticle and leaching base cations from mesophyll cells, while the simultaneous foliar uptake of nitrates in

  7. Characterization of tropical precipitation using drop size distribution and rain rate-radar reflectivity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saurabh; Maitra, Animesh

    2018-04-01

    Characterization of precipitation is important for proper interpretation of rain information from remotely sensed data. Rain attenuation and radar reflectivity (Z) depend directly on the drop size distribution (DSD). The relation between radar reflectivity/rain attenuation and rain rate (R) varies widely depending upon the origin, topography, and drop evolution mechanism and needs further understanding of the precipitation characteristics. The present work utilizes 2 years of concurrent measurements of DSD using a ground-based disdrometer at five diverse climatic conditions in Indian subcontinent and explores the possibility of rain classification based on microphysical characteristics of precipitation. It is observed that both gamma and lognormal distributions are performing almost similar for Indian region with a marginally better performance by one model than other depending upon the locations. It has also been found that shape-slope relationship of gamma distribution can be a good indicator of rain type. The Z-R relation, Z = ARb, is found to vary widely for different precipitation systems, with convective rain that has higher values of A than the stratiform rain for two locations, whereas the reverse is observed for the rest of the three locations. Further, the results indicate that the majority of rainfall (>50%) in Indian region is due to the convective rain although the occurrence time of convective rain is low (<10%).

  8. Estimation of Trends in Distributions of One-Minute Rain Rates Over the UK to Assess Impacts on Telecommunications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellerby, Tim; Ranatunga, Channa; Paulson, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    It is known that the rain rate exceeded 0.01% of the time has experienced an increasing trend, in the UK, over the last twenty years. It is very likely that rain fade and outage experience a similar trend. This paper presents a method, applicably globally, to estimate these trends. The input data are parameters easily extracted from numerical weather prediction reanalysis data. The method is verified using rain gauge data from the UK. Dynamic fading due to rain and wet snow tends to be larger than that due to other mechanisms on terrestrial and Earth-space links at frequencies above approximately 5 GHz. The International Telecommunication Union (ITU-R) maintains a set of models for predicting average annual distributions of rain fade, with a one-minute integration time, on individual links. An important parameter in these models of rain fade is the one-minute rain rate exceeded for 0.01% of an average year (R0.01%). Several recent reports have suggested that trends in climate parameters could be having significant effect on telecommunications systems over their lifetime. A satellite communications system has a typical life-cycle of 30 years, from initial conception to decommissioning. The objective of this work is to develop a method to estimate trends in the R0.01% rain rate, globally, using readily accessible data. A relationship is postulated between very low resolution rain parameters from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) reanalysis data and the one-minute averaged, point rain rates required for radio regulation, and the optimization of network spectral efficiency and performance. Trends in these parameters can then be linked to trends in one-minute rain rates. The transformation of reanalysis parameters to one-minute rain rate CCDF parameters has been optimized to provide the best fit to the 743 experimental CCDF statistics, acquired from over the 139 locations, archived in the database of the ITU-R Study Group 3: DBSG3. Inherent in this process is the

  9. EFFECT OF SOIL TILLAGE AND PLANT RESIDUE ON SURFACE ROUGHNESS OF AN OXISOL UNDER SIMULATED RAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elói Panachuki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface roughness of the soil is formed by mechanical tillage and is also influenced by the kind and amount of plant residue, among other factors. Its persistence over time mainly depends on the fundamental characteristics of rain and soil type. However, few studies have been developed to evaluate these factors in Latossolos (Oxisols. In this study, we evaluated the effect of soil tillage and of amounts of plant residue on surface roughness of an Oxisol under simulated rain. Treatments consisted of the combination of the tillage systems of no-tillage (NT, conventional tillage (CT, and minimum tillage (MT with rates of plant residue of 0, 1, and 2 Mg ha-1 of oats (Avena strigosa Schreb and 0, 3, and 6 Mg ha-1 of maize (Zea mays L.. Seven simulated rains were applied on each experimental plot, with intensity of 60±2 mm h-1 and duration of 1 h at weekly intervals. The values of the random roughness index ranged from 2.94 to 17.71 mm in oats, and from 5.91 to 20.37 mm in maize, showing that CT and MT are effective in increasing soil surface roughness. It was seen that soil tillage operations carried out with the chisel plow and the leveling disk harrow are more effective in increasing soil roughness than those carried out with the heavy disk harrow and leveling disk harrow. The roughness index of the soil surface decreases exponentially with the increase in the rainfall volume applied under conditions of no tillage without soil cover, conventional tillage, and minimum tillage. The oat and maize crop residue present on the soil surface is effective in maintaining the roughness of the soil surface under no-tillage.

  10. Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity–rain rate relationships for radar hydrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Uijlenhoet

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of the radar reflectivity factor Z(mm6m-3 to rain rate R(mm h-1 is a crucial step in the hydrological application of weather radar measurements. It has been common practice for over 50 years now to take for this conversion a simple power law relationship between Z and R. It is the purpose of this paper to explain that the fundamental reason for the existence of such power law relationships is the fact that Z and R are related to each other via the raindrop size distribution. To this end, the concept of the raindrop size distribution is first explained. Then, it is demonstrated that there exist two fundamentally different forms of the raindrop size distribution, one corresponding to raindrops present in a volume of air and another corresponding to those arriving at a surface. It is explained how Z and R are defined in terms of both these forms. Using the classical exponential raindrop size distribution as an example, it is demonstrated (1 that the definitions of Z and R naturally lead to power law Z–R relationships, and (2 how the coefficients of such relationships are related to the parameters of the raindrop size distribution. Numerous empirical Z–R relationships are analysed to demonstrate that there exist systematic differences in the coefficients of these relationships and the corresponding parameters of the (exponential raindrop size distribution between different types of rainfall. Finally, six consistent Z–R relationships are derived, based upon different assumptions regarding the rain rate dependence of the parameters of the (exponential raindrop size distribution. An appendix shows that these relationships are in fact special cases of a general Z–R relationship that follows from a recently proposed scaling framework for describing raindrop size distributions and their properties. Keywords: radar hydrology, raindrop size distribution, radar reflectivity–rain rate relationship

  11. TRMM Precipitation Radar Surface Rain L3 1 month 5 degree x 5 degree V7 (TRMM_3A26) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains distributions of monthly surface rainfall. These data were derived from rain rate statistics and include the estimated values of the...

  12. Statistical and neural classifiers in estimating rain rate from weather radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Michaelides

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Weather radars are used to measure the electromagnetic radiation backscattered by cloud raindrops. Clouds that backscatter more electromagnetic radiation consist of larger droplets of rain and therefore they produce more rain. The idea is to estimate rain rate by using weather radar as an alternative to rain-gauges measuring rainfall on the ground. In an experiment during two days in June and August 1997 over the Italian-Swiss Alps, data from weather radar and surrounding rain-gauges were collected at the same time. The statistical KNN and the neural SOM classifiers were implemented for the classification task using the radar data as input and the rain-gauge measurements as output. The proposed system managed to identify matching pattern waveforms and the rainfall rate on the ground was estimated based on the radar reflectivities with a satisfactory error rate, outperforming the traditional Z/R relationship. It is anticipated that more data, representing a variety of possible meteorological conditions, will lead to improved results. The results in this work show that an estimation of rain rate based on weather radar measurements treated with statistical and neural classifiers is possible.

  13. Study of 1-min rain rate integration statistic in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sujan; Choi, Dong-You

    2017-03-01

    The design of millimeter wave communication links and the study of propagation impairments at higher frequencies due to a hydrometeor, particularly rain, require the knowledge of 1-min. rainfall rate data. Signal attenuation in space communication results are due to absorption and scattering of radio wave energy. Radio wave attenuation due to rain depends on the relevance of a 1-min. integration time for the rain rate. However, in practice, securing these data over a wide range of areas is difficult. Long term precipitation data are readily available. However, there is a need for a 1-min. rainfall rate in the rain attenuation prediction models for a better estimation of the attenuation. In this paper, we classify and survey the prominent 1-min. rain rate models. Regression analysis was performed for the study of cumulative rainfall data measured experimentally for a decade in nine different regions in South Korea, with 93 different locations, using the experimental 1-min. rainfall accumulation. To visualize the 1-min. rainfall rate applicable for the whole region for 0.01% of the time, we have considered the variation in the rain rate for 40 stations across South Korea. The Kriging interpolation method was used for spatial interpolation of the rain rate values for 0.01% of the time into a regular grid to obtain a highly consistent and predictable rainfall variation. The rain rate exceeded the 1-min. interval that was measured through the rain gauge compared to the rainfall data estimated using the International Telecommunication Union Radio Communication Sector model (ITU-R P.837-6) along with the empirical methods as Segal, Burgueno et al., Chebil and Rahman, logarithmic, exponential and global coefficients, second and third order polynomial fits, and Model 1 for Icheon regions under the regional and average coefficient set. The ITU-R P. 837-6 exhibits a lower relative error percentage of 3.32% and 12.59% in the 5- and 10-min. to 1-min. conversion, whereas the

  14. Differences in rain rate intensities between TRMM observations and community atmosphere model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Bowman, Kenneth P.; Jackson, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation related latent heating is important in driving the atmospheric general circulation and in generating intraseasonal to decadal atmospheric variability. Our ability to project future climate change, especially trends in costly precipitation extremes, hinges upon whether coupled GCMs capture processes that affect precipitation characteristics. Our study compares the tropical-subtropical precipitation characteristics of simulations by the NCAR CAM3.1 atmospheric GCM and observations derived from the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Despite a fairly good simulation of the annual mean rain rate, CAM rains about 10-50% more often than the real world and fails to capture heavy rainfall associated with deep convective systems over subtropical South America and U.S. Southern Plains. When it rains, there is a likelihood of 0.96-1.0 that it rains lightly in the model, compared to values of 0.84-1.0 in TRMM data. On the other hand, the likelihood of the occurrence of moderate to heavy rainfall is an order of magnitude higher in observations (0.12-0.2) than that in the model (model compensates for the lack of heavy precipitation through raining more frequently within the light rain category, which leads to an annual rainfall amount close to what is observed. CAM captures the qualitative change of rain rate PDF from a "dry" oceanic to a "wet" oceanic region, but it fails to simulate the change of precipitation characteristics from an oceanic region to a land region where thunderstorm rainfall dominates.

  15. Light Reflection from Water Surfaces Perturbed by Falling Rain Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molesini, Giuseppe; Vannoni, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    An account of peculiar light patterns produced by reflection in a pool under falling rain droplets was recently reported by Molesini and Vannoni (2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 403-11). The mathematical approach, however, only covered the case of a symmetrical location of a light source and the observer's eyes with respect to the vertical of the falling…

  16. Performance analysis of 60-min to 1-min integration time rain rate conversion models in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Yun-Yann; Singh, Mandeep Singh Jit; Thiruchelvam, Vinesh

    2018-01-01

    Utilizing the frequency band above 10 GHz is in focus nowadays as a result of the fast expansion of radio communication systems in Malaysia. However, rain fade is the critical factor in attenuation of signal propagation for frequencies above 10 GHz. Malaysia is located in a tropical and equatorial region with high rain intensity throughout the year, and this study will review rain distribution and evaluate the performance of 60-min to 1-min integration time rain rate conversion methods for Malaysia. Several conversion methods such as Segal, Chebil & Rahman, Burgeono, Emiliani, Lavergnat and Gole (LG), Simplified Moupfouma, Joo et al., fourth order polynomial fit and logarithmic model have been chosen to evaluate the performance to predict 1-min rain rate for 10 sites in Malaysia. After the completion of this research, the results show that Chebil & Rahman model, Lavergnat & Gole model, Fourth order polynomial fit and Logarithmic model have shown the best performances in 60-min to 1-min rain rate conversion over 10 sites. In conclusion, it is proven that there is no single model which can claim to perform the best across 10 sites. By averaging RMSE and SC-RMSE over 10 sites, Chebil and Rahman model is the best method.

  17. A Model for Estimation of Rain Rate on Tropical Land from TRMM Microwave Imager Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2004-01-01

    Over the tropical land regions observations of the 85 GHz brightness temperature (T(sub 85v)) made by the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) radiometer when analyzed with the help of rain rate (R(sub pR)) deduced from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) indicate that there are two maxima in rain rate. One strong maximum occurs when T(sub 85) has a value of about 220 K and the other weaker one when T(sub 85v) is much colder approx. 150 K. Together with the help of earlier studies based on airborne Doppler Radar observations and radiative transfer theoretical simulations, we infer the maximum near 220 K is a result of relatively weak scattering due to super cooled rain drops and water coated ice hydrometeors associated with a developing thunderstorm (Cb) that has a strong updraft. The other maximum is associated with strong scattering due to ice particles that are formed when the updraft collapses and the rain from the Cb is transit2oning from convective type to stratiform type. Incorporating these ideas and with a view to improve the estimation of rain rate from existing operational method applicable to the tropical land areas, we have developed a rain retrieval model. This model utilizes two parameters, that have a horizontal scale of approx. 20km, deduced from the TMI measurements at 19, 21 and 37 GHz (T(sub 19v), T(sub 21v), T(sub 37v). The third parameter in the model, namely the horizontal gradient of brightness temperature within the 20 km scale, is deduced from TMI measurements at 85 GHz. Utilizing these parameters our retrieval model is formulated to yield instantaneous rain rate on a scale of 20 km and seasonal average on a mesoscale that agree well with that of the PR.

  18. Satellite passive microwave rain rate measurement over croplands during spring, summer and fall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Rain rate algorithms for spring, summer and fall that have been developed from comparisons between the brightness temperatures measured by the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and rain rates derived from operational WSR-57 radars over land are described. Data were utilized from a total of 25 SMMR passes and 234 radars, resulting in ∼12 000 observations of ∼1600 km 2 areas. Multiple correlation coefficients of 0.63, 0.80 and 0.75 are achieved for the spring, summer and fall algorithms, respectively. Most of this information is in the form of multifrequency contrast in brightness temperature, which is interpreted as a measurement of the degree to which the land-emitted radiation is attenuated by the rain systems. The SMMR 37 GHz channel has more information on rain rate than any other channel. By combining the lower frequency channels with the 37 GHz observations, variations in land and precipitation thermometric temperatures can be removed, leaving rain attenuation as the major effect on brightness temperature. Polarization screening at 37 GHz is found to be sufficient to screen out cases of wet ground, which is only important when the ground is relatively vegetation free. Heavy rain cases are found to be a significant part of the algorithms' success, because of the strong microwave signatures (low brightness temperatures) that result from the presence of precipitation-sized ice in the upper portions of heavily precipitating storms. If IR data are combined with the summer microwave data, an improved (0.85) correlation with radar rain rates is achieved

  19. Feasibility Study of Rain Rate Monitoring from Polarimetric GNSS Propagation Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao An

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the feasibility of estimating rain rate based on polarimetric Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS signals is explored in theory. After analyzing the cause of polarimetric signals, three physical-mathematical relation models between co-polar phase shift (KHH, KVV, specific differential phase shift (KDP, and rain rate (R are respectively investigated. These relation models are simulated based on four different empirical equations of nonspherical raindrops and simulated Gamma raindrop size distribution. They are also respectively analyzed based on realistic Gamma raindrop size distribution and maximum diameter of raindrops under three different rain types: stratiform rain, cumuliform rain, and mixed clouds rain. The sensitivity of phase shift with respect to some main influencing factors, such as shape of raindrops, frequency, as well as elevation angle, is also discussed, respectively. The numerical results in this study show that the results by scattering algorithms T-matrix are consistent with those from Rayleigh Scattering Approximation. It reveals that they all have the possibility to estimate rain rate using the KHH-R, KVV-R or KDP-R relation. It can also be found that the three models are all affected by shape of raindrops and frequency, while the elevation angle has no effect on KHH-R. Finally, higher frequency L1 or B1 and lower elevation angle are recommended and microscopic characteristics of raindrops, such as shape and size distribution, are deemed to be important and required for further consideration in future experiments. Since phase shift is not affected by attenuation and not biased by ground clutter cancellers, this method has considerable potential in precipitation monitoring, which provides new opportunities for atmospheric research.

  20. A Model for Estimation of Rain Rate on Tropical Land from TRMM Microwave Imager Radiometer Observations

    OpenAIRE

    C., PRABHAKARA; R., IACOVAZZI; J. M., YOO; K. M., KIM; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Center for Research on the Changing Earth System; EWHA Womans University; Science Systems and Applications, Inc.

    2005-01-01

    Over the tropical land regions scatter plots of the rain rate (R_), deduced from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) versus the observed 85GHz brightness temperature (T_) made by the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) radiometer, for a period of a season over a given geographic region of 3°×5°(lat×lon), indicate that there are two maxima in rain rate. One strong maximum occurs when T_ has a value of about 220K, and the other weaker one when T_ is much colder ~150K. Also these two maxima are vividly re...

  1. A Matérn model of the spatial covariance structure of point rain rates

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ying

    2014-07-15

    It is challenging to model a precipitation field due to its intermittent and highly scale-dependent nature. Many models of point rain rates or areal rainfall observations have been proposed and studied for different time scales. Among them, the spectral model based on a stochastic dynamical equation for the instantaneous point rain rate field is attractive, since it naturally leads to a consistent space–time model. In this paper, we note that the spatial covariance structure of the spectral model is equivalent to the well-known Matérn covariance model. Using high-quality rain gauge data, we estimate the parameters of the Matérn model for different time scales and demonstrate that the Matérn model is superior to an exponential model, particularly at short time scales.

  2. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer Wind Speed and Rain Rate Retrievals during the 2010 GRIP Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahawneh, Saleem; Farrar, Spencer; Johnson, James; Jones, W. Linwood; Roberts, Jason; Biswas, Sayak; Cecil, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing observations of hurricanes, from NOAA and USAF hurricane surveillance aircraft, provide vital data for hurricane research and operations, for forecasting the intensity and track of tropical storms. The current operational standard for hurricane wind speed and rain rate measurements is the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which is a nadir viewing passive microwave airborne remote sensor. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer, HIRAD, will extend the nadir viewing SFMR capability to provide wide swath images of wind speed and rain rate, while flying on a high altitude aircraft. HIRAD was first flown in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes, GRIP, NASA hurricane field experiment in 2010. This paper reports on geophysical retrieval results and provides hurricane images from GRIP flights. An overview of the HIRAD instrument and the radiative transfer theory based, wind speed/rain rate retrieval algorithm is included. Results are presented for hurricane wind speed and rain rate for Earl and Karl, with comparison to collocated SFMR retrievals and WP3D Fuselage Radar images for validation purposes.

  3. Perfluoroalkyl substances in the Maltese environment - (I) surface water and rain water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammut, G; Sinagra, E; Helmus, R; de Voogt, P

    2017-07-01

    The presence of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in rain water on the Maltese Islands is reported here for the first time and an extensive survey of these substances in surface water also reported. The Maltese archipelago lies at the centre of the Mediterranean Sea and consists of three main inhabited islands: Malta, Gozo and Comino. Surface water was collected from 41 valleys during the months of February and March 2015 at the peak of the wet season. Rain water was collected during the months of December 2014, February, August, September and October 2015. PFASs were extracted from the water samples using solid phase extraction and the extracts were then analysed using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in tandem (UPLC-MS/MS). All surface and rain water samples were contaminated with at least one PFAS. PFOS (waters respectively. The ΣPFAS concentrations in rain water ranged between 0.38ng/L (1st October 2015) and 6ng/L (21st February 2015). The Maltese archipelago is surrounded by sea and disconnected from any other mainland; therefore the results confirm that remote environments can become contaminated by PFASs from rain events depending on wind prevailing trajectories. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Real-Time Rain Rate Evaluation via Satellite Downlink Signal Attenuation Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannetti, Filippo; Reggiannini, Ruggero; Moretti, Marco; Adirosi, Elisa; Baldini, Luca; Facheris, Luca; Antonini, Andrea; Melani, Samantha; Bacci, Giacomo; Petrolino, Antonio; Vaccaro, Attilio

    2017-08-12

    We present the NEFOCAST project (named by the contraction of "Nefele", which is the Italian spelling for the mythological cloud nymph Nephele, and "forecast"), funded by the Tuscany Region, about the feasibility of a system for the detection and monitoring of precipitation fields over the regional territory based on the use of a widespread network of new-generation Eutelsat "SmartLNB" (smart low-noise block converter) domestic terminals. Though primarily intended for interactive satellite services, these devices can also be used as weather sensors, as they have the capability of measuring the rain-induced attenuation incurred by the downlink signal and relaying it on an auxiliary return channel. We illustrate the NEFOCAST system architecture, consisting of the network of ground sensor terminals, the space segment, and the service center, which has the task of processing the information relayed by the terminals for generating rain field maps. We discuss a few methods that allow the conversion of a rain attenuation measurement into an instantaneous rainfall rate. Specifically, we discuss an exponential model relating the specific rain attenuation to the rainfall rate, whose coefficients were obtained from extensive experimental data. The above model permits the inferring of the rainfall rate from the total signal attenuation provided by the SmartLNB and from the link geometry knowledge. Some preliminary results obtained from a SmartLNB installed in Pisa are presented and compared with the output of a conventional tipping bucket rain gauge. It is shown that the NEFOCAST sensor is able to track the fast-varying rainfall rate accurately with no delay, as opposed to a conventional gauge.

  5. Perfluoroalkyl substances in the Maltese Environment - (I) Surface water and rain water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sammut, G.; Sinagra, E.; Helmus, R.; de Voogt, P.

    2017-01-01

    The presence of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in rain water on the Maltese Islands is reported here for the first time and an extensive survey of these substances in surface water also reported. The Maltese archipelago lies at the centre of the Mediterranean Sea and consists of three main

  6. Range profiling of the rain rate by an airborne weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Robert; Nakamura, Kenji

    1990-01-01

    A class of methods based on a measure of path attenuation that is used to constrain the Hitschfeld-Bordan solution is investigated. Such methods are investigated for lidar, radar, and combined radar-radiometer applications. Their function is to allocate the attenuation in proportion to the strength of the measured reflectivity. A description is provided of four estimates of rain rate that have been tested using data from a dual-wavelength airborne radar at 10 GHz and 35 GHz. It is concluded, that when attenuation is significant, the estimates are generally more accurate than those without attenuation correction. Thus, such methodologies can be utilized to extend the effective dynamic range of the radar to higher rain rates.

  7. Degradation of unglazed rough graphite-aluminium solar absorber surfaces in simulated acid and neutral rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konttinen, P.; Lund, P.D.; Salo, T.

    2005-01-01

    Degradation mechanisms of unglazed solar absorber surfaces based on aluminium substrate were studied. Rough graphite-aluminium surfaces were total-immersion subjected to aerated and de-aerated simulated neutral and acid rain. Test conditions were based on calculated absorber stagnation temperature and global rain acidity measurements. Changes in optical properties, elemental composition and sample mass were examined by spectrometry, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and thermogravimetry, respectively. The absorbers exhibited almost no degradation at pH value of 3.5. At pH 5.5 alumina on the surface hydrated significantly degrading the optical properties of the surfaces severely in most cases. Therefore these absorber surfaces can not be recommended to be used in non-glazed applications if they are exposed to rain with pH exceeding ∼ 3.5-4.5. The total-immersion test needs to be developed further as the test results exhibited poor temperature and time dependency thus preventing accurate service lifetime estimates. Still, these tests were useful in determining favourable and non-favourable operating conditions for the absorber surfaces based on aluminium substrate. (author)

  8. Multifractal comparison of the extremes of rain rates and integrated vapour content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, Auguste; Ni, Vincent; Bosser, Pierre; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall extremes are studied through the analyse of three related fields measured with the help of co-located devices installed in the roof of the Ecole des Ponts ParisTech building: (i) Integrated Water Vapour (IWV); it corresponds the amount of water vapour present in the vertical columns between a GPS ground receiver and corresponding satellites. It is estimated from the time shift between the expected duration the signal needs to reach the receiver (the two positions are known) and the actual one (ii) Rain rate measured by three optical disdrometers of two different types (Campbell Scientific PWS100 and OTT Parsivel2) (iii) Relative humidity measured by a dedicated sensor First the correlations between these quantities during significant events is analysed. It appears that although IWV tends to decrease (vapour condense to form drops that fall) and relative humidity to increase during a rainfall event, it turns out difficult to quantitatively characterize this link. It is possibly due to the fact that the scale gap between a punctual measure for the rain rate and an average over a few km height column for the IWV is too large. Finally the scaling features of these three fields are investigated with the help of the Universal Multifractal framework which has been extensively used to analyse and simulate geophysical fields extremely variable over wide ranges of scales. Only three parameters are used to characterize variability across scales: C1 the mean intermittency, alpha the multifractality index and H the non-conservative exponent. Retrieved features are compared and the notion of maximum observable singularity is used to quantify the extremes of the various fields. Authors acknowledge the financial support of the Interreg IV NEW RainGain project (www.raingain.eu) and the chair "hydrology for resilient cities" sponsored by Véolia, and the Climate-KIC Blue Green Dream project (bgd.org.uk/).

  9. Attenuation of surface waves due to monsoon rains: A model study for the north Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Kumar, B.P.; Sarma, Y.V.B.

    The dynamic interaction of intense rain with waves based on momentum exchange is applied to a second generation wave model to predict wave attenuation during monsoon. The scheme takes into account the characteristics of rain and wave parameters...

  10. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  11. Rain Gauges Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility deployed rain gauges located near disdrometers (DISD and VDIS data streams). This handbook deals specifically with the rain gauges that make the observations for the RAIN data stream. Other precipitation observations are made by the surface meteorology instrument suite (i.e., MET data stream).

  12. So, How Much of the Earth's Surface Is Covered by Rain Gauges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Chris; Becker, Andreas; Huffman, George J.; Muller, Catherine L.; Joe, Paul; Jackson, Gail; Kirschbaum, Dalia

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of global precipitation, both rainfall and snowfall, is critical to a wide range of users and applications. Rain gauges are indispensable in the measurement of precipitation, remaining the de facto standard for precipitation information across Earths surface for hydrometeorological purposes. However, their distribution across the globe is limited: over land their distribution and density is variable, while over oceans very few gauges exist and where measurements are made, they may not adequately reflect the rainfall amounts of the broader area. Critically, the number of gauges available, or appropriate for a particular study, varies greatly across the Earth owing to temporal sampling resolutions, periods of operation, data latency, and data access. Numbers of gauges range from a few thousand available in nearreal time to about 100,000 for all official gauges, and to possibly hundreds of thousands if all possible gauges are included. Gauges routinely used in the generation of global precipitation products cover an equivalent area of between about 250 and 3,000 m2. For comparison, the center circle of a soccer pitch or tennis court is about 260 m2. Although each gauge should represent more than just the gauge orifice, autocorrelation distances of precipitation vary greatly with regime and the integration period. Assuming each Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC)available gauge is independent and represents a surrounding area of 5-km radius, this represents only about 1 of Earths surface. The situation is further confounded for snowfall, which has a greater measurement uncertainty.

  13. Modeled dosage-response relationship on the net photosynthetic rate for the sensitivity to acid rain of 21 plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shihuai; Gou, Shuzhen; Sun, Baiye; Lv, Wenlin; Li, Yuanwei; Peng, Hong; Xiao, Hong; Yang, Gang; Wang, Yingjun

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the sensitivity of plant species to acid rain based on the modeled dosage-response relationship on the net photosynthetic rate (P (N)) of 21 types of plant species, subjected to the exposure of simulated acid rain (SAR) for 5 times during a period of 50 days. Variable responses of P (N) to SAR occurred depending on the type of plant. A majority (13 species) of the dosage-response relationship could be described by an S-shaped curve and be fitted with the Boltzmann model. Model fitting allowed quantitative evaluation of the dosage-response relationship and an accurate estimation of the EC(10), termed as the pH of the acid rain resulting in a P (N) 10 % lower than the reference value. The top 9 species (Camellia sasanqua, Cinnamomum camphora, etc. EC(10) ≤ 3.0) are highly endurable to very acid rain. The rare, relict plant Metasequoia glyptostroboides was the most sensitive species (EC(10) = 5.1) recommended for protection.

  14. GPM and TRMM Radar Vertical Profiles and Impact on Large-scale Variations of Surface Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. J.; Adler, R. F.

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies by the authors using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) data have shown that TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) and GPM Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) surface rain estimates do not have corresponding amplitudes of inter-annual variations over the tropical oceans as do passive microwave observations by TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI). This includes differences in surface temperature-rainfall variations. We re-investigate these relations with the new GPM Version 5 data with an emphasis on understanding these differences with respect to the DPR vertical profiles of reflectivity and rainfall and the associated convective and stratiform proportions. For the inter-annual variation of ocean rainfall from both passive microwave (TMI and GMI) and active microwave (PR and DPR) estimates, it is found that for stratiform rainfall both TMI-PR and GMI-DPR show very good correlation. However, the correlation of GMI-DPR is much higher than TMI-PR in convective rainfall. The analysis of vertical profile of PR and DPR rainfall during the TRMM and GPM overlap period (March-August, 2014) reveals that PR and DPR have about the same rainrate at 4km and above, but PR rainrate is more than 10% lower that of DPR at the surface. In other words, it seems that convective rainfall is better defined with DPR near surface. However, even though the DPR results agree better with the passive microwave results, there still is a significant difference, which may be a result of DPR retrieval error, or inherent passive/active retrieval differences. Monthly and instantaneous GMI and DPR data need to be analyzed in details to better understand the differences.

  15. Airborne Measurements of Rain and the Ocean Surface Backscatter Response at C- and Ku-band

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fernandez, Daniel E; Chang, Paul S; Carswell, James R; Contreras, Robert F; Frasier, Stephen J

    2005-01-01

    ...) and the Simultaneous Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR). IWRAP is a dual-band (C- and Ku), dual-polarized pencilbeam airborne radar that profiles the volume backscatter and Doppler velocity from rain and that also measures the ocean backscatter response...

  16. Nitrite in dew, fog, cloud and rain water: An indicator for heterogeneous processes on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acker, K.; Moeller, D.; Beysens, D.; Beysens, D.; Acker, K.; Beysens, D.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrite was measured in atmospheric liquid phase samples between 1998 and 2005 to investigate the heterogeneous formation of nitrous acid in the lower atmosphere, as well as to assess the quality of water recovered from dew. The samples were collected during ground-based cloud field experiments at different German mountain sites (Brocken, Schmucke, and Hohenpeissenberg) and at a site south of the Bordeaux urban area (France). Concentrations found in Bordeaux dew samples (up to 2800 μgl -1 ) are comparable to those found elsewhere in urban fog and dew water and considerably higher than those detected in cloud water or rain. Particulate nitrite (and nitrate) as well as HNO 2 (HNO 3 ) data in air masses from a foothill site of Mt. Schmucke, before involved in cloud processing, are also presented. In clouds at Mt. Brocken, both the interstitial HNO 2 gas and the aqueous phase nitrite concentration have been measured simultaneous. Significant deviations from Henry's law have been observed, indicating that a calculation of HNO 2 from measured solute nitrite concentrations in bulk samples will overestimate the gas phase concentration. Besides the heterogeneous HNO 2 production on wetted surfaces with contact to atmospheric air, a fraction of nitrite measured in cloud droplets or dew will arise from the dissolution of gas phase HNO 2 , the particle scavenging processes or the dissolution of surface substrates. HNO 2 is a dominant hydroxyl radical source during daytime due to its effective photolysis and after water evaporation the released nitrite can significantly contribute to the total OH production and therefore to photochemical smog conditions in the lower atmosphere. (authors)

  17. Utility of remote sensing-based surface energy balance models to track water stress in rain-fed switchgrass under dry and wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of remote sensing-based surface energy balance (SEB) models to track water stress in rain-fed switchgrass has not been explored yet. In this paper, the theoretical framework of crop water stress index (CWSI) was utilized to estimate CWSI in rain-fed switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) usin...

  18. TRMM Ground Validation Radar Site Rain Rate Map L2 1 hour 2 km V7 (TRMM_2A53UW) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is part of the University of Washington TRMM Ground Validation products. Instantaneous rain rate cartesian grid based on baseUW and 2A54UW. Units are...

  19. Estimation of Rain Intensity Spectra over the Continental US Using Ground Radar-Gauge Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xin; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2013-01-01

    A high-resolution surface rainfall product is used to estimate rain characteristics over the continental US as a function of rain intensity. By defining each data at 4-km horizontal resolutions and 1-h temporal resolutions as an individual precipitating/nonprecipitating sample, statistics of rain occurrence and rain volume including their geographical and seasonal variations are documented. Quantitative estimations are also conducted to evaluate the impact of missing light rain events due to satellite sensors' detection capabilities. It is found that statistics of rain characteristics have large seasonal and geographical variations across the continental US. Although heavy rain events (> 10 mm/hr.) only occupy 2.6% of total rain occurrence, they may contribute to 27% of total rain volume. Light rain events (< 1.0 mm/hr.), occurring much more frequently (65%) than heavy rain events, can also make important contributions (15%) to the total rain volume. For minimum detectable rain rates setting at 0.5 and 0.2 mm/hr which are close to sensitivities of the current and future space-borne precipitation radars, there are about 43% and 11% of total rain occurrence below these thresholds, and they respectively represent 7% and 0.8% of total rain volume. For passive microwave sensors with their rain pixel sizes ranging from 14 to 16 km and the minimum detectable rain rates around 1 mm/hr., the missed light rain events may account for 70% of train occurrence and 16% of rain volume. Statistics of rain characteristics are also examined on domains with different temporal and spatial resolutions. Current issues in estimates of rain characteristics from satellite measurements and model outputs are discussed.

  20. Legates Surface and Ship Observations of Precipitation 0.5 x 0.5 degree V1 (RAIN_LEGATES) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Legates Surface and Shipboard Rain Gauge Observations data set consists of a global climatology of monthly mean precipitation values. A global climatology of...

  1. Advanced communications technology satellite high burst rate link evaluation terminal power control and rain fade software test plan, version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    The Power Control and Rain Fade Software was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal (ACTS HBR-LET). The HBR-LET is an experimenters terminal to communicate with the ACTS for various experiments by government, university, and industry agencies. The Power Control and Rain Fade Software is one segment of the Control and Performance Monitor (C&PM) Software system of the HBR-LET. The Power Control and Rain Fade Software automatically controls the LET uplink power to compensate for signal fades. Besides power augmentation, the C&PM Software system is also responsible for instrument control during HBR-LET experiments, control of the Intermediate Frequency Switch Matrix on board the ACTS to yield a desired path through the spacecraft payload, and data display. The Power Control and Rain Fade Software User's Guide, Version 1.0 outlines the commands and procedures to install and operate the Power Control and Rain Fade Software. The Power Control and Rain Fade Software Maintenance Manual, Version 1.0 is a programmer's guide to the Power Control and Rain Fade Software. This manual details the current implementation of the software from a technical perspective. Included is an overview of the Power Control and Rain Fade Software, computer algorithms, format representations, and computer hardware configuration. The Power Control and Rain Fade Test Plan provides a step-by-step procedure to verify the operation of the software using a predetermined signal fade event. The Test Plan also provides a means to demonstrate the capability of the software.

  2. TRMM Ground Validation Radar Site Rain Type Totals Map L3 1 month 2 km V7 (TRMM_3A54) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The 3A54 product, 'Site Rainfall Map', is a map of monthly surface rain totals derived from the instantaneous rain rate maps (2A53). The map is in Cartesian...

  3. Superposition of the Neyman-Scott Rectangular Pulses Model and the Poisson White Noise Model for the Representation of Tropical Rain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, M. L.

    2009-12-01

    A point process model for tropical rain rates is developed through the derivation of the third moment expression for a combined point process model. The model is a superposition of a Neyman-Scott rectangular pulse model and a Poisson white noise process model. The model is scalable in the temporal dimension. The derivation of the third moment for this model allows the inclusion of the skewness parameter which is necessary to adequately represent rainfall intensity. Analysis of the model fit to tropical tipping bucket raingauge data ranging in temporal scale from 5 minutes to one day indicates that it can adequately produce synthesized rainfall having the statistical characteristics of rain rate over the range of scales tested. Of special interest is the model’s capability to accurately preserve the probability of extreme tropical rain rates at different scales. In addition to various hydrological applications, the model also has many potential uses in the field of meteorology, such as the study and development of radar rain rate algorithms for the tropics which need to parameterized attenuation due to heavy rain.

  4. Performance of a piezoelectric energy harvester in actual rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Voon-Kean; Ho, Jee-Hou; Chai, Ai-Bao

    2017-01-01

    When raindrops impact on the surface of a piezoelectric beam, strain energy produced by the impinging raindrop will be converted to harvestable electrical energy by the piezoelectric layers in a cantilever beam. The novelty of this study is to investigate the performance of the harvester in actual rain and provide practical insights on implementation. The influences of rain parameters such as rain rate, rainfall depth, raindrop count, and drop size distribution (DSD) are discussed in this study. The raindrops accumulated on the surface of the piezoelectric beam will form a water layer. It is described using added mass coefficient in this study. In an actual rain experiment, a piezoelectric beam with surface area of 0.0018 m 2 is able to produce 2076 μJ of energy over a duration of 301 min. The energy generation of a raindrop impact piezoelectric energy harvester is highly dependent on the rain rate. Due to the inconsistency of the energy generation, the piezoelectric energy harvester would require an integration of suitable energy storage device for continuous operation. Nevertheless, this work shows the feasibility of harvesting raindrop energy using a piezoelectric beam. - Highlights: • The performance of a piezoelectric rain energy harvester is tested in actual rain. • The energy generation is highly dependent on the rain rate. • Practical insights on the implementation of the harvester are discussed. • A total energy of 2076 μJ is generated over a duration of 301 min.

  5. Evaluation of high-resolution satellite precipitation products with surface rain gauge observations from Laohahe Basin in northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-hu Jiang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Three high-resolution satellite precipitation products, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM standard precipitation products 3B42V6 and 3B42RT and the Climate Precipitation Center's (CPC morphing technique precipitation product (CMORPH, were evaluated against surface rain gauge observations from the Laohahe Basin in northern China. Widely used statistical validation indices and categorical statistics were adopted. The evaluations were performed at multiple time scales, ranging from daily to yearly, for the years from 2003 to 2008. The results show that all three satellite precipitation products perform very well in detecting the occurrence of precipitation events, but there are some different biases in the amount of precipitation. 3B42V6, which has a bias of 21%, fits best with the surface rain gauge observations at both daily and monthly scales, while the biases of 3B42RT and CMORPH, with values of 81% and 67%, respectively, are much higher than a normal receivable threshold. The quality of the satellite precipitation products also shows monthly and yearly variation: 3B42RT has a large positive bias in the cold season from September to April, while CMORPH has a large positive bias in the warm season from May to August, and they all attained their best values in 2006 (with 10%, 50%, and −5% biases for 3B42V6, 3B42RT, and CMORPH, respectively. Our evaluation shows that, for the Laohahe Basin, 3B42V6 has the best correspondence with the surface observations, and CMORPH performs much better than 3B42RT. The large errors of 3B42RT and CMORPH remind us of the need for new improvements to satellite precipitation retrieval algorithms or feasible bias adjusting methods.

  6. Controlling mechanisms of surface partial pressure of CO2 in Jiaozhou Bay during summer and the influence of heavy rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunxiao; Yang, Xufeng; Han, Ping; Xue, Liang; Zhang, Longjun

    2017-09-01

    Due to the combined effects of natural processes and human activities, carbon source/sink processes and mechanisms in the coastal ocean are becoming more and more important in current ocean carbon cycle research. Based on differences in the ratio of total alkalinity (TA) to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) associated with terrestrial input, biological process (production and respiration), calcium carbonate (CaCO3) process (precipitation and dissolution) and CO2 evasion/invasion, we discuss the mechanisms controlling the surface partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in Jiaozhou Bay (JZB) during summer and the influence of heavy rain, via three cruises performed in mid-June, early July and late July of 2014. In mid-June and in early July, without heavy rain or obvious river input, sea surface pCO2 ranged from 521 to 1080 μatm and from 547 to 998 μatm, respectively. The direct input of DIC from sewage and the intense respiration produced large DIC additions and the highest pCO2 values in the northeast of the bay near the downtown of Qingdao. However, in the west of the bay, significant CaCO3 precipitation led to DIC removal but no obvious increase in pCO2, which was just close to that in the central area. Due to the shallow depth and longer water residence time in this region, this pattern may be related to the sustained release of CO2 into the atmosphere. In late July, heavy rain promoted river input in the western and eastern portions of JZB. Strong primary production led to a significant decrease in pCO2 in the western area, with the lowest pCO2 value of 252 μatm. However, in the northeastern area, the intense respiration remained, and the highest pCO2 value was 1149 μatm. The average air-sea CO2 flux in mid-June and early July was 20.23 mmol m- 2 d- 1 and 23.56 mmol m- 2 d- 1, respectively. In contrast, in late July, sources became sinks for atmospheric CO2 in the western and central areas of the bay, halving the average air-sea CO2 flux to a value of 10.58 mmol m- 2

  7. Rain, winds and haze during the Huygens probe's descent to Titan's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasko, M.G.; Archinal, B.; Becker, T.; Bezard, B.; Bushroe, M.; Combes, M.; Cook, D.; Coustenis, A.; De Bergh, C.; Dafoe, L.E.; Doose, L.; Doute, S.; Eibl, A.; Engel, S.; Gliem, F.; Grieger, B.; Holso, K.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Karkoschka, E.; Keller, H.U.; Kirk, R.; Kramm, R.; Kuppers, M.; Lanagan, P.; Lellouch, E.; Lemmon, M.; Lunine, J.; McFarlane, E.; Moores, J.; Prout, G.M.; Rizk, B.; Rosiek, M.; Rueffer, P.; Schroder, S.E.; Schmitt, B.; See, C.; Smith, P.; Soderblom, L.; Thomas, N.; West, R.

    2005-01-01

    The irreversible conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons in Titan's stratosphere implies a surface or subsurface methane reservoir. Recent measurements from the cameras aboard the Cassini orbiter fail to see a global reservoir, but the methane and smog in Titan's atmosphere impedes the search for hydrocarbons on the surface. Here we report spectra and high-resolution images obtained by the Huygens Probe Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer instrument in Titan's atmosphere. Although these images do not show liquid hydrocarbon pools on the surface, they do reveal the traces of once flowing liquid. Surprisingly like Earth, the brighter highland regions show complex systems draining into flat, dark lowlands. Images taken after landing are of a dry riverbed. The infrared reflectance spectrum measured for the surface is unlike any other in the Solar System; there is a red slope in the optical range that is consistent with an organic material such as tholins, and absorption from water ice is seen. However, a blue slope in the near-infrared suggests another, unknown constituent. The number density of haze particles increases by a factor of just a few from an altitude of 150 km to the surface, with no clear space below the tropopause. The methane relative humidity near the surface is 50 per cent. ?? 2005 Nature Publishing Group.

  8. The Effect of Surface Roughness on the Corrosion Properties of Type AISI 304 Stainless Steel in Diluted NaCl and Urban Rain Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leban, Mirjam Bajt; Mikyška, Črt; Kosec, Tadeja; Markoli, Boštjan; Kovač, Janez

    2014-05-01

    Due to their good corrosion resistance, favorable mechanical properties, and reasonable price regarding their excellent properties, austenitic stainless steels have, over recent decades, become one of the alloys that are increasingly used in civil engineering and building, as well as for specific architectural purposes. Architects often design stainless steel exterior elements with higher surface roughnesses, which are not resistant to corrosion processes. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of different types of surface finishes to stainless steel of quality AISI 304 on the corrosion properties of this steel. In order to achieve this goal, electrochemical tests were performed on different surface finishes in two different environments: in an NaCl aqueous solution, and in simulated urban rain which contained no chlorides. In addition to the electrochemical methods used, surface roughness was also measured, and XPS surface analyses were performed. The results of the investigation showed that surface roughness affects the growth of the passive layer in urban rain significantly; however, the growth of such a film is retarded in the case of the NaCl aqueous solution. Based on the results of the performed analyses, it was found that, in the NaCl solution, the pitting potential depended strongly upon the surface roughness and the surface finish, but this was not true for the samples tested in urban rain.

  9. How you cannot find rain with changes in land surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanders, Niko

    2017-04-01

    Estimating precipitation from space-born sensors is valuable source of observation in poorly-gauged regions. For example, hydrological modelling and monitoring greatly benefits from the increased near-real time data availability for improved accuracy in the simulations of water resources. As is true for all satellite product, precipitation estimated from space are far from perfect and scientist have used many techniques to improve their accuracy. In this study, I tried to improve the space-born precipitation estimates by using remotely sensed soil moisture to observe sudden increases in soil wetness as a result of precipitation. After a month of massaging the data and applied methodology I realized that the gain was very marginal and I was drilling a dry hole. Driven by these disappointing results I tried some random other satellite products to see if they showed correlation with the precipitation signal. There I found a causality that I had not expected at the start of this study, linking land surface temperature to precipitation. It seemed that using changes in land surface temperature strongly correlated with precipitation totals, driven by a cooling of the soil as a result of increase wetness. This link could not only be modelled, but more surprisingly it could be observed from space and used to improve the satellite precipitation estimates. The reduction in the precipitation uncertainty was far better than for any of the three soil moisture products, contrary to what one might expect. This was far from the anticipated result but it showed me that sometimes you should think out of the box and not only use observations for their intended purpose. This experience has motivated me to not only use the obvious observation or method and try techniques and methods from other disciplines to see if we can improve our understanding of the hydrological cycle.

  10. Influence of the vertical profile of reflectivity on radar-estimated rain rates at short time steps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berne, A.D.; Delrieu, G.; Andrieu, H.; Creutin, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    The present study aims to demonstrate the major influence of the vertical heterogeneity of rainfall on radar rain gauge assessment. For this purpose, an experimental setup was deployed during the HYDROMET Integrated Radar Experiment (HIRE-98) based on a conventional S-band weather radar operating at

  11. Screened Thermonuclear Reaction Rates on Magnetar Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong-Lin, Liu; Zhi-Quan, Luo; Jing-Jing, Liu; Xiang-Jun, Lai

    2008-01-01

    Improving Salpeter's method, we discuss the effect of superstrong magnetic fields (such as those of magnetars) on thermonuclear reaction rates. These most interesting reactions, including the hydrogen burning by the CNO cycle and the helium burning by the triple alpha reaction, are investigated as examples on the magnetar surfaces. The obtained result shows that the superstrong magnetic fields can increase the thermonuclear reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. The enhancement may have significant influence for further study research of the magnetars, especially for the x-ray luminosity observation and the evolution of magnetars. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  12. Simulation of torrential rain as a means for assessment of surface runoff coefficients and calculation of recurrent design events in alpine catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markart, Gerhard; Kohl, Bernhard; Sotier, Bernadette; Klebinder, Klaus; Schauer, Thomas; Bunza, Günther

    2010-05-01

    Simulation of heavy rain is an established method for studying infiltration characteristics, runoff and erosion behaviour in alpine catchments. Accordingly for characterization and differentiation of various runoff producing areas in alpine catchments transportable spray irrigation installations for large plots have been developed at the BFW, Department of Natural Hazards and Alpine Timberline, in Innsbruck, Austria. One installation has been designed for assessment of surface runoff coefficients under convective torrential rain with applicable precipitation intensities between 30 and 120 mm*h-1 and a plot size between 50 and 100 m2. The second device is used for simulation of persistent rain events (rain intensity about 10 mm*h-1, plot size: 400-1200 m2). Very reasonable results have been achieved during the comparison with spray irrigations from other institutions (e.g. Bavarian Environmental Agency in Munich) in the field. Rain simulations at BFW are mostly combined with comprehensive additional investigations on land-use, vegetation cover, soil physical characteristics, soil humidity, hydrogeology and other features of the test-sites. This allows proper interpretation of the achieved runoff data. At the moment results from more than 280 rain simulations are available from about 25 catchments / regions of the Eastern Alps at the BFW. Results show that the surface runoff coefficient, when runoff is constant at the test site (φconst) increases only slightly between rain intensities from 30 to 120 mm*h-1 (increment is 6%). Therefore φconst shall be used for assessment of runoff behaviour of runoff contributing areas, because it is less dependent form system conditions than φtot. BFW-data have been consolidated with results of the LfU (Bavarian Environmental Agency in Munich) in a data base and formed the basis for the development of a simple code of practice for assessment of surface runoff coefficients in torrential rain. The manual is freely available under

  13. Potential Predictability of the Sea-Surface Temperature Forced Equatorial East Africa Short Rains Interannual Variability in the 20th Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahaga, T. K.; Gizaw, G.; Kucharski, F.; Diro, G. T.

    2014-12-01

    In this article, the predictability of the 20th century sea-surface temperature (SST) forced East African short rains variability is analyzed using observational data and ensembles of long atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations. To our knowledge, such an analysis for the whole 20th century using a series of AGCM ensemble simulations is carried out here for the first time. The physical mechanisms that govern the influence of SST on East African short rains in the model are also investigated. It is found that there is substantial skill in reproducing the East African short rains variability, given that the SSTs are known. Consistent with previous recent studies, it is found that the Indian Ocean and in particular the western pole of the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) play a dominant role for the prediction skill, whereas SSTs outside the Indian Ocean play a minor role. The physical mechanism for the influence of the western Indian Ocean on East African rainfall in the model is consistent with previous findings and consists of a gill-type response to a warm (cold) anomaly that induces a westerly(easterly) low-level flow anomaly over equatorial Africa and leads to moisture flux convergence (divergence) over East Africa. On the other hand, a positive El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) anomaly leads to a spatially non-coherent reducing effect over parts of East Africa, but the relationship is not strong enough to provide any predictive skill in our model. The East African short rains prediction skill is also analyzed within a model-derived potential predictability framework and it is shown that the actual prediction skill is broadly consistent with the model potential prediction skill. Low-frequency variations of the prediction skill are mostly related to SSTs outside the Indian Ocean region and are likely due to an increased interference of ENSO with the Indian Ocean influence on East African short rains after the mid-1970s climate shift.

  14. Effect of explicit urban land surface representation on the simulation of the 26 July 2005 heavy rain event over Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lei

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate whether explicit representation of the urban land surface improves the simulation of the record-breaking 24-h heavy rain event that occurred over Mumbai, India on 26 July 2005 as the event has been poorly simulated by operational weather forecasting models. We conducted experiments using the Regional Atmosphere modeling system (RAMS 4.3, coupled with and without explicit urban energy balance model-town energy budget (TEB to study the role of urban land – atmosphere interactions in modulating the heavy rain event over the Indian monsoon region. The impact of including an explicit urban energy balance on surface thermodynamic, boundary layer, and circulation changes are analyzed. The results indicate that even for this synoptically active rainfall event, the vertical wind and precipitation are significantly influenced by heterogeneity in surface temperatures due to urbanization, and the effect is more significant during the storm initiation. Interestingly, precipitation in the upwind region of Mumbai city is increased in the simulation, possibly as a feedback from the sea breeze – urban landscape convergence. We find that even with the active monsoon, the representation of urbanization contributes to local heavy precipitation and mesoscale precipitation distribution over the Indian monsoon region. Additional experiments within a statistical dynamical framework show that an urban model by itself is not the dominant factor for the enhanced rainfall for a Mumbai heavy rain event; the combination of updated SST fields using Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM data with the detailed representation of urban effects simulated by the TEB model created realistic gradients that successfully maintained the convergence zone over Mumbai. Further research will require more detailed morphology data for simulating weather events in such urban regions. The results suggest that urbanization can significantly contribute to extremes in

  15. Geoelectrical Monitoring for the characterisation of the near surface interflow in small alpine catchment areas during continuous rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ita, A.; Römer, A.; Markart, G.; Klebinder, K.; Bieber, G.; Kohl, B.

    2009-04-01

    In a pilot study the bandwidth of the near surface interflow and subsurface stormflow was investigated on a hill slope complex at the military training centre Lizum/Walchen (approx. 2000m above sea level) in Tyrol. High amounts of precipitation (about 250 mm) were applied within 2 days by use of a transportable spray irrigation installation. During the first day water from a creek was applied to the test site. On the following day the site was sprinkled with a salt tracer for an hour followed by creek water for the rest of the day. To characterise the runoff, different measurements techniques were used in the irrigation field. The subsurface runoff was registered in calibrated tanks. Changes in soil moisture were measured with buried TDR-waveguides - arranged in four profiles from 15 cm to 115 cm soil depth in maximum. In addition three geoelectrical profiles were measured. Two geoelectrical profiles were positioned orthogonal to the slope in the precipitation area, where one was reaching over the edge. The third profile was parallel to the slope overlapping with the second profile. Electrode distances were 0.25 cm and 0.50 cm respectively with 48 electrodes per profile. Geoelectrical measurements were done periodically before, during and after the rain simulation experiments. These have been carried out with the newly developed geoelectric instrument of the Geological survey of Austria, GEOMON4D. The advantage of the instrument is that it can measure a resistivity section at high speed and in an automated, meaning monitoring mode. Therefore, it is possible to register small and fast changes in the soil conductivity caused by a tracer. Summarising it can be said that the resistivity soundings give a detailed picture regarding the geological structure of the research area as well as explicit knowledge of how the near surface interflow spreads out in the subsurface. The geoelectric measurements deliver precise information about the behaviour of the salt tracer, its

  16. Rain effect on Aquarius L-band Emissivity and Backscatter Model Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, W.; Yueh, S. H.; Fore, A.; Neumann, G.; Hayashi, A.

    2012-12-01

    Remote sensing of sea surface salinity (SSS) is being performed by Aquarius and SMOS missions, which are using L-band radiometry to sense the microwave emissions from sea surfaces. To enable accurate SSS retrieval, it is essential to correct the impact of sea surface roughness on L-band brightness temperatures. In addition, the impact of rain has to be carefully assessed and accounted for. Although the atmospheric attenuation caused by raindrops are likely negligible at 1.4GHz, other factors must be considered because they may have indirect but important contribution to the surface roughness and consequently L-band brightness temperatures. For example, the wind speed dependent roughness correction will be corrupted when rain striking the water, creating rings, stalks, and crowns from which the signal scatters. It is also unknown how long the freshwater stays at surface while through the oceanic mixing process at various regions over global oceans. We collocated the Aquarius L-band data with various wind products, including SSM/I, NCEP, ASCAT and WindSAT, as well as the SSM/I and WindSAT rain products. During the first four months of Aquarius mission, near 1.9 million pixels are identified under rain conditions by either SSM/I or WindSAT. We derived the L-band emissivity and backscatter geophysical model functions (GMF), parameterized by SSM/I and NCEP winds for rain-free conditions. However, the residual ocean surface emissivity (the Aquarius measured minus the rain-free model predictions) reveals profound resemblance with global precipitation pattern. In region dominated by rain, e.g. ITCZ, northern hemisphere storm track, and Indian Ocean partially under the influence of summer monsoon, the GMF built using rain free data underestimates excess emissivity about 0.5 to 1 K. The dependence of residual of emissivity and backscatter is shown as a function of wind speed and rain rate. A modified GMF is developed including rain rate as one of the parameters. Due to

  17. Sea Surface Temperatures Mediated by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation Affect Birds Breeding in Temperate Coastal Rain Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Gaston

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the timing of breeding and juvenile/adult ratios among songbirds in temperate rain forests over four years on the Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands archipelago, British Columbia. In May 1998, air temperatures in Haida Gwaii were above average, whereas in 1999 they were the lowest in 20 yr: temperatures in the other two years were closer to normal, although 2001 was almost as cold as 1999. Temperatures closely followed the patterns of sea surface temperatures created by the 1997-1998 El Niño, i.e., warm, event and the subsequent strong La Niña, i.e., cool, event. Timing of breeding, as measured by the first capture of juveniles or by direct observations of hatching, varied by approximately 19 d between the earliest (1998 and latest (1999 years. In 1998, the proportion of juveniles among birds trapped increased steeply as soon as young birds began to appear. In other years, the rate of increase was slower. In 1999, the peak proportions of hatching-year individuals among the foliage-gleaning insectivores, i.e., the Orange-crowned Warbler (Vermivora celata, Townsend's Warbler (Dendroica townsendi, and the Golden-crowned Kinglet (Regulus satrapa, were lower than in other years, with almost no young Orange-crowned Warblers captured at all. The pattern of variation in the timing of breeding and in the proportion of hatching-year individuals trapped fitted the temperature data well, although rainfall may also have contributed. We concluded that changes mediated by El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO in sea surface temperatures off northern British Columbia, through their effects on air temperatures, had a strong effect on the breeding of forest birds, to the point of causing nearly complete reproductive failure for one species in 1999. An intensification of the ENSO cycle could lead to more erratic reproduction for some species.

  18. Acidification and Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  19. Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.; Dietrich, W.E.; Sposito, Garrison

    1997-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  20. Evaluation of TRMM Ground-Validation Radar-Rain Errors Using Rain Gauge Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianxin; Wolff, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Ground-validation (GV) radar-rain products are often utilized for validation of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spaced-based rain estimates, and hence, quantitative evaluation of the GV radar-rain product error characteristics is vital. This study uses quality-controlled gauge data to compare with TRMM GV radar rain rates in an effort to provide such error characteristics. The results show that significant differences of concurrent radar-gauge rain rates exist at various time scales ranging from 5 min to 1 day, despite lower overall long-term bias. However, the differences between the radar area-averaged rain rates and gauge point rain rates cannot be explained as due to radar error only. The error variance separation method is adapted to partition the variance of radar-gauge differences into the gauge area-point error variance and radar rain estimation error variance. The results provide relatively reliable quantitative uncertainty evaluation of TRMM GV radar rain estimates at various times scales, and are helpful to better understand the differences between measured radar and gauge rain rates. It is envisaged that this study will contribute to better utilization of GV radar rain products to validate versatile spaced-based rain estimates from TRMM, as well as the proposed Global Precipitation Measurement, and other satellites.

  1. Rain-Induced Propagation Parameters For Earth-Space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    space path at two elevation angles and some rain rates representing high and low availability requirements in Nigeria. The paper first calculates the slant path scattering parameters at various frequencies and rain rates, and then uses the new ...

  2. Wind, rain and soil erosion rates on bare and plant covered agriculture plots at the experimental station of El Teularet -Sierra de Enguera, Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, A.; Azorin-Molina, C.; Iserloh, Th.

    2012-04-01

    covered with straw, chipped branches of olive and with a geotextil developed specifically to control erosion on agricultural fields. The Soil Erosion Experimental Station of the El Teularet-Serra de Enguera is located in Eastern Spain. The station is devoted to study the soil water erosion processes under rain-fed agriculture fields and the rangelands. Agriculture is the main source of sedi ments on the mountainous areas of Spain due to the current management. The exper imental station of the El Teularet-Sierra de Enguera is composed also of a meteorological station with tipping-bucket raingauges (0.2 mm), and sensors that measure soil and air moisture and temperature, wind direction and speed and the sun radiation connected to a data-logger that record these data every five minutes. This paper will review the data collected during the period 2004 to 2011 in order to determine if the wind direction and wind speed determined the soil erosion rates. In this way it will be clarified the infliuence of wind on the soil erosion processes.The results will be compared to the measurement collected at the Montesa experimental station devoted to the study of soil erosion on citrus orchards. The experimental setup within the citrus plantation is being supported by the research project CGL2008- 02879/BTE.

  3. Less rain, more water in ponds: a remote sensing study of the dynamics of surface waters from 1950 to present in pastoral Sahel (Gourma region, Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gardelle

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the flooded area of ponds in the Gourma region from 1950 to present are studied by remote sensing, in the general context of the current multi-decennial Sahel drought. The seasonal and interannual variations of the areas covered by surface water are assessed using multi-date and multi-sensor satellite images (SPOT, FORMOSAT, LANDSAT-MSS, –TM, and -ETM, CORONA, and MODIS and aerial photographs (IGN. Water body classification is adapted to each type of spectral resolution, with or without a middle-infrared band, and each spatial resolution, using linear unmixing for mixed pixels of MODIS data. The high-frequency MODIS data document the seasonal cycle of flooded areas, with an abrupt rise early in wet season and a progressive decrease in the dry season. They also provide a base to study the inter-annual variability of the flooded areas, with sharp contrasts between dry years such as 2004 (low and early maximal area and wetter years such as 2001 and 2002 (respectively high and late maximal area.The highest flooded area reached annually greatly depends on the volume, intensity and timing of rain events. However, the overall reduction by 20% of annual rains during the last 40 years is concomitant with an apparently paradoxical large increase in the area of surface water, starting from the 1970's and accelerating in the mid 1980's. Spectacular for the two study cases of Agoufou and Ebang Mallam, for which time series covering the 1954 to present period exist, this increase is also diagnosed at the regional scale from LANDSAT data spanning 1972–2007. It reaches 108% between September 1975 and 2002 for 91 ponds identified in central Gourma. Ponds with turbid waters and no aquatic vegetation are mostly responsible for this increase, more pronounced in the centre and north of the study zone. Possible causes of the differential changes in flooded areas are discussed in relation with the specifics in topography, soil texture and vegetation

  4. Utility of remote sensing-based surface energy balance models to track water stress in rain-fed switchgrass under dry and wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Nishan; Wagle, Pradeep; Gowda, Prasanna H.; Kakani, Vijaya G.

    2017-11-01

    The ability of remote sensing-based surface energy balance (SEB) models to track water stress in rain-fed switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) has not been explored yet. In this paper, the theoretical framework of crop water stress index (CWSI; 0 = extremely wet or no water stress condition and 1 = extremely dry or no transpiration) was utilized to estimate CWSI in rain-fed switchgrass using Landsat-derived evapotranspiration (ET) from five remote sensing based single-source SEB models, namely Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), Mapping ET with Internalized Calibration (METRIC), Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS), Simplified Surface Energy Balance Index (S-SEBI), and Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop). CWSI estimates from the five SEB models and a simple regression model that used normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), near-surface temperature difference, and measured soil moisture (SM) as covariates were compared with those derived from eddy covariance measured ET (CWSIEC) for the 32 Landsat image acquisition dates during the 2011 (dry) and 2013 (wet) growing seasons. Results indicate that most SEB models can predict CWSI reasonably well. For example, the root mean square error (RMSE) ranged from 0.14 (SEBAL) to 0.29 (SSEBop) and the coefficient of determination (R2) ranged from 0.25 (SSEBop) to 0.72 (SEBAL), justifying the added complexity in CWSI modeling as compared to results from the simple regression model (R2 = 0.55, RMSE = 0.16). All SEB models underestimated CWSI in the dry year but the estimates from SEBAL and S-SEBI were within 7% of the mean CWSIEC and explained over 60% of variations in CWSIEC. In the wet year, S-SEBI mostly overestimated CWSI (around 28%), while estimates from METRIC, SEBAL, SEBS, and SSEBop were within 8% of the mean CWSIEC. Overall, SEBAL was the most robust model under all conditions followed by METRIC, whose performance was slightly worse and better than SEBAL in dry and wet years

  5. The Influence of Rain Sensible Heat and Subsurface Energy Transport on the Energy Balance at the Land Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollet, S.J.; Cvijanovic, I.; Schüttemeyer, D.; Maxwell, R.M.; Moene, A.F.; Bayer, P.

    2009-01-01

    In land surface models, which account for the energy balance at the land surface, subsurface heat transport is an important component that reciprocally influences ground, sensible, and latent heat fluxes and net radiation. In most models, subsurface heat transport parameterizations are commonly

  6. Coastal and rain-induced wind variability depicted by scatterometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portabella, M.; Lin, W.; Stoffelen, A.; Turiel, A.; Verhoef, A.; Verspeek, J.; Ballabrera, J.; Vogelzang, J.

    2012-04-01

    conditions, using collocations with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) rain data, and the tropical moored buoy wind and precipitation data. It turns out that the effect of low and moderate rain appears mainly in increasing the wind variability near the surface and, unlike for Ku-band scatterometers, the rain rate itself does not appear clearly as a limiting factor in ASCAT wind quality. Moreover, the downburst patterns as observed by ASCAT are unique and have large implications for air-sea exchange. At the conference, the main progress in scatterometer wind data processing will be shown.

  7. SSM/I Rain Retrievals Within a Unified All-Weather Ocean Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, Frank J.; Spencer, Roy W.

    1996-01-01

    A new method for the physical retrieval of rain rates from satellite microwave radiometers is presented and compared to two other rainfall climatologies derived from satellites. The method is part of a unified ocean parameter retrieval algorithm that is based on the fundamental principles of radiative transfer. The algorithm simultaneously finds near-surface wind speed W, columnar water vapor V, columnar cloud liquid water L, rain rate R, and effective radiating temperature T(sub U) for the upwelling radiation. The performance of the algorithm in the absence of rain is discussed in Wentz, and this paper focuses on the rain component of the algorithm. A particular strength of the unified algorithm is its ability to 'orthogonalize' the retrievals so that there is minimum cross-talk between the retrieved parameters. For example, comparisons of the retrieved water vapor with radiosonde observations show that there is very little correlation between the water vapor retrieval error and rain rate. For rain rates from 1 to 15 mm/h, the rms difference between the retrieved water vapor and the radiosonde value is 5 mm. A novel feature of the rain retrieval method is a beamfilling correction that is based upon the ratio of the retrieved liquid water absorption coefficients at 37 GHz and 19.35 GHz. This ratio decreases by about 40% when heavy and light rain co-exist within the SSM/I footprint as compared to the case of uniform rain. This correction has the effect of increasing the rain rate when the spectral ratio of the absorption coefficients is small. Even with this beamfilling correction, tropical rainfall is still unrealistically low when the freezing level in the tropics (approx. 5 km) is used to specify the rain layer thickness. We restore realism by reducing the assumed averaged tropical rain layer thickness to 3 km, thereby accounting for the existence of warm rain processes in which the rain layer does not extend to the freezing level. Global rain rates are produced

  8. The Sensitivity of Heavy Precipitation to Horizontal Resolution, Domain Size, and Rain Rate Assimilation: Case Studies with a Convection-Permitting Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingbao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Community Climate and Earth-System Simulator (ACCESS is used to test the sensitivity of heavy precipitation to various model configurations: horizontal resolution, domain size, rain rate assimilation, perturbed physics, and initial condition uncertainties, through a series of convection-permitting simulations of three heavy precipitation (greater than 200 mm day−1 cases in different synoptic backgrounds. The larger disparity of intensity histograms and rainfall fluctuation caused by different model configurations from their mean and/or control run indicates that heavier precipitation forecasts have larger uncertainty. A cross-verification exercise is used to quantify the impacts of different model parameters on heavy precipitation. The dispersion of skill scores with control run used as “truth” shows that the impacts of the model resolution and domain size on the quantitative precipitation forecast are not less than those of perturbed physics and initial field uncertainties in these not intentionally selected heavy precipitation cases. The result indicates that model resolution and domain size should be considered as part of probabilistic precipitation forecasts and ensemble prediction system design besides the model initial field uncertainty.

  9. Effects of surface slope on erosion rates of quartz particles

    OpenAIRE

    Lodge, Phillip.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling sediment erosion is important in a wide range of environmental problems. The effects of various environmental factors on erosion rates have been studied, but the effects of surface slope on erosion rates of a wide range of sediments have not been quantified. The effects of surface slope, both in the direction of flow (pitch) and perpendicular to the flow (roll), on erosion rates of quartz particles were investigated using the Sediment Erosion at Depth Flume (Sedflume). US Navy (US...

  10. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  11. The Acid Rain Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  12. The Scavenging of Radon Progeny by Snow and Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, G.; Greenfield, M.; Henson, W.; Peace, A.; Stow, D.

    2003-03-01

    In the previous paper Greenfield et al. show that changes in atmospheric gamma radiation rates due to radon progeny adsorbed by rain measured at 6-20 m above ground can be used as a real-time monitor of rain and snow precipitation rates in several locations around the world. In New Zealand, at the Ardmore Field Station operated by the University of Auckland, a gamma ray detection system of the sort described earlier was installed 6 m up a meteorological tower carrying the usual wind speed, wind direction, temperature, humidity and rainfall measuring equipment and attached to a data logger. In addition, a vertically pointing X Band meteorological radar was deployed together with three rain-drop size spectrum measuring devices (disdrometers) at the ground. The microphysical data obtained, particularly from the radar and the disdrometers, allows the construction of a case by case one-dimensional cloud physics model so that the hydrometeor size spectrum, surface area and fall speeds can be depicted in a reasonably realistic way. This then allows modeling of the scavenging processes by the snow and rain in a more quantitative way thus enabling a program of detailed investigation of the microphysical processes involved in the hypothesis presented in the earlier paper: that this mechanism allows gamma ray count rates to be used as a surrogate for rainfall rates. Interesting questions related to the spatial representativeness of various rainfall data sets can also be pursued.

  13. Warm Rain Processes Over the Tropical Oceans and Implications on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Wu, H. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this talk, we will first show results from TRMM regarding the characteristics of warm rains over the tropical oceans, and the dependence of rate of warm rain production on sea surface temperature. Results lead to the hypothesis that warm rain production efficiency, i.e., autoconversion, may be increased in a warm climate. We use the GEOS-II GCM to test this hypothesis. Our modeling results show that in a climate with increased rate of autoconversion, the total rain amount is increased, with warm rain contributing to a larger portion of the increase. The abundant rainout of warm precipitation at middle to low levels causes a reduction of high cloud cover due to the depletion of water available for ice-phase rain production. As a result, more isolated, but more intense penetrative convection develops. Results also show that increased autoconversion reduces the convective adjustment time scale tends, implying a faster recycling of atmospheric water. Most interestingly, the increased low level heating associated with warm rain leads to more energetic Madden and Julian oscillations in the tropics, with well-defined eastward propagation. While reducing the autoconversion leads to an abundant mix of westward and eastward tropical disturbance on daily to weekly time scales. The causes of the sensitivity of the dynamical regimes to the microphysics parameterization in the GCM will be discussed.

  14. Importance of surface structure on dissolution of fluorite: Implications for surface dynamics and dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, J. R. A.; Piazolo, S.; Balic-Zunic, T.

    2014-02-01

    Dissolution rates are usually calculated as a function of surface area, which is assumed to remain constant ignoring the changes occurring on the surface during dissolution. Here we present a study of how topography of natural fluorite surfaces with different orientation changes during up to 3200 h of dissolution. Results are analyzed in terms of changes in surface area, surface reactivity and dissolution rates. All surfaces studied present fast changes in topography during the initial 200 h of dissolution. The controlling factors that cause the development of topography are the stability of the step edges forming the initial surface and its inclination to the closest stable planes, which are specific for each surface orientation. During an initial dissolution regime dissolution rates decrease significantly, even though the total surface area increases. During a second dissolution regime, some surfaces continue to present significant changes in topography, while for others the topography tends to remain approximately constant. The observed variation of dissolution rates are attributed to a decrease of the density of step edges on the surface and the continuous increase in exposure of more stable surfaces. Calculations of dissolution rates, which assume that dissolution rates are directly proportional to surface area, are not valid for the type of surfaces studied. Instead, to develop accurate kinetic dissolution models and more realistic stochastic dissolution simulations the surface reactivity, determined by the relative stability of the planes and type of edges that constitute a surface needs to be considered. Significant differences between dissolution rates calculated based on surface area alone, and based on surface reactivity are expected for materials with the fluorite structure.

  15. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R.; Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H.; Akiyama, M.; Lukeš, P.

    2014-01-01

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H 2 O 2 and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  16. Studying, Determining The Radionuclide Of Tritum In The Water Samples (Rain, Surface Water) By Using Liquid Scintillation Counting (TRi-carb 3180TR/SL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thi Linh; Nguyen Dinh Tung; Truong Y; Le Nhu Sieu; Nguyen Van Phuc; Nguyen Van Phu; Nguyen Kim Thanh

    2014-01-01

    Tritium in the environment is of natural or man-made origin. Tritium is a radioactive isotope that occurs in the environment and is associated with the interaction of cosmic ray in the atmosphere. However, the most significant sources of tritium in the environment results from nuclear weapons testing in the atmosphere carried out during the late 1950s and early 1960s. Today, the most important new sources of tritium in the environments, such as power stations, processing and using of isotopes released the local tritium. The objective of this study is the application of the liquid scintillation technique to tritium analysis in water samples (rain, and surface waters). Following the Eichrom Tritium Column technique, an aliquot of the passed tritium resin sample (10 mL) is mixed with 10 mL of scintillation cocktail (Ultima Gold LLT, Packard) in 20-mL plastic- container vials and the sample activity is determined using a liquid scintillation spectrometer, Tri-carb 3180TR/SL. Counting efficiency is evaluated with internal standards. The tritium concentrations of water samples that were collected from DaLat, Lamdong range between 0 to 36.2 TU. (author)

  17. Rate-Dependent Slip of Newtonian Liquid at Smooth Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yingxi; Granick, Steve

    2001-01-01

    Newtonian fluids were placed between molecularly smooth surfaces whose spacing was vibrated at spacings where the fluid responded as a continuum. Hydrodynamic forces agreed with predictions from the no-slip boundary condition only provided that flow rate (peak velocity normalized by spacing) was low, but implied partial slip when it exceeded a critical level, different in different systems, correlated with contact angle (surface wettability). With increasing flow rate and partially wetted surfaces, hydrodynamic forces became up to 2--4 orders of magnitude less than expected by assuming the no-slip boundary condition that is commonly stated in textbooks

  18. Effect of CH4 and O2 variations on rates of CH4 oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teh, Yit Arn; Conrad, Mark; Silver, Whendee L.; Carlson, Charlotte M.

    2003-10-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria are the primary sink for CH{sub 4} in reduced soils, and account for as much as 90 percent of all CH{sub 4} produced. Methanotrophic bacteria strongly discriminate against the heavy isotopes of carbon, resulting in CH{sub 4} emissions that are significantly more enriched in {sup 13}C than the original source material. Previous studies have used an isotope mass balance approach to quantify CH{sub 4} sources and sinks in the field, based on the assumption that the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation is a constant. This study quantifies the effect of systematic variations in CH{sub 4} and O{sub 2} concentrations on rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils. Soils were collected from the 0-15 cm depth, and incubated with varying concentrations of CH{sub 4} (100 ppmv, 500 ppmv, 1000 ppmv, and 5000 ppmv) or O{sub 2} (3 percent, 5 percent, 10 percent, and 21 percent). The isotope fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was calculated for each incubation using a Rayleigh fractionation model. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 100 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the lowest rate of CH{sub 4} uptake, and the other 3 treatments showing similar rates of CH{sub 4} uptake. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation did not vary significantly between the different O{sub 2} treatments. The fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between the different CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 5000 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the largest {sup 13}C-enrichment of residual CH{sub 4}. In treatments where CH{sub 4} concentration was not rate-limiting (> 500 ppmv CH{sub 4}), the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was negatively correlated with CH{sub 4} oxidation rate (P < 0.003, r{sup 2} = 0.86). A multiple regression model that included initial CH{sub 4} concentration and CH{sub 4} oxidation rate as independent variables

  19. The influence of nitrogen fertiliser rate and crop rotation on soil methane flux in rain-fed potato fields in Wuchuan County, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liwei; Pan, Zhihua; Xu, Hui; Wang, Cheng; Gao, Lin; Zhao, Peiyi; Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; Cui, Guohui; Wang, Sen; Han, Guolin; Zhao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    As one of the important greenhouse gases, the characteristics and principles of methane exchange characteristics in cultivated lands have become hot topics in current climate change research. This study examines the influences of nitrogen fertilisation, temperature and soil water content on methane exchange characteristic and methane exchange functional gene-pmoA gene abundance based on experimental observations of methane exchange fluxes using the static chamber–gas chromatographic method and measurements of methanotroph gene copy numbers in three growing periods by real-time PCR in rain-fed potato fields. The results indicate that the rain-fed potato fields were a CH 4 sink with an average annual methane absorption (negative emission) of 940.8 ± 103.2 g CH 4 -C/ha/year. The cumulative methane absorption first exhibited flat and subsequently increasing trend with the increase of nitrogen fertilisation from 0 ~ 135 kg N·ha −1 . Methane cumulative absorption significantly increased with the increase of temperature when temperatures were below 19.6 °C. Methane oxidation capacity (methanotroph pmoA gene copy numbers) showed an increasing and subsequently decreasing trend with the increase of soil moisture. Crop rotation was observed to increase the methane absorption in rain-fed potato fields and nearly one time higher than that under continuous cropping. A mechanism concept model of the methane exchange in rain-fed potato fields was advanced in this paper. - Highlights: • Rain-fed potato fields were a CH 4 sink. • Increased nitrogen fertilisation and temperature led to higher CH 4 absorption. • CH 4 oxidation capacity showed a parabolic trend with soil moisture increased. • Crop rotation increased CH 4 absorption one time higher than continuous cropping. • A mechanism concept model of the CH 4 exchange in potato fields was advanced.

  20. Description and preliminary results of a 100 square meter rain gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Salvatore; Petroselli, Andrea; Baldini, Luca; Gorgucci, Eugenio

    2018-01-01

    Rainfall is one of the most crucial processes in hydrology, and the direct and indirect rainfall measurement methods are constantly being updated and improved. The standard instrument used to measure rainfall rate and accumulation is the rain gauge, which provides direct observations. Though the small dimension of the orifice allows rain gauges to be installed anywhere, it also causes errors due to the splash and wind effects. To investigate the role of the orifice dimension, this study, for the first time, introduces and demonstrates an apparatus for observing rainfall called a giant-rain gauge that is characterised by a collecting surface of 100 m2. To discuss the new instrument and its technical details, a preliminary analysis of 26 rainfall events is provided. The results suggest that there are significant differences between the standard and proposed rain gauges. Specifically, major discrepancies are evident for low time aggregation scale (5, 10, and 15 min) and for high rainfall intensity values.

  1. Pollen selection under acid rain stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.

    1994-01-01

    To investigate whether acid rain stress induces pollen selection in nature, three different approaches were used, based on the assumption that the response of pollen grains to acid rain is controlled by an acid sensitive gene product. Germination of pollen from homozygous and heterozygous individuals under acid rain stress was examined to detect any differences in rate of germination between populations of homogeneous and heterogeneous pollen grains. In vitro and in vivo bulked segregant analysis using RAPDs was used to search for differences in DNA constitution between the survivors of acid rain stressed and non-acid rain stressed pollen populations in vitro and between the progenies of acid rain stressed and non-acid rain stressed populations during pollination, respectively. No evidence for the pollen selection under acid rain stress was obtained in any of the test systems. Inhibition of protein synthesis using cycloheximide led to significant reduction of tube elongation at 4 hr and had no effect on pollen germination at any time interval tested. Total proteins extracted from control and acid rain stressed pollen grain populations exhibited no differences. The reduction of corn pollen germination in vitro under acid rain stress was mainly due to pollen rupture. The present data indicates the reduction of pollen germination and tube growth under acid rain stress may be a physiological response rather than a genetic response. A simple, nontoxic, and effective method to separate germinated from ungerminated pollen grains has been developed using pollen from corn (Zea mays, L. cv. Pioneer 3747). The separated germinated pollen grains retained viability and continued tube growth when placed in culture medium.

  2. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  3. Rain Forest Murals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The rain forest murals in the author's school began as a request from her principal to have students decorate the cafeteria with their own paintings. She decided to brainstorm ideas with her eighth-grade students. Taking into consideration the architectural space and the environmental concerns they wanted to convey, students chose the rain forest…

  4. The acid rain primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugent, O.

    2006-10-01

    Acid rain continues to be a major problem in North America, and particularly in eastern Canada. This report introduced the topic of acid rain and discussed its formation, measurement, sources, and geographic distribution. The major sources of sulphur dioxide in Canada are smelting metals, burning coal for electrical power generation, industrial emissions (e.g., pulp and paper, petroleum and aluminum industry), and oil and gas extraction and refining. In Canada, the largest source of nitrogen oxide is the burning of fossil fuels by the transportation sector. Problem areas for acid rain in Canada were identified. The effects of acid rain were examined on lakes and aquatic ecosystems, forests and soils, human-made structures and materials, human health, and on visibility. Acid rain policies and programs were then presented from a historical and current context. Ecosystem recovery from acid rain was discussed with reference to acid rain monitoring, atmospheric response to reductions in acid-causing emissions, and ecosystem recovery of lakes, forests, and aquatic ecosystems. Challenges affecting ecosystem recovery were also presented. These challenges include drought and dry weather, decrease of base cations in precipitation, release of sulphate previously stored in soil, mineralization and immobilization of sulphur/sulphates. Last, the report discussed what still needs to be done to improve the problem of acid rain as well as future concerns. These concerns include loss of base cations from forested watersheds and nitrogen deposition and saturation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 17 figs

  5. Microcanonical rates, gap times, and phase space dividing surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezra, Gregory S.; Waalkens, Holger; Wiggins, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The general approach to classical unimolecular reaction rates due to Thiele is revisited in light of recent advances in the phase space formulation of transition state theory for multidimensional systems. Key concepts, such as the phase space dividing surface separating reactants from products, the

  6. Indexing Glomerular Filtration Rate to Body Surface Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redal-Baigorri, Belén; Rasmussen, Knud; Heaf, James Goya

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Kidney function is mostly expressed in terms of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). A common feature is the expression as ml/min per 1.73 m(2) , which represents the adjustment of the individual kidney function to a standard body surface area (BSA) to allow comparison between individuals...

  7. Influence of deposition rate on PL spectrum and surface morphology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Influence of deposition rate on PL spectrum and surface morphology of ZnO nanolayers deposited on Si (100) substrate. A ZENDEHNAM. ∗. , M MIRZAEE and S MIRI. Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Arak University, Arak 38156-8-8349, Iran. MS received 26 March 2012; revised 5 May 2012.

  8. Differential responses of plant foliage to simulated acid rain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, L.S. (Manhattan Coll., Bronx, NY); Curry, T.M.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were performed to show the responses of foliage of several clones of Tradescantia sp., Pteridium aquilinum, Quercus palustris, and Glycine max to simulated acid rain. These experiments were performed to (a) predict the relative sensitivities of foliage of these plants to acid rain, and (b) identify leaf surface and anatomical alterations to simulated acid rain that may be used to diagnose acid rain injury. Plants were exposed to simulated rain at pH levels of 5.7, 3.4, 3.1, 2.9, 2.7, 2.5, and 2.3.

  9. Life in Tropical Rain Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NatureScope, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the diversity of rain forest life, the adaptations of rain forest plants and animals, and ways these organisms interact. Includes activities on canopy critters with a copyable sheet, rain forest revue, design a plant, and jungle sleuths. (RT)

  10. Science of acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Tsuguo

    1992-01-01

    In this report, the mechanism of forming acid rain in the atmosphere and the process of its fall to ground, the mechanism of withering forests by acid substances, and the process of acidifying lakes and marshes are explained. Moreover, the monitoring networks for acid rain and the countermeasures are described. Acid rain is the pollution phenomena related to all environment, that is, atmosphere, hydrosphere, soilsphere, biosphere and so on, and it is a local environmental pollution problem, and at the same time, an international, global environmental pollution problem. In Japan, acid rain has fallen, but the acidification of lakes and marshes is not clear, and the damage to forests is on small scale. However in East Asia region, the release of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides is much, and the increase of the effects of acid rain is expected. It is necessary to devise the measures for preventing the damage due to acid rain. The global monitoring networks of World Meteorological Organization and United Nations Environment Program, and those in Europe, USA and Japan are described. The monitoring of acid rain in Japan is behind that in Europe and USA. (K.I.)

  11. Rate and extent of aqueous perchlorate removal by iron surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Angela M; De Leon, Corinne H; Young, Thomas M

    2003-07-15

    The rate and extent of perchlorate reduction on several types of iron metal was studied in batch and column reactors. Mass balances performed on the batch experiments indicate that perchlorate is initially sorbed to the iron surface, followed by a reduction to chloride. Perchlorate removal was proportional to the iron dosage in the batch reactors, with up to 66% removal in 336 h in the highest dosage system (1.25 g mL(-1)). Surface-normalized reaction rates among three commercial sources of iron filings were similar for acid-washed samples. The most significant perchlorate removal occurred in solutions with slightly acidic or near-neutral initial pH values. Surface mediation of the reaction is supported by the absence of reduction in batch experiments with soluble Fe2+ and also by the similarity in specific reaction rate constants (kSA) determined for three different iron types. Elevated soluble chloride concentrations significantly inhibited perchlorate reduction, and lower removal rates were observed for iron samples with higher amounts of background chloride contamination. Perchlorate reduction was not observed on electrolytic sources of iron or on a mixed-phase oxide (Fe3O4), suggesting that the reactive iron phase is neither pure zerovalent iron nor the mixed oxide alone. A mixed valence iron hydr(oxide) coating or a sorbed Fe2+ surface complex represent the most likely sites for the reaction. The observed reaction rates are too slow for immediate use in remediation system design, but the findings may provide a basis for future development of cost-effective abiotic perchlorate removal techniques.

  12. RAINE Public Communities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The file geodatabase (fgdb) contains the New England Town Boundaries and information related specifically to the Resilience and Adaptation in New England (RAINE) web...

  13. Rate law analysis of water oxidation on a hematite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Formal, Florian; Pastor, Ernest; Tilley, S David; Mesa, Camilo A; Pendlebury, Stephanie R; Grätzel, Michael; Durrant, James R

    2015-05-27

    Water oxidation is a key chemical reaction, central to both biological photosynthesis and artificial solar fuel synthesis strategies. Despite recent progress on the structure of the natural catalytic site, and on inorganic catalyst function, determining the mechanistic details of this multiredox reaction remains a significant challenge. We report herein a rate law analysis of the order of water oxidation as a function of surface hole density on a hematite photoanode employing photoinduced absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals a transition from a slow, first order reaction at low accumulated hole density to a faster, third order mechanism once the surface hole density is sufficient to enable the oxidation of nearest neighbor metal atoms. This study thus provides direct evidence for the multihole catalysis of water oxidation by hematite, and demonstrates the hole accumulation level required to achieve this, leading to key insights both for reaction mechanism and strategies to enhance function.

  14. Isotopic equilibrium between precipitation and water vapor: evidence from continental rains in central Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, K.; Gerlein, C.; Kemeny, P. C.; Caylor, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    An accurate understanding of the relationships between the isotopic composition of liquid water and that of water vapor in the environment can help describe hydrologic processes across many scales. One such relationship is the isotopic equilibrium between falling raindrops and the surrounding vapor. The degree of equilibration is used to model the isotopic composition of precipitation in isotope-enable general circulation models and land-atmosphere exchange models. Although this equilibrium has been a topic of isotope hydrology research for more than four decades, few studies have included vapor measurements to validate modeling efforts. Recent advances in laser technology have allowed for in situ vapor measurements at high temporal resolution (e.g., >1 Hz). Here we present concomitant rain and vapor measurements for a series of 17 rain events during the 'Continental' rainy season (June through August) at Mpala Research Center in central Kenya. Rain samples (n=218) were collected at intervals of 2 to 35 minutes (median of 3 minutes) depending on the rain rate (0.4 to 10.5 mm/hr). The volume-weighted mean rain values for δ18O, δ2H and D-excess (δ2H - 8* δ18O) were 0.1 ‰, 10.7 ‰, and 10.1 ‰. These values are more enriched than the annual weighted means reported for the area (-2.2 ‰, -7.6 ‰, and 11.0 ‰, respectively). Vapor was measured continuously at ~2Hz (DLT-100, Los Gatos Research), with an inverted funnel intake 4m above the ground surface. The mean vapor isotopic composition during the rain events was -10.0 +/- 1.2 ‰ (1 σ) for δ18O and -73.9 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. The difference between the rain sample isotopic composition and that of liquid in isotopic equilibrium with the corresponding vapor at the ambient temperature was 0.8 +/- 2.2 ‰ for δ18O and 6.2 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. This disequilibrium was found to correlate with the natural log of rain rate (R2 of 0.26 for δ18O and 0.46 for δ2H), with lower rain rates having larger

  15. Assistant for Analyzing Tropical-Rain-Mapping Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A document is defined that describes an approach for a Tropical Rain Mapping Radar Data System (TDS). TDS is composed of software and hardware elements incorporating a two-frequency spaceborne radar system for measuring tropical precipitation. The TDS would be used primarily in generating data products for scientific investigations. The most novel part of the TDS would be expert-system software to aid in the selection of algorithms for converting raw radar-return data into such primary observables as rain rate, path-integrated rain rate, and surface backscatter. The expert-system approach would address the issue that selection of algorithms for processing the data requires a significant amount of preprocessing, non-intuitive reasoning, and heuristic application, making it infeasible, in many cases, to select the proper algorithm in real time. In the TDS, tentative selections would be made to enable conversions in real time. The expert system would remove straightforwardly convertible data from further consideration, and would examine ambiguous data, performing analysis in depth to determine which algorithms to select. Conversions performed by these algorithms, presumed to be correct, would be compared with the corresponding real-time conversions. Incorrect real-time conversions would be updated using the correct conversions.

  16. Whither Acid Rain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Brimblecombe

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid rain, the environmental cause célèbre of the 1980s seems to have vanished from popular conscience. By contrast, scientific research, despite funding difficulties, has continued to produce hundreds of research papers each year. Studies of acid rain taught much about precipitation chemistry, the behaviour of snow packs, long-range transport of pollutants and new issues in the biology of fish and forested ecosystems. There is now evidence of a shift away from research in precipitation and sulfur chemistry, but an impressive theoretical base remains as a legacy.

  17. People & Tropical Rain Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NatureScope, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Discusses ways people who live in rain forests make a living and some of the products that enrich our lives. Provides activities covering forest people, tropical treats, jungle in the pantry, treetop explorers, and three copyable pages to accompany activities. (Author/RT)

  18. Rain Forests: Tropical Treasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Rain Forests: Tropical Treasures." Contents are organized into the…

  19. Rain Forest Dance Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dawn

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the author's experience as a dancer and choreographer artist-in-residence with third graders at a public elementary school, providing a cultural arts experience to tie in with a theme study of the rain forest. Details the residency and the insights she gained working with students, teachers, and theme. (SR)

  20. Warm Rain Processes over the Tropical Oceans and Implications on Climate Change: Results from TRMM and GEOS GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Wu, H. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this talk, we will first show results from TRMM data regarding the characteristics of warm rains over the tropical oceans, and the dependence of rate of warm rain production on sea surface temperature. Results lead to the hypothesis that warm rain production efficiency, i.e., autoconversion, may be increased in a warm climate. We use the GEOS-II GCM to test this hypothesis. Our modeling results show that in a climate with increased rate of autoconversion, the total rain amount is increased, with warm rain contributing to larger portion of the increase. The abundant rainout of warm precipitation causes a reduction of low and middle cloud amount due to rainout, and reduced high clouds due to less water vapor available for ice-phase convection. However, clod radiation feedback caused by the increased rainfall efficiency, leads to differential vertical heating/cooling producing a more unstable atmosphere, allowing, more intense, but isolated penetrative convection, with contracted anvils to develop. Results also show that increased autoconversion reduces the convective adjustment time scale, resulting in faster recycling of atmospheric water. Most interestingly, the increased low level heating associated with warm rain leads to more energetic Madden and Julian oscillations in the tropics, with well-defined eastward propagation. While reducing the autoconversion leads to an abundant mix of westward and eastward tropical disturbances on daily to weekly time scales. The crucial link of precipitation microphysical processes to climate change including the effects of aerosols will be discussed.

  1. Warm Rain Processes Over the Tropical Oceans and Implications on Climate Change: Results from TRMM and GOES GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Wu, H. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this talk, we will first show results from TRMM data regarding the characteristics of warm rains over the tropical oceans, and the dependence of rate of warm rain production on sea surface temperature. Results lead to the hypothesis that warm rain production efficiency, i.e., autoconversion, may be increased in a warm climate. We use the GEOS-II GCM to test this hypothesis. Our modeling results show that in a climate with increased rate of autoconversion, the total rain amount is increased, with warm rain contributing to a larger portion of the increase. The abundant rainout of warm precipitation causes a reduction of low and middle cloud amount due to rainout, and reduced high clouds due to less water vapor available for ice-phase convection. However, clod radiation feedback caused by the increased rainfall efficiency, leads to differential vertical heating/cooling producing a more unstable atmosphere, allowing, more intense, but isolated penetrative convection, with contracted anvils to develop. Results also show that increased autoconversion reduces the convective adjustment time scale, resulting in faster recycling of atmospheric water. Most interestingly, the increased low level heating associated with warm rain leads to more energetic Madden and Julian oscillations in the tropics, with well-defined eastward propagation. While reducing the autoconversion leads to an abundant mix of westward and eastward tropical disturbances on daily to weekly time scales. The crucial link of precipitation microphysical processes to climate change including the effects of aerosols will be discussed.

  2. The production rate of cosmogenic deuterium at the Moon's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füri, Evelyn; Deloule, Etienne; Trappitsch, Reto

    2017-09-01

    The hydrogen (D/H) isotope ratio is a key tracer for the source of planetary water. However, secondary processes such as solar wind implantation and cosmic ray induced spallation reactions have modified the primordial D/H signature of 'water' in all rocks and soils recovered on the Moon. Here, we re-evaluate the production rate of cosmogenic deuterium (D) at the Moon's surface through ion microprobe analyses of hydrogen isotopes in olivines from eight Apollo 12 and 15 mare basalts. These in situ measurements are complemented by CO2 laser extraction-static mass spectrometry analyses of cosmogenic noble gas nuclides (3He, 21Ne, 38Ar). Cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of the mare basalts, derived from their cosmogenic 21Ne content, range from 60 to 422 Ma. These CRE ages are 35% higher, on average, than the published values for the same samples. The amount of D detected in the olivines increases linearly with increasing CRE ages, consistent with a production rate of (2.17 ± 0.11) ×10-12 mol(g rock)-1 Ma-1. This value is more than twice as high as previous estimates for the production of D by galactic cosmic rays, indicating that for water-poor lunar samples, i.e., samples with water concentrations ≤50 ppm, corrected D/H ratios have been severely overestimated.

  3. Weighing Rain Gauge Recording Charts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weighing rain gauge charts record the amount of precipitation that falls at a given location. The vast majority of the Weighing Rain Gauge Recording Charts...

  4. Simulation of surface dynamics during dissolution as a function of the surface orientation: Implications for non-constant dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, J. R. A.; Piazolo, S.; Evans, L.

    2014-12-01

    An important problem in geochemistry is the understanding of how changes occurring on a surface during dissolution affect the variability of measured dissolution rates. In this study a new approach to study the effect of surface dynamics on dissolution rates is tested by coupling experimental data with a numerical model that simulates the retreat of surface profiles during dissolution. We present specific results from the simulation of dissolution of fluorite surfaces. The equations that determine the retreat of a surface are based on experimentally obtained equations that relate the retreat rate of a surface to a single variable, the crystallographic orientation of the surface. Our results show that depending on the starting orientation, different types of topography are developed, similar to those observed experimentally. During the initial dissolution phase, changes of topography are rapid and associated with fast dissolution rates. The progressively slower dissolution rates are coupled with the development of surface segments with orientations that dissolve at a slower rate. Consequently, the overall retreat rate of a profile decreases during the simulation, and tends to a near-constant value. The results show a close relationship between dissolution rates, surface orientation and surface dynamics, which suggests that the dissolution rate of a specific mineral phase is not constant but varies with dissolution time and surface structure. This variability needs to be considered in the evaluation of experimentally derived dissolution rates, future dissolution experiments, and predictive kinetic models of dissolution.

  5. When It Rains, It Pours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Linda

    2012-01-01

    "It's raining, it's pouring, the old man is snoring!" "The itsy, bitsy spider crawled up the waterspout, down came the rain and washed the spider out. Out came the sun and dried up all the rain, and the itsy, bitsy spider went up the spout again." What do children's nursery rhymes have to do with the school library? The author begins by telling a…

  6. Prolonged acid rain facilitates soil organic carbon accumulation in a mature forest in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Hui, Dafeng; Deng, Qi; Xiong, Xin; Qiu, Qingyan; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-02-15

    With the continuing increase in anthropogenic activities, acid rain remains a serious environmental threat, especially in the fast developing areas such as southern China. To detect how prolonged deposition of acid rain would influence soil organic carbon accumulation in mature subtropical forests, we conducted a field experiment with simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments in a monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest at Dinghushan National Nature Reserve in southern China. Four levels of SAR treatments were set by irrigating plants with water of different pH values: CK (the control, local lake water, pH ≈ 4.5), T1 (water pH=4.0), T2 (water pH=3.5), and T3 (water pH=3.0). Results showed reduced pH measurements in the topsoil exposed to simulated acid rains due to soil acidification. Soil respiration, soil microbial biomass and litter decomposition rates were significantly decreased by the SAR treatments. As a result, T3 treatment significantly increased the total organic carbon by 24.5% in the topsoil compared to the control. Furthermore, surface soil became more stable as more recalcitrant organic matter was generated under the SAR treatments. Our results suggest that prolonged acid rain exposure may have the potential to facilitate soil organic carbon accumulation in the subtropical forest in southern China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors Contributing to the Hydrologic Effectiveness of a Rain Garden Network (Cincinnati OH USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Shuster

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Infiltrative rain gardens can add retention capacity to sewersheds, yet factors contributing to their capacity for detention and redistribution of stormwater runoff are dynamic and often unverified. Over a four-year period, we tracked whole-system water fluxes in a two-tier rain garden network and assessed near-surface hydrology and soil development across construction and operational phases. The monitoring data provided a quantitative basis for determining effectiveness of this stormwater control measure. Based on 233 monitored warm-season rainfall events, nearly half of total inflow volume was detained, with 90 percent of all events producing no flow to the combined sewer. For the events that did result in flow to the combined sewer system, the rain garden delayed flows for an average of 5.5 h. Multivariate analysis of hydrologic fluxes indicated that total event rainfall depth was a predominant hydrologic driver for network outflow during both phases, with average event intensity and daily evapotranspiration as additional, independent factors in regulating retention in the operational phase. Despite sediment loads that can clog the rooting zone, and overall lower-than-design infiltration rates, tradeoffs among soil profile development and hydrology apparently maintained relatively high overall retention effectiveness. Overall, our study identified factors relevant to regulation of retention capacity of a rain garden network. These factors may be generalizable, and guide improvement of new or existing rain garden designs.

  8. Isopleths of surface air concentration and surface air kerma rate due to a radioactive cloud released from a stack (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Haruo; Kikuchi, Masamitsu; Sekita, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Takenori

    2004-06-01

    This report is a revised edition of 'Isopleths of Surface Air Concentration and Surface Air Absorbed Dose Rate due to a Radioactive Cloud Released from a Stack(II) '(JAERI-M 90-206) and based on the revised Nuclear Safety Guidelines reflected the ICRP1990 Recommendation. Characteristics of this report are the use of Air Karma Rate (Gy/h) instead of Air Absorbed Dose Rate (Gy/h), and the record of isopleths of surface air concentration and surface air karma rate on CD-ROM. These recorded data on CD-ROM can be printed out on paper and/or pasted on digital map by personal computer. (author)

  9. A meteorological potential forecast model for acid rain in Fujian Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi Yong; Lin, Chang Cheng; Liu, Jing Xiong; Wu, De Hui; Lian, Dong Ying; Chen, Bin Bin

    2010-05-01

    Based on the acid rain and concurrent meteorological observational data during the past 10 years in Fujian Province, China, the dependence of distribution characteristics of acid rain on season, rain rate, weather pattern and dominant airflow in four regions of Fujian Province is analyzed. On the annual average, the acid rain frequency is the highest (above 40%) in the southern and mid-eastern regions, and the lowest (16.2%) in the western region. The acid rain occurs most frequently in spring and winter, and least frequent in summer. The acid rain frequency in general increases with the increase of precipitation. It also depend on the direction of dominant airflows at 850 hPa. In the mid-eastern region, more than 40% acid rains appear when the dominant wind directions are NW, W, SW, S and SE. In the southern region, high acid rain occurrence happens when the dominant wind directions are NW, W, SW and S. In the northern region, 41.8% acid rains occur when the southwesterly is pronounced. In the western region, the southwesterly is associated with a 17% acid rain rate. The examination of meteorological sounding conditions over Fuzhou, Xiamen and Shaowu cities shows that the acid rain frequency increases with increased inversion thickness. Based on the results above, a meteorological potential forecast model for acid rain is established and tested in 2007. The result is encouraging. The model provides an objective basis for the development of acid rain forecasting operation in the province.

  10. Optical Rain Gauge Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    To improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility deploys several types of rain gauges (MET, RAIN, and optical rain gauge [ORG] datastreams) as well as disdrometers (DISD and VDIS datastreams) at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site. This handbook deals specifically with the independent analog ORG (i.e., the ORG datastream).

  11. More rain compensation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sworder, D. D.; Vojak, R.

    1992-01-01

    To reduce the impact of rain-induced attenuation in the 20/30 GHz band, the attenuation at a specified signal frequency must be estimated and extrapolated forward in time on the basis of a noisy beacon measurement. Several studies have used model based procedures for solving this problem in statistical inference. Perhaps the most widely used model-based paradigm leads to the Kalman filter and its lineal variants. In this formulation, the dynamic features of the attenuation are represented by a state process (x(sub t)). The observation process (y(sub t)) is derived from beacon measurements. Some ideas relating to the signal processing problems related to uplink power control are presented. It is shown that some easily implemented algorithms hold promise for use in estimating rain induced fades. The algorithms were applied to actual data generated at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VPI) test facility. Because only one such event was studied, it is not clear that the algorithms will have the same effectiveness when a wide range of events are studied.

  12. Music after the rain

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    The group Home Cooking (left to right: Jean-Marie Planche, Tony Arnold, Serge Waeffler, Django Manglunki) entertains the crowd with a humoristic blues/rock performance. The earth moved in Prévessin on 29 July. This was not an earthquake but an 'international' music event, the seventeenth CERN Hardronic Festival, which saw musicians from many different countries, including Russia, Britain, Spain, France, Belgium and the USA, take to the stage. The audience rocked to music from eight different groups until the early hours. About a thousand people flocked to CERN to hear what the best of its musical talents had to offer. The evening was very nearly a wash-out, though. After a week of scorching hot temperatures, the heavens suddenly opened and the rain didn't stop until a few minutes before the first act came on stage. Thanks to this narrow escape, the organisers can boast a 17-year run of rain-free Hardronic festivals. All the different musical styles were given a warm reception, from traditional Russian folk...

  13. Influence of deposition rate on PL spectrum and surface morphology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A conventional oven in open air with average humidity of 60% was used for thermal oxidation of Zn films and the samples oxidation took place at 400. ◦. C temperatures. In this work, six samples with dif- ferent deposition rates were coated. To change the coating rates of zinc (0·6–4·5 nm/s), the discharge current was var-.

  14. Near-Surface Circulation and Fate of Upper Layer Fresh Water from Rivers Runoff and Rain in the Bay of Bengal near Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    and variability over the experiment area and to infer the surface freshwater export pathways from direct measurements. The salinity drifters were...GOALS Improve the knowledge of the near-surface circulation in the BoB and of the pathways through which the freshwater fluxes occur. OBJECTIVES...drifters was deployed 2015 when an additional fleet of 36 salinity drifters was used in conjunction of other IOP activities to map the SSS distribution

  15. The Rain Keeps Falling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Rose

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The force of disaster hit me in the heart when, as a young woman, I heard Bob Dylan sing ‘Hard Rain’. In a voice stunned by violence, the young man reports on a multitude of forces that drag the world into catastrophe. In the 1960s I heard the social justice in the song. In 2004 the environmental issues ambush me. The song starts and ends in the dying world of trees and rivers. The poet’s words in both domains of justice are eerily prophetic. They call across the music, and across the years, saying that a hard rain is coming. The words bear no story at all; they give us a series of compelling images, an account of impending calamity. The artistry of the poet—Bob (Billy Boy Dylan—offers sequences of reports that, like Walter Benjamin’s storm from paradise, pile wreckage upon wreckage.

  16. Rain or snow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    It's easy to look out the window and decide whether it's raining, snowing, or hailing, right? Well, not always—especially when the region of interest isn't directly outside your window. To help discern the difference, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has developed a laser beam device that differentiates between the precipitation types.The laser weather identifier produces different signals when raindrops, snowflakes, or hailstones pass through the laser's beam, according to Ting-i Wang—until recently a scientist at NOAA's Environmental Research Laboratories in Boulder, Colo. These signature signals can be read by computer and integrated into present weather networks. ‘It can eliminate human error or negligence, and can be cost effective by constantly observing and monitoring the weather,’ Wang noted. Wang and his colleagues are developing several of the laser instruments for evaluation by NOAA's National Weather Service. The first of these is scheduled to be installed in 1984.

  17. Acid rain in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Neeloo; Streets, David G.; Foell, Wesley K.

    1992-07-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of great concern in North America and Europe during the past several decades. However, due to the passage of a number of recent regulations, most notably the Clean Air Act in the United States in 1990, there is an emerging perception that the problem in these Western nations is nearing solution. The situation in the developing world, particularly in Asia, is much bleaker. Given the policies of many Asian nations to achieve levels of development comparable with the industrialized world—which necessitate a significant expansion of energy consumption (most derived from indigenous coal reserves)—the potential for the formation of, and damage from, acid deposition in these developing countries is very high. This article delineates and assesses the emissions patterns, meteorology, physical geology, and biological and cultural resources present in various Asian nations. Based on this analysis and the risk factors to acidification, it is concluded that a number of areas in Asia are currently vulnerable to acid rain. These regions include Japan, North and South Korea, southern China, and the mountainous portions of Southeast Asia and southwestern India. Furthermore, with accelerated development (and its attendant increase in energy use and production of emissions of acid deposition precursors) in many nations of Asia, it is likely that other regions will also be affected by acidification in the near future. Based on the results of this overview, it is clear that acid deposition has significant potential to impact the Asian region. However, empirical evidence is urgently needed to confirm this and to provide early warning of increases in the magnitude and spread of acid deposition and its effects throughout this part of the world.

  18. Rain Gardens: Stormwater Infiltrating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hydrological dynamics and changes in stormwater nutrient concentrations within rain gardens were studied by introducing captured stormwater runoff to rain gardens at EPA’s Urban Water Research Facility in Edison, New Jersey. The runoff used in these experiments was collected...

  19. Eolian erosion of the Martian surface. I - Erosion rate similitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, J. D.; White, B. R.; Greeley, R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    A similitude parameter is derived which is based on theoretical considerations of erosion due to sand in saltation. This parameter has been used to correlate wind tunnel experiments of particle flow over model craters. The characteristics of the flow field in the vicinity and downstream of a crater are discussed and it is shown that erosion is initiated in areas lying under a pair of trailing vortices. The erosion rate parameter is used to calculate erosion rates on Mars, reported in Part 2, to be published later.

  20. Evaluation of the RAIN project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuanes, A.; Dickson, W.; Jenkins, A.; Rasmussen, L.; Stordal, F.

    1991-11-01

    This report presents a scientific assessment of the RAIN project. It describes the main hypotheses tested and the applied methods. The major results of the research are highlighted and discussed, and they are placed in the perspective of national and international acid rain research. An important part of the RAIN project has been to provide information to the public about the acid rain problem, and in this way it has performed an important background role in influencing political decisions and legislation. The RAIN project is regarded as a cost effective research effort, and the novel approach and capital investment will enable further manipulation studies at these sites in the future. It is recommended that the project is continued in the immediate future, with some modification to answer specific questions resulting from the collected data. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  1. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ruma, R.; Hosseini, S.H.R.; Yoshihara, K.; Akiyama, M.; Sakugawa, T.; Lukeš, Petr; Akiyama, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 12 (2014), s. 123304-123304 ISSN 0021-8979 Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M100431203 Program:M Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : plasma in air * water surface discharge * pulse frequency * hydrogen peroxide * organic dye Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2014 http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1063/1.4896266

  2. Evaluation of Turf-Grass and Prairie-Vegetated Rain Gardens in a Clay and Sand Soil, Madison, Wisconsin, Water Years 2004-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, William R.; Balster, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    atmosphere through evapotranspiration; therefore, the remainder was considered recharge. During water year 2005, recharge was 81 to 75 percent of total influent volume for the prairie- and turf-rain gardens in sand and 87 to 78 percent for the prairie- and turf-rain gardens in clay, respectively. Maximum recharge volumes ranged from 90 to 94 percent of the total influent volume in the turf and prairie rain gardens in sand and occurred during water year 2004. Maximum recharge in the turf and prairie rain gardens in clay ranged from 89 percent during water year 2007 to 98 percent during water year 2004. Median infiltration rates were an order of magnitude greater for rain gardens planted in sand than for those in clay, regardless of vegetation type. Under similar soil conditions, rain gardens planted with turf grass had lower median infiltration rates than those planted with prairie species. Median infiltration rates were 0.28 and 0.88 inches per hour in the turf and prairie rain gardens in clay, respectively, and 2.5 and 4.2 inches per hour in the turf and prairie rain gardens in sand, respectively. In general, infiltration rates were greater during spring (April and May) and summer (June through August) months. Of the six observed exceedences of the storage capacity of the turf rain garden in clay between April-November during 2004-07, five were predicted by use of a combination of the normalized surface storage volume, the median infiltration rate, and an estimate of specific yield for soils under the rain garden to a depth equal to the uppermost limiting layer. By use of the same criteria, in water year 2008, when the contributing drainage area to the prairie rain garden in clay was doubled, all four observed exceedences of the total storage capacity were predicted. The accuracy of the predictions of when the total storage capacity of the rain gardens would be exceeded indicates that by applying measurements of the appropriate soil properties to rain g

  3. Empirical recurrence rates for ground motion signals on planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Panning, Mark

    2018-03-01

    We determine the recurrence rates of ground motion events as a function of sensed velocity amplitude at several terrestrial locations, and make a first interplanetary comparison with measurements on the Moon, Mars, Venus and Titan. This empirical approach gives an intuitive order-of-magnitude guide to the observed ground motion (including both tectonic and ocean- and atmosphere-forced signals) of these locations as a guide to instrument expectations on future missions, without invoking interior models and specific sources: for example a Venera-14 observation of possible ground motion indicates a microseismic environment mid-way between noisy and quiet terrestrial locations. Quiet terrestrial regions see a peak velocity amplitude in mm/s roughly equal to 0.3*N(-0.7), where N is the number of "events" (half-hour intervals in which a given peak ground motion is exceeded) observed per year. The Apollo data show endogenous seismic signals for a given recurrence rate that are typically about 10,000 times smaller in amplitude than a quiet site on Earth, although local thermally-induced moonquakes are much more common. Viking data masked for low-wind periods appear comparable with a quiet terrestrial site, whereas a Venera observation of microseisms suggests ground motion more similar to a more active terrestrial location. Recurrence rate plots from in-situ measurements provide a context for seismic instrumentation on future planetary missions, e.g. to guide formulation of data compression schemes. While even small geophones can discriminate terrestrial activity rates, observations with guidance accelerometers are typically too insensitive to provide meaningful constraints (i.e. a non-zero number of "events") on actual ground motion observations unless operated for very long periods.

  4. Foliar nutrient status of Pinus ponderosa exposed to ozone and acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, P.D.; Houpis, J.L.J.

    1991-01-01

    A direct effect of foliar exposure to acid rain may be increased leaching of nutrient elements. Ozone exposure, through degradation of the cuticle and cellular membranes, may also result in increased nutrient leaching. To test these hypotheses, the foliar concentrations of 13 nutrient elements were monitored for mature branches of three clones of Pinus ponderosa exposed to ozone and/or acid rain. The three clones represented three distinct levels of phenotypic vigor. Branches were exposed to charcoal filtered, ambient, or 2 x ambient concentrations of ozone and received no acid rain (NAP), pH 5.1 rain (5.1), or pH 3.0 (3.0) rain. Following 10 months of continuous ozone exposure and 3 months of weekly rain applications, the concentrations of P and Mg differed significantly among rain treatments with a ranking of: 5.1 < NAP < 3.0. The S concentration increased with rain application regardless of pH. For the clones of moderate and low vigor, the concentration of N decreased with increasing rain acidity. There was no evidence of significant ozone or ozone x acid rain response. Among the three families, high phenotypic vigor was associated with significantly greater concentrations of N, P, K, Mg, B and An. These results indicate generally negligible leaching as a result of exposure to acid rain and/or ozone for one growing season. Increases in foliar concentrations of S, Mg and P are possibly the result of evaporative surface deposition from the rain solution

  5. Effect of surface roughness on the heating rates of large-angled hypersonic blunt cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimpan, Kiran Joy; Menezes, Viren

    2018-03-01

    Surface-roughness caused by the residue of an ablative Thermal Protection System (TPS) can alter the turbulence level and surface heating rates on a hypersonic re-entry capsule. Large-scale surface-roughness that could represent an ablated TPS, was introduced over the forebody of a 120° apex angle blunt cone, in order to test for its influence on surface heating rates in a hypersonic freestream of Mach 8.8. The surface heat transfer rates measured on smooth and roughened models under the same freestream conditions were compared. The hypersonic flow-fields of the smooth and rough-surfaced models were visualized to analyse the flow physics. Qualitative numerical simulations and pressure measurements were carried out to have an insight into the high-speed flow physics. Experimental observations under moderate Reynolds numbers indicated a delayed transition and an overall reduction of 17-46% in surface heating rates on the roughened model.

  6. Seven Guideposts for Tropical Rain Forest Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillero, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Identifies seven guideposts for tropical rain forest education. Aids teachers in finding structure and creating educational experiences that promote more complete understanding of tropical rain forests. (CCM)

  7. Millimeter wave propagation modeling of inhomogeneous rain media for satellite communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, R. R.; Stutzman, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical propagation model that represents the scattering properties of an inhomogeneous rain often found on a satellite communications link is presented. The model includes the scattering effects of an arbitrary distribution of particle type (rain or ice), particle shape, particle size, and particle orientation within a given rain cell. An associated rain propagation prediction program predicts attenuation, isolation and phase shift as a function of ground rain rate. A frequency independent synthetic storm algorithm is presented that models nonuniform rain rates present on a satellite link. Antenna effects are included along with a discussion of rain reciprocity. The model is verified using the latest available multiple frequency data from the CTS and COMSTAR satellites. The data covers a wide range of frequencies, elevation angles, and ground site locations.

  8. Regional characteristics of land use in northeast and southern Blue Ridge province: Associations with acid-rain effects on surface-water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liegel, L.; Cassell, D.; Stevens, D.; Shaffer, P.; Church, R.

    1991-01-01

    The Direct/Delayed Response Project (DDRP) is one of several being conducted by the United States Environmental Protection Agency to assess risk to surface waters from acidic deposition in the eastern United States. In one phase of DDRP, land use, wetland, and forest cover data were collected for statistical samples of 145 northeast lakes and 35 southern Blue Ridge Province stream watersheds. Land use and other data were then extrapolated from individual to target watershed populations in both study regions. Project statistical design allows summarization of results for various subsets of the target population. The article discusses results and implications of the land-use and land-cover characterization for both regions

  9. Power law relationships for rain attenuation and reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devasirvatham, D. M. J.; Hodge, D. B.

    1978-01-01

    The equivalent reflectivity, specific attenuation and volumetric backscatter cross section of rain are calculated and tabulated at a number of frequencies from 1 to 500 GHz using classical Mie theory. The first two parameters are shown to be closely approximated as functions of rain rate by the power law aR to the b power. The a's and b's are also tabulated and plotted for convenient reference.

  10. Surface Roughness effects on Runoff and Soil Erosion Rates Under Simulated Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil surface roughness is identified as one of the controlling factors governing runoff and soil loss yet, most studies pay little attention to soil surface roughness. In this study, we analyzed the influence of random soil surface roughness on runoff and soil erosion rates. Bulk samples of a silt l...

  11. The urban perspectives of acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonn, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents discussions held during a workshop an Urban Perspective of Acid Rain. The workshop was sponsored by the Office of the Director, National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). NAPAP anticipates giving increased emphasis to the benefits in urban areas of emissions reductions. The goal of this informal, exploratory workshop was to serve as a first step towards identifying pollutant monitoring, and research and assessment needs to help answer, from an urban perspective, the two key questions posed to NAPAP by Congress: (1) what are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of the acid rain control program, and (2) what reductions in deposition, rates are needed in order to prevent adverse effects? The workshop addressed research activities needed to respond to these questions. The discussions focused. sequentially, on data needs, data and model availability, and data and modeling gaps. The discussions concentrated on four areas of effects: human health, materials, urban forests, and visibility

  12. [Effects of simulated acid rain on water physiological characteristics of Myrica rubra seedlings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaho, Zhao-bin; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Shu-quan; Lu, Mei-juan

    2011-08-01

    Taking the seedlings of typical subtropical economic tree species Myrica rubra in Zhejiang Province as test materials, a pot experiment was conducted to study their water physiological characteristics under effects of simulated acid rain (pH 2.5 and pH 4.0), with water (pH 5.6) as the control. Season, year, and acid rain all had significant effects on the photosynthetic rate (Pn). Among the treatments, the Pn had a greater difference in summer than in spring and autumn, and was higher in treatment acid rain (pH 4.0). Season, year, acid rain, and the interactions of season and year and of the three factors had significant effects on the stomata conductance (Gs), and also, the Gs had a greater difference among the treatments in summer than in spring and autumn. Acid rain had inhibitory effect on Gs. Season, year, acid rain, and the interactions of season and year and of season and acid rain affected the transpiration rate (Tr) significantly. Same as Pn and Gs, the Tr had a greater difference among the treatments in summer than in spring and autumn. Acid rain (pH 2.5) had the strongest inhibitory effect on Tr. Acid rain and the interactions of season and year and of season and acid rain had significant effects on the water use efficiency (WUE), and acid rain (pH 2.5) had definitely positive effect on the WUE.

  13. Effect of surface roughness on erosion rates of pure copper coupons in pulsed vacuum arc system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Lakshminarayana; Munz, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    Vacuum arc erosion measurements were performed on copper cathodes having different surface roughness and surface patterns in 10 -5 Torr vacuum (1.3324 mPa), in an external magnetic field of 0.04 T. Different surface patterns and surface roughness were created by grit blasting with alumina grits (G-cathodes) and grinding with silicon carbide emery paper (E-cathodes). The erosion rates of these cathodes were obtained by measuring the weight loss of the electrode after igniting as many as 135 arc pulses, each of which was 500 μs long at an arc current of 125 A. The erosion rates measured indicate that erosion rates decrease with decreasing roughness levels. Results obtained indicate that both surface roughness and surface patterns affect the erosion rate. Having patterns perpendicular to the direction of cathode spot movement gives lower erosion rates than having patterns parallel to arc movement. Isotropic surfaces give lower erosion rates than patterned surfaces at the same roughness

  14. Measurements of dry-deposition rates on various earth surfaces by 212Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osaki, S.; Sugihara, S.; Maeda, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Dry deposition rates of 212 Pb on a coniferous forest (Japanese cedar) and a broad-leaf forest (Pasania edulis) have been measured. Those on various kinds of grass fields, various states on artificial surface such as water, paper, and standing paper have been also measured. The dry deposition rates depend on the characteristics of depositing particles and the conditions of deposited surfaces. Dry deposition rates on the forest of Japanese cedar are highest because of the complex and adhesive surface of the leaves. Those on various grass fields are roughly depend on the logarithm of the height of their grasses. The total deposition rates of 7 Be do not depend on the densities or heights of the grasses. 7 Be may be not kept on their leaves or surface soil for a long time. The dry deposition rates of on artificial surface, e.g. paper and water surfaces make clear the mechanism on dry deposition, and suggest that more chances of collision and more adhesive of the surface are important for the dry deposition. About 90% of all deposition on the artificial paper grass was attached on the standing paper. On water surface, 60% of the rate of paper grass was attached, but only about 20% were attached on a dry paper plate. The aerosol particles are deposited by collision with the surface, therefore the deposition velocity depends on the chance of collision and the characteristics of the surface. Therefore the dry deposition rates on forests are larger and those of coniferous forest are largest. (author)

  15. Destruction rains from power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Acid rain more acidic than lemon juice periodically falls in the U.S. east of the Mississippi River. Acid rain is the final product in a chain of reactions that begins when SO/sub 2/ is emitted from power plants. SO/sub 2/ reacts with atmospheric constituents to form sulfur trioxide, sulfate, and sulfuric acid. It is sulfate which is most harmful to human health. Nitric oxides also react in the atmosphere to form nitric acid. Coal combustion produces more than half the man-made air-borne sulfur, and half the nitrate (NOx). Auto engines produce nearly half the NOx, while catalytic convertors are a direct source of sulfuric acid. Fertilizer may also produce nitrate. As many as 21,000 people die annually from sulfur-related causes east of the Mississippi, according to a draft report by the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Acid rain has wreaked havoc in some northeastern waterways. Since 1940, it has eliminated fish from nearly half the Adirondack lakes. Acid rain also affects forest ecosystems by leaching nutrients from foliage and soil, and by killing important soil microorganisms. Antiquated buildings and sculpture are eroding. Two major obstacles for controlling acid rain and sulfates abound - bureaucratic and the National Energy Plan's commitment to coal. (MCW)

  16. The effect of heating rate on the surface chemistry of NiTi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undisz, Andreas; Hanke, Robert; Freiberg, Katharina E; Hoffmann, Volker; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2014-11-01

    The impact of the heating rate on the Ni content at the surface of the oxide layer of biomedical NiTi is explored. Heat treatment emulating common shape-setting procedures was performed by means of conventional and inductive heating for similar annealing time and temperature, applying various heating rates from ~0.25 K s(-1) to 250 K s(-1). A glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy method was established and employed to evaluate concentration profiles of Ni, Ti and O in the near-surface region at high resolution. The Ni content at the surface of the differently treated samples varies significantly, with maximum surface Ni concentrations of ~20 at.% at the lowest and ~1.5 at.% at the highest heating rate, i.e. the total amount of Ni contained in the surface region of the oxide layer decreases by >15 times. Consequently, the heating rate is a determinant for the biomedical characteristics of NiTi, especially since Ni available at the surface of the oxide layer may affect the hemocompatibility and be released promptly after surgical application of a respective implant. Furthermore, apparently contradictory results presented in the literature reporting surface Ni concentrations of ~3 at.% to >20 at.% after heat treatment are consistently explained considering the ascertained effect of the heating rate. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of Bacillus subtilis endospore surface reactivity on the rate of forsterite dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Z.; Gorman-Lewis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Primary mineral dissolution products, such as silica (Si), calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), play an important role in numerous biologic and geochemical cycles including microbial metabolism, plant growth and secondary mineral precipitation. The flux of these and other dissolution products into the environment is largely controlled by the rate of primary silicate mineral dissolution. Bacteria, a ubiquitous component in water-rock systems, are known to facilitate mineral dissolution and may play a substantial role in determining the overall flux of dissolution products into the environment. Bacterial cell walls are complex and highly reactive organic surfaces that can affect mineral dissolution rates directly through microbe-mineral adsorption or indirectly by complexing dissolution products. The effect of bacterial surface adsorption on chemical weathering rates may even outweigh the influence of active processes in environments where a high proportion of cells are metabolically dormant or cell metabolism is slow. Complications associated with eliminating or accounting for ongoing metabolic processes in long-term dissolution studies have made it challenging to isolate the influence of cell wall interactions on mineral dissolution rates. We utilized Bacillus subtilis endospores, a robust and metabolically dormant cell type, to isolate and quantify the effects of bacterial surface reactivity on forsterite (Mg2SiO4) dissolution rates. We measured the influence of both direct and indirect microbe-mineral interactions on forsterite dissolution. Indirect pathways were isolated using dialysis tubing to prevent mineral-microbe contact while allowing free exchange of dissolved mineral products and endospore-ion adsorption. Homogenous experimental assays allowed both direct microbe-mineral and indirect microbe-ion interactions to affect forsterite dissolution rates. Dissolution rates were calculated based on silica concentrations and zero-order dissolution kinetics

  18. quantification of rain quantification of rain induced artifacts on digital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    3DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS, OSUN STATE UNIVERSITY,OSOGBO, OSUN STATE. NIGERIA. 5 KING FAHD ... The presence of artifacts on the high definition television (TV) content and the eventual loss of the digital TV signals to rain is still a ... 4, October 2015 803 a short period of time over a little coverage area, and.

  19. [Characteristics and the impact factors of acid rain in Fuzhou and Xiamen 1992-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiu-Ping; Wang, Hong; Chen, Bin-Bin; Sui, Ping; Lin, Wen

    2014-10-01

    Based on the observed acid rain data, synoptic situations and mass concentrations of atmospheric pollutants data from 1992 to 2012, the temporal variation characteristics and the impact factors of acid rain were analyzed in Fuzhou and Xiamen. The results showed that acid rain and non-acid rain accounted for 38.1% and 61.9% respectively in Fuzhou, 40.6% and 59.4% respectively in Xiamen. The annual average pH was 4.1-5.5 in Fuzhou. Acid rain pollution alleviated after 2007 in Fuzhou, and alleviated after 2006 in Xiamen. Acid rain was more serious in winter and spring than in summer and autumn. Precipitation intensity could affect the acidity of rain. Acid rain was observed more serious in southeast, southwest, west and northwest wind in Fuzhou, and more serious in northeast, southwest, west and northwest wind in Xiamen. Acid rain was most severe under the condition of transformed surface cold high, while most light under the conditions of typhoon (intertropical convergence zone) and outside of typhoon (intertropical convergence zone). There was a negative correlation between the mass concentrations of atmospheric pollutants, such as SO2, NO2, PM10, and the pH of rain in Fuzhou.

  20. Combining meteorological radar and network of rain gauges data for space–time model development

    OpenAIRE

    Pastoriza, Vicente; Núñez Fernández, Adolfo; Machado, Fernando; Mariño, Perfecto; Pérez Fontán, Fernando; Fiebig, Uwe-Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Technological developments and the trend to go higher and higher in frequency give rise to the need for true space–time rain field models for testing the dynamics of fade countermeasures. There are many models that capture the spatial correlation of rain fields. Worth mentioning are those models based on cell ensembles. However, the rain rate fields created in this way need the introduction of the time variable to reproduce their dynamics. In this paper, we have concentrated on ad...

  1. Spread of pathogens through rain drop impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungho; Gruszewski, Hope; Gidley, Todd; Schmale, David G., III; Jung, Sunghwan

    2017-11-01

    Rain drop impact can disperse micron-sized pathogenic particles over long distances. In this study, we aim to elucidate mechanisms for disease dispersal when a rain drop impacts a particle-laden solid surface. Three different dispersal types were observed depending on whether the dispersed glass particles were dry or wet. For a dry particle dispersal, the movement of contact line made the particles initially jump off the surface with relatively high velocity. Then, air vortex was formed due to the air current entrained along with the falling drop, and advected the particles with relatively low velocity. For a wet particle dispersal, the contact line of a spreading liquid became unstable due to the presence of the particles on the substrate. This caused splashing at the contact line and ejected liquid droplets carrying the particles. Finally, we released a drop onto wheat plants infected with the rust fungus, Puccinia triticina, and found that nearly all of the satellite droplets from a single drop contained at least one rust spore. Also, we visualized such novel dispersal dynamics with a high-speed camera and characterized their features by scaling models. This research was partially supported by National Science Foundation Grant CBET-1604424.

  2. Raindrop and flow interactions for interrill erosion with wind-driven rain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erpul, G.; Gabriels, D.; Darell Norton, L.; Dennis, C.; Huang, C.H.; Visser, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Wind-driven rain (WDR) experiments were conducted to evaluate the interrill component of the Water Erosion Prediction Project model with a two-dimensional experimental set-up in a wind tunnel. Synchronized wind and rain simulations were applied to soil surfaces on windward and leeward slopes of 7,

  3. Regulatory aspects of acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, P.R.; Berkau, E.E.; Schnelle, K.B.

    1993-01-01

    On November 15, 1990, President Bush signed the 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA) amendments into law. This was a historical document which marked the beginning of a concerted effort to address a most pressing environmental problem of this century, namely acid rain. Acid rain is the generic term used to describe the phenomenon by which sulfur dioxides (SO 2 ) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ) react in the atmosphere in the presence of sunlight to form acids which are scrubbed out of the atmosphere during a precipitation event. When this happens the pH of the precipitation falls considerably below 7.0. Years of research have shown that acid rain has a very detrimental effect on soils, vegetation, and marine life. The large amounts of SO 2 and NO x being released by coal-fired utility boilers have largely incriminated utility companies as being the culprits. Most of the research work has been in Canada because the direction of the jet stream across the US is such that the emissions from the midwestern and northeastern US are carried into southeastern Canada. An interim report from the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) has assessed that power plants contribute up to 65% of the national annual emissions of SO 2 , and up to 29% of the NO x emissions. It is for these reasons that acid rain control has been given such a priority by legislators

  4. Far from equilibrium enstatite dissolution rates in alkaline solutions at earth surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Sougata; Walther, John V.

    2011-12-01

    Far from equilibrium enstatite dissolution rates both open to atmospheric CO 2 and CO 2 purged were measured as a function of solution pH from 8 to 13 in batch reactors at room temperature. Congruent dissolution was observed after an initial period of incongruent dissolution with preferential Si release from the enstatite. Steady-state dissolution rates in open to atmospheric CO 2 conditions decrease with increase in solution pH from 8 to 12 similar to the behavior reported by other investigators. Judging from the pH 13 dissolution rate, rates increase with pH above pH 12. This is thought to occur because of the increase in overall negative surface charges on enstatite as Mg surface sites become negative above pH 12.4, the pH of zero surface charge of MgO. Steady-state dissolution rates of enstatite increase above pH 10 when CO 2 was purged by performing the experiments in a N 2 atmosphere. This suggests inhibition of dissolution rates above pH 10 when experiments were open to the atmosphere. The dissolved carbonate in these solutions becomes dominantly CO 32- above pH 10.33. It is argued that CO 32- forms a >Mg 2-CO 3 complex at positively charged Mg surface sites on enstatite, resulting in stabilization of the surface Si-O bonds. Therefore, removal of solution carbonate results in an increase in dissolution rates of enstatite above pH 10. The log rate of CO 2-purged enstatite dissolution in moles per cm 2 per s as a function of increasing pH above pH 10 is equal to 0.35. This is consistent with the model of silicate mineral dissolution in the absence of surface carbonation in alkaline solutions proposed earlier in the literature.

  5. Reaction rates of ozone and terpenes adsorbed to model indoor surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springs, M; Wells, J R; Morrison, G C

    2011-08-01

    Reaction rates and reaction probabilities have been quantified on model indoor surfaces for the reaction of ozone with two monoterpenes (Δ(3) -carene and d-limonene). Molar surface loadings were obtained by performing breakthrough experiments in a plug-flow reactor (PFR) packed with beads of glass, polyvinylchloride or zirconium silicate. Reaction rates and probabilities were determined by equilibrating the PFR with both the terpene and the ozone and measuring the ozone consumption rate. To mimic typical indoor conditions, temperatures of 20, 25, and 30°C were used in both types of experiments along with a relative humidity ranging from 10% to 80%. The molar surface loading decreased with increased relative humidity, especially on glass, suggesting that water competed with the terpenes for adsorption sites. The ozone reactivity experiments indicate that higher surface loadings correspond with higher ozone uptake. The reaction probability for Δ(3) -carene with ozone ranged from 2.9 × 10(-6) to 3.0 × 10(-5) while reaction probabilities for d-limonene ranged from 2.8 × 10(-5) to 3.0 × 10(-4) . These surface reaction probabilities are roughly 10-100 times greater than the corresponding gas-phase values. Extrapolation of these results to typical indoor conditions suggests that surface conversion rates may be substantial relative to gas-phase rates, especially for lower volatility terpenoids. At present, it is unclear how important heterogeneous reactions will be in influencing indoor concentrations of terpenes, ozone and their reaction products. We observe that surface reaction probabilities were 10 to 100 times greater than their corresponding gas-phase values. Thus indoor surfaces do enhance effective reaction rates and adsorption of terpenes will increase ozone flux to otherwise low-reactivity surfaces. Extrapolation of these results to typical indoor conditions suggests that surface conversion rates may be substantial relative to gas-phase rates, especially

  6. First principles predictions of electron tunneling rates between atoms and crystalline surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidfeldt, Keith

    Charge transfer is a critical process that controls many important reactions such as photosynthesis, corrosion, and catalysis. We developed a quantitative method for calculating charge transfer rates using periodic density functional theory (DFT). This approach allows us to model from first principles the interaction between an adsorbate and arbitrary material surfaces. By deconvoluting the projected density of states of the ionization level of the atom, we can determine its width, which is proportional to the charge transfer rate. These rates can be used to predict important properties such as adsorbate excited state lifetimes and neutralization fractions for scattered ions. By comparing neutralization fractions for Li scattering off of Al(001) to experimental data, we validated our first principles method of predicting charge transfer rates. While our results are consistent with the classic Langmuir-Gurney (LG) model of adsorption for nearly-free-electron-like metal surfaces, we find several important deviations caused by the actual electronic structure of more complicated material surfaces. For example, we find that the d-band of transition metal surfaces mediates an intra-atomic hybridization of the Li ionization level. Secondly, we find that surface-projected band gaps (e.g., in Cu(111)) enhance the lifetimes of alkali atoms above surfaces containing such band gaps. In addition, our method allows us to also study atoms interacting with non-metallic surfaces where the LG model does not apply. For example, we find that alkali charge transfer rates are controlled by dangling bonds on covalently-bonded surfaces (e.g., Si(001)-(2xl)) instead of by the traditional image potential.

  7. NAMMA SENEGAL RAIN GAUGE NETWORK V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Senegal Rain Gauge Network consisted of 40 rain gauge sites (AMMA 1-40) located in various places throughout Senegal, West Africa. These data files were...

  8. Material Removal Rate, Electrode Wear Rate, and Surface Roughness Evaluation in Die Sinking EDM with Hollow Tool through Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teepu Sultan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical discharge machining is one of the earliest nontraditional machining, extensively used in industry for processing of parts having unusual profiles with reasonable precision. In the present work, an attempt has been made to model material removal rate, electrode wear rate, and surface roughness through response surface methodology in a die sinking EDM process. The optimization was performed in two steps using one factor at a time for preliminary evaluation and a Box-Behnken design involving three variables with three levels for determination of the critical experimental conditions. Pulse on time, pulse off time, and peak current were changed during the tests, while a copper electrode having tubular cross section was employed to machine through holes on EN 353 steel alloy workpiece. The results of analysis of variance indicated that the proposed mathematical models obtained can adequately describe the performances within the limits of factors being studied. The experimental and predicted values were in a good agreement. Surface topography is revealed with the help of scanning electron microscope micrographs.

  9. Direct Measurement of Surface Dissolution Rates in Potential Nuclear Waste Forms: The Example of Pyrochlore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Cornelius; Finkeldei, Sarah; Brandt, Felix; Bosbach, Dirk; Luttge, Andreas

    2015-08-19

    The long-term stability of ceramic materials that are considered as potential nuclear waste forms is governed by heterogeneous surface reactivity. Thus, instead of a mean rate, the identification of one or more dominant contributors to the overall dissolution rate is the key to predict the stability of waste forms quantitatively. Direct surface measurements by vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) and their analysis via material flux maps and resulting dissolution rate spectra provide data about dominant rate contributors and their variability over time. Using pyrochlore (Nd2Zr2O7) pellet dissolution under acidic conditions as an example, we demonstrate the identification and quantification of dissolution rate contributors, based on VSI data and rate spectrum analysis. Heterogeneous surface alteration of pyrochlore varies by a factor of about 5 and additional material loss by chemo-mechanical grain pull-out within the uppermost grain layer. We identified four different rate contributors that are responsible for the observed dissolution rate range of single grains. Our new concept offers the opportunity to increase our mechanistic understanding and to predict quantitatively the alteration of ceramic waste forms.

  10. Effects of surface orientation, fluid chemistry and mechanical polishing on the variability of dolomite dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Voltolini, Marco; Knauss, Kevin G.

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies of carbonate surface reactivity have underscored the fundamental variability of dissolution rates and the heterogeneous distribution of the reaction over the mineral surface due to the inhomogeneous distribution of surface energy. Dolomite dissolution rates relative to different cleavage planes (r-planes) and surfaces cut approximately perpendicular to the c-axis (c-planes) were studied at 50 °C as a function of pH (3.4 ≤ pH ≤ 9.0) and solution composition by vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), with the aim of providing an estimate of the intrinsic rate variation of dolomite single crystals and describing the surface reaction distribution and the rate controlling mechanisms. Surface normal retreat rates measured under acidic conditions increased linearly with time and were not visibly affected by the parallel increase of surface roughness. Mean total dissolution rates of r-planes decreased by over 200 times from pH 3.4 to pH 9.0 and CO32--rich solutions, whereas corresponding rate variations spanned over 3 orders of magnitude when also c-plane rate distributions were included in the analysis. At acid to near neutral pH, c-planes dissolved ∼ three times faster than the adjoining r-planes but slower at basic pH and high total carbon concentration, displaying a distinctive morphologic evolution in these two regimes. The comparison of polished and unpolished crystals showed that polished cleavage planes dissolved about three times faster than the unpolished counterpart at near neutral to basic conditions, whereas no significant difference in reactivity was observed at pH < 5. Although experimental data and observations indicate a tendency of dolomite faces to reach a low-energy topography over the course of the reaction, the evolution of the entire crystal morphology depends also on the reactivity of edge and corner regions, whose contribution to measured rates is not generally taken into account by laboratory

  11. Effects of simulated acid rain on vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of simulated acid rain on Chenopodium quinoa, Hordeum vulgare and Phaseolus vulgaris. Because of differential species' susceptibility, detailed experiments were conducted only on Phaseolus vulgaris. Acid rain was simulated by spraying the plants with a hand-held atomizer. Sulfuric acid solutions covering a pH range of 1.5 to 3.5 in one half pH unit increments were used. Gross morphological effects noted at lower pH values included failure to attain normal height, necrosis and wrinkling of leaves, excessive and adventitious budding, and premature abscission of primary leaves. Histological effects included smaller cell size, a decreased amount of intercellular space, hypertrophied nuclei and nucleoli, and a reduction in the size of starch granules within the chloroplasts. Dry weight remained an approximately constant percentage of fresh weight, and chlorophyll analyses showed that both chlorophyll concentration and ratio of chlorophyll 'a' to chlorophyll 'b' also remained constant. Respirometer studies showed that, while respiration rate increased only slightly at low pH values, photosynthetic rate increased dramatically. Quantitative analyses indicated that carbohydrate content was reduced at low pH values, with starch content reduced much more than sugar content. Root biomass was also reduced at low pH values. Application of Congo red indicator solution to the acid treated tissue showed that it was being acidified to a pH of below 4. 114 references, 23 figures, 12 tables.

  12. Acid rain and its environmental effects: Recent scientific advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Douglas A.; Aherne, Julian; Gay, David A.; Lehmann, Christopher M. B.

    2016-12-01

    The term 'acid rain' refers to atmospheric deposition of acidic constituents that impact the earth as rain, snow, particulates, gases, and vapor. Acid rain was first recognized by Ducros (1845) and subsequently described by the English chemist Robert Angus Smith (Smith, 1852) whose pioneering studies linked the sources to industrial emissions and included early observations of deleterious environmental effects (Smith, 1872). Smith's work was largely forgotten until the mid-20th century when observations began to link air pollution to the deposition of atmospheric sulfate (SO42-) and other chemical constituents, first near the metal smelter at Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and later at locations in Europe, North America, and Australia (Gorham, 1961). Our modern understanding of acid rain as an environmental problem caused largely by regional emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) stems from observations in the 1960s and early 1970s in Sweden by Svante Odén (Odén, 1976), and in North America by Gene Likens and colleagues (Likens and Bormann, 1974). These scientists and many who followed showed the link to emissions from coal-fired power plants and other industrial sources, and documented the environmental effects of acid rain such as the acidification of surface waters and toxic effects on vegetation, fish, and other biota.

  13. Rain drop size distribution over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcù, Federico; D'Adderio, Leo Pio; Prodi, Franco; Caracciolo, Clelia

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade, interest in measuring and studying rain drop size distribution (DSD) has grown due to applications in cloud physics, in calibration of space-borne and ground-based microwave active precipitation sensors and in soil science and agriculture. Such studies are of particular interest over remote areas, where knowledge of clouds and precipitation processes is lacking while the need for remote sensing based precipitation estimates is growing in global water cycle and climate trend studies. Disdrometric data over the Tibetan Plateau were collected during the 2010 monsoon season using the Pludix disdrometer, a vertically pointing, continuous wave, X-band, low power radar. Three experimental sites were set up at altitudes greater than 3300 m a.s.l., and a total number of 37 rain events were measured at two of the three sites. The analysis focuses on 2-min and 5-min DSD data for selected convective and stratiform events and the results are discussed in comparison with previous studies performed at lower altitudes. The time evolution of DSDs shows a regular behavior with respect to rain intensity: they change concavity and show a breakup signature in cases of the highest rain rates. Collisional breakup takes place for relatively lower rain rates, compared to the low-altitude measurements, and the size of the largest drops is also relatively smaller. An overall rainfall characteristic evaluation is also performed on the whole data set, deriving DSD integral parameters in order to compute a relationship between reflectivity and rain rate, resulting in A = 214 (A = 247) and b = 1.25 (b = 1.15) for convective (stratiform) precipitation.

  14. Prediction of material removal rate and surface roughness for wire electrical discharge machining of nickel using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangam Chinnadurai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on investigating the effects of process parameters, namely, Peak current (Ip, Pulse on time (Ton, Pulse off time (Toff, Water pressure (Wp, Wire feed rate (Wf, Wire tension (Wt, Servo voltage (Sv and Servo feed setting (Sfs, on the Material Removal Rate (MRR and Surface Roughness (SR for Wire electrical discharge machining (Wire-EDM of nickel using Taguchi method. Response Surface Methodology (RSM is adopted to evolve mathematical relationships between the wire cutting process parameters and the output variables of the weld joint to determine the welding input parameters that lead to the desired optimal wire cutting quality. Besides, using response surface plots, the interaction effects of process parameters on the responses are analyzed and discussed. The statistical software Mini-tab is used to establish the design and to obtain the regression equations. The developed mathematical models are tested by analysis-of-variance (ANOVA method to check their appropriateness and suitability. Finally, a comparison is made between measured and calculated results, which are in good agreement. This indicates that the developed models can predict the responses accurately and precisely within the limits of cutting parameter being used.

  15. Prediction of material removal rate and surface roughness for wire electrical discharge machining of nickel using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinnadurai, T.; Vendan, S.A.

    2016-07-01

    This study focuses on investigating the effects of process parameters, namely, Peak current (Ip), Pulse on time (Ton), Pulse off time (Toff), Water pressure (Wp), Wire feed rate (Wf), Wire tension (Wt), Servo voltage (Sv) and Servo feed setting (Sfs), on the Material Removal Rate (MRR) and Surface Roughness (SR) for Wire electrical discharge machining (Wire-EDM) of nickel using Taguchi method. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) is adopted to evolve mathematical relationships between the wire cutting process parameters and the output variables of the weld joint to determine the welding input parameters that lead to the desired optimal wire cutting quality. Besides, using response surface plots, the interaction effects of process parameters on the responses are analyzed and discussed. The statistical software Mini-tab is used to establish the design and to obtain the regression equations. The developed mathematical models are tested by analysis-of-variance (ANOVA) method to check their appropriateness and suitability. Finally, a comparison is made between measured and calculated results, which are in good agreement. This indicates that the developed models can predict the responses accurately and precisely within the limits of cutting parameter being used. (Author)

  16. Slant-Path Rain Attenuation Statistics over Nigeria | Adefolalu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Slant path attenuation of microwaves due to rainfall intensities exceeding 0.01 and 0.001per cent of average year have been computed for five different geographical zones in Nigeria, using relevant ITU-R recommendations and global rain rate data. The resulting charts can be used for preliminary estimates of maximum ...

  17. Factorial study of rain garden design for nitrogen removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Nitrate (〖NO〗_3^--N ) removal studies in bioretention systems showed great variability in removal rates and in some cases 〖NO〗_3^--N was exported. A 3-way factorial design (2 x 2 x 4) was devised for eight outdoor un-vegetated rain gardens to evaluate the effects of ...

  18. Mechanics of Interrill Erosion with Wind-Driven Rain (WDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article provides an evaluation analysis for the performance of the interrill component of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model for Wind-Driven Rain (WDR) events. The interrill delivery rates (Di) were collected in the wind tunnel rainfall simulator facility of the International Cen...

  19. Acid Rain: What It Is -- How You Can Help!

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This publication discusses the nature and consequences of acid precipitation (commonly called acid rain). Topic areas include: (1) the chemical nature of acid rain; (2) sources of acid rain; (3) geographic areas where acid rain is a problem; (4) effects of acid rain on lakes; (5) effect of acid rain on vegetation; (6) possible effects of acid rain…

  20. Is there a link between blastomere contact surfaces of day 3 embryos and live birth rate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paternot Goedele

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-cell communication and adhesion are essential for the compaction process of early stage embryos. The aim of this study was to develop a non-invasive objective calculation system of embryo compaction in order to test the hypothesis that embryos with a larger mean contact surface result in a higher live birth rate compared to embryos with a lower mean contact surface. Methods Multilevel images of 474 embryos transferred on day 3 were evaluated by the Cellify software. This software calculates the contact surfaces between the blastomeres. The primary outcome of this study was live birth. An ideal range of contact surface was determined and the positive and negative predictive value, the sensitivity, the specificity and the area under the curve for this new characteristic were calculated. Results In total, 115 (24% transferred embryos resulted in a live birth. Selection of an embryo for transfer on its mean contact surface could predict live birth with a high sensitivity (80% and high negative predicting value (83% but with a low positive predictive value (27%, a low specificity (31% and low area under the ROC curve (0.56. The mean contact surface of embryos cultured in a single medium was significantly higher compared to the mean contact surface of embryos cultured in a sequential medium (p = 0.0003. Conclusions Neither the mean contact surface nor the number of contact surfaces of a day 3 embryo had an additional value in the prediction of live birth. The type of culture medium, however, had an impact on the contact surface of an embryo. Embryos cultured in a single medium had a significant larger contact surface compared to embryos cultured in the sequential medium.

  1. The effect of loading rate on ductile fracture toughness and fracture surface roughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osovski, S.; Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Ponson, L.

    2015-01-01

    The variation of ductile crack growth resistance and fracture surface roughness with loading rate is modeled under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions. Three-dimensional calculations are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitatin...

  2. Comparison of Instantaneous Frequency Scaling from Rain Attenuation and Optical Disdrometer Measurements at K/Q bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessel, James; Zemba, Michael; Luini, Lorenzo; Riva, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Rain attenuation is strongly dependent on the rain rate, but also on the rain drop size distribution (DSD). Typically, models utilize an average drop size distribution, such as those developed by Laws and Parsons, or Marshall and Palmer. However, individual rain events may possess drop size distributions which could be significantly different from the average and will impact, for example, fade mitigation techniques which utilize channel performance estimates from a signal at a different frequency. Therefore, a good understanding of the characteristics and variability of the raindrop size distribution is extremely important in predicting rain attenuation and instantaneous frequency scaling parameters on an event-toevent basis. Since June 2014, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have measured the attenuation due to rain in Milan, Italy, on the 20/40 GHz beacon signal broadcast from the Alphasat TDP#5 Aldo Paraboni Q/V-band Payload. Concomitant with these measurements are the measurements of drop size distribution and rain rate utilizing a Thies Clima laser precipitation monitor (disdrometer). In this paper, we discuss the comparison of the predicted rain attenuation at 20 and 40 GHz derived from the drop size distribution data with the measured rain attenuation. The results are compared on statistical and real-time bases. We will investigate the performance of the rain attenuation model, instantaneous frequency scaling, and the distribution of the scaling factor. Further, seasonal rain characteristics will be analysed.

  3. Response of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings to simulated acid rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chanjuan; Ge, Yuqing; Su, Lei; Bu, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the adaptation of plants to acid rain is important to find feasible approaches to alleviate such damage to plants. We studied effects of acid rain on plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate during stress and recovery periods. Simulated acid rain at pH 5.5 did not affect plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription in leaves treated with acid rain at pH 3.5 was increased to maintain ion homeostasis by transporting excessive H(+) out of cells. Then intracellular H(+) was close to the control after a 5-day recovery, alleviating damage on membrane and sustaining photosynthetic efficiency and growth. Simulated acid rain at pH 2.5 inhibited plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity by decreasing the expression of H(+)-ATPase at transcription level, resulting in membrane damage and abnormal intracellular H(+), and reduction in photosynthetic efficiency and relative growth rate. After a 5-day recovery, all parameters in leaves treated with pH 2.5 acid rain show alleviated damage, implying that the increased plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and its high expression were involved in repairing process in acid rain-stressed plants. Our study suggests that plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase can play a role in adaptation to acid rain for rice seedlings.

  4. Dissociation and recombination rate constants for CN on Cu and Ni group transition metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Harrell

    2000-07-01

    We report dissociation and recombination reaction rate constants for CN on the fcc(111) surfaces of Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag and Au from molecular dynamics simulations employing our normalized bond index-reactive potential functions (NBI-RPF). The Arrhenius pre-exponentials for recombination of CN on these surfaces are about three orders of magnitude greater than the dissociation pre-exponentials. On the series of metals considered herein, the reaction energetics favor dissociation on the more active metals and favor recombination on the least active metals. However, the differences in the pre-exponentials of nearly a factor of 10 3 express the tendency of the reaction entropy to favor the recombination on the surfaces investigated. We also discuss the implications of these results in terms of the thermodynamics of the surface reactions.

  5. First-order dissolution rate law and the role of surface layers in glass performance assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grambow, B.; Müller, R.

    2001-09-01

    The first-order dissolution rate law is used for nuclear waste glass performance predictions since 1984. A first discussion of the role of saturation effects was initiated at the MRS conference that year. In paper (1) it was stated that "For glass dissolution A* (the reaction affinity) cannot become zero since saturation only involves the reacting surface while soluble elements still might be extracted from the glass" [B. Grambow, J. Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 44 (1985) 15]. Saturation of silica at the surface and condensation of surface silanol groups was considered as being responsible for the slow down of reaction rates by as much as a factor of 1000. Precipitation of Si containing secondary phases such as quartz was invoked as a mechanism for keeping final dissolution affinities higher than zero. Another (2) paper [A.B. Barkatt, P.B. Macedo, B.C. Gibson, C.J. Montrose, J. Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 44 (1985) 3] stated that "… under repository conditions the extent of glass dissolution will be moderate due to saturation with respect to certain major elements (in particular, Si, Al and Ca). Consequently, the concentration levels of the more soluble glass constituents in the aqueous medium are expected to fall appreciable below their solubility limit." The formation of dense surface layers was considered responsible for explaining the saturation effect. The mathematical model assumed stop of reaction in closed systems, once solubility limits were achieved. For more than 15 years the question of the correctness of one or the other concept has seldom been posed and has not yet been resolved. The need of repository performance assessment for validated rate laws demands a solution, particularly since the consequences of the two concepts and research requirements for the long-term glass behavior are quite different. In concept (1) the stability of the `equilibrium surface region' is not relevant because, by definition, this region is stable chemically and after a

  6. Surface controlled dissolution rates of gypsum in aqueous solutions exhibit nonlinear dissolution kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Alexander A.; Vosbeck, Katrin; Dreybrodt, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    The effective dissolution rates of gypsum are determined by mixed kinetics, where the rate constants of dissolution at the surface and the transport constant of molecular diffusion of dissolved material are similar. To obtain the surface reaction rate law it is necessary to know the transport constant. We have determined the surface rate law for monocrystalline selenite by using a rotating disc set-up, where the transport coefficients are well known. As a result, up to a calcium concentration of 0.6 · ceq, we find a nearly linear rate law Rs = ksl (1- cs/ ceq) n1, where cs is the total calcium concentration at the surface and ceq the equilibrium concentration with respect to gypsum, n1 = 1.2 ± 0.2, and ksl = 1.1 · 10 -4 mmol cm -2 s -1 ± 15%. We also employed batch-experiments for selenite, alabaster and gypsum rock samples. The result of these experiments were interpreted by using a transport constant determined by NaCl dissolution experiments under similar physical conditions. The batch experiments reveal a dissolution rate law Rs = ksl (1- cs/ ceq) n1, ksl = 1.3 · 10 -4 mmol · cm -2 s -1, n1 = 1.2 ± 0.2 for c ≤ 0.94 · ceq. Close to equilibrium a nonlinear rate law, Rs = ks2 (1- cs/ ceq) n2, is observed, where ks2 is in the order of 10 mmol · cm -2 s -1 and n2 ≈ 4.5. The experimentally observed gypsum dissolution rates from the batch experiments could be accurately fitted, with only minor variations of the surface reaction constant obtained from the rotating disk experiment and the transport coefficient from the NaCl dissolution batch experiment. Batch experiments on pure synthetic gypsum, reveal a linear rate law up to equilibrium. This indicates inhibition of dissolution in natural samples close to equilibrium, as is known also for calcite minerals.

  7. Open charcoal chamber method for mass measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapalov, Andrey; Kovler, Konstantin; Miklyaev, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface can serve as an important criterion in the evaluation of radon hazard of the land. Recently published international standard ISO 11665-7 (2012) is based on the accumulation of radon gas in a closed container. At the same time since 1998 in Russia, as a part of engineering and environmental studies for the construction, radon flux measurements are made using an open charcoal chamber for a sampling duration of 3–5 h. This method has a well-defined metrological justification and was tested in both favorable and unfavorable conditions. The article describes the characteristics of the method, as well as the means of sampling and measurement of the activity of radon absorbed. The results of the metrological study suggest that regardless of the sampling conditions (weather, the mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil, soil properties and conditions), uncertainty of method does not exceed 20%, while the combined standard uncertainty of radon exhalation rate measured from the soil surface does not exceed 30%. The results of the daily measurements of radon exhalation rate from the soil surface at the experimental site during one year are reported. - Highlights: • Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface area of 32 cm 2 can be measured at level of 10 mBq/(m 2 s) at the uncertainty ≤30%. • The method has a metrological justification. • No need to consider climate conditions, soil properties and conditions, mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil.

  8. Rain intensity over specific rain thresholds in Athens and Thessaloniki, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philandras, C. M.; Nastos, P. T.; Kapsomenakis, J.; Repapis, C. C.

    2009-09-01

    It is well documented that climatic change has caused significant impacts in the water cycle and great spatial and temporal variability of the rain events. The rain scarcity in many cases is associated with extreme convective weather resulted in flash floods, which threatens the human life and the existed infrastructure. In this study, the annual mean rain intensity (mm/h) along with the annual number of rain days for rain events over specific rain thresholds, such as 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 mm, in two Greek cities Athens and Thessaloniki, during the period 1930-2007, are examined. The meteorological data, which concern daily rain totals (mm) and duration (h), were acquired from the National Observatory of Athens and from the meteorological station of the University of Thessaloniki. Our findings show that, in Athens, an increase in the number of annual rain days and the mean rain intensity over the aforementioned rain thresholds appears at the end of 1980’s and continues until nowadays. On the contrary, concerning Thessaloniki, a decrease in the rain days is apparent from 1980, while the decrease in the mean rain intensity concerns only the rain thresholds of 10 and 20 mm. This analysis reveals that extreme rain events are more frequent in Athens, which is under a high urbanization rhythm, than in Thessaloniki at the north of Greece. Finally, the patterns of the atmospheric circulation, which are associated with specific extreme cases are analysed, using NCEP reanalysis data.

  9. Afternoon rain more likely over drier soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Christopher M; de Jeu, Richard A M; Guichard, Françoise; Harris, Phil P; Dorigo, Wouter A

    2012-09-20

    Land surface properties, such as vegetation cover and soil moisture, influence the partitioning of radiative energy between latent and sensible heat fluxes in daytime hours. During dry periods, soil-water deficit can limit evapotranspiration, leading to warmer and drier conditions in the lower atmosphere. Soil moisture can influence the development of convective storms through such modifications of low-level atmospheric temperature and humidity, which in turn feeds back on soil moisture. Yet there is considerable uncertainty in how soil moisture affects convective storms across the world, owing to a lack of observational evidence and uncertainty in large-scale models. Here we present a global-scale observational analysis of the coupling between soil moisture and precipitation. We show that across all six continents studied, afternoon rain falls preferentially over soils that are relatively dry compared to the surrounding area. The signal emerges most clearly in the observations over semi-arid regions, where surface fluxes are sensitive to soil moisture, and convective events are frequent. Mechanistically, our results are consistent with enhanced afternoon moist convection driven by increased sensible heat flux over drier soils, and/or mesoscale variability in soil moisture. We find no evidence in our analysis of a positive feedback--that is, a preference for rain over wetter soils-at the spatial scale (50-100 kilometres) studied. In contrast, we find that a positive feedback of soil moisture on simulated precipitation does dominate in six state-of-the-art global weather and climate models--a difference that may contribute to excessive simulated droughts in large-scale models.

  10. Humid tropical rain forest has expanded into eucalypt forest and savanna over the last 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tng, David Y P; Murphy, Brett P; Weber, Ellen; Sanders, Gregor; Williamson, Grant J; Kemp, Jeanette; Bowman, David M J S

    2012-01-01

    Tropical rain forest expansion and savanna woody vegetation thickening appear to be a global trend, but there remains uncertainty about whether there is a common set of global drivers. Using geographic information techniques, we analyzed aerial photography of five areas in the humid tropics of northeastern Queensland, Australia, taken in the 1950s and 2008, to determine if changes in rain forest extent match those reported for the Australian monsoon tropics using similar techniques. Mapping of the 1950s aerial photography showed that of the combined study area (64,430 ha), 63% was classified as eucalypt forests/woodland and 37% as rain forest. Our mapping revealed that although most boundaries remained stable, there was a net increase of 732 ha of the original rain forest area over the study period, and negligible conversion of rain forest to eucalypt forest/woodland. Statistical modeling, controlling for spatial autocorrelation, indicated distance from preexisting rain forest as the strongest determinant of rain forest expansion. Margin extension had a mean rate across the five sites of 0.6 m per decade. Expansion was greater in tall open forest types but also occurred in shorter, more flammable woodland vegetation types. No correlations were detected with other local variables (aspect, elevation, geology, topography, drainage). Using a geographically weighted mean rate of rain forest margin extension across the whole region, we predict that over 25% of tall open forest (a forest type of high conservation significance) would still remain after 2000 years of rain forest expansion. This slow replacement is due to the convoluted nature of the rain forest boundary and the irregular shape of the tall open forest patches. Our analyses point to the increased concentration of atmospheric CO(2) as the most likely global driver of indiscriminate rain forest expansion occurring in northeastern Australia, by increasing tree growth and thereby overriding the effects of fire

  11. Rain scavenging of radioactive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.L.

    1975-01-01

    An assessment is made of the rainout of airborne radioactive particles from a nuclear detonation with emphasis on the microphysical removal processes. For submicron particles the scavenging processes examined are Brownian and turbulent diffusion to cloud droplets. For particles larger than 1 μm radius, nucleation scavenging is examined. For various particle size and radioactivity distributions, it is found that from 27 to 99 percent of the radioactivity is attached to cloud droplets and subject to rapid removal by rain. (U.S.)

  12. Space Radar Image of Randonia Rain Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This multi-frequency space radar image of a tropical rainforest in western Brazil shows rapidly changing land use patterns and it also demonstrates the capability of the different radar frequencies to detect and penetrate heavy rainstorms. This color image was created by combining the three separate radar frequencies into a composite image. The three black and white images below represent the individual frequencies. The lower left image, X-band vertically transmitted and received, is blue in the color image; the lower center image, C-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received is green; and the lower right image, L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received is red. A heavy downpour in the lower center of the image appears as a black 'cloud' in the X-band image, the same area is shows up faintly in the C-band image, and is invisible in the L-band image. When combined in the color image, the rain cell appears red and yellow. Although radar can usually 'see' through clouds, short radar wavelengths (high frequency), such as X and C-band, can be changed by unusually heavy rain cells. L-band, at a 24 cm (9 inches) wavelength, is unaffected by such rain cells. By analyzing the way the radar changes, scientist can estimate rainfall rates. The area shown is in the state of Rondonia, in western Brazil. The pink areas are pristine tropical rainforest, and the blue and green patches are areas where the forest has been cleared for agriculture. Cleared areas are typically able to support intense farming for a only few years, before soil erosion renders the fields unusable. Radar imaging can be used to monitor not only the rainforest destruction, but also the rates of recovery of abandoned fields. This image is 35.2 kilometers by 21.3 kilometers (21.8 miles by 13.2 miles) and is centered at 11.2 degrees south latitude, 61.7 degrees west longitude. North is toward the upper left. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic

  13. Rain-related Fatal Crashes in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Hatim; Jackson, Terrance

    2013-04-01

    Weather has a direct impact on traffic safety. This study focuses on fatal crashes in the presence of rain. We reviewed information related to the events that lead to rain- related crashes in the Texas since 1982. Analysis of the data reveals that 12.4% of crashes in Texas were rain-related. Most rain-related crashes are located in Texas "Flash Flood Alley" which includes major urban centers. Fatal crash data and GIS are used to explore and identify the spatio-temporal distribution of the crashes. Spatial statistical techniques are used to identify significant patterns of rain-related fatal crashes. Logistic and nonlinear regression is used to identify and rank all environmental and non-environmental factors that contribute to fatal crashes. Focus will be on factors that amplify the rain effect. Identifying the variables contributing to these fatal crash types is necessary for the implementation of effective countermeasures for road weather safety purposes.

  14. Acid rain information book. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    Acid rain is one of the most widely publicized environmental issues of the day. The potential consequences of widespread acid rain demand that the phenomenon be carefully evaluated. Review of the literature shows a rapidly growing body of knowledge, but also reveals major gaps in understanding that need to be narrowed. This document discusses aspects of the acid rain phenomenon, points out areas of uncertainty and summarizes current and projected research. The report is organized by a logical progression from sources of pollutants affecting acid rain formation to the atmospheric transport and transformation of those pollutants and finally to the deposition of acid rain, the effects of that deposition, and possible mitigative measures and regulatory options. This information is followed by a discussion of uncertainties in the understanding of the acid rain phenomenon and a description of current and proposed research by responsible government agencies and other concerned organizations

  15. Measurement of the radon exhalation rate from the medium surface by tracing the radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanliang Tan; Detao Xiao

    2013-01-01

    The paper will present a method based on the accumulation chamber technique for measuring of radon exhalation from the medium surface. A radon monitor traces the change of radon concentration in the accumulation chamber, and then the radon exhalation can be obtained accurately through linear fit. Based on our recent experiments, the radon exhalation rate from the medium surface obtained from this method is in good agreement with the actual exhalation rate of our simulation facility. This method is superior to the competition method which obtains the radon exhalation through the exponential fit by an external PC-system. The calculation for the exponential fit is very easy by computer and related software. However, for portable instruments, the single chip microcomputer can't calculate the exponential fit rapidly. Thus, this method is usable for developing the new portable instrument to classify building materials, etc. (author)

  16. Erosion in radial inflow turbines. Volume 4: Erosion rates on internal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, W. B., Jr.; Tabakoff, W.

    1975-01-01

    An analytic study of the rate at which material is removed by ingested dust impinging on the internal surfaces of a typical radial inflow turbine is presented. Results show that there are several regions which experience very severe erosion loss, and other regions that experience moderate levels of erosion loss: (1) the greatest amount of material loss occurs on the trailing edges of the nozzle blades where very high velocity, moderate angle impacts occur. The tip regions of ductile materials are also subjected to serious levels of erosion loss; (2) moderate amounts of erosion occur near the end of the scroll and on a few of the nozzle blades near this location. Results are presented in the form of surface contours that exist on the scroll and blade surfaces after continuous particulate ingestion with time.

  17. Acid rain information book. Draft final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    Acid rain is one of the most widely publicized environmental issues of the day. The potential consequences of increasingly widespread acid rain demand that this phenomenon be carefully evaluated. Reveiw of the literature shows a rapidly growing body of knowledge, but also reveals major gaps in understanding that need to be narrowed. This document discusses major aspects of the acid rain phenomenon, points out areas of uncertainty, and summarizes current and projected research by responsible government agencies and other concerned organizations.

  18. High Resolution Simulation of a Colorado Rockies Extreme Snow and Rain Event in both a Current and Future Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Roy; Ikeda, Kyoko; Liu, Changhai; Gutmann, Ethan; Gochis, David

    2016-04-01

    Modeling of extreme weather events often require very finely resolved treatment of atmospheric circulation structures in order to produce and localize the large moisture fluxes that result in extreme precipitation. This is particularly true for cool season orographic precipitation processes where the representation of the landform can significantly impact vertical velocity profiles and cloud moisture entrainment rates. This study presents results for high resolution regional climate modeling study of the Colorado Headwaters region using an updated version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model run at 4 km horizontal resolution and a hydrological extension package called WRF-Hydro. Previous work has shown that the WRF modeling system can produce credible depictions of winter orographic precipitation over the Colorado Rockies if run at horizontal resolutions warming on total precipitation, snow-rain partitioning and surface hydrological fluxes (evapotranspiration and runoff) will be discussed in the context of how potential changes in temperature impact the amount of precipitation, the phase of precipitation (rain vs. snow) and the timing and amplitude of streamflow responses. The results show using the Pseudo Global Warming technique that intense precipitation rates significantly increased during the event and a significant fraction of the snowfall converts to rain which significantly amplifies the runoff response from one where runoff is produced gradually to one in which runoff is rapidly translated into streamflow values that approach significant flooding risks. Results from a new, CONUS scale high resolution climate simulation of extreme events in a current and future climate will be presented as time permits.

  19. Measuring the Electrode Kinetics of Surface Confined Electrode Reactions at a Constant Scan Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Guziejewski, Dariusz; Mirceski, Valentin; Jadresko, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: The kinetics of surface confined electrode reactions of alizarin, vitamin B12, and vitamin K2 is measured with square-wave voltammetry over a wide pH interval, by applying the recent methodology for kinetic analysis at a constant scan rate [V. Mirceski, D. Guziejewski, K. Lisichkov, Electrochim. Acta 2013, 114, 667–673]. The reliability and the simplicity of the recent methodology is confirmed. The methodology requires analysis of the peak potential separation o...

  20. Characterization of MHz pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser-irradiated gold-coated silicon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatakrishnan Krishnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, MHz pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser-irradiated gold-coated silicon surfaces under ambient condition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The radiation fluence used was 0.5 J/cm2 at a pulse repetition rate of 25 MHz with 1 ms interaction time. SEM analysis of the irradiated surfaces showed self-assembled intermingled weblike nanofibrous structure in and around the laser-irradiated spots. Further TEM investigation on this nanostructure revealed that the nanofibrous structure is formed due to aggregation of Au-Si/Si nanoparticles. The XRD peaks at 32.2°, 39.7°, and 62.5° were identified as (200, (211, and (321 reflections, respectively, corresponding to gold silicide. In addition, the observed chemical shift of Au 4f and Si 2p lines in XPS spectrum of the irradiated surface illustrated the presence of gold silicide at the irradiated surface. The generation of Si/Au-Si alloy fibrous nanoparticles aggregate is explained by the nucleation and subsequent condensation of vapor in the plasma plume during irradiation and expulsion of molten material due to high plasma pressure.

  1. Dabbing the Skin Surface Dry During Ice Massage Augments Rate of Temperature Drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Amrik; Lentell, Gary; Pettitt, Robert W

    While ice massage (IM) is a rapid cooling technique used to facilitate therapeutic movements in the rehabilitation process, evidence of its efficacy over alternative therapeutic protocols is scarce. We determined whether dabbing the skin surface dry during a standard IM treatment would lead to greater rate of skin temperature reduction in comparison to without dabbing; and whether dabbing the skin would lead to an acute change in flexibility. Sixteen healthy volunteers received a "dabbing" and "non-dabbing" 7-minute IM treatment over the surface of each triceps surae muscle. Minute-by-minute temperature change in skin surface was evaluated using an infrared thermometer. Active (AROM) and passive (PROM) range of motion were evaluated via hand-held goniometer and passive stretch force was evaluated with an algometer. Dependent variables (reported as Mean ± SD) were tested with two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures. Skin temperature (°C) was reduced to with dabbing (5.8 ± 1.1) in comparison to without dabbing (6.8 ± 1.4), evoking significantly greater cooling at 1-min of ice massage (group X time interaction, p0.05) for either IM group. The dabbing protocol resulted in more rapid rate of temperature drop at 1-minute, however, both IM techniques are sufficient in cooling surface temperature after 2-minutes of IM. Further study is warranted to determine the clinical significance of the dabbing procedure.

  2. Haloacetates in fog and rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römpp, A; Klemm, O; Fricke, W; Frank, H

    2001-04-01

    Atmospheric haloacetates can arise from photochemical degradation of halogenated hydrocarbons and from direct anthropogenic emissions. Furthermore, there is also evidence of natural sources although these are quantitatively uncertain. As haloacetates are highly soluble in water, hydrometeors are most significant for their deposition. Fogwater (96 samples) and rainwater samples (over 100 samples) were collected from July 1998 to March 1999 at an ecological research site in northeastern Bavaria, Germany. They were analyzed for monofluoroacetate (MFA), difluoroacetate (DFA), trifluoroacetate (TFA), monochloroacetate (MCA), dichloroacetate (DCA), trichloroacetate (TCA), monobromoacetate (MBA), and dibromoacetate (DBA). The major inorganic ions were also determined. High concentrations of up to 11 microg/L MCA, 5 microg/L DCA, 2 microg/L TCA, and 2 microg/L TFA were found in fogwater associated with westerly winds. Backward trajectories were calculated to determine the origin of the air masses. MBA and DBA have highest concentrations in fogwater advected with air originating from the Atlantic, suggesting the marine origin of these two compounds. All analyzed substances show higher average concentrations in fog than in rain. Estimates of the deposition of haloacetates suggest that the contribution of fog may be more important than rain for the total burden of a forest ecosystem.

  3. Combined effects of lead and acid rain on photosynthesis in soybean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Liao, Chenyu; Fan, Caixia; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    To explore how lead (Pb) and acid rain simultaneously affect plants, the combined effects of Pb and acid rain on the chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence reaction, Hill reaction rate, and Mg(2+)-ATPase activity in soybean seedlings were investigated. The results indicated that, when soybean seedlings were treated with Pb or acid rain alone, the chlorophyll content, Hill reaction rate, Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, and maximal photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) were decreased, while the initial fluorescence (F 0) and maximum quantum yield (Y) were increased, compared with those of the control. The combined treatment with Pb and acid rain decreased the chlorophyll content, Hill reaction rate, Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, F(v)/F(m), and Y and increased F 0 in soybean seedlings. Under the combined treatment with Pb and acid rain, the two factors showed additive effects on the chlorophyll content in soybean seedlings and exhibited antagonistic effects on the Hill reaction rate. Under the combined treatment with high-concentration Pb and acid rain, the two factors exhibited synergistic effects on the Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, F 0, F v/F m, as well as Y. In summary, the inhibition of the photosynthetic process is an important physiological basis for the simultaneous actions of Pb and acid rain in soybean seedlings.

  4. Acid rain and its environmental effects: Recent scientific advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Douglas A.; Aherne, Julian; Gay, David A.; Lehmann, Christopher M.B.

    2016-01-01

    The term ‘acid rain’ refers to atmospheric deposition of acidic constituents that impact the earth as rain, snow, particulates, gases, and vapor. Acid rain was first recognized by Ducros (1845) and subsequently described by the English chemist Robert Angus Smith (Smith, 1852) whose pioneering studies linked the sources to industrial emissions and included early observations of deleterious environmental effects (Smith, 1872). Smith's work was largely forgotten until the mid-20th century when observations began to link air pollution to the deposition of atmospheric sulfate (SO42−) and other chemical constituents, first near the metal smelter at Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and later at locations in Europe, North America, and Australia (Gorham, 1961). Our modern understanding of acid rain as an environmental problem caused largely by regional emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) stems from observations in the 1960s and early 1970s in Sweden by Svante Odén (Odén, 1976), and in North America by Gene Likens and colleagues (Likens and Bormann, 1974). These scientists and many who followed showed the link to emissions from coal-fired power plants and other industrial sources, and documented the environmental effects of acid rain such as the acidification of surface waters and toxic effects on vegetation, fish, and other biota.

  5. Lightning-based propagation of convective rain fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dietrich

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new multi-sensor approach for continuously monitoring convective rain cells. It exploits lightning data from surface networks to propagate rain fields estimated from multi-frequency brightness temperature measurements taken by the AMSU/MHS microwave radiometers onboard NOAA/EUMETSAT low Earth orbiting operational satellites. Specifically, the method allows inferring the development (movement, morphology and intensity of convective rain cells from the spatial and temporal distribution of lightning strokes following any observation by a satellite-borne microwave radiometer. Obviously, this is particularly attractive for real-time operational purposes, due to the sporadic nature of the low Earth orbiting satellite measurements and the continuous availability of ground-based lightning measurements – as is the case in most of the Mediterranean region. A preliminary assessment of the lightning-based rainfall propagation algorithm has been successfully made by using two pairs of consecutive AMSU observations, in conjunction with lightning measurements from the ZEUS network, for two convective events. Specifically, we show that the evolving rain fields, which are estimated by applying the algorithm to the satellite-based rainfall estimates for the first AMSU overpass, show an overall agreement with the satellite-based rainfall estimates for the second AMSU overpass.

  6. Size dependence of volume and surface nucleation rates for homogeneous freezing of supercooled water droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kuhn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The relative roles of volume and surface nucleation were investigated for the homogeneous freezing of pure water droplets. Experiments were carried out in a cryogenic laminar aerosol flow tube using supercooled water aerosols with maximum volume densities at radii between 1 and 3 μm. Temperature- and size-dependent values of volume- and surface-based homogeneous nucleation rates between 234.8 and 236.2 K were derived using a microphysical model and aerosol phase compositions and size distributions determined from infrared extinction measurements in the flow tube. The results show that the contribution from nucleation at the droplet surface increases with decreasing droplet radius and dominates over nucleation in the bulk droplet volume for droplets with radii smaller than approximately 5 μm. This is interpreted in terms of a lowered free energy of ice germ formation in the surface-based process. The implications of surface nucleation for the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation in numerical models are considered.

  7. Determining Cell-surface Expression and Endocytic Rate of Proteins in Primary Astrocyte Cultures Using Biotinylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Daniel Kai Long; Moukhles, Hakima

    2017-07-03

    Cell-surface proteins mediate a wide array of functions. In many cases, their activity is regulated by endocytic processes that modulate their levels at the plasma membrane. Here, we present detailed protocols for 2 methods that facilitate the study of such processes, both of which are based on the principle of the biotinylation of cell-surface proteins. The first is designed to allow for the semi-quantitative determination of the relative levels of a particular protein at the cell-surface. In it, the lysine residues of the plasma membrane proteins of cells are first labeled with a biotin moiety. Once the cells are lysed, these proteins may then be specifically precipitated via the use of agarose-immobilized streptavidin by exploiting the natural affinity of the latter for biotin. The proteins isolated in such a manner may then be analyzed via a standard western blotting approach. The second method provides a means of determining the endocytic rate of a particular cell-surface target over a period of time. Cell-surface proteins are first modified with a biotin derivative containing a cleavable disulfide bond. The cells are then shifted back to normal culture conditions, which causes the endocytic uptake of a proportion of biotinylated proteins. Next, the disulfide bonds of non-internalized biotin groups are reduced using the membrane-impermeable reducing agent glutathione. Via this approach, endocytosed proteins may thus be isolated and quantified with a high degree of specificity.

  8. Effect of Pad Surface Roughness on SiO2 Removal Rate in Chemical Mechanical Polishing with Ceria Slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masato; Ono, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Masaya; Ashizawa, Toranosuke; Doi, Toshiro

    2006-02-01

    The effect of pad surface roughness on SiO2 removal rate was investigated using four different slurries containing ceria (CeO2) powders of different crystallite sizes and mean particle sizes. A clear maximum was observed in the dependence of removal rate on pad surface roughness. The four ceria slurries showed a peak in blanket wafer removal rate against pad surface roughness Ra. The peak moved toward larger Ra values with decreasing ceria crystallite size. The removal rate was strongly influenced not only by pad surface roughness but also by the crystallite size of ceria in the slurry.

  9. Interactive effects of cadmium and acid rain on photosynthetic light reaction in soybean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaoguo; Wang, Lihong; Chen, Minmin; Wang, Lei; Liang, Chanjuan; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2012-05-01

    Interactive effects of cadmium (Cd(2+)) and acid rain on photosynthetic light reaction in soybean seedlings were investigated under hydroponic conditions. Single treatment with Cd(2+) or acid rain and the combined treatment decreased the content of chlorophyll, Hill reaction rate, the activity of Mg(2+)-ATPase, maximal photochemical efficiency and maximal quantum yield, increased initial fluorescence and damaged the chloroplast structure in soybean seedlings. In the combined treatment, the change in the photosynthetic parameters and the damage of chloroplast structure were stronger than those of any single pollution. Meanwhile, Cd(2+) and acid rain had the interactive effects on the test indices in soybean seedlings. The results indicated that the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain aggravated the toxic effect of the single pollution of Cd(2+) or acid rain on the photosynthetic parameters due to the serious damage to the chloroplast structure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Differences in rates of decrease of environmental radiation dose rates by ground surface property in Fukushima City after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakamu, Takeyasu; Kanda, Hideyuki; Tsuji, Masayoshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Miyake, Masao; Hayakawa, Takehito; Katsuda, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Yayoi; Okouchi, Toshiyasu; Hazama, Akihiro; Fukushima, Tetsuhito

    2013-01-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011, the environmental radiation dose in Fukushima City increased. On 11 April, 1 mo after the earthquake, the environmental radiation dose rate at various surfaces in the same area differed greatly by surface property. Environmental radiation measurements continue in order to determine the estimated time to 50% reduction in environmental radiation dose rates by surface property in order to make suggestions for decontamination in Fukushima. The measurements were carried out from 11 April to 11 November 2011. Forty-eight (48) measurement points were selected, including four kinds of ground surface properties: grass (13), soil (5), artificial turf (7), and asphalt (23). Environmental radiation dose rate was measured at heights of 100 cm above the ground surface. Time to 50% reduction of environmental radiation dose rates was estimated for each ground surface property. Radiation dose rates on 11 November had decreased significantly compared with those on 11 April for all surface properties. Artificial turf showed the longest time to 50% reduction (544.32 d, standard error: 96.86), and soil showed the shortest (213.20 d, standard error: 35.88). The authors found the environmental radiation dose rate on artificial materials to have a longer 50% reduction time than that on natural materials. These results contribute to determining an order of priority for decontamination after nuclear disasters.

  11. Surface treatments for controlling corrosion rate of biodegradable Mg and Mg-based alloy implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M S; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Due to their excellent biodegradability characteristics, Mg and Mg-based alloys have become an emerging material in biomedical implants, notably for repair of bone as well as coronary arterial stents. However, the main problem with Mg-based alloys is their rapid corrosion in aggressive environments such as human bodily fluids. Previously, many approaches such as control of alloying materials, composition and surface treatments, have been attempted to regulate the corrosion rate. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent research focusing on surface treatment techniques utilised to control the corrosion rate and surface integrity of Mg-based alloys in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Surface treatments generally involve the controlled deposition of thin film coatings using various coating processes, and mechanical surfacing such as machining, deep rolling or low plasticity burnishing. The aim is to either make a protective thin layer of a material or to change the micro-structure and mechanical properties at the surface and sub-surface levels, which will prevent rapid corrosion and thus delay the degradation of the alloys. We have organised the review of past works on coatings by categorising the coatings into two classes-conversion and deposition coatings-while works on mechanical treatments are reviewed based on the tool-based processes which affect the sub-surface microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. Various types of coatings and their processing techniques under two classes of coating and mechanical treatment approaches have been analysed and discussed to investigate their impact on the corrosion performance, biomechanical integrity, biocompatibility and cell viability. Potential challenges and future directions in designing and developing the improved biodegradable Mg/Mg-based alloy implants were addressed and discussed. The literature reveals that no solutions are yet complete and hence new and innovative approaches are

  12. Surface treatments for controlling corrosion rate of biodegradable Mg and Mg-based alloy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, M S; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Due to their excellent biodegradability characteristics, Mg and Mg-based alloys have become an emerging material in biomedical implants, notably for repair of bone as well as coronary arterial stents. However, the main problem with Mg-based alloys is their rapid corrosion in aggressive environments such as human bodily fluids. Previously, many approaches such as control of alloying materials, composition and surface treatments, have been attempted to regulate the corrosion rate. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent research focusing on surface treatment techniques utilised to control the corrosion rate and surface integrity of Mg-based alloys in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Surface treatments generally involve the controlled deposition of thin film coatings using various coating processes, and mechanical surfacing such as machining, deep rolling or low plasticity burnishing. The aim is to either make a protective thin layer of a material or to change the micro-structure and mechanical properties at the surface and sub-surface levels, which will prevent rapid corrosion and thus delay the degradation of the alloys. We have organised the review of past works on coatings by categorising the coatings into two classes—conversion and deposition coatings—while works on mechanical treatments are reviewed based on the tool-based processes which affect the sub-surface microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. Various types of coatings and their processing techniques under two classes of coating and mechanical treatment approaches have been analysed and discussed to investigate their impact on the corrosion performance, biomechanical integrity, biocompatibility and cell viability. Potential challenges and future directions in designing and developing the improved biodegradable Mg/Mg-based alloy implants were addressed and discussed. The literature reveals that no solutions are yet complete and hence new and innovative approaches

  13. Surface treatments for controlling corrosion rate of biodegradable Mg and Mg-based alloy implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M S; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Due to their excellent biodegradability characteristics, Mg and Mg-based alloys have become an emerging material in biomedical implants, notably for repair of bone as well as coronary arterial stents. However, the main problem with Mg-based alloys is their rapid corrosion in aggressive environments such as human bodily fluids. Previously, many approaches such as control of alloying materials, composition and surface treatments, have been attempted to regulate the corrosion rate. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent research focusing on surface treatment techniques utilised to control the corrosion rate and surface integrity of Mg-based alloys in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Surface treatments generally involve the controlled deposition of thin film coatings using various coating processes, and mechanical surfacing such as machining, deep rolling or low plasticity burnishing. The aim is to either make a protective thin layer of a material or to change the micro-structure and mechanical properties at the surface and sub-surface levels, which will prevent rapid corrosion and thus delay the degradation of the alloys. We have organised the review of past works on coatings by categorising the coatings into two classes—conversion and deposition coatings—while works on mechanical treatments are reviewed based on the tool-based processes which affect the sub-surface microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. Various types of coatings and their processing techniques under two classes of coating and mechanical treatment approaches have been analysed and discussed to investigate their impact on the corrosion performance, biomechanical integrity, biocompatibility and cell viability. Potential challenges and future directions in designing and developing the improved biodegradable Mg/Mg-based alloy implants were addressed and discussed. The literature reveals that no solutions are yet complete and hence new and innovative approaches

  14. Radon and Thoron Exhalation Rates from Surface Soil of Bangka - Belitung Islands, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarbaini Syarbaini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.2.1.35-42Radon and thoron exhalation rate from soil is one of the most important factors that can influence the radioactivity level in the environment. Radon and thoron gases are produced by the decay of the radioactive elements those are radium and thorium in the soil, where its concentration depends on the soil conditions and the local geological background. In this paper, the results of radon and thoron exhalation rate measurements from surface soil of Bangka Belitung Islands at thirty six measurement sites are presented. Exhalation rates of radon and thoron were measured by using an accumulation chamber equipped with a solid-state alpha particle detector. Furthermore, the correlations between radon and thoron exhalation rates with their parent nuclide (226Ra and 232Th concentrations in collected soil samples from the same locations were also evaluated. The result of the measurement shows that mostly the distribution of radon and thoron is similar to 226Ra and 232Th, eventhough it was not a good correlation between radon and thoron exhalation rate with their parent activity concentrations (226Ra and 232Th due to the environmental factors that can influence the radon and thoron mobilities in the soil. In comparison to a world average, Bangka Belitung Islands have the 222Rn and 220Rn exhalation rates higher than the world average value for the regions with normal background radiation.

  15. Construction of Polarimetric Radar-Based Reference Rain Maps for the Iowa Flood Studies Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Walt; Krajewski, Witek; Wolff, David; Gatlin, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Iowa Flood Studies (IFloodS) campaign was conducted in central and northeastern Iowa during the months of April-June, 2013. Specific science objectives for IFloodS included quantification of uncertainties in satellite and ground-based estimates of precipitation, 4-D characterization of precipitation physical processes and associated parameters (e.g., size distributions, water contents, types, structure etc.), assessment of the impact of precipitation estimation uncertainty and physical processes on hydrologic predictive skill, and refinement of field observations and data analysis approaches as they pertain to future GPM integrated hydrologic validation and related field studies. In addition to field campaign archival of raw and processed satellite data (including precipitation products), key ground-based platforms such as the NASA NPOL S-band and D3R Ka/Ku-band dual-polarimetric radars, University of Iowa X-band dual-polarimetric radars, a large network of paired rain gauge platforms, and a large network of 2D Video and Parsivel disdrometers were deployed. In something of a canonical approach, the radar (NPOL in particular), gauge and disdrometer observational assets were deployed to create a consistent high-quality distributed (time and space sampling) radar-based ground "reference" rainfall dataset, with known uncertainties, that could be used for assessing the satellite-based precipitation products at a range of space/time scales. Subsequently, the impact of uncertainties in the satellite products could be evaluated relative to the ground-benchmark in coupled weather, land-surface and distributed hydrologic modeling frameworks as related to flood prediction. Relative to establishing the ground-based "benchmark", numerous avenues were pursued in the making and verification of IFloodS "reference" dual-polarimetric radar-based rain maps, and this study documents the process and results as they pertain specifically

  16. Construction of Polarimetric Radar-Based Reference Rain Maps for the Iowa Flood Studies Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Walter; Wolff, David; Krajewski, Witek; Gatlin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Iowa Flood Studies (IFloodS) campaign was conducted in central and northeastern Iowa during the months of April-June, 2013. Specific science objectives for IFloodS included quantification of uncertainties in satellite and ground-based estimates of precipitation, 4-D characterization of precipitation physical processes and associated parameters (e.g., size distributions, water contents, types, structure etc.), assessment of the impact of precipitation estimation uncertainty and physical processes on hydrologic predictive skill, and refinement of field observations and data analysis approaches as they pertain to future GPM integrated hydrologic validation and related field studies. In addition to field campaign archival of raw and processed satellite data (including precipitation products), key ground-based platforms such as the NASA NPOL S-band and D3R Ka/Ku-band dual-polarimetric radars, University of Iowa X-band dual-polarimetric radars, a large network of paired rain gauge platforms, and a large network of 2D Video and Parsivel disdrometers were deployed. In something of a canonical approach, the radar (NPOL in particular), gauge and disdrometer observational assets were deployed to create a consistent high-quality distributed (time and space sampling) radar-based ground "reference" rainfall dataset, with known uncertainties, that could be used for assessing the satellite-based precipitation products at a range of space/time scales. Subsequently, the impact of uncertainties in the satellite products could be evaluated relative to the ground-benchmark in coupled weather, land-surface and distributed hydrologic modeling frameworks as related to flood prediction. Relative to establishing the ground-based "benchmark", numerous avenues were pursued in the making and verification of IFloodS "reference" dual-polarimetric radar-based rain maps, and this study documents the process and results as they pertain specifically

  17. Near-surface air temperature lapse rates in Xinjiang, northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mingxia; Zhang, Mingjun; Wang, Shengjie; Zhu, Xiaofan; Che, Yanjun

    2018-02-01

    Lapse rates of near-surface (2 m) air temperature are important parameters in hydrologic and climate simulations, especially for the mountainous areas without enough in-situ observations. In Xinjiang, northwestern China, the elevations range from higher than 7000 m to lower than sea level, but the existing long-term meteorological measurements are limited and distributed unevenly. To calculate lapse rates in Xinjiang, the daily data of near-surface air temperature ( T min, T ave, and T max) were measured by automatic weather stations from 2012 to 2014. All the in situ observation stations were gridded into a network of 1.5° (latitude) by 1.5° (longitude), and the spatial distribution and the daily, monthly, seasonal variations of lapse rates for T min, T ave, and T max in Xinjiang are analyzed. The Urumqi River Basin has been considered as a case to study the influence of elevation, aspect, and the wet and dry air conditions to the T min, T ave, and T max lapse rates. Results show that (1) the lapse rates for T min, T ave, and T max vary spatially during the observation period. The spatial diversity of T min lapse rates is larger than that of T ave, and that of T max is the smallest. For each season, T max lapse rates have more negative values than T ave lapse rates which are steeper than T min lapse rates. The weakest spatial diversity usually appears in July throughout a year. (2) The comparison for the three subregions (North, Middle, and South region) exhibits that lapse rates have similar day-to-day and month-to-month characteristics which present shallower values in winter months and steeper values in summer months. The T ave lapse rates in North region are shallower than those in Middle and South region, and the steepest T ave lapse rates of the three regions all appear in April. T min lapse rates are shallower than T max lapse rates. The maximum medians of T min and T max lapse rates for each grid in the three regions all appear in January, whereas the

  18. Rain and contamination tests on HVDC wall bushings with and without RTV coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, H.M.; Hall, J.F.; Nellis, C.L.; Low, S.S.; Lorden, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper results of tests made to determine the ability of room temperature vulcanized (RTV) silicone rubber coatings to improve the performance of HVDC wall bushings are described. The behavior of uncoated full scale ± 500 kV wall bushings is first determined in wetting conditions consisting of nonuniform rain and fog with various amounts of pre-deposited surface contamination. Parameters affecting flashover performance, such as polarity, rain conductivity, and contamination severity are discussed. Results of nonuniform rain tests on an RTV coated wall bushing are reported

  19. Desert Dust and Monsoon Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent have know that heavy dust events brought on by strong winds occur frequently in the pre-monsoon season, before the onset of heavy rain. Yet scientists have never seriously considered the possibility that natural dust can affect monsoon rainfall. Up to now, most studies of the impacts of aerosols on Indian monsoon rainfall have focused on anthropogenic aerosols in the context of climate change. However, a few recent studies have show that aerosols from antropogenic and natural sources over the Indian subcontinent may affect the transition from break to active monsoon phases on short timescales of days to weeks. Writing in Nature Geoscience, Vinoj and colleagues describe how they have shown that desert dust aerosols over the Arabian Sea and West Asia can strenghten the summer monsoon over the Indial subcontinent in a matter of days.

  20. Quantity and quality of runoff reduction and recharge enhancement from constructed rain gardens and vegetated retention ponds in Austin, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eljuri, A. G.; Moffett, K. B.

    2013-12-01

    Rain gardens and retention ponds are intended to reduce storm water and pollutant runoff to rivers and streams, rain gardens by enhancing infiltration and retention ponds by promoting evaporation. The City of Austin, Texas is actively investing money and time into these storm water management solutions, but there are no data comparing their effectiveness. In particular, comparisons of rain gardens against control plots and new wetland-vegetated retention pond designs against traditional grassy pond designs are lacking. This study quantifies the quantity and quality of storm runoff to and from five sites: three engineered sites, two rain gardens receiving direct runoff from the same residential roof and a planted retention pond receiving municipal parking lot runoff, and two control sites, a mulched residential lawn receiving direct roof runoff and a grassy municipal retention pond receiving parking lot runoff. A locally installed rain gauge monitors precipitation rates and we collect and analyze rainwater chemistry. Each site is instrumented with bottles to collect direct runoff samples and suction lysimeters within and below the root zone, at 10 cm and 40 cm depth, from which to collect soil water. Soil moisture sensors at 5 cm, 25 cm, and 50 cm depth are used to monitor changes in soil moisture profiles over time. Evapotranspiration rates were determined using local meteorological data and stomatal conductance measurements at the sites. Infiltrometer tests, soil characterizations, and vegetation surveys were also conducted at each site. The soil at the rain gardens are highly mixed with pebbles at the top and become a more uniform soil towards the bottom of the root zone. This differs from the control site where the soil is uniform except for the thin layer of wood chips at the surface. The water samples were analyzed for pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and cations (incl. cadmium, iron, zinc, and lead) and anions (incl

  1. Dosimetric perturbations of a lead shield for surface and interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Granero, Domingo; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Rivard, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    In surface and interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy with either 60 Co, 192 Ir, or 169 Yb sources, some radiosensitive organs near the surface may be exposed to high absorbed doses. This may be reduced by covering the implants with a lead shield on the body surface, which results in dosimetric perturbations. Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed for the three radionuclides placed at a single dwell position. Four different shield thicknesses (0, 3, 6, and 10 mm) and three different source depths (0, 5, and 10 mm) in water were considered, with the lead shield placed at the phantom surface. Backscatter dose enhancement and transmission data were obtained for the lead shields. Results were corrected to account for a realistic clinical case with multiple dwell positions. The range of the high backscatter dose enhancement in water is 3 mm for 60 Co and 1 mm for both 192 Ir and 169 Yb. Transmission data for 60 Co and 192 Ir are smaller than those reported by Papagiannis et al (2008 Med. Phys. 35 4898–4906) for brachytherapy facility shielding; for 169 Yb, the difference is negligible. In conclusion, the backscatter overdose produced by the lead shield can be avoided by just adding a few millimetres of bolus. Transmission data provided in this work as a function of lead thickness can be used to estimate healthy organ equivalent dose saving. Use of a lead shield is justified. (paper)

  2. Effects of surface cracks and strain rate on the tensile behavior of Balmoral Red granite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardoukhi Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental procedure for studying the effects of surface cracks on the mechanical behavior of Balmoral Red granite under dynamic and quasi-static loading. Three different thermal shocks were applied on the surface of the Brazilian Disc test samples by keeping a flame torch at a fixed distance from the sample surface for 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Microscopy clearly shows that the number of the surface cracks increases with the duration of the thermal shock. After the thermal shock, the Brazilian Disc tests were performed using a servohydraulic materials testing machine and a compression Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB device. The results show that the tensile strength of the rock decreases and the rate sensitivity of the rock increases as more cracks are introduced to the structure. The DIC analysis of the Brazilian disc tests shows that the fracture of the sample initiates at the center of the samples or slightly closer to the incident bar contact point. This is followed by crushing of the samples at both contact points with the stress bars.

  3. Escaping the correction for body surface area when calculating glomerular filtration rate in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepsz, Amy; Tondeur, Marianne [CHU St. Pierre, Department of Radioisotopes, Brussels (Belgium); Ham, Hamphrey [University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-09-15

    {sup 51}Cr ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid ({sup 51}Cr EDTA) clearance is nowadays considered as an accurate and reproducible method for measuring glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in children. Normal values in function of age, corrected for body surface area, have been recently updated. However, much criticism has been expressed about the validity of body surface area correction. The aim of the present paper was to present the normal GFR values, not corrected for body surface area, with the associated percentile curves. For that purpose, the same patients as in the previous paper were selected, namely those with no recent urinary tract infection, having a normal left to right {sup 99m}Tc MAG3 uptake ratio and a normal kidney morphology on the early parenchymal images. A single blood sample method was used for {sup 51}Cr EDTA clearance measurement. Clearance values, not corrected for body surface area, increased progressively up to the adolescence. The percentile curves were determined and allow, for a single patient, to estimate accurately the level of non-corrected clearance and the evolution with time, whatever the age. (orig.)

  4. Acid Rain. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, Pauline, Comp.

    The term "acid rain," also called "acid precipitation," generally refers to any precipitation having a pH value of less than 5.6. This guide to the literature on acid rain in the collections of the Library of Congress is not necessarily intended to be a comprehensive bibliography. It is designed to provide the reader with a set…

  5. Acid rain and sugar maple decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul G. Schaberg

    2017-01-01

    Through the increased combustion of fossil fuels, humans have dramatically increased pollutant additions of sulfur and nitrogen into the atmosphere where it conbines with water to form sulfuric and nitric acids, creating acid rain (Driscoll et al. 2001). Incoming acid rain has various impacts on human and natural systems, including the accelerated degradation of built...

  6. Rain garden guidelines for southwest Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rain gardens are a unique and practical landscape feature that can enhance the beauty of home gardens. When properly installed, they are one method of limiting the negative effects of rainfall runoff in urban areas. Indeed, rain gardens turn a "negative" into a "positive" by capt...

  7. Rain-induced subsurface airflow and Lisse effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haipeng; Jiao, Jiu J.; Weeks, Edwin P.

    2008-07-01

    Water-level increase after rainfall is usually indicative of rainfall recharge to groundwater. This, however, may not be true if the Lisse effect occurs. This effect represents the water-level increase in a well driven by airflow induced by an advancing wetting front during highly intensive rains. The rainwater, which may behave like a low-permeability lid, seals the ground surface so that the air pressure beneath the wetting front is increased because of air compression due to downward movement of the wetting front. A rapid and substantial rise of the water level in the well screened below water table, which bears no relationship to groundwater recharge, can be induced when various factors such as soil properties and the rain-runoff condition combine favorably. A transient, three-dimensional and variably saturated flow model was employed to study the air and groundwater flows in the soil under rain conditions. The objectives of this paper are two-fold: to evaluate the reliability of the theory of the Lisse effect presented by Weeks to predict its magnitude in modeled situations that mimic the physical complexity of real aquifers, and to conduct parametric studies on the sensitivity of the water-level rise in the well to soil properties and the rain event. The simulation results reveal that the magnitude of the Lisse effect increases with the ponding depth. Soil permeability plays a key role in generating the Lisse effect. The water-level rise in the well is delayed relative to the air-pressure rise in the unsaturated zone when the soil permeability is low, and the maximum water-level rise is less than the maximum air pressure induced by rain infiltration. The simulation also explores the sensitivity of the Lisse effect to the van Genuchten parameters and the water table depth.

  8. Rating

    OpenAIRE

    Karas, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Charakteristika ratingu. Dělení a druhy ratingu (rating emise × rating emitenta; dlouhodobý rating × krátkodobý rating; mezinárodní rating × lokální rating). Obecné požadavky kladené na rating. Proces tvorby ratingu. Vyžádaný rating. Nevyžádaný rating. Ratingový proces na bázi volně přístupných informací. Uplatňované ratingové systémy. Ratingová kriteria. Využití a interpretace ratingové známky. Funkce ratingu. Rating v souvislosti s BASEL II. Rating v souvislosti s hospodářskými krizemi....

  9. Effect of simulated acid rain on vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of simulated acid rain on Chenopodium quinoa, Hordeum vulgare and Phaseolus vulgaris. Detailed experiments were conducted only on Phaseolus vulgaris. Sulfuric acid solutions covering a pH range of 1.5 to 3.5 were used. Gross morphological effects noted at lower pH values included failure to attain normal height, necrosis and wrinkling of leaves, excessive and adventitious budding, and premature abscission of primary leaves. Histological effects included smaller cell size, a decreased amount of intercellular space, hypertrophied nuclei and nucleoli, and a reduction in the size of starch granules within the chloroplasts. Dry weight remained an approximately constant percentage of fresh weight, and chlorophyll analyses showed that both chlorophyll concentration and ratio of chlorophyll to chlorophyll also remained constant. Respirometer studies showed that respiration rate increased slightly and photosynthetic rate increased dramatically. Quantitative analyses indicated that carbohydrate content was reduced at low pH values. Root biomass was also reduced. Application of Congo red indicator solution to the acid treated tissue showed that it was being acidified to a pH of below 4. Experiments involving aspiration of control tissue in acid solutions suggest that the increase in photosynthetic rate and the decreases in carbohydrate content and root biomass were caused by an uncoupling of photophosphorylation of adenosine diphosphate. Uncoupling was probably caused by hydrogen ion interference with proton pumps associated with the electron transport chain in the light reactions of photosynthesis. 128 references. (MDF)

  10. Collisional Dissociation of CO: ab initio Potential Energy Surfaces and Quasiclassical Trajectory Rate Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenke, David W.; Jaffe, Richard L.; Chaban, Galina M.

    2016-01-01

    We have generated accurate global potential energy surfaces for CO+Ar and CO+O that correlate with atom-diatom pairs in their ground electronic states based on extensive ab initio electronic structure calculations and used these potentials in quasi-classical trajectory nuclear dynamics calculations to predict the thermal dissociation rate coefficients over 5000- 35000 K. Our results are not compatible with the 20-45 year old experimental results. For CO + Ar we obtain fairly good agreement with the experimental rate coefficients of Appleton et al. (1970) and Mick and Roth (1993), but our computed rate coefficients exhibit a stronger temperature dependence. For CO + O our dissociation rate coefficient is in close agreement with the value from the Park model, which is an empirical adjustment of older experimental results. However, we find the rate coefficient for CO + O is only 1.5 to 3.3 times larger than CO + Ar over the temperature range of the shock tube experiments (8000-15,000 K). The previously accepted value for this rate coefficient ratio is 15, independent of temperature. We also computed the rate coefficient for the CO + O ex- change reaction which forms C + O2. We find this reaction is much faster than previously believed and is the dominant process in the removal of CO at temperatures up to 16,000 K. As a result, the dissociation of CO is accomplished in two steps (react to form C+O2 and then O2 dissociates) that are endothermic by 6.1 and 5.1 eV, instead of one step that requires 11.2 eV to break the CO bond.

  11. Evaporation Rate of Distilled Water Drop on the Surface of Non-Ferrous Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponomarev Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied experimentally the evaporation process of distilled water drops on the surfaces of non-ferrous metals. Investigations were conducted on the experimental setup using a shadow optical system. The main elements of this system are the source of plane-parallel light and photographic camera. According to the contact diameter change during the evaporation, three stages have been determined (spreading, pinning, depinning. It has been found, that the dependence of evaporation rate on drop volume at low temperatures appear to be well fit by a power function.

  12. [Effects of simulated acid rain on decomposition of soil organic carbon and crop straw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xue-Zhu; Huang, Yao; Yang, Xin-Zhong

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the organic carbon decomposition in different acidity soils, a 40-day incubation test was conducted with the paddy soils of pH 5.48, 6.70 and 8.18. The soils were amended with 0 and 15 g x kg(-1) of rice straw, adjusted to the moisture content of 400 g x kg(-1) air-dried soil by using simulated rain of pH 6.0, 4.5, and 3.0, and incubated at 20 degrees C. The results showed that straw, acid rain, and soil co-affected the CO2 emission from soil system. The amendment of straw increased the soil CO2 emission rate significantly. Acid rain had no significant effects on soil organic carbon decomposition, but significantly affected the straw decomposition in soil. When treated with pH 3.0 acid rain, the amount of decomposed straw over 40-day incubation in acid (pH 5.48) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils was 8% higher, while that in neutral soil (pH 6.70) was 15% lower, compared to the treatment of pH 6.0 rain. In the treatment of pH 3.0 acid rain, the decomposition rate of soil organic C in acid (pH 5.48) soil was 43% and 50% (P acid and alkaline soils, respectively.

  13. Rain, Rain, Go Away, Come Again Another Day. Weather Preferences of Summer Tourists in Mountain Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Steiger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Weather and climate are important factors for travel decision-making and overall tourist satisfaction. As central motivators for destination choice, they directly and indirectly influence demand patterns and can be a resource and limitation for tourism at the same time. In this paper, results of an in-situ survey of mountain summer tourists (n = 733 in the Alps in Southern Germany are presented. Respondents rated ‘rain’ as the most important aspect of weather during their holiday. During a 7-day holiday, 2.1 days of continuous rain are accepted, and 3.1 days of days with thunderstorms. The ideal temperature range is between 21 and 25 °C, thus lying 4–7 degrees lower than for beach tourism. Temperatures below 15 °C and above 30 °C are perceived as unacceptable. Statistically significant differences were found for several tourist types: Older tourists are more sensitive to heat, tourists with sports activities are more tolerant to cool temperatures, first-time visitors are more sensitive to rain and families with children prefer higher temperatures. From the results, some implications for mountain destinations arise: mountain destinations could be promoted as a heat refuge, and attracting sports tourists might be a promising way to reduce weather sensitivity; however, some variety of well-promoted weather independent attractions seems to be mandatory.

  14. Effect of rain gauge density over the accuracy of rainfall: a case study over Bangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anoop Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Rainfall is an extremely variable parameter in both space and time. Rain gauge density is very crucial in order to quantify the rainfall amount over a region. The level of rainfall accuracy is highly dependent on density and distribution of rain gauge stations over a region. Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) have installed a number of Automatic Weather Station (AWS) rain gauges over Indian region to study rainfall. In this paper, the effect of rain gauge density over daily accumulated rainfall is analyzed using ISRO AWS gauge observations. A region of 50 km × 50 km box over southern part of Indian region (Bangalore) with good density of rain gauges is identified for this purpose. Rain gauge numbers are varied from 1-8 in 50 km box to study the variation in the daily accumulated rainfall. Rainfall rates from the neighbouring stations are also compared in this study. Change in the rainfall as a function of gauge spacing is studied. Use of gauge calibrated satellite observations to fill the gauge station value is also studied. It is found that correlation coefficients (CC) decrease from 82% to 21% as gauge spacing increases from 5 km to 40 km while root mean square error (RMSE) increases from 8.29 mm to 51.27 mm with increase in gauge spacing from 5 km to 40 km. Considering 8 rain gauges as a standard representative of rainfall over the region, absolute error increases from 15% to 64% as gauge numbers are decreased from 7 to 1. Small errors are reported while considering 4 to 7 rain gauges to represent 50 km area. However, reduction to 3 or less rain gauges resulted in significant error. It is also observed that use of gauge calibrated satellite observations significantly improved the rainfall estimation over the region with very few rain gauge observations.

  15. Combined effects of lanthanum (III) chloride and acid rain on photosynthetic parameters in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihong; Wang, Wen; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) pollution and acid rain are environmental issues, and their deleterious effects on plants attract worldwide attention. These two issues exist simultaneously in many regions, especially in some rice-growing areas. However, little is known about the combined effects of REEs and acid rain on plants. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum chloride (LaCl3), one type of REE salt, and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice were investigated. We showed that the combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 4.5 increased net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatic conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), Hill reaction activity (HRA), apparent quantum yield (AQY) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) in rice. The combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 3.5 began to behave toxic effects on photosynthesis (decreasing Pn, Gs, HRA, AQY and CE, and increasing Ci), and the maximally toxic effects were observed in the combined treatment of 2449.0 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 2.5. Moreover, the combined effects of LaCl3 and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice depended on the growth stage of rice, with the maximal effects occurring at the booting stage. Furthermore, the combined treatment of high-concentration LaCl3 and low-pH acid rain had more serious effects on photosynthesis in rice than LaCl3 or acid rain treatment alone. Finally, the combined effect of LaCl3 and acid rain on Pn in rice resulted from the changes in stomatic (Gs, Ci) and non-stomatic (HRA, AQY and CE) factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. GPM GROUND VALIDATION RAIN GAUGES NASA ACHIEVE IPHEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Rain Gauges NASA ACHIEVE IPHEx dataset includes data from the OSi Optical Rain Gauge (ORG815), and a standard tipping bucket rain gauge....

  17. Enhanced Sensitivity of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors Incorporating Metallic Dot Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A new surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz∙deg∙s−1 and good linearity were observed.

  18. Distinct global warming rates tied to multiple ocean surface temperature changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shuai-Lei; Luo, Jing-Jia; Huang, Gang; Wang, Pengfei

    2017-07-01

    The globally averaged surface temperature has shown distinct multi-decadal fluctuations since 1900, characterized by two weak slowdowns in the mid-twentieth century and early twenty-first century and two strong accelerations in the early and late twentieth century. While the recent global warming (GW) hiatus has been particularly ascribed to the eastern Pacific cooling, causes of the cooling in the mid-twentieth century and distinct intensity differences between the slowdowns and accelerations remain unclear. Here, our model experiments with multiple ocean sea surface temperature (SST) forcing reveal that, although the Pacific SSTs play essential roles in the GW rates, SST changes in other basins also exert vital influences. The mid-twentieth-century cooling results from the SST cooling in the tropical Pacific and Atlantic, which is partly offset by the Southern Ocean warming. During the recent hiatus, the tropical Pacific-induced strong cooling is largely compensated by warming effects of other oceans. In contrast, during the acceleration periods, ubiquitous SST warming across all the oceans acts jointly to exaggerate the GW. Multi-model simulations with separated radiative forcing suggest diverse causes of the SST changes in multiple oceans during the GW acceleration and slowdown periods. Our results highlight the importance of multiple oceans on the multi-decadal GW rates.

  19. Seismic potential of weak, near-surface faults revealed at plate tectonic slip rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikari, Matt J; Kopf, Achim J

    2017-11-01

    The near-surface areas of major faults commonly contain weak, phyllosilicate minerals, which, based on laboratory friction measurements, are assumed to creep stably. However, it is now known that shallow faults can experience tens of meters of earthquake slip and also host slow and transient slip events. Laboratory experiments are generally performed at least two orders of magnitude faster than plate tectonic speeds, which are the natural driving conditions for major faults; the absence of experimental data for natural driving rates represents a critical knowledge gap. We use laboratory friction experiments on natural fault zone samples at driving rates of centimeters per year to demonstrate that there is abundant evidence of unstable slip behavior that was not previously predicted. Specifically, weak clay-rich fault samples generate slow slip events (SSEs) and have frictional properties favorable for earthquake rupture. Our work explains growing field observations of shallow SSE and surface-breaking earthquake slip, and predicts that such phenomena should be more widely expected.

  20. The surface quality of AWJ cut parts as a function of abrasive material reusing rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnakovszky, C.; Herghelegiu, E.; Radu, M. C.; Tampu, N. C.

    2015-11-01

    Abrasive water jet cutting (AWJ) has been extensively used during the last years to process a large variety of materials since it offers important advantages as a good quality of the processed surface, without heat affected zones, low environmental impact (no emission of dust or other compounds that endanger the health of the user), small induced mechanical stresses etc. The main disadvantage is the high cost of processing (cost of equipment and consumables). In view of this, the effects of reusing the abrasive material on the quality of processed surface are investigated in this paper. Two steel materials were used: OL 37 (S 235) with large applicability in machine building industry and 2P armor steel used in the arms industry. The reusing rate of the garnet abrasive material was: 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100%. The quality of processed surface was quantified by the following parameters: width at the jet inlet (Li), width at the jet outlet (Lo), inclination angle (α), deviation from perpendicularity (u) and roughness (Ra).

  1. The portfolio risk management and diversification benefits from the South African rand currency index (rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Y. Jordaan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to explain the source of risk management and diversification benefits that investors may gain from the South African Rand Currency Index (RAIN as it relates to an equity portfolio with stock market exposure (locally or international. These diversification benefits may result from the negative correlation between RAIN and the South African All Share Index (ALSI. To explain and fully exploit the benefits of RAIN, the main variables that represent South Africa’s trading partner equity and bond markets movements, were identified. To account for the interaction of RAIN with the ALSI, the latter was firstly decomposed into its economic groups and secondly into its various sub-sectors. Various analyses were carried out to determine which variables describe the relationship between the ALSI and RAIN. The variables that describe the relationship with a high adjusted R2, were identified. The findings suggest that when the ALSI is decomposed into its ten economic groups and thirty-seven sub-groups, the quadratic as opposed to linear models using response surface regressions, explained the majority of the variation in RAIN over the entire period. The linear models, however, explained more of the variation in RAIN during the recent 2008/2009 financial crisis

  2. Data driven analysis of rain events: feature extraction, clustering, microphysical /macro physical relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djallel Dilmi, Mohamed; Mallet, Cécile; Barthes, Laurent; Chazottes, Aymeric

    2017-04-01

    The study of rain time series records is mainly carried out using rainfall rate or rain accumulation parameters estimated on a fixed integration time (typically 1 min, 1 hour or 1 day). In this study we used the concept of rain event. In fact, the discrete and intermittent natures of rain processes make the definition of some features inadequate when defined on a fixed duration. Long integration times (hour, day) lead to mix rainy and clear air periods in the same sample. Small integration time (seconds, minutes) will lead to noisy data with a great sensibility to detector characteristics. The analysis on the whole rain event instead of individual short duration samples of a fixed duration allows to clarify relationships between features, in particular between macro physical and microphysical ones. This approach allows suppressing the intra-event variability partly due to measurement uncertainties and allows focusing on physical processes. An algorithm based on Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Self Organising Maps (SOM) is developed to obtain a parsimonious characterisation of rain events using a minimal set of variables. The use of self-organizing map (SOM) is justified by the fact that it allows to map a high dimensional data space in a two-dimensional space while preserving as much as possible the initial space topology in an unsupervised way. The obtained SOM allows providing the dependencies between variables and consequently removing redundant variables leading to a minimal subset of only five features (the event duration, the rain rate peak, the rain event depth, the event rain rate standard deviation and the absolute rain rate variation of order 0.5). To confirm relevance of the five selected features the corresponding SOM is analyzed. This analysis shows clearly the existence of relationships between features. It also shows the independence of the inter-event time (IETp) feature or the weak dependence of the Dry percentage in event (Dd%e) feature. This confirms

  3. Coronal rain in magnetic bipolar weak fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Fang, X.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We intend to investigate the underlying physics for the coronal rain phenomenon in a representative bipolar magnetic field, including the formation and the dynamics of coronal rain blobs. Methods: With the MPI-AMRVAC code, we performed three dimensional radiative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation with strong heating localized on footpoints of magnetic loops after a relaxation to quiet solar atmosphere. Results: Progressive cooling and in-situ condensation starts at the loop top due to radiative thermal instability. The first large-scale condensation on the loop top suffers Rayleigh-Taylor instability and becomes fragmented into smaller blobs. The blobs fall vertically dragging magnetic loops until they reach low-β regions and start to fall along the loops from loop top to loop footpoints. A statistic study of the coronal rain blobs finds that small blobs with masses of less than 1010 g dominate the population. When blobs fall to lower regions along the magnetic loops, they are stretched and develop a non-uniform velocity pattern with an anti-parallel shearing pattern seen to develop along the central axis of the blobs. Synthetic images of simulated coronal rain with Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly well resemble real observations presenting dark falling clumps in hot channels and bright rain blobs in a cool channel. We also find density inhomogeneities during a coronal rain "shower", which reflects the observed multi-stranded nature of coronal rain. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 7 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Is the surface oxygen exchange rate linked to bulk ion diffusivity in mixed conducting Ruddlesden-Popper phases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C; Tamimi, Mazin A; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The possible link between oxygen surface exchange rate and bulk oxygen anion diffusivity in mixed ionic and electronic conducting oxides is a topic of great interest and debate. While a large body of experimental evidence and theoretical analyses support a link, observed differences between bulk and surface composition of these materials are hard to reconcile with this observation. This is further compounded by potential problems with simultaneous measurement of both parameters. Here we utilize separate techniques, in situ neutron diffraction and pulsed isotopic surface exchange, to examine bulk ion mobility and surface oxygen exchange rates of three Ruddlesden-Popper phases, general form A(n-1)A(2)'B(n)O(3n+1), A(n-1)A(2)'B(n)X(3n+1); LaSrCo(0.5)Fe(0.5)O(4-δ) (n = 1), La(0.3)Sr(2.7)CoFeO(7-δ) (n = 2) and LaSr3Co(1.5)Fe(1.5)O(10-δ) (n = 3). These measurements are complemented by surface composition determination via high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering. We observe a correlation between bulk ion mobility and surface exchange rate between materials. The surface exchange rates vary by more than one order of magnitude with high anion mobility in the bulk of an oxygen vacancy-rich n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper material correlating with rapid oxygen exchange. This is in contrast with the similar surface exchange rates which we may expect due to similar surface compositions across all three samples. We conclude that experimental limitations lead to inherent convolution of surface and bulk rates, and that surface exchange steps are not likely to be rate limiting in oxygen incorporation.

  5. Effect of Deposition Rate on Structure and Surface Morphology of Thin Evaporated Al Films on Dielectrics and Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, K.; Rubahn, H. G.

    2012-01-01

    . The structure and surface morphology of the as-deposited Al films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM imaging of the films showed that the mean grain size of thin Al films on all of the substrates increased from 20 nm - 30 nm to 50 nm - 70 nm...... with increase of the deposition rate. Quantitative AFM characterization showed that for all substrates the root mean square surface roughness increases monotonically with increasing the deposition rate from 0.1 nm/s to 2 nm/s. The observed effects of the deposition rate on the grain size and surface roughness...

  6. Implications of Warm Rain in Shallow Cumulus and Congestus Clouds for Large-Scale Circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuijens, Louise; Emanuel, Kerry; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan

    2017-11-01

    Space-borne observations reveal that 20-40% of marine convective clouds below the freezing level produce rain. In this paper we speculate what the prevalence of warm rain might imply for convection and large-scale circulations over tropical oceans. We present results using a two-column radiative-convective model of hydrostatic, nonlinear flow on a non-rotating sphere, with parameterized convection and radiation, and review ongoing efforts in high-resolution modeling and observations of warm rain. The model experiments investigate the response of convection and circulation to sea surface temperature (SST) gradients between the columns and to changes in a parameter that controls the conversion of cloud condensate to rain. Convection over the cold ocean collapses to a shallow mode with tops near 850 hPa, but a congestus mode with tops near 600 hPa can develop at small SST differences when warm rain formation is more efficient. Here, interactive radiation and the response of the circulation are crucial: along with congestus a deeper moist layer develops, which leads to less low-level radiative cooling, a smaller buoyancy gradient between the columns, and therefore a weaker circulation and less subsidence over the cold ocean. The congestus mode is accompanied with more surface precipitation in the subsiding column and less surface precipitation in the deep convecting column. For the shallow mode over colder oceans, circulations also weaken with more efficient warm rain formation, but only marginally. Here, more warm rain reduces convective tops and the boundary layer depth—similar to Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) studies—which reduces the integrated buoyancy gradient. Elucidating the impact of warm rain can benefit from large-domain high-resolution simulations and observations. Parameterizations of warm rain may be constrained through collocated cloud and rain profiling from ground, and concurrent changes in convection and rain in subsiding and convecting branches of

  7. The effect of daytime rain on the Indian Flying Fox (Mammalia: Chiroptera: Pteropodidae Pteropus giganteus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baskaran

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Excessive water loss during the day due to heat stress in bats of the genus Pteropus appears to be inevitable, because these bats are exposed to direct sunlight.  Rain also affects the rest pattern of the Indian Flying Fox Pteropus giganteus during the day.  When rain occurred during the day, most of the bats hung in a slanting position and did not exhibit any movements.  After rain, they licked both ventral and dorsal surfaces of the wing membrane and scratched their body with their thumb claws.  They also licked the water droplets that remained on the leaves and branches of the tree.  Even though their rest had been affected by the rain the bats utilized the water droplets to quench their thirst, cool their body and clean their fur.  The construction of water reservoirs near Pteropus roosts will help to assure their long-term conservation. 

  8. Response surface modelling of tool electrode wear rate and material removal rate in micro electrical discharge machining of Inconel 718

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puthumana, Govindan

    2017-01-01

    conductivity and high strength causing it extremely difficult tomachine. Micro-Electrical Discharge Machining (Micro-EDM) is a non-conventional method that has a potential toovercome these restrictions for machining of Inconel 718. Response Surface Method (RSM) was used for modelling thetool Electrode Wear...

  9. In situ cosmogenic 53Mn production rate from ancient low-denudation surface in tropic Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, T.; Fifield, L.K.; Stone, J.O.; Vasconcelos, P.M.; Tims, S.G.; Chappell, J.

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary results of 53 Mn measurements for seven Brazilian haematites are presented. The production rate of 53 Mn due to cosmic-ray induced disintegration of iron is estimated to be 103 ± 19 atoms g(Fe) -1 yr -1 at sea level and high latitude. This is consistent with the only previously published measurement. The muon contribution to the total 53 Mn production at the surface is estimated to be ∼7%. Cosmogenic-isotope dating employing 53 Mn is applicable to any rock/mineral type that contains iron as a major constituent, such as haematite, goethite, pyroxene and olivine. The method has the potential to extend the time scale of cosmogenic exposure dating to >10 Ma.

  10. The urban perspectives of acid rain. Workshop summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, B.E.

    1993-06-04

    This report documents discussions held during a workshop an Urban Perspective of Acid Rain. The workshop was sponsored by the Office of the Director, National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). NAPAP anticipates giving increased emphasis to the benefits in urban areas of emissions reductions. The goal of this informal, exploratory workshop was to serve as a first step towards identifying pollutant monitoring, and research and assessment needs to help answer, from an urban perspective, the two key questions posed to NAPAP by Congress: (1) what are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of the acid rain control program, and (2) what reductions in deposition, rates are needed in order to prevent adverse effects? The workshop addressed research activities needed to respond to these questions. The discussions focused. sequentially, on data needs, data and model availability, and data and modeling gaps. The discussions concentrated on four areas of effects: human health, materials, urban forests, and visibility.

  11. Rain Erosion/Measurement Impact Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The FARM Rain Erosion/Impact Measurement Lab develops solutions for deficiencies in the ability of materials, coatings and designs to withstand a severe operational...

  12. TECHNOLOGICAL OPTIONS FOR ACID RAIN CONTROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discussed are acid rain control options available to the electric utility industry. They include coal switching, flue gas desulfurization, and such emerging lower cost technologies as Limestone Injection Multistage Burners (LIMB) and Advanced Silicate (ADVACATE), both developed ...

  13. Acid rain information book. Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    Potential consequences of widespread acid precipitation are reviewed through an extensive literature search. Major aspects of the acid rain phenomena are discussed, areas of uncertainty identified, and current research summarized

  14. A study of the rates of heat transfer and bubble site density for nucleate boiling on an inclined heating surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonamy, S.E.; Symons, J.G.

    1974-08-01

    Nucleate pool boiling of distilled water from an electrically heated surface at atmospheric pressure is studied for varying heating surface inclinations. The constants of the accepted boiling equation phi = K Tsup(B) and the Rohsenow Correlation Coefficient are found to be dependent on surface orientation. Convection cooling is observed to play a major role in pool boiling phenomena and causes large changes in the heat transfer rates for a given excess of temperature of the heated surface. Active nucleation site density is studied and found to be independent of surface inclination. Empirical relations are presented to provide an understanding of the effects of inclination on other boiling parameters. (author)

  15. Acid rain in an Amazon rainforest

    OpenAIRE

    Haines, Bruce; Jordan, Carl; Clark, Howard; Clark, Kathleen E.

    2011-01-01

    Acid rain is reported from the Amazon territory of Venezuela. The volume weighted average pHwas 4.7 for 70 storms sampled from January 1979 through February 1980. At this location,remote from point sources of industrial pollution, acid rain might result from naturalbiogeochemical processes in the rainforest, from global atmospheric pollution, or from somecombination of natural and polliition processes.DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0889.1983.tb00011.x

  16. Providing driving rain data for hygrothermal calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Mikkel Kristian

    1996-01-01

    Due to a wish for driving rain data as input for hygrothermal calculations, this report deals with utilizing commonly applied empirical relations and standard meteorological data, in an attempt to provide realistic estimates rather than exact correlations.......Due to a wish for driving rain data as input for hygrothermal calculations, this report deals with utilizing commonly applied empirical relations and standard meteorological data, in an attempt to provide realistic estimates rather than exact correlations....

  17. Raine syndrome: expanding the radiological spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koob, Meriam; Dietemann, Jean-Louis [CHU de Strasbourg Hopital de Hautepierre, Service de Radiologie 2, Strasbourg (France); Doray, Berenice; Fradin, Melanie [CHU de Strasbourg, Hopital de Hautepierre, Laboratoire de Genetique Medicale, Strasbourg (France); Astruc, Dominique [CHU de Strasbourg Hopital de Hautepierre, Service de Neonatologie, Strasbourg (France)

    2011-03-15

    We describe ante- and postnatal imaging of a 1-year-old otherwise healthy girl with Raine syndrome. She presented with neonatal respiratory distress related to a pyriform aperture stenosis, which was diagnosed on CT. Signs of chondrodysplasia punctata, sagittal vertebral clefting and intervertebral disc and renal calcifications were also found on imaging. This new case confirms that Raine syndrome is not always lethal. The overlapping imaging signs with chondrodysplasia punctata and the disseminated calcifications give new insights into its pathophysiology. (orig.)

  18. Raine syndrome: expanding the radiological spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koob, Meriam; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Doray, Berenice; Fradin, Melanie; Astruc, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    We describe ante- and postnatal imaging of a 1-year-old otherwise healthy girl with Raine syndrome. She presented with neonatal respiratory distress related to a pyriform aperture stenosis, which was diagnosed on CT. Signs of chondrodysplasia punctata, sagittal vertebral clefting and intervertebral disc and renal calcifications were also found on imaging. This new case confirms that Raine syndrome is not always lethal. The overlapping imaging signs with chondrodysplasia punctata and the disseminated calcifications give new insights into its pathophysiology. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of fog and rain water collected at Delta Barrage, Egypt as a new resource for irrigated agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Talaat A.; Omar, Mohie El Din M.; El Gammal, H. A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Alternative clean water resources are needed in Egypt to face the current water shortage and water quality deterioration. Therefore, this research investigates the suitability of harvesting fog and rain water for irrigation using a pilot fog collector for water quantity, water quality, and economic aspects. A pilot fog collector was installed at one location at Delta Barrage, Egypt. Freeze liquid nitrogen was fixed at the back of the fiberglass sheet to increase the condensation rate. The experiment was conducted during the period from November 2015 to February 2016. In general, all physicochemical variables are observed with higher values in the majority of fog than rain water. The fog is assumed to contain higher concentrations of anthropogenic emissions. TDS in both waters collected are less than 700 mg/l at sodium content less than 60%, classifying these waters as good for various plants under most conditions. In addition, SAR calculated values are less than 3.0 in each of fog and rain water, which proves the water suitability for all irrigated agriculture. Al and Fe concentrations were found common in all samples with values less than the permissible limits of the guidelines. These metals originate from soil material, ash and metal surfaces. The sensitive heavy metals (Cd and Pb) were within the permissible limits of the guideline in fog water, indicating this water is suitable for irrigation. On the contrary, rain water that has heavy metals is not permitted in irrigation water as per the Egyptian law. As per WQI, the rain water is classified as good quality while fog is classified as medium quality. Regarding the water quantity, a significant increase in the harvested fog quantity was observed after cooling the collector surface with freeze liquid nitrogen. The current fog collector produced the lowest water quantity among different fog collectors worldwide. However, these comparative results confirmed that quantity is different from one location to another

  20. Prediction of Ablation Rates from Solid Surfaces Exposed to High Temperature Gas Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuzlu, Kazim M.; Coote, David

    2013-01-01

    ablation. Two different ablation models are proposed to determine the heat loss from the solid surface due to the ablation of the solid material. Both of them are physics based. Various numerical simulations were carried out using both models to predict the temperature distribution in the solid and in the gas flow, and then predict the ablation rates at a typical NTR motor hydrogen gas temperature and pressure. Solid mass loss rate per foot of a pipe was also calculated from these predictions. The results are presented for fully developed turbulent flow conditions in a sample SS pipe with a 6 inch diameter.

  1. Effects of acid rain on grapevines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Dee, R.J.; Kender, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, 8 additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid rain solutions at pH 2.75 and 3.25. With Concord in 1981, few foliar lesions on leaves were visible at pH 2.75. In contrast, many leaf lesions with decreased fruit soluble solids were observed at pH 2.5 in 1980. The relationship between acid-rain and oxidant stipple, chlorosis, and soluble solids in the absence of acid rain leaf lesions at pH>2.5 remains unclear. Acute sprays (pH2.75) at anthesis reduced pollen germination in four grape cultivars. However, fruit set was reduced in only one of these. Grape yields were not influenced by acid rain treatments. There was no evidence that acid-rain at ambient pH levels had negative effects on grape production or fruit quality.

  2. Exploitation of cloud top characterization from three-channel IR measurements in a physical PMW rain retrieval algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Torricella

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall intensity estimates by passive microwave (PMW measurements from space perform generally better over the sea surface with respect to land, due to the problems in separating true rain signatures from those produced by surfaces having similar spectral behaviour (e.g. snow, ice, desert and semiarid grounds. The screening procedure aimed at recognizing the various surface types and delimit precipitation is based on tests that rely on PMW measurements only and global thresholds. The shortcoming is that the approach tries to discard spurious precipitating features (often detected over the land-sea border thus leading to no-rain conservative tests and thresholds. The TRMM mission, with its long record of simultaneous data from the Visible and Infrared Radiometer System (VIRS, the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI and rain profiles from the Precipitation Radar (PR allows for unambiguous testing of the usefulness of cloud top characterization in rain detection. An intense precipitation event over the North Africa is analysed exploiting a night microphysical RGB scheme applied to VIRS measurements to classify and characterize the components of the observed scenario and to discriminate the various types of clouds. This classification is compared to the rain intensity maps derived from TMI by means of the Goddard profiling algorithm and to the near-surface rain intensities derived from PR. The comparison allows to quantify the difference between the two rain retrievals and to assess the usefulness of RGB analysis in identifying areas of precipitation.

  3. Effects of scaffold surface morphology on cell adhesion and survival rate in vitreous cryopreservation of tenocyte-scaffold constructs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhi [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Bone and Joint Surgery, The affiliated hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou 646000 (China); Qing, Quan [Sichuan College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Mianyang 621000 (China); Regenerative Medicine Research Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chen, Xi; Liu, Cheng-Jun; Luo, Jing-Cong [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Hu, Jin-Lian [Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); Qin, Ting-Wu, E-mail: tingwuqin@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The shapes of tenocytes varied when seeded on different surface of scaffolds. • Tenocytes were flat on smooth surface and spindle on micro-grooved surface. • Tenocytes were ellipse or spindle on porous surface. • Tenocytes got varying adhesion shape and elongation index on varying surfaces. • The tenocyte survival on porous surface was superior to the other two groups. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of scaffold surface morphology on cell adhesion and survival rate in vitreous cryopreservation of tenocyte-scaffold constructs. Tenocytes were obtained from tail tendons of rats. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was used to fabricate three types of scaffolds with varying surface morphological characteristics, i.e., smooth, micro-grooved, and porous surfaces, respectively. The tenocytes were seeded on the surfaces of the scaffolds to form tenocyte-scaffold constructs. The constructs were cryopreserved in a vitreous cryoprotectant (CPA) with a multi-step protocol. The cell adhesion to scaffolds was observed with electronic scanning microscopy (SEM). The elongation index of the living tenocytes and ratio of live/dead cell number were examined based on a live/dead dual fluorescent staining technique, and the survival rate of tenocytes was studied with flow cytometry (FC). The results showed the shapes of tenocytes varied between the different groups: flat or polygonal (on smooth surface), spindle (on micro-grooved surface), and spindle or ellipse (on porous surface). After thawing, the porous surface got the most living tenocytes and a higher survival rate, suggesting its potential application for vitreous cryopreservation of engineered tendon constructs.

  4. Emergent relation between surface vapor conductance and relative humidity profiles yields evaporation rates from weather data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvucci, Guido D; Gentine, Pierre

    2013-04-16

    The ability to predict terrestrial evapotranspiration (E) is limited by the complexity of rate-limiting pathways as water moves through the soil, vegetation (roots, xylem, stomata), canopy air space, and the atmospheric boundary layer. The impossibility of specifying the numerous parameters required to model this process in full spatial detail has necessitated spatially upscaled models that depend on effective parameters such as the surface vapor conductance (C(surf)). C(surf) accounts for the biophysical and hydrological effects on diffusion through the soil and vegetation substrate. This approach, however, requires either site-specific calibration of C(surf) to measured E, or further parameterization based on metrics such as leaf area, senescence state, stomatal conductance, soil texture, soil moisture, and water table depth. Here, we show that this key, rate-limiting, parameter can be estimated from an emergent relationship between the diurnal cycle of the relative humidity profile and E. The relation is that the vertical variance of the relative humidity profile is less than would occur for increased or decreased evaporation rates, suggesting that land-atmosphere feedback processes minimize this variance. It is found to hold over a wide range of climate conditions (arid-humid) and limiting factors (soil moisture, leaf area, energy). With this relation, estimates of E and C(surf) can be obtained globally from widely available meteorological measurements, many of which have been archived since the early 1900s. In conjunction with precipitation and stream flow, long-term E estimates provide insights and empirical constraints on projected accelerations of the hydrologic cycle.

  5. Satellite observations of rainfall effect on sea surface salinity in the waters adjacent to Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chung-Ru; Hsu, Po-Chun; Lin, Chen-Chih; Huang, Shih-Jen

    2017-10-01

    Changes of oceanic salinity are highly related to the variations of evaporation and precipitation. To understand the influence of rainfall on the sea surface salinity (SSS) in the waters adjacent to Taiwan, satellite remote sensing data from the year of 2012 to 2014 are employed in this study. The daily rain rate data obtained from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I), Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's Microwave Imager (TRMM/TMI), Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR), and WindSat Polarimetric Radiometer. The SSS data was derived from the measurements of radiometer instruments onboard the Aquarius satellite. The results show the average values of SSS in east of Taiwan, east of Luzon and South China Sea are 33.83 psu, 34.05 psu, and 32.84 psu, respectively, in the condition of daily rain rate higher than 1 mm/hr. In contrast to the rainfall condition, the average values of SSS are 34.07 psu, 34.26 psu, and 33.09 psu in the three areas, respectively at no rain condition (rain rate less than 1 mm/hr). During the cases of heavy rainfall caused by spiral rain bands of typhoon, the SSS is diluted with an average value of -0.78 psu when the average rain rate is higher than 4 mm/hr. However, the SSS was increased after temporarily decreased during the typhoon cases. A possible reason to explain this phenomenon is that the heavy rainfall caused by the spiral rain bands of typhoon may dilute the sea surface water, but the strong winds can uplift the higher salinity of subsurface water to the sea surface.

  6. Deep Joint Rain Detection and Removal from a Single Image

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wenhan; Tan, Robby T.; Feng, Jiashi; Liu, Jiaying; Guo, Zongming; Yan, Shuicheng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address a rain removal problem from a single image, even in the presence of heavy rain and rain streak accumulation. Our core ideas lie in the new rain image models and a novel deep learning architecture. We first modify an existing model comprising a rain streak layer and a background layer, by adding a binary map that locates rain streak regions. Second, we create a new model consisting of a component representing rain streak accumulation (where individual streaks cannot b...

  7. Modeling dose-rate on/over the surface of cylindrical radio-models using Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Xuefu; Ma Guoxue; Wen Fuping; Wang Zhongqi; Wang Chaohui; Zhang Jiyun; Huang Qingbo; Zhang Jiaqiu; Wang Xinxing; Wang Jun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models, which belong to the Metrology Station of Radio-Geological Survey of CNNC. Methods: The dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models were modeled using the famous Monte Carlo code-MCNP. The dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models were measured by a high gas pressurized ionization chamber dose-rate meter, respectively. The values of dose-rate modeled using MCNP code were compared with those obtained by authors in the present experimental measurement, and with those obtained by other workers previously. Some factors causing the discrepancy between the data obtained by authors using MCNP code and the data obtained using other methods are discussed in this paper. Results: The data of dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models, obtained using MCNP code, were in good agreement with those obtained by other workers using the theoretical method. They were within the discrepancy of ±5% in general, and the maximum discrepancy was less than 10%. Conclusions: As if each factor needed for the Monte Carlo code is correct, the dose-rates on/over the surface of cylindrical radio-models modeled using the Monte Carlo code are correct with an uncertainty of 3%

  8. In-situ GPS records of surface mass balance, firn compaction rates, and ice-shelf basal melt rates for Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shean, D. E.; Christianson, K.; Larson, K. M.; Ligtenberg, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Smith, B.; Stevens, C.

    2016-12-01

    In recent decades, Pine Island Glacier (PIG) has experienced marked retreat, speedup and thinning due to ice-shelf basal melt, internal ice-stream instability and feedbacks between these processes. In an effort to constrain recent ice-stream dynamics and evaluate potential causes of retreat, we analyzed 2008-2010 and 2012-2014 GPS records for PIG. We computed time series of horizontal velocity, strain rate, multipath-based antenna height, surface elevation, and Lagrangian elevation change (Dh/Dt). These data provide validation for complementary high-resolution WorldView stereo digital elevation model (DEM) records, with sampled DEM vertical error of 0.7 m. The GPS antenna height time series document a relative surface elevation increase of 0.7-1.0 m/yr, which is consistent with estimated surface mass balance (SMB) of 0.7-0.9 m.w.e./yr from RACMO2.3 and firn compaction rates from the IMAU-FDM dynamic firn model. An abrupt 0.2-0.3 m surface elevation decrease due to surface melt and/or greater near-surface firn compaction is observed during a period of warm atmospheric temperatures from December 2012 to January 2013. Observed surface Dh/Dt for all PIG shelf sites is highly linear with trends of -1 to -4 m/yr and PIG shelf and 4 m/yr for the South shelf. These melt rates are similar to those derived from ice-bottom acoustic ranging, phase-sensitive ice-penetrating radar, and high-resolution stereo DEM records. The GPS/DEM records document higher melt rates within and near transverse surface depressions and rifts associated with longitudinal extension. Basal melt rates for the 2012-2014 period show limited temporal variability, despite significant change in ocean heat content. This suggests that sub-shelf melt rates are less sensitive to ocean heat content than previously reported, at least for these locations and time periods.

  9. Impact of source position on high-dose-rate skin surface applicator dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jeho; Barker, Christopher A; Zaider, Marco; Cohen, Gil'ad N

    2016-01-01

    Skin surface dosimetric discrepancies between measured and treatment planning system predicted values were traced to source position sag inside the applicator and to source transit time. We quantified their dosimetric impact and propose corrections for clinical use. We measured the dose profiles from the Varian Leipzig-style high-dose-rate (HDR) skin applicator, using EBT3 film, photon diode, and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter for three different GammaMedplus HDR afterloaders. The measured dose profiles at several depths were compared with BrachyVision Acuros calculated profiles. To assess the impact of the source sag, two different applicator orientations were considered. The dose contribution during source transit was assessed by comparing diode measurements using an HDR timer and an electrometer timer. Depth doses measured using the three dosimeters were in good agreement, but were consistently higher than the Acuros dose calculations. Measurements with the applicator face up were significantly (exceeding 10%) lower than those in the face down position, due to source sag inside the applicator. Based on the inverse square law, the effective source sag was evaluated to be about 0.5 mm from the planned position. The additional dose during source transit was evaluated to be about 2.8% for 30 seconds of treatment with a 40700 U (10 Ci) source. With a very short source-to-surface distance, the small source sag inside the applicator has a significant dosimetric impact. This effect is unaccounted for in the vendor's treatment planning template and should be considered before the clinical use of the applicator. Further investigation of other applicators with large source lumen diameter may be warranted. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Adhesive-Bonded Composite Joint Analysis with Delaminated Surface Ply Using Strain-Energy Release Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadegani, Alireza; Yang, Chihdar; Smeltzer, Stanley S. III

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model to determine the strain energy release rate due to an interlaminar crack of the surface ply in adhesively bonded composite joints subjected to axial tension. Single-lap shear-joint standard test specimen geometry with thick bondline is followed for model development. The field equations are formulated by using the first-order shear-deformation theory in laminated plates together with kinematics relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. The system of second-order differential equations is solved to using the symbolic computation tool Maple 9.52 to provide displacements fields. The equivalent forces at the tip of the prescribed interlaminar crack are obtained based on interlaminar stress distributions. The strain energy release rate of the crack is then determined by using the crack closure method. Finite element analyses using the J integral as well as the crack closure method are performed to verify the developed analytical model. It has been shown that the results using the analytical method correlate well with the results from the finite element analyses. An attempt is made to predict the failure loads of the joints based on limited test data from the literature. The effectiveness of the inclusion of bondline thickness is justified when compared with the results obtained from the previous model in which a thin bondline and uniform adhesive stresses through the bondline thickness are assumed.

  11. Rain Scattering and Co-ordinate Distance Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hajny

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Calculations of scattered field on the rain objects are based on using of Multiple MultiPole (MMP numerical method. Both bi-static scattering function and bi-static scattering cross section are calculated in the plane parallel to Earth surface. The co-ordination area was determined using the simple model of scattering volume [1]. Calculation for frequency 9.595 GHz and antenna elevation of 25° was done. Obtained results are compared with calculation in accordance to ITU-R recommendation.

  12. Heart rate variability and surface electromyography of trained cyclists at different cadences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Saraiva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The heart rate variability (HRV and surface electromyography (sEMG are important tools in the evaluation of cardiac autonomic system and neuromuscular parameters, respectively. The aim of the study was to evaluate the behavior of HRV and sEMG of the vastus lateralis in two exercise protocols on a cycle ergometer at 60 and 80 rpm. Eight healthy men cyclists who have trained for at least two years were evaluated. Reduction was observed followed by stabilization of RMSSD and SDNN indices of HRV (p<0.05 along with increases in the amplitude of the sEMG signal (p<0.05 in both protocols. Significant correlations were observed between the responses of HRV and sEMG in the cadence of 60 rpm (RMSSD and sEMG: r = -0.42, p=0.03; SDNN and sEMG: r = -0.45, p=0.01 and 80 rpm (RMSSD and sEMG: r = -0.47, p=0.02; SDNN and sEMG: r = -0.49, p=0.01, yet no difference was observed for these variables between the two protocols. We concluded that the parasympathetic cardiac responses and sEMG are independent of cadences applied at the same power output.

  13. A Krebs Cycle Component Limits Caspase Activation Rate through Mitochondrial Surface Restriction of CRL Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aram, Lior; Braun, Tslil; Braverman, Carmel; Kaplan, Yosef; Ravid, Liat; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Arama, Eli

    2016-04-04

    How cells avoid excessive caspase activity and unwanted cell death during apoptotic caspase-mediated removal of large cellular structures is poorly understood. We investigate caspase-mediated extrusion of spermatid cytoplasmic contents in Drosophila during spermatid individualization. We show that a Krebs cycle component, the ATP-specific form of the succinyl-CoA synthetase β subunit (A-Sβ), binds to and activates the Cullin-3-based ubiquitin ligase (CRL3) complex required for caspase activation in spermatids. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that this interaction occurs on the mitochondrial surface, thereby limiting the source of CRL3 complex activation to the vicinity of this organelle and reducing the potential rate of caspase activation by at least 60%. Domain swapping between A-Sβ and the GTP-specific SCSβ (G-Sβ), which functions redundantly in the Krebs cycle, show that the metabolic and structural roles of A-Sβ in spermatids can be uncoupled, highlighting a moonlighting function of this Krebs cycle component in CRL activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Commentary on the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun II. Insight Relative to Coronal Rain and Splashdown Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Coronal rain represents blobs of solar material with a width of ∼ 300 km and a length of ∼ 700 km which are falling from the active region of the corona towards the solar surface along loop-like paths. Conversely, coronal showers are com prised of much larger bulks of matter, or clumps of solar rain. Beyond coronal rain and showers, the expulsion of solar matter from the surface, whether through flares, pro minences, or coronal mass ejections, can result in massive disruptions which have bee n observed to rise far into the corona, return towards the Sun, and splashdown onto the phot osphere. The existence of coronal rain and the splashdown of mass ejections onto the so lar surface constitute the twenty-third and twenty-fourth lines of evidence that the S un is condensed matter.

  15. Tear-Film Evaporation Rate from Simultaneous Ocular-Surface Temperature and Tear-Breakup Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursch, Thomas J; Li, Wing; Taraz, Baseem; Lin, Meng C; Radke, Clayton J

    2018-01-01

    A corneal heat-transfer model is presented to quantify simultaneous measurements of fluorescein tear-breakup area (TBA) and ocular-surface temperature (OST). By accounting for disruption of the tear-film lipid layer (TFLL), we report evaporation rates through lipid-covered tear. The modified heat-transfer model provides new insights into evaporative dry eye. A quantitative analysis is presented to assess human aqueous tear evaporation rate (TER) through intact TFLLs from simultaneous in vivo measurement of time-dependent infrared OST and fluorescein TBA. We interpret simultaneous OST and TBA measurements using an extended heat-transfer model. We hypothesize that TBAs are ineffectively insulated by the TFLL and therefore exhibit higher TER than does that for a well-insulting TFLL-covered tear. As time proceeds, TBAs increase in number and size, thereby increasing the cornea area-averaged TER and decreasing OST. Tear-breakup areas were assessed from image analysis of fluorescein tear-film-breakup video recordings and are included in the heat-transfer description of OST. Model-predicted OSTs agree well with clinical experiments. Percent reductions in TER of lipid-covered tear range from 50 to 95% of that for pure water, in good agreement with literature. The physical picture of noninsulating or ruptured TFLL spots followed by enhanced evaporation from underlying cooler tear-film ruptures is consistent with the evaporative-driven mechanism for local tear rupture. A quantitative analysis is presented of in vivo TER from simultaneous clinical measurement of transient OST and TBA. The new heat-transfer model accounts for increased TER through expanding TBAs. Tear evaporation rate varies strongly across the cornea because lipid is effectively missing over tear-rupture troughs. The result is local faster evaporation compared with nonruptured, thick lipid-covered tear. Evaporative-driven tear-film ruptures deepen to a thickness where fluorescein quenching commences and local

  16. Performance of Using Cascade Forward Back Propagation Neural Networks for Estimating Rain Parameters with Rain Drop Size Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddi Tengeleng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study is to estimate the parameters M (water content, R (rain rate and Z (radar reflectivity with raindrop size distribution by using the neural network method. Our investigations have been conducted in five African localities: Abidjan (Côte d’Ivoire, Boyele (Congo-Brazzaville, Debuncha (Cameroon, Dakar (Senegal and Niamey (Niger. For the first time, we have predicted the values of the various parameters in each locality after using neural models (LANN which have been developed with locally obtained disdrometer data. We have shown that each LANN can be used under other latitudes to get satisfactory results. Secondly, we have also constructed a model, using as train-data, a combination of data issued from all five localities. With this last model called PANN, we could obtain satisfactory estimates forall localities. Lastly, we have distinguished between stratiform and convective rain while building the neural networks. In fact, using simulation data from stratiform rain situations, we have obtained smaller root mean square errors (RMSE between neural values and disdrometer values than using data issued from convective situations.

  17. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  18. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-07-10

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  19. [Effects of simulated acid rain on Quercus glauca seedlings photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Shu-quan; Jiang, Fu-wei; Yin, Xiu-min; Lu, Mei-juan

    2009-09-01

    Taking the seedlings of Quercus glauca, a dominant evergreen broadleaf tree species in subtropical area, as test materials, this paper studied their photosynthesis, chlorophyll fluorescence, and chlorophyll content under effects of simulated acid rain with pH 2.5, 4.0, and 5.6 (CK). After 2-year acid rain stress, the net photosynthetic rate of Q. glauca increased significantly with decreasing pH of acid rain. The acid rain with pH 2.5 and 4.0 increased the stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, and the effect was more significant under pH 2.5. The intercellular CO2 concentration decreased in the order of pH 2.5 > pH 5.6 > pH 4.0. The maximum photosynthetic rate, light compensation point, light saturation point, and dark respiration rate were significantly higher under pH 2.5 and 4.0 than under pH 5.6, while the apparent quantum yield was not sensitive to acid rain stress. The maximal photochemical efficiency of PS II and the potential activity of PS II under pH 2.5 and 4.0 were significantly higher than those under pH 5.6. The relative chlorophyll content was in the order of pH 2.5 > pH 5.6 > pH 4.0, and there was a significant difference between pH 2.5 and 4.0. All the results suggested that the photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence of Q. glauca increased under the effects of acid rain with pH 2.5 and 4.0, and the acid rain with pH 2.5 had more obvious effects.

  20. Variable-focus microscopy and UV surface dissolution imaging as complementary techniques in intrinsic dissolution rate determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ward, Adam; Walton, Karl; Box, Karl

    2017-01-01

    This work reports a novel approach to the assessment of the surface properties of compacts used in Surface Dissolution Imaging (SDI). SDI is useful for determining intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR), an important parameter in early stage drug development. Surface topography, post-compaction and post-SDI...... possible polymorphic changes that may have occurred post-compaction and post-SDI run. IBUs IDR decreased from 0.033mg/min/cm(2) to 0.022mg/min/cm(2) from 10 to 20min, respectively, during the experiment. XRD and DSC showed no form changes during the SDI run. The surface topography images showed...... that a distinct imprint was embossed on the surfaces of some compacts which could affect IDRs. Surface parameter values were associated with the SDI experiments which showed strong correlations with the IDR values. The variable-focus microscope can be used as a complimentary tool in the determination of IDR...

  1. Rain Initiation Time in Turbulent Warm Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkovich, Gregory; Stepanov, Mikhail G.; Vucelja, Marija

    2006-04-01

    A mean field model is presented that describes droplet growth resulting from condensation and collisions and droplet loss resulting from fallout. The model allows for an effective numerical simulation. The numerical scheme that is conservative in water mass and keeps accurate count of the number of droplets is applied, and the way in which the rain initiation time depends on different parameters is studied. In particular, it is shown that the rain initiation time depends nonmonotonically (has a minimum) on the number of cloud condensation nuclei. Also presented is a simple model that allows one to estimate the rain initiation time for turbulent clouds with an inhomogeneous concentration of cloud condensation nuclei. It is argued that by overseeding even a part of a cloud by small hygroscopic nuclei one can substantially delay the onset of precipitation.

  2. Propagating Characteristics of Pulsed Laser in Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the performance of laser ranging system under the rain weather condition, we need to know the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain. In this paper, the absorption and attenuation coefficients were calculated based on the scattering theories in discrete stochastic media, and the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain were simulated and analyzed using Monte-Carlo method. Some simulation results were verified by experiments, and the simulation results are well matched with the experimental data, with the maximal deviation not less than 7.5%. The results indicated that the propagating laser beam would be attenuated and distorted due to the scattering and absorption of raindrops, and the energy attenuation and pulse shape distortion strongly depended on the laser pulse widths.

  3. Electron dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure of the skin from uniformly deposited activity on the body surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Dose-rate conversion factors have been calculated for external exposure of the skin from electrons emitted by sources that are deposited uniformly on the body surface. The dose-rate factors are obtained from electron scaled point kernels developed by Berger. The dose-rate factors are calculated at depths of 4, 8, and 40 mg cm-2 below the body surface as recommended by Whitton, and at a depth of 7 mg cm-2 as recommended in ICRP Publication 26 (ICRP77). The dependence of the dose-rate factors at selected depths on the energy of the emitted electrons is displayed. The dose-rate factors for selected radionuclides of potential importance in radiological assessments are tabulated

  4. The dissociation and recombination rates of CH4through the Ni(111) surface: The effect of lattice motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenji; Zhao, Yi

    2017-07-28

    Methane dissociation is a prototypical system for the study of surface reaction dynamics. The dissociation and recombination rates of CH 4 through the Ni(111) surface are calculated by using the quantum instanton method with an analytical potential energy surface. The Ni(111) lattice is treated rigidly, classically, and quantum mechanically so as to reveal the effect of lattice motion. The results demonstrate that it is the lateral displacements rather than the upward and downward movements of the surface nickel atoms that affect the rates a lot. Compared with the rigid lattice, the classical relaxation of the lattice can increase the rates by lowering the free energy barriers. For instance, at 300 K, the dissociation and recombination rates with the classical lattice exceed the ones with the rigid lattice by 6 and 10 orders of magnitude, respectively. Compared with the classical lattice, the quantum delocalization rather than the zero-point energy of the Ni atoms further enhances the rates by widening the reaction path. For instance, the dissociation rate with the quantum lattice is about 10 times larger than that with the classical lattice at 300 K. On the rigid lattice, due to the zero-point energy difference between CH 4 and CD 4 , the kinetic isotope effects are larger than 1 for the dissociation process, while they are smaller than 1 for the recombination process. The increasing kinetic isotope effect with decreasing temperature demonstrates that the quantum tunneling effect is remarkable for the dissociation process.

  5. Acid rain and electric utilities 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This proceedings contains more than 100 technical presentations dealing with a variety of topics concerning the Title IV acid rain provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Some of the major topics addressed include: emerging environmental issues impacting electric utilities (proposed revisions to the ozone and particulate matter NAAQS), acid rain program overview, continuous emissions monitoring rule revisions, global climate change and CO 2 , emissions data management, Clean Air Power Initiative and regional issues, compliance/designated representative, flow monitoring, emissions control technology, allowance and trading, emission reductions, NO x control issues, hazardous air pollutants, and CEMS advances

  6. Allowance System: Proposed acid-rain rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed four rules containing the core acid rain requirements: the Permits Rule (40 CFR Part 72), the Allowance System Rule (40 CFR Part 73), the Continuous Emission Monitoring Rule (40 CFR Part 75), and the Excess Emissions Rule (40 CFR Part 77). EPA will also propose additional rules at a future date. These rules will include requirements for facilities that elect to opt into the Acid Rain Program (40 CFR Part 74) and for the nitrogen oxide (NOx) control program (40 CFR Part 76). The fact sheet summarizes the key components of EPA's proposed Allowance System

  7. Monsoon rains over West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Schupelius, Gert-Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    Potential mechanisms producing high or low seasonal rainfall in tropical West Africa are investigated for the period 1963–74 using monthly data of precipitation, surface pressure in the South Atlantic and rawinsondes, mainly in Africa. Contrary to widespread opinion, the South Atlantic pressures yielded no correlation; the best connection was between rainfall and upper-level African observations.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1976.tb00700.x

  8. Flying in the rain: hovering performance of Anna's hummingbirds under varied precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Dudley, Robert

    2012-10-07

    Flight in rain represents a greater challenge for smaller animals because the relative effects of water loading and drop impact are greater at reduced scales given the increased ratios of surface area to mass. Nevertheless, it is well known that small volant taxa such as hummingbirds can continue foraging even in extreme precipitation. Here, we evaluated the effect of four rain intensities (i.e. zero, light, moderate and heavy) on the hovering performance of Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) under laboratory conditions. Light-to-moderate rain had only a marginal effect on flight kinematics; wingbeat frequency of individuals in moderate rain was reduced by 7 per cent relative to control conditions. By contrast, birds hovering in heavy rain adopted more horizontal body and tail positions, and also increased wingbeat frequency substantially, while reducing stroke amplitude when compared with control conditions. The ratio between peak forces produced by single drops on a wing and on a solid surface suggests that feathers can absorb associated impact forces by up to approximately 50 per cent. Remarkably, hummingbirds hovered well even under heavy precipitation (i.e. 270 mm h(-1)) with no apparent loss of control, although mechanical power output assuming perfect and zero storage of elastic energy was estimated to be about 9 and 57 per cent higher, respectively, compared with normal hovering.

  9. Average BER and outage probability of the ground-to-train OWC link in turbulence with rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixin; Yang, Yanqiu; Hu, Beibei; Yu, Lin; Hu, Zheng-Da

    2017-09-01

    The bit-error rate (BER) and outage probability of optical wireless communication (OWC) link for the ground-to-train of the curved track in turbulence with rain is evaluated. Considering the re-modulation effects of raining fluctuation on optical signal modulated by turbulence, we set up the models of average BER and outage probability in the present of pointing errors, based on the double inverse Gaussian (IG) statistical distribution model. The numerical results indicate that, for the same covered track length, the larger curvature radius increases the outage probability and average BER. The performance of the OWC link in turbulence with rain is limited mainly by the rain rate and pointing errors which are induced by the beam wander and train vibration. The effect of the rain rate on the performance of the link is more severe than the atmospheric turbulence, but the fluctuation owing to the atmospheric turbulence affects the laser beam propagation more greatly than the skewness of the rain distribution. Besides, the turbulence-induced beam wander has a more significant impact on the system in heavier rain. We can choose the size of transmitting and receiving apertures and improve the shockproof performance of the tracks to optimize the communication performance of the system.

  10. Urban evaporation rates for water-permeable pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, P; Göbel, P; Coldewey, W G

    2010-01-01

    In urban areas the natural water balance is disturbed. Infiltration and evaporation are reduced, resulting in a high surface runoff and a typical city climate, which can lead to floods and damages. Water-permeable pavements have a high infiltration rate that reduces surface runoff by increasing the groundwater recharge. The high water retention capacity of the street body of up to 51 l/m(2) and its connection via pores to the surface lead to higher evaporation rates than impermeable surfaces. A comparison of these two kinds of pavements shows a 16% increase in evaporation levels of water-permeable pavements. Furthermore, the evaporation from impermeable pavements is linked directly to rain events due to fast-drying surfaces. Water-permeable pavements show a more evenly distributed evaporation after a rain event. Cooling effects by evaporative heat loss can improve the city climate even several days after rain events. On a large scale use, uncomfortable weather like sultriness or dry heat can be prevented and the urban water balance can be attenuated towards the natural.

  11. Experimental drought in a tropical rain forest increases soil carbon dioxide losses to the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Cory C; Wieder, William R; Reed, Sasha C; Townsend, Alan R

    2010-08-01

    Climate models predict precipitation changes for much of the humid tropics, yet few studies have investigated the potential consequences of drought on soil carbon (C) cycling in this important biome. In wet tropical forests, drought could stimulate soil respiration via overall reductions in soil anoxia, but previous research suggests that litter decomposition is positively correlated with high rainfall fluxes that move large quantities of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the litter layer to the soil surface. Thus, reduced rainfall could also limit C delivery to the soil surface, reducing respiration rates. We conducted a throughfall manipulation experiment to investigate how 25% and 50% reductions in rainfall altered both C movement into soils and the effects of those DOM fluxes on soil respiration rates. In response to the experimental drought, soil respiration rates increased in both the -25% and -50% treatments. Throughfall fluxes were reduced by 26% and 55% in the -25% and -50% treatments, respectively. However, total DOM fluxes leached from the litter did not vary between treatments, because the concentrations of leached DOM reaching the soil surface increased in response to the simulated drought. Annual DOM concentrations averaged 7.7 +/- 0.8, 11.2 +/- 0.9, and 15.8 +/- 1.2 mg C/L in the control, -25%, and -50% plots, respectively, and DOM concentrations were positively correlated with soil respiration rates. A laboratory incubation experiment confirmed the potential importance of DOM concentration on soil respiration rates, suggesting that this mechanism could contribute to the increase in CO2 fluxes observed in the reduced rainfall plots. Across all plots, the data suggested that soil CO2 fluxes were partially regulated by the magnitude and concentration of soluble C delivered to the soil, but also by soil moisture and soil oxygen availability. Together, our data suggest that declines in precipitation in tropical rain forests could drive higher CO2

  12. Validity of the formalism of calculation in surface TG-43 brachytherapy high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granero, D.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Vijande, J.; Ballester, F.; Rivard, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the clinical implications and limitations in implant surface with a source of HDR very close or in contact with the surface of the skin, also studied the effect of bolus on the implant. The two available radionuclides have been studied commercially in HDR, Ir-192 and Co-60 units. (Author)

  13. Research on the effect of coverage rate on the surface quality in laser direct writing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xuetao; Tu, Dawei

    2017-07-01

    Direct writing technique is usually used in femtosecond laser two-photon micromachining. The size of the scanning step is an important factor affecting the surface quality and machining efficiency of micro devices. According to the mechanism of two-photon polymerization, combining the distribution function of light intensity and the free radical concentration theory, we establish the mathematical model of coverage of solidification unit, then analyze the effect of coverage on the machining quality and efficiency. Using the principle of exposure equivalence, we also obtained the analytic expressions of the relationship among the surface quality characteristic parameters of microdevices and the scanning step, and carried out the numerical simulation and experiment. The results show that the scanning step has little influence on the surface quality of the line when it is much smaller than the size of the solidification unit. However, with increasing scanning step, the smoothness of line surface is reduced rapidly, and the surface quality becomes much worse.

  14. Hot-electron-mediated desorption rates calculated from excited-state potential energy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for desorption induced by (multiple) electronic transitions [DIET (DIMET)] based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the delta self-consistent field extension of density-functional theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on various...... transition-metal surfaces and show that classical nuclear dynamics does not suffice for propagation in the excited state. We present a simple Hamiltonian describing the system with parameters obtained from the excited-state potential energy surface and show that this model can describe desorption dynamics...... in both the DIET and DIMET regimes and reproduce the power-law behavior observed experimentally. We observe that the internal stretch degree of freedom in the molecules is crucial for the energy transfer between the hot electrons and the molecule when the coupling to the surface is strong....

  15. Evaluation method of gas leakage rate from transportation casks of radioactive materials (gas leakage rates from scratches on O-ring surface)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aritomi, Masanori; Li Ninghua; Asano, Ryoji; Kawa, Tsunemichi

    2004-01-01

    A sealing function is essential for transportation and/or storage casks of radioactive materials under both normal and accidental operating conditions in order to prevent radioactive materials from being released into the environment. In the safety analysis report, the release rate of radioactive materials into the environment is evaluated using the correlations specified in the ANSI N14.5, 1987. The purposes of the work are to reveal the underlying problems on the correlations specified in the ANSI N14.5 related to gas leakage rates from a scratch on O-ring surface and from multi-leak paths, to offer a data base to study the evaluation method of the leakage rate and to propose the evaluation method. In this paper, the following insights were obtained and clarified: 1. If a characteristic value of a leak path is defined as D 4 /a ('D' is the diameter and 'a' is the length), a scratch on the O-ring surface can be evaluated as a circular tube. 2. It is proper to use the width of O-ring groove on the flange as the leak path length for elastomer O-rings. 3. Gas leakage rates from multi leak paths of the transportation cask can be evaluated in the same manner as a single leak path if an effective D4/a is introduced. (author)

  16. Evolution of drop size distribution in natural rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Adderio, Leo Pio; Porcù, Federico; Tokay, Ali

    2018-02-01

    Both numerical modeling and laboratory experiments document the possibility of a raindrop size distribution (DSD) to evolve to an equilibrium stage (EDSD), where all the principal processes occur at steady rates. The aim of this work is to observe the temporal behavior of the DSD and to directly investigate the conditions favorable to the onset of the EDSD in natural rain. We exploited a large disdrometer dataset collected in the framework of the Ground Validation activities related to the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement mission. More than 200,000 one-minute data of two-dimensional video disdrometer (2DVD) are collected over USA to represent a wide range of precipitation types. The original data are averaged over 2 min and an automatic algorithm is used on a selected subset to identify samples with EDSD. Results show that the EDSD occurs mainly in convective events and lasts for very short time intervals (2 to 4 min). It is more frequent for rain rate between 20 and 40 mm h- 1 and it mostly occurs during sharp increase of precipitation rates.

  17. Acid Rain Materials for Classroom Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Lance; Kooser, Robert G.

    This booklet contains three separate papers suitable for use in an advanced high school or college chemistry course. The first paper provides background information on acids and bases. The second paper provides additional background information, focusing on certain aspects of atmospheric chemistry as it relates to the acid rain problem. An attempt…

  18. Acid Rain. Teacher's Guide. LHS GEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Colin; Barber, Jacqueline; Coonrod, Jan

    This teacher's guide presents a unit on acid rain and introduces hands-on activities for sixth through eighth grade students. In each unit, students act as real scientists and gather evidence by using science process skills such as observing, measuring and recording data, classifying, role playing, problem solving, critical thinking, synthesizing…

  19. Acid Rain: A Student's First Sourcebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Beth Ann; And Others

    The purpose of this guide is to help students better understand the science, citizen action, and research issues that are part of the acid rain problem. The guide is designed for students in grades 4-8 and their teachers. Following an introduction, the first seven sections are informative in nature. They include: (1) "Observations about Acidity";…

  20. 7746 CONCENTRATIONS OF FORMALDEHYDE IN RAIN WATERS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Win7Ent

    2013-06-03

    Jun 3, 2013 ... below the toxicity level recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and other world bodies for drinking water. In conclusion, the results of the rain waters collected for the period of assay suggests that the values did not cause any toxicity effects and thus were fit for human consumption based on ...

  1. Urban dew and rain in Paris, France: Occurrence and physico-chemical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beysens, D.; Mongruel, A.; Acker, K.

    2017-06-01

    This paper summarizes one year (April 2011 to March 2012) measurements on planar condensing surfaces of dew and rain events and related physico-chemical characteristics in the urban environment of Paris (city center). Yearly collected water was 3.48 mm for dew (63 events) and 593 mm for rain (146 events). The latter value compares well with rain data (547 mm and 107 events) collected within 12 km at Paris-Orly airport. An estimation of dew yield based on meteo data gives 2.35 mm and 74 events, to be compared with 17.11 mm and 196 events at Paris-Orly. These differences highlight the large reduction in dew events and dew yields in an urban area as compared to a close rural-like area. This reduction is not due to a sky view reduction but to heat island that increases air temperature and decreases relative humidity. Analysis of dew (34) and rain (77) samples were done concerning pH, electrical conductivity (EC), major anions and cations as well as selected trace metals and other minor ions. Mean pH values are found similar for both, dew (6.5) and rain (6.1), rain being slightly more acidic than dew. The mean dew total ionic content (TIC 1.8 meq/l) and EC value (124 μS/cm) are about four times that of rain (0.45 meq/l; 35 μS/cm), meaning that total dissolved solids in dew is nearly four times that in rain. Sulfate and nitrate are the most acidifying components, calcium the most neutralizing constituent with ratio of mean total acidity/total alkalinity comparable for dew and rain ( 0.9). Sulfate and nitrate have mainly anthropogenic sources, whereas chloride and magnesium are mostly connected with marine air masses. Dew is a considerable factor of wet deposition of pollutants; dew and rain ion concentrations, however, meet the WHO requirements for drinking water.

  2. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Klopfer, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Protective barriers have been identified as integral components of plans to isolate defense waste on the Hanford Site. The use of natural materials to construct protective barriers over waste site is being considered. Design requirements for protective barriers include preventing exposure of buried waste, and restricting penetration or percolation of surface waters through the waste zone. Studies were initiated to evaluate the effects of wind erosion on candidate protective barrier surfaces. A wind tunnel was used to provide controlled erosive stresses and to investigate the erosive effects of wind forces on proposed surface layers for protective barriers. Mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared and tested for resistance to wind erosion at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Aerosol Wind Tunnel Research Facility. These tests were performed to investigate surface deflation caused by suspension of soil from various surface layer configurations and to provide a comparison of the relative resistance of the different surfaces to wind erosion. Planning, testing, and analyzing phases of this wind erosion project were coordinated with other tasks supporting the development of protective barriers. These tasks include climate-change predictions, field studies and modeling efforts. This report provides results of measurements of deflation caused by wind forces over level surfaces. Section 2.0 reviews surface layer characteristics and previous relevant studies on wind erosion, describes effects of erosion, and discusses wind tunnel modeling. Materials and methods of the wind tunnel tests are discussed in Section 3.0. Results and discussion are presented in Section 4.0, and conclusions and recommendations Section 5.0. 53 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Evaluation of the contribution of contamination of radiotherapy room surfaces in the measure of exposure rate of radioiodine therapy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Rafael Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    The contamination of radiotherapy room surfaces is significant and the measures of patient exposure rate are held on the fourth dependencies, relevant questions are raised: the background radiation of the room stay high due to surface contamination, may interfere with the rate of patient exposure at the time of its release? The monitoring site is important to determine whether the patient will be released? The value of the deal activity and the clinical condition of the patient may increase the contamination, influencing the monitoring results? This paper aims to conduct a quantitative analysis of surface contamination of the contribution of therapeutic room at the time is monitored exposure rate from inpatient. Measurements were made regarding the hospitalization of 32 patients with different doses administered activity, age and of both genders. The measurements were performed in the therapeutic rooms at the hospital Brotherhood Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo. Exposure rate measurements were performed at the center of the room at 1 meter of the patient on the day of its release. After his release and prior to decontamination, measurements were performed at predetermined landmarks within the therapeutic room. The results revealed that on average background radiation, high due to surface contamination contributes only 2% of the patient dose rate. It can be considered that even with influence of contamination of surfaces, this is insignificant to determine if the patient may or may not be released. This study suggests that the site in which monitoring occurs exposure rate of the patient should not be decisive for liberation thereof. (author)

  4. Evaporation from rain-wetted forest in relation to canopy wetness, canopy cover, and net radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.

    2001-01-01

    Evaporation from wet canopies is commonly calculated using E-PM, the Penman-Monteith equation with zero surface resistance. However, several observations show a lower evaporation from rain-wetted forest. Possible causes for the difference between E-PM and experiments are evaluated to provide rules

  5. A novel pulse isotopic exchange technique for rapid determination of the oxygen surface exchange rate of oxide ion conductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.; Song, Chunlin; Song, C.; Zhu, J.J.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Yi, Jianxin; Boukamp, Bernard A.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a novel pulse 18O–16O isotopic exchange technique for the rapid determination of the oxygen surface exchange rate of oxide ion conductors while simultaneously providing insight into the mechanism of the oxygen exchange reaction, which contributes to the efficient

  6. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Contributions of solar-wind induced potential sputtering to the lunar surface erosion rate and it's exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnussirat, S. T.; Barghouty, A. F.; Edmunson, J. E.; Sabra, M. S.; Rickman, D. L.

    2018-04-01

    Sputtering of lunar regolith by solar-wind protons and heavy ions with kinetic energies of about 1 keV/amu is an important erosive process that affects the lunar surface and exosphere. It plays an important role in changing the chemical composition and thickness of the surface layer, and in introducing material into the exosphere. Kinetic sputtering is well modeled and understood, but understanding of mechanisms of potential sputtering has lagged behind. In this study we differentiate the contributions of potential sputtering from the standard (kinetic) sputtering in changing the chemical composition and erosion rate of the lunar surface. Also we study the contribution of potential sputtering in developing the lunar exosphere. Our results show that potential sputtering enhances the total characteristic sputtering erosion rate by about 44%, and reduces sputtering time scales by the same amount. Potential sputtering also introduces more material into the lunar exosphere.

  9. Slowed decomposition is biotically mediated in an ectomycorrhizal, tropical rain forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Krista L; Zak, Donald R; Edwards, Ivan P; Blackwood, Christopher B; Upchurch, Rima

    2010-11-01

    Bacteria and fungi drive the cycling of plant litter in forests, but little is known about their role in tropical rain forest nutrient cycling, despite the high rates of litter decay observed in these ecosystems. However, litter decay rates are not uniform across tropical rain forests. For example, decomposition can differ dramatically over small spatial scales between low-diversity, monodominant rain forests, and species-rich, mixed forests. Because the climatic patterns and soil parent material are identical in co-occurring mixed and monodominant forests, differences in forest floor accumulation, litter production, and decomposition between these forests may be biotically mediated. To test this hypothesis, we conducted field and laboratory studies in a monodominant rain forest in which the ectomycorrhizal tree Dicymbe corymbosa forms >80% of the canopy, and a diverse, mixed forest dominated by arbuscular mycorrhizal trees. After 2 years, decomposition was significantly slower in the monodominant forest (P forest (P forest (P = 0.02), and the composition of fungal communities was distinct between the two rain forest types (P = 0.001). Sequencing of fungal rDNA revealed a significantly lower richness of saprotrophic fungi in the monodominant forest (19 species) relative to the species-rich forest (84 species); moreover, only 4% percent of fungal sequences occurred in both forests. These results show that nutrient cycling patterns in tropical forests can vary dramatically over small spatial scales, and that changes in microbial community structure likely drive the observed differences in decomposition.

  10. Wind-driven rain as a boundary condition for HAM simulations: analysis of simplified modelling approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Hans; Blocken, Bert; Roels, Staf

    2007-01-01

    While the numerical simulation of moisture transfer inside building components is currently undergoing standardisation, the modelling of the atmospheric boundary conditions has received far less attention. This article analyses the modelling of the wind-driven-rain load on building facades...... though: the full variability with the perpendicular wind speed and horizontal rain intensity should be preserved, where feasible, for improved estimations of the moisture transfer in building components. In the concluding section, it is moreover shown that the dependence of the surface moisture transfer...

  11. Reductions in soil surface albedo as a function of biochar application rate: implications for global radiative forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verheijen, Frank G A; Bastos, Ana Catarina; Keizer, Jan Jacob; Jeffery, Simon; Van der Velde, Marijn; Penížek, Vít; Beland, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Biochar can be defined as pyrolysed (charred) biomass produced for application to soils with the aim of mitigating global climate change while improving soil functions. Sustainable biochar application to soils has been estimated to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by 71–130 Pg CO 2 -C e over 100 years, indicating an important potential to mitigate climate change. However, these estimates ignored changes in soil surface reflection by the application of dark-coloured biochar. Through a laboratory experiment we show a strong tendency for soil surface albedo to decrease as a power decay function with increasing biochar application rate, depending on soil moisture content, biochar application method and land use. Surface application of biochar resulted in strong reductions in soil surface albedo even at relatively low application rates. As a first assessment of the implications for climate change mitigation of these biochar–albedo relationships, we applied a first order global energy balance model to compare negative radiative forcings (from avoided CO 2 emissions) with positive radiative forcings (from reduced soil surface albedos). For a global-scale biochar application equivalent to 120 t ha −1 , we obtained reductions in negative radiative forcings of 5 and 11% for croplands and 11 and 23% for grasslands, when incorporating biochar into the topsoil or applying it to the soil surface, respectively. For a lower global biochar application rate (equivalent to 10 t ha −1 ), these reductions amounted to 13 and 44% for croplands and 28 and 94% for grasslands. Thus, our findings revealed the importance of including changes in soil surface albedo in studies assessing the net climate change mitigation potential of biochar, and we discuss the urgent need for field studies and more detailed spatiotemporal modelling. (letter)

  12. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions...

  13. Erosion rates of wood during natural weathering. Part I, Effects of grain angle and surface texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Sam Williams; Mark T. Knaebe; Peter G. Sotos; William C. Feist

    2001-01-01

    This is the first in a series of reports on the erosion rates of wood exposed outdoors near Madison, Wisconsin. The specimens were oriented vertically, facing south; erosion was measured annually for the first several years and biannually for the remainder of the exposure. In the work reported here, the erosion rates of earlywood and latewood were determined for smooth...

  14. Horizontal transport of the regolith, modification of features, and erosion rates on the lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidson, R.; Drozd, R. J.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Morgan, C. J.; Poupeau, G.

    1975-01-01

    Impact-ejecta systematics are developed for the smaller cratering events which, with cumulative crater populations observed in young mare regions and on Copernicus ejecta fields, yield rates and a range distribution for the horizontal transport of material by impact processes. The deposition rate for material originating more than 1 m away is found to be about 8 mm per million years. Material from 10 km away accumulates at a rate of about 0.08 mm per million years, providing a steady influx of foreign material. From the degradation of boulder tracks, a rate of 5 plus or minus 3 cm per million years is computed for the filling of shallow lunar depressions on slopes. Mass wastage and downslope movement of bedrock outcroppings on Hadley Rille seem to be proceeding at a rate of about 8 mm per million years. The Camelot profile is suggestive of a secondary impact feature.

  15. Landslide triggering by rain infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2000-01-01

    Landsliding in response to rainfall involves physical processes that operate on disparate timescales. Relationships between these timescales guide development of a mathematical model that uses reduced forms of Richards equation to evaluate effects of rainfall infiltration on landslide occurrence, timing, depth, and acceleration in diverse situations. The longest pertinent timescale is A/D0, where D0 is the maximum hydraulic diffusivity of the soil and A is the catchment area that potentially affects groundwater pressures at a prospective landslide slip surface location with areal coordinates x, y and depth H. Times greater than A/D0 are necessary for establishment of steady background water pressures that develop at (x, y, H) in response to rainfall averaged over periods that commonly range from days to many decades. These steady groundwater pressures influence the propensity for landsliding at (x, y, H), but they do not trigger slope failure. Failure results from rainfall over a typically shorter timescale H2/D0 associated with transient pore pressure transmission during and following storms. Commonly, this timescale ranges from minutes to months. The shortest timescale affecting landslide responses to rainfall is √(H/g), where g is the magnitude of gravitational acceleration. Postfailure landslide motion occurs on this timescale, which indicates that the thinnest landslides accelerate most quickly if all other factors are constant. Effects of hydrologic processes on landslide processes across these diverse timescales are encapsulated by a response function, R(t*) = √(t*/π) exp (-1/t*) - erfc (1/√t*), which depends only on normalized time, t*. Use of R(t*) in conjunction with topographic data, rainfall intensity and duration information, an infinite-slope failure criterion, and Newton's second law predicts the timing, depth, and acceleration of rainfall-triggered landslides. Data from contrasting landslides that exhibit rapid, shallow motion and slow, deep

  16. Effect of simulated acid rain on fluorine mobility and the bacterial community of phosphogypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Tang, Ya; Anderson, Christopher W N; Jeyakumar, Paramsothy; Yang, Jinyan

    2018-03-21

    Contamination of soil and water with fluorine (F) leached from phosphogypsum (PG) stacks is a global environmental issue. Millions of tons of PG is produced each year as a by-product of fertilizer manufacture, and in China, weathering is exacerbated by acid rain. In this work, column leaching experiments using simulated acid rain were run to evaluate the mobility of F and the impact of weathering on native bacterial community composition in PG. After a simulated summer rainfall, 2.42-3.05 wt% of the total F content of PG was leached and the F concentration in leachate was above the quality standard for surface water and groundwater in China. Acid rain had no significant effect on the movement of F in PG. A higher concentration of F was observed at the bottom than the top section of PG columns suggesting mobility and reprecipitation of F. Throughout the simulation, the PG was environmentally safe according the TCLP testing. The dominant bacteria in PG were from the Enterococcus and Bacillus genus. Bacterial community composition in PG leached by simulated acid rain (pH 3.03) was more abundant than at pH 6.88. Information on F mobility and bacterial community in PG under conditions of simulated rain is relevant to management of environmental risk in stockpiled PG waste.

  17. A Generalized Approach to Model the Spectra and Radiation Dose Rate of Solar Particle Events on the Surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingnan; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; McDole, Thoren; Kühl, Patrick; Appel, Jan C.; Matthiä, Daniel; Krauss, Johannes; Köhler, Jan

    2018-01-01

    For future human missions to Mars, it is important to study the surface radiation environment during extreme and elevated conditions. In the long term, it is mainly galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) modulated by solar activity that contribute to the radiation on the surface of Mars, but intense solar energetic particle (SEP) events may induce acute health effects. Such events may enhance the radiation level significantly and should be detected as immediately as possible to prevent severe damage to humans and equipment. However, the energetic particle environment on the Martian surface is significantly different from that in deep space due to the influence of the Martian atmosphere. Depending on the intensity and shape of the original solar particle spectra, as well as particle types, the surface spectra may induce entirely different radiation effects. In order to give immediate and accurate alerts while avoiding unnecessary ones, it is important to model and well understand the atmospheric effect on the incoming SEPs, including both protons and helium ions. In this paper, we have developed a generalized approach to quickly model the surface response of any given incoming proton/helium ion spectra and have applied it to a set of historical large solar events, thus providing insights into the possible variety of surface radiation environments that may be induced during SEP events. Based on the statistical study of more than 30 significant solar events, we have obtained an empirical model for estimating the surface dose rate directly from the intensities of a power-law SEP spectra.

  18. Possible impacts of climate change on freezing rain in south-central Canada using downscaled future climate scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Freezing rain is a major atmospheric hazard in mid-latitude nations of the globe. Among all Canadian hydrometeorological hazards, freezing rain is associated with the highest damage costs per event. Using synoptic weather typing to identify the occurrence of freezing rain events, this study estimates changes in future freezing rain events under future climate scenarios for south-central Canada. Synoptic weather typing consists of principal components analysis, an average linkage clustering procedure (i.e., a hierarchical agglomerative cluster method, and discriminant function analysis (a nonhierarchical method. Meteorological data used in the analysis included hourly surface observations from 15 selected weather stations and six atmospheric levels of six-hourly National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP upper-air reanalysis weather variables for the winter months (November–April of 1958/59–2000/01. A statistical downscaling method was used to downscale four general circulation model (GCM scenarios to the selected weather stations. Using downscaled scenarios, discriminant function analysis was used to project the occurrence of future weather types. The within-type frequency of future freezing rain events is assumed to be directly proportional to the change in frequency of future freezing rain-related weather types The results showed that with warming temperatures in a future climate, percentage increases in the occurrence of freezing rain events in the north of the study area are likely to be greater than those in the south. By the 2050s, freezing rain events for the three colder months (December–February could increase by about 85% (95% confidence interval – CI: ±13%, 60% (95% CI: ±9%, and 40% (95% CI: ±6% in northern Ontario, eastern Ontario (including Montreal, Quebec, and southern Ontario, respectively. The increase by the 2080s could be even greater: about 135% (95% CI: ±20%, 95% (95% CI: ±13%, and 45% (95% CI: ±9

  19. Study of the Effect of Simulated Rain on the Offset Parabolic Antenna at Ku-Band with Different Elevation Angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mostafa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of rain on the receiver antenna is a major factor to degrade the system performance in a frequency above 10 GHz. This paper deals with the wet antenna attenuation at Ku-band with three different frequencies at different rain rates. During the Ku-band propagation experiment, it was discovered that rain water on the antenna caused a significant attenuation. It is necessary to estimate the losses caused by water on the antenna in order to separate these losses from the atmospheric propagation losses. The experiment was done at USM Engineering Campus to study the attenuation for these physical parameters. A Ku-band RF signal was generated by a signal generator and transmitted via horn antenna. The signal was received using a smooth offset antenna of 60 cm by 54 cm (Astro dish and measured using spectrum analyzer. In order to simulate a rain, pipes with bores of a same distance were implemented. Three cases were considered: in the first case one pipe was used to simulate low rain rate, the second case two pipes were used to simulate medium rain rate, and the third case three pipes were used to simulate heavy rain rate. In addition, the tap was used to control the flow of water in order to get more values of rain rate. The total attenuation of RF signals due to water layer on the feed and on the reflector feed was found to be 3.1 dB at worst case. On the other hand, the attenuation of RF signal due to the feed only was 2.83 dB, so the major attenuation occur was due to feed.

  20. Ancient Jets of Fiery Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2015-04-01

    Chondrules are intriguing millimeter-sized crystallized droplets that are abundant in chondrites, so named because of the presence of numerous chondrules. They have puzzled cosmochemists since they were described by English scientist H. C. Sorby in 1877. Everyone agrees that they formed as molten droplets of silicates, but nobody agrees on how the little things formed. Ideas range from impacts onto asteroids, primary condensation in the solar nebula, shock waves and/or lightening in the solar nebula, or by processes operating as planets began to form. A new twist on this last idea was investigated in a new way by Brandon Johnson (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT) and co-authors David Minton and Jay Melosh (Purdue University), and Maria Zuber at MIT. Johnson and coworkers modeled the effects of impacts between planetesimals 100-1000 kilometers in diameter. When such objects hit each other, the first thing that happens is jetting of molten rock. Johnson and colleagues propose that the jets will subdivide into droplets as the jetted material is shot into space. They estimate that the chondrules would have the correct cooling rates (as determined from previous studies of chondrules) and the collision frequency would be high enough to produce abundant chondrules. Johnson and coworkers suggest that chondrules are a "byproduct of [planetary] accretion."

  1. Landslide triggering by rain infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2000-01-01

    Landsliding in response to rainfall involves physical processes that operate on disparate timescales. Relationships between these timescales guide development of a mathematical model that uses reduced forms of Richards equation to evaluate effects of rainfall infiltration on landslide occurrence, timing, depth, and acceleration in diverse situations. The longest pertinent timescale is A/D0, where D0 is the maximum hydraulic diffusivity of the soil and A is the catchment area that potentially affects groundwater pressures at a prospective landslide slip surface location with areal coordinates x, y and depth H. Times greater than A/D0 are necessary for establishment of steady background water pressures that develop at (x, y, H) in response to rainfall averaged over periods that commonly range from days to many decades. These steady groundwater pressures influence the propensity for landsliding at (x, y, H), but they do not trigger slope failure. Failure results from rainfall over a typically shorter timescale H2/D0 associated with transient pore pressure transmission during and following storms. Commonly, this timescale ranges from minutes to months. The shortest timescale affecting landslide responses to rainfall is √(H/g), where g is the magnitude of gravitational acceleration. Postfailure landslide motion occurs on this timescale, which indicates that the thinnest landslides accelerate most quickly if all other factors are constant. Effects of hydrologic processes on landslide processes across these diverse timescales are encapsulated by a response function, R(t*) = √(t*/π) exp (-1/t*) - erfc (1/√t*), which depends only on normalized time, t*. Use of R(t*) in conjunction with topographic data, rainfall intensity and duration information, an infinite-slope failure criterion, and Newton's second law predicts the timing, depth, and acceleration of rainfall-triggered landslides. Data from contrasting landslides that exhibit rapid, shallow

  2. Etch rate and surface morphology of polycrystalline beta-silicon carbide using chlorine trifluoride gas

    OpenAIRE

    Habuka, Hitoshi; Oda, S.; Fukai, Y.; Fukae, K.; Takeuchi, T.; Aihara, M.

    2006-01-01

    Etch rates of polycrystalline beta-silicon carbide (SiC) substrate in a wide range from less than one to more than 10 mu m/min are obtained using chlorine trifluoride gas in ambient nitrogen at 673-973 K and atmospheric pressure in a horizontal reactor. Over the chlorine trifluoride gas concentrations of 10-100% used in this study, the etch rate increases at the substrate temperatures between 673 and 773 K. Additionally, the etch rate at temperatures higher than 773 K is independent of the su...

  3. Simulating response of N2O emissions to fertiliser N application and climatic variability from a rain-fed and wheat-cropped soil in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Barton, Louise; Chen, Deli

    2012-03-30

    Besides land management and soil properties, nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions from the soil may be responsive to climatic variation. In this study the Water and Nitrogen Management Model (WNMM) was calibrated and validated to simulate N(2)O emissions from a rain-fed and wheat-cropped system on a sandy duplex soil at Cunderdin, Western Australia, from May 2005 to May 2007, then it was deployed to simulate N(2)O emissions for seven scenarios of fertiliser N application under various climatic conditions (1970-2006). The WNMM satisfactorily simulated crop growth, soil water content and mineral N contents of the surface soil (0-10 cm), soil temperatures at depths and N(2)O emissions from the soil compared with field observations in two fertiliser treatments during calibration and validation. About 70% of total N(2)O emissions were estimated as nitrification-induced. The scenario analysis indicated that the WNMM-simulated annual N(2)O emissions for this rain-fed and wheat-cropped system were significantly correlated with annual average minimum air temperature (r = 0.21), annual pan evaporation (r = 0.20) and fertiliser N application rate (r = 0.80). Both annual rainfall and wheat yield had weak and negative correlations with annual N(2)O emissions. Multiple linear regression models for estimating annual N(2)O emissions were developed to account for the impacts of climatic variation (including temperature and rainfall), fertiliser N application and crop yield for this rain-fed and wheat-cropped system in Western Australia, which explained 64-74% of yearly variations of the WNMM-estimated annual N(2) O emissions. The WNMM was tested and capable of simulating N(2) O emissions from the rain-fed and wheat-cropped system. The inclusion of climatic variables as predictors in multiple linear regression models improved their accuracy in predicting inter-annual N(2)O emissions. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Using NEXRAD and Rain Gauge Precipitation Data for Hydrologic Calibration of SWAT in a Northeastern Watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. M. Sexton,; A. M. Sadeghi,; X. Zhang,; R. Srinivasan,; A. Shirmohammadi,

    2010-01-01

    The value of watershed-scale, hydrologic and water quality models to ecosystem management is increasingly evident as more programs adopt these tools to evaluate the effectiveness of different management scenarios and their impact on the environment. Quality of precipitation data is critical for appropriate application of watershed models. In small watersheds, where no dense rain gauge network is available, modelers are faced with a dilemma to choose between different data sets. In this study, we used the German Branch (GB) watershed (~50 km2), which is included in the USDA Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP), to examine the implications of using surface rain gauge and next-generation radar (NEXRAD) precipitation data sets on the performance of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The GB watershed is located in the Coastal Plain of Maryland on the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay. Stream flow estimation results using surface rain gauge data seem to indicate the importance of using rain gauges within the same direction as the storm pattern with respect to the watershed. In the absence of a spatially representative network of rain gauges within the watershed, NEXRAD data produced good estimates of stream flow at the outlet of the watershed. Three NEXRAD datasets, including (1)*non-corrected (NC), (2) bias-corrected (BC), and (3) inverse distance weighted (IDW) corrected NEXRAD data, were produced. Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficients for daily stream flow simulation using these three NEXRAD data ranged from 0.46 to 0.58 during calibration and from 0.68 to 0.76 during validation. Overall, correcting NEXRAD with rain gauge data is promising to produce better hydrologic modeling results. Given the multiple precipitation datasets and corresponding simulations, we explored the combination of the multiple simulations using Bayesian model averaging.

  5. Wear rate and surface coating optimization of coconut coir-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The use of fuzzy logic for modeling surface parameters of coconut coir-based composite is the focus of this research paper. Natural fiber–polymer composite has been developed by combining coconut coir as a stimulator and polyester as a fixative. This sturdy material is resistant to scratches in the coating process on the ...

  6. Multilayer Coating of Tetrandrine-loaded PLGA nanoparticles: Effect of surface charges on cellular uptake rate and drug release profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Rui; Li, Ke; Chen, Zhe; Shi, Chen

    2016-02-01

    The effect of surface charges on the cellular uptake rate and drug release profile of tetrandrine-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (TPNs) was studied. Stabilizer-free nanoprecipitation method was used in this study for the synthesis of TPNs. A typical layer-by-layer approach was applied for multi-coating particles' surface with use of poly(styrene sulfonate) sodium salt (PSS) as anionic layer and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) as cationic layer. The modified TPNs were characterized by different physicochemical techniques such as Zeta sizer, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The drug loading efficiency, release profile and cellular uptake rate were evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography and confocal laser scanning microscopy, respectively. The resultant PSS/PAH/PSS/PAH/TPNs (4 layers) exhibited spherical-shaped morphology with the average size of 160.3±5.165 nm and zeta potential of-57.8 mV. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading efficiency were 57.88% and 1.73%, respectively. Multi-layer coating of polymeric materials with different charges on particles' surface could dramatically influence the drug release profile of TPNs (4 layers vs. 3 layers). In addition, variable layers of surface coating could also greatly affect the cellular uptake rate of TPNs in A549 cells within 8 h. Overall, by coating particles' surface with those different charged polymers, precise control of drug release as well as cellular uptake rate can be achieved simultaneously. Thus, this approach provides a new strategy for controllable drug delivery.

  7. False negative rate and other performance measures of a sponge-wipe surface sampling method for low contaminant concentrations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einfeld, Wayne; Krauter, Paula A.; Boucher, Raymond M.; Tezak, Mathew; Amidan, Brett G. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Piepel, Greg F. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA)

    2011-05-01

    Recovery of spores from environmental surfaces is known to vary due to sampling methodology, techniques, spore size and characteristics, surface materials, and environmental conditions. A series of tests were performed to evaluate a new, validated sponge-wipe method. Specific factors evaluated were the effects of contaminant concentrations and surface materials on recovery efficiency (RE), false negative rate (FNR), limit of detection (LOD) - and the uncertainties of these quantities. Ceramic tile and stainless steel had the highest mean RE values (48.9 and 48.1%, respectively). Faux leather, vinyl tile, and painted wood had mean RE values of 30.3, 25.6, and 25.5, respectively, while plastic had the lowest mean RE (9.8%). Results show a roughly linear dependence of surface roughness on RE, where the smoothest surfaces have the highest mean RE values. REs were not influenced by the low spore concentrations tested (3 x 10{sup -3} to 1.86 CFU/cm{sup 2}). The FNR data were consistent with RE data, showing a trend of smoother surfaces resulting in higher REs and lower FNRs. Stainless steel generally had the lowest mean FNR (0.123) and plastic had the highest mean FNR (0.479). The LOD{sub 90} varied with surface material, from 0.015 CFU/cm{sup 2} on stainless steel up to 0.039 on plastic. Selecting sampling locations on the basis of surface roughness and using roughness to interpret spore recovery data can improve sampling. Further, FNR values, calculated as a function of concentration and surface material, can be used pre-sampling to calculate the numbers of samples for statistical sampling plans with desired performance, and post-sampling to calculate the confidence in characterization and clearance decisions.

  8. [Combined injured effects of acid rain and lanthanum on growth of soybean seedling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chan-juan; Pan, Dan-yun; Xu, Qiu-rong; Zhou, Qing

    2010-07-01

    Combined effects of acid rain and lanthanum on growth of soybean seedling (Glycine max) and its inherent mechanism were studied in this paper. Compared with treatments by simulated acid rain (pH 3.0, 3.5, 4.5) or rare earth La(III) (60, 100 and 300 mg x L(-1)), the decrease degree of growth parameters in combined treatments was higher, indicating that there were a synergistic effects between acid rain and La. Moreover,the inhibition effects of acid rain and La(III) were more obvious when pH value of acid rain was lower or the concentration of La(III) was higher. The changes of photosynthetic parameters were similar to those of growth, but the decrease degree of each parameter was not same in the same treatment group. The decrease degree of optimal PSII photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) and chlorophyll content (Chl) were 9.35%-22.75% and 9.14%-24.53%, respectively, lower than that of photosynthetic rate Pn (22.78%-84.7%), Hill reaction rate (15.52%-73.38%) and Mg2+ -ATPase activity (14.51%-71.54%), showing that the sensitivity of photosynthetic parameters to the combined factors was different. Furthermore, relative analysis showed that the change of Pn were mainly affected by Hill reaction rate and Mg2+ -ATPase activity, and was less influenced by Chl and Fv/Fm. It indicates that the effect of acid rain and La on each reaction in photosynthesis was different, and the inhibition of combined treatments on photosynthesis in plants was one of the main factors affecting growth of plant.

  9. Experiments in a flighted conveyor comparing shear rates in compressed versus free surface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, Nicholas; Higgins, Hannah; Krupiarz, Kamila; O'Connor, Ryan

    2017-11-01

    Uniformity of granular flow rate is critical in industry. Experiments in a flighted conveyor system aim to fill a gap in knowledge of achieving steady mass flow rate by correlating velocity profile data with mass flow rate measurements. High speed images were collected for uniformly-shaped particles in a bottom-driven flow conveyor belt system from which the velocity profiles can be generated. The correlation of mass flow rates from the velocity profiles to the time-dependent mass measurements will determine energy dissipation rates as a function of operating conditions. The velocity profiles as a function of the size of the particles, speed of the belt, and outlet size, will be compared to shear rate relationships found in past experiments that focused on gravity-driven systems. The dimension of the linear shear and type of decaying transition to the stationary bed may appear different due to the compression versus dilation space in open flows. The application of this research can serve to validate simulations in discrete element modeling and physically demonstrate a process that can be further developed and customized for industry applications, such as feeding a biomass conversion reactor. Sponsored by NIU's Office of Student Engagement and Experiential Learning.

  10. Pollution problem: acid rain and beekeeping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, B.

    1979-11-01

    Some of the problems caused by acid rain are presented with emphasis on the effects on bees, especially in the Northeast. Scientists believe that rain east of the Mississippi is below 5.6 and average Northeastern rainfall is now down to pH 4. Trace minerals are being leached out of the soils and nectar that lacks calcium is being passed by when the bees forage. The first plants to show the effects will be the wild varieties of the legumes, such as clover. This leaves only plants on the extreme end of the acid scale such as the blueberry for bee forage. This leads to the side effect of the movement of calcium in nectar which will be restricted due to a lack of calcium-lime.

  11. Radiation-dose consequences of acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Sheppard, M.I.; Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially Ra and Cs, are among these materials. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will cause increases in mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Several simulation models were tested with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modelled a typical, acid rain sensitive soil using meterological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. Based on the literature available, a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor or 2 or more. This will lead to increases in plant uptake and ultimate dose to man of about the same extent

  12. Rain VM: Portable Concurrency through Managing Code

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Neil C.C.

    2006-01-01

    A long-running recent trend in computer programming is the growth in popularity of virtual machines. However, few have included good support for concurrency - a natural mechanism in the Rain programming language. This paper details the design and implementation of a secure virtual machine with support for concurrency, which enables portability of concurrent programs. Possible implementation ideas of many-to-many threading models for the virtual machine kernel are discussed, and initial benchm...

  13. From acid rain to toxic snow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, D.

    1999-01-01

    Emerging acid rain problems and problems related to various airborne toxins and effects in soils are discussed by David Schindler, the Volvo Environment Prize winner, a member of the Dept. of Biological Sciences, Univ. of Alberta, Canada. A chain of events involving depletion of basic cations in soils and global warming can result ultimately in a significant threat to indigenous peoples living at high latitudes

  14. Estimating Rain Attenuation In Satellite Communication Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Attenuation computed with help of statistical model and meteorological data. NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model (SLAM) program QuickBASIC computer program evaluating static and dynamic statistical assessment of impact of rain attenuation on communication link established between Earth terminal and geosynchronous satellite. Application in specification, design, and assessment of satellite communication links for any terminal location in continental United States. Written in Microsoft QuickBASIC.

  15. Surface-active ionic liquids in micellar catalysis: impact of anion selection on reaction rates in nucleophilic substitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognigni, Alice; Gaertner, Peter; Zirbs, Ronald; Peterlik, Herwig; Prochazka, Katharina; Schröder, Christian; Bica, Katharina

    2016-05-21

    A series of surface-active ionic liquids based on the 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium cation and different anions such as halides and alkylsulfates was synthesized. The aggregation behavior of these ionic liquids in water was characterized by surface tension, conductivity measurements and UV-Vis spectroscopy in order to determine the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and to provide aggregation parameters. The determination of surface activity and aggregation properties of amphiphilic ionic liquids was accompanied by SAXS studies on selected surface-active ionic liquids. The application of these surface-active ionic liquids with different anions was tested in nucleophilic substitution reactions for the degradation of organophosphorus compounds. Kinetic studies via UV-Vis spectrophotometry showed a strong acceleration of the reaction in the micellar system compared to pure water. In addition, an influence of the anion was observed, resulting in a correlation between the anion binding to the micelle and the reaction rate constants, indicating that the careful choice of the surface-active ionic liquid can considerably affect the outcome of reactions.

  16. Measurement of rain acidity in Brunei Darussalam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidup, H.; David, A.

    1999-01-01

    Although acid rain and its harmful environmental consequences have been recognised and documented in the industrialised countries of Europe and North America there have been few studies of this phenomenon in other regions of the globe. Recent measurements in some tropical countries have demonstrated the occurrence of acid rain. It was therefore considered necessary to set up a routine rainwater acidity monitoring programme in Brunei Darussalam in order to provide a database which would be of use in assessing any potential environmental impacts in the country. This paper describes the rainwater acidity monitoring programme that was initiated in 1995 by the Brunei Meteorological Service as part of the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW). Wet-only deposition samples were collected using an automatic precipitation collector. Rainwater pH was determined in an on-site laboratory immediately upon sample collection. The pH of 185 samples collected so far varied between 4.27 and 6.27. 91% of the samples had pH below 5.6 indicating the occurrence of acid rain in Brunei Darussalam

  17. Non lethal Raine syndrome and differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Al-Sheqaih, Nada; Ratbi, Ilham; Urquhart, Jill E; O'Sullivan, James; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Williams, Simon S; Elalloussi, Mustapha; Lyahyai, Jaber; Sbihi, Leila; Cherkaoui Jaouad, Imane; Sbihi, Abdelhafid; Newman, William G; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2016-11-01

    Raine syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive bone dysplasia characterized by characteristic facial features with exophthalmos and generalized osteosclerosis. Amelogenesis imperfecta, hearing loss, seizures, and intracerebral calcification are apparent in some affected individuals. Originally, Raine syndrome was originally reported as a lethal syndrome. However, recently a milder phenotype, compatible with life, has been described. Biallelic variants inFAM20C, encoding aGolgi casein kinase involved in biomineralisation, have been identified in affected individuals. We report here a consanguineous Moroccan family with two affected siblingsa girl aged 18 and a boy of 15years. Clinical features, including learning disability, seizures and amelogenesis imperfecta, initially suggested a diagnosis of Kohlschutter-Tonz syndrome. However,a novel homozygous FAM20Cvariantc.676T > A, p.(Trp226Arg) was identified in the affected siblings. Our report reinforces that Raine syndrome is compatible with life, and that mild hypophosphatemia and amelogenesis imperfecta are key features of the attenuated form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of Copper Corrosion Products and Relation between Surface Appearance and Corrosion Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Tru, Nguyen Nhi; Yoshino, Tsujino; Yasuki, Maeda

    2008-01-01

    Copper was exposed unsheltered and sheltered in four humid tropical sites, representing urban, urban-industrial, urban-marine and rural environments. The corrosion rates and the sequence of corrosion product formation are presented and discussed in relation with climatic and atmospheric pollution parameters. Chemical compositions of corrosion products were found to depend on environments and duration of exposure. In all environments, cuprite was the predominating corrosion product that formed first and continuously increased during the exposure. Among the sulphur-containing corrosion products, posnjakite and brochantite were more frequently found and the first formed earlier. Nantokite was the most common chlorine-containing products for most cases, except the high-chloride environment, where atacamite was detected instead. The corrosion rate of copper was well indicated by the colour of patina. The red-purple colour corresponded to the high corrosion rate and the greenish grey colour corresponded to the low corrosion rate. Corrosion rate of sheltered copper in urban-marine environment increased with the exposure time

  19. Effects of sampling rate on automated fatigue recognition in surface EMG signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahl Lorenz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects different sampling rates may produce on the quality of muscle fatigue detection algorithms. sEMG signals were obtained from isometric contractions of the arm. Subsampled signals resulting in technically relevant sampling rates were computationally deduced from the original recordings. The spectral based fatigue recognition methods mean and median frequency as well as spectral moment ratio were included in this investigation, as well as the sample and the fuzzy approximate entropy. The resulting fatigue indices were evaluated with respect to noise and separability of different load levels. We concluded that the spectral moment ratio provides the best results in fatigue detection over a wide range of sampling rates.

  20. Rain Sensor with Stacked Light Waveguide Having Tilted Air Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoo Nam Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle sensor to detect rain drop on and above waveguide utilizing light deflection and scattering was realized, keeping wide sensing coverage and sensitivity to detect mist accumulation. Proposed sensor structure under stacked light wave guide consisted of light blocking fixture surrounding photodetector and adjacent light source. Tilted air gap between stacked light waveguide and light blocking fixture played major role to increase sensitivity and to enhance linearity. This sensor structure eliminated complex collimating optics, while keeping wide sensing coverage using simple geometry. Detection algorithm based on time-to-intensity transformation process was used to convert raining intensity into countable raining process. Experimental result inside simulated rain chamber showed distinct different response between light rain and normal rain. Application as automobile rain sensor is expected.

  1. Rates and patterns of surface deformation from laser scanning following the South Napa earthquake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Stephen B.; Lienkaemper, James J.; Pickering, Alexandra J; Avdievitch, Nikita N.

    2015-01-01

    The A.D. 2014 M6.0 South Napa earthquake, despite its moderate magnitude, caused significant damage to the Napa Valley in northern California (USA). Surface rupture occurred along several mapped and unmapped faults. Field observations following the earthquake indicated that the magnitude of postseismic surface slip was likely to approach or exceed the maximum coseismic surface slip and as such presented ongoing hazard to infrastructure. Using a laser scanner, we monitored postseismic deformation in three dimensions through time along 0.5 km of the main surface rupture. A key component of this study is the demonstration of proper alignment of repeat surveys using point cloud–based methods that minimize error imposed by both local survey errors and global navigation satellite system georeferencing errors. Using solid modeling of natural and cultural features, we quantify dextral postseismic displacement at several hundred points near the main fault trace. We also quantify total dextral displacement of initially straight cultural features. Total dextral displacement from both coseismic displacement and the first 2.5 d of postseismic displacement ranges from 0.22 to 0.29 m. This range increased to 0.33–0.42 m at 59 d post-earthquake. Furthermore, we estimate up to 0.15 m of vertical deformation during the first 2.5 d post-earthquake, which then increased by ∼0.02 m at 59 d post-earthquake. This vertical deformation is not expressed as a distinct step or scarp at the fault trace but rather as a broad up-to-the-west zone of increasing elevation change spanning the fault trace over several tens of meters, challenging common notions about fault scarp development in strike-slip systems. Integrating these analyses provides three-dimensional mapping of surface deformation and identifies spatial variability in slip along the main fault trace that we attribute to distributed slip via subtle block rotation. These results indicate the benefits of laser scanner surveys along

  2. Bacterial growth on surfaces: Automated image analysis for quantification of growth rate-related parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S.; Sternberg, Claus; Poulsen, L. K.

    1995-01-01

    species-specific hybridizations with fluorescence-labelled ribosomal probes to estimate the single-cell concentration of RNA. By automated analysis of digitized images of stained cells, we determined four independent growth rate-related parameters: cellular RNA and DNA contents, cell volume......, and the frequency of dividing cells in a cell population. These parameters were used to compare physiological states of liquid-suspended and surfacegrowing Pseudomonas putida KT2442 in chemostat cultures. The major finding is that the correlation between substrate availability and cellular growth rate found...

  3. [Dynamics of seed rain of Tripterygium hypoglaucum and soil seed bank].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Wei, Yong-Sheng; Liu, Xiang; Su, Shu; Qu, Xian-You; Wang, Chang-Hua

    2017-11-01

    Tripterygium hypoglaucum is an endangered species in arid areas of Xiannvshan Chongqing, China. The dynamic characteristics of seed rain and soil seed bank of T. hypoglaucum were studied in this paper.Results showed that T. hypoglaucum years of mature seeds distribution number up to October; the seed rain occurred from the last ten-day of September to in the first ten-day of November and the peak of scattered seed rain concentrated in the October.The numbers of soil seed bank at 2-5 cm soil layer,mainly concentrated in the 1.5-3.5 m range. T. hypoglaucum seeds to the wind as a force for transmission, the transmission ability is strong, but in the process of natural reproduction, full mature seed rate is low, the soil seed bank seeds seed short-lived factors these were unfavorable for the natural reproduction of T. hypoglaucum population. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  4. Rain Check Application: Mobile tool to monitor rainfall in remote parts of Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X.; Baird, J.; Chiu, M. T.; Morelli, R.; de Lanerolle, T. R.; Gourley, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Rainfall observations performed uniformly and continuously over a period of time are valuable inputs in developing climate models and predicting events such as floods and droughts. Rain-Check is a mobile application developed in Google App Inventor Platform, for android based smart phones, to allow field researchers to monitor various rain gauges distributed though out remote regions of Haiti and send daily readings via SMS messages for further analysis and long term trending. Rainfall rate and quantity interact with many other factors to influence erosion, vegetative cover, groundwater recharge, stream water chemistry and runoff into streams impacting agriculture and livestock. Rainfall observation from various sites is especially significant in Haiti with over 80% of the country is mountainous terrain. Data sets from global models and limited number of ground stations do not capture the fine-scale rainfall patterns necessary to describe local climate. Placement and reading of rain gauges are critical to accurate measurement of rainfall.

  5. A TRMM-Calibrated infrared technique for rainfall estimation: application on rain events over eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Feidas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to evaluate the use of a satellite infrared (IR technique for estimating rainfall over the eastern Mediterranean. The Convective-Stratiform Technique (CST, calibrated by coincident, physically retrieved rain rates from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR, is applied over the Eastern Mediterranean for four rain events during the six month period of October 2004 to March 2005. Estimates from this technique are verified over a rain gauge network for different time scales. Results show that PR observations can be applied to improve IR-based techniques significantly in the conditions of a regional scale area by selecting adequate calibration areas and periods. They reveal, however, the limitations of infrared remote sensing techniques, originally developed for tropical areas, when applied to precipitation retrievals in mid-latitudes.

  6. A study of erosion rates on salt diapir surfaces in the Zagros Mountains, SE Iran

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bruthans, J.; Asadi, N.; Filippi, Michal; Wilhelm, Z.; Zare, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 5 (2008), s. 1079-1089 ISSN 0943-0105 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB301110501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : salt diapir * weathering residuum * erosion rate Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.026, year: 2008

  7. Deposition Rates on Smooth Surfaces and Coagulation of Aerosol Particles Inside a Test Chamber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hussein, T.; Hruška, A.; Dohányosová, Pavla; Ondráčková, Lucie; Hemerka, J.; Kulmala, M.; Smolík, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 4 (2009), s. 905-914 ISSN 1352-2310 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/04/1190; GA ČR GA101/07/1361 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : deposition rate * turbophoresis * coagulation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.139, year: 2009

  8. Modelling and analysis of material removal rate and surface roughness in wire-cut EDM of armour materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindranadh Bobbili

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The current work presents a comparative study of wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM of armour materials such as aluminium alloy 7017 and rolled homogeneous armour (RHA steel using buckingham pi theorem to model the input variables and thermo-physical characteristics of WEDM on material removal rate (MRR and surface roughness (Ra of Al 7017 and RHA steel. The parameters of the model such as pulse-on time, flushing pressure, input power, thermal diffusivity and latent heat of vaporization have been determined through design of experiment methodology. Wear rate of brass wire increases with rise in input energy in machining Al 7017. The dependence of thermo-physical properties and machining variables on mechanism of MRR and Ra has been described by performing scanning electron microscope (SEM study. The rise in pulse-on time from 0.85μs to 1.25μs causes improvement in MRR and deterioration of surface finish. The machined surface has revealed that craters are found on the machined surface. The propensity of formation of craters increases during WEDM with a higher current and larger pulse-on time.

  9. Soil surface organic layers in Arctic Alaska: spatial distribution, rates of formation, and microclimatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Carson A.; Mann, Daniel H.; Verbyla, David L.; Kunz, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Organic layers of living and dead vegetation cover the ground surface in many permafrost landscapes and play important roles in ecosystem processes. These soil surface organic layers (SSOLs) store large amounts of carbon and buffer the underlying permafrost and its contained carbon from changes in aboveground climate. Understanding the dynamics of SSOLs is a prerequisite for predicting how permafrost and carbon stocks will respond to warming climate. Here we ask three questions about SSOLs in a representative area of the Arctic Foothills region of northern Alaska: (1) What environmental factors control the thickness of SSOLs and the carbon they store? (2) How long do SSOLs take to develop on newly stabilized point bars? (3) How do SSOLs affect temperature in the underlying ground? Results show that SSOL thickness and distribution correlate with elevation, drainage area, vegetation productivity, and incoming solar radiation. A multiple regression model based on these correlations can simulate spatial distribution of SSOLs and estimate the organic carbon stored there. SSOLs develop within a few decades after a new, sandy, geomorphic surface stabilizes but require 500–700 years to reach steady state thickness. Mature SSOLs lower the growing season temperature and mean annual temperature of the underlying mineral soil by 8 and 3°C, respectively. We suggest that the proximate effects of warming climate on permafrost landscapes now covered by SSOLs will occur indirectly via climate's effects on the frequency, extent, and severity of disturbances like fires and landslides that disrupt the SSOLs and interfere with their protection of the underlying permafrost.

  10. On the Ni-Ion release rate from surfaces of binary NiTi shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševčíková, Jana; Bártková, Denisa; Goldbergová, Monika; Kuběnová, Monika; Čermák, Jiří; Frenzel, Jan; Weiser, Adam; Dlouhý, Antonín

    2018-01-01

    The study is focused on Ni-ion release rates from NiTi surfaces exposed in the cell culture media and human vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC) culture environments. The NiTi surface layers situated in the depth of 70 μm below a NiTi oxide scale are affected by interactions between the NiTi alloys and the bio-environments. The finding was proved with use of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electron microscopy experiments. As the exclusive factor controlling the Ni-ion release rates was not only thicknesses of the oxide scale, but also the passivation depth, which was two-fold larger. Our experimental data strongly suggested that some other factors, in addition to the Ni concentration in the oxide scale, admittedly hydrogen soaking deep below the oxide scale, must be taken into account in order to rationalize the concentrations of Ni-ions released into the bio-environments. The suggested role of hydrogen as the surface passivation agent is also in line with the fact that the Ni-ion release rates considerably decrease in NiTi samples that were annealed in controlled hydrogen atmospheres prior to bio-environmental exposures.

  11. The role of chemical weathering in the neutralization of acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asolekar, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical weathering of soils/minerals is an important process which controls the long-term neutralization of acid rain as well as the quality of surface water, ground water, and oceans. Few laboratory studies have been conducted to evaluate the response of real whole soils or soil fractions to acidification. In this research experiments were performed in a laboratory semi-continuous pH-stat reactor over the pH range 2.7 to 4.7 using Band C-horizon soil fractions from the Bear Brook Watershed, Maine, and in presence/absence of 1 to 20 mmol/L oxalate ligand in the bulk solution. Acid consumption rate and the corresponding release rates of sodium, calcium, magnesium, aluminum, iron, and silica were monitored in the laboratory reactor. Both H + -ion and oxalate promoted weathering rates were fractional order based on the concentration in bulk solution. The mixed kinetic model for the soils is: WR T = WR H + WR ox = K H (H + ) m + K ox [OX TD ] p , where m and p are fractional orders. The hydrogen ion consumption rates were approximately equal to cation release rates on an equivalent basis for hydrogen ion promoted weathering situations where secondary precipitation was unlikely (pH < 4.7) as well as for weathering of C-horizon light fraction at pH 4.0 and oxalate concentration 1 and 5 mmol/L. The relative proportions of released species were in the neighborhood of stoichiometric ratios of bulk soil chemistry for weatherable minerals in Band C-horizon soil fractions. The experimental ratios of H/Si, Al/Si, Fe/Si, Ca/Si, Na/Si, and Mg/Si for linear weathering rates of Band C-horizon soil fractions were fairly constant in the presence and absence of oxalate ligand and strongly suggested that silica may be used as a tracer for primary mineral weathering assuming quartz is inert

  12. Application of Synthetic Storm Technique for Diurnal and Seasonal Variation of Slant Path Ka-Band Rain Attenuation Time Series over a Subtropical Location in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Ojo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As technology advances and more demands are on satellite services, rain-induced attenuation still creates one of the most damaging effects of the atmosphere on the quality of radio communication signals, especially those operating above 10 GHz. System designers therefore require statistical information on rain-induced attenuation over the coverage area in order to determine the appropriate transmitter and receiver characteristics to be adopted. This paper presents results on the time-varying rain characterization and diurnal variation of slant path rain attenuation in the Ka-band frequency simulated with synthetic storm techniques over a subtropical location in South Africa using 10-year rain rate time-series data. The analysis is based on the CDF of one-minute rain rate; time-series seasonal variation of rain rate observed over four time intervals: 00:00–06:00, 06:00–12:00, 12:00–18:00, and 18:00–24:00; diurnal fades margin; and diurnal variation of rain attenuation. Comparison was also made between the synthesized values and measured attenuation data. The predicted statistics are in good agreement with those obtained from the propagation beacon measurement in the area. The overall results will be needed for an acceptable planning that can effectively reduce the fade margin to a very low value for an optimum data communication over this area.

  13. Jaeger Monthly Mean Global Precipitation 2.5 x 5.0 degree V1 (RAIN_JEAGER) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Jaeger Surface Rain Gauge Observations data set consists of gridded mean monthly global precipitation values for 1931 to 1960 over the continents and 1955 to...

  14. Validation of the H-SAF precipitation product H03 over Greece using rain gauge data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feidas, H.; Porcu, F.; Puca, S.; Rinollo, A.; Lagouvardos, C.; Kotroni, V.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive validation of the combined infrared/microwave H-SAF (EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management) precipitation product H03, for a 1-year period, using gauge observations from a relatively dense network of 233 stations over Greece. First, the quality of the interpolated data used to validate the precipitation product is assessed and a quality index is constructed based on parameters such as the density of the station network and the orography. Then, a validation analysis is conducted based on comparisons of satellite (H03) with interpolated rain gauge data to produce continuous and multi-categorical statistics at monthly and annual timescales by taking into account the different geophysical characteristics of the terrain (land, coast, sea, elevation). Finally, the impact of the quality of interpolated data on the validation statistics is examined in terms of different configurations of the interpolation model and the rain gauge network characteristics used in the interpolation. The possibility of using a quality index of the interpolated data as a filter in the validation procedure is also investigated. The continuous validation statistics show yearly root mean squared error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) corresponding to the 225 and 105 % of the mean rain rate, respectively. Mean error (ME) indicates a slight overall tendency for underestimation of the rain gauge rates, which takes large values for the high rain rates. In general, the H03 algorithm cannot retrieve very well the light (10 mm/h) precipitation. The poor correlation between satellite and gauge data points to algorithm problems in co-locating precipitation patterns. Seasonal comparison shows that retrieval errors are lower for cold months than in the summer months of the year. The multi-categorical statistics indicate that the H03 algorithm is able to discriminate efficiently the rain from the no rain events

  15. In-situ buildup of cosmogenic isotopes at the earth`s surface: measurement of erosion rates and exposure times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Stone, J.O.H.; Evans, J.M.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Cosmic rays produce a number of nuclides in rocks that can be used to determine the geomorphic history of surfaces. The most useful are the radioactive isotopes {sup 10}Be (t{sub 1/2} = 1.5Ma), {sup 26}Al (0.7Ma) and {sup 36}Cl (0.3Ma). Within the top 2m of the surface, these are produced principally by fast neutrons. At greater depths, production is dominated by the capture of negative muons. Measurements of a single nuclide produced in situ can be used to determine total exposure times or erosion rates. The use of multiple nuclides with different half-lives makes it possible to determine more complex histories, such as exposures interrupted by periods of burial. At the ANU, all three of the isotopes above are being used to study a variety of problems in geomorphology and paleoclimatology, although to date, most of the work has concentrated on {sup 36}Cl. The accumulation of cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) provides a means of measuring erosion rates on limestone surfaces. Sensitivity is achieved over a wide range of erosion rates due to the high production rate of {sup 36}Cl in calcite (typically greater than 30 atoms/g/yr) and a detection limit of ca. 5000 atoms/g attainable with the ANU AMS system. The method is simplified by the predominance of Ca reactions (principally spallation) over other sources of {sup 36}Cl in calcite, and the ease of sample preparation. This presentation discuss the results of measurements of {sup 36}Cl in calcite from limestone samples from Australia and Papua New Guinea. Erosion rates derived from these measurements range from 3 microns per year (Australia) to over 200 microns per year in the New Guinea highlands. 3 refs.

  16. Canard explosion and coherent biresonance in the rate oscillation of CO oxidation on platinum surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Hou, Zhonghuai; Xin, Houwen

    2005-09-29

    The relationship between canard explosion and coherent biresonance is analyzed by numerically investigating a temporal dynamical model of CO oxidation on Pt surface. Canard explosion, manifesting itself by a dramatic change in the amplitude and period of a periodic orbit within a very narrow interval of a control parameter, is the result of multiple time scales in a dynamical system and is common in excitable systems. Coherent biresonance, namely, two peaks on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) curve when varying noise intensity, is a novel phenomenon of coherent resonance which is well-known in excitable systems. When the control parameter is varied from a stable fixed point, crossing the supercritical Hopf bifurcation, one of the peaks that corresponds to relatively larger noise intensity, keeps a constant height and position, while the other becomes higher and moves to lower noise level. When we consider the case in which two control parameters are perturbed by independent noise simultaneously, an interesting picture of one valley between two ridges appears on the 3D surface of SNR.

  17. High cloud variations with surface temperature from 2002 to 2015: Contributions to atmospheric radiative cooling rate and precipitation changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Run; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Su, Hui; Gu, Yu; Zhao, Bin; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Liu, Shaw Chen

    2017-05-01

    The global mean precipitation is largely constrained by atmospheric radiative cooling rates (Qr), which are sensitive to changes in high cloud fraction. We investigate variations of high cloud fraction with surface temperature (Ts) from July 2002 to June 2015 and compute their radiative effects on Qr using the Fu-Liou-Gu plane-parallel radiation model. We find that the tropical mean (30°S-30°N) high cloud fraction decreases with increasing Ts at a rate of about -1.0 ± 0.34% K-1 from 2002 to 2015, which leads to an enhanced atmospheric cooling around 0.86 W m-2 K-1. On the other hand, the northern midlatitudes (30°N-60°N) high cloud fraction increases with surface warming at a rate of 1.85 ± 0.65% K-1 and the near-global mean (60°S-60°N) high cloud fraction shows a statistically insignificant decreasing trend with increasing Ts over the analysis period. Dividing high clouds into cirrus, cirrostratus, and deep convective clouds, we find that cirrus cloud fraction increases with surface warming at a rate of 0.32 ± 0.11% K-1 (0.01 ± 0.17% K-1) for the near-global mean (tropical mean), while cirrostratus and deep convective clouds decrease with surface warming at a rate of -0.02 ± 0.18% K-1 and -0.33 ± 0.18% K-1 for the near-global mean and -0.64 ± 0.23% K-1 and -0.37 ± 0.13% K-1 for the tropical mean, respectively. High cloud fraction response to feedback to Ts accounts for approximately 1.9 ± 0.7% and 16.0 ± 6.1% of the increase in precipitation per unit surface warming over the period of 2002-2015 for the near-global mean and the tropical mean, respectively.

  18. Experimental investigation of influence of acid rain on leaching and hydraulic characteristics of cement-based solidified/stabilized lead contaminated clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yan-Jun; Jiang, Ning-Jun; Shen, Shui-Long; Jin, Fei

    2012-07-30

    Remediation of contaminated lands in China urban areas is of great concern. Degradation of construction facilities caused by acid rain is a serious environmental pollution issue in China. This paper presents an investigation of the effects of acid rain on leaching and hydraulic properties of cement-based solidified/stabilized lead contaminated soil. Laboratory tests including infiltration test and soaking test are conducted. It is found that the soil hydraulic conductivity decreases with increase in the pore volume of flow of permeant liquids (acid rain and distilled water). The decreasing rate in the case of the acid rain is lower than that in the case of the distilled water. The soaking test results show that pH and the presence of sulfate ions of acid rain have considerable influence on the leached concentrations and leaching rate of calcium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Relation between Mesophyll Surface Area, Photosynthetic Rate, and Illumination Level during Development for Leaves of Plectranthus parviflorus Henckel 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobel, Park S.; Zaragoza, Lawrence J.; Smith, William K.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of illumination level during leaf development on the mesophyll cell surface area per unit leaf area (Ames/A), CO2 resistances, and the photosynthetic rate was determined for leaves of Plectranthus parviflorus Henckel. The relative importance of Ames/A versus CO2 resistances in accounting for observed changes in photosynthesis was quantitatively evaluated using equations based on analogies to electrical circuits. When the illumination during development was raised from 900 to 42,000 lux, the leaves more than tripled in thickness as the mesophyll cells increased in size and frequency, which caused Ames/A to go from 11 to 50. The net rate of photosynthesis at light saturation concomitantly increased 4-fold, reflecting a corresponding decrease in the total resistance for CO2 movement per unit leaf area. However, the CO2 resistance per unit area of mesophyll cells remained about 580 seconds per centimeter for leaves grown under 900 to 42,000 lux. Thus, for P. parviflorus, the increased photosynthetic rate for leaves developing under higher illuminations resulted from a higher Ames/A, not from changes in the CO2 resistances within individual mesophyll cells, expressed per unit area of cell surface. Results are discussed in terms of previously observed increases in thickness, internal leaf area, and photosynthetic rates for sun versus shade leaves on various plant species. PMID:16659211

  20. Soil movements and surface erosion rates on rocky slopes in the mountain areas of the karst region of Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. B.; Bai, X. Y.; Long, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The karst region of Southwest China with an area of 54 × 104 km2 is one of the largest karst areas in the world and experiences subtropical climate. Hill-depressions are common landforms in the mountain areas of this region. Downslope soil movement on the ground by surface water erosion and soil sinking into underground holes by creeping or pipe erosion are mayor types of soil movements on rocky carbonate slopes. The 137Cs technique was used to date the sediment deposits in six karst depressions, to estimate average surface erosion rates on slopes from their catchments. The estimates of soil loss rates obtained from this study evidenced considerable variability. A value of 1.0 t km-2 year-1 was obtained for a catchment under original dense karst forest, but the erosion rates ranged between 19.3 t km-2 year-1 and 48.7 t km-2 year-1 in four catchments under secondary forest or grasses, where the original forest cover had been removed in the Ming and Qing dynasties, several hundred years ago. The highest rate of 1643 t km-2 year-1 was obtained for a catchment underlain by clayey carbonate rocks, where the soil cover was thicker and more extensive than in the other catchments and extensive land reclamation for cultivation had occurred during the period 1979-1981, immediately after the Cultural Revolution.

  1. Observation and Estimation of Evapotranspiration from an Irrigated Green Roof in a Rain-Scarce Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcan Feng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available While the rain-driven evapotranspiration (ET process has been well-studied in the humid climate, the mixed irrigation and rain-driven ET process is less understood for green roof implementations in dry regions, where empirical observations and model parameterizations are lacking. This paper presents an effort of monitoring and simulating the ET process for an irrigated green roof in a rain-scarce environment. Annual ET rates for three weighing lysimeter test units with non-vegetated, sedums, and grass covers were 2.01, 2.52, and 2.69 mm d−1, respectively. Simulations based on the three Penman–Monteith equation-derived models achieved accuracy within the reported range of previous studies. Compared to the humid climate, the overestimation of high ET rates by existing models is expected to cause a larger error in dry environments, where the enhanced ET process caused by repeated irrigations overlapped with hot, dry conditions often occurs during summer. The studied sedum species did not show significantly lower ET rates than native species, and could not effectively take advantage of the deep moisture storage. Therefore, native species, instead of the shallow-rooted species commonly recommended in humid climates, might be a better choice for green roofs in rain-scarce environments.

  2. The effect of artificial rain on backscattered acoustic signal: first measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titchenko, Yuriy; Karaev, Vladimir; Meshkov, Evgeny; Goldblat, Vladimir

    The problem of rain influencing on a characteristics of backscattered ultrasonic and microwave signal by water surface is considered. The rain influence on backscattering process of electromagnetic waves was investigated in laboratory and field experiments, for example [1-3]. Raindrops have a significant impact on backscattering of microwave and influence on wave spectrum measurement accuracy by string wave gauge. This occurs due to presence of raindrops in atmosphere and modification of the water surface. For measurements of water surface characteristics during precipitation we propose to use an acoustic system. This allows us obtaining of the water surface parameters independently on precipitation in atmosphere. The measurements of significant wave height of water surface using underwater acoustical systems are well known [4, 5]. Moreover, the variance of orbital velocity can be measure using these systems. However, these methods cannot be used for measurements of slope variance and the other second statistical moments of water surface that required for analyzing the radar backscatter signal. An original design Doppler underwater acoustic wave gauge allows directly measuring the surface roughness characteristics that affect on electromagnetic waves backscattering of the same wavelength [6]. Acoustic wave gauge is Doppler ultrasonic sonar which is fixed near the bottom on the floating disk. Measurements are carried out at vertically orientation of sonar antennas towards water surface. The first experiments were conducted with the first model of an acoustic wave gauge. The acoustic wave gauge (8 mm wavelength) is equipped with a transceiving antenna with a wide symmetrical antenna pattern. The gauge allows us to measure Doppler spectrum and cross section of backscattered signal. Variance of orbital velocity vertical component can be retrieved from Doppler spectrum with high accuracy. The result of laboratory and field experiments during artificial rain is presented

  3. Flumazenil decreases surface expression of α4β2δ GABAA receptors by increasing the rate of receptor internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuver, Aarti; Smith, Sheryl S

    2016-01-01

    Increases in expression of α4βδ GABAA receptors (GABARs), triggered by fluctuations in the neurosteroid THP (3α-OH-5α[β]-pregnan-20-one), are associated with changes in mood and cognition. We tested whether α4βδ trafficking and surface expression would be altered by in vitro exposure to flumazenil, a benzodiazepine ligand which reduces α4βδ expression in vivo. We first determined that flumazenil (100 nM-100 μM, IC50=∼1 μM) acted as a negative modulator, reducing GABA (10 μM)-gated current in the presence of 100 nM THP (to increase receptor efficacy), assessed with whole cell patch clamp recordings of recombinant α4β2δ expressed in HEK-293 cells. Surface expression of recombinant α4β2δ receptors was detected using a 3XFLAG reporter at the C-terminus of α4 (α4F) using confocal immunocytochemical techniques following 48 h exposure of cells to GABA (10 μM)+THP (100 nM). Flumazenil (10 μM) decreased surface expression of α4F by ∼60%, while increasing its intracellular accumulation, after 48 h. Reduced surface expression of α4β2δ after flumazenil treatment was confirmed by decreases in the current responses to 100 nM of the GABA agonist gaboxadol. Flumazenil-induced decreases in surface expression of α4β2δ were prevented by the dynamin blocker, dynasore, and by leupeptin, which blocks lysosomal enzymes, suggesting that flumazenil is acting to increase endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of the receptor. Flumazenil increased the rate of receptor removal from the cell surface by 2-fold, assessed using botulinum toxin B to block insertion of new receptors. These findings may suggest new therapeutic strategies for regulation of α4β2δ expression using flumazenil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of Scaling Approaches for the Oceanic Dissipation Rate of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in the Surface Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esters, L. T.; Ward, B.; Sutherland, G.; Ten Doeschate, A.; Landwehr, S.; Bell, T. G.; Christensen, K. H.

    2016-02-01

    The air-sea exchange of heat, gas and momentum plays an important role for the Earth's weather and global climate. The exchange processes between ocean and atmosphere are influenced by the prevailing surface ocean dynamics. This surface ocean is a highly turbulent region where there is enhanced production of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The dissipation rate of TKE (ɛ) in the surface ocean is an important process for governing the depth of both the mixing and mixed layers, which are important length-scales for many aspects of ocean research. However, there exist very limited observations of ɛ under open ocean conditions and consequently our understanding of how to model the dissipation profile is very limited. The approaches to model profiles of ɛ that exist, differ by orders of magnitude depending on their underlying theoretical assumption and included physical processes. Therefore, scaling ɛ is not straight forward and requires open ocean measurements of ɛ to validate the respective scaling laws. This validated scaling of ɛ, is for example required to produce accurate mixed layer depths in global climate models. Errors in the depth of the ocean surface boundary layer can lead to biases in sea surface temperature. Here, we present open ocean measurements of ɛ from the Air-Sea Interaction Profiler (ASIP) collected during several cruises in different ocean basins. ASIP is an autonomous upwardly rising microstructure profiler allowing undisturbed profiling up to the ocean surface. These direct measurements of ɛ under various types of atmospheric and oceanic conditions along with measurements of atmospheric fluxes and wave conditions allow us to make a unique assessment of several scaling approaches based on wind, wave and buoyancy forcing. This will allow us to best assess the most appropriate ɛ-based parameterisation for air-sea exchange.

  5. Acid rain control: success on the cheap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    At the time of the fourth Conference of the Parties to the climate change convention in Buenos Aires, the article discusses whether the flexible free-market approach developed in the USA to control acid rain (under the Clean Air Act Amendments) could be adopted to control greenhouse gases around the world. The economic success of Phase I and the effects of Phase II (to start in 2000), with several uncertainties, are discussed. The article quotes opinions of many government officials and also of non-governmental environmentalists. 3 figs

  6. Technological options for acid rain control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Princiotta, F.T.; Sedman, C.B.

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses technological options for acid rain control. Compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will require careful scrutiny of a number of issues before selecting control options to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. One key consideration is the effect of fuel switching or control technology upon the existing dust collector, with additional air toxics legislation looming ahead. A number of likely SO2 and NOx retrofit technologies and estimated costs are presented, along with results of retrofit case studies. New hybrid particulate controls are also being developed to meet future requirements

  7. Combined MW-IR Precipitation Evolving Technique (PET of convective rain fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Di Paola

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new multi-sensor approach for convective rain cell continuous monitoring based on rainfall derived from Passive Microwave (PM remote sensing from the Low Earth Orbit (LEO satellite coupled with Infrared (IR remote sensing Brightness Temperature (TB from the Geosynchronous (GEO orbit satellite. The proposed technique, which we call Precipitation Evolving Technique (PET, propagates forward in time and space the last available rain-rate (RR maps derived from Advanced Microwave Sounding Units (AMSU and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS observations by using IR TB maps of water vapor (6.2 μm and thermal-IR (10.8 μm channels from a Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI radiometer. PET is based on two different modules, the first for morphing and tracking rain cells and the second for dynamic calibration IR-RR. The Morphing module uses two consecutive IR data to identify the motion vector to be applied to the rain field so as to propagate it in time and space, whilst the Calibration module computes the dynamic relationship between IR and RR in order to take into account genesis, extinction or size variation of rain cells. Finally, a combination of the Morphing and Calibration output provides a rainfall map at IR space and time scale, and the whole procedure is reiterated by using the last RR map output until a new MW-based rainfall is available. The PET results have been analyzed with respect to two different PM-RR retrieval algorithms for seven case studies referring to different rainfall convective events. The qualitative, dichotomous and continuous assessments show an overall ability of this technique to propagate rain field at least for 2–3 h propagation time.

  8. Generalized Temporal Acceleration Scheme for Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Surface Catalytic Processes by Scaling the Rates of Fast Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybeck, Eric C; Plaisance, Craig P; Neurock, Matthew

    2017-04-11

    A novel algorithm is presented that achieves temporal acceleration during kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of surface catalytic processes. This algorithm allows for the direct simulation of reaction networks containing kinetic processes occurring on vastly disparate time scales which computationally overburden standard KMC methods. Previously developed methods for temporal acceleration in KMC were designed for specific systems and often require a priori information from the user such as identifying the fast and slow processes. In the approach presented herein, quasi-equilibrated processes are identified automatically based on previous executions of the forward and reverse reactions. Temporal acceleration is achieved by automatically scaling the intrinsic rate constants of the quasi-equilibrated processes, bringing their rates closer to the time scales of the slow kinetically relevant nonequilibrated processes. All reactions are still simulated directly, although with modified rate constants. Abrupt changes in the underlying dynamics of the reaction network are identified during the simulation, and the reaction rate constants are rescaled accordingly. The algorithm was utilized here to model the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reaction over ruthenium nanoparticles. This reaction network has multiple time-scale-disparate processes which would be intractable to simulate without the aid of temporal acceleration. The accelerated simulations are found to give reaction rates and selectivities indistinguishable from those calculated by an equivalent mean-field kinetic model. The computational savings of the algorithm can span many orders of magnitude in realistic systems, and the computational cost is not limited by the magnitude of the time scale disparity in the system processes. Furthermore, the algorithm has been designed in a generic fashion and can easily be applied to other surface catalytic processes of interest.

  9. Nutrients interaction investigation to improve Monascus purpureus FTC5391 growth rate using Response Surface Methodology and Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad, R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Two vital factors, certain environmental conditions and nutrients as a source of energy are entailed for successful growth and reproduction of microorganisms. Manipulation of nutritional requirement is the simplest and most effectual strategy to stimulate and enhance the activity of microorganisms. Methodology and Results: In this study, response surface methodology (RSM and artificial neural network (ANN were employed to optimize the carbon and nitrogen sources in order to improve growth rate of Monascus purpureus FTC5391,a new local isolate. The best models for optimization of growth rate were a multilayer full feed-forward incremental back propagation network, and a modified response surface model using backward elimination. The optimum condition for cell mass production was: sucrose 2.5%, yeast extract 0.045%, casamino acid 0.275%, sodium nitrate 0.48%, potato starch 0.045%, dextrose 1%, potassium nitrate 0.57%. The experimental cell mass production using this optimal condition was 21 mg/plate/12days, which was 2.2-fold higher than the standard condition (sucrose 5%, yeast extract 0.15%, casamino acid 0.25%, sodium nitrate 0.3%, potato starch 0.2%, dextrose 1%, potassium nitrate 0.3%. Conclusion, significance and impact of study: The results of RSM and ANN showed that all carbon and nitrogen sources tested had significant effect on growth rate (P-value < 0.05. In addition the use of RSM and ANN alongside each other provided a proper growth prediction model.

  10. Reduction of initial corrosion rate and improvement of cell adhesion through surface modification of biodegradable Mg alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyung-Seop; Lee, Sun Hee; Kim, Won-Joo; Jeon, Hojeong; Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Ahn, Jae-Pyung; Kim, Yu-Chan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the surface modification of biodegradable pure Magnesium and Mg-5wt%Ca-1wt%Zn alloy was performed through immersion in HBSS, inorganic salt solution and cell media to reduce initial hydrogen evolution and improve cell adhesion. The formation of different CaP-like coatings from immersion of pure Mg and Mg alloy were observed using Cryo FIB analysis and their performances were measured through cell adhesion, quantification of released Mg ions, and cell cytotoxicity assays. The coating layers displayed significant reduction of initial corrosion rate, and cell adhesion for both pure Mg and Mg alloy appeared to be influenced by the amino acids and proteins in the cell media. In general, Mg alloy showed a denser coating layer with higher Ca contents, resulting in greater reduction of initial corrosion rate and improved cell adhesion, when compared to pure Mg. This is due to saturation of Ca around the corrosion site that provided much favorable environmental condition to produce denser calcium phosphate coating mixture. The result from this study suggests that the surface modification of biodegradable Mg alloy by immersion in alkaline solutions can be utilized to obtain ideal biodegradable orthopedic implant material with reduced initial hydrogen evolution rate and improved cell adhesion.

  11. Use of variance techniques to measure dry air-surface exchange rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesely, M. L.

    1988-07-01

    The variances of fluctuations of scalar quantities can be measured and interpreted to yield indirect estimates of their vertical fluxes in the atmospheric surface layer. Strong correlations among scalar fluctuations indicate a similarity of transfer mechanisms, which is utilized in some of the variance techniques. The ratios of the standard deviations of two scalar quantities, for example, can be used to estimate the flux of one if the flux of the other is measured, without knowledge of atmospheric stability. This is akin to a modified Bowen ratio approach. Other methods such as the normalized standard-deviation technique and the correlation-coefficient technique can be utilized effectively if atmospheric stability is evaluated and certain semi-empirical functions are known. In these cases, iterative calculations involving measured variances of fluctuations of temperature and vertical wind velocity can be used in place of direct flux measurements. For a chemical sensor whose output is contaminated by non-atmospheric noise, covariances with fluctuations of scalar quantities measured with a very good signal-to-noise ratio can be used to extract the needed standard deviation. Field measurements have shown that many of these approaches are successful for gases such as ozone and sulfur dioxide, as well as for temperature and water vapor, and could be extended to other trace substances. In humid areas, it appears that water vapor fluctuations often have a higher degree of correlation to fluctuations of other trace gases than do temperature fluctuations; this makes water vapor a more reliable companion or “reference” scalar. These techniques provide some reliable research approaches but, for routine or operational measurement, they are limited by the need for fast-response sensors. Also, all variance approaches require some independent means to estimate the direction of the flux.

  12. Analysis of Effects of Cutting Parameters of Wire Electrical Discharge Machining on Material Removal Rate and Surface Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonday, H. R.; Tigga, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    As wire electrical discharge machining is pioneered as a vigorous, efficient and precise and complex nontraditional machining technique, research is needed in this area for efficient machining. In this paper, the influence of various input factors of wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM) on output variable has been analyzed by using Taguchi technique and analysis of variance. The design of experiments has been done and by applying L8 orthogonal arrays method and experiments have been conducted and collected required data. The objectives of the research are to maximize the material removal rate and to minimize the surface roughness value (Ra). Surface morphology of machined workpiece has been obtained and examined by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique.

  13. Analysis of Effects of Cutting Parameters of Wire Electrical Discharge Machining on Material Removal Rate and Surface Integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonday, H. R.; Tigga, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    As wire electrical discharge machining is pioneered as a vigorous, efficient and precise and complex nontraditional machining technique, research is needed in this area for efficient machining. In this paper, the influence of various input factors of wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM) on output variable has been analyzed by using Taguchi technique and analysis of variance. The design of experiments has been done and by applying L8 orthogonal arrays method and experiments have been conducted and collected required data. The objectives of the research are to maximize the material removal rate and to minimize the surface roughness value (Ra). Surface morphology of machined workpiece has been obtained and examined by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. (paper)

  14. Variability within the 10-year pollen rain of a seasonal neotropical forest and its implications for paleoenvironmental and phenological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselhorst, Derek S; Moreno, J Enrique; Punyasena, Surangi W

    2013-01-01

    Tropical paleoecologists use a combination of mud-water interface and modern pollen rain samples (local samples of airborne pollen) to interpret compositional changes within fossil pollen records. Taxonomic similarities between the composition of modern assemblages and fossil samples are the basis of reconstructing paleoclimates and paleoenvironments. Surface sediment samples reflect a time-averaged accumulation of pollen spanning several years or more. Due to experimental constraints, modern pollen rain samples are generally collected over shorter timeframes (1-3 years) and are therefore less likely to capture the full range of natural variability in pollen rain composition and abundance. This potentially biases paleoenvironmental interpretations based on modern pollen rain transfer functions. To determine the degree to which short-term environmental change affects the composition of the aerial pollen flux of Neotropical forests, we sampled ten years of the seasonal pollen rain from Barro Colorado Island, Panama and compared it to climatic and environmental data over the same ten-year span. We establish that the pollen rain effectively captured the strong seasonality and stratification of pollen flow within the forest canopy and that individual taxa had variable sensitivity to seasonal and annual changes in environmental conditions, manifested as changes in pollen productivity. We conclude that modern pollen rain samples capture the reproductive response of moist tropical plants to short-term environmental change, but that consequently, pollen rain-based calibrations need to include longer sampling periods (≥7 years) to reflect the full range of natural variability in the pollen output of a forest and simulate the time-averaging present in sediment samples. Our results also demonstrate that over the long-term, pollen traps placed in the forest understory are representative samples of the pollen output of both canopy and understory vegetation. Aerial pollen traps

  15. High-rate production of micro- and nanostructured surfaces: Injection molding and novel process for metal tooling manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus Vega, Marisely

    rapidly processed via liquid injection molding. LSR with its excellent mechanical properties, transparency, non-toxicity and rapid molding capabilities can bring the production of micro and nanostructured surfaces from laboratory research facilities to high-rate manufacturing. However, previous research on microstructured surfaces made off LSR does not focus on the processing aspect of this material. Therefore, there is a lack of understanding of how different processing conditions affect the replication of microstructures. Additionally, there are no reports molding nanostructures of LSR. Features between 115 microm and 0.250 microm were molded in this work and the effect of different processing conditions and features sizes were studied. For the last part of this work, a novel metal additive manufacturing technique was used for the production of microstructured surfaces to be used as tooling for injection molding. The printing method consists of metal pastes printed through a tip onto a steel substrate. Prior work has shown spreading and swelling of features when metal pastes extrude out of the printing tip. PDMS was studied as a binder material to minimize spreading and swelling of the features by curing right after printing. In addition, prior work has shown durability of this metal printed tool up to 5000 injection molding cycles. This work compares this durability to durability of commercially available selective laser sintering metal tools. Furthermore, surface roughness was studied as this is one of the most important things to consider when molding microchannels for certain applications.

  16. Rain songs and the observance of the rain cult amongst the Lobedu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article I will first give a short introduction on the social dynamics and the observance of the raincult amongst the Lobedu people, who form part of the Northern Sotho branch of the Bantu-speakingpeoples of southern Africa. Examples of rain songs that I recorded at the tribal capital of the Lobedu rainqueen, Modjadji, ...

  17. Prediction of Optimal Designs for Material Removal Rate and Surface Roughness Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheswara Rao Ch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work involves in finding the optimal combination of cutting parameters, in dry turning of EN19 steel using a tungsten carbide tool of nose radius 0.4 mm. The experiments were conducted on a CNC turret lathe as per the designed L9 (3^3 orthogonal array. In order to optimize the Material Removal Rate (MRR, Arithmetic Average Roughness (Ra and Average Peak-to-Valley Height Roughness (Rz individually, Single objective Taguchi method has been employed. From the results, the optimal combination of cutting parameters for MRR is found at: 225 m/min, 0.15 mm/rev and 0.6 mm. Optimal combination of Ra and Rz is found at: 225 m/min, 0.05 mm/rev and 0.6 mm. Analysis of variance (ANOVA is used to find the influence of cutting parameters on the responses. ANOVA results revealed that speed and feed has high influence on MRR. Speed has high influence in affecting the Roughness parameters. Linear regression models for the responses were prepared using the MINITAB-16 software. From the results, it is found that the models prepared are more significant and accurate.

  18. Performance Investigation of FSO-OFDM Communication Systems under the Heavy Rain Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Florence; He, Jing; Chen, Lin

    2017-12-01

    The challenge in the free-space optical (FSO) communication is the propagation of optical signal through different atmospheric conditions such as rain, snow and fog. In this paper, an orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing technique (OFDM) is proposed in the FSO communication system. Meanwhile, considering the rain attenuation models based on Marshal & Palmer and Carbonneau models, the performance of FSO communication system based on the OFDM is evaluated under the heavy-rain condition in Changsha, China. The simulation results show that, under a heavy-rainfall condition of 106.18 mm/h, with an attenuation factor of 7 dB/km based on the Marshal & Palmer model, the bit rate of 2.5 and 4.0 Gbps data can be transmitted over the FSO channels of 1.6 and 1.3 km, respectively, and the bit error rate of less than 1E - 4 can be achieved. In addition, the effect on rain attenuation over the FSO communication system based on the Marshal & Palmer model is less than that of the Carbonneau model.

  19. Effect of ice surface size on collision rates and head impacts at the World Junior Hockey Championships, 2002 to 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennberg, Richard

    2005-03-01

    To determine if collision rates and head impacts in elite junior hockey differed between games played on the small North American ice surface (85 ft wide), an intermediate-size Finnish ice surface (94 ft wide), and the large standard international ice surface (100 ft wide). Videotape analysis of all games involving Team Canada from the 2002 (large ice, Czech Republic), 2003 (small ice, Canada), and 2004 (intermediate ice, Finland) World Junior Championships. All collisions were counted and separated into various categories (volitional player/player bodychecks, into boards or open ice, plus accidental/incidental player/boards, player/ice, head/stick, head/puck). Further subdivisions included collisions involving the head directly or indirectly and notably severe head impacts. Small, intermediate, and large ice surface mean collisions/game, respectively, were 295, 258, 222, total collisions; 251, 220, 181, volitional bodychecks; 126, 115, 88, into boards; 125, 106, 93, open ice; 71, 52, 44, total head; 44, 36, 30, indirect head; 26, 16, 13, direct head; and 1.3, 0.5, 0.3, severe head (P < 0.05 for small-intermediate ice and intermediate-large ice differences in total collisions; P < 0.005 for small-large ice difference; P < 0.05 for small-intermediate ice differences in head impacts; P < 0.01 for small-large ice differences in total and severe head impacts). There is a significant inverse correlation between ice size and collision rates in elite hockey, including direct, indirect, and severe head impacts. These findings suggest that uniform usage of the larger international rinks could reduce the risk of injury, and specifically, concussions in elite hockey by decreasing the occurrence of collisions and head impacts.

  20. Guidance proposal for using available DegT50 values for estimation of degradation rates of plant protection products in Dutch surface water and sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Adriaanse, P.I.; Horst, ter M.M.S.; Tiktak, A.; Linden, van der A.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The degradation rate of plant protection products and their transformation products in surface water and sediment may influence their concentrations in Dutch surface water. Therefore the estimation of these rates may be an important part of the assessment of the exposure of aquatic organisms. We

  1. Vegetation and pollen rain relationship from the tropical Atlantic rain forest in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Behling

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the southern Brazilian tropical Atlantic lowland rain forest and modern pollen rain was studied by pollen traps. The study was carried out on a one hectare plot undisturbed rain forest of the reserve Volta Velha and two secondary forests, ± 50 and 7 years old. About 248 identified tree, shrub and herb species (excluding epiphytes of 50 families were represented by 126 different pollen and spore types (including non-local taxa. The calculated average influx of pollen rain from the native Atlantic rain forest was 12465 pollen grains per cm² and year. The influx from the ± 50 years old and from the 7 years old secondary forest was relatively low (4112 and 3667 grains per cm² and year, respectively compared to the undisturbed rain forest. The occurrence of pollen grains of herbs and fern spores were significantly higher in the secondary forests than in the undisturbed rain forest.Estudou-se a relação entre a Floresta Tropical Atlântica sul brasileira e a chuva polínica atual através de coletores de pólen. O estudo foi realizado em uma parcela de um hectare de floresta não perturbada localizada na Reserva Volta Velha (26º 04' S, 48º 38' W, 9 m s.n.m. e duas outras parcelas de floresta secundária (± 50 e 7 anos de idade. Cerca de 248 espécies arbóreas, arbustivas e herbáceas (excluindo epifitas, englobadas em 50 familias estavam representadas por 126 diferentes tipos de pólen e esporos (incluindo taxa não locais. Na área não perturbada, a média do fluxo de entrada da chuva polínica foi de 12465 grãos de pólen por cm²/ano. Nas áreas de ± 50 anos e 7 anos correspondentes a estádios florestais secundários o fluxo de entrada foi relativamente baixo (4112 e 3667 grãos por cm²/ano, respectivamente comparativamente à área não perturbada. A ocorrência de grãos de pólen de herbáceas e esporos de pteridófitas foi significativamente maior nas áreas secundárias do que na área não perturbada.

  2. Stretch rate effects and flame surface densities in premixed turbulent combustion up to 1.25 MPa

    KAUST Repository

    Bagdanavicius, Audrius

    2015-11-01

    Independent research at two centres using a burner and an explosion bomb has revealed important aspects of turbulent premixed flame structure. Measurements at pressures and temperatures up to 1.25MPa and 673K in the two rigs were aimed at quantifying the influences of flame stretch rate and strain rate Markstein number, Masr , on both turbulent burning velocity and flame surface density. That on burning velocity is expressed through the stretch rate factor, Io , or probability of burning, Pb 0.5. These depend on Masr , but they grow in importance as the Karlovitz stretch factor, K, increases, and are evaluated from the associated burning velocity data. Planar laser tomography was employed to identify contours of reaction progress variable in both rigs. These enabled both an appropriate flame front for the measurement of the turbulent burning velocity to be identified, and flame surface densities, with the associated factors, to be evaluated. In the explosion measurements, these parameters were derived also from the flame surface area, the derived Pb 0.5 factor and the measured turbulent burning velocities. In the burner measurement they were calculated directly from the flame surface density, which was derived from the flame contours.A new overall correlation is derived for the Pb 0.5 factor, in terms of Masr at different K and this is discussed in the light of previous theoretical studies. The wrinkled flame surface area normalised by the area associated with the turbulent burning velocity measurement, and the ratio of turbulent to laminar burning velocity, ut /ul , are also evaluated. The higher the value of Pb0.5, the more effective is an increased flame wrinkling in increasing ut /ul A correlation of the product of k and the laminar flame thickness with Karlovitz stretch factor and Markstein number is explored using the present data and those of other workers. Some generality is revealed, enabling the wave length associated with the spatial change in mean

  3. Acid rain compliance: Options, facts, and findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, K.S.; Metzroth, L.F.; Radjef-Jenatton, M.

    1991-01-01

    On January 1, 1995, those utilities affected during the Phase 1 implementation of the amended Clean Air Act will be required to comply with new clean air standards. During the next three years leading up to that date, in order to achieve compliance, those companies need to not only decide on a strategy but also implement a plan. To date very few clear-cut compliance decisions have been made. The reasons for the uncertainty center on future fuel prices and the prospects for more efficient and lower cost FGD systems. Many utility planners look at today's coal market and find it hard to believe that prices for some specialty coals, particularly ultra-low sulfur coals, will be higher than the tremendous costs associated with the development of an FGD system. With that in mind, it comes as no surprise that coal switching has been regarded as the least cost choice among even the largest sulfur emitting companies in the country. However, if companies continue to make least cost decisions based on today's coal market, the US coal and utility industries could be in for some disruptive times ahead. While no paper can completely address the enormous complexity surrounding acid rain compliance, this paper addresses some of the broad issues which result from compliance activity and summarizes the findings outlined in RDI's four volume report, the Acid Rain Handbook

  4. Strategies for controlling acid rain: economic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, B.A.; Crocker, T.D.

    1992-01-01

    There are two competing approaches to reducing pollution such as the acid rain precursors SOsub(2) and NOsub(x). In the command and control approach, pollution control legislation may dictate the technological method by which specified pollution reductions are to be achieved. A key feature of command-and-control regulations is their inflexibility. The alternative approach relies on market mechanisms and incentives to induce firms to reduce pollution voluntarily. Economists generally prefer this approach because it permits flexibility for firms in selecting abatement methods to minimize costs. This chapter deals with qualitative issues in determining and achieving an ''optimal'' pollution level using various taxes, subsidies or quantitative restrictions. Alternative permit schemes for achieving regional pollution control are considered. Statistical studies are discussed which compare the command-and-control approach with the economic incentives approach and show that there are substantial cost differences between them in most cases. Finally, some institutional factors, that may lead to more costly acid rain control schemes being selected, are examined. A list of 61 references is appended. (UK)

  5. The role of calcium in improving photosynthesis and related physiological and biochemical attributes of spring wheat subjected to simulated acid rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatabadian, Aria; Sanavy, Seyed Ali Mohammad Modarres; Gholamhoseini, Majid; Joghan, Aydin Khodaei; Majdi, Mohammad; Kashkooli, Arman Beyraghdar

    2013-04-01

    The response of photosynthesis parameters, catalase, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activity, malondialdehyde, proline, chlorophyll, yield and yield components to foliar application of calcium and simulated acid rain in wheat were investigated. Foliar treatment of calcium led to significant increases in the photosynthesis rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, proline, chlorophyll, yield and yield components in plants subjected to acid rain. Antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation in the wheat leaves decreased because of calcium foliar application. Calcium hindered degradation of the rubisco subunits under acid rain treatment compared with water-treated plants. Results suggest that acid rain induces the production of free radicals resulting in lipid peroxidation of the cell membrane so that significant increase in antioxidant enzyme activity was observed. In addition, photosynthetic parameters i.e. photosynthesis rate, transpiration rate and stomatal conductance were drastically suppressed by acid rain. The cellular damage caused by free radicals might be reduced or prevented by a protective metabolism including antioxidative enzymes and calcium. We report that foliar application of calcium before acid rain may ameliorate the adverse effects of acid rain in wheat plants.

  6. Response of soybean seed germination to cadmium and acid rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting Ting; Wu, Peng; Wang, Li Hong; Zhou, Qing

    2011-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) pollution and acid rain are the main environmental issues, and they often occur in the same agricultural region. Nevertheless, up to now, little information on the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain action on crops were presented. Here, we investigated the combined effect of Cd(2+) and acid rain on the seed germination of soybean. The results indicated that the single treatment with the low level of Cd(2+) (0.18, 1.0, 3.0 mg L(-1)) or acid rain (pH ≥3.0) could not affect the seed germination of soybean, which was resulted in the increased activities of peroxidase and catalase. The single treatment with the high concentration of Cd(2+) (>6 mg L(-1)) or acid rain at pH 2.5 decreased the activities of peroxidase and catalase, damaged the cell membrane and then decreased the seed germination of soybean. Meanwhile, the same toxic effect was observed in the combined treatment with Cd(2+) and acid rain, and the combined treatment had more toxic effect than the single treatment with Cd(2+) or acid rain. Thus, the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain had more potential threat to the seed germination of soybean than the single pollution of Cd(2+) or acid rain.

  7. GPM Ground Validation Southern Appalachian Rain Gauge IPHEx V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Southern Appalachian Rain Gauge IPHEx dataset was collected during the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx) field...

  8. Groundwater Recharge Rates and Surface Runoff Response to Land Use and Land Cover Changes in Semi-arid Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owuor, Steven; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Guzha, Alphonce; Rufino, Mariana; Pelster, David; Díaz-Pinés, Eugenio; Breuer, Lutz; Merbold, Lutz

    2017-04-01

    Conclusive evidence and understanding of the effects of land use and land cover (LULC) on both groundwater recharge and surface runoff is critical for effective management of water resources in semi-arid region as those heavily depend on groundwater resources. However, there is limited quantitative evidence on how changes to LULC in semi-arid tropical and subtropical regions affect the subsurface components of the hydrologic cycle, particularly groundwater recharge. In this study, we reviewed a total of 27 studies (2 modelling and 25 experimental), which reported on pre- and post-land use change groundwater recharge or surface runoff magnitude, and thus allowed to quantify the response of groundwater recharge rates and runoff to LULC. Restoration of bare land induces a decrease in groundwater recharge from 42 % of precipitation to between 6 and 12 % depending on the final LULC. If forests are cleared for rangelands, groundwater recharge increases by 7.8 ± 12.6 %, while conversion to cropland or grassland results in increases of 3.4 ± 2.5 and 4.4 ± 3.3 %, respectively. Rehabilitation of bare land to cropland results in surface runoff reductions of between 5.2 and 7.3 %. The conversion of forest vegetation to managed LULC shows an increase in surface runoff from 1 to 14.1 % depending on the final LULC. Surface runoff is reduced from 2.5 to 1.1 % when grassland is converted to forest vegetation. While there is general consistency in the results from the selected case studies, we conclude that there are few experimental studies that have been conducted in tropical and subtropical semi-arid regions, despite that many people rely heavily on groundwater for their livelihoods. Therefore, there is an urgent need to increase the body of quantitative evidence given the pressure of growing human population and climate change on water resources in the region.

  9. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. II. THE GRAND-DESIGN GALAXY M51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A. [On sabbatical leave from the Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacan, C.P. 58089, Mexico. (Mexico); Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel, E-mail: r.gonzalez@crya.unam.mx [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-06-20

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass and surface densities of total gas ({Sigma}{sub gas}), molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}), neutral gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub I}}), and star formation rate ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) in the grand-design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. By comparing the two-dimensional distribution of cluster masses and gas surface densities, we find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.4{+-}0.2}}, whereM{sub 3rd} is the median of the five most massive clusters. There is no correlation with{Sigma}{sub gas},{Sigma}{sub H2}, or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.6{+-}0.1}} and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 0.5{+-}0.2}; there is no correlation with either {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}} or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. The results could hardly be more different from those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but we have determined M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 3.8{+-}0.3}, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}{sup 1.2{+-}0.1}}, and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub SFR}{sup 0.9{+-}0.1}. For the older sample in M51, the lack of tight correlations is probably due to the combination of strong azimuthal variations in the surface densities of gas and star formation rate, and the cluster ages. These two facts mean that neither the azimuthal average of the surface densities at a given radius nor the surface densities at the present-day location of a stellar cluster represent the true surface densities at the place and time of cluster formation. In the case of the younger sample, even if the clusters have not yet

  10. Field investigation of surface-deposited radon progeny as a possible predictor of the airborne radon progeny dose rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kainan; Steck, Daniel J; Field, R William

    2009-08-01

    The quantitative relationships between radon gas concentration, the surface-deposited activities of various radon progeny, the airborne radon progeny dose rate, and various residential environmental factors were investigated through actual field measurements in 38 selected Iowa houses occupied by either smokers or nonsmokers. Airborne dose rate was calculated from unattached and attached potential alpha energy concentrations (PAECs) using two dosimetric models with different activity-size weighting factors. These models are labeled Pdose and Jdose, respectively. Surface-deposited 218Po and 214Po were found significantly correlated to radon, unattached PAEC, and both airborne dose rates (p fireplace, or usage of a ceiling fan significantly, or marginally significantly, reduced the Pdose to 0.65 (90% CI 0.42-0.996), 0.54 (90% CI 0.28-1.02), and 0.66 (90% CI 0.45-0.96), respectively. For Jdose, only the usage of a ceiling fan significantly reduced the dose rate to 0.57 (90% CI 0.39-0.85). In smoking environments, deposited 218Po was a significant negative predictor for Pdose (RR 0.68, 90% CI 0.55-0.84) after adjusting for long-term 222Rn and environmental factors. A significant decrease of 0.72 (90% CI 0.64-0.83) in the mean Pdose was noted, after adjusting for the radon and radon progeny effects and other environmental factors, for every 10 additional cigarettes smoked in the room. A significant increase of 1.71 in the mean Pdose was found for large room size relative to small room size (90% CI 1.08-2.79) after adjusting for the radon and radon progeny effects as well as other environmental factors. Fireplace usage was found to significantly increase the mean Pdose to 1.71 (90% CI 1.20-2.45) after adjusting for other factors.

  11. Trends in Pinus ponderosa foliar pigment concentration due to chronic exposure of ozone and acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuman, L.; Houpis, J.; Anderson, P.

    1991-01-01

    To determine the effects of ozone and acid rain on mature Ponderosa pine trees, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. has collaborated with University of California Berkeley, University of California Davis, California State University Chico, and the US Forest Service at the latter's Chico Tree Improvement Center. Foliar tissue from mature grafted scions of Pinus ponderosa were exposed to two times ambient ozone for ten months and to acid rain (3.0 pH) weekly for 10 weeks using branch exposure chambers. Pigment extracts were analyzed spectrophotometrically for concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, and carotenoid pigments, at 662 nm, 644 nm, and 470 nm, respectively. Pigment concentrations were expressed on a surface area basis. Preliminary results revealed that chlorophyll a showed a downward trend due to the ozone treatment. Acid rain caused no effects on these three pigments, however, chlorophyll b showed an upward trend due to the interaction of ozone and acid rain. The carotenoid pigments showed no changes due to the treatments either singly, or in combination

  12. Trace organic compounds in rain. 1. Sampler design and analysis by adsortion/thermal desorption (ATD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankow, J.F.; Isabelle, L.M.; Asher, W.E.

    1984-05-01

    The design and sue of a rain sampler with a 0.89-m/sup 2/ collection surface area are described. The sampler is controlled electronically, provides for the in situ filtration of the sample, and carries out the preconcentration of nonpolar organic compounds by means of cartridges of the sorbent Tenax-GC. Analytical results were obtained for 27 compounds by fused silica capillary column gas chromatography with detection by mass spectrometry for four rain events sampled 12 km southwest of Portland, Or, at the Oregon Graduate Center (OGC), and for five rain events sampled in southeast Portland. Mean dissolved rain concentrations for ..cap alpha..-hexachlorocyclohexane (..cap alpha..-HCH), naphthalene, acenaphthylene, fluorene, and phenanthrene were 5.9, 11, 4.7, 3.2, and 24 ng/L, respectively, at OGC. The mean values for the Portland events were 47, 72, 55, 43, and 140 ng/L, respectively. Since dissolved concentrations were measured, the data were also used in conjunction with available Henry's law constants to estimate the concurrent, local atmospheric levels of these compounds at these sites. Many of the H values of interest are available only near T = 298 K. Therefore, the further understanding of the wet deposition of toxic organic compounds will be facilitated by the direct study of wet deposition as well as by the determination of the temperature dependence of the H values of environmentally interesting compounds. 36 references.

  13. Harmless nectar source or deadly trap: Nepenthes pitchers are activated by rain, condensation and nectar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Ulrike; Bohn, Holger F; Federle, Walter

    2008-02-07

    The leaves of Nepenthes pitcher plants are specialized pitfall traps which capture and digest arthropod prey. In many species, insects become trapped by 'aquaplaning' on the wet pitcher rim (peristome). Here we investigate the ecological implications of this capture mechanism in Nepenthes rafflesiana var. typica. We combine meteorological data and continuous field measurements of peristome wetness using electrical conductance with experimental assessments of the pitchers' capture efficiency. Our results demonstrate that pitchers can be highly effective traps with capture rates as high as 80% but completely ineffective at other times. These dramatic changes are due to the wetting condition of the peristome. Variation of peristome wetness and capture efficiency was perfectly synchronous, and caused by rain, condensation and nectar secreted from peristome nectaries. The presence of nectar on the peristome increased surface wetness mainly indirectly by its hygroscopic properties. Experiments confirmed that pitchers with removed peristome nectaries remained generally drier and captured prey less efficiently than untreated controls. This role of nectar in prey capture represents a novel function of plant nectar. We propose that the intermittent and unpredictable activation of Nepenthes pitcher traps facilitates ant recruitment and constitutes a strategy to maximize prey capture.

  14. InSAR coherence study of unusual rain events in the Atacama Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, T. E.; Scott, C. P.; Lohman, R.

    2017-12-01

    The Atacama Desert (AD) occupies much of Chile at latitudes 18-27°S. The surficial materials vary, dependent on proximity to the ocean, slope, position within a surface water drainage system, mean annual rainfall, human land disturbance, and the local history of climate changes. Three major divisions of soil composition include: near coastal zone of silicate mineral soils, mostly devoid of plants; central hyperarid zone dominated by gypsum, devoid of plants; eastern zone of silicate-based soils, very sparse plants. The AD in March 2015 experienced the largest rain event of modern history, and again in June 2017 almost as much rain fell within the study area (24.2-25.7°S, coast to Andes Mountains). Those natural experiments set the stage for InSAR remote sensing of surface changes in a 24,000 square kilometer area. We used interferometric coherence of radar to measure the similarity in the reflective ground properties at the time of two SAR acquisitions, and a time series of European Space Agency's Sentinel-1A data sets acquired between January 2015 and August 2017. Date pairs lacking an intervening rain event reveal extensive regions of high coherence, and in those areas we focus on the temporal evolution of coherence across dates of, and following dates of, the major rains. Permanent change of the surface is most extensive in the eastern and western sectors, yet the degree of permanent change was small except in valley bottoms. In the sector with gypsum soil small degrees of permanent change occurred over 30% of the surface including in narrow (1-3 km) elongate (10-60 km) stripes that cross-cut topography, likely revealing rain bands. The spatial pattern of transient change in coherence differs. Over half the gypsum-dominated zone displays a transient change signal, whose spatial pattern corresponds to geomorphological forms; older landforms display greater transient coherence changes. In the silicate-dominated eastern region the transient signals are smaller

  15. Investigation of the rates of surface and bulk ROS-generating reactions using indigo dye as an indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carly; Clark, Douglas; Graves, David

    2014-10-01

    We present evidence for the existence of two distinct processes that contribute to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in liquids exposed to cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) in air. At the plasma-liquid interface, there exists a fast surface reaction zone where RONS from the gas phase interact with species in the liquid. RONS can also be produced by ``slow'' chemical reactions in the bulk liquid, even long after plasma exposure. To separate the effects of these processes, we used indigo dye as an indicator of ROS production; specifically generation of hydroxyl radical. The rate of indigo decolorization while in direct contact with CAP is compared with the expected rate of hydroxyl radical generation at the liquid surface. When added to aqueous solutions after CAP exposure, indigo dye reacts on a time scale consistent with the production of peroxynitrous acid, ONOOH, which is known to decompose to hydroxyl radical below a pH of 6.8. In this study, the CAP used was a air corona discharge plasma run in a positive streamer mode.

  16. Six-Year Survival and Early Failure Rate of 2918 Implants with Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Enossal Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gac, Olivier Le; Grunder, Ueli

    2015-02-05

    The aim of this chart review was to obtain an objective, quantitative assessment of the clinical performance of an implant line used in an implantological office setting. Implants with hydrophilic (INICELL) and hydrophobic (TST; both: Thommen Medical AG, Grenchen, Switzerland) enossal surfaces were compared and the cumulative implant survival rate was calculated. The data of 1063 patients that received 2918 implants (1337 INICELL, 1581 TST) was included. The average follow up time was 2.1 (1.1-5.4) years for INICELL and 4.5 (1.3-5.9) years for TST implants (Thommen Medical AG, Switzerland). In the reported period 7 implants with INICELL (0.5%) and 23 TST implants (1.5%) failed. This difference was statistically significant. The analysis of cases treated and followed up in a single implantological office for 6 years confirmed the very good clinical outcome that was achieved with both used implant lines. Within the limitations of this retrospective analysis, the overall early failure rate of the hydrophilic implants was significantly lower than that of hydrophobic implants. The use of hydrophilic implants allows the clinician to obtain less early failures, hence the interest of an up-to-date surface for the daily work of an implant practice.

  17. [Effects of simulated acid rain on seed germination and seedling growth of different type corn Zea mays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Yan

    2013-06-01

    Taking normal corn, waxy corn, pop corn, and sweet corn as test materials, this paper studied their seed germination and seedling growth under effects of simulated acid rain (pH 6.0, 5.0, 4.0, 3.0, 2.0, and 1.0). Simulated acid rain at pH 2.0-5.0 had no significant effects on the seed germination and seedling growth, but at pH 1.0, the germination rate of normal corn, waxy corn, pop corn, and sweet corn was 91.3%, 68.7%, 27.5%, and 11.7%, respectively. As compared with those at pH 6.0 (CK), the germination rate, germination index, vigor index, germination velocity, shoot height, root length, shoot and root dry mass, and the transformation rate of stored substances at pH 1.0 had significant decrease, and the average germination time extended apparently. At pH 1.0, the effects of acid rain were greater at seedling growth stage than at germination stage, and greater on underground part than on aboveground part. Due to the differences in gene type, normal corn and waxy corn had the strongest capability against acid rain, followed by pop corn, and sweet corn. It was suggested that corn could be categorized as an acid rain-tolerant crop, the injury threshold value of acid rain was likely between pH 1.0 and pH 2.0, and normal corn and waxy corn would be prioritized for planting in acid rain-stricken area.

  18. Experimental drought in a tropical rain forest increases soil carbon dioxide losses to the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Cory C.; Wieder, William R.; Reed, Sasha C.; Townsend, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Climate models predict precipitation changes for much of the humid tropics, yet few studies have investigated the potential consequences of drought on soil carbon (C) cycling in this important biome. In wet tropical forests, drought could stimulate soil respiration via overall reductions in soil anoxia, but previous research suggests that litter decomposition is positively correlated with high rainfall fluxes that move large quantities of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the litter layer to the soil surface. Thus, reduced rainfall could also limit C delivery to the soil surface, reducing respiration rates. We conducted a throughfall manipulation experiment to investigate how 25% and 50% reductions in rainfall altered both C movement into soils and the effects of those DOM fluxes on soil respiration rates. In response to the experimental drought, soil respiration rates increased in both the -25% and -50% treatments. Throughfall fluxes were reduced by 26% and 55% in the -25% and -50% treatments, respectively. However, total DOM fluxes leached from the litter did not vary between treatments, because the concentrations of leached DOM reaching the soil surface increased in response to the simulated drought. Annual DOM concentrations averaged 7.7 ± 0.8, 11.2 ± 0.9, and 15.8 ± 1.2 mg C/L in the control, -25%, and -50% plots, respectively, and DOM concentrations were positively correlated with soil respiration rates. A laboratory incubation experiment confirmed the potential importance of DOM concentration on soil respiration rates, suggesting that this mechanism could contribute to the increase in CO2 fluxes observed in the reduced rainfall plots. Across all plots, the data suggested that soil CO2 fluxes were partially regulated by the magnitude and concentration of soluble C delivered to the soil, but also by soil moisture and soil oxygen availability. Together, our data suggest that declines in precipitation in tropical rain forests could drive higher CO2 fluxes

  19. Rainfall estimation from soil moisture data: crash test for SM2RAIN algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocca, Luca; Albergel, Clement; Massari, Christian; Ciabatta, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso; de Rosnay, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture governs the partitioning of mass and energy fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere and, hence, it represents a key variable for many applications in hydrology and earth science. In recent years, it was demonstrated that soil moisture observations from ground and satellite sensors contain important information useful for improving rainfall estimation. Indeed, soil moisture data have been used for correcting rainfall estimates from state-of-the-art satellite sensors (e.g. Crow et al., 2011), and also for improving flood prediction through a dual data assimilation approach (e.g. Massari et al., 2014; Chen et al., 2014). Brocca et al. (2013; 2014) developed a simple algorithm, called SM2RAIN, which allows estimating rainfall directly from soil moisture data. SM2RAIN has been applied successfully to in situ and satellite observations. Specifically, by using three satellite soil moisture products from ASCAT (Advanced SCATterometer), AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observation) and SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity); it was found that the SM2RAIN-derived rainfall products are as accurate as state-of-the-art products, e.g., the real-time version of the TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) product. Notwithstanding these promising results, a detailed study investigating the physical basis of the SM2RAIN algorithm, its range of applicability and its limitations on a global scale has still to be carried out. In this study, we carried out a crash test for SM2RAIN algorithm on a global scale by performing a synthetic experiment. Specifically, modelled soil moisture data are obtained from HTESSEL model (Hydrology Tiled ECMWF Scheme for Surface Exchanges over Land) forced by ERA-Interim near-surface meteorology. Afterwards, the modelled soil moisture data are used as input into SM2RAIN algorithm for testing weather or not the resulting rainfall estimates are able to reproduce ERA-Interim rainfall data. Correlation, root

  20. Titanium and steel fracture fixation plates with different surface topographies: Influence on infection rate in a rabbit fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsemakers, W J; Schmid, Tanja; Zeiter, Stephan; Ernst, Manuela; Keller, Iris; Cosmelli, Nicolo; Arens, Daniel; Moriarty, T Fintan; Richards, R Geoff

    2016-03-01

    Implant-related infection is a challenging complication in musculoskeletal trauma surgery. In the present study, we examined the role of implant material and surface topography as influencing factors on the development of infection in an experimental model of plating osteosynthesis in the rabbit. The implants included in this experimental study were composed of: standard Electropolished Stainless Steel (EPSS), standard titanium (Ti-S), roughened stainless steel (RSS) and surface polished titanium (Ti-P). Construct stability and load-to-failure of Ti-P implants was compared to that of Ti-S implants in a rabbit cadaveric model. In an in vivo study, a rabbit humeral fracture model was used. Each rabbit received one of three Staphylococcus aureus inocula, aimed at determining the infection rate at a low, medium and high dose of bacteria. Outcome measures were quantification of bacteria on the implant and in the surrounding tissues, and determination of the infectious dose 50 (ID50). No significant differences were observed between Ti-S and Ti-P regarding stiffness or failure load in the cadaver study. Of the 72 rabbits eventually included in the in vivo study, 50 developed an infection. The ID50 was found to be: EPSS 3.89×10(3) colony forming units (CFU); RSS 8.23×10(3) CFU; Ti-S 5.66×10(3) CFU; Ti-P 3.41×10(3) CFU. Significantly lower bacterial counts were found on the Ti-S implants samples compared with RSS implants (ptitanium and steel implants with conventional or modified topographies. Ti-P implants, which have previously been shown in preclinical studies to reduce complications associated with tissue adherence, do not affect infection rate in this preclinical fracture model. Therefore, Ti-P implants are not expected to affect the infection rate, or influence implant stability in the clinical situation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Rate equation model of bulk optical damage of silica, and the influence of polishing on surface optical damage of silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Arlee; Do, Binh; Schuster, Rod; Collier, David

    2008-02-01

    Our objective is to understand the mechanism that generates catastrophic optical damage in pulsed fiber amplifiers. We measured optical damage thresholds of bulk fused silica at 1064 nm for 8 ns and 14 ps pulses. The 8 ns pulse is single longitudinal mode from a Q-switched laser, and the 14 ps pulse is from a Q-switched mode-lock laser. The beams in both cases are TEM 00 mode, and they are focused to a 7.5 μm spot inside a fused silica window. The pulse-to-pulse energy variations are 1% for 8 ns pulses and 5% for 14 ps pulses. Under these conditions optical damage is always accompanied by plasma formation at the focal spot; we found the damage threshold fluences are 3854 +/- 85 J/cm2 for the 8 ns pulses and 25.4 +/- 1.0 J/cm2 for the 14 ps pulses. These fluences are corrected for self focusing. Both damage thresholds are deterministic, in contrast to the claim often made in the literature that optical damage is statistical in the nanosecond range. The measured damage threshold fluences for 8 ns and 14 ps pulses do not fit a square root of pulse duration scaling rule. We interpret the damage in terms of plasma formation initiated by multiphoton ionization and amplified by an electron avalanche. The damage threshold irradiance can be matched with a simple rate equation model that includes multiphoton ionization, electron avalanche, and electron-hole recombination. The damage morphologies are dramatically different in the nanosecond and picosecond cases because of the large difference in deposited energy. However, both morphologies are reproducible from pulse to pulse. We also measured surface damage thresholds for silica windows polished by different methods. We find that cerium oxide polished surfaces damage at approximately 40% of the bulk threshold, with a large statistical spread. Surfaces prepared using an Al IIO 3 polish damaged between 50% and 100% of the bulk damage limit, with a substantial fraction at 100%. Surfaces polished using first the Al IIO 3 polish

  2. Anomalies in relative humidity profile in the boundary layer during convective rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rohit; Talukdar, Shamitaksha; Saha, Upal; Jana, Soumyajyoti; Maitra, Animesh

    2017-07-01

    Radiometric observations of relative humidity profile at Kolkata show a significant fall at around 1 to 2 km height during convective rain events. An extensive investigation shows that the fall of relative humidity is not seen during calm conditions but is strongly related to the characteristics of temperature lapse rate profiles. Moreover, the phenomenon may have strong association with boundary layer structure. The reason for such anomalies in the planetary boundary layer humidity profile might be due to the release of latent heat at the mentioned altitude. The abundance of pollutant aerosols in urban regions has also been found to contribute to this relative humidity anomaly. It has also been reported that this boundary layer relative humidity is accompanied by high latent heat release and condensation of vapour to liquid which is not much prominent in other rain types as observed in stratiform rain. Hence, convective rain produces some unique boundary layer characteristics which have also been partially supported with allied satellite and multi-station observations.

  3. Probing the rate-determining region of the potential energy surface for a prototypical ion-molecule reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changjian; Liu, Xinguo; Sweeny, Brendan C; Miller, Thomas M; Ard, Shaun G; Shuman, Nicholas S; Viggiano, Albert A; Guo, Hua

    2018-03-13

    We report a joint experimental-theoretical study of the F -  + HCl → HF + Cl - reaction kinetics. The experimental measurement of the rate coefficient at several temperatures was made using the selected ion flow tube method. Theoretical rate coefficients are calculated using the quasi-classical trajectory method on a newly developed global potential energy surface, obtained by fitting a large number of high-level ab initio points with augmentation of long-range electrostatic terms. In addition to good agreement between experiment and theory, analyses suggest that the ion-molecule reaction rate is significantly affected by shorter-range interactions, in addition to the traditionally recognized ion-dipole and ion-induced dipole terms. Furthermore, the statistical nature of the reaction is assessed by comparing the measured and calculated HF product vibrational state distributions to that predicted by the phase space theory.This article is part of the theme issue 'Modern theoretical chemistry'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  4. Rain Forests: Do They Hold Up the Sky?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Donna Gail; Dybdahl, Claudia S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper uses the topic of rain forests to demonstrate how a meaningful and relevant Science, Technology, and Society program can be designed for intermediate-level students. Students create and immerse themselves in a tropical rain forest, explore the forest ecosystem and peoples, and consider solutions to the problem of deforestation. (JDD)

  5. 40 CFR 75.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 75.3 Section 75.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING General § 75.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions. The...

  6. A European Acid Rain Program based on the US experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, U. Steiner; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2000-01-01

    The paper shows that cost-effective involvement of the source location involves utmost difficulty in practice. Based on the RAINS model, it is recommended that source location should be ignored in a European market for SO2, as is the case in the US Acid Rain Program. Based on the political target...

  7. Elementary Acid Rain Kit, Interdisciplinary, Grades 4-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    An interdisciplinary approach for teaching about acid rain is offered in this curriculum guide for teachers of grades 4-8. Skill and concept areas of science, math, social studies, art, and the language arts are developed in 12 activities which focus on the acid rain problems. A matrix of the activities and subject areas indicates the coverage…

  8. Monitoring of rain water storage in forests with satellite radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, JJM; Klaassen, W; Kuiper, PJC

    The sensitivity of radar backscatter to the amount of intercepted rain in temperate deciduous forests is analyzed to determine the feasibility of retrieval of this parameter from satellite radar data. A backscatter model is validated with X-band radar measurements of a single tree exposed to rain. A

  9. A Rain Garden for Our School: Becoming Environmental Stewards

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadyen, Joy

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about a rain garden project at Hampton Elementary School in Bay City, Michigan. The goal of the project was to slow and filter silt-laden runoff (from parking lots, sidewalks, and playground) on its path to Saginaw Bay in Lake Huron. In addition, doing so, the rain gardens would demonstrate to the township, city,…

  10. A technique for collecting botanical specimens in rain forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyland, B.P.M.

    1972-01-01

    I. Introduction — The need for a simple method of collecting botanical material from rain-forest trees became evident during the construction of a field key to the rain-forest trees of North Queensland. Many collecting techniques have been developed, e.g. throwing sticks and stones, severing

  11. Flow Dynamics and Nutrient Reduction in Rain Gardens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hydrological dynamics and changes in stormwater nutrient concentrations within rain gardens were studied by introducing captured stormwater runoff to rain gardens at EPA’s Urban Water Research Facility in Edison, New Jersey. The runoff used in these experiments was collected...

  12. Spatial variability and trends of the rain intensity over Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambezidis, H. D.; Larissi, I. K.; Nastos, P. T.; Paliatsos, A. G.

    2010-07-01

    In this study, the spatial and temporal variability of the mean annual rain intensity in Greece are examined during a 41-year period (1962-2002). The meteorological datasets concern monthly rain amounts (mm) and the respective monthly durations (h) recorded at thirty two meteorological stations of the Hellenic National Meteorological Service, which are uniformly distributed on Greek territory, in order to calculate the mean monthly rain intensity. All the rain time series used in the analysis were tested by the application of the short-cut Bartlett test of homogeneity. The spatial distribution of the mean annual rain intensity is studied using the Kriging interpolation method, while the temporal variability, concerning the mean annual rain intensity trends along with their significance (Mann-Kendall test), is analysed. The findings of the analysis show that statistically significant negative trends (95% confidence level) appear mainly in the west sub-regions of Greece, while statistically significant positive trends (95% confidence level) appear in the wider area of Athens and the complex of Cyclades Islands. Further analysis concerning the seasonal rain intensity is needed, because there are different seasonal patterns, taking into account that, convective rain in Greece occurs mainly within the summer season.

  13. Acid Rain in Niger Delta Region: Implication on Water Resources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research focused on the effect of acid rain on the water quality of the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. Three hundred water samples were collected: 100 water samples from rain, 100 from open wells and 100 from rivers. The water samples were analysed using the paired t-test and multiple correlation analysis to ascertain ...

  14. Simulated Acid Rain-induced Alterations in Flowering, Leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Acid rain/deposition (including snow and fog), formed due to reaction of oxides of sulphur and nitrogen with atmospheric ... pollution. Several studies conducted in field and greenhouse have demonstrated that acid rain exposure of plants results in poor growth, premature leaf abscission, delayed flowering, decreased flower.

  15. Mechanics of interrill erosion with wind-driven rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vector physics of wind-driven rain (WDR) differs from that of wind-free rain, and the interrill soil detachment equations in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model were not originally developed to deal with this phenomenon. This article provides an evaluation of the performance of the...

  16. Simulation of hurricane response to suppression of warm rain by sub-micron aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rosenfeld

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of hurricane modification was investigated for hurricane Katrina using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF. The possible impact of seeding of clouds with submicron cloud condensation nuclei (CCN on hurricane structure and intensity as measured by nearly halving of the area covered by hurricane force winds was simulated by "turning–off" warm rain formation in the clouds at Katrina's periphery (where wind speeds were less than 22 m s−1. This simplification of the simulation of aerosol effects is aimed at evaluating the largest possible response. This resulted in the weakening of the hurricane surface winds compared to the "non-seeded" simulated storm during the first 24 h within the entire tropical cyclone (TC area compared to a control simulation without warm rain suppression. Later, the seeding-induced evaporative cooling at the TC periphery led to a shrinking of the eye and hence to some increase in the wind within the small central area of the TC. Yet, the overall strength of the hurricane, as defined by the area covered by hurricane force winds, decreased in response to the suppressed warm rain at the periphery, as measured by a 25% reduction in the radius of hurricane force winds. In a simulation with warm rain suppression throughout the hurricane, the radius of the hurricane force winds was reduced by more than 42%, and although the diameter of the eye shrunk even further the maximum winds weakened. This shows that the main mechanism by which suppressing warm rain weakens the TC is the low level evaporative cooling of the un-precipitated cloud drops and the added cooling due to melting of precipitation that falls from above.

  17. Quality control of rain data used for urban runoff systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, H. K.; Rosenørn, S.; Madsen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    for collection and quality control of rain data from a network of tipping bucket rain gauges in Denmark carried out by the Danish Meteorological Institute. During rain, the RIMCO gauge counts the number of tips teach of 0.2 mm of precipitation) every minute, The quality control of the rain data includes......When improving software packages such as MOUSE and SAMBA for designing sewers and storage basins, and simulating overflows and flooding the quality of the input becomes important. The essential input to these modelling tools are the historical rain series. This paper presents the procedures...... Hellmann gauges. Shortcomings and improvements of the quality control are discussed. Although, it is possible to improve the efficiency of the quality control, long term corrections will always be necessary. (C) 1998 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  18. Millennial-scale dynamics of southern Amazonian rain forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayle, F E; Burbridge, R; Killeen, T J

    2000-12-22

    Amazonian rain forest-savanna boundaries are highly sensitive to climatic change and may also play an important role in rain forest speciation. However, their dynamics over millennial time scales are poorly understood. Here, we present late Quaternary pollen records from the southern margin of Amazonia, which show that the humid evergreen rain forests of eastern Bolivia have been expanding southward over the past 3000 years and that their present-day limit represents the southernmost extent of Amazonian rain forest over at least the past 50,000 years. This rain forest expansion is attributed to increased seasonal latitudinal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which can in turn be explained by Milankovitch astronomic forcing.

  19. Characterization of the precipitation in southwestern part of Greece with X-band Doppler radar, 2-D video disdrometer and rain gauges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Defer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We document precipitation in the southwestern part of Greece with the National Observatory of Athens (NOA X-band radar, NOA 2D video disdrometer and a network of rain gauges. The observations were collected between February and April 2004. Time evolution of the drop size distribution (DSD is presented for the 9 March 2004 case where rain rate (computed on 1-min period was measured up to 80 mm/h and reflectivity at the location of the disdrometer exceeded 40 dBZ. We then present the differences of DSD as function of the rain rate for the studied case as well as for the entire observations of the field experiment. It shows that higher the rain rate is, larger the range of the DSD and higher the concentration of the raindrops are.

  20. Treatment of skin carcinomas of the face by high-dose-rate brachytherapy and custom-made surface molds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guix, Benjamin; Finestres, Fernando; Tello, Jose-Ignacio; Palma, Cesar; Martinez, Antonio; Guix, Jose-Ramon; Guix, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the results obtained in a prospective group of patients with basal or squamous cell skin carcinomas of the face treated by high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy via custom-made surface molds. Methods and Materials: A total of 136 patients with basal or squamous cell carcinomas of the face were treated between March 1992 and March 1997 by surface molds and HDR brachytherapy with iridium-192. Nineteen patients were treated with standard Brock applicators and 117 patients with custom-made polymethyl methacrylate applicators, built over a plaster mold obtained of the patient's face. Minimum dose administered to the tumor was 6000 to 6500 cGy in 33 to 36 fractions at 180 cGy/fraction in lesions of up to 4 cm. Lesions greater than 4 cm were boosted up to 7500-8000 cGy after a 3-week pause. Results: With the custom-made surface molds, the dose distribution was uniform in the surface of the skin and at 5 mm depth in the whole area of the applicator. Differences between the areas of maximum and minimum dose at this depth never reached values higher than 5% of the prescribed dose. At the edges of the custom-made molds dose gradient was sharp, with the detected dose at 5 mm from the applicator being negligible. All the patients were complete responders. There were 3 local recurrences, 1/73 patients treated for primary tumor and 2/63 patients treated for recurrent tumor. Actuarial local control at 5 years for all patients was 98%, for those patients with primary tumors 99%, and for recurrent patients 87%. The treatment tolerance was excellent in all cases. No severe, early, or late, complications were detected. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a highly effective treatment of skin carcinomas of the face. Custom-made molds, to be used in conjunction with HDR brachytherapy equipment, make possible a uniform dose distribution, with a sharp dose gradient in the limits of applicators. Custom-made surface molds are easy and safe to use, and they fit very accurately for

  1. Actual laser removal of black soiling crust from siliceous sandstone by high pulse repetition rate equipment: effects on surface morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iglesias-Campos, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research project studies the role of pulse repetition rate in laser removal of black soiling crust from siliceous sandstone, and specifically, how laser fluence correlates with high pulse repetition rates in cleaning practice. The aim is to define practical cleaning processes and determine simple techniques for evaluation based on end-users’ perspective (restorers. Spot and surface tests were made using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser system with a wide range of pulse repetition rates (5–200 Hz, systematically analysed and compared by macrophotography, portable microscope, stereomicroscope with 3D visualizing and area roughness measurements, SEM imaging and spectrophotometry. The results allow the conclusion that for operation under high pulse repetition rates the average of total energy applied per spot on a treated surface should be attendant upon fluence values in order to provide a systematic and accurate description of an actual laser cleaning intervention.En este trabajo se estudia el papel de la frecuencia de repetición en la limpieza láser de costras de contaminación sobre una arenisca silícea, y concretamente, como se relaciona fluencia y frecuencias elevadas en una limpieza real. Se pretende definir un procedimiento práctico de limpieza y determinar técnicas sencillas de evaluación desde el punto de vista de los usuarios finales (restauradores. Para el estudio se realizaron diferentes ensayos en spot y en superficie mediante un equipo Q-switched Nd:YAG con un amplio rango de frecuencias (5–200 Hz, que se analizaron y compararon sistemáticamente mediante macrofotografía, microscopio portátil, estereomicroscopio con visualización 3D y mediciones de rugosidad en área, imágenes SEM y espectrofotometría. Los resultados permiten proponer que, al trabajar con altas frecuencias, la media de la energía total depositada por spot en la superficie debería acompañar los valores de fluencia para describir y comprender mejor una

  2. Field Investigation of the Surface-deposited Radon Progeny as a Possible Predictor of the Airborne Radon Progeny Dose Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kainan; Steck, Daniel J.; Field, R. William

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative relationships between radon gas concentration, the surface-deposited activities of various radon progeny, the airborne radon progeny dose rate, and various residential environmental factors were investigated through actual field measurements in 38 selected Iowa houses occupied by either smokers or nonsmokers. Airborne dose rate was calculated from unattached and attached potential alpha energy concentrations (PAECs) using two dosimetric models with different activity-size weighting factors. These models are labeled Pdose and Jdose, respectively. Surface-deposited 218Po and 214Po were found significantly correlated to radon, unattached PAEC, and both airborne dose rates (p fireplace, or usage of a ceiling fan significantly, or marginal significantly, reduced the Pdose to 0.65 (90% CI 0.42–0.996), 0.54 (90% CI 0.28–1.02) and 0.66 (90% CI 0.45–0.96), respectively. For Jdose, only the usage of a ceiling fan significantly reduced the dose rate to 0.57 (90% CI 0.39–0.85). In smoking environments, deposited 218Po was a significant negative predictor for Pdose (RR 0.68, 90% CI 0.55–0.84) after adjusting for long-term 222Rn and environmental factors. A significant decrease of 0.72 (90% CI 0.64–0.83) in the mean Pdose was noted, after adjusting for the radon and radon progeny effects and other environmental factors, for every 10 increasing cigarettes smoked in the room. A significant increase of 1.71 in the mean Pdose was found for large room size relative to small room size (90% CI 1.08–2.79) after adjusting for the radon and radon progeny effects as well as other environmental factors. Fireplace usage was found to significantly increase the mean Pdose to 1.71 (90% CI 1.20–2.45) after adjusting for other factors. PMID:19590273

  3. Effects of rain gardens on the quality of water in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area of Minnesota, 2002-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornes, Lan H.

    2005-01-01

    Rain gardens are a popular method of managing runoff while attempting to provide aesthetic and environmental benefits. Five rain-garden sites in the Minneapolis – Saint Paul metropolitan area of Minnesota were instrumented to evaluate the effects of this water-management system on surface and subsurface water quality. Most of these sites were in suburban locations and frequently in newer developments. Because of this they were affected by changing hydrology during the course of this study.

  4. In situ cosmogenic {sup 53}Mn production rate from ancient low-denudation surface in tropic Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujioka, T., E-mail: toshiyuki.fujioka@anu.edu.a [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Fifield, L.K. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Stone, J.O. [Quaternary Research Center and Department of Geological Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1310 (United States); Vasconcelos, P.M. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia); Tims, S.G. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Chappell, J. [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2010-04-15

    Preliminary results of {sup 53}Mn measurements for seven Brazilian haematites are presented. The production rate of {sup 53}Mn due to cosmic-ray induced disintegration of iron is estimated to be 103 +- 19 atoms g(Fe){sup -1} yr{sup -1} at sea level and high latitude. This is consistent with the only previously published measurement. The muon contribution to the total {sup 53}Mn production at the surface is estimated to be approx7%. Cosmogenic-isotope dating employing {sup 53}Mn is applicable to any rock/mineral type that contains iron as a major constituent, such as haematite, goethite, pyroxene and olivine. The method has the potential to extend the time scale of cosmogenic exposure dating to >10 Ma.

  5. Macrophyte decomposition in a surface-flow ammonia-dominated constructed wetland: Rates associated with environmental and biotic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thullen, J.S.; Nelson, S.M.; Cade, B.S.; Sartoris, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Decomposition of senesced culm material of two bulrush species was studied in a surface-flow ammonia-dominated treatment wetland in southern California. Decomposition of the submerged culm material during summer months was relatively rapid (k = 0.037 day-1), but slowed under extended submergence (up to 245 days) and during fall and spring sampling periods (k = 0.009-0.014 day-1). Stepwise regression of seasonal data indicated that final water temperature and abundance of the culm-mining midge, Glyptotendipes, were significantly associated with culm decomposition. Glyptotendipes abundance, in turn, was correlated with water quality parameters such as conductivity and dissolved oxygen and ammonia concentrations. No differences were detected in decomposition rates between the bulrush species, Schoenoplectus californicus and Schoenoplectus acutus.

  6. 224Ra distribution in surface and deep water of Long Island Sound: sources and horizontal transport rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgersen, Thomas; Turekian, K. K.; Turekian, V. C.; Tanaka, N.; DeAngelo, Edward; O'Donnell, J.

    1996-10-01

    Measurements of surface water and deep water 224Ra (half-life 3.64 days) distributions in Long Island Sound (LIS) were conducted in July 1991. Because the pycnocline structure of LIS had been in place for about 50 days in July (long compared to the half-life of 224Ra), 224Ra in the surface water and the deep water operate as separate systems. In the surface water, the fine-grain sediments of nearshore and saltmarsh environments provide a strong source of 224Ra, which is horizontally mixed away from the shore to central LIS. A one-dimensional model of 224Ra distribution suggests across-LIS horizontal eddy dispersivity of 5-50 m 2 s -1. In the deep water, the mid-LIS sediment flux of 224Ra is enhanced by ˜2x relative to the periphery, and the horizontal eddy flux is from central LIS to the periphery. A second one-dimensional model suggests a cross-LIS horizontal eddy dispersivity below the thermocline of 5-50 m 2 s -1. 224Ra fluxes into the deep water of the central LIS are likely enhanced by (1) inhomogeneous sediment or (2) a reduced scavenging of 224Ra in the sediments of central LIS brought about by low oxygen conditions (hypoxia) and the loss of the MnO 2 scavenging layer in the sediments. These rates of horizontal eddy dispersivity are significantly less than the estimate of 100-650 m 2 s -1 (Riley, 1967) but are consistent with the transport necessary to explain the dynamics of oxygen depletion in summer LIS. These results demonstrate the use of 224Ra for quantifying the parameters needed to describe estuarine mixing and transport.

  7. Investigation of surface oxide morphology in SG feedwater pipes and study of its influence on flow accelerated corrosion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, G.; Alos-Ramos, O.; Monchecourt, D.; Mansour, C.; Delaunay, S.; Trevin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) affects carbon steel components in the secondary circuits of PWR plants. The mandatory use of the prediction tool BRT-CICERO in all its PWR plants enables EDF to perform efficient inspections programs and minimize the number of leaks in the secondary circuits. Due to the operating conditions, SG feedwater flow regulation (ARE) circuits can be affected by FAC phenomenon. Thickness loss has been reported by several plants during the last 10 years, although significant damage by FAC remains very rare. This paper describes the surface features observed on an ARE straight tube that has orange peel pattern with thickness loss on the one half of its inner surface and a thick fouling layer without much thickness loss on the other. An analysis of the oxide porosity and structure by SEM investigation has been carried out. The origin of fouling layer and its behavior in the ARE circuits environment (oxide solubility, flow stability/turbulence) have been discussed. Finally by comparing with the classic FAC models, an attempt of correlation between the presence of the fouling layer and the lower corrosion rate is proposed. (authors)

  8. Livelihoods Poised Between Cold and Dry: Modeling Land Surface Phenologies and Phenometric Lapse Rates in Central Asian Highland Pastures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henebry, G. M.; Tomaszewska, M. A.; Krehbiel, C. P.; Kelgenbaeva, K.

    2016-12-01

    To explore the vulnerability of high-elevation communities in the Kyrgyz Republic and in Uzbekistan to changing climatic, sociodemographic, and socioeconomic conditions, we assembled image time series to characterize the condition of pastures near villages at high elevation (>2000 masl) and in remote pastures at higher elevations. Here we describe the application of the convex quadratic (CxQ) model of land surface phenology to highland pasturelands for selected oblasts in the Kyrgyz Republic and in eastern Uzbekistan. We used 16 years (2000-2015) of Landsat normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data with MODIS land surface temperature data processed into accumulated growing degree-days. The peak height of the NDVI and the thermal time to peak are two key phenological metrics derived analytically from the fitted parameter coefficients of the CxQ model for each pixel time series. Both exhibited sensitivity to elevation, which we describe in terms of phenometric lapse rates (PLRs). Interannual variation in PLRs was expressed differently for the peak NDVI and the thermal time to peak. Peak NDVI increased with elevation up to a point but also exhibited more spatial variation in dry years than in wetter years. Thermal time to peak exhibited strong, highly significant negative linear relationships to elevation with steeper slopes in drier years. Both types of PLRs were modulated by aspect. These relationships and the associated CxQ models by elevation and aspect can provide expectations against which to detect changes in pasture status as a result of management or weather.

  9. Climate change as a confounding factor in reversibility of acidification: RAIN and CLIMEX projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Wright

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The RAIN and CLIMEX experiments at Risdalsheia, southernmost Norway, together cover 17 years (1984-2000 of whole-catchment manipulation of acid deposition and climate. A 1200 m2 roof placed over the forest canopy at KIM catchment excluded about 80% of ambient acid deposition; clean rain was sprinkled under the roof. A climate change treatment (3.7°C increase in air temperature and increase in air carbon dioxide concentrations to 560 ppmv was superimposed on the clean rain treatment for four years (1995-1998. Sea-salt inputs and temperature are climate-related factors that influence water chemistry and can confound long-term trends caused by changes in deposition of sulphur and nitrogen. The RAIN and CLIMEX experiments at Risdalsheia provided direct experimental data that allow quantitative assessment of these factors. Run-off chemistry responded rapidly to the decreased acid deposition. Sulphate concentrations decreased by 50% within three years; nitrate and ammonium concentrations decreased to new steady-state levels within the first year. Acid neutralising capacity increased and hydrogen ion and inorganic aluminium decreased. Similar recovery from acidification was also observed at the reference catchment, ROLF, in response to the general 50% reduction in sulphate deposition over southern Norway in the late 1980s and 1990s. Variations in sea-salt deposition caused large variations in run-off chemistry at the reference catchment ROLF and the year-to-year noise in acid neutralising capacity was as large as the overall trend over the period. These variations were absent at KIM catchment because the sea-salt inputs were held constant over the entire 17 years of the clean rain treatment. The climate change experiment at KIM catchment resulted in increased leaching of inorganic nitrogen, probably due to increased mineralisation and nitrification rates in the soils. Keywords: acid deposition, global change, water, soil, catchment, experiment, Norway.

  10. Standard test method to determine the performance of tiled roofs to wind-driven rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez de Rojas, M. I.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which roof coverings can resist water penetration from the combination of wind and rain, commonly referred to as wind driven rain, is important for the design of roofs. A new project of European Standard prEN 15601 (1 specifies a method of test to determine the performance of the roof covering against wind driven rain. The combined action of wind and rain varies considerably with geographical location of a building and the associated differences in the rain and wind climate. Three windrain conditions and one deluge condition covering Northern Europe Coastal, Central Europe and Southern Europe are specified in the project standard, each subdivided into four wind-speeds and rainfall rates to be applied to the test. The project does not contain information on the level of acceptable performance.Para el diseño de los tejados es importante determinar el punto hasta el cual éstos pueden resistirse a la penetración de agua causada por la combinación de viento y lluvia. Un nuevo proyecto de Norma Europeo prEN 15601 (1 especifica un método de ensayo para determinar el comportamiento del tejado frente a la combinación de viento y lluvia. La acción combinada de viento y lluvia varía considerablemente con la situación geográfica de un edificio y las diferencias asociadas al clima de la lluvia y del viento. El proyecto de norma especifica las condiciones de viento y lluvia y una condición de diluvio para cada una de las tres zonas de Europa: Europa del Norte y Costera, Europa Central y Europa del Sur, cada una subdividida en cuatro condiciones de velocidades de viento y caudal de lluvia para ser aplicadas en los ensayos. El proyecto no contiene la información sobre condiciones aceptables.

  11. High Ice Water Content at Low Radar Reflectivity near Deep Convection. Part I ; Consistency of In Situ and Remote-Sensing Observations with Stratiform Rain Column Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlind, A. M.; Ackerman, A. S.; Grandin, A.; Dezitter, F.; Weber, M.; Strapp, J. W.; Korolev, A. V.; Williams, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    Occurrences of jet engine power loss and damage have been associated with flight through fully glaciated deep convection at -10 to -50 degrees Centigrade. Power loss events commonly occur during flight through radar reflectivity (Zeta (sub e)) less than 20-30 decibels relative to Zeta (dBZ - radar returns) and no more than moderate turbulence, often overlying moderate to heavy rain near the surface. During 2010-2012, Airbus carried out flight tests seeking to characterize the highest ice water content (IWC) in such low-radar-reflectivity regions of large, cold-topped storm systems in the vicinity of Cayenne, Darwin, and Santiago. Within the highest IWC regions encountered, at typical sampling elevations (circa 11 kilometers), the measured ice size distributions exhibit a notably narrow concentration of mass over area-equivalent diameters of 100-500 micrometers. Given substantial and poorly quantified measurement uncertainties, here we evaluate the consistency of the Airbus in situ measurements with ground-based profiling radar observations obtained under quasi-steady, heavy stratiform rain conditions in one of the Airbus-sampled locations. We find that profiler-observed radar reflectivities and mean Doppler velocities at Airbus sampling temperatures are generally consistent with those calculated from in situ size-distribution measurements. We also find that column simulations using the in situ size distributions as an upper boundary condition are generally consistent with observed profiles of radar reflectivity (Ze), mean Doppler velocity (MDV), and retrieved rain rate. The results of these consistency checks motivate an examination of the microphysical pathways that could be responsible for the observed size-distribution features in Ackerman et al. (2015).

  12. The effects of viscosity, surface tension, and flow rate on gasoil-water flow pattern in microchannels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boogar, Rahman Sadeghi; Gheshlaghi, Reza; Mahdavi, Mahmood Akhavan [Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    A microchannel was fabricated with glass tubes to investigate the effect of viscosity, surface tension, and flow rate on the liquid-liquid two-phase flow regime. Water and gasoil were selected as aqueous and organic working fluids, respectively. The two fluids were injected into the microchannel and created either slug or parallel profile depending on the applied conditions. The range of Reynolds and capillary numbers was chosen in such a way that neither inertia nor interfacial tension forces were negligible. Xanthan gum was used to increase viscosity and Triton X-100 (TX-100) and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) were used to reduce the interfacial tension. The results demonstrated that higher value of viscosity and flow rate increased interfacial area, but slug flow regime remained unchanged. The two surfactants showed different effects on the flow regime and interfacial area. Addition of TX-100 did not change the slug flow but decreased the interfacial area. In contrast, addition of SDS increased interfacial area by decreasing the slug’s length in the low concentrations and by switching from slug to parallel regime at high concentrations.

  13. [The relationship between the variation rate of MODIS land surface temperature and AMSR-E soil moisture and its application to downscaling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, An-Qi; Xie, Chao; Shi, Jian-Cheng; Gong, Hui-Li

    2013-03-01

    Using AMSR-E soil moisture, MODIS land surface temperature (Ts) and vegetation index product, the authors discuss the relationship between the variation rate of land surface temperature and surface soil moisture. Selecting the plains region of central United States as the study area, the authors propose the distribution triangle of the variation rate of land surface temperature and soil moisture. In the present paper, temperature variation and vegetation index (TVVI), a new index containing the information of temperature variation and vegetation, is introduced. The authors prove that TVVI and soil moisture show a steady relationship of exponential function; and build a quantitative model of soil moisture(SM) and instantaneous surface temperature variation (VTs). The authors later achieve downscaling of AMSR-E soil moisture data, through the above stated functional relationships and high-resolution MODIS data. Comparison with measured data on ground surface indicates that this method of downscaling is of high precision

  14. Distributed Disdrometer and Rain Gauge Measurement Infrastructure Developed for GPM Ground Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Bringi, V. N.; Gatlin, Patrick; Phillips, Dustin; Schwaller, Mathew; Tokay, Ali; Wingo, Mathew; Wolff, David

    2010-01-01

    Global Precipitation Mission (GPM)retrieval algorithm validation requires datasets characterizing the 4-D structure, variability, and correlation properties of hydrometeor particle size distributions (PSD) and accumulations over satellite fields of view (FOV;gauges and disdrometers to provide fine-scale measurements of PSD and precipitation accumulation variability. These observations will be combined with dual-frequency, polarimetric, and profiling radar data in a bootstrapping fashion to extend validated PSD measurements to a large coverage domain. Accordingly, a total of 24 Parsivel disdrometers(PD), 5 3rd-generation 2D Video Disdrometers (2DVD), 70 tipping bucket rain gauges (TBRG),9 weighing gauges, 7 Hot-Plate precipitation sensors (HP), and 3 Micro Rain Radars (MRR) have been procured. In liquid precipitation the suite of TBRG, PD and 2DVD instruments will quantify a broad spectrum of rain rate and PSD variability at sub-kilometer scales. In the envisioned network configuration 5 2DVDs will act as reference points for 16 collocated PD and TBRG measurements. We find that PD measurements provide similar measures of the rain PSD as observed with collocated 2DVDs (e.g., D0, Nw) for rain rates less than 15 mm/hr. For heavier rain rates we will rely on 2DVDs for PSD information. For snowfall we will combine point-redundant observations of SWER distributed over three or more locations within a FOV. Each location will contain at least one fenced weighing gauge, one HP, two PDs, and a 2DVD. MRRs will also be located at each site to extend the measurement to the column. By collecting SWER measurements using different instrument types that employ different measurement techniques our objective is to separate measurement uncertainty from natural variability in SWER and PSD. As demonstrated using C3VP polarimetric radar, gauge, and 2DVD/PD datasets these measurements can be combined to bootstrap an area wide SWER estimate via constrained modification of density

  15. Pyrite oxidation under simulated acid rain weathering conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Li, Heping; Wang, Luying; Wen, Xiaoying; Liu, Qingyou

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the electrochemical corrosion behavior of pyrite in simulated acid rain with different acidities and at different temperatures. The cyclic voltammetry, polarization curve, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results showed that pyrite has the same electrochemical interaction mechanism under different simulated acid rain conditions, regardless of acidity or environmental temperature. Either stronger acid rain acidity or higher environmental temperature can accelerate pyrite corrosion. Compared with acid rain having a pH of 5.6 at 25 °C, the prompt efficiency of pyrite weathering reached 104.29% as the acid rain pH decreased to 3.6, and it reached 125.31% as environmental temperature increased to 45 °C. Increasing acidity dramatically decreases the charge transfer resistance, and increasing temperature dramatically decreases the passivation film resistance, when other conditions are held constant. Acid rain always causes lower acidity mine drainage, and stronger acidity or high environmental temperatures cause serious acid drainage. The natural parameters of latitude, elevation, and season have considerable influence on pyrite weathering, because temperature is an important influencing factor. These experimental results are of direct significance for the assessment and management of sulfide mineral acid drainage in regions receiving acid rain.

  16. Chemical composition of acid rains in the Venezuelan savannah region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza, E.; Arias, M. C.; Donoso, L.; Graterol, N.; Hermoso, M.; Martí, I.; Romero, J.; Rondón, A.; Santana, M.

    1992-02-01

    The chemical composition of rain events has been determined at 6 sites in the Venezuelan savannah region. The results indicate that precipitations are little affected by anthropogenic emissions and that rain concentrations of anions and cations are similar to those observed at "remote" continental sites. At each location, the rain is acidic with average pHs ranging from 4.4 to 5.4. Over 50% of the free acidity may be due to formic and acetic acids. HNO3 and H2SO4 contribute only less than 36%. NH3 plays a significant role as neutralizing compound; Ca and Mg carbonates may also, in some cases, reduce the acidity of the rain solution. A complete evaluation of the ions that take part in the acid-base equilibrium is given. The participation of organic acid is discussed in detail. The first rains of the season, during biomass burning periods, are heavily loaded with several compounds, showing that emissions and/or atmospheric production are enhanced during vegetation fires. No significant variation in rain acidity was observed; it is likely that the larger atmospheric photochemical formation of organic and inorganic acids during burning is neutralized by a large primary emission of NH3. The study of these "particular" rains is useful in searching for pollutants emitted by fires and/or possible atmospheric processes that may occur in the associated haze layer.

  17. Adjusting weather radar data to rain gauge measurements with data-driven models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschl, Reinhard; Randeu, Walter; Teschl, Franz

    2010-05-01

    Weather radar networks provide data with good spatial coverage and temporal resolution. Hence they are able to describe the variability of precipitation. Typical radar stations determine the rain rate for every square kilometre and make a full volume scan within about 5 minutes. A weakness however, is their often poor metering precision limiting the applicability of the radar for hydrological purposes. In contrast to rain gauges, which measure precipitation directly on the ground, the radar determines the reflectivity aloft and remote. Due to this principle, several sources of possible errors occur. Therefore improving the radar estimates of rainfall is still a vital topic in radar meteorology and hydrology. This paper presents data-driven approaches to improve radar estimates of rainfall by mapping radar reflectivity measurements Z to rain gauge data R. The analysis encompasses several input configurations and data-driven models. Reflectivity measurements at a constant altitude and the vertical profiles of reflectivity above a rain gauge are used as input parameters. The applied models are Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Model Tree (MT), and IBk a k-nearest-neighbour classifier. The relationship found between the data of a rain gauge and the reflectivity measurements is subsequently applied to another site with comparable terrain. Based on this independent dataset the performance of the data-driven models in the various input configurations is evaluated. For this study, rain gauge and radar data from the province of Styria, Austria, were available. The data sets extend over a two-year period (2001 and 2002). The available rain gauges use the tipping bucket principle with a resolution of 0.1 mm. Reflectivity measurements are obtained from the Doppler weather radar station on Mt. Zirbitzkogel (by courtesy of AustroControl GmbH). The designated radar is a high-resolution C-band weather-radar situated at an altitude of 2372 m above mean sea level. The data

  18. Acid rain publications by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1979-1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villella, Rita F.

    1989-01-01

    Pollution of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems has been a concern to society since the burning of fossil fuels began in the industrial revolution. In the past decade or so, this concern has been heightened by evidence that chemical transformation in the atmosphere of combustion by-products and subsequent long-range transport can cause environmental damage in remote areas. The extent of this damage and the rates of ecological recovery were largely unknown. "Acid rain" became the environmental issue of the 1980's. To address the increasing concerns of the public, in 1980 the Federal government initiated a 10-year interagency research program to develop information that could be used by the President and the Congress in making decisions for emission controls. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been an active participant in acid precipitation research. The Service provided support to a number of scientific conferences and forums, including the Action Seminar on Acid Precipitation held in Toronto, Canada, in 1979, an international symposium on Acidic Precipitation and Fishery Impacts in Northeastern North America in 1981, and a symposium on Acidic Precipitation and Atmospheric Deposition: A Western Perspective in 1982. These meetings as well as the growing involvement with the government's National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program placed the Service in the lead in research on the biological effects of acidic deposition. Research projects have encompassed water chemistry, aquatic invertebrates, amphibians, fish, and waterfowl. Water quality surveys have been conducted to help determine the extent of acid precipitation effects in the northeast, Middle Atlantic, and Rocky Mountain regions. In addition to lake and stream studies, research in wetland and some terrestrial habitats has also been conducted. Specific projects have addressed important sport species such as brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and striped bass (Morone

  19. Trend of acid rain and neutralization by yellow sand in east Asia—a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Hiroaki; Ueda, Hiromasa; Wang, Zifa

    Acid rain and its neutralization by yellow sand in East Asia were investigated numerically by an Air Quality Prediction Modeling System (AQPMS). AQPMS consists of advection, diffusion, dry and wet deposition, gas-phase chemistry and the liquid-phase chemistry. A new deflation module of the yellow sand (Asian soil dust) was designed to provide explicit information on the dust loading. Different from the previous ones for Sahara and Australian deserts, this new one includes three major predictors, i.e., the friction velocity, the surface humidity and the predominant weather system, while this module was linked to the AQPMS. For model validation, the predicted pH values and sulfate- and nitrate-ion levels of precipitation, together with the surface concentrations of gaseous pollutants, were compared with the measured values at atmospheric monitoring stations, and a reasonable agreement was obtained. Firstly, the trend of the acid rain in East Asia due to the rapid increase of Chinese pollutants emission was investigated, and a remarkably rapid increase of acid rain area was predicted in the period from 1985 to 1995, the monthly mean pH values showing the decrease of 0.3-0.8 in the area from the center to northeast in China, and 0.1-0.2 even in Japan and Korea. Secondly, the simulation results of April 1995 exhibited a strong neutralization of the precipitation by the yellow sand. The monthly mean pH values in the northern China showed a remarkable increase of 0.6-1.8 by neutralization effect of the yellow sand, while the increases in the southern China were less than 0.1. Even in Korea and Japan the yellow sand caused the increase of the pH value of rain by 0.1-0.2.

  20. Trend of acid rain and neutralization by yellow sand in east Asia - a numerical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terada, Hiroaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Ueda, Hiromasa [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Disaster Prevention Research Inst.; Wang, Z. [Institute for Global Change Research, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Acid rain and its neutralization by yellow sand in East Asia were investigated numerically by an Air Quality Prediction Modeling System (AQPMS). AQPMS consists of advection, diffusion, dry and wet deposition, gas-phase chemistry and the liquid-phase chemistry. A new deflation module of the yellow sand (Asian soil dust) was designed to provide explicit information on the dust loading. Different from the previous ones for Sahara and Australian deserts, this new one includes three major predictors, i.e., the friction velocity, the surface humidity and the predominant weather system, while this module was linked to the AQPMS. For model validation, the predicted pH values and sulfate- and nitrate-ion levels of precipitation, together with the surface concentrations of gaseous pollutants, were compared with the measured values at atmospheric monitoring stations, and a reasonable agreement was obtained. Firstly, the trend of the acid rain in East Asia due to the rapid increase of Chinese pollutants emission was investigated, and a remarkably rapid increase of acid rain area was predicted in the period from 1985 to 1995, the monthly mean pH values showing the decrease of 0.3-0.8 in the area from the center to northeast in China, and 0.1-0.2 even in Japan and Korea. Secondly, the simulation results of April 1995 exhibited a strong neutralization of the precipitation by the yellow sand. The monthly mean pH values in northern China showed a remarkable increase of 0.6-1.8 by neutralization effect of the yellow sand, while the increases in southern China were less than 0.1. Even in Korea and Japan the yellow sand caused the increase of the pH value of rain by 0.1-0.2. (author)

  1. Comment on “Rain dance”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orville, Harold D.

    A recent news brief about cloud seeding work being conducted in Cohuila, Mexico, (“Rain Dance,” Eos, July 23, 1996) contained unfounded, off-hand remarks that are a disservice to many scientists and professionals in the cloud physics and weather modification community. The news brief stated that “most previous attempts to catalyze rainfall by cloud seeding have produced inconclusive results, and almost none of the experiments have had a sound scientific basis.” The inconclusive results are primarily statistical; many outstanding scientific results have developed from the 50-year history of research into weather modification.Also, most of the work that I know about has proceeded on the scientific basis that was developed over the years by the scientific and operational communities, and it is improving with time. It is grossly inaccurate to say that almost none of the experiments have had a sound scientific basis. Improvements in technology are strengthening that scientific basis, and current physical and numerical studies being conducted in many places are improving understanding. (See reviews of the status of weather modification from the American Meteorological Society [1992] and the World Meteorological Organization [1992].)

  2. Exploring the nonlinear cloud and rain equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Ilan; Tziperman, Eli; Feingold, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Marine stratocumulus cloud decks are regarded as the reflectors of the climate system, returning back to space a significant part of the income solar radiation, thus cooling the atmosphere. Such clouds can exist in two stable modes, open and closed cells, for a wide range of environmental conditions. This emergent behavior of the system, and its sensitivity to aerosol and environmental properties, is captured by a set of nonlinear equations. Here, using linear stability analysis, we express the transition from steady to a limit-cycle state analytically, showing how it depends on the model parameters. We show that the control of the droplet concentration (N), the environmental carrying-capacity (H0), and the cloud recovery parameter (τ) can be linked by a single nondimensional parameter (μ=√{N }/(ατH0) ) , suggesting that for deeper clouds the transition from open (oscillating) to closed (stable fixed point) cells will occur for higher droplet concentration (i.e., higher aerosol loading). The analytical calculations of the possible states, and how they are affected by changes in aerosol and the environmental variables, provide an enhanced understanding of the complex interactions of clouds and rain.

  3. Utility views of acid rain legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katlic, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    The electric utilities consume almost 85% of the coal that is used in the US. The utilities as well as other industries will be seriously affected by revisions currently being considered to the Clean Air Act. We endorse the 10-year scientific National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) which concludes the acid rain is not an environmental crisis but a long-term problem that needs to be addressed. The extreme views expressed by environmentalists and echoed by the media have been rendered unlikely to be correct assording to the NAPAP director. For example, the report found that the majority of North American forests are healthy. In addition, SO 2 emissions are down while coal use has doubled since the 70's. However, Congress, by considering any of the proposed Clean Air bills, is ignoring the NAPAP results. Experts from all areas are touting the need for the development of a National Energy Policy which would decrease our reliance on foreign oil and capitalize on the resources in abundance here in the United States -- like coal. The President has urged lawmakers to enact measures that would do just that. Yet the Joint Committee of Congress is marching on with revisions to a Clean Air Act that is already working. This will increase the cost of energy across all areas of industry and call a halt to the industrial recovery in this country

  4. ACID RAIN - A PROBLEM OF THE PRESENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozelinda Čož-Rakovac

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Acid rains is one of the most relevant problems of the human environment, the result being pollution of the atmosphere caused by ever growing industrial development. It is caused by the freeing of sulphuric oxides and oxygen, which along with certain chemical reactions transfer into sulphate and nitrate, and through wet or dry sediments reach the ground. This has an effect on lakes, rivers, the entire animal and plant kingdom, including all the good creations of mankind. Over a longer time period acid destroy organisms which live in the water of some freshwater ecosystems, depending on local geological characteristics (presence of natural neutralizers of acid in the ground which makes an area more of less sensitive to acidity. Investigators have determined that the activity of H+ on organisms which live in the water depend differently on species and concentrations of acidity. For many species the problems begin already with pH ≤ 6, and only a few resistant species survive at pH ≤ 4.7. Acidity changes chemical and biochemical tissue composition, decreases the osmoregulation, influences the level of hormones in the blood, has an effect on fish smoltification, and interrupts its reproduction. Acidifying sensitive water ecosystems in the Northern hemisphere corresponds with the increase of acid precipitation. To prevent this problem from spreading even more it is necessary to solve it as soon as possible, either by controlling the release of pollutants into the atmosphere, or improving of the already occurring consequences.

  5. Acid rain compliance planning using decision analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.; Sweet, T.; Borison, A.

    1991-01-01

    Illinois Power Company (IP) is an investor-owned electric and natural gas utility serving portions of downstate Illinois. In addition to one nuclear unit and several small gas and/or oil-fired units, IP has ten coal-fired units. It is easy to understand the impact the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) could have on IP. Prior to passage of the CAAA, IP formed several teams to evaluate the specific compliance options at each of the high sulfur coal units. Following that effort, numerous economic analyses of compliance strategies were conducted. The CAAA have introduced a new dimension to planning under uncertainty. Not only are many of the familiar variables uncertain, but the specific form of regulation, and indeed, the compliance goal itself is hard to define. For IP, this led them to use techniques not widely used within their corporation. This paper summarizes the analytical methods used in these analyses and the preliminary results as of July, 1991. The analysis used three approaches to examine the acid rain compliance decision. These approaches were: (1) the 'most-likely,' or single-path scenario approach; (2) a multi-path strategy analysis using the strategies defined in the single-scenario analysis; and (3) a less constrained multi-path option analysis which selects the least cost compliance option for each unit

  6. A Rain Taxonomy for Degraded Visual Environment Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, P. N.; Petersen, W. A.

    2018-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) provides a description of a rainfall taxonomy that defines the detailed characteristics of naturally occurring rainfall. The taxonomy is based on raindrop size measurements collected around the globe and encompasses several different climate types. Included in this TM is a description of these rainfall observations, an explanation of methods used to process those data, and resultant metrics comprising the rain taxonomy database. Each of the categories in the rain taxonomy are characterized by a unique set of raindrop sizes that can be used in simulations of electromagnetic wave propagation through a rain medium.

  7. Chemical composition of acid rains in the Venezuelan savannah region

    OpenAIRE

    SANHUEZA, E.; ARIAS, M. C.; DONOSO, L.; GRATEROL, N.; HERMOSO, M.; MARTÍ, I.; ROMERO, J.; RONDÓN, A.; SANTANA, M.

    2011-01-01

    The chemical composition of rain events has been determined at 6 sites in the Venezuelan savannah region. The results indicate that precipitations are little affected by anthropogenic emissions and that rain concentrations of anions and cations are similar to those observed at “remote” continental sites. At each location, the rain is acidic with average pHs ranging from 4.4 to 5.4. Over 50% of the free acidity may be due to formic and acetic acids. HNO3 and H2SO4 contribute only less than 36%...

  8. Sci-Thur PM – Brachytherapy 06: 3D Printed Surface Applicators for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, Scott; Yewondwossen, Mammo; Robar, James

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a new applicator for administering high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using 3D printing technology. Primary advantages of using a 3D printed applicator will be to offer a more streamlined approach for therapists and patients while achieving better conformity, reproducibility, and patient specific applicators. Methods: A phantom study was conducted to measure the effectiveness of a 3D printed surface applicator by analyzing tumours on three locations of the body: the foot, nose, and scalp. The applicator was designed using Eclipse and further modified using Blender to create the catheter tunnels before being printed on a Lulzbot Taz 5 3D printer. A radiation plan was made using Oncentra Brachytherapy for a control treatment option using Freiburg Flaps and one with the novel method of a 3D printed applicator. A comparative analysis was made using D90, D100, V100, V150, and V200 Results: The 3D printed applicator showed comparable dose coverage with significant improvements on highly irregular surfaces when analyzed against a plan made using Freiburg Flaps. Although both plans exhibited complete tumour coverage, the 3D applicator showed improvements in D90 and V150 and the 3D applicator had a dose homogeneity index (DHI) of 0.99 compared to a DHI of 0.97 for the control. Therapist prep time also dropped significantly due to the lack of need for a thermoplastic mesh. Conclusions: 3D printed applicators for treatment of superficial sites proved to offer more patient convenience, less prep time, better conformity and tighter margins.

  9. Seasonal rhythms of seed rain and seedling emergence in two tropical rain forests in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, M C M; Oliveira, P E A M

    2008-09-01

    Seasonal tropical forests show rhythms in reproductive activities due to water stress during dry seasons. If both seed dispersal and seed germination occur in the best environmental conditions, mortality will be minimised and forest regeneration will occur. To evaluate whether non-seasonal forests also show rhythms, for 2 years we studied the seed rain and seedling emergence in two sandy coastal forests (flooded and unflooded) in southern Brazil. In each forest, one 100 x 30-m grid was marked and inside it 30 stations comprising two seed traps (0.5 x 0.5 m each) and one plot (2 x 2 m) were established for monthly monitoring of seed rain and a seedling emergence study, respectively. Despite differences in soil moisture and incident light on the understorey, flooded and unflooded forests had similar dispersal and germination patterns. Seed rain was seasonal and bimodal (peaks at the end of the wetter season and in the less wet season) and seedling emergence was seasonal and unimodal (peaking in the wetter season). Approximately 57% of the total species number had seedling emergence 4 or more months after dispersal. Therefore, both seed dormancy and the timing of seed dispersal drive the rhythm of seedling emergence in these forests. The peak in germination occurs in the wetter season, when soil fertility is higher and other phenological events also occur. The strong seasonality in these plant communities, even in this weakly seasonal climate, suggests that factors such as daylength, plant sensitivity to small changes in the environment (e.g. water and nutrient availability) or phylogenetic constraints cause seasonal rhythms in the plants.

  10. The Star Formation Rate and Gas Surface Density Relation in the Milky Way: Implications for Extragalactic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiderman, Amanda L.; Evans, N. J., II; Allen, L. E.; Huard, T.; Heyer, M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the relation between star formation rate (SFR) and gas surface densities in Galactic star forming regions using a sample of YSOs and massive clumps. Our YSO sample consists of objects located in 20 molecular clouds from the Spitzer c2d and Gould's Belt surveys. We estimate the gas surface density (Sigma_gas) from Av maps and YSO SFR surface densities (Sigma_SFR) from the number of YSOs, assuming a mean mass and lifetime. We also divide the clouds into contour levels of Av, counting only the youngest Class I and Flat SED YSOs. For a sample of massive star forming clumps, we derive SFRs from the infrared luminosity and use HCN gas maps to estimate Sigma_gas. We find that Galactic clouds lie above the extragalactic relations (e.g., Kennicutt-Schmidt Law) by factors up to 17. Cloud regions with high Sigma_gas lie above extragalactic relations up to a factor of 54 and overlap with massive clumps. We use 12CO and 13CO gas maps of the Perseus and Ophiuchus clouds to estimate Sigma_gas and compare to Sigma_gas from Av maps. We find that 13CO, underestimates the Av-based mass by factors of 4-5. 12CO may underestimate the total gas mass at Sigma_gas > 200 Msun pc^-2 by > 30%; however, this does not explain the large discrepancy between Galactic and extragalactic relations. We find evidence for a threshold of star formation (Sigma_th) at 129+-14 Msun pc^-2. At Sigma_gas > Sigma_th, the Galactic relation is linear. A possible reason for the difference between Galactic and extragalactic relations is that all the CO-emitting gas, including Sigma_gas below Sigma_th, is measured in extragalactic studies. If the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation (Sigma_SFR Sigma_gas^1.4) and a linear relation between dense gas and star formation is assumed, the fraction of dense gas (f_dense) increases as Sigma_gas^0.4. When Sigma_gas reaches 300Sigma_th, f_dense is 1.

  11. [Effects of simulated acid rain on oilseed rape (Brassica napus) physiological characteristics at flowering stage and yield].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chun-Xin; Zhou, Qin; Han, Liang-Liang; Zhang, Pei; Jiang, Hai-Dong

    2010-08-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of different acidity simulated acid rain on the physiological characteristics at flowering stage and yield of oilseed rape (B. napus cv. Qinyou 9). Comparing with the control (pH 6.0), weak acidity (pH = 4.0-5.0) simulated acid rain stimulated the rape growth to some extent, but had less effects on the plant biomass, leaf chlorophyll content, photosynthetic characteristics, and yield. With the further increase of acid rain acidity, the plant biomass, leaf chlorophyll content, photosynthetic rate, antioxidative enzyme activities, and non-enzyme antioxidant contents all decreased gradually, while the leaf malonyldialdehyde (MDA) content and relative conductivity increased significantly. As the results, the pod number per plant, seed number per pod, seed weight, and actual yield decreased. However, different yield components showed different sensitivity to simulated acid rain. With the increasing acidity of simulated acid rain, the pod number per plant and the seed number per pod decreased significantly, while the seed weight was less affected.

  12. The mechanical interactions between an American football cleat and playing surfaces in-situ at loads and rates generated by elite athletes: a comparison of playing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Richard; Forman, Jason L; Crandall, Jeff; Lessley, David

    2015-03-01

    This study quantified the mechanical interactions between an American football cleat and eight surfaces used by professional American football teams. Loading conditions were applied with a custom-built testing apparatus designed to represent play-relevant maneuvers of elite athletes. Two natural grass and six infill artificial surfaces were tested with the cleated portion of a shoe intended for use on either surface type. In translation tests with a 2. 8-kN vertical load, the grass surfaces limited the horizontal force on the cleats by tearing. This tearing was not observed with the artificial surfaces, which allowed less motion and generated greater horizontal force (3.2 kN vs. 4.5 kN, p force on the natural surfaces than on the artificial surfaces (2.4 kN vs. 3.0 kN, p force-limiting mechanism inherent to natural grass surfaces. Future work should consider implications of these findings for performance and injury risk and should evaluate the findings' sensitivity to cleat pattern and playing conditions.

  13. Detection of rain events in radiological early warning networks with spectro-dosimetric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, R.; Dombrowski, H.; Kessler, P.; Röttger, A.; Neumaier, S.

    2017-10-01

    Short-term pronounced increases of the ambient dose equivalent rate, due to rainfall are a well-known phenomenon. Increases in the same order of magnitude or even below may also be caused by a nuclear or radiological event, i.e. by artificial radiation. Hence, it is important to be able to identify natural rain events in dosimetric early warning networks and to distinguish them from radiological events. Novel spectrometric systems based on scintillators may be used to differentiate between the two scenarios, because the measured gamma spectra provide significant nuclide-specific information. This paper describes three simple, automatic methods to check whether an dot H*(10) increase is caused by a rain event or by artificial radiation. These methods were applied to measurements of three spectrometric systems based on CeBr3, LaBr3 and SrI2 scintillation crystals, investigated and tested for their practicability at a free-field reference site of PTB.

  14. SMEX02 Rain Gauge Network, Walnut Creek, Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes hourly precipitation data taken at 20 rain gauge locations as part of the Soil Moisture Experiment 2002 (SMEX02). This study was conducted...

  15. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Rain Fall, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Rain Fall data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have not been...

  16. The natural emergence of the correlation between H2 and star formation rate surface densities in galaxy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Alessandro; Bovino, Stefano; Capelo, Pedro R.; Volonteri, Marta; Silk, Joseph

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we present a suite of high-resolution numerical simulations of an isolated galaxy to test a sub-grid framework to consistently follow the formation and dissociation of H2 with non-equilibrium chemistry. The latter is solved via the package KROME, coupled to the mesh-less hydrodynamic code GIZMO. We include the effect of star formation (SF), modelled with a physically motivated prescription independent of H2, supernova feedback and mass-losses from low-mass stars, extragalactic and local stellar radiation, and dust and H2 shielding, to investigate the emergence of the observed correlation between H2 and SF rate surface densities. We present two different sub-grid models and compare them with on-the-fly radiative transfer (RT) calculations, to assess the main differences and limits of the different approaches. We also discuss a sub-grid clumping factor model to enhance the H2 formation, consistent with our SF prescription, which is crucial, at the achieved resolution, to reproduce the correlation with H2. We find that both sub-grid models perform very well relative to the RT simulation, giving comparable results, with moderate differences, but at much lower computational cost. We also find that, while the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation for the total gas is not strongly affected by the different ingredients included in the simulations, the H2-based counterpart is much more sensitive, because of the crucial role played by the dissociating radiative flux and the gas shielding.

  17. Results of Dynamic Calibration of Tipping-Bucket Rain Gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvicera, V.; Grabner, M.

    2009-04-01

    Experimental research in the Department of Frequency Engineering in the Czech Metrology Institute (CMI) in Prague, the Czech Republic, is focused on stability of received signal on terrestrial radio and optical paths. Rain can cause serious attenuation of electromagnetic waves in the frequency bands over 10 GHz. Therefore, our experimental research is also focused on our own meteorological measurement in the vicinity of experimental radio and optical paths. The heated tipping-bucket raingauge MR3H manufactured by Meteoservis, the Czech Republic, with the collector area of 500 cm2 and the rain amount per tip of 0.1 mm is used at CMI for the measurement of rainfall intensities. The time of tips is recorded with uncertainty of 0.1 second. The obtained time of tips are stored by PC and recorded on CD-ROM. It is generally known higher rainfall intensities measured by tipping-bucket rain gauges are underestimated. Therefore, after static calibration the tipping-bucket rain gauge was dynamically calibrated by water flowmeters. The Brooks FLOMEGA Flow Meters models 5882 and 3750 were used for the rain gauge calibration in the range from 2.6 mm/h to 530 mm/h. The used method of dynamic calibration of raingauges and our experience obtained will be described. The dependence of the measured rain intensity on the reference rain intensity (calibration curve) will be presented. Both the results obtained and the influence of dynamic calibration on our results concerning attenuation of electromagnetic waves due to rain will be discussed. Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic under the Project No. OC09076 supported the described work.

  18. Photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the restinga plant species Eugenia uniflora L. exposed to simulated acid rain and iron ore dust deposition: Potential use in environmental risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust Neves, Natalia; Oliva, Marco Antonio; Cruz Centeno, Danilo da; Costa, Alan Carlos; Ferreira Ribas, Rogerio; Gusmao Pereira, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The Brazilian sandy coastal plain named restinga is frequently subjected to particulate and gaseous emissions from iron ore factories. These gases may come into contact with atmospheric moisture and produce acid rain. The effects of the acid rain on vegetation, combined with iron excess in the soil, can lead to the disappearance of sensitive species and decrease restinga biodiversity. The effects of iron ore dust deposition and simulated acid rain on photosynthesis and on antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Eugenia uniflora, a representative shrub species of the restinga. This study aimed to determine the possible utility of this species in environmental risk assessment. After the application of iron ore dust as iron solid particulate matter (SPM Fe ) and simulated acid rain (pH 3.1), the 18-month old plants displayed brown spots and necrosis, typical symptoms of iron toxicity and injuries caused by acid rain, respectively. The acidity of the rain intensified leaf iron accumulation, which reached phytotoxic levels, mainly in plants exposed to iron ore dust. These plants showed the lowest values for net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, chlorophyll a content and electron transport rate through photosystem II (PSII). Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased by simulated acid rain. Peroxidase activity and membrane injury increased following exposure to acid rain and simultaneous SPM Fe application. Eugenia uniflora exhibited impaired photosynthetic and antioxidative metabolism in response to combined iron and acid rain stresses. This species could become a valuable tool in environmental risk assessment in restinga areas near iron ore pelletizing factories. Non-invasive evaluations of visual injuries, photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence, as well as invasive biochemical analysis could be used as markers.

  19. Photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the restinga plant species Eugenia uniflora L. exposed to simulated acid rain and iron ore dust deposition: Potential use in environmental risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rust Neves, Natalia; Oliva, Marco Antonio; Cruz Centeno, Danilo da; Costa, Alan Carlos; Ferreira Ribas, Rogerio [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Universidade Federal de Vicosa, Av. PH Rolfs, Campus, Vicosa, Minas Gerais, 36570-000 (Brazil); Gusmao Pereira, Eduardo, E-mail: egpereira@gmail.com [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Universidade Federal de Vicosa, Av. PH Rolfs, Campus, Vicosa, Minas Gerais, 36570-000 (Brazil)

    2009-06-01

    The Brazilian sandy coastal plain named restinga is frequently subjected to particulate and gaseous emissions from iron ore factories. These gases may come into contact with atmospheric moisture and produce acid rain. The effects of the acid rain on vegetation, combined with iron excess in the soil, can lead to the disappearance of sensitive species and decrease restinga biodiversity. The effects of iron ore dust deposition and simulated acid rain on photosynthesis and on antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Eugenia uniflora, a representative shrub species of the restinga. This study aimed to determine the possible utility of this species in environmental risk assessment. After the application of iron ore dust as iron solid particulate matter (SPM{sub Fe}) and simulated acid rain (pH 3.1), the 18-month old plants displayed brown spots and necrosis, typical symptoms of iron toxicity and injuries caused by acid rain, respectively. The acidity of the rain intensified leaf iron accumulation, which reached phytotoxic levels, mainly in plants exposed to iron ore dust. These plants showed the lowest values for net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, chlorophyll a content and electron transport rate through photosystem II (PSII). Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased by simulated acid rain. Peroxidase activity and membrane injury increased following exposure to acid rain and simultaneous SPM{sub Fe} application. Eugenia uniflora exhibited impaired photosynthetic and antioxidative metabolism in response to combined iron and acid rain stresses. This species could become a valuable tool in environmental risk assessment in restinga areas near iron ore pelletizing factories. Non-invasive evaluations of visual injuries, photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence, as well as invasive biochemical analysis could be used as markers.

  20. Characteristic, origin, prediction of acid rain at Chongqing in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaolei; Ogura, Norio

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of the acid rain at Chongqing city, Sichuan Province, China is presented. The chemical analysis of the rainwater in major cities in China, seasonal variation of pH of the rain in last decade, concentration of the SO 2 in atmosphere and in rain at Chongqing city are reviewed. The possible factors affecting the acidity is analyzed. The closed geography is revealed to be one of the cause. Industries exhausting soot and Chongqing coal thermal plant combusting coal of high sulfur and high ash concentration are the main sources of pollutants. SO 2 from coal as domestic fuel may not be ignored. It is estimated that the concentrations of SO 2 in atmosphere, SO 4 2- in rain, H + in rain, and wet precipitation shall be 0.61 mg/m 3 , 402.2μeq/l, 122.2μeq/l and 3.67mg/m 2 ·yr, respectively. Warning is made that unless rapid countermeasure shall be devised, Chongqing may become one of the worst acid rain districts. (Y.A.)

  1. Improved Gradation for Rain Garden of Low Impact Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sandra; Chang, Fu-Ming

    2016-04-01

    With rapid urban and economic development, living standard improves in urban areas but urban ecological environments deteriorate rapidly. Urban waterlogging and flooding have become a serious problem for urban water security. As urbanization continues, sustainability is the key to balance between urban development and healthy environment. Rain garden is recommended to be one of the best ways to reduce urban pollutants. It not only diminishes runoff flooding but also purify water in the urban area. The studies on rain gardens are mainly about how to incorporate rain garden to purify water quality, but lack of researches on runoff control. This project focuses on rain garden under Low Impact Development using indoor laboratory to test and quantify the water holding capacities of two different Taiwan indigenous rain garden plants, Taiwan Cyclosorus and Sour Grass. The results show that the water holding capacity of Sour Grass (10%-37%) is better than that of Taiwan Cyclosorus (6.8%-17.3%). The results could be a helpful reference for Low Impact Development in urban flood prevention and urban planning. Keywords: Low Impact Development; rain garden; indoor laboratory experiments; water holding capacity; porosity

  2. Development of the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Carswell, J. R.; Li, L.; Schaubert, D.; Heymsfield, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    A dual-wavelength (Ku and Ka band) High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) is under development for measuring tropospheric winds within precipitation regions and ocean surface winds in rain-free to light rain regions. This instrument is being designed for operation on high-altitude manned aircraft and the Global Hawk UAV. Proposed lidar-based systems provide measurements in cloud-free regions globally. Since many of the weather systems are in disturbed regions that contain precipitation and clouds, microwave based techniques are more suitable in these regions. Airborne radars at NASA and elsewhere have shown the ability to measure winds in precipitation and clouds. These radars have not generally been suitable for deriving the full horizontal wind from above cloud systems (high-altitude or space) that would require conical scan. HIWRAP is conical scan radar that uses new technologies that utilize solid state rather than tube based transmitters. The presentation will discuss the motivation for the instrument, key system level technologies, status, and planned flight testing of the prototype sensor on the high-altitude WB-57 aircraft to demonstrate the system level performance of the instrument.

  3. Environmental effects of a rare rain event in the high Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Magnus; Abermann, Jakob; Skov, Kirstine

    2017-04-01

    Projections of future Arctic climate indicate an intensified hydrological cycle with more precipitation. This will have a number of implications for Arctic ecosystem processes, including glacier mass balance, river discharge and tundra ecosystem functioning. At the high Arctic Zackenberg Research Station, northeast Greenland, a comprehensive climate change and ecosystem monitoring programme has been running since 1996, covering glaciological, terrestrial, limnic and marine compartments (www.zackenberg.dk). During 2015, we observed record high annual precipitation in Zackenberg. Almost one-quarter of the annual precipitation fell during a unique nine-day long rain event in August. This study focusses on various inter-related ecosystem processes affected by the exceptional rain event: Increased river discharge resulting in high transport of suspended sediments and dissolved organic carbon. Late summer soil wetting and prolonged reduction of incoming shortwave radiation altering the surface energy balance and decreasing ecosystem carbon uptake. As precipitation is predicted to increase in the Arctic in near future, extreme rain events as the one observed in August 2015 in Zackenberg can be expected to become more frequent. As such, the environmental effects we observe and are able to quantify, constitute an important showcase for the response of Arctic ecosystems to climatic changes. It also demonstrates the importance of integrated, long-term environmental monitoring programmes in the Arctic.

  4. Critical review: Copper runoff from outdoor copper surfaces at atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Hedberg, Jonas F; Herting, Gunilla; Goidanich, Sara; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2014-01-01

    This review on copper runoff dispersed from unsheltered naturally patinated copper used for roofing and facades summarizes and discusses influencing factors, available literature, and predictive models, and the importance of fate and speciation for environmental risk assessment. Copper runoff from outdoor surfaces is predominantly governed by electrochemical and chemical reactions and is highly dependent on given exposure conditions (size, inclination, geometry, degree of sheltering, and orientation), surface parameters (age, patina composition, and thickness), and site-specific environmental conditions (gaseous pollutants, chlorides, rainfall characteristics (amount, intensity, pH), wind direction, temperature, time of wetness, season). The corrosion rate cannot be used to assess the runoff rate. The extent of released copper varies largely between different rain events and is related to dry and wet periods, dry deposition prior to the rain event and prevailing rain and patina characteristics. Interpretation and use of copper runoff data for environmental risk assessment and management need therefore to consider site-specific factors and focus on average data of long-term studies (several years). Risk assessments require furthermore that changes in copper speciation, bioavailability aspects, and potential irreversible retention on solid surfaces are considered, factors that determine the environmental fate of copper runoff from outdoor surfaces.

  5. The Effect of Growth Temperature and V/III Flux Ratio of MOCVD Antimony Based Semiconductors on Growth Rate and Surface Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramelan Ari Handono

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epitaxial Alx Ga1-x Sb layers on GaSb and GaAs substrates have been grown by atmospheric pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition using TMAl, TMGa and TMSb. Nomarski microscope and a profiler were employed to examine the surface morphology and growth rate of the samples. We report the effect of growth temperature and V/III flux ratio on growth rate and surface morphology. Growth temperatures in the range of 520°C and 680°C and V/III ratios from 1 to 5 have been investigated. A growth rate activation energy of 0.73 eV was found. At low growth temperatures between 520 and 540°C, the surface morphology is poor due to antimonide precipitates associated with incomplete decomposition of the TMSb. For layers grown on GaAs at 580°C and 600°C with a V/III ratio of 3 a high quality surface morphology is typical, with a mirror-like surface and good composition control. It was found that a suitable growth temperature and V/III flux ratio was beneficial for producing good AlGaSb layers. Undoped AlGaSb grown at 580°C with a V/III flux ratio of 3 at the rate of 3.5 μm/hour shows p-type conductivity with smooth surface morphology

  6. Responses of tropical legumes from the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest to simulated acid rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Guilherme C; Silva, Luzimar C

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the morphological and anatomical effects of simulated acid rain on leaves of two species native to the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest: Paubrasilia echinata and Libidibia ferrea var. leiostachya. Saplings were subjected to acid rain in a simulation chamber during 10 days for 15 min daily, using H 2 SO 4 solution pH 3.0 and, in the control, deionized water. At the end of the experiment, fragments from young and expanding leaves were anatomically analyzed. Although L. ferrea var. leiostachya leaves are more hydrophobic, rain droplets remained in contact with them for a longer time, as in the hydrophilic P. echinata leaves, droplets coalesce and rapidly run off. Visual symptomatology consisted in interveinal and marginal necrotic dots. Microscopic damage found included epicuticular wax flaking, turgor loss and epidermal cell shape alteration, hypertrophy of parenchymatous cells, and epidermal and mesophyll cell collapse. Formation of a wound tissue was observed in P. echinata, and it isolated the necrosis to the adaxial leaf surface. Acid rain increased thickness of all leaf tissues except spongy parenchyma in young leaves of L. ferrea var. leiostachya, and such thickness was maintained throughout leaf expansion. To our knowledge, this is the first report of acidity causing increase in leaf tissue thickness. This could represent the beginning of cell hypertrophy, which was seen in visually affected leaf regions. Paubrasilia echinata was more sensitive, showing earlier symptoms, but the anatomical damage in L. ferrea var. leiostachya was more severe, probably due to the higher time of contact with acid solution in this species.

  7. A Dynamic Optimization Technique for Siting the NASA-Clark Atlanta Urban Rain Gauge Network (NCURN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Taylor, Layi

    2003-01-01

    NASA satellites and ground instruments have indicated that cities like Atlanta, Georgia may create or alter rainfall. Scientists speculate that the urban heat island caused by man-made surfaces in cities impact the heat and wind patterns that form clouds and rainfall. However, more conclusive evidence is required to substantiate findings from satellites. NASA, along with scientists at Clark Atlanta University, are implementing a dense, urban rain gauge network in the metropolitan Atlanta area to support a satellite validation program called Studies of PRecipitation Anomalies from Widespread Urban Landuse (SPRAWL). SPRAWL will be conducted during the summer of 2003 to further identify and understand the impact of urban Atlanta on precipitation variability. The paper provides an. overview of SPRAWL, which represents one of the more comprehensive efforts in recent years to focus exclusively on urban-impacted rainfall. The paper also introduces a novel technique for deploying rain gauges for SPRAWL. The deployment of the dense Atlanta network is unique because it utilizes Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Decision Support Systems (DSS) to optimize deployment of the rain gauges. These computer aided systems consider access to roads, drainage systems, tree cover, and other factors in guiding the deployment of the gauge network. GIS and DSS also provide decision-makers with additional resources and flexibility to make informed decisions while considering numerous factors. Also, the new Atlanta network and SPRAWL provide a unique opportunity to merge the high-resolution, urban rain gauge network with satellite-derived rainfall products to understand how cities are changing rainfall patterns, and possibly climate.

  8. 40 CFR 72.31 - Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information requirements for Acid Rain... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Applications § 72.31 Information requirements for Acid Rain permit applications. A complete Acid Rain permit application shall include the...

  9. 40 CFR 72.69 - Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.69 Issuance and effective date of acid rain permits. (a) After the close of the public comment period, the Administrator will issue or deny an Acid Rain permit. The Administrator will serve a copy of any Acid Rain...

  10. Acid Rain: A Teacher's Guide. Activities for Grades 4 to 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This guide on acid rain for elementary and secondary students is divided into three study areas: (1) What Causes Acid Rain; (2) What Problems Acid Rain Has Created; (3) How You and Your Students Can Help Combat Acid Rain. Each section presents background information and a series of lessons pertaining to the section topic. Activities include…

  11. Acid Rain. Activities for Grades 4 to 12. A Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, David; Bryant, Jeannette

    This teacher's guide on acid rain is divided into three study areas to explain: (1) what causes acid rain; (2) what problems acid rain has created; and (3) what teachers and students can do to help combat acid rain. Instructions for activities within the study areas include suggested grade levels, objectives, materials needed, and directions for…

  12. Using Measurements of Topography to Infer Rates of Crater Degradation and Surface Evolution on the Moon and Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, C.; Crowley, M. C.; Leight, C.; Dyar, M. D.; Minton, D.; Hirabayashi, M.; Thomson, B. J.; Watters, W. A.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of how the topography of impact craters vary with age enable estimates for how fast the surface of airless bodies evolve. Fresh simple craters form with a depth/diameter (d/D) ratio of 0.21, sharp rims, and steep interior slopes. These fresh craters then are eroded and infilled, reducing d/D, and topographically muting their appearance. On the Moon and Mercury, the dominant mechanism responsible for this erosion likely includes the cumulative effects of numerous later small primary and secondary impact craters. The resulting topographic evolution can be modeled as a diffusive process, similar to how hillslopes evolve on Earth. However, the topographic diffusivity (κ) forced by impact cratering is dependent on both scale and time, so diffusion is anomalous, rather than classical. A key finding of this study is how the diffusivity and hence erosion rate is different on the Moon and Mercury. On the Moon, based on measurements of >13000 craters in the 800 m ≤ D ≤ 5 km size range on the lunar maria, the average diffusivity at 1 km scale is estimated as 5.5m2/Myr. With this diffusivity, D 1 km craters are reduced to 52% of their original depth over 3 Ga. Larger craters have relative depths that are much less reduced over an equivalent period, and smaller craters are much more eroded, even accounting for some scale-dependence of diffusivity (κ ∝ D0.9). In fact, the smallest craters are sufficiently degraded to become unrecognizable. The rate of topographic diffusion is the critical control on how a crater population reaches saturation equilibrium. On Mercury, d/D for 204 craters with 2.5 km ≤ D ≤ 5 km on the smooth plains were measured with MDIS stereo topography and MLA data. For these craters, the median d/D was 0.13. Craters in this same size range on the lunar maria are much less modified than those on Mercury when measured with the same techniques on data resampled to a resolution equivalent to the Mercury data, and their d/D is nearly

  13. Polarimetric Emission of Rain Events: Simulation and Experimental Results at X-Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Duffo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate models are used today for infrared and microwave satellite radiance simulations of the first two Stokes elements in the physical retrieval, data assimilation etc. of surface and atmospheric parameters. Although in the past a number of theoretical and experimental works have studied the polarimetric emission of some natural surfaces, specially the sea surface roughened by the wind (Windsat mission, very limited studies have been conducted on the polarimetric emission of rain cells or other natural surfaces. In this work, the polarimetric emission (four Stokes elements of a rain cell is computed using the polarimetric radiative transfer equation assuming that raindrops are described by Pruppacher-Pitter shapes and that their size distribution follows the Laws-Parsons law. The Boundary Element Method (BEM is used to compute the exact bistatic scattering coefficients for each raindrop shape and different canting angles. Numerical results are compared to the Rayleigh or Mie scattering coefficients, and to Oguchi’s ones, showing that above 1-2 mm raindrop size the exact formulation is required to model properly the scattering. Simulation results using BEM are then compared to the experimental data gathered with a X-band polarimetric radiometer. It is found that the depolarization of the radiation caused by the scattering of non-spherical raindrops induces a non-zero third Stokes parameter, and the differential phase of the scattering coefficients induces a non-zero fourth Stokes parameter.

  14. Ecosystem Respiration in an Undisturbed, Old-Growth, Temperate Rain Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. E.; Walcroft, A. S.; McSeveny, T. M.; Rogers, G. N.; Whitehead, D.

    2008-12-01

    Old-growth forests are usually close to carbon neutral, and climate change may push them towards becoming net carbon sources. Ecosystem carbon exchange and its component fluxes, were measured in a temperate rainforest in South Westland, New Zealand. The forest, which receives over 3 m of rain a year, is dominated by 400 year-old podocarp trees, and is on a low nutrient, acidic, peat soil. Nighttime respiration measurements using eddy covariance were problematic due to katabatic induced CO2 drainage flows near the ground and low turbulence. Instead of the friction velocity filtering technique, we used the maximum eddy flux within a few hours of sunset to derive a function relating nighttime ecosystem respiration to soil temperature. The function was then used to calculate respiration for the nighttime periods. Soil respiration was measured at regular intervals during the growing season. Soil temperature was regulated by incoming radiation and changes in the soil heat capacity. The water table was typically only 160 mm below the ground surface. Soil respiration (mean = 2.9 μmol m-2 s-1) increased strongly with both an increase in soil temperature and an increase in the depth to the water table, and accounted for approximately 50% of ecosystem respiration. Changes in the water table depth caused by altered rainfall regime, evaporation and drainage are likely to have a significant effect on the soil respiration rate and carbon balance of this old-growth forest. Foliage and stem respiration were also measured and integrated to the canopy scale using a model. The model was then used to decompose ecosystem respiration measurements into its components. A combination of measured and modelled data indicates that the ecosystem is a net source for carbon (-0.34 kg C m&-2 yr-1).

  15. Near-surface air temperature lapse rate in a humid mountainous terrain on the southern slopes of the eastern Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattel, Dambaru Ballab; Yao, Tandong; Panday, Prajjwal Kumar

    2018-05-01

    Based on climatic data from 18 stations on the southern slopes of the eastern Himalayas in Bhutan for the period from 1996 to 2009, this paper investigates monthly characteristics of the near-surface air temperature lapse rate (TLR). The station elevations used in this study range from 300 to 2760 m a. s. l. TLRs were evaluated using a linear regression model. The monthly values of maximum TLRs were always smaller than those of the minimum TLRs, which is in contrast to results from the surrounding mountainous regions. In this study, annual patterns of TLRs were somewhat consistent, particularly in the summer; during the other seasons, patterns contrasted to results from the southeastern Tibetan Plateau (China) and were almost comparable to results from Nepal. The shallowest observed values for TLRs in summer are due to intense latent heating at the higher elevation, associated with water vapor condensation from moist convection and evapotranspiration, and decreasing sensible heating at lower elevation, due to heavier rainfall, cloud, and forest cover. When compared to summer, the steeper TLRs in the non-monsoon season are due to sensible heating at the lower elevations, corresponding to dry and clear weather seasons, as well as increasing cooling at higher elevations, particularly in winter due to snow and cloud cover. Owing to lower albedo and higher aerodynamic roughness of forested areas, the TLRs were considerably reduced in daytime because of the dissipation of sensible heat to the atmospheric boundary layer. The distinct variation in diurnal TLR range is due to the diurnal variation in net radiation associated with reduced turbulent heating in the day and increased turbulent heating in the night, in addition to the effect of moisture and cloud cover. The shallower values of TLRs in this study when compared with the surrounding mountainous regions are due to high humidity, as well as the differing elevations and local climates.

  16. Surface Passivation of MoO₃ Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition toward High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, B; Shahid, Muhammad; Nagaraju, D H; Anjum, D H; Hedhili, Mohamed N; Alshareef, H N

    2015-06-24

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in lithium (Li) ion batteries at high-rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than that of bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g; on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li-ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction were carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  17. Surface Passivation of MoO3 Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition Towards High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2015-06-03

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in Lithium (Li) ion batteries at high rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g, on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li–ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex–situ HRTEM, X–ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and X–ray diffraction was carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  18. Investigation of material removal rate and surface roughness during wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM of Inconel 625 super alloy by cryogenic treated tool electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Goyal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation focuses the effect of process parameters on material removal rate (MRR and surface roughness (Ra in wire electric discharge machining of Inconel 625. Machining was done by using a normal zinc coated wire and cryogenic treated zinc coated wire. The experiments were performed by considering different process parameters viz. tool electrode, current intensity, pulse on time, pulse off time, wire feed and wire tension. The thickness of work material and dia. of wire are kept constant. Taguchi L18 (21 * 35 orthogonal array of experimental design is used to perform the experiments. Analysis of variance (ANOVA is employed to optimize the material removal rate and surface roughness. Based on analysis it is found that pulse on time, tool electrode and current intensity are the significant parameters that affect the material removal rate and surface roughness. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM are used to identify the microstructure of the machined work piece.

  19. A one-layer satellite surface energy balance for estimating evapotranspiration rates and crop water stress indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, Salvatore; Consoli, Simona; Russo, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Daily evapotranspiration fluxes over the semi-arid Catania Plain area (Eastern Sicily, Italy) were evaluated using remotely sensed data from Landsat Thematic Mapper TM5 images. A one-source parameterization of the surface sensible heat flux exchange using satellite surface temperature has been used. The transfer of sensible and latent heat is described by aerodynamic resistance and surface resistance. Required model inputs are brightness, temperature, fractional vegetation cover or leaf area index, albedo, crop height, roughness lengths, net radiation, air temperature, air humidity and wind speed. The aerodynamic resistance (r(ah)) is formulated on the basis of the Monin-Obukhov surface layer similarity theory and the surface resistance (r(s)) is evaluated from the energy balance equation. The instantaneous surface flux values were converted into evaporative fraction (EF) over the heterogeneous land surface to derive daily evapotranspiration values. Remote sensing-based assessments of crop water stress (CWSI) were also made in order to identify local irrigation requirements. Evapotranspiration data and crop coefficient values obtained from the approach were compared with: (i) data from the semi-empirical approach "K(c) reflectance-based", which integrates satellite data in the visible and NIR regions of the electromagnetic spectrum with ground-based measurements and (ii) surface energy flux measurements collected from a micrometeorological tower located in the experiment area. The expected variability associated with ET flux measurements suggests that the approach-derived surface fluxes were in acceptable agreement with the observations.

  20. Effect of time sequences in scanning algorithms on the surface temperature during corneal laser surgery with high-repetition-rate excimer laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrochen, Michael; Schelling, Urs; Wuellner, Christian; Donitzky, Christof

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the influence of temporal and spatial spot sequences on the ocular surface temperature increase during corneal laser surgery with a high-repetition-rate excimer laser. Institute for Refractive and Ophthalmic Surgery, Zurich, Switzerland, and WaveLight AG, Erlangen, Germany. An argon-fluoride excimer laser system working at a repetition rate of 1050 Hz was used to photoablate bovine corneas with various myopic, hyperopic, and phototherapeutic ablation profiles. The temporal distribution of ablation profiles was modified by 4 spot sequences: line, circumferential, random, and an optimized scan algorithm. The increase in ocular surface temperature was measured using an infrared camera. The maximum and mean ocular surface temperature increases depended primarily on the spatial and temporal distribution of the spots during photoablation and the amount of refractive correction. The highest temperature increases were with the line and circumferential scan sequences. Significant lower temperature increases were found with the optimized and random scan algorithms. High-repetition-rate excimer laser systems require spot sequences with optimized temporal and spatial spot distribution to minimize the increase in ocular surface temperature. An ocular surface temperature increase will always occur depending on the amount of refractive correction, the type of ablation profile, the radiant exposure, and the repetition rate of the laser system.

  1. Rain pollination provides reproductive assurance in a deceptive orchid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xu-Li; Barrett, Spencer C. H.; Lin, Hua; Chen, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Xiang; Gao, Jiang-Yun

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Abiotic pollination by wind or water is well established in flowering plants. In some species pollination by rain splashes, a condition known as ombrophily, has been proposed as a floral strategy. However, evidence for this type of abiotic pollination has remained controversial and many reported cases have subsequently been shown to be false. This study investigates ombrophily in the deceptive orchid Acampe rigida to determine the mechanism by which this species is able to maintain high fecundity, despite flowering during the rainy season in south-west China when pollinators are scarce. Methods The floral mechanisms promoting rain pollination in A. rigida were observed and described in detail. Controlled pollination experiments and observations of floral visitors were conducted. A field experiment using rain shelters at 14 sites in Guangxi, south-west China, evaluated the contribution of rain pollination to fruit-set. Key Results During rainfall, raindrops physically flicked away the anther cap exposing the pollinarium. Raindrops then caused pollinia to be ejected upwards with the strap-like stipe pulling them back and causing them to fall into the stigmatic cavity, resulting in self-pollination. Neither flower nor pollen function were damaged by water. Although A. rigida is self-compatible, it is incapable of autonomous self-pollination without the assistance of rain splashes. The results of the rain-sheltering experiment indicated that rain pollination contributed substantially to increasing fruit-set, although there was variation among sites in the intensity of this effect. Conclusions A. rigida flowers during the rainy season, when pollinators are scarce, and ombrophily functions to provide reproductive assurance without compromising opportunities for outcrossing. PMID:22851311

  2. Thermal Rate Coefficients and Kinetic Isotope Effects for the Reaction OH + CH4 → H2O + CH3 on an ab Initio-Based Potential Energy Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Guo, Hua

    2018-03-15

    Thermal rate coefficients for the title reaction and its various isotopologues are computed using a tunneling-corrected transition-state theory on a global potential energy surface recently developed by fitting a large number of high-level ab initio points. The calculated rate coefficients are found to agree well with the measured ones in a wide temperature range, validating the accuracy of the potential energy surface. Strong non-Arrhenius effects are found at low temperatures. In addition, the calculations reproduced the primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects. These results confirm the strong influence of tunneling to this heavy-light-heavy hydrogen abstraction reaction.

  3. Land-use systems and resilience of tropical rain forests in the Tehuantepec Isthmus, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Romero, Arturo; Oropeza-Orozco, Oralia; Galicia-Sarmiento, Leopoldo

    2004-12-01

    Land-cover types were analyzed for 1970, 1990 and 2000 as the bases for determining land-use systems and their influence on the resilience of tropical rain forests in the Tehuantepec Isthmus, Mexico. Deforestation (DR) and mean annual transformation rates were calculated from land-cover change data; thus, the classification of land-use change processes was determined according to their impact on resilience: a) Modification, including land-cover conservation and intensification, and b) Conversion, including disturbance and regeneration processes. Regeneration processes, from secondary vegetation under extensive use, cultivated vegetation under intensive use, and cultivated or induced vegetation under extensive use to mature or secondary vegetation, have high resilience capacity. In contrast, cattle-raising is characterized by rapid expansion, long-lasting change, and intense damages; thus, recent disturbance processes, which include the conversion to cattle-raising, provoke the downfall of the traditional agricultural system, and nullify the capacity of resilience of tropical rain forest. The land-use cover change processes reveal a) the existence of four land-use systems (forestry, extensive agriculture, extensive cattle-raising, and intensive uses) and b) a trend towards the replacement of agricultural and forestry systems by extensive cattle-raising, which was consolidated during 1990-2000 (DR of evergreen tropical rain forest = 4.6%). Only the forestry system, which is not subject to deforestation, but is affected by factors such as selective timber, extraction, firewood collection, grazing, or human-induced fire, is considered to have high resilience (2 years), compared to agriculture (2-10 years) or cattle-raising (nonresilient). It is concluded that the analysis of land-use systems is essential for understanding the implications of land-use cover dynamics on forest recovery and land degradation in tropical rain forests.

  4. Evaluation of a conceptual rainfall forecasting model from observed and simulated rain events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dolciné

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Very short-term rainfall forecasting models designed for runoff analysis of catchments, particularly those subject to flash-floods, typically include one or more variables deduced from weather radars. Useful variables for defining the state and evolution of a rain system include rainfall rate, vertically integrated rainwater content and advection velocity. The forecast model proposed in this work complements recent dynamical formulations by focusing on a formulation incorporating these variables using volumetric radar data to define the model state variables, determining the rainfall source term directly from multi-scan radar data, explicitly accounting for orographic enhancement, and explicitly incorporating the dynamical model components in an advection-diffusion scheme. An evaluation of this model is presented for four rain events collected in the South of France and in the North-East of Italy. Model forecasts are compared with two simple methods: persistence and extrapolation. An additional analysis is performed using an existing mono-dimensional microphysical meteorological model to produce simulated rain events and provide initialization data. Forecasted rainfall produced by the proposed model and the extrapolation method are compared to the simulated events. The results show that the forecast model performance is influenced by rainfall temporal variability and performance is better for less variable rain events. The comparison with the extrapolation method shows that the proposed model performs better than extrapolation in the initial period of the forecast lead-time. It is shown that the performance of the proposed model over the extrapolation method depends essentially on the additional vertical information available from voluminal radar.

  5. Rain/No-Rain Identification from Bispectral Satellite Information using Deep Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Satellite-based precipitation estimation products have the advantage of high resolution and global coverage. However, they still suffer from insufficient accuracy. To accurately estimate precipitation from satellite data, there are two most important aspects: sufficient precipitation information in the satellite information and proper methodologies to extract such information effectively. This study applies the state-of-the-art machine learning methodologies to bispectral satellite information for Rain/No-Rain detection. Specifically, we use deep neural networks to extract features from infrared and water vapor channels and connect it to precipitation identification. To evaluate the effectiveness of the methodology, we first applies it to the infrared data only (Model DL-IR only), the most commonly used inputs for satellite-based precipitation estimation. Then we incorporates water vapor data (Model DL-IR + WV) to further improve the prediction performance. Radar stage IV dataset is used as ground measurement for parameter calibration. The operational product, Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information Using Artificial Neural Networks Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS), is used as a reference to compare the performance of both models in both winter and summer seasons.The experiments show significant improvement for both models in precipitation identification. The overall performance gains in the Critical Success Index (CSI) are 21.60% and 43.66% over the verification periods for Model DL-IR only and Model DL-IR+WV model compared to PERSIANN-CCS, respectively. Moreover, specific case studies show that the water vapor channel information and the deep neural networks effectively help recover a large number of missing precipitation pixels under warm clouds while reducing false alarms under cold clouds.

  6. Aerosols' influence on the interplay between condensation, evaporation and rain in warm cumulus cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Altaratz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical cloud model is used to study the influence of aerosol on the microphysics and dynamics of moderate-sized, coastal, convective clouds that develop under the same meteorological conditions. The results show that polluted convective clouds start their precipitation later and precipitate less than clean clouds but produce larger rain drops. The evaporation process is more significant at the margins of the polluted clouds (compared to the clean cloud due to a higher drop surface area to volume ratio and it is mostly from small drops. It was found that the formation of larger raindrops in the polluted cloud is due to a more efficient collection process.

  7. Basin-wide erosion rates of a relict surface in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau from in-situ produced 10Be in fluvial sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ping; Stroeven, Arjen; Harbor, Jonathan; Heyman, Jakob; Caffee, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Over geological time Earth's surface undergoes radical changes. Few regions display these changes more than the Tibetan Plateau, a dynamic region undergoing changes brought about by tectonic and climatic forcing. Our goal is to quantify surface erosion rates on the Tibetan Plateau. Characterizing the surficial changes and the underlying causes are significant goals that require quantitative tools. With the development of AMS and improved understanding of nuclide production rates, in-situ produced cosmogenic nuclide dating has become increasingly effective for quantifying surface exposure age and erosion rates. Likewise, in-situ cosmogenic 10Be has been successfully to determine basin-wide erosion rates in many geological setting. However, quantifying fluvial erosion rates from glaciated basins using cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in fluvial sediments has limitations because burial by ice and glacial erosion can strongly reduce concentrations or entirely reset the cosmogenic nuclide clock in a landscape, which in turn leads to overestimation of fluvial erosion rates. In this study, we measured 10Be concentrations in river sand samples from both previously glaciated basins and non-glaciated basins, on a low-relief relict surface and the surrounding mountain area, respectively, in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. The results show that fluvial sediments from glaciated basins have higher cosmogenic nuclide concentrations than expected given the deglaciation ages for these basins. Derived basin wide erosion rates are therefore significantly lower for glaciated basins than for non-glaciated basins. We interpret the high cosmogenic nuclide concentrations as a result of nuclide inheritance from before the last glaciation. In contrast to others studies indicating that overestimation of fluvial erosion rates can occur due to glacial erosion, our results suggest that in the case of a formerly glaciated relict surface in southeastern Tibet (largely preserved under non

  8. Acid rain attack on outdoor sculpture in perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Richard A.

    2016-12-01

    A major concern motivating research in acid rain materials effects has been the potential for damage to cultural heritage, particularly outdoor marble and bronze sculpture. However, a combination of field and laboratory studies has failed to show a correlation between rain pH and loss of materials. In order to understand this counterintuitive lack of acid rain effect, an aqueous geochemical modeling approach was used to analyze rain runoff chemistry for the relative importance of acid rain neutralization, dry deposition, and in the case of marble, natural carbonate dissolution. This approach involved the development of pH - SO42- phase diagrams for marble (calcium carbonate) and bronze (copper) under ambient environmental conditions. This then enabled reaction path modeling of the acid neutralization process using the pH range typically found in wet deposition (3.5-6). The results were for marble that the theoretical maximum amount of Ca2+ ion that could be lost due acid rain neutralization would be 0.158 mmol/l compared to 10.5 mmol/l by dry deposition, and for bronze, the Cu2+ ion losses would be 0.21 mmol/l and 47.3 mmol/l respectively. Consequently dry deposition effects on these materials have the potential to dominate over wet deposition effects. To test these predictions the geochemical models were applied to examples of data sets from mass balance (runoff vs rainfall) studies on a marble statue in New York City and some bronze memorial plaques at Gettysburg PA. Although these data sets were collected in the early 1980s they remain valid for demonstrating the mass balance method. For the marble statue, the mean Ca2+ losses by dry deposition was about 69% of the total compared 0.3% for acid rain neutralization, which was less than the natural carbonate dissolution losses of 0.8%. For the bronze, the mean Cu2+ losses were 70.6% by SO42- dry deposition and 23% by NO3- dry deposition compared to 6.4% by acid rain neutralization. Thus for both cases the wet

  9. Biomass burning in the Amazon-fertilizer for the mountaineous rain forest in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Peter; Kohlpaintner, Michael; Rollenbeck, Ruetger

    2005-09-01

    Biomass burning is a source of carbon, sulfur and nitrogen compounds which, along with their photochemically generated reaction products, can be transported over very long distances, even traversing oceans. Chemical analyses of rain and fogwater samples collected in the mountaineous rain forest of south Ecuador show frequent episodes of high sulfate and nitrate concentration, from which annual deposition rates are derived comparable to those found in polluted central Europe. As significant anthropogenic sources are lacking at the research site it is suspected that biomass burning upwind in the Amazon basin is the major source of the enhanced sulfate and nitrate imput. Regular rain and fogwater sampling along an altitude profile between 1800 and 3185 m has been carried out in the Podocarpus National Park close to the Rio SanFrancisco (3 degrees 58'S, 79 degrees 5'W) in southern Ecuador. pH values, electrical conductivity and chemical ion composition were measured at the TUM-WZW using standard methods. Results reported cover over one year from March 2002 until May 2003. Annual deposition rates of sulfate were calculated ranging between 4 and 13 kg S/ha year, almost as high as in polluted central Europe. Nitrogen deposition via ammonia (1.5-4.4 kg N/ha year) and nitrate (0.5-0.8 kg N/ha year) was found to be lower but still much higher than to be expected in such pristine natural forest environment. By means of back trajectory analyses it can be shown that most of the enhanced sulfur and nitrogen deposition is most likely due to forest fires far upwind of the ecuadorian sampling site, showing a seasonal variation, with sources predominantly found in the East/North East during January-March (Colombia, Venezuala, Northern Brazil) and East/SouthEast during July-September (Peru, Brazil). Our results show that biomass burning in the Amazon basin is the predominant source of sulfur and nitrogen compounds that fertilize the mountaineous rain forest in south Ecuador. The

  10. Assessment of rain water chemistry in the Lucknow metropolitan city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Purnima; Rai, Vibhuti

    2018-05-01

    Lucknow metropolitan city is one of the most populated cities of India, which have been facing many problems such as chaotic urbanization, overpopulation, water scarcity, waterlogging, etc., among these water scarcity is one of the important problem. Rain water harvesting is a futuristic tool for mitigation of water scarcity problem through conservation and storage of rain water. This rain water can be used for all purposes by human beings, thus it is necessary to check the chemistry of rain water. The rain water samples were collected from the five zones of Lucknow city. For the comparative study, water samples have been collected from two different dates first from first rainfall and second after 3 days of interval in the second rainfall. The heavy metal concentrations were found in both first and second rainfall water samples in all zones of Lucknow city. The concentration of chromium, cadmium and lead were found to be sufficiently high in several samples. These heavy metals show the concentration above the permissible limit as set by WHO, which can cause various adverse health impacts.

  11. [Relationship between simulated acid rain stress and leaf reflectance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-dong; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Shu-quan; Zhou, Guo-mo; Jiang, Zi-shan

    2010-01-01

    Acid rain is a worldwide environmental problem. Serious acid rain pollution in subtropical China has constituted a potential threat to the health of the local forest. In the present paper, the changing properties of the chlorophyll concentration and spectral reflectance at the visible wavelengths for the six subtropical broad-leaved tree species leaves under simulated acid rain (SAR) treatment with different pH levels were studied. With the increasing strength of the SAR, the chlorophyll concentrations of the experimental species under pH 2.5 and pH 4.0 treatment were higher than that under pH 5.6; the spectral reflectance at the visible wavelengths for pH 2.5 and pH 4.0 were lower than that for pH 5.6 in general; while there weren't significant differences between pH 2.5 and pH 4.0. After the treatment with different levels of SAR, the differences in spectral reflectance at the visible wavelengths mainly focused around the green peak and red edge on the reflectance curve. The subtropical broad-leaved tree species studied were relatively not sensitive to acid rain stresses; some stronger acid rain may accelerate the growth of the tree species used here to some extent.

  12. Endangerment of cultural heritage sites by strong rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauß, Thomas; Fischer, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Due to climate change extreme weather conditions become more and more frequent in the last years. Especially in Germany nearly every year a large flood event happens. Most of these events are caused by strong rain. There are at most two causes for these floodings: The first is locally strong rain in the area of damage, the second happens at damage sites located near confluxes and strong rain in the upper stream areas of the joining rivers. The amount of damage is often strongly correlated with unreasonable designation of new construction in such endangered regions. Our presented study is based on an earlier project together with a German insurance company. In this project we analyzed correlations of geographical settings with the insurance data of flood damages over ten years. The result of this study was a strong relation of the terrain with the amount and the probability of damages. Further investigations allow us to derive a system for estimating potential endangerment due to strong rain just from suitable digital terrain models (DTMs). In the presented study we apply this method to different types of cultural heritage (CH) sites in Germany and other parts of the world to detect which type of CH sites were build with potential endangerment of strong rain events in mind and which ones are prone to such events.

  13. The regional costs and benefits of acid rain control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkman, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    Congress recently enacted acid rain control legislation as part of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments following a decade-long debate among disparate regional interests. Although Congress succeeded in drafting a law acceptable to all regions, the regional costs and benefits of the legislation remain uncertain. The research presented here attempts to estimate the regional costs and benefits and the economic impacts of acid rain controls. These estimates are made using a modeling system composed of econometric, linear programming and input-output models. The econometric and linear programming components describe markets for electricity and coal. The outputs of these components including capital investment, electricity demand, and coal production are taken as exogenous inputs by a multiregional input-output model. The input-output model produces estimates of changes in final demand, gross output, and employment. The utility linear programming model also predicts sulfur dioxide emissions (an acid-rain precursor). According to model simulations, the costs of acid rain control exceed the benefits for many regions including several regions customarily thought to be the major beneficiaries of acid rain control such as New England

  14. Forecasting of rain-on-snow events in alpine region using a fully coupled atmosphere/snowpack/hydrology model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vionnet, V.; Fortin, V.; Dimitrijevic, M.; Abrahamowicz, M.; Gauthier, N.; Garnaud, C.; Bélair, S.; Milbrandt, J.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Rain-on-snow (ROS) events occur when rain falls on a snowpack and present a strong flooding potential. An accurate estimation of the amount and timing of snowpack runoff is crucial for hydro-meteorological forecasters and remains a challenge. Indeed, during ROS events, snowpack runoff is strongly influenced by the complex evolution of meteorological and snowpack conditions. In this study, the ability of the distributed hydrology platform GEM-Hydro to forecast hydro-meteorological conditions during ROS events in complex terrain is assessed. GEM-Hydro couples the GEM (Global Environmental Multi-scale) atmospheric model with the SVS (Soil, Vegetation and Snow) land-surface scheme and the WATROUTE routing scheme. GEM-Hydro is applied to the ROS event of 19-22 June 2013 in the Canadian Rockies that contributed to the devastating streamflow observed in Calgary (Alberta, Canada) and the surrounding region. A substantial snowpack remained at high elevations in the region due to a late May snowfall, snow redistribution by wind and avalanches and relatively cool spring temperatures. Relatively warm rainfall at the beginning of the storm changed to snowfall towards the end, resulting in a complex ROS and snow accumulation event. The impact of model resolution on the quality of the forecast is firstly tested using three configurations of the system at 2.5, 1 and 0.25 km. The sensitivity to horizontal resolution of simulated wind-driven turbulent energy fluxes between the atmosphere and snow surface is especially discussed since these fluxes often drive the high melt rates during ROS events. Additional simulations with a version of SVS including the multi-layer snowpack scheme Explicit Snow (SVS-ES) have then been carried out and compared to results obtained with the default version of SVS featuring a single layer snow scheme. In particular, the impact of the initialization of snowpack variables on simulated runoff is presented. This work is the first step towards the

  15. Aerosol size-dependent below-cloud scavenging by rain and snow in the ECHAM5-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Posselt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Wet deposition processes are highly efficient in the removal of aerosols from the atmosphere, and thus strongly influence global aerosol concentrations, and clouds, and their respective radiative forcings. In this study, physically detailed size-dependent below-cloud scavenging parameterizations for rain and snow are implemented in the ECHAM5-HAM global aerosol-climate model. Previously, below-cloud scavenging by rain in the ECHAM5-HAM was simply a function of the aerosol mode, and then scaled by the rainfall rate. The below-cloud scavenging by snow was a function of the snowfall rate alone. The global mean aerosol optical depth, and sea salt burden are sensitive to the below-cloud scavenging coefficients, with reductions near to 15% when the more vigorous size-dependent below-cloud scavenging by rain and snow is implemented. The inclusion of a prognostic rain scheme significantly reduces the fractional importance of below-cloud scavenging since there is higher evaporation in the lower troposphere, increasing the global mean sea salt burden by almost 15%. Thermophoretic effects are shown to produce increases in the global and annual mean number removal of Aitken size particles of near to 10%, but very small increases (near 1% in the global mean below-cloud mass scavenging of carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols. Changes in the assumptions about the below-cloud scavenging by rain of particles with radius smaller than 10 nm do not cause any significant changes to the global and annual mean aerosol mass or number burdens, despite a change in the below-cloud number removal rate for nucleation mode particles by near to five-fold. Annual and zonal mean nucleation mode number concentrations are enhanced by up to 30% in the lower troposphere with the more vigourous size-dependent below-cloud scavenging. Closer agreement with different observations is found when the more physically detailed below-cloud scavenging parameterization is employed in the ECHAM5

  16. Impacts of simulated acid rain on recalcitrance of two different soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhongmin; Liu, Xingmei; Wu, Jianjun; Xu, Jianming

    2013-06-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to estimate the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) on recalcitrance in a Plinthudult and a Paleudalfs soil in south China, which were a variable and a permanent charge soil, respectively. Simulated acid rains were prepared at pH 2.0, 3.5, 5.0, and 6.0, by additions of different volumes of H2SO4 plus HNO3 at a ratio of 6 to 1. The leaching period was designed to represent 5 years of local annual rainfall (1,200 mm) with a 33 % surface runoff loss. Both soils underwent both acidification stages of (1) cation exchange and (2) mineral weathering at SAR pH 2.0, whereas only cation exchange occurred above SAR pH 3.5, i.e., weathering did not commence. The cation exchange stage was more easily changed into that of mineral weathering in the Plinthudult than in the Paleudalfs soil, and there were some K(+) and Mg(2+) ions released on the stages of mineral weathering in the Paleudalfs soil. During the leaching, the release of exchangeable base cations followed the order Ca(2+) >K(+) >Mg(2+) >Na(+) for the Plinthudult and Ca(2+) >Mg(2+) >Na(+) >K(+) for the Paleudalfs soil. The SARs above pH 3.5 did not decrease soil pH or pH buffering capacity, while the SAR at pH 2.0 decreased soil pH and the buffering capacity significantly. We conclude that acid rain, which always has a pH from 3.5 to 5.6, only makes a small contribution to the acidification of agricultural soils of south China in the short term of 5 years. Also, Paleudalfs soils are more resistant to acid rain than Plinthudult soils. The different abilities to prevent leaching by acid rain depend upon the parent materials, types of clay minerals, and soil development degrees.

  17. Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis on the Rain-Wind-Induced Vibration of Cable Considering the Equilibrium Position of Rivulet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xijun Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear dynamic behavior of rain-wind-induced vibration of inclined cable is investigated with the consideration of the equilibrium position of the moving rivulet. The partial differential governing equations of three-degree-of-freedom on the model of rain-wind-induced cable vibration are established, which are proposed for describing the nonlinear interactions among the in-plane, out-of-plane vibration of the cable and the oscillation of the moving rivulet. The Galerkin method is applied to discretize the partial differential governing equations. The approximately analytic solution is obtained by using the method of averaging. The unique correspondence between the wind and the equilibrium position of the rivulet is ascertained. The presence of rivulet at certain positions on the surface of cable is then proved to be one of the trigger for wind-rain-induced cable vibration. The nonlinear dynamic phenomena of the inclined cable subjected to wind and rain turbulence are then studied by varying the parameters including mean wind velocity, Coulomb damping force, damping ratio, the span length, and the initial tension of the inclined cable on the model. The jump phenomenon is also observed which occurs when there are multiple solutions in the system.