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Sample records for surface radius experiments

  1. Topographic matching of distal radius and proximal fibula articular surface for distal radius osteoarticular reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Chen, S; Wang, Z; Guo, Y; Liu, B; Tong, D

    2016-07-01

    During osteoarticular reconstruction of the distal radius with the proximal fibula, congruity between the two articular surfaces is an important factor in determining the quality of the outcome. In this study, a three-dimensional model and a coordinate transformation algorithm were developed on computed tomography scanning. Articular surface matching was performed and parameters for the optimal position were determined quantitatively. The mean radii of best-fit spheres of the articular surfaces of the distal radius and proximal fibula were compared quantitatively. The radial inclination and volar tilt following reconstruction by an ipsilateral fibula graft, rather than the contralateral, best resembles the values of the native distal radius. Additionally, the ipsilateral fibula graft reconstructed a larger proportion of the distal radius articular surface than did the contralateral. The ipsilateral proximal fibula graft provides a better match for the reconstruction of the distal radius articular surface than the contralateral, and the optimal position for graft placement is quantitatively determined. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. The PRad experiment and the proton radius puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasparian Ashot

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available New results from the recent muonic hydrogen experiments seriously questioned our knowledge of the proton charge radius, rp. The new value, with its unprecedented less than sub-percent precision, is currently up to eight standard deviation smaller than the average value from all previous experiments, triggering the well-known “proton charge radius puzzle” in nuclear and atomic physics. The PRad collaboration is currently preparing a novel, magnetic-spectrometer-free ep scattering experiment in Hall B at JLab for a new independent rp measurement to address this growing “puzzle” in physics.

  3. Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, C.; Gao, H.

    2016-03-01

    The puzzle of proton charge radius was recently raised by the measurement of muonic hydrogen Lamb shift at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), whose results were seven standard deviations smaller than the CODATA recommended value. To investigate this discrepancy, the PRad experiment was proposed and approved at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The experiment will extract the proton charge radius with a sub-percent accuracy by measuring the cross-sections of unpolarized electronproton elastic scattering in an unprecedented low Q2 region (2×10-4 GeV2/c2).

  4. Proton Charge Radius (PRad Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The puzzle of proton charge radius was recently raised by the measurement of muonic hydrogen Lamb shift at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI, whose results were seven standard deviations smaller than the CODATA recommended value. To investigate this discrepancy, the PRad experiment was proposed and approved at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab. The experiment will extract the proton charge radius with a sub-percent accuracy by measuring the cross-sections of unpolarized electronproton elastic scattering in an unprecedented low Q2 region (2×10−4 GeV2/c2.

  5. Pool boiling from downward-facing curved surfaces: Effects of radius of curvature and edge angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Gao, C.

    1996-01-01

    Transient pool boiling from downward-facing curved surfaces in water is of interest for assessing the coolability of the lower head of an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) pressure vessel following a core meltdown accident. Here, quenching experiments were performed to investigate the effects of radius of curvature and edge angle on pool boiling from downwards-facing surfaces in saturated power. The experiments employed two, 20-mm-thick copper test sections that had the same diameter (75 mm) but different surface radii (148 and 218.5 mm) and vapor release (or edge) angles (14.68 and 9.88 deg). The effect of surface area on pool boiling was determined by comparing the present results with the results for a copper section that was of the same thickness but had a surface radius of 148 mm and was less than one-half the surface area. The maximum heat flux (q MHF ) was highest at the lowermost position and decreased with increased local inclination on the surface. Both local and surface average q MHF were representative of quasi-steady-state critical heat flux. The high edge angle reduced vapor accumulation, which enhanced surface coolability and shortened its quenching time. For an edge angle of 9.88 deg, increasing the surface area (or surface radius) insignificantly affected the local q MHF near the edge of the copper section but lowered it everywhere else by ∼10%. For the same surface area, the larger edge angle (or smaller surface radius) increased q MHF by as much as 40%

  6. The Proton Radius Experiment at Jefferson Lab (PRad)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparian, Ashot

    2017-09-01

    The proton charge radius (Rp) is one of the most fundamental quantities in physics. Precision knowledge of its value is critically important for both nuclear and atomic physics - especially for the spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Recent high precision measurements of Rp using the muonic hydrogen atom demonstrated up to eight standard deviation smaller value than the accepted average from all previous experiments performed with different methods. This fact triggered the well known ``Proton Charge Radius Puzzle'' in hadronic physics. The PRad collaboration at Jefferson Lab for the last five years developed a novel magnetic-spectrometer-free e-p scattering experiment to address this puzzle. The experiment was successfully performed in May and June of 2016 with taking high statistics and rich experimental data. The specifics of the experiment together with the preliminary physics results from the data analysis process will be presented and discussed in this talk. PRad is supported in part by NSF MRI Award PHY-1229153, as well as, DOE awards for GEM.

  7. Investigating the Effect of Approach Angle and Nose Radius on Surface Quality of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Dilbag; Kalsi, Nirmal S.

    2017-11-01

    This experimental work presents a surface quality evaluation of a Nickel-Cr-Fe based Inconel 718 superalloy, which has many applications in the aero engine and turbine components. However, during machining, the early wear of tool leads to decrease in surface quality. The coating on cutting tool plays a significant role in increasing the wear resistance and life of the tool. In this work, the aim is to study the surface quality of Inconel 718 with TiAlN-coated carbide tools. Influence of various geometrical parameters (tool nose radius, approach angle) and machining variables (cutting velocity, feed rate) on the quality of machined surface (surface roughness) was determined by using central composite design (CCD) matrix. The mathematical model of the same was developed. Analysis of variance was used to find the significance of the parameters. Results showed that the tool nose radius and feed were the main active factors. The present experiment accomplished that TiAlN-coated carbide inserts result in better surface quality as compared with uncoated carbide inserts.

  8. Experimental and numerical investigation of laser forming of cylindrical surfaces with arbitrary radius of curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Safari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, laser forming of cylindrical surfaces with arbitrary radius of curvature is investigated experimentally and numerically. For laser forming of cylindrical surfaces with arbitrary radius of curvature, a new and comprehensive method is proposed in this paper. This method contains simple linear irradiating lines and using an analytical method, required process parameters for laser forming of a cylindrical surface with a specific radius of curvature is proposed. In this method, laser output power, laser scanning speed and laser beam diameter are selected based on laser machine and process limitations. As in the laser forming of a cylindrical surface, parallel irradiating lines are needed; therefore key parameter for production of a cylindrical surface with a specific radius of curvature is the number of irradiating lines. Hence, in the proposed analytical method, the required number of irradiating lines for production of a cylindrical surface with a specific radius of curvature is suggested. Performance of the proposed method for production of cylindrical surface with a specific radius of curvature is verified with experimental tests. The results show that using proposed analytical method, cylindrical surfaces with any radius of curvature can be produced successfully.

  9. GEM detector performance and efficiency in Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xinzhan; PRad Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was performed in 2016 at Jefferson Lab in Hall B. It aims to investigate the proton charge radius puzzle through electron proton elastic scattering process. The experiment used a non-magnetic spectrometer method, and reached a very small ep scattering angle and thus an unprecedented small four-momentum transfer squared region, Q2 from 2 ×10-4 to 0.06(GeV / c) 2 . PRad experiment was designed to measure the proton charge radius within a sub-percent precision. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors have contributed to reach the experimental goal. A pair of large area GEM detectors, and a large acceptance, high resolution calorimeter(HyCal) were utilized in the experiment to detect the scattered electrons. The precision requirements of the experiment demands a highly accurate understanding of efficiency and stability of GEM detectors. In this talk, we will present the preliminary results on the performance and efficiency of GEM detectors. This work is supported in part by NSF MRI award PHY-1229153, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-07ER41528, No. DE-FG02-03ER41240 and Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory.

  10. Influence of edge radius of sintered-carbide tip on roughness of machined surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing of cutting speed and thus increasing labour productivity is observed as a current trend in engineering production. This effort results to development of new cutting materials which are more capable to resist increased requirements on machined surface as well as operating life of the instrument. Nowadays, the most widely used materials used for cutting instruments are sintered carbides which are alloyed by other metals. The goal of this paper is to analyse change in quality of machined surface depending on the change of cutting conditions. For cutting operation, there were used a milling cutter high-speed steel 90 (HSS and removable sintered-carbide tips with different radius. Steel 12 050 hardened for 17 HRC was used as a machined material. Firstly, hardness of machined as well as machining materials was analysed. Further, metallographic analysis and measurement of microhardness of the individual structure phases was processed. Cutting conditions of both instruments were selected depending on the machined material. Surface roughness indicates the quality of machined surface.

  11. Optical Thickness and Effective Radius Retrievals of Liquid Water Clouds over Ice and Snow Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, S.; King, M. D.; Tsay, S.-C.; Arnold, G. T.; Gerber, H.; Hobbs, P. V.; Rangno, A.

    1999-01-01

    Cloud optical thickness and effective radius retrievals from solar reflectance measurements traditionally depend on a combination of spectral channels that are absorbing and non-absorbing for liquid water droplets. Reflectances in non-absorbing channels (e.g., 0.67, 0.86 micrometer bands) are largely dependent on cloud optical thickness, while longer wavelength absorbing channels (1.6, 2.1, and 3.7 micrometer window bands) provide cloud particle size information. Retrievals are complicated by the presence of an underlying ice/snow surface. At the shorter wavelengths, sea ice is both bright and highly variable, significantly increasing cloud retrieval uncertainty. However, reflectances at the longer wavelengths are relatively small and may be comparable to that of dark open water. Sea ice spectral albedos derived from Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) measurements during April 1992 and June 1995 Arctic field deployments are used to illustrate these statements. A modification to the traditional retrieval technique is devised. The new algorithm uses a combination of absorbing spectral channels for which the snow/ice albedo is relatively small. Using this approach, preliminary retrievals have been made with the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) imager flown aboard the NASA ER-2 during FIRE-ACE. Data from coordinated ER-2 and University of Washington CV-580 aircraft observations of liquid water stratus clouds on June 3 and June 6, 1998 have been examined. Size retrievals are compared with in situ cloud profile measurements of effective radius made with the CV-580 PMS FSSP probe, and optical thickness retrievals are compared with extinction profiles derived from the Gerber Scientific "g-meter" probe. MAS retrievals are shown to be in good agreement with the in situ measurements.

  12. LH2 Target Design & Position Survey Techniques for the MUSE experiment for Precise Proton Radius Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pottier, Luc; Roy, Pryiashee; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Raymond, Richard; Steinberg, Noah; Rossi de La Fuente, Erick; MUSE (MUon proton Scattering Experiment) Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The proton radius puzzle is a currently unresolved problem which has intrigued the scientific community, dealing with a 7 σ discrepancy between the proton radii determined from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy and electron scattering measurements. The MUon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) aims to resolve this puzzle by performing the first simultaneous elastic scattering measurements of both electrons and muons on the proton, which will allow the comparison of the radii from the two interactions with reduced systematic uncertainties. The data from this experiment is expected to provide the best test of lepton universality to date. The experiment will take place at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland in 2018. An essential component of the experiment is a liquid hydrogen (LH2) cryotarget system. Our group at the University of Michigan is responsible for the design, fabrication and installation of this system. Here we present our LH2 target cell design and fabrication techniques for successful operation at 20 K and 1 atm, and our computer vision-based target position survey system which will determine the position of the target, installed inside a vacuum chamber, with 0.01 mm or better precision at the height of the liquid hydrogen target and along the beam direction during the experiment.

  13. Data Analysis and Preliminary Results of the Proton Charge Radius Experiment (PRad) at JLab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Weizhi; Peng, Chao; PRad Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    In order to investigate the proton radius puzzle, the PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was performed in 2016 in Hall B at Jefferson Lab, with 1.1 and 2.2 GeV unpolarized electron beam on a windowless H2 gas flow target. The experiment aims to extract the electric form factor of the proton in an unprecedented low squared momentum transfer region (Q2 = 2 ×10-4 - 0.06(GeV / c) 2), with a sub-percent precision. The PRad experiment utilizes a non-magnetic calorimetric method with a large acceptance and high resolution calorimeter (HyCal), and two large area, high spatial resolution Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors. To control the systematic uncertainties, the absolute e - p elastic scattering cross section is normalized to that of the well-known M øller scattering process, which is measured simultaneously within similar kinematics and experimental acceptances. Both the luminosity and the energy independent part of the detector acceptance and efficiency are canceled out in the ratio. In this talk, we will discuss details of the data analysis and present the preliminary physics results from the 2.2 GeV data. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-03ER41231, NSF MRI award PHY-1229153, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Duke University.

  14. Neutron Skin of 208Pb, Nuclear Symmetry Energy, and the Parity Radius Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Centelles, M.; Vinas, X.; Warda, M.

    2011-01-01

    A precise determination of the neutron skin Δr np of a heavy nucleus sets a basic constraint on the nuclear symmetry energy (Δr np is the difference of the neutron and proton rms radii of the nucleus). The parity radius experiment (PREX) may achieve it by electroweak parity-violating electron scattering (PVES) on 208 Pb. We investigate PVES in nuclear mean field approach to allow the accurate extraction of Δr np of 208 Pb from the parity-violating asymmetry A PV probed in the experiment. We demonstrate a high linear correlation between A PV and Δr np in successful mean field forces as the best means to constrain the neutron skin of 208 Pb from PREX, without assumptions on the neutron density shape. Continuation of the experiment with higher precision in A PV is motivated since the present method can support it to constrain the density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy to new accuracy.

  15. COMBINATION OF FIXATION TECHNIQUES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF COMPLEX DISTAL RADIUS FRACTURE- OUR EXPERIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Sunder Sen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to categorically suggest the apt method of surgical technique for a particular type of distal radius fracture (Frykman’s type III-VI. Distal radius fracture are among the most common fractures of the upper extremity inspite of increased focus on regular prevention of osteoporosis, early identification and its prompt management. Most distal radius fractures are the result of low energy mechanisms that can be successfully treated either nonoperatively or with a variety of operative techniques if indicated. Complex distal radius fractures occur most commonly in high-energy injuries with extensive comminution or bone loss and associated soft tissue or vascular injuries. These high-energy fractures can present challenges in reconstructing the distal radius. Effective restoration of the bony architecture requires a thorough knowledge of distal radius anatomy, understanding of the goals of treatment, versatility in surgical approaches and familiarity with multiple fixation options. Although, majority of the extra-articular fracture without signs of instability can be successfully managed with POP immobilisation for a period of 4-5 weeks followed by active physiotherapy, other types (Frykman’s III-VI need surgical management that too with combination of surgical techniques namely augmented spanning external fixator with supplemented K-wire fixation or external fixation followed by fragment specific volar locking compression plate osteosynthesis. MATERIALS AND METHODS I have studied 50 cases of distal radius fractures classified using Frykman’s classification using combination of techniques namely augmented spanning external fixator application with K-wire supplementation and spanning external fixator application followed by volar LCP fixation in which external fixator had been used as a reduction tool in majority of the cases and external fixator had been removed after plate osteosynthesis. In some cases retained

  16. Reconstruction and Calibration of Small Radius Jets in the ATLAS Experiment for LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Loch, Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Small radius jets with R = 0.4 are standard tools in ATLAS for physics analysis. They are calibrated using a sequence of Monte Carlo simulation-derived calibrations and corrections followed by in-situ calibrations based on the transverse momentum balance between the probed jets and well-measured reference signals. In this talk the inputs to jet reconstruction in LHC Run 2 comprising calorimeter cell clusters, reconstructed charge particle tracks, and particle flow objects, are discussed together with the jet energy calibration scheme. Selected results from the performance of the procedure and the associated systematic uncertainties are presented.

  17. Measurements of the toroidal plasma rotation velocity in TFTR major-radius compression experiments with auxiliary neutral beam heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitter, M.; Wong, K.L.; Scott, S.; Hsuan, H.; Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; Tait, G.

    1990-01-01

    The time history of the central toroidal plasma rotation velocity in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experiments [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2587 (1985)] with auxiliary heating by neutral deuterium beam injection and major-radius compression has been measured from the Doppler shift of the emitted Ti XXI Kα line radiation. The experiments were conducted for neutral beam powers in the range 2.1--3.8 MW and line-averaged densities in the range 1.8--3.0x10 19 m -2 . The observed rotation velocity increase during compression is consistent with theoretical estimates

  18. Short-radius horizontal well re-entry learning curve: prize, cost and operational experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boote, K. [Ocelot Energy Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); MacDonald, R. [Lauron Engineering Ltd, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1997-12-01

    Six mature vertical wells in Alberta belonging to Ocelot Energy Inc., were reentered and drilled horizontally. Experiences gained, the modifications made to the drilling program and the rewards in the form of incremental oil, were discussed. Details of pre- and post-performance, operational experiences with exiting the casing, building the curve, overbalance versus underbalanced drilling, motors, directional equipment, setting liners, remedial workovers and the cost of the operation were part of the discussion.

  19. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  20. Configuration design and accuracy analysis of a novel magneto rheological finishing machine tool for concave surfaces with small radius of curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Henan; Chen, Mingjun; Yu, Bo; Zhen, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a computer-controlled deterministic polishing technique that is widely used in the production of high-quality optics. In order to overcome the defects of existing MRF processes that are unable to achieve concave surfaces with small radius of curvature, a configuration method of a novel structured MRF machine tool using small ball-end permanent-magnet polishing head is proposed in this paper. The preliminary design focuses on the structural configuration of the machine, which includes the machine body, motion units and accessory equipment, and so on. Structural deformation and fabrication accuracy of the machine are analyzed theoretically, in which the reasonable structure sizes, manufacturing errors and assembly errors of main structural components are given for configuration optimization. Based on the theoretical analysis, a four-axes linkage MRF machine tool is developed. Preliminary experiments of spot polishing are carried out and the results indicate that the proposed MRF process can achieve stable polishing area which meets requirement of deterministic polishing. A typical small-bore complex component is polished on the developed device and fine surface quality is obtained with sphericity of the finished spherical surfaces 1.3 μm and surface roughness Ra less than 0.018 μm.

  1. Effect of myopic adolescents wearing orthokeratology lens on the corneal surface curvature radius and anterior chamber depth

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    Qian Yu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the effect of myopic adolescents wearing orthokeratology lens on the corneal surface curvature radius and anterior chamber depth. METHODS: Totally 120 cases of adolescent myopia were selected, among them 58 cases with 116 eyes were divided into 11-14 years old group and 62 cases with 124 eyes were 15-18 years old group according to the age. They were treated with long-term orthokeratology lens treatment, and two groups of patients were observed before wearing lens(T0, wearing for 6mo(T1, 12mo(T2for uncorrected visual acuity, the average refractive degree improvement, the central corneal thickness, corneal curvature changes and the incidence of complications. RESULTS: The uncorrected visual acuity of the two groups at 12mo after wearing were better than that at 6mo which was better than that before wearing; the diopter had the same trend. The uncorrected visual acuity and the diopter of the 11-14 years old group at 6 and 12mo was better than those of 15-18 years old group with significant difference(PP>0.05. The corneal anterior surface curvature of the two groups at 12mo after wearing were more than that at 6mo which was more than that before wearing. The axial length of the 11-14 years old group was longer than that of the 15-18 years old group with significant difference(PP>0.05. There was no significant difference on the anterior chamber depth between the two groups at different time or between before and after wearing(P>0.05.CONCLUSION: Long-term wearing orthokeratology lenses have a significant effect for control ling juvenile myopia, and can improve the corneal anterior surface curvature, especially in the lower age group, and has no significant effect on the anterior chamber depth.

  2. Expressions of the radius and the surface tension of surface of tension in terms of the pressure distribution for nanoscale liquid threads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Hong; Wei Jiu-An; Cui Shu-Wen; Zhu Ru-Zeng

    2013-01-01

    The expressions of the radius and the surface tension of surface of tension R s and γ s in terms of the pressure distribution for nanoscale liquid threads are of great importance for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the interfacial phenomena of nanoscale fluids; these two basic expressions are derived in this paper. Although these expressions were derived first in the literature [Kim B G, Lee J S, Han M H, and Park S, 2006 Nanoscale and Microscale Thermophysical Engineering, 10, 283] and used widely thereafter, the derivation is wrong both in logical structure and physical thought. In view of the importance of these basic expressions, the logic and physical mistakes appearing in that derivation are pointed out. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  3. Radius of proximal isovelocity surface area in the assessment of rheumatic mitral stenosis: Connecting flow to anatomy and hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Alaa Mabrouk Salem; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ahmed; Raslan, Hala; Rifaie, Osama

    2015-10-01

    Echocardiographic assessment of left atrial pressure (LAP) in mitral stenosis (MS) is controversial. We sought to examine the role of the radius of the proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA-r) in the assessment of the hemodynamic status of MS after fixing the aliasing velocity (Val). We studied 42 candidates of balloon mitral valvuloplasty (BMV), for whom pre-BMV echocardiography was done and LAP invasively measured before dilatation. PISA-r was calculated after fixing aliasing velocity to 33 cm/s. In addition, the ratio IVRT/Te'-E was also measured, where IVRT was isovolumic relaxation time, and Te'-E was the time difference between the onset of mitral flow E-wave and mitral annular early diastolic velocity. IVRT/Te'-E and PISA-r showed a strong correlation with LAP (r = -0.715 and -0.637, all p < 0.001) and with right-sided pressures. In addition, PISA-r correlated with mitral valve area by planimetry method (MVA) and with left ventricular outflow tract stroke volume (r = 0.66 and 0.71, all p < 0.001). Receiver operator characteristic curve (ROC-curve) showed that PISA-r was not inferior to IVRT/Te'-E in differentiating LAP ⩾25 from <25 mmHg. Provided that Val is set to a constant of 33 cm/s, PISA-r can assess the hemodynamic status of MS, and seems a simple alternative to the tedious IVRT/Te'-E for estimation of LAP.

  4. Critical radius for nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexiades, V.; Solomon, A.D.

    1986-04-01

    The free energy of formation and the critical radius for homogeneous nucleation of a spherical nucleus in supercooled liquid, at given temperature and ambient pressure, are determined, taking fully into account surface area, curvature, and pressure effects. The specific heats and densities of the two phases are allowed to be different and all thermophysical properties are temperature dependent. In the simple case in which classical nucleation theory is valid, the results predict a critical radius of about 40% larger than the classical value, and an activation energy barrier of almost three times larger than the classical value. 8 refs.

  5. A spectral method for retrieving cloud optical thickness and effective radius from surface-based transmittance measurements

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    P. J. McBride

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new spectral method for the retrieval of optical thickness and effective radius from cloud transmittance that relies on the spectral slope of the normalized transmittance between 1565 nm and 1634 nm, and on cloud transmittance at a visible wavelength. The standard dual-wavelength technique, which is traditionally used in reflectance-based retrievals, is ill-suited for transmittance because it lacks sensitivity to effective radius, especially for optically thin clouds. Using the spectral slope rather than the transmittance itself enhances the sensitivity of transmittance observations with respect to the effective radius. This is demonstrated by applying it to the moderate spectral resolution observations from the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR and Shortwave Spectroradiometer (SWS, and by examining the retrieval uncertainties of the standard and the spectral method for data from the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP site and a NOAA ship cruise (ICEALOT. The liquid water path (LWP is derived from the retrieved optical thickness and effective radius, based on two different assumptions about the cloud vertical profile, and compared to the simultaneous observations from a microwave radiometer. Optical thickness and effective radius is also compared to MODIS retrievals. In general, the effective radius uncertainties were much larger for the standard retrieval than for the spectral retrieval, particularly for thin clouds. When defining 2 μm as upper limit for the tolerable uncertainty of the effective radius, the standard method returned only very few valid retrievals for clouds with an optical thickness below 25. For the analyzed ICEALOT data (mean optical thickness 23, the spectral method provided valid retrievals for 84 % of the data (24 % for the standard method. For the SGP data (mean optical thickness 44, both methods provided a high return of 90 % for the spectral method and 78 % for the standard method.

  6. A Method to Estimate the Probability That Any Individual Lightning Stroke Contacted the Surface Within Any Radius of Any Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.; Roeder, William; Merceret, Francis J.

    2010-01-01

    A technique has been developed to calculate the probability that any nearby lightning stroke is within any radius of any point of interest. In practice, this provides the probability that a nearby lightning stroke was within a key distance of a facility, rather than the error ellipses centered on the stroke. This process takes the current bivariate Gaussian distribution of probability density provided by the current lightning location error ellipse for the most likely location of a lightning stroke and integrates it to get the probability that the stroke is inside any specified radius. This new facility-centric technique will be much more useful to the space launch customers and may supersede the lightning error ellipse approach discussed in [5], [6].

  7. Near-surface heater experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, L.D.; Cuderman, J.F.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Lappin, A.

    1978-12-31

    Full-scale near-surface heater experiments are presently being conducted by Sandia Laboratories in the Conasauga Formation at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and in the Eleana Formation on the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purposes of these experiments are: (1) to determine if argillaceous media can withstand thermal loads characteristic of high level waste; (2) to provide data for improvement of themomechanical modeling of argillaceous rocks; (3) to identify instrumentation development needed for further in situ testing; and (4) to identify unexpected general types of behavior, if any. The basic instrumentation of these tests consists of a heater in a central hole, surrounded by arrays of holes containing various instrumentation. Temperatures, thermal profiles, vertical displacements, volatile pressurization, and changes in in situ stresses are measured in each experiment as a function of time, and compared with pretest modeling results. Results to date, though in general agreement with modeling results assuming conductive heat transfer within the rock, indicate that the presence of even small amounts of water can drastically affect heat transfer within the heater hole itself, and that small amounts of upward convection of water may be occurring in the higher temperature areas of the Conasauga experiments.

  8. The proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonesini, Maurizio

    2017-12-01

    The FAMU (Fisica degli Atomi Muonici) experiment has the goal to measure precisely the proton Zemach radius, thus contributing to the solution of the so-called proton radius "puzzle". To this aim, it makes use of a high-intensity pulsed muon beam at RIKEN-RAL impinging on a cryogenic hydrogen target with an high-Z gas admixture and a tunable mid-IR high power laser, to measure the hyperfine (HFS) splitting of the 1S state of the muonic hydrogen. From the value of the exciting laser frequency, the energy of the HFS transition may be derived with high precision ( 10-5) and thus, via QED calculations, the Zemach radius of the proton. The experimental apparatus includes a precise fiber-SiPMT beam hodoscope and a crown of eight LaBr3 crystals and a few HPGe detectors for detection of the emitted characteristic X-rays. Preliminary runs to optimize the gas target filling and its operating conditions have been taken in 2014 and 2015-2016. The final run, with the pump laser to drive the HFS transition, is expected in 2018.

  9. Antiproton charge radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D.; Heiss, M. W.

    2016-09-01

    The upcoming operation of the extra low energy antiprotons ring at CERN, the upgrade of the antiproton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of 1 08 e+ /s will open the possibility for new experiments with antihydrogen (H ¯). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of H ¯. For four months of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of C P T and the first determination of the antiproton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  10. Surface-induced effects in fluctuation-based measurements of single-polymer elasticity: A direct probe of the radius of gyration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes-Gold, Sarah N.; Morgan, Ian L.; Saleh, Omar A.

    2018-03-01

    Single-molecule measurements of polymer elasticity are powerful, direct probes of both biomolecular structure and principles of polymer physics. Recent work has revealed low-force regimes in which biopolymer elasticity is understood through blob-based scaling models. However, the small tensions required to observe these regimes have the potential to create measurement biases, particularly due to the increased interactions of the polymer chain with tethering surfaces. Here, we examine one experimentally observed bias, in which fluctuation-based estimates of elasticity report an unexpectedly low chain compliance. We show that the effect is in good agreement with predictions based on quantifying the exclusion effect of the surface through an image-method calculation of available polymer configurations. The analysis indicates that the effect occurs at an external tension inversely proportional to the polymer's zero-tension radius of gyration. We exploit this to demonstrate a self-consistent scheme for estimating the radius of gyration of the tethered polymer. This is shown in measurements of both hyaluronic acid and poly(ethylene glycol) chains.

  11. A Laboratory Experiment to Demonstrate the Principles of Sedimentation in a Centrifuge: Estimation of Radius and Settling Velocity of Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Erin; Felse, P. Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Centrifugation is a major unit operation in chemical and biotechnology industries. Here we present a simple, hands-on laboratory experiment to teach the basic principles of centrifugation and to explore the shear effects of centrifugation using bacterial cells as model particles. This experiment provides training in the use of a bench-top…

  12. Puzzling out the proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihovilovič, M.; Merkel, H.; Weber, A.

    2016-01-01

    The discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurement and the best present value obtained from the elastic scattering experiments, remains unexplained and represents a burning problem of today's nuclear physics: after more than 50 years of research the radius of a basic constituent of matter is still not understood. This paper presents a summary of the best existing proton radius measurements, followed by an overview of the possible explanations for the observed inconsistency between the hydrogen and the muonic-hydrogen data. In the last part the upcoming experiments, dedicated to remeasuring the proton radius, are described.

  13. Puzzling out the proton radius puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihovilovič Miha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurement and the best present value obtained from the elastic scattering experiments, remains unexplained and represents a burning problem of today’s nuclear physics: after more than 50 years of research the radius of a basic constituent of matter is still not understood. This paper presents a summary of the best existing proton radius measurements, followed by an overview of the possible explanations for the observed inconsistency between the hydrogen and the muonic-hydrogen data. In the last part the upcoming experiments, dedicated to remeasuring the proton radius, are described.

  14. Spectral radius of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Stevanovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Spectral Radius of Graphs provides a thorough overview of important results on the spectral radius of adjacency matrix of graphs that have appeared in the literature in the preceding ten years, most of them with proofs, and including some previously unpublished results of the author. The primer begins with a brief classical review, in order to provide the reader with a foundation for the subsequent chapters. Topics covered include spectral decomposition, the Perron-Frobenius theorem, the Rayleigh quotient, the Weyl inequalities, and the Interlacing theorem. From this introduction, the

  15. Multipactor experiment on a dielectric surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rex Beach, III

    2001-12-01

    Multipactor is an electron multiplication process, or electron avalanche, that occurs on metallic and dielectric surfaces in the presence of rf microwave fields. Just as a rock avalanche only needs one rock to cause a larger slide of destruction, one electron under multipactor conditions can cause a tremendous amount of damage to electrical components. Multipactor is a nuisance that can cause excessive noise in communication satellites and radar, and damage to vacuum windows in particle accelerators. Single-surface multipactor on dielectrics is responsible for poor transmission properties of vacuum windows and can eventually lead to vacuum window failure. The repercussions of multipactor affect a wide range of people. For example, a civilian placing a call on a cell phone, or a captain dependent on radar for his ship's safety could both be affected by multipactor. In order to combat this expensive annoyance, a unique experiment to investigate single-surface multipactor on a dielectric surface was developed and tested. The motivation of this thesis is to introduce a novel experiment for multipactor that is designed to verify theoretical calculations and explore the physics behind the phenomenon. The compact apparatus consists of a small brass microwave cavity in a high vacuum system. Most single-surface multipactor experiments consist of a large resonant ring wave guide with a MW power supply. This experiment is the first to utilize a high Q resonant cavity and kW-level power supply to create multipactor on a dielectric surface. The small brass resonant cavity has an inner length of 9.154 cm with an inner diameter of 9.045 cm. A pulsed, variable frequency microwave source at ˜2.4 GHz, 2 kW peak excites the TE111 mode with a strong electric field parallel to a dielectric plate (˜0.2 cm thickness) that is inserted at the mid-plane of the cavity. The microwave pulses from the power supply are monitored by calibrated microwave diodes. These calibrated diodes along

  16. Track Reconstruction and the Proton Radius Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Steven; Cline, Ethan; Gilman, Ron; MUSE Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    In 2010, Pohl et al. measured the proton charge radius to be 0.84184(67) fm using muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. This value differs about 5 σ from the CODATA proton radius from measurements with electrons. Other experiments with muons and electrons have confirmed the difference and the discrepancy has been termed the `Proton Radius Puzzle.' Currently there are no explanations for the puzzle. The MUon proton Scattering Experiment (MUSE) will make a significant measurement of the proton radius with muon scattering for the first time. The experiment tracks elastic scattering of electrons and muons off of liquid hydrogen. Particle tracks are reconstructed with track fitting software GenFit. Using a simulation of MUSE, GenFit has been determined to be proficient at track reconstruction. This project has been supported by funding from National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1560077.

  17. Distal Radius Hemiarthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Brian D; Lawler, Ericka A; Kuhl, Taften L

    2016-08-01

    Due to a higher risk for implant loosening, particularly of the distal component, patients with physically demanding lifestyles are infrequently considered for total wrist arthroplasty (TWA). A distal radius hemiarthroplasty may obviate the need for the strict restrictions recommended for patients treated by TWA, thus providing another surgical option for active patients with severe wrist arthritis, especially those with articular degeneration of the lunate facet of the radius, capitate head, or combination of both, who are not typically candidates for traditional motion-preserving procedures. Eight fresh-frozen cadaver limbs (age range, 43-82 years) with no history of rheumatoid arthritis or upper extremity trauma were used. Radiodense markers were inserted in the radius and hand. Posteroanterior (PA) fluoroscopic images with the wrist in neutral, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation, and lateral images with the wrist in neutral, flexion, and extension were obtained for each specimen before implantation, after distal radius hemiarthroplasty, and after combined hemiarthroplasty and PRC. On the PA images, the capitate remained within 1.42 and 2.21 mm of its native radial-ulnar position following hemiarthroplasty and hemiarthroplasty with PRC, respectively. Lateral images showed the capitate remained within 1.06 mm of its native dorsal-volar position following hemiarthroplasty and within 4.69 mm following hemiarthroplasty with PRC. Following hemiarthroplasty, capitate alignment changed 2.33 and 2.59 mm compared with its native longitudinal alignment on PA and lateral films, respectively. These changes did not reach statistical significance. As expected, significant shortening in longitudinal alignment was seen on both PA and lateral films for hemiarthroplasty with PRC. A distal radius implant hemiarthroplasty with or without a PRC provides good static alignment of the wrist in a cadaver model and thus supports the concept as potential treatment alternatives

  18. Proposal for a minimal surface code experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, James R.; Peter, Andreas; Winkler, János R.; Loss, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Current quantum technology is approaching the system sizes and fidelities required for quantum error correction. It is therefore important to determine exactly what is needed for proof-of-principle experiments, which will be a major step towards fault-tolerant quantum computation. Here we propose a surface code based experiment that is the smallest, both in terms of code size and circuit depth, that would allow errors to be detected and corrected for both the X and Z bases of a qubit. This requires 17 physical qubits initially prepared in a product state, on which 16 two-qubit entangling gates are applied before a final measurement of all qubits. A platform agnostic error model is applied to give some idea of the noise levels required for success. It is found that a true demonstration of quantum error correction will require fidelities for the preparation and measurement of qubits and the entangling gates to be above 99 % .

  19. Prediction of the surface roughness of AA6082 flow-formed tubes by design of experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasulu, M.; Komaraiah, M.; Rao, C. S. Krishna Prasada

    2013-01-01

    Flow forming is a modern, chipless metal forming process that is employed for the production of thin-walled seamless tubes. Experiments are conducted on AA6082 alloy pre-forms to flow form into thin-walled tubes on a CNC flow-forming machine with a single roller. Design of experiments is used to predict the surface roughness of flow-formed tubes. The process parameters selected for this study are the roller axial feed, mandrel speed, and roller radius. A standard response surface methodology (RSM) called the Box Behnken design is used to perform the experimental runs. The regression model developed by RSM successfully predicts the surface roughness of AA6082 flow-formed tubes within the range of the selected process parameters.

  20. Prediction of the surface roughness of AA6082 flow-formed tubes by design of experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasulu, M. [Government Polytechnic for Women Badangpet, Hyderabad (India); Komaraiah, M. [Sreenidhi Institute of Science and Technology, Hyderabad (India); Rao, C. S. Krishna Prasada [Bharat Dynamics Limited, Hyderabad (India)

    2013-06-15

    Flow forming is a modern, chipless metal forming process that is employed for the production of thin-walled seamless tubes. Experiments are conducted on AA6082 alloy pre-forms to flow form into thin-walled tubes on a CNC flow-forming machine with a single roller. Design of experiments is used to predict the surface roughness of flow-formed tubes. The process parameters selected for this study are the roller axial feed, mandrel speed, and roller radius. A standard response surface methodology (RSM) called the Box Behnken design is used to perform the experimental runs. The regression model developed by RSM successfully predicts the surface roughness of AA6082 flow-formed tubes within the range of the selected process parameters.

  1. Computational Analysis of Dual Radius Circulation Control Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Vatsa, V. N.; Rumsey, C. L.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the work is to use multiple codes and multiple configurations to provide an assessment of the capability of RANS solvers to predict circulation control dual radius airfoil performance and also to identify key issues associated with the computational predictions of these configurations that can result in discrepancies in the predicted solutions. Solutions were obtained for the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) dual radius circulation control airfoil and the General Aviation Circulation Control (GACC) dual radius airfoil. For the GTRI-DR airfoil, two-dimensional structured and unstructured grid computations predicted the experimental trend in sectional lift variation with blowing coefficient very well. Good code to code comparisons between the chordwise surface pressure coefficients and the solution streamtraces also indicated that the detailed flow characteristics were matched between the computations. For the GACC-DR airfoil, two-dimensional structured and unstructured grid computations predicted the sectional lift and chordwise pressure distributions accurately at the no blowing condition. However at a moderate blowing coefficient, although the code to code variation was small, the differences between the computations and experiment were significant. Computations were made to investigate the sensitivity of the sectional lift and pressure distributions to some of the experimental and computational parameters, but none of these could entirely account for the differences in the experimental and computational results. Thus, CFD may indeed be adequate as a prediction tool for dual radius CC flows, but limited and difficult to obtain two-dimensional experimental data prevents a confident assessment at this time.

  2. Pisiform malalignment associated with distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Takafumi; Zenke, Yukichi; Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Menuki, Kunitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    2018-03-01

    The association of scaphoid or other carpal bone fractures with distal radius fractures is frequently reported, whereas few studies have described pisiform malalignment associated with distal radius fractures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and characteristics of pisiform malalignment associated with distal radius fractures. We performed a retrospective study by reviewing the data of 152 consecutive patients with a mean age of 63 years who were treated surgically for distal radius fractures during a five-year period. We evaluated the pisotriquetral joint via preoperative sagittal computed tomography (CT) and assessed pisiform malalignment. Pisiform malalignment was defined as follows: (1) wide type, joint space ≥4.0 mm; (2) non-parallel type, loss of parallelism of the joint surface of ≥20°; or (3) overriding type, proximal or distal overriding of the pisotriquetral joint ≥2.0 mm. We investigated the relationship between pisiform malalignment and the patterns of distal radius fractures. Pisiform malalignment was assessed using postoperative CT to determine whether it had been reduced. Pisiform malalignment was observed in 48 cases involving 44 patients with a mean age of 58 (17-81) years. The patients included 16, 17, and 15 cases of the wide type, non-parallel type, and overriding type, respectively. Distal radius fractures with dorsal displacement exhibited pisiform malalignment significantly more frequently than those with volar displacement. No significant difference was noted between intra- and extra-articular fractures or between patients with and without distal ulnar fractures. Among the 22 pisiform malalignment cases assessed via postoperative CT, 15 cases were reduced, and 7 cases remained malaligned. The non-parallel type exhibited the lowest reduction rate among the 3 types. Among distal radius fractures, 29% were complicated by pisiform malalignment. Distal radius fractures with dorsal displacement exhibited a

  3. The proton radius puzzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antognini, A; Haensch, T W; Amaro, F D; Cardoso, J M R; Fernandes, L M P; Lopes, J A M; Biraben, F; Indelicato, P; Julien, L; Le Bigot, E-O; Covita, D S; Dax, A; Dhawan, S; Graf, T; Giesen, A; Kao, C-Y; Liu, Y-W; Knowles, P; Ludhova, L; Kottmann, F

    2011-01-01

    By means of pulsed laser spectroscopy applied to muonic hydrogen (μ - p) we have measured the 2S F= 1 1/2 - 2P F= 2 3/2 transition frequency to be 49881.88(76) GHz. By comparing this measurement with its theoretical prediction based on bound-state QED we have determined a proton radius value of r p = 0.84184(67) fm. This new value differs by 5.0 standard deviations from the COD ATA value of 0.8768(69) fm, and 3 standard deviation from the e-p scattering results of 0.897(18) fm. The observed discrepancy may arise from a computational mistake of the energy levels in μp or H, or a fundamental problem in bound-state QED, an unknown effect related to the proton or the muon, or an experimental error.

  4. The proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antognini, A.; Amaro, F. D.; Biraben, F.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Covita, D. S.; Dax, A.; Dhawan, S.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Giesen, A.; Graf, T.; Hänsch, T. W.; Indelicato, P.; Julien, L.; Kao, C.-Y.; Knowles, P.; Kottmann, F.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Liu, Y.-W.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Ludhova, L.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mulhauser, F.; Nebel, T.; Nez, F.; Rabinowitz, P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Schaller, L. A.; Schuhmann, K.; Schwob, C.; Taqqu, D.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Pohl, R.

    2011-09-01

    By means of pulsed laser spectroscopy applied to muonic hydrogen (μ- p) we have measured the 2SF = 11/2 - 2PF = 23/2 transition frequency to be 49881.88(76) GHz [1]. By comparing this measurement with its theoretical prediction [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] based on bound-state QED we have determined a proton radius value of rp = 0.84184(67) fm. This new value differs by 5.0 standard deviations from the COD ATA value of 0.8768(69) fm [8], and 3 standard deviation from the e-p scattering results of 0.897(18) fm [9]. The observed discrepancy may arise from a computational mistake of the energy levels in μp or H, or a fundamental problem in bound-state QED, an unknown effect related to the proton or the muon, or an experimental error.

  5. Anatomic Relationships of the Distal and Proximal Radioulnar Joints Articulating Surface Areas and of the Radius and Ulna Bone Volumes - Implications for Biomechanical Studies of the Distal and Proximal Radioulnar Joints and Forearm Bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Paul S C; Shaw, Oliver G; Lees, Vivien C

    2016-01-01

    Previous work from this laboratory has evidenced the biomechanical role of forearm osseoligamentous structures in load transfer of applied forces. It has shown that forces transmitted across the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) and proximal radioulnar joint (PRUJ) are similar, though not identical, under axial loading conditions. The purpose of the study was to assess the articulating surface areas of the radioulnar joints and the volumes of the forearm bones addressing the hypothesis that there may be anatomic adaptations that reflect the biomechanical function of the integrated forearm unit. The articulating surface areas of PRUJ and DRUJ were assessed using a laser scanner in 24 cadaver forearms. The articulating joint surfaces were additionally delineated from standardized photographs assessed by three observers. The surface areas of matched pairs of joints were compared on the null hypothesis that these were the same within a given forearm specimen. An additional 44 pairs of matched forearm bone volumes were measured using water displacement technique and again compared through statistical analysis (paired sample t-test and Bland-Altman analysis). The findings of this study are that the articulating surface areas of the DRUJ and PRUJ as well as the bone volumes are significantly different and, yet, strongly correlated. The paired sample t-test showed a significant difference between the surface areas of the DRUJ and PRUJ (p radius to ulna bone volume ratio of 0.81. When the olecranon was disregarded, radius volume was on average of 4% greater than ulna volume. This study demonstrates and defines the anatomical relationships between the two forearm bones and their articulating joints when matched for specimen. The data obtained are consistent with the theory of integrated forearm function generated from published biomechanical studies.

  6. Precise measurement of scleral radius using anterior eye profilometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Danilo A; Kedzia, Renata; Iskander, D Robert

    2017-02-01

    To develop a new and precise methodology to measure the scleral radius based on anterior eye surface. Eye Surface Profiler (ESP, Eaglet-Eye, Netherlands) was used to acquire the anterior eye surface of 23 emmetropic subjects aged 28.1±6.6years (mean±standard deviation) ranging from 20 to 45. Scleral radius was obtained based on the approximation of the topographical scleral data to a sphere using least squares fitting and considering the axial length as a reference point. To better understand the role of scleral radius in ocular biometry, measurements of corneal radius, central corneal thickness, anterior chamber depth and white-to-white corneal diameter were acquired with IOLMaster 700 (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Jena, Germany). The estimated scleral radius (11.2±0.3mm) was shown to be highly precise with a coefficient of variation of 0.4%. A statistically significant correlation between axial length and scleral radius (R 2 =0.957, pscleral radius. Lastly, no correlation was observed comparing scleral radius to the central corneal thickness (R 2 =0.047, p=0.161). Three-dimensional topography of anterior eye acquired with Eye Surface Profiler together with a given estimate of the axial length, can be used to calculate the scleral radius with high precision. Copyright © 2016 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of liquid surface tension on circular and linear hydraulic jumps; theory and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Rajesh Kumar; Jha, Narsing Kumar; Linden, Paul F.; Wilson, David Ian

    2017-11-01

    The hydraulic jump has attracted considerable attention since Rayleigh published his account in 1914. Watson (1964) proposed the first satisfactory explanation of the circular hydraulic jump by balancing the momentum and hydrostatic pressure across the jump, but this solution did not explain what actually causes the jump to form. Bohr et al. (1992) showed that the hydraulic jump happens close to the point where the local Froude number equals to one, suggesting a balance between inertial and hydrostatic contributions. Bush & Aristoff (2003) subsequently incorporated the effect of surface tension and showed that this is important when the jump radius is small. In this study, we propose a new account to explain the formation and evolution of hydraulic jumps under conditions where the jump radius is strongly influenced by the liquid surface tension. The theory is compared with experiments employing liquids of different surface tension and different viscosity, in circular and linear configurations. The model predictions and the experimental results show excellent agreement. Commonwealth Scholarship Commission, St. John's college, University of Cambridge.

  8. A Maximum Radius for Habitable Planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibert, Yann

    2015-09-01

    We compute the maximum radius a planet can have in order to fulfill two constraints that are likely necessary conditions for habitability: 1- surface temperature and pressure compatible with the existence of liquid water, and 2- no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean, that would prevent the operation of the geologic carbon cycle to operate. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met: in the Super-Earth mass range (1-12 Mearth), the overall maximum that a planet can have varies between 1.8 and 2.3 Rearth. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios, and taking into account irradiation effects on the structure of the gas envelope.

  9. Theory and experiments on surface diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvestri, W.L.

    1998-11-01

    The following topics were dealt with: adatom formation and self-diffusion on the Ni(100) surface, helium atom scattering measurements, surface-diffusion parameter measurements, embedded atom method calculations.

  10. [Effect of age and anti-osteoporotic drugs on bone strength and structure of the distal radius].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Shigeharu

    2013-07-01

    The distal radius constitutes a proximal part of the wrist joint, which bears axial load from the carpal bones. Based on the biomechanical experiments, the load transmitted from the carpal bones to the distal articular surface of the radius is greater to the lunate fossa than the scaphoid fossa. The findings are consistent with the results obtained from HR-pQCT analysis of the distal radius. As ageing, bone mineral densities of the distal radius decrease, and structures of the cortical and trabecular bones also deteriorate. Such deterioration can be prevented by osteoporotic medicines such as PTH or bisphosphonate. Denosumab has been shown to increase mechanical indices of the bone structure of the distal radius. The distal radius of the individual is fractured when the load over approximately 5 times (2.5SD) of the weight is applied. It is possible to predict load of fracture in the distal radius from the results of DXA derived BMD or HR-pQCT derived bone parameters. We should not miss the opportunity of treatment for osteoporosis when the patients with fragility distal radius fracture are seen.

  11. Anatomic relationships of the distal and proximal radioulnar joints articulating surface areas, and of the radius and ulna bone volumes – implications for biomechanical studies of the distal and proximal radioulnar joints and forearm bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S C Malone

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPrevious work from this laboratory has evidenced the biomechanical role of forearm osseoligamentous structures in load transfer of applied forces. It has shown that transmitted forces across the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ and proximal radioulnar joint (PRUJ are similar though not identical under axial loading conditions. The purpose of the study was to assess the articulating surface areas of the radioulnar joints and the volumes of the forearm bones addressing the hypothesis that there may be anatomic adaptations that reflect the biomechanical function of the integrated forearm unit.MethodsThe articulating surface areas of PRUJ and DRUJ were assessed using a laser scanner in 24 cadaver forearms. The articulating joint surfaces were additionally delineated from standardized photographs assessed by three observers. The surface areas of matched pairs of joints were compared on the null hypothesis that these were the same within a given forearm specimen. An additional 44 pairs of matched forearm bone volumes were measured using water displacement technique and again compared through statistical analysis (paired sample t-test, and Bland Altman analysis.ResultsThe findings of this study are that the articulating surface areas of the DRUJ and PRUJ as well as the bone volumes are significantly different and yet strongly correlated. The paired sample t-test showed a significant difference between the surface areas of the DRUJ and PRUJ (p<0.05. The PRUJ articulating surface area was marginally larger than the DRUJ with a PRUJ : DRUJ ratio of 1.02. Paired sample t-test showed a significant difference between the two bone volumes (p<0.01 with a radius to ulna bone volume ratio of 0.81. When the olecranon was disregarded, radius volume was on average 4% greater than ulna volume.ConclusionsThis study demonstrated defines the anatomical relationships between the two forearm bones and their articulating joints when matched for specimen. The data

  12. Antimonene: Experiments and theory of surface conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Juan Jose; Ares, Pablo; Pakdel, Sahar; Paz, Wendel; Zamora, Felix; Gomez-Herrero, Julio

    Very recently antimony has been demonstrated to be amenable to standard exfoliation procedures opening the possibility of studying the electronic properties of isolated few-layers flakes of this material, a.k.a. antimonene. Antimony is a topological semimetal, meaning that its electronic structure presents spin-split helical states (or Dirac cones) on the surface, but it is still trivially metallic in bulk. Antimonene, on the other hand, may present a much reduced electronic bulk contribution for a small number of layers. A novel technique to make electrical contacts on the surface of individual thin flakes (5-10 monolayers) has allowed us to measure the (surface) conductivity of these in ambient conditions. Our measurements show a high conductivity in the range of 1 - 2e2 / h , which we attribute to the surface Dirac electrons. We have also carried out theoretical work to address the origin of this value, in particular, the importance of scattering between the Dirac electrons and the bulk bands. Our calculations are based on density functional theory for the electronic structure and Kubo formalism for the conductivity, the latter considering random disorder and the presence of water. Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad, Grant FIS2016-80434-P.

  13. Effects of inlet radius and bell mouth radius on flow rate and sound quality of centrifugal blower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Pham Ngoc; Kim, Jae Won; Byun, S. M.; Ahn, E. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of inlet radius and bell mouth radius on flow rate of centrifugal blower were numerically simulated using a commercial CFD program, FLUENT. In this research, a total of eight numerical models were prepared by combining different values of bell mouth radii and inlet radii (the cross section of bell mouth was chosen as a circular arc in this research). The frozen rotor method combined with a realizable k-epsilon turbulence model and non-equilibrium wall function was used to simulate the three-dimensional flow inside the centrifugal blowers. The inlet radius was then revealed to have significant impact on flow rate with the maximum difference between analyzed models was about 4.5% while the bell mouth radius had about 3% impact on flow rate. Parallel experiments were carried out to confirm the results of CFD analysis. The CFD results were thereafter validated owning to the good agreement between CFD results and the parallel experiment results. In addition to performance analysis, noise experiments were carried out to analyze the dependence of sound quality on inlet radius and bell mouth radius with different flow rate. The noise experiment results showed that the loudness and sharpness value of different models were quite similar, which mean the inlet radius and the bell mouth radius didn't have a clear impact on sound quality of centrifugal blower

  14. Boston ocular surface prosthesis: An Indian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Madanlal Rathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Boston ocular surface prosthesis (BOSP is a scleral contact lens used in the management of patients who are rigid gas permeable (RGP failures as with corneal ectasias such as keratoconus and in those patients who have ocular surface disease such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS. Aim: To report utilization of BOSP in a tertiary eye care center in India. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed charts of 32 patients who received BOSP from July 2008 to May 2009. Indications for fitting these lenses, improvement in visual acuity (VA before and after lens fitting and relief of symptoms of pain and photophobia were noted. Paired t-test was used for statistical analysis using SPSS version 16.0 for Windows. Results: Thirty-two patients (43 eyes received these lenses. These consisted of 23 eyes of 17 patients who failed RGP trials for irregular astigmatism and corneal ectasia such as keratoconus and post radial keratotomy and scar and 20 eyes of 15 patients with SJS. Mean age of RGP failures was 27.94 years. Pre- and post-BOSP wear mean LogMAR VA was 1.13 and 0.29, respectively, in RGP failures. The P value was statistically significant (P 2 lines in 7/20 eyes (35% with SJS, with improvement in symptoms. Conclusion: BOSP improves VA in patients who have irregular astigmatism as in ectasias and RGP failures and improves vision and symptoms in patients with SJS.

  15. Boston ocular surface prosthesis: An Indian experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Varsha Madanlal; Mandathara, Preeji Sudharman; Dumpati, Srikanth; Vaddavalli, Pravin K; Sangwan, Virender S

    2011-01-01

    Context: Boston ocular surface prosthesis (BOSP) is a scleral contact lens used in the management of patients who are rigid gas permeable (RGP) failures as with corneal ectasias such as keratoconus and in those patients who have ocular surface disease such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS). Aim: To report utilization of BOSP in a tertiary eye care center in India. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed charts of 32 patients who received BOSP from July 2008 to May 2009. Indications for fitting these lenses, improvement in visual acuity (VA) before and after lens fitting and relief of symptoms of pain and photophobia were noted. Paired t-test was used for statistical analysis using SPSS version 16.0 for Windows. Results: Thirty-two patients (43 eyes) received these lenses. These consisted of 23 eyes of 17 patients who failed RGP trials for irregular astigmatism and corneal ectasia such as keratoconus and post radial keratotomy and scar and 20 eyes of 15 patients with SJS. Mean age of RGP failures was 27.94 years. Pre- and post-BOSP wear mean LogMAR VA was 1.13 and 0.29, respectively, in RGP failures. The P value was statistically significant (P 2 lines in 7/20 eyes (35%) with SJS, with improvement in symptoms. Conclusion: BOSP improves VA in patients who have irregular astigmatism as in ectasias and RGP failures and improves vision and symptoms in patients with SJS. PMID:21666311

  16. Experiments on seismic metamaterials: molding surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brûlé, S; Javelaud, E H; Enoch, S; Guenneau, S

    2014-04-04

    Materials engineered at the micro- and nanometer scales have had a tremendous and lasting impact in photonics and phononics. At much larger scales, natural soils civil engineered at decimeter to meter scales may interact with seismic waves when the global properties of the medium are modified, or alternatively thanks to a seismic metamaterial constituted of a mesh of vertical empty inclusions bored in the initial soil. Here, we show the experimental results of a seismic test carried out using seismic waves generated by a monochromatic vibrocompaction probe. Measurements of the particles' velocities show a modification of the seismic energy distribution in the presence of the metamaterial in agreement with numerical simulations using an approximate plate model. For complex natural materials such as soils, this large-scale experiment was needed to show the practical feasibility of seismic metamaterials and to stress their importance for applications in civil engineering. We anticipate this experiment to be a starting point for smart devices for anthropic and natural vibrations.

  17. Experiments on Seismic Metamaterials: Molding Surface Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brûlé, S.; Javelaud, E. H.; Enoch, S.; Guenneau, S.

    2014-04-01

    Materials engineered at the micro- and nanometer scales have had a tremendous and lasting impact in photonics and phononics. At much larger scales, natural soils civil engineered at decimeter to meter scales may interact with seismic waves when the global properties of the medium are modified, or alternatively thanks to a seismic metamaterial constituted of a mesh of vertical empty inclusions bored in the initial soil. Here, we show the experimental results of a seismic test carried out using seismic waves generated by a monochromatic vibrocompaction probe. Measurements of the particles' velocities show a modification of the seismic energy distribution in the presence of the metamaterial in agreement with numerical simulations using an approximate plate model. For complex natural materials such as soils, this large-scale experiment was needed to show the practical feasibility of seismic metamaterials and to stress their importance for applications in civil engineering. We anticipate this experiment to be a starting point for smart devices for anthropic and natural vibrations.

  18. Response Surface Model Building Using Orthogonal Arrays for Computer Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Resit; Braun, Robert D.; Moore, Arlene A.; Lepsch, Roger A.

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates response surface methods for computer experiments and discusses some of the approaches available. Orthogonal arrays constructed for computer experiments are studied and an example application to a technology selection and optimization study for a reusable launch vehicle is presented.

  19. Apollo experience report: Thermal design of Apollo lunar surface experiments package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R. S., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The evolution of the thermal design of the Apollo lunar surface experiments package central station from the basic concept to the final flight hardware is discussed, including results of development, prototype, and qualification tests that were used to verify that the flight hardware would operate adequately on the lunar surface. In addition, brief discussions of the thermal design of experiments included in the experiments package are presented. The flight thermal performance is compared with analytical results and thermal-vacuum test results, and design modifications for future lunar surface experiment packages are presented.

  20. Surface deposition measurements of the TMI-2 gross decontamination experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIssac, C.V.; Hetzer, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    In order to measure the effectiveness of the gross decontamination experiment (principally a water spray technique) performed in the TMI-2 reactor building, the Technical Information and Examination Program's Radiation and Environment personnel made surface activity measurements before and after the experiment. In conjunction with surface sampling, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and gamma spectrometry measurements were also performed to distinguish between radiation fields and contamination. The surface sampler used to collect samples from external surfaces within the reactor building is a milling tool having four major components: a 1.27-cm constant-speed drill; a drill support assembly that allows setting sample penetration depth; filter cartridges for intake air purification and sample collection; and an air pump that forces air across the surface being sampled and through the sample filter cartridge

  1. Diffraction experiments of argon or helium on polluted surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthier, J.P.; Constans, A.; Daury, G.; Lostis, P.

    1975-01-01

    Scattering patterns of molecular beams of argon or helium from metal surfaces (bulk metal or thin films) are reported. The pressure in the scattering chamber is about 10 -6 torr. So, the surfaces are polluted. Diffraction peaks are observed which can be interpreted very well by assuming that nitrogen, oxygen or carbon atoms are adsorbed of the surface. On the other hand, diffraction peaks from a silicon crystal have been observed which can be reproduced very well by using silicon crystal lattice. These experiments are not interpreted accurately, but show that molecular reflection can be used for some surface studies [fr

  2. MUSE: Measuring the proton radius with muon-proton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernauer, Jan Christopher [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The proton radius has been measured so far using electron-proton scattering, electronic Hydrogen spectroscopy and muonic Hydrogen spectroscopy, the latter producing a much more accurate, but seven sigma different, result, leading to the now famous proton radius puzzle. The MUSE collaboration aims to complete the set of measurements by using muon scattering to determine the proton radius and to shed light on possible explanations of the discrepancy. The talk gives an overview of the experiment motivation and design and a status report on the progress.

  3. On joint numerical radius II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drnovšek, R.; Müller, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 9 (2014), s. 1197-1204 ISSN 0308-1087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0473; GA AV ČR IAA100190903 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : joint numerical range * numerical radius Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.738, year: 2014 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03081087.2013.816303

  4. Turning and Radius Deviation Correction for a Hexapod Walking Robot Based on an Ant-Inspired Sensory Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaguang; Guo, Tong; Liu, Qiong; Zhu, Qianwei; Zhao, Xiangmo; Jin, Bo

    2017-11-23

    Abstract : In order to find a common approach to plan the turning of a bio-inspired hexapod robot, a locomotion strategy for turning and deviation correction of a hexapod walking robot based on the biological behavior and sensory strategy of ants. A series of experiments using ants were carried out where the gait and the movement form of ants was studied. Taking the results of the ant experiments as inspiration by imitating the behavior of ants during turning, an extended turning algorithm based on arbitrary gait was proposed. Furthermore, after the observation of the radius adjustment of ants during turning, a radius correction algorithm based on the arbitrary gait of the hexapod robot was raised. The radius correction surface function was generated by fitting the correction data, which made it possible for the robot to move in an outdoor environment without the positioning system and environment model. The proposed algorithm was verified on the hexapod robot experimental platform. The turning and radius correction experiment of the robot with several gaits were carried out. The results indicated that the robot could follow the ideal radius and maintain stability, and the proposed ant-inspired turning strategy could easily make free turns with an arbitrary gait.

  5. Distal radius reconstruction with vascularized proximal fibular autograft after en-bloc resection of recurrent giant cell tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yun-fa; Wang, Jian-wei; Huang, Pin; Xu, Zhong-he

    2016-01-01

    Background Giant cell tumors (GCTs) located in the distal radius are likely to recur, and the treatment of such recurrent tumors is very difficult. Here, we report our clinical experience in distal radius reconstruction with vascularized proximal fibular autografts after en-bloc excision of the entire distal radius in 17 patients with recurrent GCT (RGCT) of the distal radius. Methods All 17 patients with RGCT in distal radius underwent plain radiography and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...

  6. Distal radius fracture after proximal row carpectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igeta, Yuka; Naito, Kiyohito; Sugiyama, Yoichi; Obata, Hiroyuki; Aritomi, Kentaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We encountered a patient with distal radius fracture (DRF) after proximal row carpectomy (PRC). The mechanism of the DRF after PRC is discussed in this report. The patient was a 73-year-old female who had undergone PRC due to Kienböck disease before. The wrist range of motion was: 45° on dorsiflexion and 20° on flexion. DRF has occurred at 3 years after PRC. The fracture type was extra-articular fracture. Osteosynthesis was performed using a volar locking plate. No postoperative complication developed, the Mayo score was excellent at 6 months after surgery, and the daily living activity level recovered to that before injury. Since the wrist range of motion decreased and the lunate fitted into the joint surface after PRC, making the forearm join with the hand like a single structure, pressure may have been loaded on the weak distal end of the radius from the dorsal side, causing volar displacement and fracture. The pressure distribution and range of motion of the radiocarpal joint after PRC are different from those of a normal joint, and the mechanism of fracture also changes due to PRC. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Are classifications of proximal radius fractures reproducible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    dos Santos João BG

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fractures of the proximal radius need to be classified in an appropriate and reproducible manner. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of the three most widely used classification systems. Methods Elbow radiographs images of patients with proximal radius fractures were classified according to Mason, Morrey, and Arbeitsgemeinschaft für osteosynthesefragen/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation (AO/ASIF classifications by four observers with different experience with this subject to assess their intra- and inter-observer agreement. Each observer analyzed the images on three different occasions on a computer with numerical sequence randomly altered. Results We found that intra-observer agreement of Mason and Morrey classifications were satisfactory (κ = 0.582 and 0.554, respectively, while the AO/ASIF classification had poor intra-observer agreement (κ = 0.483. Inter-observer agreement was higher in the Mason (κ = 0.429-0.560 and Morrey (κ = 0.319-0.487 classifications than in the AO/ASIF classification (κ = 0.250-0.478, which showed poor reliability. Conclusion Inter- and intra-observer agreement of the Mason and Morey classifications showed overall satisfactory reliability when compared to the AO/ASIF system. The Mason classification is the most reliable system.

  8. Nuclear charge radius of 11Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Rodolfo; Noertershaeuser, Wilfried; Dax, Andreas; Ewald, Guido; Goette, Stefan; Kirchner, Reinhard; Kluge, H.-Juergen; Kuehl, Thomas; Wojtaszek, Agnieszka; Bushaw, Bruce A.; Drake, Gordon W. F.; Yan Zongchao; Zimmermann, Claus; Albers, Daniel; Behr, John; Bricault, Pierre; Dilling, Jens; Dombsky, Marik; Lassen, Jens; Phil Levy, C. D.

    2006-01-01

    We have determined the nuclear charge radius of 11 Li by high-precision laser spectroscopy. The experiment was performed at the TRIUMF-ISAC facility where the 7 Li- 11 Li isotope shift (IS) was measured in the 2s → 3s electronic transition using Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy with a relative accuracy better than 10 -5 . The accuracy for the IS of the other lithium isotopes was also improved. IS's are mainly caused by differences in nuclear mass, but changes in proton distribution also give small contributions. Comparing experimentally measured IS with advanced atomic calculation of purely mass-based shifts, including QED and relativistic effects, allows derivation of the nuclear charge radii. The radii are found to decrease monotonically from 6 Li to 9 Li, and then increase with 11 Li about 11% larger than 9 Li. These results are a benchmark for the open question as to whether nuclear core excitation by halo neutrons is necessary to explain the large nuclear matter radius of 11 Li; thus, the results are compared with a number of nuclear structure models.

  9. The radius of RX Eridani

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolley, R.; Dean, J.

    1976-01-01

    Photoelectric observations of the light curves of RX Eri obtained in B, V and I, and radial velocity determinations, are combined to determine the radius by a method originally proposed by van Hoof which avoids matching colours in the rising and falling branches of the light curve and concentrates on the falling branch. The results agree well with those from other stars determined by the normal Baade-Wesselink method, but the method is easier to apply if the colour curve is flat in the falling branch. The parameters found for the star are r 0 = 5.5 Sun, mass = 0.45 Sun, and Msub(v) = + 0sup(m).54. (author)

  10. Volar morphology of the distal radius in axial planes: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, Keiichiro; Oka, Kunihiro; Kawanishi, Yohei; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Murase, Tsuyoshi

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the cause of rupture of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) after volar plate fixation of distal radius fractures, previous studies have examined the shape of the distal radius in the sagittal plane or in the lateral view. However, there are no reports on the anatomical shape of the volar surface concavity of the distal radius in the axial plane. We hypothesized that this concavity might contribute to the mismatch between the plate and the surface of the radius. To test this hypothesis, we constructed three-dimensional models of the radius and FPL based on computed tomography scans of 70 normal forearms. We analyzed axial cross-sectional views with 2 mm intervals. In all cases, the volar surface of the distal radius was concave in the axial plane. The concavity depth was maximum at 6 mm proximal to the palmar edge of the lunate fossa and progressively decreased toward the proximal radius. FPL was closest to the radius at 2 mm proximal to the palmar edge of the lunate fossa. The volar surface of the distal radius was externally rotated from proximal to distal. These results may help to develop new implants which fit better to the radius and decrease tendon irritation. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A Liquid Metal Flume for Free Surface Magnetohydrodynamic Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nornberg, M.D.; Ji, H.; Peterson, J.L.; Rhoads, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    We present an experiment designed to study magnetohydrodynamic effects in free-surface channel flow. The wide aspect ratio channel (the width to height ratio is about 15) is completely enclosed in an inert atmosphere to prevent oxidization of the liquid metal. A custom-designed pump reduces entrainment of oxygen, which was found to be a problem with standard centrifugal and gear pumps. Laser Doppler Velocimetry experiments characterize velocity profiles of the flow. Various flow constraints mitigate secondary circulation and end effects on the flow. Measurements of the wave propagation characteristics in the liquid metal demonstrate the surfactant effect of surface oxides and the damping of fluctuations by a cross-channel magnetic field

  12. Numbers of center points appropriate to blocked response surface experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holms, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    Tables are given for the numbers of center points to be used with blocked sequential designs of composite response surface experiments as used in empirical optimum seeking. The tables also give the star point radii for exact orthogonal blocking. The center point options vary from a lower limit of one to an upper limit equal to the numbers proposed by Box and Hunter for approximate rotatability and uniform variance, and exact orthogonal blocking. Some operating characteristics of the proposed options are described.

  13. Understanding colloidal charge renormalization from surface chemistry: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisler, T.; Schulz, S. F.; Borkovec, M.; Sticher, H.; Schurtenberger, P.; D'Aguanno, B.; Klein, R.

    1994-12-01

    In this paper we report on the charging behavior of latex particles in aqueous suspensions. We use static light scattering and acid-base titrations as complementary techniques to observe both effective and bare particle charges. Acid-base titrations at various ionic strengths provide the pH dependent charging curves. The surface chemical parameters (dissociation constant of the acidic carboxylic groups, total density of ionizable sites and Stern capacitance) are determined from fits of a Stern layer model to the titration data. We find strong evidence that the dissociation of protons is the only specific adsorption process. Effective particle charges are determined by fits of integral equation calculations of the polydisperse static structure factor to the static light scattering data. A generalization of the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model including the dissociation of the acidic surface groups and the autodissociation of water is used to predict effective particle charges from the surface chemical parameters determined by the titration experiments. We find that the light scattering data are best described by a model where a small fraction of the ionizable surface sites are sulfate groups which are completely dissociated at moderate pH. These effective charges are comparable to the predictions by a basic cell model where charge regulation is absent.

  14. Ultrasonic pattern recognition study of feedwater nozzle inner radius indication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, H.; Takama, S.; Kishigami, M.; Sasahara, T.; Ando, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made to distinguish defects on feed-water nozzle inner radius from noise echo caused by stainless steel cladding by using ultrasonic pattern recognition method with frequency analysis technique. Experiment has been successfully performed on flat clad plates and nozzle mock-up containing fatigue cracks and the following results which shows the high capability of frequency analysis technique are obtained

  15. Artificial gravity: head movements during short-radius centrifugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, L. R.; Hecht, H.; Lyne, L. E.; Sienko, K. H.; Cheung, C. C.; Kavelaars, J.

    2001-01-01

    Short-radius centrifugation is a potential countermeasure to long-term weightlessness. Unfortunately, head movements in a rotating environment induce serious discomfort, non-compensatory vestibulo-ocular reflexes, and subjective illusions of body tilt. In two experiments we investigated the effects

  16. Preliminary results report: Conasauga near-surface heater experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, J.L.

    1979-06-01

    From November 1977 to August 1978, two near-surface heater experiments were operated in two somewhat different stratigraphic sequences within the Conasauga formation which consist predominantly of shale. Specific phenomena investigated were the thermal and mechanical responses of the formation to an applied heat load, as well as the mineralogical changes induced by heating. Objective was to provide a minimal integrated field and laboratory study that would supply a data base which could be used in planning more expensive and complex vault-type experiments in other localities. The experiments were operated with heater power levels of between 6 and 8 kW for heater mid-plane temperatures of 385 0 C. The temperature fields within the shale were measured and analysis is in progress. Steady state conditions were achieved within 90 days. Conduction appears to be the principal mechanism of heat transport through the formation. Limited mechanical response measurements consisting of vertical displacement and stress data indicate general agreement with predictions. Posttest data, collection of which await experiment shutdown and cooling of the formation, include the mineralogy of posttest cores, posttest transmissivity measurements and corrosion data on metallurgical samples

  17. RESULT OF PRE-CONTOURED DISTAL RADIUS INDIAN LOCKING PLATES IN DISTAL RADIUS FRACTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Shaleen; Baljit; Aditya; Parminder; Simarpreet S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fractures of the distal radius are common, open reduction and internal fixation using an interlocking plate system has gained popularity for the treatment of dorsally displaced distal radius fractures. The aim of the study was to assess how adequately distal radial fracture reduction was reproduced and maintained with the pre-contoured distal radius Indian locking plates and to evaluate the functional and radiological results of treating unstable distal radius ...

  18. Effects of Leading-Edge Radius on Aerodynamic Characteristics of 50º Delta Wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaagen, N.G.

    2010-01-01

    The study focuses on the effects of the leading-edge radius on the flow over 50º swept delta wing models. Three models were tested, one model having a sharp leading edge and the other two having a semi-circular leading edge of different radius. The vortical flow on and off the surface of the models

  19. Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, V. A.; Ott, C. M.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    The determination of risk from infectious disease during spaceflight missions is composed of several factors including both the concentration and characteristics of the microorganisms to which the crew are exposed. Thus, having a good understanding of the microbial ecology aboard spacecraft provides the necessary information to mitigate health risks to the crew. While preventive measures are taken to minimize the presence of pathogens on spacecraft, medically significant organisms have been isolated from both the Mir and International Space Station (ISS). Historically, the method for isolation and identification of microorganisms from spacecraft environmental samples depended upon their growth on culture media. Unfortunately, only a fraction of the organisms may grow on a specific culture medium, potentially omitting those microorganisms whose nutritional and physical requirements for growth are not met. To address this bias in our understanding of the ISS environment, the Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment was designed to investigate and develop monitoring technology to provide better microbial characterization. For the SWAB flight experiment, we hypothesized that environmental analysis using non-culture-based technologies would reveal microorganisms, allergens, and microbial toxins not previously reported in spacecraft, allowing for a more complete health assessment. Key findings during this experiment included: a) Generally, advanced molecular techniques were able to reveal a few organisms not recovered using culture-based methods; however, there is no indication that current monitoring is "missing" any medically significant bacteria or fungi. b) Molecular techniques have tremendous potential for microbial monitoring, however, sample preparation and data analysis present challenges for spaceflight hardware. c) Analytical results indicate that some molecular techniques, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), can

  20. Probing surfaces with single-polymer atomic force microscope experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedsam, C; Gaub, H E; Netz, R R

    2006-03-01

    In the past 15 years atomic force microscope (AFM) based force spectroscopy has become a versatile tool to study inter- and intramolecular interactions of single polymer molecules. Irreversible coupling of polymer molecules between the tip of an AFM cantilever and the substrate allows one to study the stretching response up to the high force regime of several nN. For polymers that glide or slip laterally over the surface with negligible friction, on the other hand, the measured force profiles exhibit plateaus which allow one to extract the polymer adsorption energies. Long-term stable polymer coatings of the AFM tips allow for the possibility of repeating desorption experiments from solid supports with individual molecules many times, yielding good sampling statistics and thus reliable estimates for adsorption energies. In combination with recent advances in theoretical modeling, a detailed picture of the conformational statistics, backbone elasticity, and the adsorption characteristics of single polymer molecules is obtained.

  1. Photoemission from Coated Surfaces A Comparison of Theory to Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, K

    2005-01-01

    Photocathodes for FELs and accelerators will benefit from rugged and self-rejuvenating photocathodes with high QE at the longest possible wavelength. The needs of a high power FEL are not met at present by existing photocathode-drive laser combinations: requirements generally necessitate barrier-lowering coatings which are degraded by operation. We seek to develop a controlled porosity dispenser cathode, and shall report on our coordinated experimental and theoretical studies. Our models account for field, thermal, and surface effects of cesium monolayers on photoemission, and compare well with concurrent experiments examining the QE, patchiness, and evolution of the coatings. Field enhancement, thermal variation of specific heat and electron relaxation rates and their relation to high laser intensity and/or short pulse-to-pulse separation, variations in work function effects due to coating non-uniformity, and the dependence on the wavelength of the incident light are included. The status of methods by which ...

  2. Experiment on Physical Desalinisation of Uranium-contaminated Gravel Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Han, Gyu-Seong; Moon, Jai-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    As a result, the method to wash uranium-contaminated gravels could not get satisfactory desalinization rate. During the long oxidization process it was judged that uranium penetrated inside the gravels, so we tried to increase the desalinization rate by fragmentizing them into pieces and then washing them. The desalinization rate after fragmentizing the gravels into pieces and washing them brought a satisfactory result.. However, we could obtain desired concentration for gravels with high uranium concentration by fragmentizing them and breaking them further into even smaller pieces. Likewise, desalinization using soil washing process is complicated and has to go through multiple washing steps, resulting in too much of waste fluid generated accordingly. The increase of waste fluid generated leads to the increase in by-products of the final disposal process later on, bringing a not good economic result. Furthermore, taking into account that the desalinization rate is 65% during soil washing process, it is expected that gravel washing will show a similar desalinization result; it is considered uneasy to have a perfect desalinization only by soil washing. The grinding method is actually used in the primary desalinization process in order to desalinize radioactivity-contaminated concrete. This method does desalinization by grinding the radioactivity-contaminated area of the concrete surface with desalinization equipment, which enables a near-to-perfect desalinization for relatively thinly contaminated surface. Likewise, this research verified the degree of desalinization by applying the grinding method and comparing it to the fragmentizing-washing method, and attempted to find a method to desalinize uranium-contaminated gravels more effectively. In order to desalinize uranium-contaminated gravels more effectively and compare to the existing washing-desalinization method, we conducted a desalinization experiment with grinding method that grinds gravel surface. As a

  3. Chondromyxoid Fibroma of Radius: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Bagewadi, Rajakumar M.; Nerune, Savitri Mallikarjun; Hippargi, Surekha B.

    2016-01-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF) is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour accounting to less than 1% of bone tumours. It is most commonly seen in lower extremity involving tibia. CMF of radius is rare. We report a rare case of CMF of proximal radius in a 37-year-old female who presented with swelling and pain over right elbow. Wide local excision of proximal radius along with radial head was done and above elbow POP slab was applied for one month. Elbow range of movement exercises started after one m...

  4. Localized electronic states: the small radius potential approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steslicka, M.; Jurczyszyn, L.

    1984-09-01

    Using a quasi three-dimensional crystal model we investigate the localized electronic states, generated by the crystal surface covered by foreign atoms. Two such states are found in the first forbidden energy gap and, because of their localization properties, called the Tamm-like and adsorption-like states. Using the small radius potential approximation, the properties of both types of states were discussed in detail. (author)

  5. Experiment Evaluation of Skin Friction Drag by Surface Tailoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manigandan, S.; Gopal krishna, K.; Gagan Kumar, K.; Gunasekar, P.; Nithya, S.

    2017-08-01

    Reduction of drag is an important role of aerodynamic specialist in real time world. The performance of forward moving object improved when the drag is reduced. Skin friction drag caused when the fluid tending to shear along the surface of the body and it is dependent on energy expenditure. Initial research concluded that nearly 20 to 40% of total drag is skin friction drag, based on flight forward velocity. This means a lot of fuel burned. In this paper we investigate a methodology to reduce the skin friction drag by implementing different kinds of exterior treatments. The ideology inspired from the world fastest moving oceanic creature. Structures are fabricated based on the replica of scales of the oceanic creature. The outer skin of the aerofoil NACA0012 is modified like shark scales. Then it is tested using open type sub sonic wind tunnel. In addition to that, the leading edge thickness effect also studied. The turbulent flow phenomenon is validated at different velocities and compared with numerical results using STAR CCM+. From the plots and graphical results, it is found that the skin friction drag is generated less due to reduction of transverse shear stress present in turbulent flow and skin friction drag depends on boundary layer thickness and on the percentage of chord of flow separation. In addition to this, the result delivers that the ordinary polished surface produces more drag than the modified scales. The outlook of this technology is excrescence for different applications. This open section wind tunnel testing produces 10-15% reduction in drag and can be turn to high values when the experiment is conducted in closed section wind tunnel with real time atmospheric conditions, which can be done as a future work.

  6. Nonlinear buckling analyses of a small-radius carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Yong-Gang; Li, Min; Jia, Jiao

    2014-04-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) was first discovered by Sumio Iijima. It has aroused extensive attentions of scholars from all over the world. Over the past two decades, we have acquired a lot of methods to synthesize carbon nanotubes and learn their many incredible mechanical properties such as experimental methods, theoretical analyses, and computer simulations. However, the studies of experiments need lots of financial, material, and labor resources. The calculations will become difficult and time-consuming, and the calculations may be even beyond the realm of possibility when the scale of simulations is large, as for computer simulations. Therefore, it is necessary for us to explore a reasonable continuum model, which can be applied into nano-scale. This paper attempts to develop a mathematical model of a small-radius carbon nanotube based on continuum theory. An Isotropic circular cross-section, Timoshenko beam model is used as a simplified mechanical model for the small-radius carbon nanotube. Theoretical part is mainly based on modified couple stress theory to obtain the numerical solutions of buckling deformation. Meanwhile, the buckling behavior of the small radius carbon nanotube is simulated by Molecular Dynamics method. By comparing with the numerical results based on modified couple stress theory, the dependence of the small-radius carbon nanotube mechanical behaviors on its elasticity constants, small-size effect, geometric nonlinearity, and shear effect is further studied, and an estimation of the small-scale parameter of a CNT (5, 5) is obtained.

  7. Local Convergence and Radius of Convergence for Modified Newton Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Măruşter Ştefan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the local convergence of modified Newton method, i.e., the classical Newton method in which the derivative is periodically re-evaluated. Based on the convergence properties of Picard iteration for demicontractive mappings, we give an algorithm to estimate the local radius of convergence for considered method. Numerical experiments show that the proposed algorithm gives estimated radii which are very close to or even equal with the best ones.

  8. Radius crossover sign: an indication of malreduced radius shaft greenstick fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Patrick B; Crepeau, Allison E; Herrera-Soto, José A; Price, Charles T

    2012-06-01

    Radius shaft greenstick fractures in children can be a challenging injury to treat because angulation and rotational alignment are difficult to assess. In this report, we describe a simple method for analyzing the deformity and identifying rotational and angular malalignment. This technique involves analyzing the forearm radiographs as 2 segments, proximal and distal, and assuring that the rotational position of each matches the other. We present 3 cases of proximal radius greenstick fractures in malalignment to demonstrate the radius crossover sign. Identifying the radius crossover sign, and proceeding with further closed reduction may prevent deformity that could otherwise result in a significant loss of forearm motion. Level V.

  9. Predicting jet radius in electrospinning by superpositioning exponential functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widartiningsih, P M; Viridi, S; Iskandar, F; Munir, M M

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the correlation between viscosity and fiber diameter in electrospinning. Control over fiber diameter in electrospinning process was important since it will determine the performance of resulting nanofiber. Theoretically, fiber diameter was determined by surface tension, solution concentration, flow rate, and electric current. But experimentally it had been proven that significantly viscosity had an influence to fiber diameter. Jet radius equation in electrospinning process was divided into three areas: near the nozzle, far from the nozzle, and at jet terminal. There was no correlation between these equations. Superposition of exponential series model provides the equations combined into one, thus the entire of working parameters on electrospinning take a contribution to fiber diameter. This method yields the value of solution viscosity has a linear relation to jet radius. However, this method works only for low viscosity. (paper)

  10. THE SIZE-VIRIAL RADIUS RELATION OF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2013-01-01

    I use the abundance matching ansatz, which has proven to be successful in reproducing galaxy clustering and other statistics, to derive estimates of the virial radius, R 200 , for galaxies of different morphological types and a wide range of stellar masses. I show that over eight orders of magnitude in stellar mass galaxies of all morphological types follow an approximately linear relation between half-mass radius of their stellar distribution, r 1/2 , and virial radius, r 1/2 ≈ 0.015 R 200 , with scatter of ≈0.2 dex. Such scaling is in remarkable agreement with the expectation of models that assume that galaxy sizes are controlled by halo angular momentum, r 1/2 ∝λR 200 , where λ is the spin of galaxy parent halo. The scatter about the relation is comparable with the scatter expected from the distribution of λ. Moreover, I show that when the stellar and gas surface density profiles of galaxies of different morphological types are rescaled by the radius r n = 0.015 R 200 , the rescaled profiles follow approximately universal exponential (for late types) and de Vaucouleurs (for early types) form with scatter of only ≈30%-50% at R ≈ 1-3r n . Remarkably, both late- and early-type galaxies have similar mean stellar surface density profiles at R ∼> 1r n . The main difference between their stellar distributions is thus at R n . The results of this study imply that galaxy sizes and radial distribution of baryons are shaped primarily by properties of their parent halos and that the sizes of both late-type disks and early-type spheroids are controlled by halo angular momentum.

  11. Introduction to the Design and Optimization of Experiments Using Response Surface Methodology. A Gas Chromatography Experiment for the Instrumentation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Patricia L.; Miller, Benjamin I.; Nowak, Abigail Tuttle

    2006-01-01

    The study describes how to design and optimize an experiment with multiple factors and multiple responses. The experiment uses fractional factorial analysis as a screening experiment only to identify important instrumental factors and does not use response surface methodology to find the optimal set of conditions.

  12. Precipitation Sensitivity to the Mean Radius of Drop Spectra: Comparison of Single- and Double-Moment Bulk Microphysical Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemanja Kovačević

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two bulk microphysical schemes were compared across mean radius values of the entire drop spectra. A cloud-resolving mesoscale model was used to analyze surface precipitation characteristics. The model included the following microphysical categories: water vapour, cloud droplets, raindrops, ice crystals, snow, graupel, frozen raindrops and hail. Two bulk schemes were used: a single-moment scheme in which the mean radius was specified as a parameter and a double-moment scheme in which the mean radius of drops was calculated diagnostically with a fixed value for the cloud droplet number concentration. Experiments were conducted out for three values of the mean radius (in the single-moment scheme and two cloud droplet number concentrations (in the double-moment scheme. There were large differences in the surface precipitation for the two schemes, the simulated precipitation generated by the double-moment scheme had a higher sensitivity. The single-moment scheme generated an unrealistic collection rate of cloud droplets by raindrops and hail as well as unrealistic evaporation of rain and melting of solid hydrometeors; these processes led to inaccurate timing and amounts of surface precipitation.

  13. Management of Malunions of the Distal Radius

    OpenAIRE

    Yaniel Truffin Rodriguez; Osmany Pérez Martínez; Rafael Esmandy Gómez Arregoitía; Indira L. Gómez Gil

    2015-01-01

    Fractures of the distal radius often present with a group of major complications. Of these, malunion is one of the most disabling. Its management through salvage procedures is essential for its correction. The case of a 60-year-old healthy woman of urban origin treated at the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital in Cienfuegos because of a malunion of the distal end of the left radius as a result of a previous Colles' fracture is presented. The patient complained of severe p...

  14. Supersonic molecular beam experiments on surface chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Michio

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of a molecule and a surface is important in various fields, and in particular in complex systems like biomaterials and their related chemistry. However, the detailed understanding of the elementary steps in the surface chemistry, for example, stereodynamics, is still insufficient even for simple model systems. In this Personal Account, I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams demonstrate a significant role of the translational energy of the incident molecules. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths specific for the hyperthermal energy region, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. On the other hand, oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility of understanding surface chemical reactions in detail by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for finely monitoring the elementary step of the surface chemical reactions and creating new materials on surfaces. Copyright © 2014 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Spectral Radius and Hamiltonicity of Graphs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fiedler, Miroslav; Nikiforov, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 432, č. 9 (2010), s. 2170-2173 ISSN 0024-3795 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Hamiltonian cycle * Hamiltonian path * spectral radius Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.005, year: 2010

  16. Comparison of dorsal and volar approaches to the proximal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jessica D; White, Jeffery A; Johnson, Anthony E; Blair, James A; Hsu, Joseph R

    2011-01-01

    Proximal radius exposure may be acquired by either the dorsal or volar approach depending on surgical requirements. The dorsal approach is traditionally recommended for fracture fixation of the proximal radius because of theoretically improved exposure and because the dorsal aspect of the bone is the tensile surface. The posterior interosseous nerve can be visualized and protected using this approach. The volar approach is preferred for biceps repair and boasts a distal extensile approach with adequate soft tissue coverage. Impingement on the bicipital tuberosity and biceps tendon, in addition to positioning on the compression side of the bone, makes the anterior or anterolateral position for plate placement less desirable. The goal of this study was to quantify and compare in a cadaver model the area of bone exposed using both approaches. We hypothesized that equivalent exposures can be obtained and the posterior interosseous nerve can be identified with either the Thompson or Henry approach. Standard dorsal and volar approaches were performed on 10 fresh-frozen adult cadaveric upper-limb specimens. Cross-sectional area of exposure was quantified from digital photographs using software. The 2 approaches did not result in a significant difference in area exposed. Depending on case requirements, either the dorsal or volar approach will provide adequate exposure to the proximal radius. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Proton radius from electron scattering data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higinbotham, Douglas W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Kabir, Al Amin [Kent State Univ., Kent, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Lin, Vincent [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Western Branch High School, Chesapeake, VA (United States); Meekins, David [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Norum, Blaine [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Sawatzky, Brad [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Background: The proton charge radius extracted from recent muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements is significantly smaller than that extracted from atomic hydrogen and electron scattering measurements. The discrepancy has become known as the proton radius puzzle. Purpose: In an attempt to understand the discrepancy, we review high-precision electron scattering results from Mainz, Jefferson Lab, Saskatoon and Stanford. Methods: We make use of stepwise regression techniques using the F-test as well as the Akaike information criterion to systematically determine the predictive variables to use for a given set and range of electron scattering data as well as to provide multivariate error estimates. Results: Starting with the precision, low four-momentum transfer (Q2) data from Mainz (1980) and Saskatoon (1974), we find that a stepwise regression of the Maclaurin series using the F-test as well as the Akaike information criterion justify using a linear extrapolation which yields a value for the proton radius that is consistent with the result obtained from muonic hydrogen measurements. Applying the same Maclaurin series and statistical criteria to the 2014 Rosenbluth results on GE from Mainz, we again find that the stepwise regression tends to favor a radius consistent with the muonic hydrogen radius but produces results that are extremely sensitive to the range of data included in the fit. Making use of the high-Q2 data on GE to select functions which extrapolate to high Q2, we find that a Pad´e (N = M = 1) statistical model works remarkably well, as does a dipole function with a 0.84 fm radius, GE(Q2) = (1 + Q2/0.66 GeV2)-2. Conclusions: Rigorous applications of stepwise regression techniques and multivariate error estimates result in the extraction of a proton charge radius that is consistent with the muonic hydrogen result of 0.84 fm; either from linear extrapolation

  18. Variable radius cartography - History and perspectives of a new discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalera, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    is now possible to represent paleopoles, their uncertainty ellipses, and site-pole segments of meridian (Scalera, 1988, 1990). In all paleogeographic reconstructions of the different authors, variable radius cartography is used in a way more or less complex, more or less intertwined with other disciplines and databases, not as pure representation or in the spirit of the simple fits that supported plate tectonics, but as experiments of greater complexity with a value of proof in favor of the planet expansion. Today a common feeling is that is now necessary to develop an interactive and user friendly program code, which could be distributed or used in the web. The use of variable radius mapping would be a profitable tool in the field of geodesy, where a full treatment without subtle vicious loops of an expanding globe has yet to be developed.

  19. Tilt mode stability scaling in field-reversed configurations with finite Larmor radius effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, Naotaka; Ishida, Akio; Steinhauer, Loren C.

    2000-01-01

    The marginal stability of a static plasma with finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) effects depends on a combination of the FLR effect and the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) potential energy. For the tilt mode in a field-reversed configuration (FRC) previous computations of these two factors led to a prediction of stability for S * ≤(3-5)E where S * is the macroscale parameter (separatrix radius/ion skin depth) and E is the elongation (separatrix half length/separatrix radius). This prediction explained the observed stability of most experiments. However, recent computations of actual MHD eigenfunctions indicate that the MHD growth rate has a much weaker scaling with elongation than previously believed. As a consequence, most of the long-lived, stable FRC experiments lie in the region predicted to be unstable. It appears then that the stability of FRC experiments is not explained by FLR effects in a static equilibrium. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  20. Tolerance on sphere radius for the calibration of the transfer function of coherence scanning interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Rong; Coupland, Jeremy M.; Wang, Yuhang; Leach, Richard K.

    2017-06-01

    Although coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) commonly achieves a sub-nanometre noise level in surface topography measurement, the absolute accuracy is difficult to determine when measuring a surface that contains varying local slope angles and curvatures. Recent research has shown that it is possible to use a single sphere with a radius much greater than the source wavelength to calibrate the three-dimensional transfer function of a CSI system. A major requirement is the accurate knowledge of the sphere radius, but the three-dimensional measurement of a sphere with nanometre level uncertainty is a highly challenging metrology problem, and is not currently feasible. Perfect spheres do not exist and every measurement has uncertainty. Without having a quantitative understanding of the tolerance of the sphere radius, the calibration method cannot be used confidently for calibration of the transfer function of a CSI system that may be used in research laboratories or industry. In this paper, the effects of the tolerance of the radius of the calibration sphere on surface topography measurements are quantitatively analysed through a computational approach. CSI measurements of spherical, sinusoidal and rough surfaces are investigated in the presence of various degrees of radius error. A lookup table that relates the surface height error as a function of the radius error and surface slope angle is provided. The users may estimate the required tolerances of the sphere radius for their specific surface measurements if this calibration approach is used. The output of this paper provides a feasibility analysis for this calibration method for further development and applications.

  1. Finite-Larmor-radius effects on z-pinch stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffel, Jan; Faghihi, Mostafa

    1989-06-01

    The effect of finite Larmor radius (FLR) on the stability of m = 1 small-axial-wavelength kinks in a z-pinch with purely poloidal magnetic field is investigated. We use the incompressible FLR MHD model; a collisionless fluid model that consistently includes the relevant FLR terms due to ion gyroviscosity, Hall effect and electron diamagnetism. With FLR terms absent, the Kadomtsev criterion of ideal MHD, 2r dp/dr + m2B2/μ0 ≥ 0 predicts instability for internal modes unless the current density is singular at the centre of the pinch. The same result is obtained in the present model, with FLR terms absent. When the FLR terms are included, a normal-mode analysis of the linearized equations yields the following results. Marginally unstable (ideal) modes are stabilized by gyroviscosity. The Hall term has a damping (but not absolutely stabilizing) effect - in agreement with earlier work. On specifying a constant current and particle density equilibrium, the effect of electron diamagnetism vanishes. For a z-pinch with parameters relevant to the EXTRAP experiment, the m = 1 modes are then fully stabilized over the crosssection for wavelengths λ/a ≤ 1, where a denotes the pinch radius. As a general z-pinch result a critical line-density limit Nmax = 5 × 1018 m-1 is found, above which gyroviscous stabilization near the plasma boundary becomes insufficient. This limit corresponds to about five Larmor radii along the pinch radius. The result holds for wavelengths close to, or smaller than, the pinch radius and for realistic equilibrium profiles. This limit is far below the required limit for a reactor with contained alpha particles, which is in excess of 1020 m-1.

  2. Trajectory Calculator for Finite-Radius Cutter on a Lathe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry; Yu, Nan

    2009-01-01

    A computer program calculates the two-dimensional trajectory (radial vs. axial position) of a finite-radius-of-curvature cutting tool on a lathe so as to cut a workpiece to a piecewise-continuous, analytically defined surface of revolution. (In the original intended application, the tool is a diamond cutter, and the workpiece is made of a crystalline material and is to be formed into an optical resonator disk.) The program also calculates an optimum cutting speed as F/L, where F is a material-dependent empirical factor and L is the effective instantaneous length of the cutting edge.

  3. Venus Surface Composition Constrained by Observation and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Martha; Treiman, Allan; Helbert, Jörn; Smrekar, Suzanne

    2017-11-01

    New observations from the Venus Express spacecraft as well as theoretical and experimental investigation of Venus analogue materials have advanced our understanding of the petrology of Venus melts and the mineralogy of rocks on the surface. The VIRTIS instrument aboard Venus Express provided a map of the southern hemisphere of Venus at ˜1 μm allowing, for the first time, the definition of surface units in terms of their 1 μm emissivity and derived mineralogy. Tessera terrain has lower emissivity than the presumably basaltic plains, consistent with a more silica-rich or felsic mineralogy. Thermodynamic modeling and experimental production of melts with Venera and Vega starting compositions predict derivative melts that range from mafic to felsic. Large volumes of felsic melts require water and may link the formation of tesserae to the presence of a Venus ocean. Low emissivity rocks may also be produced by atmosphere-surface weathering reactions unlike those seen presently. High 1 μm emissivity values correlate to stratigraphically recent flows and have been used with theoretical and experimental predictions of basalt weathering to identify regions of recent volcanism. The timescale of this volcanism is currently constrained by the weathering of magnetite (higher emissivity) in fresh basalts to hematite (lower emissivity) in Venus' oxidizing environment. Recent volcanism is corroborated by transient thermal anomalies identified by the VMC instrument aboard Venus Express. The interpretation of all emissivity data depends critically on understanding the composition of surface materials, kinetics of rock weathering and their measurement under Venus conditions. Extended theoretical studies, continued analysis of earlier spacecraft results, new atmospheric data, and measurements of mineral stability under Venus conditions have improved our understanding atmosphere-surface interactions. The calcite-wollastonite CO2 buffer has been discounted due, among other things, to

  4. Cost Effective RADIUS Authentication for Wireless Clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru ENACEANU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Network administrators need to keep administrative user information for each network device, but network devices usually support only limited functions for user management. WLAN security is a modern problem that needs to be solved and it requires a lot of overhead especially when applied to corporate wireless networks. Administrators can set up a RADIUS server that uses an external database server to handle authentication, authorization, and accounting for network security issues.

  5. Ulnar shortening osteotomy for distal radius malunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Robin N; Leversedge, Fraser J

    2014-08-01

    Background Malunion is a common complication of distal radius fractures. Ulnar shortening osteotomy (USO) may be an effective treatment for distal radius malunion when appropriate indications are observed. Methods The use of USO for treatment of distal radius fracture malunion is described for older patients (typically patients >50 years) with dorsal or volar tilt less than 20 degrees and no carpal malalignment or intercarpal or distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) arthritis. Description of Technique Preoperative radiographs are examined to ensure there are no contraindications to ulnar shortening osteotomy. The neutral posteroanterior (PA) radiograph is used to measure ulnar variance and to estimate the amount of ulnar shortening required. An ulnar, mid-sagittal incision is used and the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve is preserved. An USO-specific plating system with cutting jig is used to create parallel oblique osteotomies to facilitate shortening. Intraoperative fluoroscopy and clinical range of motion are checked to ensure adequate shortening and congruous reduction of the ulnar head within the sigmoid notch. Results Previous outcomes evaluation of USO has demonstrated improvement in functional activities, including average flexion-extension and pronosupination motions, and patient reported outcomes. Conclusion The concept and technique of USO are reviewed for the treatment of distal radius malunion when specific indications are observed. Careful attention to detail related to surgical indications and to surgical technique typically will improve range of motion, pain scores, and patient-reported outcomes and will reduce the inherent risks of the procedure, such as ulnar nonunion or the symptoms related to unrecognized joint arthritis.  Level IV.

  6. Upper pinch radius limit in EXTRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1989-12-01

    A simple static equilibrium model of the Z-pinch is considered where a hot plasma core is surrounded by a cold-mantle (gas blanket). The pinch radius, defined as the radial extension of the fully ionized plasma core, is uniquely determined by the plasma particle. momentum and heat balance equations. In Extrap configurations an octupole field is introduced which imposes a magnetic separatrix on Z-pinch geometry. This makes the conditions for Extrap equilibrium 'overdetermined' when the characteristic pinch radium given by the plasma parameters tends to exceed the characteristic radius of the magnetic separatrix. In this case no conventional pinch equilibrium can exist, and part of the current which is forced into the plasma discharge by external sources must be channelled outside of the separatrix, i.e. into the surrounding support structure of the Extrap conductors and the vessel walls. A possibly existing bootstrap current in the plasma boundary layer is further expected to be 'scraped off' in this case. The present paper gives some illustrations of the marginal case of this upper pinch radius limit, in a state where the pinch current is antiparallel to the external rod currents which generate the octupole field. (authors)

  7. Understanding colloidal charge renormilization from surface chemistry : experiment and theory

    OpenAIRE

    Gisler, Thomas; Schulz, S. F.; Borkovec, Michal; Sticher, Hans; Schurtenberger, Peter; D'Aguanno, Bruno; Klein, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we report on the charging behavior of latex particles in aqueous suspensions. We use static light scattering and acid-base titrations as complementary techniques to observe both effective and bare particle charges. Acid-base titrations at various ionic strengths provide the pH dependent charging curves. The surface chemical parameters (dissociation constant of the acidic carboxylic groups, total density of ionizable sites and Stem capacitance) are determined from tits of a Stem ...

  8. Agoras: Towards Collaborative Game-Based Learning Experiences on Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catala, Alejandro; Garcia-Sanjuan, Fernando; Pons, Patricia; Jaen, Javier; Mocholi, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    Children nowadays consume and manage lots of interactive digital software. This makes it more interesting and powerful to use digital technologies and videogames supporting learning experiences. However, in general, current digital proposals lack of in-situ social interaction supporting natural exchange and discussion of ideas in the course of…

  9. Charge Radius Measurement of the Halo Nucleus $^{11}$Li

    CERN Multimedia

    Kluge, H-J; Kuehl, T; Simon, H; Wang, Haiming; Zimmermann, C; Onishi, T; Tanihata, I; Wakasugi, M

    2002-01-01

    %IS385 %title\\\\ \\\\The root-mean-square charge radius of $^{11}$Li will be determined by measuring the isotope shift of a suitable atomic transition in a laser spectroscopic experiment. Comparing the charge radii of the lithium isotopes obtained by this nuclear-model-independent method with the relevant mass radii obtained before will help to answer the question whether the proton distribution in halo nuclei at the neutron drip-line is decoupled to the first order from their neutron distribution. The necessary experimental sensitivity requires the maximum possible rate of $^{11}$Li nuclei in a beam of low emittance which can only be provided by ISOLDE.

  10. Inductive voltage adder (IVA) for submillimeter radius electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Maenchen, J.E. [and others

    1996-12-31

    The authors have already demonstrated the utility of inductive voltage adder accelerators for production of small-size electron beams. In this approach, the inductive voltage adder drives a magnetically immersed foilless diode to produce high-energy (10--20 MeV), high-brightness pencil electron beams. This concept was first demonstrated with the successful experiments which converted the linear induction accelerator RADLAC II into an IVA fitted with a small 1-cm radius cathode magnetically immersed foilless diode (RADLAC II/SMILE). They present here first validations of extending this idea to mm-scale electron beams using the SABRE and HERMES-III inductive voltage adders as test beds. The SABRE experiments are already completed and have produced 30-kA, 9-MeV electron beams with envelope diameter of 1.5-mm FWHM. The HERMES-III experiments are currently underway.

  11. Asymptomatic Flexor Tendon Damages after Volar Locking Plate Fixation of Distal Radius Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Susumu; Abe, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-01

    To investigate asymptomatic flexor tendon damages after volar locking plate fixation of distal radius fractures in 32 wrists of 32 patients with distal radius fractures fixed using two plate types. Sixteen patients received the Acu-Loc volar distal radius plate, and the remaining 16 patients received the Aptus distal radius correction plate. The flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon and flexor digitorum profundus were evaluated according to intraoperative findings at plate removal. Ultrasonography was used to measure the distance between the FPL tendon and distal edge of the plates (FPL plate distance) before plate removal, the distance between the FPL tendon and distal edge of the radius (FPL radius distance) after plate removal, in the contralateral wrist, and the angle between an extension line of a volar surface line on the proximal FPL tendon and a second volar surface line on the distal FPL tendon (FPL angles). Erosion of the FPL tendon was identified in four wrists, and erosion of the flexor digitorum profundus of the index finger was identified in one wrist. All five cases of wrists with flexor tendon damage had Acu-Loc plates installed. The average FPL angle before plate removal was 15.4° in the wrists with tendon damage, which was statistically significantly larger than the average FPL angle in the wrists without erosion. The type of plate and larger FPL angle on ultrasonography may be the risk factors for flexor tendon damage.

  12. Distal radius reconstruction with vascularized proximal fibular autograft after en-bloc resection of recurrent giant cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Fa; Wang, Jian-Wei; Huang, Pin; Xu, Zhong-He

    2016-08-17

    Giant cell tumors (GCTs) located in the distal radius are likely to recur, and the treatment of such recurrent tumors is very difficult. Here, we report our clinical experience in distal radius reconstruction with vascularized proximal fibular autografts after en-bloc excision of the entire distal radius in 17 patients with recurrent GCT (RGCT) of the distal radius. All 17 patients with RGCT in distal radius underwent plain radiography and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the distal radius as the initial evaluation after hospitalization. Then the distal radius were replaced by vascularized proximal fibular autografts after en-bloc RGCT resection. We assessed all patients by using clinical examinations, plain radiography of the wrist and chest, and Mayo wrist scores in the follow-ups. After an average follow-up of 4.3 years (range: 1.5-10.0 years), no lung metastasis or local recurrence was detected in any of the 17 patients. In total, 14 patients had excellent or good functional wrist scores, 16 were pain free or had occasional pain, and 15 patients returned to work. The mean range of motion of the wrist was 101° (flexion-extension), and the mean grip strength was 77.2 % of the contralateral normal hand. En-bloc excision of the entire distal radius and distal radius reconstruction with a vascularized proximal fibular autograft can effectively achieve local tumor control and preserve wrist function in patients with RGCT of the distal radius.

  13. Linear intra-bone geometry dependencies of the radius: Radius length determination by maximum distal width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumbach, S.F.; Krusche-Mandl, I.; Huf, W.; Mall, G.; Fialka, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate possible linear intra-bone geometry dependencies by determining the relation between the maximum radius length and maximum distal width in two independent populations and test for possible gender or age effects. A strong correlation can help develop more representative fracture models and osteosynthetic devices as well as aid gender and height estimation in anthropologic/forensic cases. Methods: First, maximum radius length and distal width of 100 consecutive patients, aged 20–70 years, were digitally measured on standard lower arm radiographs by two independent investigators. Second, the same measurements were performed ex vivo on a second cohort, 135 isolated, formalin fixed radii. Standard descriptive statistics as well as correlations were calculated and possible gender age influences tested for both populations separately. Results: The radiographic dataset resulted in a correlation of radius length and width of r = 0.753 (adj. R 2 = 0.563, p 2 = 0.592) and side no influence on the correlation. Radius length–width correlation for the isolated radii was r = 0.621 (adj. R 2 = 0.381, p 2 = 0.598). Conclusion: A relatively strong radius length–distal width correlation was found in two different populations, indicating that linear body proportions might not only apply to body height and axial length measurements of long bones but also to proportional dependency of bone shapes in general.

  14. Radius morphology and its effects on rotation with contoured and noncontoured plating of the proximal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupasinghe, Shavantha L; Poon, Peter C

    2012-05-01

    The radius has a sagittal bow and a coronal bow. Fractures are often treated with volar anterior plating. However, the sagittal bow is often overlooked when plating. This study looks at radial morphology and the effect of plating the proximal radius with straight plates and then contoured plates bowed in the sagittal plane. We report our findings and their effect on forearm rotation. Morphology was investigated in 14 radii. Attention was paid to the proximal shaft of the radius and its sagittal bow; from this, 6-, 7-, and 8-hole plates were contoured to fit this bow. A simple transverse fracture was then made at the apex of this bow in 23 cadaver arms. Supination and pronation were compared when plating with a straight plate and a contoured plate. Ten cadavers underwent ulna plating at the same level. The effect on rotation of fractures plated in the distal-third shaft was also measured. A significant reduction in rotation was found when a proximal radius fracture was plated with a straight plate compared with a contoured plate: 10.8°, 12.8°, and 21.7° for 6-, 7-, and 8-hole plates, respectively (P proximal shaft of the radius. Plating this with contoured plates in the sagittal plane improves rotation when compared with straight plates. Additional ulna plating is not a source of reduced forearm rotation. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A measurement of the pion charge radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendolia, S.R.; Badelek, B.; Batignani, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Bertolucci, E.; Bettoni, D.; Bosisio, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Dell'Orso, M.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Giazotto, A.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Tonelli, G.; Codino, A.; Fabbri, F.L.; Laurelli, P.; Satta, L.; Spillantini, P.; Zallo, A.; Counihan, M.J.; Frank, S.G.F.; Harvey, J.; Storey, D.; Menasce, D.; Meroni, E.; Moroni, L.

    1984-01-01

    We report a measurement of the negative pion electromagnetic form factor in the range of space-like four-momentum transfer 0.014 2 2 . The measurement was made by the NA7 collaboration at the CERN SPS, by observing the interaction of 300 GeV pions with the electrons of a liquid hydrogen target. The form factor is fitted by a pole form with a pion radius of (rho 2 )sup(1/2) = 0.657 +- 0.012 fm. (orig.)

  16. A measurement of the kaon charge radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendolia, S.R.; Batignani, G.; Bertolucci, E.; Bosisio, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Dell'Orso, M.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Gianetti, P.; Giazzotto, A.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Beck, G.A.; Bologna, G.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Mannocchi, G.; Picchi, P.; Budinich, M.; Liello, F.; Ragusa, F.; Rolandi, L.; Stefanini, A.; Fabbri, F.L.; Laurelli, P.; Zallo, A.; Gren, M.G.; Landon, M.P.J.; March, P.V.; Strong, J.A.; Tenchini, R.; Meroni, E.

    1986-01-01

    The negative kaon electromagnetic form factor has been measured in the space-like q 2 range 0.015-0.10 (GeV/c) 2 by the direct scattering of 250 GeV kaons from electrons at the CERN SPS. It is found that the kaon mean square charge radius K 2 >=0.34±0.05 fm 2 . From data collected simultaneously for πe scattering, the difference between the charged pion and kaon mean square radii (which is less sensitive to systematic errors) is found to be π 2 >- K 2 >=0.10±0.045 fm 2 . (orig.)

  17. Small-radius jets to all orders

    CERN Document Server

    Cacciari, Matteo; Soyez, Gregory; Salam, Gavin; Dasgupta, Mrinal

    2015-01-01

    With hadron colliders continuing to push the boundaries of precision, it is becoming increas­ ingly important to have a detailed understanding of the subtleties appearing at smaller values of the jet radius R. We present a method to resum all leading logarithmic terms, a'.; Inn R, using a generating functional approach, as was recently discussed in Ref. 1. We study a variety of observables, such as the inclusive jet spectrum and jet vetoes for Higgs physics, and show that small-R effects can be sizeable. Finally, we compare our calculations to existing ALICE data, and show good agreement.

  18. Giant cell tumour of the proximal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A P; Mahajan, S; Singh, A P

    2009-11-01

    A 52-year-old Indian woman presented with a progressively increasing swelling and pain in the right elbow for the past eight months, which was not associated with trauma or constitutional symptoms. The patient was diagnosed to have Campanacci grade III giant cell tumour of the proximal radius, and was treated with above elbow amputation. The patient has not shown any recurrence after five years of follow-up. The case was reported because of its rarity and the unusual site of occurrence of the tumour.

  19. Distal radius fracture after proximal row carpectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Igeta, Yuka; Naito, Kiyohito; Sugiyama, Yoichi; Obata, Hiroyuki; Aritomi, Kentaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We encountered a patient with distal radius fracture (DRF) after proximal row carpectomy (PRC). The mechanism of the DRF after PRC is discussed in this report. Presentation of case: The patient was a 73-year-old female who had undergone PRC due to Kienböck disease before. The wrist range of motion was: 45° on dorsiflexion and 20° on flexion. DRF has occurred at 3 years after PRC. The fracture type was extra-articular fracture. Osteosynthesis was performed using a volar lockin...

  20. Earthquake Energy Distribution along the Earth Surface and Radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, P.; Krumm, F.; Riguzzi, F.; Doglioni, C.; Suele, B.; Wang, K.; Panza, G.F.

    2010-07-01

    The global earthquake catalog of seismic events with M W ≥ 7.0, for the time interval from 1950 to 2007, shows that the depth distribution of earthquake energy release is not uniform. The 90% of the total earthquake energy budget is dissipated in the first ∼30km, whereas most of the residual budget is radiated at the lower boundary of the transition zone (410 km - 660 km), above the upper-lower mantle boundary. The upper border of the transition zone at around 410 km of depth is not marked by significant seismic energy release. This points for a non-dominant role of the slabs in the energy budged of plate tectonics. Earthquake number and energy release, although not well correlated, when analysed with respect to the latitude, show a decrease toward the polar areas. Moreover, the radiated energy has the highest peak close to (±5 o ) the so-called tectonic equator defined by Crespi et al. (2007), which is inclined about 30 o with respect to the geographic equator. At the same time the presence of a clear axial co- ordination of the radiated seismic energy is demonstrated with maxima at latitudes close to critical (±45 o ). This speaks about the presence of external forces that influence seismicity and it is consistent with the fact that Gutenberg-Richter law is linear, for events with M>5, only when the whole Earth's seismicity is considered. These data are consistent with an astronomical control on plate tectonics, i.e., the despinning (slowing of the Earth's angular rotation) of the Earth's rotation caused primarily by the tidal friction due to the Moon. The mutual position of the shallow and ∼660 km deep earthquake energy sources along subduction zones allows us to conclude that they are connected with the same slab along the W-directed subduction zones, but they may rather be disconnected along the opposed E-NE-directed slabs, being the deep seismicity controlled by other mechanisms. (author)

  1. Design of roundness measurement model with multi-systematic error for cylindrical components with large radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chuanzhi; Wang, Lei; Tan, Jiubin; Zhao, Bo; Tang, Yangchao

    2016-02-01

    The paper designs a roundness measurement model with multi-systematic error, which takes eccentricity, probe offset, radius of tip head of probe, and tilt error into account for roundness measurement of cylindrical components. The effects of the systematic errors and radius of components are analysed in the roundness measurement. The proposed method is built on the instrument with a high precision rotating spindle. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by experiment with the standard cylindrical component, which is measured on a roundness measuring machine. Compared to the traditional limacon measurement model, the accuracy of roundness measurement can be increased by about 2.2 μm using the proposed roundness measurement model for the object with a large radius of around 37 mm. The proposed method can improve the accuracy of roundness measurement and can be used for error separation, calibration, and comparison, especially for cylindrical components with a large radius.

  2. Conasauga near-surface heater experiment. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, J.L.

    1979-11-01

    The Conasauga Experiment was undertaken to begin assessment of the thermomechanical and chemical response of a specific shale to the heat resulting from emplacement of high-level nuclear wastes. Canister-size heaters were implanted in Conasauga shale in Tennessee. Instrumentation arrays wee placed at various depths in drill holes around each heater. The heaters operated for 8 months and, after the first 4 days, were maintained at 385 0 C. Emphasis was on characterizing the thermal and mechanical response of the formation. Conduction was the major mode of heat transport; convection was perceptible only at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Despite dehydration of the shale at higher temperatures, in situ thermal conductivity was essentially constant and not a function of temperature. The mechanical response of the formation was a slight overall expansion, apparently resulting in a general decrease in permeability. Metallurgical observations were made, the stability of a borosilicate glass wasteform simulant was assessed, and changes in formation mineralogy and groundwater composition were documented. In each of these areas, transient nonequilibrium processes occur that affect material stability and may be important in determining the integrity of a repository. In general, data from the test reflect favorably on the use of shale as a disposal medium for nuclear waste

  3. Conasauga near-surface heater experiment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumhansl, J.L.

    1979-11-01

    The Conasauga Experiment was undertaken to begin assessment of the thermomechanical and chemical response of a specific shale to the heat resulting from emplacement of high-level nuclear wastes. Canister-size heaters were implanted in Conasauga shale in Tennessee. Instrumentation arrays wee placed at various depths in drill holes around each heater. The heaters operated for 8 months and, after the first 4 days, were maintained at 385/sup 0/C. Emphasis was on characterizing the thermal and mechanical response of the formation. Conduction was the major mode of heat transport; convection was perceptible only at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Despite dehydration of the shale at higher temperatures, in situ thermal conductivity was essentially constant and not a function of temperature. The mechanical response of the formation was a slight overall expansion, apparently resulting in a general decrease in permeability. Metallurgical observations were made, the stability of a borosilicate glass wasteform simulant was assessed, and changes in formation mineralogy and groundwater composition were documented. In each of these areas, transient nonequilibrium processes occur that affect material stability and may be important in determining the integrity of a repository. In general, data from the test reflect favorably on the use of shale as a disposal medium for nuclear waste.

  4. QED confronts the radius of the proton

    CERN Document Server

    De Rujula, A

    2011-01-01

    Recent results on muonic hydrogen [1] and the ones compiled by CODATA on ordinary hydrogen and $ep$-scattering [2] are $5\\sigma$ away from each other. Two reasons justify a further look at this subject: 1) One of the approximations used in [1] is not valid for muonic hydrogen. This amounts to a shift of the proton's radius by $\\sim 3$ of the standard deviations of [1], in the "right" direction of data-reconciliation. In field-theory terms, the error is a mismatch of renormalization scales. Once corrected, the proton radius "runs", much as the QCD coupling "constant" does. 2) The result of [1] requires a choice of the "third Zemach moment". Its published independent determination is based on an analysis with a $p$-value --the probability of obtaining data with equal or lesser agreement with the adopted (fit form-factor) hypothesis-- of $3.92\\times 10^{-12}$. In this sense, this quantity is not empirically known. Its value would regulate the level of "tension" between muonic- and ordinary-hydrogen results, curr...

  5. [Carpal malalignment following distal radius fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulet, B; Gauci, M-O; Lazerges, C; Chammas, M

    2016-12-01

    Adaptive carpal malalignment is the consequence of malunion of the distal radius. Since the radial metaphysis and capitate have to be aligned, any disorientation of the radial epiphysis will force the proximal carpal row to adapt, as it is the only mobile element. There are two types of adaptation depending where the compensative occurs: (1) midcarpal - leading to flexion between the lunate and capitate, with the lunate maintaining a normal relationship with the radial epiphysis axis; (2) radiocarpal - combining flexion and dorsal displacement of the lunate relative to the axis of the radial epiphysis, with the midcarpal joint remaining aligned. Clinically, adaptive carpal malalignment is not the first reason for consultation in cases of distal radius malunion. It occurs in cases of moderate deformity with preserved pronation-supination in a young patient who has good mobility. It generates dorsal pain that may be associated with a snapping sensation. The diagnosis requires strict lateral X-ray views. Over time, the wrist becomes stiff but analgesic and is often well tolerated functionally. This type of deformity has not been shown to lead to osteoarthritis. Osteotomy to correct the malunion is the only way to treat adaptive carpal malalignment in active young patients who have a mobile but painful wrist. Copyright © 2016 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Surface enhanced second harmonic generation from macrocycle, catenane, and rotaxane thin films : Experiments and theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arfaoui, I.; Bermudez, V.; Bottari, G.; De Nadai, C.; Jalkanen, J.P.; Kajzar, F.; Leigh, D.A.; Lubomska, M.; Mendoza, S.M.; Niziol, J.; Rudolf, Petra; Zerbetto, F.

    2006-01-01

    Surface enhanced second harmonic generation (SE SHG) experiments on molecular structures, macrocycles, catenanes, and rotaxanes, deposited as monolayers and multilayers by vacuum sublimation on silver, are reported. The measurements show that the molecules form ordered thin films, where the highest

  7. Surface enhanced SHG from macrocycle, catenane and rotaxane thin films : experiments and theory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arfaoui, I.; Bermudez, V.; De Nadai, C.; Jalkanen, J.-P.; Kajzar, F.; Leigh, D.A.; Lubomska, M.; Mendoza, S.M.; Niziol, J.; Rudolf, Petra; Zerbetto, F.; Grote, JG; Kaino, T; Kajzar, F

    2005-01-01

    Surface enhanced second harmonic generation experiments on supramolecules: macrocycles, catenanes and rotaxanes, monolayers and multilayers deposited by vacuum evaporation on silver layers are reported and described. The measurements show that the molecules are ordered in thin films. The highest

  8. The Influence of Demographics and Navy Career Experiences on the Performance of Junior Surface Naval Officers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, A

    1998-01-01

    .... Results indicate that Naval Academy graduates, business majors, officers with CRUDES experience, and non-minority officers are more likely to achieve Surface Warfare qualification and receive top fitness report scores...

  9. HABITABILITY OF EXOMOONS AT THE HILL OR TIDAL LOCKING RADIUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Kane, Stephen R., E-mail: natalie.hinkel@gmail.com [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Caltech, MS 100-22, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Moons orbiting extrasolar planets are the next class of object to be observed and characterized for possible habitability. Like the host-planets to their host-star, exomoons have a limiting radius at which they may be gravitationally bound, or the Hill radius. In addition, they also have a distance at which they will become tidally locked and therefore in synchronous rotation with the planet. We have examined the flux phase profile of a simulated, hypothetical moon orbiting at a distant radius around the confirmed exoplanets {mu} Ara b, HD 28185 b, BD +14 4559 b, and HD 73534 b. The irradiated flux on a moon at its furthest, stable distance from the planet achieves its largest flux gradient, which places a limit on the flux ranges expected for subsequent (observed) moons closer in orbit to the planet. We have also analyzed the effect of planetary eccentricity on the flux on the moon, examining planets that traverse the habitable zone either fully or partially during their orbit. Looking solely at the stellar contributions, we find that moons around planets that are totally within the habitable zone experience thermal equilibrium temperatures above the runaway greenhouse limit, requiring a small heat redistribution efficiency. In contrast, exomoons orbiting planets that only spend a fraction of their time within the habitable zone require a heat redistribution efficiency near 100% in order to achieve temperatures suitable for habitability. This means that a planet does not need to spend its entire orbit within the habitable zone in order for the exomoon to be habitable. Because the applied systems comprise giant planets around bright stars, we believe that the transit detection method is most likely to yield an exomoon discovery.

  10. Major Successes of Theory-and-Experiment-Combined Studies in Surface Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2009-11-21

    Experimental discoveries followed by theoretical interpretations that pave the way of further advances by experimentalists is a developing pattern in modern surface chemistry and catalysis. The revolution of modern surface science started with the development of surface-sensitive techniques such as LEED, XPS, AES, ISS and SIMS, in which the close collaboration between experimentalists and theorists led to the quantitative determination of surface structure and composition. The experimental discovery of the chemical activity of surface defects and the trends in the reactivity of transitional metals followed by the explanations from the theoretical studies led to the molecular level understanding of active sites in catalysis. The molecular level knowledge, in turn, provided a guide for experiments to search for new generation of catalysts. These and many other examples of successes in experiment-and-theory-combined studies demonstrate the importance of the collaboration between experimentalists and theorists in the development of modern surface science.

  11. The "Chocolate Experiment"--A Demonstration of Radiation Absorption by Different Colored Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    In the typical "cookbook" experiment comparing the radiation absorption rates of different colored surfaces, students' hands are commonly used as a measurement instrument to demonstrate that dull black and silvery surfaces are good and poor absorbers of radiation, respectively. However, college students are often skeptical about using…

  12. Artificial gravity: head movements during short-radius centrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L. R.; Hecht, H.; Lyne, L. E.; Sienko, K. H.; Cheung, C. C.; Kavelaars, J.

    2001-01-01

    Short-radius centrifugation is a potential countermeasure to long-term weightlessness. Unfortunately, head movements in a rotating environment induce serious discomfort, non-compensatory vestibulo-ocular reflexes, and subjective illusions of body tilt. In two experiments we investigated the effects of pitch and yaw head movements in participants placed supine on a rotating bed with their head at the center of rotation, feet at the rim. The vast majority of participants experienced motion sickness, inappropriate vertical nystagmus and illusory tilt and roll as predicted by a semicircular canal model. However, a small but significant number of the 28 participants experienced tilt in the predicted plane but in the opposite direction. Heart rate was elevated following one-second duration head turns. Significant adaptation occurred following a series of head turns in the light. Vertical nystagmus, motion sickness and illusory tilt all decreased with adaptation. Consequences for artificial gravity produced by short-radius centrifuges as a countermeasure are discussed. Grant numbers: NCC 9-58. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Muonic hydrogen spectroscopy: the proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antognini, Aldo; Nez, François; Amaro, Fernando D.; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M. R.; Covita, Daniel S.; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Fernandes, Luis M. P.; Giesen, Adolf; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Le Bigot, Eric-Olivier; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A. M.; Ludhova, Livia; Monteiro, Cristina M. B.; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; Dos Santos, Joaquim M. F.; Schaller, Lukas A.; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F. C. A.; Pohl, Randolf

    2010-09-01

    By means of pulsed laser spectroscopy applied to muonic hydrogen (μ¯p) we havemeasured the 2S (F=1)/(1/2) - 2P(F=2)/(3/2) transition frequency to be 49881.88(76)GHz.1 By comparing this measurement with its theoretical prediction 2-7 based on bound-state QED we have determined a proton radius value of rP =0.84184(67) fm. This new value differs by 5.0 standard deviations from the CODATA value of 0.8768(69) fm,8 and 3 standard deviation from the e-p scattering results of 0.897(18) fm.9 The observed discrepancy may arise from a computational mistake of the energy levels in μp or H, or a fundamental problem in bound-state QED, an unknown effect related to the proton or the muon, or an experimental error.

  14. Fracture lines and comminution zones in OTA/AO type 23C3 distal radius fractures: The distal radius map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misir, Abdulhamit; Ozturk, Kahraman; Kizkapan, Turan Bilge; Yildiz, Kadir Ilker; Gur, Volkan; Sevencan, Ahmet

    2018-01-01

    This study was designed to define fracture lines and comminution zones in OTA/AO 23C3 distal radius fractures from axial computed tomography (CT) images that would influence surgical planning, development of new classifications, and possible implant designs. Thirty-four consecutive OTA/AO 23C3 fractures treated by a single surgeon between January 2014 and December 2014 were analyzed. For each fracture, maps of the fracture lines and zones of comminution were drawn. Each map was digitized and graphically superimposed to create a compilation of fracture lines and zones of comminution. Based on this compilation, major and minor fracture lines were identified and fracture patterns were defined. All major fracture lines were distributed in the central region of the radius distal articular surface. There is a recurrent fracture pattern with a comminution zone including the scaphoid and lunate fossa; Lister's tubercle; and ulnar, volar, and radial zones. It is important for the practicing surgeon to understand these four main fragments. Knowledge of this constant pattern should influence the development of new classifications and possible implant designs.

  15. The lower limit of the flowing pore throat radius in the extra-low permeability reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Junhui; Yin, Daiyin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a method for determining the lower limit of flowing pore throat radius of the extra low permeability reservoir in the periphery of Changyuan Oil Fields is given. The capillary pressure curve is divided into linear type and concave type. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) T2 spectrum is divided into 3 types: the left peak is greater than the right peak, the left peak is equal to the right one, and the left peak is smaller than the right one. The method for determining the lower limit of flowing pore throat radius is, first, converting the nuclear magnetic resonance T2 spectrum to the capillary pressure curve calculated, then fitting the capillary pressure curves measured by the constant speed mercury injection experiment and the capillary pressure curve calculated. After finding the relevant parameters, converting the horizontal axis of the NMR T2 spectra from relaxation time to pore throat radius, and the pore throat radius corresponding to the T2 cutoff value is the lower limit of the flowing pore throat radius. The lower limit of the flowing pore throat radius of the extra low permeability Fuyang Oil Reservoir in the periphery of Changyuan Oil Fields is about 0.68μm

  16. Equation of state, mass and radius for neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, G.; Oestgaard, E.; Dybvik, B.

    1993-02-01

    We have calculated total masses and radii of neutron stars from the Tolman-Oppenheimer Volkoff (TOV) equations (form matter in equilibrium in gravitational fields) and different equations of state for neutron-star matter. The calculations are done for different input central densities. We have also obtained pressure and density as a function of distance from the center of the star, the moment of inertia and the surface gravitational redshift as a function of the total mass of the star. The maximum mass M max is for all equations of state in our calculations given by 1.65M sun max sun (where M sun is the solar mass), which agrees very well with ''experimental'' results. Corresponding radii R are given by 8.8km < R < 12.7km, and a smaller central density will, in general, give a smaller mass and a larger radius. (author). 11 refs, 19 figs, 8 tabs

  17. Relation between radius and expansion velocity in planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Y.H.; Kwitter, K.B.; Kaler, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    The expansion velocity-radius (R-V) relation for planetary nebulae is examined using the existing measurements of expansion velocities and recent calculations of radii. It is found that some of the previously alleged R-V relations for PN are not convincingly established. The scatter in the R-V plots may be due largely to stratification of ions in individual nebulae and to heterogeneity in the planetary nebula population. In addition, from new echelle/CCD observations of planetary nebulae, it is found that spatial information is essential in deriving the internal kinematic properties. Future investigations of R-V relations should be pursued separately for groups of planetaries with similar physical properties, and they should employ observations of appropriate low excitation lines in order to measure the expansion velocity at the surface of the nebula. 26 references

  18. [Treatment of type C3 distal radius fractures with AO 2.4 mm locking plate system after manipulative reduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Zuo-Jun; Wang, Lei; Niu, Su-Ling; Wen, Ya-Fei; Guo, Yan-Xing

    2014-11-01

    To summarize our experiences in the treatment of type C3 (AO/OTA) distal radius fractures fixed with AO 2.4 mm locking plates combined with percutaneous pinning after manipulative reduction. From May 2009 to March 2012, 19 patients (2 cases of both sides) with type C3 (AO/OTA) distal radius fractures were treated with volar locking plates combined with percutaneous pinning for distal radius after manipulative reduction. Among the patients, the average age was (45.3 ± 17.4) years old (ranged, 31 to 66 years old). The fracture were complicated with ulnar styloid fracture in 14 wrists and 6 wrists had distal radioulnar joint instability. All the patients had closed fracture and the mean duration was (6.7 ± 3.5) days (4.5 to 9 days). The Henry approach was applied to expose the fracture site. Joint capsule and ligaments were retained for indirect reduction. After indirect reduction, the poking reduction technique was used to correct the residual compression, and congruence of distal ulnar radial joint was verified under fluorscopic guidance. Styloid process was first pinned percutaneously and then AO 2.4 mm volar locking plate was used to support rigid fixation. The fractures complicated with distal radioulnar joint instability and ulnar styloid fracture were treated with forearm plaster support in supination for 6 weeks. Nineteen patients (21 wrists) were followed up for an average duration of 10.5 months (ranged, 7 to 17 months). Radiographic bone union of distal radius was achieved in all cases, nonunion of the ulnar styloid occurred in 3 cases, and no distal radioulnar joint instability occurred. Tendon irritation was found in 2 cases and disappeared after the internal fixation was removed. The volar tilt, radial angle, radial length, incongruence of articular surface and distal radioulnar joint were observed at the follow-up. According to Batra and Gupta scoring system, 13 wrists were assessed to have a score of more than 80, 5 wrists 70 to 90, 3 wrists less

  19. Nuclear charge radius measurements of radioactive beryllium isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to measure the nuclear charge radii of the beryllium isotopes $^{7,9,10}$Be and the one-neutron halo isotope $^{11}$Be using laser spectroscopy of trapped ions. Ions produced at ISOLDE and ionized with the laser ion source will be cooled and bunched in the radio-frequency buncher of the ISOLTRAP experiment and then transferred into a specially designed Paul trap. Here, they will be cooled to temperatures in the mK range employing sympathetic and direct laser cooling. Precision laser spectroscopy of the isotope shift on the cooled ensemble in combination with accurate atomic structure calculations will provide nuclear charge radii with a precision of better than 3%. This will be the first model-independent determination of a one-neutron halo nuclear charge radius.

  20. STUDY OF REFLECTION COEFFICIENT DISTRIBUTION FOR ANTI-REFLECTION COATINGS ON SMALL-RADIUS OPTICAL PARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Gubanova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with findings for the energy reflection coefficient distribution of anti- reflection coating along the surface of optical elements with a very small radius (2-12 mm. The factors influencing the magnitude of the surface area of the optical element, in which the energy reflection coefficient is constant, were detected. The main principles for theoretical models that describe the spectral characteristics of the multilayer interference coatings were used to achieve these objectives. The relative size of the enlightenment area is defined as the ratio of the radius for the optical element surface, where the reflection is less than a certain value, to its radius (ρ/r. The result of research is the following: this size is constant for a different value of the curvature radius for the optical element made of the same material. Its value is determined by the refractive index of material (nm, from which the optical element was made, and the design of antireflection coatings. For single-layer coatings this value is ρ/r = 0.5 when nm = 1.51; and ρ/r = 0.73 when nm = 1.75; for two-layer coatings ρ/r = 0.35 when nm = 1.51 and ρ/r = 0.41 when nm = 1.75. It is shown that with increasing of the material refractive index for the substrate size, the area of minimum reflection coefficient is increased. The paper considers a single-layer, two-layer, three-layer and five-layer structures of antireflection coatings. The findings give the possibility to conclude that equal thickness coverings formed on the optical element surface with a small radius make no equal reflection from the entire surface, and distribution of the layer thickness needs to be looked for, providing a uniform radiation reflection at all points of the spherical surface.

  1. A numerical study on effect of corner radius and Reynolds number ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prasenjit Dey

    6.4 Skin friction coefficient with Re and r. Figure 12 shows the value of the skin friction coefficient on the cylinder surface. Skin friction coefficient (Cf) is nothing. Figure 9. Variation of (a) drag coefficient with Re, (b) pressure drag coefficient and viscous drag coefficient with Re and (c) drag coefficient with corner radius. 1162.

  2. Surface-sensitive molecular interferometry: beyond 3He spin echo experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantin, Joshua T.; Krems, Roman V.; Godsi, Oded; Maniv, Tsofar; Alexandrowicz, Gil

    2017-04-01

    3 He atoms can be used as surface-sensitive atomic interferometers in 3He spin echo experiments to measure surface morphology, molecular and atomic surface diffusion dynamics, and surface vibrations. However, using the hyperfine states of molecules gives experiments the potential to be less expensive, be more sensitive, and include angle-dependent interactions. The manifold of hyperfine states of molecules is large in comparison to the two nuclear spin states used in 3He spin echo experiments and allows for increased precision, while simultaneously complicating experimental interpretation. Here, we present the theoretical formulation required to interpret these experiments. In particular, we show how to determine the effect of magnetic lensing on the molecular hyperfine states and use a modified form of the transfer matrix method to quantum mechanically describe molecular propagation throughout the experiment. We also discuss how to determine the scattering matrix from the experimental observables via machine learning techniques. As an example, we perform numerical calculations using nine hyperfine states of ortho-hydrogen and compare the results to experiment. This work was funded by NSERC of Canada and the European Research Council under the European Union's seventh framework program (FP/2007-2013)/ERC Grant 307267.

  3. Fractures of the distal radius. Current concepts for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broos, P L; Fourneau, I A; Stoffelen, D V

    2001-06-01

    The authors review the treatment of fractures of the distal radius, based on their experience and from data in the literature. The choice of a treatment for any given fracture must take into account first of all the stability of the fracture. The best results are achieved in stable fractures. Only minimally displaced distal radius fractures can be treated functionally. However, a plaster cast for one week is indicated for the comfort of the patient. In displaced but stable fractures both closed reduction and percutaneous fixation are indicated. In case of closed reduction, the plaster cast should be applied for 5 to 6 weeks with an above-elbow cast for 3 weeks. Percutaneous fixation gives the best results in extraarticular fractures in younger patients. Because of its simplicity however, it should not be ignored in the elderly osteoporotic patients. In the authors' experience, both techniques were only used for extraarticular fractures. Good and excellent results were found in the closed reduction and plaster cast group in 74% of the patients; the Kapandji technique gave 75% good and excellent results. These results are in line with other findings which show that, for simple fracture types, the Kapandji technique and closed reduction seem to give similar results. External fixation is widely used for intra-articular comminuted fractures. Dynamic external fixation does not show any advantage over static devices. Additional K-wires or bone grafting may be necessary. External fixation gives superior results to plate and screw fixation. Internal fixation should be reserved for fractures with ventral comminution or severe displacement with unacceptable reduction by closed or minimally invasive techniques.

  4. Water experiment of high-speed, free-surface, plane jet along concave wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hideo; Ida, Mizuho; Kato, Yoshio; Maekawa, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kazuhiro; Kukita, Yutaka

    1997-01-01

    In the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), an intense 14 MeV neutron beam will be generated in the high-speed liquid lithium (Li) plane jet target flowing along concave wall in vacuum. As part of the conceptual design activity (CDA) of the IFMIF, the stability of the plane liquid jet flow was studied experimentally with water in a well-defined channel geometry for non-heating condition. A two-dimensional double-reducer nozzle being newly proposed for the IFMIF target successfully provided a high-speed (≤ 17 m/s) stable water jet with uniform velocity distribution at the nozzle exit without flow separation in the nozzle. The free surface of the jet was covered by two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional waves, the size of which did not change much over the tested jet length of ∼130 mm. The jet velocity profile changed around the nozzle exit from uniform to that of free-vortex flow where the product of the radius of stream line and local velocity is constant in the jet thickness. The jet thickness increased immediately after exiting the nozzle because of the velocity profile change. The predicted jet thickness by a modified one-dimensional momentum model agreed with the data well. (author)

  5. On Galaxy Mass-Radius Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindoni, D.; Secco, L.; Contini, E.; Caimmi, R.

    In the Clausius' virial maximum theory (TCV) [Secco and Bindoni, NewA 14, 567 (2009)] to explain the galaxy Fundamental Plane (FP) a natural explanation follows about the observed relationship between stellar mass and effective radius, M ∗ - r e , for early type galaxies (ETGs). The key of this correlation lies in the deep link which has to exist between cosmology and the existence of the FP. The general strategy consists in using the two-component tensor virial theorem to describe the virial configuration of the baryonic component of mass M B ≃ M ∗ embedded in a dark matter (DM) halo of mass M D at the end of relaxation phase. In a ΛCDM flat cosmology, starting from variance at equivalence epoch, we derive some preliminary theoretical relationships, M ∗ - r e , which are functions of mass ratio m = M D / M B . They appear to be in agreement with the trends extracted from the data of galaxy sample used by [Tortora et al., MNRAS 396, 1132 (2009)].

  6. Experimental study of finite Larmor radius effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struve, K.W.

    1980-08-01

    Linear Z-pinches in Ar, Kr, Xe, N 2 , and He are experimentally studied in regimes where strong finite Larmor radius effects could provide a significant stabilizing effect. Scaling arguments show that for deuterium such a pinch has an electron line density of order 2 x 10 15 /cm. For higher Z plasmas a higher line density is allowed, the exact value of which depends on the average ion charge. The pinch is formed by puffing gas axially through the cathode towards the anode of an evacuated pinch chamber. When the gas reaches the anode, the pinch bank is fired. The pinch current rises in 2 to 3 μsec to a maximum of 100 to 200 kA. The pinch bank capacitance is 900 μF, and the external inductance is 100 nH. Additionally, the bank is fused to increase dI/dt. The primary diagnostics are a framing camera, a spatially resolved Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and X-ray absorption

  7. Three-dimensional analysis of osteophyte formation on distal radius following scaphoid nonunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, Keiichiro; Moritomo, Hisao; Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Oka, Kunihiro; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to quantitatively analyze osteophyte formation of the distal radius following scaphoid nonunion and to investigate how fracture locations relate to osteophyte formation patterns. Three-dimensional surface models of the scaphoid and distal radius were constructed from computed tomographic images of both the wrists of 17 patients' with scaphoid nonunion. The scaphoid nonunions were classified into 3 types according to the location of the fracture line: distal extra-articular (n = 6); distal intra-articular (n = 5); and proximal (n = 6). The osteophyte models of the radius were created by subtracting the mirror image of the contralateral radius model from the affected radius model using a Boolean operation. The osteophyte locations on the radius were divided into 5 areas: styloid process, dorsal scaphoid fossa, volar scaphoid fossa, dorsal lunate fossa, and volar lunate fossa. Osteophyte volumes were compared among the areas and types of nonunion. The presence or absence of dorsal intercalated segment instability (DISI) deformity was also determined. The distal intra-articular type exhibited significantly larger osteophytes in the styloid process than the distal extra-articular type. Furthermore, the proximal type exhibited significantly larger osteophytes in the dorsal scaphoid fossa than the distal extra-articular type. Finally, the distal intra- and extra-articular types were more associated with DISI deformity and tended to have larger osteophytes in the lunate fossa than the proximal type. The pattern of osteophyte formation in the distal radius determined using three-dimensional computed tomography imaging varied among the different types of scaphoid nonunion (distal extra-articular, distal intra-articular, and proximal). The results of this study are clinically useful in determining whether additional resection of osteophytes or radial styloid is necessary or not during the treatment of the scaphoid nonunion. Copyright

  8. Coevolution of bed surface patchiness and channel morphology: 2. Numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter A.; McDonald, Richard R.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; Dietrich, William E.

    2015-01-01

    In gravel bed rivers, bed topography and the bed surface grain size distribution evolve simultaneously, but it is not clear how feedbacks between topography and grain sorting affect channel morphology. In this, the second of a pair of papers examining interactions between bed topography and bed surface sorting in gravel bed rivers, we use a two-dimensional morphodynamic model to perform numerical experiments designed to explore the coevolution of both free and forced bars and bed surface patches. Model runs were carried out on a computational grid simulating a 200 m long, 2.75 m wide, straight, rectangular channel, with an initially flat bed at a slope of 0.0137. Over five numerical experiments, we varied (a) whether an obstruction was present, (b) whether the sediment was a gravel mixture or a single size, and (c) whether the bed surface grain size feeds back on the hydraulic roughness field. Experiments with channel obstructions developed a train of alternate bars that became stationary and were connected to the obstruction. Freely migrating alternate bars formed in the experiments without channel obstructions. Simulations incorporating roughness feedbacks between the bed surface and flow field produced flatter, broader, and longer bars than simulations using constant roughness or uniform sediment. Our findings suggest that patches are not simply a by-product of bed topography, but they interact with the evolving bed and influence morphologic evolution.

  9. Experiment and model for the surface tension of amine–ionic liquids aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Pan; Du, LeiXia; Fu, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The surface tensions of MEA/DEA–ionic liquids aqueous solutions were measured. • The experiments were modeled satisfactorily by using a thermodynamic equation. • The temperature dependence of the surface tension was illustrated. • The effects of the mass fractions of MEA/DEA and ionic liquids were demonstrated. - Abstract: The surface tension (γ) of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Bmim][BF 4 ])–monoethanolamine (MEA), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([Bmim][Br])–MEA, [Bmim][BF 4 ]–diethanolamine (DEA) and [Bmim][Br]–DEA aqueous solutions was measured by using the BZY-1 surface tension meter. The temperature ranged from (293.2 to 323.2) K. The mass fraction of amines and ionic liquids (ILS) respectively ranged from 0.15 to 0.30 and 0.05 to 0.10. A thermodynamic equation was proposed to model the surface tension of amines–ILS aqueous solutions and the calculated results agreed well with the experiments. The effects of temperature, mass fraction of amines and ILS on the surface tension were demonstrated on the basis of experiments and calculations

  10. Distal radius hemiarthroplasty combined with proximal row carpectomy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Jeffrey S; Adams, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Severe wrist arthritis is most commonly treated by complete wrist arthrodesis, which provides predictable pain relief but the loss of motion may reduce ease of function. In selected patients, motion preserving surgical options, including limited intercarpal fusion, proximal row carpectomy (PRC), and total wrist arthroplasty (TWA) are considered. However, limited fusion and PRC are typically possible only in less severe cases in which there are some articular surfaces showing minimal degeneration that can be retained. TWA is an option for patients who have lower activity demands and specific needs or desires to maintain some wrist motion. Recent utility and decision analysis studies demonstrate that arthroplasty is associated with higher qualify adjusted life year (QALY) than arthrodesis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Despite these positive aspects of TWA, the procedure is not as widely accepted as hip, knee, or shoulder arthroplasty. Early implants had problems related to both materials and design, with breakage, loosening and joint imbalance being common complications. Newer generation implants are improved with more predictable early function, less joint imbalance, and rare breakage, but distal component loosening remains a substantial problem. Thus, patients with poor bone stock and those with high activity demands are typically not candidates for TWA, and all patients are advised to restrict activities to reduce the risk of implant loosening. A new motion preserving procedure has recently been used at our institution in selected patients with severe arthritis who do not qualify for TWA but request an alternative to complete wrist fusion. In this procedure, a distal radius implant arthroplasty is combined with a PRC. The distal radius component of a Universal 2 (UNI 2) total wrist arthroplasty system (Integra life Sciences, Plainsboro, NJ) is used. To our knowledge, there have been no previous publications on this technique. We report our first two cases

  11. Finite-Larmor-radius stability theory of EBT plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Cheng, C.Z.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1982-11-01

    An eikonal ballooning-mode formalism is developed to describe curvature-driven modes of hot electron plasmas in bumpy tori. The formalism treats frequencies comparable to the ion-cyclotron frequency, as well as arbitrary finite Larmor radius and field polarization, although the detailed analysis is restricted to E/sub parallel/ = 0. Moderate hot-electron finite-Larmor-radius effects are found to lower the background beta core limit, whereas strong finite-Lamor-radius effects produce stabilization

  12. Extensile surgical exposures of the radius: a comparative anatomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jockel, Christopher R; Zlotolow, Dan A; Butler, R Bryan; Becker, Edward H

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate and compare exposures of the radius using 3 surgical approaches. Our hypotheses were that the anterior flexor carpi radialis approach allows greater exposure of the distal radius than does the volar-ulnar approach, and the extensile flexor carpi radialis approach allows comparable proximal and midshaft exposure of the radius compared with the dorsal Thompson approach. We performed anterior and dorsal exposures of the radius on 10 matched pairs of cadavers (20 forearms) randomly assigned to 1 anterior and 1 dorsal approach. We measured and compared the anatomic features and limits of the anterior flexor carpi radialis approach, volar-ulnar approach to the distal radius, and the dorsal Thompson approach. The anterior flexor carpi radialis approach exposed 3.3 cm of distal radius width, was convertible to an extensile approach proximally, required sacrifice of 3 arterial branches, and was limited by the junction of the radial and ulnar arteries. This approach provided 79% of radius exposure and ended 4.7 cm distal to the radiocapitellar joint. The volar-ulnar approach to the distal radius exposed 3.1 cm of distal radius width. The dorsal Thompson approach sacrificed no arterial branches, provided 69% of radius exposure, was limited by the first compartment distally and the posterior interosseous nerve proximally, and ended within 2.6 cm of the radiocapitellar joint. The posterior interosseous nerve coursed 19, 14, and 6 mm dorsolateral to the distal, middle, and proximal margins, respectively, of the supinator insertion on the radius. The volar-ulnar approach provided less access to the radial styloid and was not as extensile as the flexor carpi radialis approach. The Thompson approach provided more proximal exposure than the flexor carpi radialis approach. Improved knowledge of the anatomy, limits of exposure, and comparison of features between approaches to the radius may facilitate surgical planning and exposure. Copyright © 2013 American Society for

  13. Autentikointi RADIUS-palvelinta käyttäen

    OpenAIRE

    Huhtamäki, Samuli

    2007-01-01

    Tässä opinnäytetyössä otettiin käyttöön RADIUS-palvelin Satakunnan ammattikorkeakoulun GPRS-verkossa. Työssä esiteltiin RADIUKSEEN liittyvä teoria, ja sovellettiin sitä älyverkkolaboratorion verkkoympäristössä. Tavoitteena oli asentaa RADIUS-ohjelmisto laboratorion serverille, ja sitä käytettiin GPRS-verkon palvelujen yhteydessä (GGSN tukee RADIUSTA). Radius-palvelimen avulla autentikoidaan verkon palvelujen käyttäjät. RADIUS server was taken into service in the GPRS Network of Satakunta U...

  14. Outcome in corrective osteotomy for malunited distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Lucjan; Treder, Mariusz; Kolarz, Krzysztof; Lorczyński, Adam

    2007-01-01

    This article reports outcome in osteotomy for malunion of distal radius fractures. We evaluated 12 patients with distal radius malunion (mean age 54), who were treated with corrective osteotomy. Wrist motion and grip strength were evaluated, along with examination of pre and post osteotomy radiographs. The indications for corrections were degree of deformity, limitation of function, pain, and the appearance of the wrist. The radiographic evaluation proved that the restoration of the normal anatomic relationship between the distal radius and ulna leads to significant improvement of the function of the hand, as measured by range of motion and grip strength. Osteotomy of the distal radius in cases of malunion gives favorable outcomes.

  15. A Non-Interfering Beam Radius Diagnostic Suitable For Induction Linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nexsen, W E

    2005-01-01

    High current electron induction linacs operate in a parameter regime that allows the use of a diamagnetic loop (DML) to measure the beam magnetic moment. Under certain easily met conditions the beam radius can be derived from the moment measurement. The DML has the advantage over the present methods of measuring beam radius in that it is an electrical measurement with good time resolution that does not interfere with the beam transport. I describe experiments on the LLNL accelerators, ETA-II and FXR that give confidence in the use of a DML as a beam diagnostic

  16. The Radius and Entropy of a Magnetized, Rotating, Fully Convective Star: Analysis with Depth-dependent Mixing Length Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Lewis G.; Browning, Matthew K.

    2018-04-01

    Some low-mass stars appear to have larger radii than predicted by standard 1D structure models; prior work has suggested that inefficient convective heat transport, due to rotation and/or magnetism, may ultimately be responsible. We examine this issue using 1D stellar models constructed using Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA). First, we consider standard models that do not explicitly include rotational/magnetic effects, with convective inhibition modeled by decreasing a depth-independent mixing length theory (MLT) parameter α MLT. We provide formulae linking changes in α MLT to changes in the interior specific entropy, and hence to the stellar radius. Next, we modify the MLT formulation in MESA to mimic explicitly the influence of rotation and magnetism, using formulations suggested by Stevenson and MacDonald & Mullan, respectively. We find rapid rotation in these models has a negligible impact on stellar structure, primarily because a star’s adiabat, and hence its radius, is predominantly affected by layers near the surface; convection is rapid and largely uninfluenced by rotation there. Magnetic fields, if they influenced convective transport in the manner described by MacDonald & Mullan, could lead to more noticeable radius inflation. Finally, we show that these non-standard effects on stellar structure can be fabricated using a depth-dependent α MLT: a non-magnetic, non-rotating model can be produced that is virtually indistinguishable from one that explicitly parameterizes rotation and/or magnetism using the two formulations above. We provide formulae linking the radially variable α MLT to these putative MLT reformulations.

  17. Doodling the Nerves: Surfacing Language Anxiety Experiences in an English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siagto-Wakat, Geraldine

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the use of doodling to surface experiences in the psychological phenomenon of language anxiety in an English classroom. It treated the doodles of 192 freshmen from a premier university in Northern Luzon, Philippines. Further, it made use of phenomenological reduction in analysing the data gathered. Findings reveal…

  18. Impacts on surface productivity during sediment dispersal experiment in Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nath, B.N.; Ingole, B.S.; Parthiban, G.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Raghukumar, C.; Khadge, N.H.; Valsangkar, A.B.; Suryanarayana, A.; Jaisankar, S.; Sharma, R.

    conditions at the point of discharge thus altering the regimes of productivity in the water column. In order to assess the effects of deep sea sediment discharge on the oceanic surface water-layers (0-50M) after nodule mining, a Sediment Dispersal Experiment...

  19. A new technique for the identification of surface contamination in low temperature bolometric experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangiorgio, S.; Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Capelli, S.; Carbone, L.; Clemenza, M.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Foggetta, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gorla, P.; Nones, C.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pedretti, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Salvioni, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the bolometric experiment CUORE, a new and promising technique has been developed in order to control the dangerous contamination coming from the surfaces close to the detector. In fact, by means of a composite bolometer, it is possible to partially overcome the loss of spatial resolution of the bolometer itself and to clearly identify events coming from outside.

  20. Factors Affecting Optimal Surface Roughness of AISI 4140 Steel in Turning Operation Using Taguchi Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novareza, O.; Sulistiyarini, D. H.; Wiradmoko, R.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents the result of using Taguchi method in turning process of medium carbon steel of AISI 4140. The primary concern is to find the optimal surface roughness after turning process. The taguchi method is used to get a combination of factors and factor levels in order to get the optimum surface roughness level. Four important factors with three levels were used in experiment based on Taguchi method. A number of 27 experiments were carried out during the research and analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) method. The result of surface finish was determined in Ra type surface roughness. The depth of cut was found to be the most important factors for reducing the surface roughness of AISI 4140 steel. On the contrary, the other important factors i.e. spindle speed and rake side angle of the tool were proven to be less factors that affecting the surface finish. It is interesting to see the effect of coolant composition that gained the second important factors to reduce the roughness. It may need further research to explain this result.

  1. Evaluation of Surface Runoff Generation Processes Using a Rainfall Simulator: A Small Scale Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danáčová, Michaela; Valent, Peter; Výleta, Roman

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, rainfall simulators are being used by many researchers in field or laboratory experiments. The main objective of most of these experiments is to better understand the underlying runoff generation processes, and to use the results in the process of calibration and validation of hydrological models. Many research groups have assembled their own rainfall simulators, which comply with their understanding of rainfall processes, and the requirements of their experiments. Most often, the existing rainfall simulators differ mainly in the size of the irrigated area, and the way they generate rain drops. They can be characterized by the accuracy, with which they produce a rainfall of a given intensity, the size of the irrigated area, and the rain drop generating mechanism. Rainfall simulation experiments can provide valuable information about the genesis of surface runoff, infiltration of water into soil and rainfall erodibility. Apart from the impact of physical properties of soil, its moisture and compaction on the generation of surface runoff and the amount of eroded particles, some studies also investigate the impact of vegetation cover of the whole area of interest. In this study, the rainfall simulator was used to simulate the impact of the slope gradient of the irrigated area on the amount of generated runoff and sediment yield. In order to eliminate the impact of external factors and to improve the reproducibility of the initial conditions, the experiments were conducted in laboratory conditions. The laboratory experiments were carried out using a commercial rainfall simulator, which was connected to an external peristaltic pump. The pump maintained a constant and adjustable inflow of water, which enabled to overcome the maximum volume of simulated precipitation of 2.3 l, given by the construction of the rainfall simulator, while maintaining constant characteristics of the simulated precipitation. In this study a 12-minute rainfall with a constant intensity

  2. The `Chocolate Experiment' - A Demonstration of Radiation Absorption by Different Colored Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Dennis

    2015-12-01

    In the typical "cookbook" experiment comparing the radiation absorption rates of different colored surfaces, students' hands are commonly used as a measurement instrument to demonstrate that dull black and silvery surfaces are good and poor absorbers of radiation, respectively. However, college students are often skeptical about using their bare hands in this experiment because they learned in early science lessons that skin is not a reliable detector of heat transfer. Moreover, when the experiment is conducted in a school laboratory, it is often difficult for students to perceive the slight differences in heat transfer on the dull black and silvery aluminum leaves attached to their hands. Rather than replacing students' bare hands with such sophisticated apparatus as a data logger and temperature probe, I suggest using a simple (and delicious!) low-cost instrument, i.e., chocolate, which simply melts when it receives radiation.

  3. Distal radius fractures: what determines the outcome after surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunis, T.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis addresses current issues in the outcome of operatively treated distal radius fractures. The general aim was to determine factors associated with adverse events, loss of motion, functional limitations, and opioid use after surgery. Injury In 3D complete articular distal radius fracture

  4. The minimal spectral radius of graphs with a given diameter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, E.R. van; Kooij, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    The spectral radius of a graph (i.e., the largest eigenvalue of its corresponding adjacency matrix) plays an important role in modeling virus propagation in networks. In fact, the smaller the spectral radius, the larger the robustness of a network against the spread of viruses. Among all connected

  5. New formulas for the spectral radius via Aluthge transform

    OpenAIRE

    Chabbabi, Fadil; Mbekhta, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we give several expressions of spectral radius of a bounded operator on a Hilbert space, in terms of iterates of Aluthge transformation, numerical radius and the asymptotic behavior of the powers of this operator. Also we obtain several characterizations of normaloid operators.

  6. Determination of Radius of Curvature for Teeth With Cycloid Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Shatalov, E. V.; Efremenkov (Ephremenkov), Egor Alekseevich; Shibinskiy, Konstantin Grigorievich

    2016-01-01

    In the article the geometric determination of curvature radius is considered for teeth with cycloid profile. The equations are obtained for the determination of a radius of curvature with point coordinates of a cycloid profile. The conditions of convexo-concavity of a teeth profile are defined for transmission with intermediate rollers.

  7. Determination of Radius of Curvature for Teeth With Cycloid Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatalov, E. V.; Efremenkov, E. A.; Shibinskiy, K. G.

    2016-04-01

    In the article the geometric determination of curvature radius is considered for teeth with cycloid profile. The equations are obtained for the determination of a radius of curvature with point coordinates of a cycloid profile. The conditions of convexo-concavity of a teeth profile are defined for transmission with intermediate rollers.

  8. Outcome of management of distal radius fractures in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We tried to highlight that postmenopausal distal radius fractures attributed to osteoporosis, are not given much of consideration when lot of funds and researches are being diverted to osteoporosis and related diseases. Methods: 60 elderly female patients with distal radius fracture were studied for outcome. The primary ...

  9. Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

  10. Dust generation mechanisms under powerful plasma impacts to the tungsten surfaces in ITER ELM simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhlaj, V.A.; Garkusha, I.E.; Aksenov, N.N.; Chuvilo, A.A.; Chebotarev, V.V.; Landman, I.; Malykhin, S.V.; Pestchanyi, S.; Pugachov, A.T.

    2013-01-01

    In recent tokamak simulation experiments with the QSPA Kh-50 facility several mechanisms of dust generation from tungsten surfaces under ITER ELM-like energy loads have been identified. Here cracking and melting are reported. The brittle destruction dominates after a few transient impacts when a network of major cracks forms on the surface. Bifurcation of major cracks results in ejection of dust particles with sizes up to ∼30 μm. Dust generation occurs also after surface melting and following resolidification when fine crack networks along the grain boundaries develop. In this process the destruction is accompanied by bridge formation due to capillary tension across the fine cracks. Next impacts (even weak melt-free ones) can destroy those bridges, which produces considerable amounts of dust particles of nm-size dust. Surface modification after the repetitive plasma pulses also results in creation of nm-size dust

  11. Impact of land surface conditions on 2004 North American monsoon in GCM experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X.; Bosilovich, M.; Houser, P.; Chern, J.-D.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, two sets of six-member ensemble simulations were performed for the boreal summer of 2004 using the Finite Volume General Circulation model to investigate the sensitivity of the North American monsoon (NAM) system to land surface conditions and further to identify the mechanisms by which land surface processes control the NAM precipitation. The control simulation uses a fully interactive land surface model, whereas the sensitivity experiment uses prescribed land surface fields from the Global Land Data Assimilation System.The response of the monsoon precipitation to land surface changes varies over different regions modulated by two different soil moisture-precipitation feedbacks. The vast northern NAM region, including most of Arizona and New Mexico, as well as the northwestern Mexico shows that soil moisture has a positive feedback with precipitation primarily due to local recycling mechanisms. The reduction of soil moisture decreases latent heat flux and increases sensible heat flux and consequently increases the Bowen ratio and surface temperature, leading to a deep (warm and dry) boundary layer, which suppresses convection and hence reduces precipitation. Over the west coast of Mexico near Sinaloa, a negative soil moisture-precipitation relationship is noted to be associated with a large-scale mechanism. The reduced soil moisture changes surface fluxes and hence boundary layer instability and ultimately low-level circulation. As a result, the changes in surface pressure and large scale wind field increase moisture flux convergence and consequently moisture content, leading to increased atmospheric instability and in turn enhancing convection and accordingly precipitation. These results further reinforce the important role of land surface conditions on surface process, boundary structure, atmospheric circulation, and rainfall during the NAM development.

  12. Mercury's radius change estimates revisited using high incidence angle MESSENGER data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Achille, G.; Popa, C.; Massironi, M.; Ferrari, S.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Zusi, M.; Cremonese, G.; Palumbo, P.

    2012-04-01

    Estimates of Mercury's radius decrease obtained using the amount of strain recorded by tectonics on the planet range from 0.5 km to 2 km. These latter figures appear too low with respect to the radius contraction (up to 5-6 km) predicted by the most accredited studies based on thermo-mechanical evolution models. For this reason, it has been suggested that there may be hidden strain accommodated by features yet unseen on Mercury. Indeed, as it has been already cautioned by previous studies, the identification of tectonic features on Mercury might be largely biased by the lighting geometry of the used basemaps. This limitation might have affected the results of the extrapolations for estimating the radius change. In this study, we mapped tectonic features at the terminator thus using images acquired at high sun incidence angle (>50°) that represents the optimal condition for their observation. In fact, images with long shadows enhance the topography and texture of the surface and are ideal to detect tectonic structures. This favorable illumination conditions allowed us to infer reliable measurements of spatial distribution (i.e. frequency, orientation, and areal density) of tectonic features which can be used to estimate the average contractional strain and planetary radius decrease. We digitized tectonic structures within a region extending for an area of about 12 million sq. km (~16% of planet's surface). More than 1300 tectonic lineaments were identified and interpreted to be compressional features (i.e. lobate scarps, wrinkle ridges, and high relief ridges) with a total length of more than 12300 km. Assuming that the extensional strain is negligible within the area, the average contractional strain calculated for the survey area is ~0.21-0.28% (~0.24% for θ=30°). This strain, extrapolated to the entire surface, corresponds to a contraction in radius of about 2.5-3.4 km (~2.9 km for θ=30°). Interestingly, the values of contractional strain and radius decrease

  13. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-09-08

    Measurements and simulations have found that water moves through carbon nanotubes at exceptionally high rates owing to nearly frictionless interfaces. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications including desalination, nano-filtration and energy harvesting, yet the exact mechanisms of water transport inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be debated because existing theories do not provide a satisfactory explanation for the limited number of experimental results available so far. This lack of experimental results arises because, even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate through individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes, and no slippage in boron nitride nanotubes that are crystallographically similar to carbon nanotubes, but electronically different. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in the atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier at which the continuum picture of fluid mechanics meets the atomic nature of matter.

  14. The reliability of AO classification for distal radius fracture, using CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Yasuaki; Ono, Hiroshi; Furuta, Kazuhiko; Fujitani, Ryoutarou; Ota, Hiroyoshi

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of the AO (Association for the Study of Internal Fixation) classification of distal radius fracture, using plain radiographs and 2 cross-sectional computed tomographic (CT) surface images. Five observers independently classified 32 distal radius fractures into 9 groups under AO classification. We established 4 methods for observation. First, using only two-directional radiographs; second, four-directional radiographs; third, CT (axial view) with four-directional radiographs; and fourth, CT (axial and sagittal views) with four-directional radiographs. Kappa statistics were used to establish the relative level of agreement between the observers. Interobserver reliability was poor in both first and second methods in which only plain radiographs were used (κ=0.30 and 0.23, respectively). Furthermore, reliability did not increase in the third method with the addition of 1 CT surface image (κ=0.29). In the fourth method, with the addition of 2 cross-sectional CT surface images, the reliability increased to a moderate level (κ=0.44). Interobserver reliability of the AO system of the classification of distal radius fractures was observed on using 2 cross-sectional CT surface images with four-directional radiographs. (author)

  15. An Experiment Study on Surface Roughness in High Speed Milling NAK80 Die Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Fa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces that the high speed milling experiments on NAK80 die steel was carried out on the DMU 60 mono BLOCK five axis linkage high speed CNC machining center tool by the TiAlN coated tools, in order to research the effect of milling parameters on surface roughness Ra. The results showed that the Ra value increased with the decrease of milling speed vc, increased with the axial depth of milling ap, and feed per tooth fz and radial depth of milling ae. On the basis of the single factor experiment results, the mathematics model for between surface roughness and milling parameters were established by linear regression analysis.

  16. Experiment of Laser Pointing Stability on Different Surfaces to validate Micrometric Positioning Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)721924; Mainaud Durand, Helene; Piedigrossi, Didier; Sandomierski, Jacek; Sosin, Mateusz; Geiger, Alain; Guillaume, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    CLIC requires 10 μm precision and accuracy over 200m for the pre-alignment of beam related components. A solution based on laser beam as straight line reference is being studied at CERN. It involves camera/shutter assemblies as micrometric positioning sensors. To validate the sensors, it is necessary to determine an appropriate material for the shutter in terms of laser pointing stability. Experiments are carried out with paper, metal and ceramic surfaces. This paper presents the standard deviations of the laser spot coordinates obtained on the different surfaces, as well as the measurement error. Our experiments validate the choice of paper and ceramic for the shutter of the micrometric positioning sensor. It also provides an estimate of the achievable precision and accuracy of the determination of the laser spot centre with respect to the shutter coordinate system defined by reference targets.

  17. Observations of flow path interactions with surface structures during initial soil development stage using irrigation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, Steffen; Biemelt, Detlef; Badorreck, Annika; Gerke, Horst H.

    2010-05-01

    Structures and processes are dynamically linked especially during initial stages of soil and ecosystem development. Here we assume that soil pore structures and micro topography determine the flow paths and water fluxes as well as further structure changes. Reports about flow path developments at the soil surface are still limited because of an insufficient knowledge of the changing micro topography at the surface. The objective of this presentation is to evaluate methods for parameterisation of surface micro topography for analysing interactions between infiltration and surface runoff. Complex irrigation experiments were carried out at an experimental site in the neighbourhood of the artificially created water catchment "Chicken Creek". The irrigation rates between 160 mm/h and 250 mm/h were held constant over a time period of 20 minutes. The incoming intensities were measured as well as the raindrop-velocity and -size distributions. The surface runoff was continuously registered, soil samples were taken, and soil water potential heads were monitored using tensiometers. Surface and subsurface flow paths were identified using different tracers. The soil surface structures were recorded using a high resolution digital camera before, during, and after irrigation. Micro topography was surveyed using close-range photogrammetry. With this experimental design both, flow paths on the surface and in the soil as well as structure and texture changes could be observed simultaneously. In 2D vertical cross-sections, the effect of initial sediment deposition structure on infiltration and runoff was observed. Image analysis of surface pictures allowed identifying structural and soil textural changes during the runoff process. Similar structural changes related to surface flow paths were found with the photogrammetric surface analysis. We found evidence for the importance of the initial structures on the flow paths as well as a significant influence of the system development

  18. Radius ratio effects on natural heat transfer in concentric annulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alipour, M.; Hosseini, R.; Kolaei, Alireza Rezania

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies natural convection heat transfer in vertical and electrically heated annulus. The metallic cylinders mounted concentrically in a parallel tube. Measurements are carried out for four input electric powers and three radius ratios with an apparatus immersed in stagnant air....... This experimental work develops correlations of the average Nusselt number dependency on the Rayleigh number in the annulus, where this dependency promotes as the radius ratio increases from 0.1 to 0.2. Moreover, a correlation is proposed to determine the average Nusselt number based on the variation of the radius...

  19. Fracture heuristics: surgical decision for approaches to distal radius fractures. A surgeon’s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wichlas, Florian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the present study is to develop a heuristic that could replace the surgeon’s analysis for the decision on the operative approach of distal radius fractures based on simple fracture characteristics.Patients and methods: Five hundred distal radius fractures operated between 2011 and 2014 were analyzed for the surgeon’s decision on the approach used. The 500 distal radius fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation through palmar, dorsal, and dorsopalmar approaches with 2.4 mm locking plates or underwent percutaneous fixation. The parameters that should replace the surgeon’s analysis were the fractured palmar cortex, and the frontal and the sagittal split of the articular surface of the distal radius. Results: The palmar approach was used for 422 (84.4% fractures, the dorsal approach for 39 (7.8%, and the combined dorsopalmar approach for 30 (6.0%. Nine (1.8% fractures were treated percutaneously. The correlation between the fractured palmar cortex and the used palmar approach was moderate (r=0.464; p<0.0001. The correlation between the frontal split and the dorsal approach, including the dorsopalmar approach, was strong (r=0.715; p<0.0001. The sagittal split had only a weak correlation for the dorsal and dorsopalmar approach (r=0.300; p<0.0001. Discussion: The study shows that the surgical decision on the preferred approach is dictated through two simple factors, even in the case of complex fractures. Conclusion: When the palmar cortex is displaced in distal radius fractures, a palmar approach should be used. When there is a displaced frontal split of the articular surface, a dorsal approach should be used. When both are present, a dorsopalmar approach should be used. These two simple parameters could replace the surgeon’s analysis for the surgical approach.

  20. Fracture heuristics: surgical decision for approaches to distal radius fractures. A surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichlas, Florian; Tsitsilonis, Serafim; Kopf, Sebastian; Krapohl, Björn Dirk; Manegold, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present study is to develop a heuristic that could replace the surgeon's analysis for the decision on the operative approach of distal radius fractures based on simple fracture characteristics. Patients and methods: Five hundred distal radius fractures operated between 2011 and 2014 were analyzed for the surgeon's decision on the approach used. The 500 distal radius fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation through palmar, dorsal, and dorsopalmar approaches with 2.4 mm locking plates or underwent percutaneous fixation. The parameters that should replace the surgeon's analysis were the fractured palmar cortex, and the frontal and the sagittal split of the articular surface of the distal radius. Results: The palmar approach was used for 422 (84.4%) fractures, the dorsal approach for 39 (7.8%), and the combined dorsopalmar approach for 30 (6.0%). Nine (1.8%) fractures were treated percutaneously. The correlation between the fractured palmar cortex and the used palmar approach was moderate (r=0.464; p<0.0001). The correlation between the frontal split and the dorsal approach, including the dorsopalmar approach, was strong (r=0.715; p<0.0001). The sagittal split had only a weak correlation for the dorsal and dorsopalmar approach (r=0.300; p<0.0001). Discussion: The study shows that the surgical decision on the preferred approach is dictated through two simple factors, even in the case of complex fractures. Conclusion: When the palmar cortex is displaced in distal radius fractures, a palmar approach should be used. When there is a displaced frontal split of the articular surface, a dorsal approach should be used. When both are present, a dorsopalmar approach should be used. These two simple parameters could replace the surgeon's analysis for the surgical approach.

  1. Experiments on the rf surface resistance of the perovskite superconductors at 3 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hein, M.; Klein, N.; Mueller, G.; Piel, H.; Roeth, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Since the discovery of the perovskite superconductors many experiments to explore their physical properties have been performed and various potential applications have been considered. The high critical temperature of more than 90 K obtained with Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-δ/ (Y may be substituted by other rare earth elements) makes these superconductors interesting for applications in microwave technology. This has focused the authors interest on the investigation of their rf properties. Due to the sensitivity of the rf surface resistance to surface impurities and remaining non superconducting phases rf measurements are a good means to provide useful information about the quality of sample preparation and about physical properties of the superconductor itself. This contribution reports on the experimental determination of the rf surface resistance of Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-δ/ and Eu 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-δ/ in the normal and superconducting state at 3 GHz. In the first chapter the preparation of the ceramic samples and initial dc experiments are described. The main part of the paper describes the rf measurements which are performed in a superconducting niobium host cavity. The obtained results for both the surface resistance and the high field performance are discussed with respect to the preparation of the samples and regarding possible applications. 7 references, 7 figures, 2 tables

  2. Failure characteristics of the isolated distal radius in response to dynamic impact loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Timothy A; Andrews, David M; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2012-06-01

    We examined the mechanical response of the distal radius pre-fracture and at fracture under dynamic impact loads. The distal third of eight human cadaveric radii were potted and placed in a custom designed pneumatic impact system. The distal intra-articular surface of the radius rested against a model scaphoid and lunate, simulating 45° of wrist extension. The scaphoid and lunate were attached to a load cell that in turn was attached to an impact plate. Impulsive impacts were applied at increasing energy levels, in 10 J increments, until fracture occurred. Three 45° stacked strain gauge rosettes were affixed along the length of the radius quantifying the bone strains. The mean (SD) fracture energy was 45.5 (16) J. The mean (SD) resultant impact reaction force (IRFr) at failure was 2,142 (1,229) N, resulting in high compressive strains at the distal (2,718 (1,698) µε) and proximal radius (3,664 (1,890) µε). We successfully reproduced consistent fracture patterns in response to dynamic loads. The fracture energy and forces reported here are lower and the strains are higher than those previously reported and can likely be attributed to the controlled, incremental, dynamic nature of the applied loads. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  3. Modeling and experiments of the adhesion force distribution between particles and a surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2014-06-17

    Due to the existence of surface roughness in real surfaces, the adhesion force between particles and the surface where the particles are deposited exhibits certain statistical distributions. Despite the importance of adhesion force distribution in a variety of applications, the current understanding of modeling adhesion force distribution is still limited. In this work, an adhesion force distribution model based on integrating the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness distribution (i.e., the variation of RMS roughness on the surface in terms of location) into recently proposed mean adhesion force models was proposed. The integration was accomplished by statistical analysis and Monte Carlo simulation. A series of centrifuge experiments were conducted to measure the adhesion force distributions between polystyrene particles (146.1 ± 1.99 μm) and various substrates (stainless steel, aluminum and plastic, respectively). The proposed model was validated against the measured adhesion force distributions from this work and another previous study. Based on the proposed model, the effect of RMS roughness distribution on the adhesion force distribution of particles on a rough surface was explored, showing that both the median and standard deviation of adhesion force distribution could be affected by the RMS roughness distribution. The proposed model could predict both van der Waals force and capillary force distributions and consider the multiscale roughness feature, greatly extending the current capability of adhesion force distribution prediction.

  4. Linking PFC surface characteristics and plasma performance in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, M.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boyle, D. P.; Jaworski, M. A.; Schmitt, J. C.; Bedoya, F.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) is a spherical torus magnetic confinement device designed to accommodate lithium as the primary plasma-facing component (PFC). Results are presented from the implementation on LTX of the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP), a compact in vacuo surface science diagnostic. With MAPP, in situ surface analysis techniques of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal desorption spectroscopy are used to study evolution of the PFC surface chemistry in LTX as a function of varied lithium coating, hydrogen plasma exposure, and PFC surface temperature (20 - 300°C). Surface analysis results are then correlated with various measures of LTX plasma performance, including toroidal plasma current, line-integrated plasma density, and density-normalized impurity emission. Lithium coatings are observed to convert within hours to Li2O by gettering oxygen from both the residual vacuum and the PFC substrate. However, plasma performance remains elevated even with discharges operating against Li2O -coated PFCs. Hydrogen is retained by these Li2O coatings during a discharge, but it is almost completely desorbed as outgassed H2 in the minutes following the discharge; no persistent LiH formation is observed. This work was supported by U.S. DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-AC52-07NA27344, and DE-SC0010717, as well as by an NSF GRFP fellowship under grant DGE-0646086.

  5. Human Fertility Increases with the Marital-radius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labouriau, Rodrigo; Amorim, António

    2008-01-01

    We report a positive association between marital radius (distance between mates' birthplaces) and fertility detected in a large population. Spurious association due to socioeconomic factors is discarded by a conditional analysis involving income, education, and urbanicity. Strong evidence...

  6. Spectroscopy of muonic atoms and the proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antognini, Aldo

    2017-09-01

    We have measured several 2 S -2 P transitions in muonic hydrogen (μp), muonic deuterium (μd) and muonic helium ions (μ3He, μ4He). From muonic hydrogen we extracted a proton charge radius 20 times more precise than obtained from electron-proton scattering and hydrogen high-precision laser spectroscopy but at a variance of 7 σ from these values. This discrepancy is nowadays referred to as the proton radius puzzle. New insight has been recently provided by the first determination of the deuteron charge radius from laser spectroscopy of μd. The status of the proton charge radius puzzle including the new insights obtained by μd spectroscopy will be discussed. Work supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation SNF-200021-165854 and the ERC CoG. #725039.

  7. Nuclear radius deduced from proton diffraction by a black nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohama, Akihisa; Iida, Kei; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2004-06-01

    We find a new method to deduce nuclear radii from proton-nucleus elastic scattering data. In this method, a nucleus is viewed as a “black” sphere. A diffraction pattern of protons by this sphere is equivalent to that of the Fraunhofer diffraction by a circular hole of the same radius embedded in a screen. We determine the black sphere radius in such a way as to reproduce the empirical value of the angle of the observed first diffraction peak. It is useful to identify this radius multiplied by √(3/5 ) with the root-mean-square matter radius of the target nucleus. For most stable isotopes of masses heavier than 50, it agrees, within the error bars, with the values that were deduced in previous elaborate analyses from the data obtained at proton incident energies higher than ˜800 MeV .

  8. Generalized spectral radius and its max algebra version

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müller, Vladimír; Peperko, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 439, č. 4 (2013), s. 1006-1016 ISSN 0024-3795 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0473; GA AV ČR IAA100190903 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : generalized spectral radius * joint spectral radius * Berger-Wang formula Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.983, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0024379512007380

  9. On the radius of neighborhood graphs | Mukwembi | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The k-step graph G′k of a graph G has the same vertex set as G and two vertices are adjacent in G ′ k if and only if there exists a path of length k connecting them in G. The graph G ′ 2 is called the neighborhood graph of G. We present results on the connectivity and the radius of k-step graphs, especially on the radius of ...

  10. Lower pinch radius limit in EXTRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1989-01-01

    In an Extrap pinch there is a superimposed magnetic octupole field which forms a magnetic separatrix with the field generated by the pinch current. Earlier experiments have shown that the octupole field has a stabilizing influence on the plasma. Regardless of the details of this stabilizing mechanism, it is expected that the influence of the octupole field should become negligible for a sufficiently small ratio between the characteristic pinch and separatrix radii. In other words, there should exist a lower limit of this ratio below which the system approaches the state of an ordinary unstabilized Z-pinch. The present paper presents an extended version of an earlier theoretical model of this lower limit, and its relation to the corresponding critical ratio between the external conductor and pinch currents. This ratio is found to vary substantially with the plasma parameters. (authors)

  11. Sensitive zone parameters and curvature radius evaluation for polymer optical fiber curvature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Junior, Arnaldo G.; Frizera, Anselmo; José Pontes, Maria

    2018-03-01

    Polymer optical fibers (POFs) are suitable for applications such as curvature sensors, strain, temperature, liquid level, among others. However, for enhancing sensitivity, many polymer optical fiber curvature sensors based on intensity variation require a lateral section. Lateral section length, depth, and surface roughness have great influence on the sensor sensitivity, hysteresis, and linearity. Moreover, the sensor curvature radius increase the stress on the fiber, which leads on variation of the sensor behavior. This paper presents the analysis relating the curvature radius and lateral section length, depth and surface roughness with the sensor sensitivity, hysteresis and linearity for a POF curvature sensor. Results show a strong correlation between the decision parameters behavior and the performance for sensor applications based on intensity variation. Furthermore, there is a trade-off among the sensitive zone length, depth, surface roughness, and curvature radius with the sensor desired performance parameters, which are minimum hysteresis, maximum sensitivity, and maximum linearity. The optimization of these parameters is applied to obtain a sensor with sensitivity of 20.9 mV/°, linearity of 0.9992 and hysteresis below 1%, which represent a better performance of the sensor when compared with the sensor without the optimization.

  12. Ipsilateral olecranon and distal radius fracture: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Ömer; Polat, Gökhan; Karademir, Gökhan; Kara, Deniz; Erdil, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant ipsilateral olecranon and distal radius fracture are rare injuries. Their clinical presentation is unusual and investigation and management is poorly described. We present a 55-year-old woman patient who fell off sustaining a concomitant distal radius and olecranon fracture in the same extremity. On examination, there was gross swelling of the proximal and distal forearm and no neurovascular deficit. Radiographs confirmed distal radius and olecranon fracture. Patient was treated with open reduction and anatomic locking plate for olecranon and a closed reduction percuteneous K wire fixation with penning fixator for distal radius fracture. After physical therapy program, functional results were good and DASH score was 60. Several different combinations of fracture with dislocation have been described, but, to our knowledge, concurrent ipsilateral olecranon and distal radius fracture has not been reported before. In the literature review there are two similar cases in the English literature. Ipsilateral olecranon and distal radius fracture is a very rare injury due to different trauma mechanisms. However we should keep in mind that there may be adjacent joints and structures for concomitant injuries. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Geometric studies on variable radius spiral cone-beam scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Yangbo; Zhu Jiehua; Wang Ge

    2004-01-01

    The goal is to perform geometric studies on cone-beam CT scanning along a three-dimensional (3D) spiral of variable radius. First, the background for variable radius spiral cone-beam scanning is given in the context of electron-beam CT/micro-CT. Then, necessary and sufficient conditions are proved for existence and uniqueness of PI lines inside the variable radius 3D spiral. These results are necessary steps toward exact cone-beam reconstruction from a 3D spiral scan of variable radius, adapting Katsevich's formula for the standard helical cone-beam scanning. It is shown in the paper that when the longitudinally projected planar spiral is not always convex toward the origin, the PI line may not be unique in the envelope defined by the tangents of the spiral. This situation can be avoided by using planar spirals whose curvatures are always positive. Using such a spiral, a longitudinally homogeneous region inside the corresponding 3D spiral is constructed in which any point is passed by one and only one PI line, provided the angle ω between planar spiral's tangent and radius is bounded by vertical bar ω-90 deg. vertical bar ≤ε for some positive ε≤32.48 deg. If the radius varies monotonically, this region is larger and one may allow ε≤51.85 deg. Examples for 3D spirals based on logarithmic and Archimedean spirals are given. The corresponding generalized Tam-Danielsson detection windows are also formulated

  14. Ground-based PIV and numerical flow visualization results from the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pline, Alexander D.; Werner, Mark P.; Hsieh, Kwang-Chung

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 (USML-1) Spacelab mission planned for June, 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electric, two dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique called Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT), which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. Results using the ground based STDCE hardware, with a radiant flux heating mode, and the PDT system are compared to numerical solutions obtained by solving the axisymmetric Navier Stokes equations with a deformable free surface. The PDT technique is successful in producing a velocity vector field and corresponding stream function from the raw video data which satisfactorily represents the physical flow. A numerical program is used to compute the velocity field and corresponding stream function under identical conditions. Both the PDT system and numerical results were compared to a streak photograph, used as a benchmark, with good correlation.

  15. Estimating the Analytical and Surface Enhancement Factors in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS): A Novel Physical Chemistry and Nanotechnology Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, Ioana E.; Alnajjar, Khadijeh S.; Monahan, Jennifer L.; Stahler, Adam; Hunter, Nora E.; Weaver, Kent M.; Baker, Joshua D.; Meyerhoefer, Allie J.; Dolson, David A.

    2012-01-01

    A novel laboratory experiment was successfully implemented for undergraduate and graduate students in physical chemistry and nanotechnology. The main goal of the experiment was to rigorously determine the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based sensing capabilities of colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). These were quantified by…

  16. Early Complications Associated with the Thompson Approach to the Proximal Radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perretta, Donato J; Brock, Kenneth M; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the early complications associated with the dorsal approach to the proximal radius. This approach, also called the Thompson approach, is used relatively infrequently for the treatment of forearm fractures. It is primarily reserved for proximal one-third radius fractures where a volar plate may not be placed sufficiently proximal for adequate fixation. A retrospective chart review was performed on forearm fractures performed at our institution. Over a period from January 2008 to May 2014 a total of 120 patients underwent fixation for radius shaft fractures either isolated or associated with ulna fractures; of these 120 patients, 11 were found to have utilized the Thompson approach to the proximal radius. Demographic data was collected, along with fracture pattern, and associated complications in the first 2 weeks after surgery. The average age of the patients was 31 years (range: 20 to 46 years). Ten patients were male and one was female. The mean follow-up time was 15 weeks (range: 1 to 52 weeks). The stated indication for the dorsal approach was a proximal location of the radius fracture in 10 cases and presence of dorsal open wounds in one patient. In all cases, the posterior interosseous nerve was identified and protected. The average distance from the fracture to the radial head articular surface was 72 mm (range: 34 mm to 132 mm). Four fractures were open, and seven were closed injuries. There were two postoperative posterior interosseous nerve palsies, along with one compartment syndrome requiring fasciotomy. There were no wound complications. There was an overall complication rate of 27%. Postoperative posterior interosseous nerve palsy was the most common complication in this series, occurring in 18% of the patients in spite of identification and protection of the nerve throughout the procedure. High vigilance for compartment syndrome must also be maintained after fixation of any forearm fracture, as it occurred

  17. Surface Damage Characteristics of BK7 Glass in Ultrasonic Vibration Machining Based on Scratching Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Gao; Hong-xiang, Wang; Jun-liang, Liu; Chu, Wang; Wen-jie, Zhai

    2017-11-01

    To further explore the material removal mechanism in ultrasonic vibration machining, a diamond Vickers indenter was used to carry out scratching experiment for BK7 glass specimen. The morphologies of scratches and removal mechanism of material were analysed under different conditions. The results showed that the damage mode of scratch was plastic deformation when the scratching depth was small enough, and no crack was observed. With increase of scratching depth, the intermittent and continuous scratches appeared in plastic removal area, and plastic flow phenomenon was obvious. With further increase of scratching depth, the median/radial cracks and lateral cracks were induced, and the material was removed by plastic flow and brittle-plastic mixed mode. When the indenter arrived at the brittle fracture removal area, cracks in scratched surface became denser, the lateral cracks extended from inside of material to workpiece surface, and the material was removed by brittle fracture.

  18. Technical note: Influence of surface roughness and local turbulence on coated-wall flow tube experiments for gas uptake and kinetic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Coated-wall flow tube reactors are frequently used to investigate gas uptake and heterogeneous or multiphase reaction kinetics under laminar flow conditions. Coating surface roughness may potentially distort the laminar flow pattern, induce turbulence and introduce uncertainties in the calculated uptake coefficient based on molecular diffusion assumptions (e.g., Brown/Cooney–Kim–Davis (CKD/Knopf–Pöschl–Shiraiwa (KPS methods, which has not been fully resolved in earlier studies. Here, we investigate the influence of surface roughness and local turbulence on coated-wall flow tube experiments for gas uptake and kinetic studies. According to laminar boundary theory and considering the specific flow conditions in a coated-wall flow tube, we derive and propose a critical height δc to evaluate turbulence effects in the design and analysis of coated-wall flow tube experiments. If a geometric coating thickness δg is larger than δc, the roughness elements of the coating may cause local turbulence and result in overestimation of the real uptake coefficient (γ. We further develop modified CKD/KPS methods (i.e., CKD-LT/KPS-LT to account for roughness-induced local turbulence effects. By combination of the original methods and their modified versions, the maximum error range of γCKD (derived with the CKD method or γKPS (derived with the KPS method can be quantified and finally γ can be constrained. When turbulence is generated, γCKD or γKPS can bear large difference compared to γ. Their difference becomes smaller for gas reactants with lower uptake (i.e., smaller γ and/or for a smaller ratio of the geometric coating thickness to the flow tube radius (δg ∕ R0. On the other hand, the critical height δc can also be adjusted by optimizing flow tube configurations and operating conditions (i.e., tube diameter, length, and flow velocity, to ensure not only unaffected laminar flow patterns but also other specific requirements for an

  19. Technical note: Influence of surface roughness and local turbulence on coated-wall flow tube experiments for gas uptake and kinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Kuhn, Uwe; Meusel, Hannah; Ammann, Markus; Shao, Min; Pöschl, Ulrich; Cheng, Yafang

    2018-02-01

    Coated-wall flow tube reactors are frequently used to investigate gas uptake and heterogeneous or multiphase reaction kinetics under laminar flow conditions. Coating surface roughness may potentially distort the laminar flow pattern, induce turbulence and introduce uncertainties in the calculated uptake coefficient based on molecular diffusion assumptions (e.g., Brown/Cooney-Kim-Davis (CKD)/Knopf-Pöschl-Shiraiwa (KPS) methods), which has not been fully resolved in earlier studies. Here, we investigate the influence of surface roughness and local turbulence on coated-wall flow tube experiments for gas uptake and kinetic studies. According to laminar boundary theory and considering the specific flow conditions in a coated-wall flow tube, we derive and propose a critical height δc to evaluate turbulence effects in the design and analysis of coated-wall flow tube experiments. If a geometric coating thickness δg is larger than δc, the roughness elements of the coating may cause local turbulence and result in overestimation of the real uptake coefficient (γ). We further develop modified CKD/KPS methods (i.e., CKD-LT/KPS-LT) to account for roughness-induced local turbulence effects. By combination of the original methods and their modified versions, the maximum error range of γCKD (derived with the CKD method) or γKPS (derived with the KPS method) can be quantified and finally γ can be constrained. When turbulence is generated, γCKD or γKPS can bear large difference compared to γ. Their difference becomes smaller for gas reactants with lower uptake (i.e., smaller γ) and/or for a smaller ratio of the geometric coating thickness to the flow tube radius (δg / R0). On the other hand, the critical height δc can also be adjusted by optimizing flow tube configurations and operating conditions (i.e., tube diameter, length, and flow velocity), to ensure not only unaffected laminar flow patterns but also other specific requirements for an individual flow tube

  20. Patterning nanowire and micro-nanoparticle array on micropillar-structured surface: Experiment and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung Hsun; Guan, Jingjiao; Chau, Shiu Wu; Chen, Shia Chung; Lee, L James

    2010-08-04

    DNA molecules in a solution can be immobilized and stretched into a highly ordered array on a solid surface containing micropillars by molecular combing technique. However, the mechanism of this process is not well understood. In this study, we demonstrated the generation of DNA nanostrand array with linear, zigzag, and fork-zigzag patterns and the microfluidic processes are modeled based on a deforming body-fitted grid approach. The simulation results provide insights for explaining the stretching, immobilizing, and patterning of DNA molecules observed in the experiments.

  1. A possible experiment at LEUTL to characterize surface roughness Wakefield effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakefield effects due to internal vacuum chamber roughness may increase the electron beam energy spread and so have become an immediate concern for future x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) project developments such as the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the DESY TESLA x-ray FEL. We describe a possible experiment to characterize the effects of surface roughness on an FEL driven by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) operation. Although the specific system described is not completely identical to the above-proposed projects, much useful scaling information could be obtained and applied to shorter wavelength systems

  2. Magnetic moments in calcium isotopes via a surface-interaction experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niv, Y.; Hass, M.; Zemel, A.; Goldring, G.

    1979-01-01

    A rotation of the angular correlation of de-excitation γ-rays from 40 Ca and 44 Ca was observed in a tilted foil geometry. The signs and magnitudes of the magnetic moments of the 2 1 + of 44 Ca and of the 3 1 - level of 40 Ca were determined to be g = -0.28+-0.11 and g = +0.52+-0.18, respectively. This experiment provides further information regarding the polarization of deeply bound electronic configurations produced by a surface-interaction mechanism and demonstrates the feasibility of the present technique for measuring signs and magnitudes of magnetic moments of picosecond nuclear levels. (author)

  3. Surface complexation modelling: Experiments on the sorption of nickel on quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puukko, E.; Hakanen, M.

    1995-10-01

    Assessing the safety of a final repository for nuclear wastes requires knowledge concerning the way in which the radionuclides released are retarded in the geosphere. The aim of the work is to aquire knowledge of empirical methods repeating the experiments on the sorption of nickel on quartz described in the reports published by the British Geological Survey (BGS). The experimental results were modelled with computer models at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT Chemical Technology). The results showed that the experimental knowledge of the sorption of Ni on quartz have been acheved by repeating the experiments of BGS. Experiments made with the two quartz types, Min-U-Sil 5 (MUS) and Nilsiae, showed the difference in sorption of Ni in the low ionic strength solution (0.001 M NaNO 3 ). The sorption of Ni on MUS was higher than predicted by the Surface Complexation Model (SCM). The phenomenon was also observed by the BGS, and may be due to the different amounts of inpurities in the MUS and in the NLS. In other respects, the results of the sorption experiments fitted quite well with those predicted by the SCM model. (8 refs., 8 figs., 11 tabs.)

  4. Jets from jets: re-clustering as a tool for large radius jet reconstruction and grooming at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachman, Benjamin; Nef, Pascal; Schwartzman, Ariel; Swiatlowski, Maximilian [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University,2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj [Center for High Energy Physics, University of Oregon,1371 E. 13th Ave, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States)

    2015-02-12

    Jets with a large radius R≳1 and grooming algorithms are widely used to fully capture the decay products of boosted heavy particles at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Unlike most discriminating variables used in such studies, the jet radius is usually not optimized for specific physics scenarios. This is because every jet configuration must be calibrated, insitu, to account for detector response and other experimental effects. One solution to enhance the availability of large-R jet configurations used by the LHC experiments is jet re-clustering. Jet re-clustering introduces an intermediate scale rradius jets. In this paper we systematically study and propose new jet re-clustering configurations and show that re-clustered large radius jets have essentially the same jet mass performance as large radius groomed jets. Jet re-clustering has the benefit that no additional large-R calibration is necessary, allowing the re-clustered large radius parameter to be optimized in the context of specific precision measurements or searches for new physics.

  5. Jets from jets: re-clustering as a tool for large radius jet reconstruction and grooming at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachman, Benjamin; Nef, Pascal; Schwartzman, Ariel; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj

    2015-01-01

    Jets with a large radius R≳1 and grooming algorithms are widely used to fully capture the decay products of boosted heavy particles at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Unlike most discriminating variables used in such studies, the jet radius is usually not optimized for specific physics scenarios. This is because every jet configuration must be calibrated, insitu, to account for detector response and other experimental effects. One solution to enhance the availability of large-R jet configurations used by the LHC experiments is jet re-clustering. Jet re-clustering introduces an intermediate scale rradius jets. In this paper we systematically study and propose new jet re-clustering configurations and show that re-clustered large radius jets have essentially the same jet mass performance as large radius groomed jets. Jet re-clustering has the benefit that no additional large-R calibration is necessary, allowing the re-clustered large radius parameter to be optimized in the context of specific precision measurements or searches for new physics.

  6. A Large Radius Human Centrifuge: The Human Hypergravity Havitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, J. J. W. A.

    2008-06-01

    Life on Earth has developed at unit gravity, 9.81 m/s2, but how would plants and animals have evolved on a larger planet, i.e. larger than Earth? We are able to address this question simply by studies using centrifuges. In the past decades numerous experiments have been performed on cells, plants and animals grown for longer durations, even multi generations, under hypergravity conditions. Based on these studies we have gained interesting insights in the physiological process of these systems when exposed to artificial gravity. Animals and plants adapt themselves to this new high-g environment. Information of adaptation to hyper-g in mammals is interesting, or maybe even proof vital, for future human space flight programs especially in light of long duration missions to Moon and Mars. We know from long duration animal studies that numerous physiological processes and structures like muscles, bones, neuro-vestibular, or the cardiovascular system are affected. However, humans have never been exposed to a hyper-g environment for long durations. Human studies are mostly in the order of hours at most. Current work on human centrifuges is all focused on short arm systems to apply artificial gravity in long duration space missions. In this paper we want to address the possible usefulness of a large radius human centrifuge on Earth, or even on Moon or Mars, for both basic research and possible applications. In such a centrifuge a group of humans may be exposed to hypergravity for, in principle, an unlimited period of time.

  7. Rights and wrongs of the temporal solar radius variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozelot, J. P.; Damiani, C.

    2012-10-01

    From time immemorial men have strived to measure the size of celestial bodies. Among them, the diameter of the Sun was a source of curiosity and study. Tackled by Greek astronomers from a geometric point of view, an estimate, although incorrect, has been first determined, not truly called into question for several centuries. One must wait up to the XVIIth century to get the first precise determinations made by the French school of astronomy. Gradually, as the techniques were more and more sophisticated, many other solar diameter measurements were carried out, notably in England, Germany, Italy and US. However, even with instruments at the cutting edge of progress, no absolute value of the solar diameter has been provided yet, even if the community has adopted a canonical radius of 959''&dotbelow;63, given in all ephemeris since the end of the XIXth century. One of the major difficulties is to define a correct solar diameter. Another issue is the possible temporal variability of the size of the Sun, as first advocated at the end of the XIXth century by the Italian school. Today, this question is just on the way to being solved in spite of considerable efforts developed on ground-based facilities or on board space experiments. We will here give a review of some of the most remarkable techniques used in the past, emphasising how incorrect measurements have driven new ideas, leading to develop new statements for the underlying physics. On such new grounds, it can be speculated that the roundness of the Sun is not perfect, but developing a thin "cantaloupe skin" in periods of higher activity, with departures from sphericity being inevitably bounded by a few kilometers (around 80 km or 10 to 15 mas).

  8. Surface studies and implanted helium measurements following NOVA high-yield DT experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyer, M.A.; Hudson, G.B.

    1997-02-18

    This paper presents the results of three March 6, 1996 direct-drive high-yield DT NOVA experiments and provides `proof-of-principal` results for the quantitative measurement of energetic He ions. Semiconductor quality Si wafers and an amorphous carbon wafer were exposed to NOVA high-yield implosions. Surface damage was sub-micron in general, although the surface ablation was slightly greater for the carbon wafer than for the Si wafers. Melting of a thin ({approx} 0.1{mu}) layer of Si was evident from microscopic investigation. Electron microscopy indicated melted blobs of many different metals (e.g. Al, Au, Ta, Fe alloys, Cu and even Cd) on the surfaces. The yield measured by determining the numbers of atoms of implanted {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He indicate the number of DT fusions to be 9.1({plus_minus}2.3) X 10{sup 12} and DD fusions to be 4.8({plus_minus}1.0) x 10{sup 10}, respectively. The helium DT fusion yield is slightly lower than that of the Cu activation measurement, which was 1.3({plus_minus}0.l) x 10{sup 13} DT fusions.

  9. DNA origami as biocompatible surface to match single-molecule and ensemble experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gietl, Andreas; Holzmeister, Phil; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule experiments on immobilized molecules allow unique insights into the dynamics of molecular machines and enzymes as well as their interactions. The immobilization, however, can invoke perturbation to the activity of biomolecules causing incongruities between single molecule and ensemble measurements. Here we introduce the recently developed DNA origami as a platform to transfer ensemble assays to the immobilized single molecule level without changing the nano-environment of the biomolecules. The idea is a stepwise transfer of common functional assays first to the surface of a DNA origami, which can be checked at the ensemble level, and then to the microscope glass slide for single-molecule inquiry using the DNA origami as a transfer platform. We studied the structural flexibility of a DNA Holliday junction and the TATA-binding protein (TBP)-induced bending of DNA both on freely diffusing molecules and attached to the origami structure by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. This resulted in highly congruent data sets demonstrating that the DNA origami does not influence the functionality of the biomolecule. Single-molecule data collected from surface-immobilized biomolecule-loaded DNA origami are in very good agreement with data from solution measurements supporting the fact that the DNA origami can be used as biocompatible surface in many fluorescence-based measurements. PMID:22523083

  10. Pressurization Risk Assessment of CO2 Reservoirs Utilizing Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyant, E.; Han, W. S.; Kim, K. Y.; Park, E.; Han, K.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring of pressure buildup can provide explicit information on reservoir integrity and is an appealing tool, however pressure variation is dependent on a variety of factors causing high uncertainty in pressure predictions. This work evaluated pressurization of a reservoir system in the presence of leakage pathways as well as exploring the effects of compartmentalization of the reservoir utilizing design of experiments (Definitive Screening, Box Behnken, Central Composite, and Latin Hypercube designs) and response surface methods. Two models were developed, 1) an idealized injection scenario in order to evaluate the performance of multiple designs, and 2) a complex injection scenario implementing the best performing design to investigate pressurization of the reservoir system. A holistic evaluation of scenario 1, determined that the Central Composite design would be used for the complex injection scenario. The complex scenario evaluated 5 risk factors: reservoir, seal, leakage pathway and fault permeabilities, and horizontal position of the pathway. A total of 60 response surface models (RSM) were developed for the complex scenario with an average R2 of 0.95 and a NRMSE of 0.067. Sensitivity to the input factors was dynamic through space and time; at the earliest time (0.05 years) the reservoir permeability was dominant, and for later times (>0.5 years) the fault permeability became dominant for all locations. The RSM's were then used to conduct a Monte Carlo Analysis to further analyze pressurization risks, identifying the P10, P50, P90 values. This identified the in zone (lower) P90 values as 2.16, 1.77, and 1.53 MPa and above zone values of 1.35, 1.23, 1.09 MPa for monitoring locations 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In summary, the design of experiments and response surface methods allowed for an efficient sensitivity and uncertainty analysis to be conducted permitting a complete evaluation of the pressurization across the entire parameter space.

  11. On tidal radius determination for a globular cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, S.

    1985-01-01

    A tidal radius determination for a globular cluster based on its density minimum, which is caused by the galactic tidal forces and derivable from a model of the Galaxy, is proposed. Results obtained on the basis of the Schmidt model for two clusters are in a satisfactory agreement with those obtained earlier by means of other methods. A mass determination for the clusters through the tidal radius, when the latter one is identified with the cluster perigalactic distance, yields unusually large mass values. Probably, the tidal radius should be identified with the instantaneous galactocentric distance. Use of models more recent than the Schmidt one indicates that a globular cluster may contain a significant portion of an invisible interstellar matter. (author)

  12. Rational functions with maximal radius of absolute monotonicity

    KAUST Repository

    Loczi, Lajos

    2014-05-19

    We study the radius of absolute monotonicity R of rational functions with numerator and denominator of degree s that approximate the exponential function to order p. Such functions arise in the application of implicit s-stage, order p Runge-Kutta methods for initial value problems and the radius of absolute monotonicity governs the numerical preservation of properties like positivity and maximum-norm contractivity. We construct a function with p=2 and R>2s, disproving a conjecture of van de Griend and Kraaijevanger. We determine the maximum attainable radius for functions in several one-parameter families of rational functions. Moreover, we prove earlier conjectured optimal radii in some families with 2 or 3 parameters via uniqueness arguments for systems of polynomial inequalities. Our results also prove the optimality of some strong stability preserving implicit and singly diagonally implicit Runge-Kutta methods. Whereas previous results in this area were primarily numerical, we give all constants as exact algebraic numbers.

  13. Conceptual Design and Architecture of Mars Exploration Rover (MER) for Seismic Experiments Over Martian Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Akshay; Singh, Amit

    2012-07-01

    Keywords: MER, Mars, Rover, Seismometer Mars has been a subject of human interest for exploration missions for quite some time now. Both rover as well as orbiter missions have been employed to suit mission objectives. Rovers have been preferentially deployed for close range reconnaissance and detailed experimentation with highest accuracy. However, it is essential to strike a balance between the chosen science objectives and the rover operations as a whole. The objective of this proposed mechanism is to design a vehicle (MER) to carry out seismic studies over Martian surface. The conceptual design consists of three units i.e. Mother Rover as a Surrogate (Carrier) and Baby Rovers (two) as seeders for several MEMS-based accelerometer / seismometer units (Nodes). Mother Rover can carry these Baby Rovers, having individual power supply with solar cells and with individual data transmission capabilities, to suitable sites such as Chasma associated with Valles Marineris, Craters or Sand Dunes. Mother rover deploys these rovers in two opposite direction and these rovers follow a triangulation pattern to study shock waves generated through firing tungsten carbide shells into the ground. Till the time of active experiments Mother Rover would act as a guiding unit to control spatial spread of detection instruments. After active shock experimentation, the babies can still act as passive seismometer units to study and record passive shocks from thermal quakes, impact cratering & landslides. Further other experiments / payloads (XPS / GAP / APXS) can also be carried by Mother Rover. Secondary power system consisting of batteries can also be utilized for carrying out further experiments over shallow valley surfaces. The whole arrangement is conceptually expected to increase the accuracy of measurements (through concurrent readings) and prolong life cycle of overall experimentation. The proposed rover can be customised according to the associated scientific objectives and further

  14. Electron Microscopy Studies, Surface Analysis and Microbial Culturing Experiments on a Depth Profile Through Martian Meteorite Nakhla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporski, J. K. W.; Steele, A.; Westall, F.; Griffin, C.; Whitby, C.; Avci, R.; McKay, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Combined electron microscopy studies and culturing experiments have shown that Nakhla became contaminated with recent terrestrial microorganisms. Additional surface analysis detected an as yet unknown organic species which may represent a biomarker.

  15. Measurements of land surface features using an airborne laser altimeter: the HAPEX-Sahel experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, J.C.; Menenti, M.; Weltz, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    An airborne laser profiling altimeter was used to measure surface features and properties of the landscape during the HAPEX-Sahel Experiment in Niger, Africa in September 1992. The laser altimeter makes 4000 measurements per second with a vertical resolution of 5 cm. Airborne laser and detailed field measurements of vegetation heights had similar average heights and frequency distribution. Laser transects were used to estimate land surface topography, gully and channel morphology, and vegetation properties ( height, cover and distribution). Land surface changes related to soil erosion and channel development were measured. For 1 km laser transects over tiger bush communities, the maximum vegetation height was between 4-5 and 6-5 m, with an average height of 21 m. Distances between the centre of rows of tiger bush vegetation averaged 100 m. For two laser transects, ground cover for tiger bush was estimated to be 225 and 301 per cent for vegetation greater than 0-5m tall and 190 and 25-8 per cent for vegetation greater than 10m tall. These values are similar to published values for tiger bush. Vegetation cover for 14 and 18 km transects was estimated to be 4 per cent for vegetation greater than 0-5 m tall. These cover values agree within 1-2 per cent with published data for short transects (⩾ 100 m) for the area. The laser altimeter provided quick and accurate measurements for evaluating changes in land surface features. Such information provides a basis for understanding land degradation and a basis for management plans to rehabilitate the landscape. (author)

  16. PPOOLEX experiments on the dynamics of free water surface in the blowdown pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, J.; Puustinen, M.; Raesaenen, A.

    2013-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of the thermal stratification and mixing experiments carried out with the scaled down PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Steam was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through the vertical DN200 blowdown pipe to the condensation pool filled with sub-cooled water. The main objective of the experiments was to obtain verification data for the development of the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) and Effective Heat Source (EHS) models to be implemented in GOTHIC code by KTH. A detailed test matrix and procedure put together on the basis of pre-test calculations was provided by KTH before the experiments. Altogether six experiments were carried out. The experiments consisted of a small steam flow rate stratification period and of a higher flow rate mixing period. The dry well structures were heated up to approximately 130 deg. C before the stratification period was initiated. The initial water bulk temperature in the condensation pool was 13-16 deg. C. During the low steam flow rate (85-105 g/s) period steam condensed mainly inside the blowdown pipe. As a result temperatures remained constant below the blowdown pipe outlet while they increased towards the pool surface layers indicating strong thermal stratification of the wet well pool water. In the end of the stratification period the temperature difference between the pool bottom and surface was 15-30 deg. C depending on the test parameters and the duration of the low flow rate period. In the beginning of the mixing phase the steam flow rate was increased rapidly to 300-425 g/s to mix the pool water totally. Depending on the used steam flow rate and initial pool water temperature it took 150-500 s to achieve total mixing. If the test was continued long enough the water pool began to stratify again after the water bulk temperature had reached ∼50 deg. C despite of steam mass flux belonging to the chugging region of the

  17. PPOOLEX experiments on the dynamics of free water surface in the blowdown pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, J.; Puustinen, M.; Raesaenen, A. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Lappeenranta (Finland)

    2013-04-15

    This report summarizes the results of the thermal stratification and mixing experiments carried out with the scaled down PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Steam was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through the vertical DN200 blowdown pipe to the condensation pool filled with sub-cooled water. The main objective of the experiments was to obtain verification data for the development of the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) and Effective Heat Source (EHS) models to be implemented in GOTHIC code by KTH. A detailed test matrix and procedure put together on the basis of pre-test calculations was provided by KTH before the experiments. Altogether six experiments were carried out. The experiments consisted of a small steam flow rate stratification period and of a higher flow rate mixing period. The dry well structures were heated up to approximately 130 deg. C before the stratification period was initiated. The initial water bulk temperature in the condensation pool was 13-16 deg. C. During the low steam flow rate (85-105 g/s) period steam condensed mainly inside the blowdown pipe. As a result temperatures remained constant below the blowdown pipe outlet while they increased towards the pool surface layers indicating strong thermal stratification of the wet well pool water. In the end of the stratification period the temperature difference between the pool bottom and surface was 15-30 deg. C depending on the test parameters and the duration of the low flow rate period. In the beginning of the mixing phase the steam flow rate was increased rapidly to 300-425 g/s to mix the pool water totally. Depending on the used steam flow rate and initial pool water temperature it took 150-500 s to achieve total mixing. If the test was continued long enough the water pool began to stratify again after the water bulk temperature had reached {approx}50 deg. C despite of steam mass flux belonging to the chugging region

  18. Underground nuclear explosions. Study of the cavity radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaud, L.

    1968-11-01

    An underground nuclear explosion creates a cavity due to the expansion of the surrounding medium vaporized by the shot. The cavity radius is related to the energy of explosion and to the overburden pressure of the medium. The introduction of new elements such as the environment of the device (in a deep hole or in a tunnel) and the cohesion of the medium leads to a relationship which determines this radius. The known French and American underground explosions performed in various media, energy and overburden conditions, satisfy this relationship with a good precision. (author) [fr

  19. External Fixation of Unstable Distal Radius Fracture. A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Yaniel Truffin Rodríguez; Rafael Esmandy Gámez Arregoitía; Indira L. Gómez Gil; José Julio Requeiro Morejón

    2014-01-01

    Unstable fracture of the distal radius is a common injury. If not properly treated, it can cause major disturbance in the radiocarpal joint and impaired hand function. A case of a 42-year-old patient of rural origin without a history of previous conditions treated at the Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital in Cienfuegos is presented. He suffered a fall on the outstretched hand, which led to an unstable fracture of the left distal radius. Emergency surgery consisting of manual fracture reduction ...

  20. Thoughts on the so-called radius-capitellum axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, H.; Mueller, H.A.; Wagner, H.; Baetz, W.

    1982-02-01

    We have studied 438 patients radiologically in order to observe the so-called 'radius-capitellum axis'. In about a quarter of people with normal elbows the axis passes lateral to the middle portion of the capitellum, so that even when there is marked deviation, there is no certainty that the humero-radial joint is abnormal. Deviation of the axis can be caused by changes in the shape of the capitellum or of the radius, or by distension of the capsule of the elbow joint, or by various changes in muscular pull.

  1. Surface Treatment of a Lithium Limiter for Spherical Torus Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Doerner, R.; Antar, G.; Timberlake, J.; Spaleta, J.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Kugel, H.; Taylor, G.; Stutman, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.; Molesa, S.; Efthimion, P.; Menard, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Luckhardt, S.

    2001-03-20

    The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance in reactor design, since it could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls. As part of investigations to determine the feasibility of this approach, plasma interaction questions in a toroidal plasma geometry are being addressed in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus (ST). The first experiments involved a toroidally local lithium limiter (L3). Measurements of pumpout rates indicated that deuterium pumping was greater for the L3 compared to conventional boron carbide limiters. The difference in the pumpout rates between the two limiter types decreased with plasma exposure, but argon glow discharge cleaning was able to restore the pumping effectiveness of the L3. At no point, however, was the extremely low recycling regime reported in previous lithium experiments achieved. This may be due to the much larger lithium surfaces that were exposed to the plasma in the earlier work. The possibility will be studied in the next set of CDX-U experiments, which are to be conducted with a large area, fully toroidal lithium limiter.

  2. Surface Treatment of a Lithium Limiter for Spherical Torus Plasma Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Doerner, R.; Antar, G.; Timberlake, J.; Spaleta, J.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Kugel, H.; Taylor, G.; Stutman, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.; Molesa, S.; Efthimion, P.; Menard, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Luckhardt, S.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance in reactor design, since it could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls. As part of investigations to determine the feasibility of this approach, plasma interaction questions in a toroidal plasma geometry are being addressed in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus (ST). The first experiments involved a toroidally local lithium limiter (L3). Measurements of pumpout rates indicated that deuterium pumping was greater for the L3 compared to conventional boron carbide limiters. The difference in the pumpout rates between the two limiter types decreased with plasma exposure, but argon glow discharge cleaning was able to restore the pumping effectiveness of the L3. At no point, however, was the extremely low recycling regime reported in previous lithium experiments achieved. This may be due to the much larger lithium surfaces that were exposed to the plasma in the earlier work. The possibility will be studied in the next set of CDX-U experiments, which are to be conducted with a large area, fully toroidal lithium limiter

  3. Cloud Liquid Water, Mean Droplet Radius and Number Density Measurements Using a Raman Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid micro-spheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested.

  4. Understanding Coupled Earth-Surface Processes through Experiments and Models (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, I.; Kim, W.

    2013-12-01

    Traditionally, both numerical models and experiments have been purposefully designed to ';isolate' singular components or certain processes of a larger mountain to deep-ocean interconnected source-to-sink (S2S) transport system. Controlling factors driven by processes outside of the domain of immediate interest were treated and simplified as input or as boundary conditions. Increasingly, earth surface processes scientists appreciate feedbacks and explore these feedbacks with more dynamically coupled approaches to their experiments and models. Here, we discuss key concepts and recent advances made in coupled modeling and experimental setups. In addition, we emphasize challenges and new frontiers to coupled experiments. Experiments have highlighted the important role of self-organization; river and delta systems do not always need to be forced by external processes to change or develop characteristic morphologies. Similarly modeling f.e. has shown that intricate networks in tidal deltas are stable because of the interplay between river avulsions and the tidal current scouring with both processes being important to develop and maintain the dentritic networks. Both models and experiment have demonstrated that seemingly stable systems can be perturbed slightly and show dramatic responses. Source-to-sink models were developed for both the Fly River System in Papua New Guinea and the Waipaoa River in New Zealand. These models pointed to the importance of upstream-downstream effects and enforced our view of the S2S system as a signal transfer and dampening conveyor belt. Coupled modeling showed that deforestation had extreme effects on sediment fluxes draining from the catchment of the Waipaoa River in New Zealand, and that this increase in sediment production rapidly shifted the locus of offshore deposition. The challenge in designing coupled models and experiments is both technological as well as intellectual. Our community advances to make numerical model coupling more

  5. Isotopic effects on non-linearity, molecular radius and intermolecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    study the isotopic effects on the non-linearity parameter and the physicochemical proper- ties of the liquids, which in turn has been used to study their effect on the intermolecular interactions produced thereof. Keywords. Non-linearity parameter; molecular radius; free length; intermolecular inter- actions. PACS Nos 43.25.

  6. PROXIMAL RADIUS RECONSTRUCTION BY METATARSAL OSTEOCHONDRAL AUTO GRAFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kammar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available 17 Year Old student, Pavan presents with swelling since 8 months. Swelling was diffuse over forearm. Tenderness was present. No local rise of temperature. Range of m ovement at elbow was restricted and painful terminally. No distal neurovascular deficits. X - ray reveale d it to be an a neurysmal bone cyst of proximal right radius. FNAC showed Aneurysmal bone cyst for which curettage and bone grafting was done. Post 6 months tumour recurred with a swelling around upper third of right fo rearm. FNAC and J - needle biopsy showed it to be a neurysmal bone cyst. MRI showed ABC of proximal radius without soft tissue involvement. Excision of proximal third of radius with reconstruction by 3 rd metatarsal and augmented with fib ular graft and stabili zed with dynamic c ompression plate and screws . Tumour specimen was sent for h istopathology a t 2 weeks p ost operatively patient had good range of movements. At present patient has full range of flexion , extension , supination & pronation . He is able to carry out his ADL. In the literature proximal radius reconstruction has been tried in traumatic communited radial head fractures. Here it done for r ecurrent benign tumour like aneurysmal bone cyst, as the base of 3rd metatarsal anatomically coincides with radial head and hence a better radio - capital articulation

  7. Axial Length/Corneal Radius of Curvature Ratio and Refractive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... variously described as determined by the ocular biometric variables. There have been many studies on the relationship between refractive error and ocular axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth, corneal radius of curvature (CR), keratometric readings as well as other ocular biometric variables such as ...

  8. Effect of Hall Current and Finite Larmor Radius Corrections on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 37; Issue 3. Effect of Hall Current and Finite Larmor Radius Corrections on Thermal Instability of Radiative Plasma for Star Formation in Interstellar Medium (ISM). Sachin Kaothekar. Research Article Volume 37 Issue 3 September 2016 Article ID 23 ...

  9. Individualist-Collectivist Culture and Trust Radius : A Multilevel Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoorn, André

    We apply a multilevel approach to examine empirically the nexus between individualist and collectivist culture on the one hand and people’s radius of trust on the other. People’s trust level (i.e., the intensity with which people trust other people) has been extensively studied. Increasingly,

  10. Finite Larmor radius flute mode theory with end loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotelnikov, I.A. [AN SSSR, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki; Berk, H.L. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1993-08-01

    The theory of flute mode stability is developed for a two-energy- component plasma partially terminated by a conducting limiter. The formalism is developed as a preliminary study of the effect of end-loss in open-ended mirror machines where large Larmor radius effects are important.

  11. Frictional coefficient depending on active friction radius with BPV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The comparison of estimated frictional coefficient from numerical output is in agreement with vis-à-vis corresponding similar computed from the virtual braking system model in the Simulink. The results indicated that highest frictional coefficient of 0.7 was obtained on the piston side of the rotor disc and active friction radius is ...

  12. Axial Length/Corneal Radius of Curvature Ratio and Refractive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... Aim/Background: Associations between axial length (AL) to corneal radius of curvature (CR) ratio and refractive status in a healthy Nigerian adult population were studied. Materials and Methods: Healthy students and members of staff of Obafemi Awolowo Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, South West ...

  13. Thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome: a clinical genetic study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greenhalgh, K.L.; Howell, R.; Bottani, A.; Ancliff, P.J.; Brunner, H.G.; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, C.C.; Vernon, E.; Brown, K.W.; Newbury-Ecob, R.

    2002-01-01

    The thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome characterised by bilateral absence of the radii and a thrombocytopenia. The lower limbs, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and other systems may also be involved. Shaw and Oliver in 1959 were the first to

  14. Thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome : a clinical genetic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greenhalgh, KL; Howell, RT; Bottani, A; Ancliff, PJ; Brunner, HG; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, CC; Vernon, E; Brown, KW; Newbury-Ecob, RA

    2002-01-01

    The thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome characterised by bilateral absence of the radii and a thrombocytopenia. The lower limbs, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and other systems may also be involved. Shaw and Oliver in 1959 were the first to

  15. Larmor radius expansion for the inhomogeneous plasma dielectric tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottaviani, M.

    1984-01-01

    A larmour radius expansion for the dielectric tensor of an inhomogeneous plasma with perpendicular gradients is derived directly from the relativistic Vlasov equation. Various wave equations are derived from relevant radio frequency heating problems together with a generalized Poynting theorem. The validity of Kadomtev's assumption is discussed

  16. Axial Length/Corneal Radius of Curvature Ratio and Refractive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim/Background: Associations between axial length (AL) to corneal radius of curvature (CR) ratio and refractive status in a healthy Nigerian adult population were studied. Materials and Methods: Healthy students and members of staff of Obafemi Awolowo Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile‑Ife, South West Nigeria, free of ...

  17. Effect of Hall Current and Finite Larmor Radius Corrections on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effects of finite ion Larmor radius (FLR) corrections,. Hall current and radiative heat-loss function on the thermal instability of an infinite homogeneous, viscous plasma incorporating the effects of finite electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and permeability for star formation in interstellar medium have been ...

  18. Recognizing chaotic states in stadium billiard by calculating gyration radius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barezi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available   Nowadays study of chaotic quantum billiards because of their relation to Nano technology. In this paper distribution of zeros of wave function on the boundary of two circular and stadium billiards are investigated. By calculating gyration radius for these points chaotic and non-chaotic states are distinguished.

  19. Radiographic evaluation of the distal radius using two novel biplanar "pitch-and-roll" views: a preliminary cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Brandon M; Ryu, Jaiyoung

    2009-12-01

    This study's objective was to compare the use of two biplanar angled radiographs versus standard posterioanterior (PA) and lateral radiographs in determining preservation of the articular space with regard to pin placement in the distal radius. Various combinations of inclination (pitch) and clockwise/counterclockwise rotation (roll) were used to determine the best view of the distal radius articular surface. Optimum visualization of the articular surface presented at 12 degrees inclination plus 15 degrees counterclockwise rotation for the PA view and 22 degrees inclination and 15 degrees counterclockwise rotation for the lateral view. Ten cadaveric forearms were dissected, and ten Kirschner wires (K-wires) were placed at specific surfaces of the distal radius. Each K-wire was countersunk 2 mm below the chondral surface so all K-wires resided within the subchondral bone. Each forearm was radiographed in four views; PA, lateral, pitch-and-roll PA (PR-PA), and pitch-and-roll lateral (PR-lateral). Four blinded reviewers evaluated the radiographs and marked whether they were certain, relatively certain, or uncertain that the K-wires did not penetrate into the articular space. Reviewers demonstrated significantly less uncertainty about intraarticular penetration (p < 0.005) with both the PR-PA and PR-lateral views compared with standard PA and lateral views. The biconcave nature of the distal radius makes it extremely difficult to visualize placement of hardware with respect to the articular surface using standard radiographs. The use of PR-PA and PR-lateral views significantly improves the surgeon's ability to judge the position of hardware in the distal radius compared to standard radiographic views, thus allowing for more meaningful clinical decision in post-operative radiographs.

  20. Theoretical distribution of load in the radius and ulna carpal joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Florez, Kalenia; Vergara-Amador, Enrique; de Las Casas, Estevam Barbosa; Garzón-Alvarado, Diego A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate a model for the analysis of the load distribution through the wrist joint, subjected to forces on the axes of the metacarpals from distal to proximal for two different mesh densities. To this end, the Rigid Body Spring Model (RBSM) method was used on a three-dimensional model of the wrist joint, simulating the conditions when making a grip handle. The cartilage and ligaments were simulated as springs acting under compression and tension, respectively, while the bones were considered as rigid bodies. At the proximal end of the ulna the movement was completely restricted, and the radius was allowed to move only in the lateral/medial direction. With these models, we found the load distributions on each carpal articular surface of radius. Additionally, the results show that the percentage of the applied load transmitted through the radius was about 86% for one mesh and 88% for the coarser one; for the ulna it was 21% for one mesh and 18% for the coarser. The obtained results are comparable with previous outcomes reported in prior studies. The latter allows concluding that, in theory, the methodology can be used to describe the changes in load distribution in the wrist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dependence of yield of nuclear track-biosensors on track radius and analyte concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arellano, H.; Muñoz H., G.; Fink, D.; Vacik, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Alfonta, L.; Kiv, A.

    2018-04-01

    In swift heavy ion track-based polymeric biosensor foils with incorporated enzymes one exploits the correlation between the analyte concentration and the sensor current, via the enrichment of charged enzymatic reaction products in the track's confinement. Here we study the influence of the etched track radius on the biosensor's efficiency. These sensors are analyte-specific only if both the track radii and the analyte concentration exceed certain threshold values of ∼15 nm and ∼10-6 M (for glucose sensing), respectively. Below these limits the sensor signal stems un-specifically from any charge carrier. In its proper working regime, the inner track walls are smoothly covered by enzymes and the efficiency is practically radius independent. Theory shows that the measured current should be slightly sub-proportional to the analyte concentration; the measurements roughly reconfirm this. Narrower tracks (∼5-15 nm radius) with reduced enzyme coverage lead to decreasing efficiency. Tiny signals visible when the tracks are etched to effective radii between 0 and ∼5 nm are tentatively ascribed to enzymes bonded to surface-near nano-cracks in the polymer foil, resulting from its degradation due to aging, rather than to the tracks. Precondition for this study was the accurate determination of the etched track radii, which is possible only by a nanofluidic approach. This holds to some extent even for enzyme-covered tracks, though in this case most of the wall charges are compensated by enzyme bonding.

  2. Measurements of Physical Parameters of White Dwarfs: A Test of the Mass–Radius Relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bédard, A.; Bergeron, P.; Fontaine, G., E-mail: bedard@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: fontaine@astro.umontreal.ca [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2017-10-10

    We present a detailed spectroscopic and photometric analysis of 219 DA and DB white dwarfs for which trigonometric parallax measurements are available. Our aim is to compare the physical parameters derived from the spectroscopic and photometric techniques, and then to test the theoretical mass–radius relation for white dwarfs using these results. The agreement between spectroscopic and photometric parameters is found to be excellent, especially for effective temperatures, showing that our model atmospheres and fitting procedures provide an accurate, internally consistent analysis. The values of surface gravity and solid angle obtained, respectively, from spectroscopy and photometry, are combined with parallax measurements in various ways to study the validity of the mass–radius relation from an empirical point of view. After a thorough examination of our results, we find that 73% and 92% of the white dwarfs are consistent within 1 σ and 2 σ confidence levels, respectively, with the predictions of the mass–radius relation, thus providing strong support to the theory of stellar degeneracy. Our analysis also allows us to identify 15 stars that are better interpreted in terms of unresolved double degenerate binaries. Atmospheric parameters for both components in these binary systems are obtained using a novel approach. We further identify a few white dwarfs that are possibly composed of an iron core rather than a carbon/oxygen core, since they are consistent with Fe-core evolutionary models.

  3. Orbiter BLT Flight Experiment Wind Tunnel Simulations: Nearfield Flowfield Imaging and Surface Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Ivey, Christoper B.; Barthel, Brett F.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Watkins, Anthony N.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; McCrea, Andrew C.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William K.; hide

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a series of wind tunnel tests simulating the near-field behavior of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Detailed Test Objective (BLT DTO) flight experiment. Hypersonic flow over a flat plate with an attached BLT DTO-shaped trip was tested in a Mach 10 wind tunnel. The sharp-leading-edge flat plate was oriented at an angle of 20 degrees with respect to the freestream flow, resulting in post-shock edge Mach number of approximately 4. The flowfield was visualized using nitric oxide (NO) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF). Flow visualizations were performed at 10 Hz using a wide-field of view and high-resolution NO PLIF system. A lower spatial resolution and smaller field of view NO PLIF system visualized the flow at 500 kHz, which was fast enough to resolve unsteady flow features. At the lowest Reynolds number studied, the flow was observed to be laminar and mostly steady. At the highest Reynolds number, flow visualizations showed streak instabilities generated immediately downstream of the trip. These instabilities transitioned to unsteady periodic and spatially irregular structures downstream. Quantitative surface heating imagery was obtained using the Temperature Sensitive Paint (TSP) technique. Comparisons between the PLIF flow visualizations and TSP heating measurements show a strong correlation between flow patterns and surface heating trends.

  4. Contemporaneous ring fault activity and surface deformation at subsiding calderas studied using analogue experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan-Kai; Ruch, Joël; Vasyura-Bathke, Hannes; Jónsson, Sigurjón

    2017-04-01

    Ground deformation analyses of several subsiding calderas have shown complex and overlapping deformation signals, with a broad deflation signal that affects the entire volcanic edifice and localized subsidence focused within the caldera. However, the relation between deep processes at subsiding calderas, including magmatic sources and faulting, and the observed surface deformation is still debated. Several recent examples of subsiding calderas in the Galápagos archipelago and at the Axial seamount in the Pacific Ocean indicate that ring fault activity plays an important role not only during caldera collapse, but also during initial stages of caldera subsidence. Nevertheless, ring fault activity has rarely been integrated into numerical models of subsiding calderas. Here we report on sandbox analogue experiments that we use to study the processes involved from an initial subsidence to a later collapse of calderas. The apparatus is composed of a subsiding half piston section connected to the bottom of a glass box and driven by a motor to control its subsidence. We analyze at the same time during the subsidence the 3D displacement at the model surface with a laser scanner and the 2D ring fault evolution on the side of the model (cross-section) with a side-view digital camera. We further use PIVLab, a time-resolved digital image correlation software tool, to extract strain and velocity fields at both the surface and in cross-section. This setup allows to track processes acting at depth and assess their relative importance as the collapse evolves. We further compare our results with the examples observed in nature as well as with numerical models that integrate ring faults.

  5. Effect of cutoff radius, long range interaction and temperature controller on thermodynamic properties of fluids: Methanol as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidat, Abdalla; Jaradat, Adnan; Hamdan, Bushra; Abu-Ghazleh, Hind

    2018-04-01

    The best spherical cutoff radius, long range interaction and temperature controller were determined using surface tension, density, and diffusion coefficients of van Leeuwen and Smit methanol. A quite good range of cutoff radii from 0.75 to 1.45 nm has been studied on Coulomb cut-off and particle mesh Ewald (PME) long range interaction to determine the best cutoff radius and best long range interaction as well for four sets of temperature: 200, 230, 270 and 300 K. To determine the best temperature controller, the cutoff radius of 1.25 nm was fixed using PME long range interaction on calculating the above properties at low temperature range: 200-300 K.

  6. Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy for Peritoneal Surface Malignancy: Experience with 1,000 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Edward A.; Stewart, John H.; Shen, Perry; Russell, Gregory B.; Loggie, Brian L.; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I

    2014-01-01

    Background Peritoneal dissemination of abdominal malignancy (carcinomatosis) has a clinical course marked by bowel obstruction and death; it traditionally does not respond well to systemic therapy and has been approached with nihilism. To treat carcinomatosis, we utilize cytoreductive surgery (CS) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). Methods A prospective database of patients has been maintained since 1992. Patients with biopsy proven peritoneal surface disease (PSD) were uniformly evaluated for, and treated with, CS and HIPEC. Patient demographics, performance status (ECOG), resection status (R), PSD was classified according to primary site. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed. The experience was divided into quintiles and compared with outcomes. Results Between 1991 and 2013, 1,000 patients underwent 1,097 HIPEC procedures. Average age was 52.9 years and 53.1% were female. Primary tumor sites were: appendix 472(47.2%), colorectal 248(24.8%), mesothelioma 72(7.2%), ovary 69(6.9%), gastric 46(4.6%), others 97(9.7%). Thirty day mortality rate was 3.8% and median hospital stay was 8 days. Median overall survival (OS) was 29.4 months, with a 5 year survival of 32.5%. Factors correlating with improved survival on univariate and multivariate analysis (p≤.0001 for each) were preoperative performance status, primary tumor type, resection status, and experience quintile (p=.04). Over the 5 quintiles, the 1 and 5 year survival, as well as the complete cytoreduction score (R0,R1,R2a) have increased, while transfusions, stoma creations, and complications have all significantly decreased (p<.001 for all). Conclusions This largest reported single center experience with CS and HIPEC demonstrates that prognostic factors include primary site, performance status, completeness of resection, and institutional experience. The data shows that outcomes have improved over time with more complete cytoreduction and fewer serious complications

  7. Scaphoid nonunion treated with vascularised bone graft from dorsal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özalp, Taçkın; Öz, Çağlar; Kale, Gürler; Erkan, Serkan

    2015-07-01

    The main aim of this retrospective study was to present our experience on scaphoid nonunion treated with vascularised bone graft. Between 2006 and 2012, 58 patients presenting with symptomatic scaphoid nonunion were eligible to participate in this study. Topography of the nonunion included 29 proximal, 25 waist and 4 distal scaphoid nonunions. Vascularised bone graft from distal dorsal radius was used in all cases which were stabilised with the headless cannulated compression screws. Scapholunate angles, Natrass carpal height ratio were evaluated pre and postoperatively. Range of motion of the affected side was compared to that of the contralateral side after the surgery. Radiographic union was achieved in 50, out of 58 cases with an average time of 9.9 weeks (range, 6-18 weeks). Out of all the non-united cases, four of them were in proximal, three in the waist and one was in distal scaphoid. In nine proximal nonunions treated by 4+5 ECA graft all but one were united. The mean follow up was 21.7 months (12-62 months). The flexion was 91.6%, the extension was 91.5%, the radial deviation was 81.2%, and the ulnar deviation was 89.5% compared to the other side. The grip strength was 93%. Preoperative DASH score was 61.5 diminishing to 28.7 postoperatively. There was no significant change in Natrass carpal height ratio but a slight improvement occurred in scapholunate angles both pre and postoperatively. Vascularised bone graft is a good solution for scaphoid nonunion to enhance the healing rate especially in the presence of avascular necrosis. Proximal pole nonunions, humpback deformity and smoking are important negative factors for scaphoid nonunion despite the use of a vascularised bone graft. A trapezoidal wedge graft is necessary for the volar type nonunions with humpback deformity. 1,2 ICSRA offer an advantage with its proximity to scaphoid in all nonunion locations. Nonetheless, 4+5 ECA graft is also a good solution for proximal nonunions. Copyright © 2015

  8. Ion-nanostructure interaction. Comparing simulation and experiment towards surface structuring using nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland-Moritz, Henry

    2016-10-18

    Nanotechnology is a buzzword in context of the proceeding miniaturization of devices and their components. Nanoparticles (NPs) can nowadays easily be synthesized from different material compositions by different chemical and physical processes. However, most of these techniques work close to or at the thermal equilibrium. One subsequent approach to tune materials beyond equilibrium conditions is ion beam irradiation. An important effect of this approach is sputtering. Sputtering is enhanced in NPs compared to their bulk counterparts due to their large surface-to-volume ratio, especially when the ion range matches the NP size. In this work, the sputtering effects of Ar{sup +} and Ga{sup +} ion irradiated Au nanoparticles are investigated in detail by Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a variety of experiments. The sputtering of Ar{sup +} and Ga{sup +} irradiated Au NPs was investigated as a function of ion energy, NP size and impact parameter by the MC code iradina and MD code parcas. The simulation results are directly compared to experiments using high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of Au NPs on top of Si, whereat the sputter yields are significantly enhanced compared to the MC simulations. Additionally, the interaction of NPs and substrate were investigated by Rutherford backscatter spectrometry (RBS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A new MC code was developed to study the redeposition of sputtered atoms of Ga{sup +} irradiated Au NP arrays on neighboring NPs. The redeposition can lead to growth of NPs with diameters of 1 nm in vicinity of ∝50 nm NP. These simulations are directly compared to an in situ experiment. Nanostructures, spherical NPs as well as nanowires (NWs) are used as irradiation masks to structure lithium niobate (LNO) using the ion beam enhanced etching (IBEE) technique. The aspect ratio of the obtained structures can be enhanced by a second IBEE step

  9. Off-axis loads cause failure of the distal radius at lower magnitudes than axial loads: A finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, Karen L.; Grabiner, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Distal radius (Colles’) fractures are a common fall-related injury in older adults and frequently result in long-term pain and reduced ability to perform activities of daily living. Because the occurrence of a fracture during a fall depends on both the strength of the bone and upon the kinematics and kinetics of the impact itself, we sought to understand how changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and loading direction affect the fracture strength and fracture initiation location in the distal radius. A three-dimensional finite element model of the radius, scaphoid, and lunate was used to examine changes of ±2% and ±4% BMD, and both axial and physiologically relevant off-axis loads on the radius. Changes in BMD resulted in similar percent changes in fracture strength. However, modifying the applied load to include dorsal and lateral components (assuming a dorsal view of the wrist, rather than an anatomic view) resulted in a 47% decrease in fracture strength (axial failure load: 2752 N, off-axis: 1448 N). Loading direction also influenced the fracture initiation site. Axially loaded radii failed on the medial surface immediately proximal to the styloid process. In contrast, off-axis loads, containing dorsal and lateral components, caused failure on the dorsal–lateral surface. Because the radius appears to be very sensitive to loading direction, the results suggest that much of the variability in fracture strength seen in cadaver studies may be attributed to varying boundary conditions. The results further suggest that interventions focused on reducing the incidence of Colles’ fractures when falls onto the upper extremities are unavoidable may benefit from increasing the extent to which the radius is loaded along its axis. PMID:17368466

  10. Contact Modelling of Large Radius Air Bending with Geometrically Exact Contact Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorkov, V.; Konyukhov, A.; Vandepitte, D.; Duflou, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    Usage of high-strength steels in conventional air bending is restricted due to limited bendability of these metals. Large-radius punches provide a typical approach for decreasing deformations during the bending process. However, as deflection progresses the loading scheme changes gradually. Therefore, modelling of the contact interaction is essential for an accurate description of the loading scheme. In the current contribution, the authors implemented a plane frictional contact element based on the penalty method. The geometrically exact contact algorithm is used for the penetration determination. The implementation is done using the OOFEM - open source finite element solver. In order to verify the simulation results, experiments have been conducted on a bending press brake for 4 mm Weldox 1300 with a punch radius of 30 mm and a die opening of 80 mm. The maximum error for the springback calculation is 0.87° for the bending angle of 144°. The contact interaction is a crucial part of large radius bending simulation and the implementation leads to a reliable solution for the springback angle.

  11. Low beta rigid mode stability criterion for an arbitrary Larmor radius plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Wong, H.V.

    1987-05-01

    The low beta flute interchange dispersion relation for rigid displacement perturbation of axisymmetric plasma equilibria with arbitrary Larmor radius particles and field line curvature, large compared to the plasma radius, is derived. The equilibrium particle orbits are characterized by two constants of motion, energy and angular momentum, and a third adiabatic invariant derived from the rapid radial motion. The Vlasov equation is integrated, assuming that the mode frequency, axial ''bounce'' frequency, and particle drift frequency are small compared to the cyclotron frequency, and it is demonstrated that the plasma response to a rigid perturbation has a universal character independent of Larmor radius. As a result the interchange instability is the same as that predicted from conventional MHD theory. However, a new prediction, more optimistic than earlier work, is found for the low density threshold of systems like Migma, which are disc-shaped, that is, the axial extent Δz is less than the radial extent r 0 . For Δz/sub r 0 / much less than 1, the stability criterion is determined by the total particle number. Whereas the older theory (Δz/sub r 0 / much greater than 1) predicted instability at about the densities achieved in actual Migma experiments, the present theory (Δz/sub r 0 / much less than 1) indicates that the experimental results were for plasmas with particle number below the interchange threshold

  12. Experiment for a measurement of the charge radius of the proton at the S-DALINAC and investigation of the fine structure of giant resonances in {sup 28}Si, {sup 48}Ca and {sup 166}Er with the help of the wavelet analysis; Experiment zur Messung des Ladungsradius des Protons am S-DALINAC und Untersuchung der Feinstruktur von Riesenresonanzen in {sup 28}Si, {sup 48}Ca und {sup 166}Er mit Hilfe der Waveletanalyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pysmenetska, Inna

    2009-07-22

    The present thesis consists of two parts. In the first part a novel experimental method for the measurement of the proton root-mean-square radius at the S-DALINAC is presented. A setup based on semiconductor detectors is realized. In contrast to previous experiments it allows a simultaneous measurement of the momentum transfer dependence of the elastic electron scattering cross section. A possible suppression of the significant electron and bremsstrahlung background observed in a test experiment was investigated with the help of different methods, such as {delta}E-E telescopes, the time of flight method with a pulsed beam and pulse shape discrimination. The combination of these methods allows a reduction of the background at all scattering angles, which should allow a successful measurement. The response of the detector system was studied with the help of Monte-Carlo simulations with an emphasis on the dependence of the expected accuracy of different parameters. The second part of this work describes an investigation of the fine structure of giant resonances in {sup 28}Si, {sup 48}Ca and {sup 166}Er with the help of a wavelet analysis. The discrete wavelet transform was used for a background determination in spectra of the iso vector E1 and the M2 giant resonances in {sup 48}Ca. This allows the extraction of 1{sup -} und 2{sup -} level densities in the excitation energy region of the respective resonances with the help of a fluctuation analysis. A fluctuation analysis of the fine structure of the isoscalar E2 resonance in {sup 166}Er allows the extraction of the coherent widths of the 2{sup +} states. In the excitation energy region E{sub x}=10-16 MeV widths between 30 and 80 eV are found. The fine structure of the giant resonances is furthermore specified by characteristic scales. In this thesis scales in {sup 28}Si and {sup 48}Ca are extracted with the help of the above mentioned wavelet transform. In {sup 28}Si the isovector E1 and isoscalar E2 resonances were

  13. Distal end radius fractures: evaluation of results of various treatments and assessment of treatment choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargaonkar Gauresh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective:The rapid expansion of knowledge regarding the functional anatomy of hand and wrist, increasing functional demands of senior citizens and improved methodologies of achieving and maintaining anatomic restoration of distal radius fractures has generated a renewed interest in addressing these fractures in a more precise manner. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the difference in patients function among those treated by 1 closed reduction and Plaster of Paris cast, 2 distractor application, or 3 open reduction and internal fixation with a volar plate, and to assess the treatment choice for each particular fracture type. Methods: A prospective study was carried out on 60 patients with fractures of the distal end radius. Fractures were classified according to the AO classification into type A (extra-articular, type B (partial articular and type C (complete articular. After initial evaluation patients were taken up for either conservative or operative treatment and were followed up for two years. Results: Anatomical results were evaluated according to the Sarmiento’s modification of Lindstrom Criteria, which showed that excellent results were more frequent with open reduction and internal fixation using the plating technique. Clinical and functional results were evaluated according to the demerit point system of Gartland and Werley with Sarmiento modification, which was revealed to relate with the type of treatment techniques. Conclusion: There is no customized solution for all the fractures of the distal radius. The choice of treatment should be based on the fracture type, the patient’s characteristics, the patient’s demands and the treating surgeon’s experience and preference. Key words: Distal end radius fractures; Volar plate; Radial orthofix

  14. Inter- and intra-observer agreement of the AO classification for operatively treated distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buijtenen, Jesse M; van Tunen, Mischa L C; Zuidema, Wietse P; Heilbron, Emile A; de Haan, Jeroen; de Vet, Henrica C W; Derksen, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    The reproducibility of the AO classification for distal radius fractures remains a topic of debate. Previous studies showed variable reproducibility results. Important treatment decisions depend on correct classification, especially in comminuted, intra-articular fractures. Therefore, reliable reproducibility results need to be undisputedly determined. Hence, the study objective was to assess inter- and intra-observer agreement of the AO classification for operatively treated distal radius fractures. A database of 54 radiographs of all AO types (A, B and C) and groups (A2-3, B1-3, and C1-3) of distal radius fractures was assessed in twofold. Likewise, a subset of 152 radiographs of solely C-type groups (C1-3) was assessed. All fractures were classified by six observers with different experience levels: three consultant trauma surgeons, one sixth-year trauma surgery resident, a consultant trauma radiologist, and an intern with limited experienced. The inter-observer agreement of both main types and groups was moderate (κ = 0.49 resp. κ = 0.48) in combination with a good intra-observer agreement (κ = 0.68 resp. κ = 0.70). The inter-observer agreement of the subset C-type fractures group was fair (κ = 0.27) with moderate intra-observer agreement (κ = 0.43). According to these results, the reproducibility of the AO classification of main types and groups of distal radius fractures based on conventional radiographs is insufficient (κ < 0.50), especially at group level of C-type fractures.

  15. Characterization of Amylopectin irradiated by gamma rays using viscosity and radius gyration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku Sarah Syahidah Ku Muhamad

    2012-01-01

    Food irradiation is one of the most applicable methods that have been used in food industry especially to preserve food. Besides preservation of food, irradiation can also reduce microorganism, inhibit budding and others. However, this method can be misused by some irresponsible organization or person such as irradiate the food over the dose limit value. Therefore, the detection method is important to detect any misused in irradiation method. The objective of this research is to identify any changes in the structure of amylopectin by using radius gyration technique. Besides that, the viscosity of the sample is also determined by using Rheometer. The last objective of this research is to find a relationship between radius gyration and irradiation dose can be determined. Amylopectin and cassava powder were the sample in this research. The samples were irradiated in the gamma-cell at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, and 10.0 kGy doses. 0 kGy were the controlled sample. The sample were made into gel to analysed using Rheometer and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). The viscosity of the sample were analysed by using Rheometer while the radius gyration of the sample were analysed by using SAXS. Hence, the result of this experiment is, the viscosity of amylopectin reduces as the doses increases. But, at 10 kGy, the viscosity of the cassava starch was increased significantly. For the SAXS analysis, it is shows that the graph for amylopectin were fluctuates. While, for cassava starch the radius gyration increases with doses. Hence, the rheometer technique is suitable to be develop as a detection method in food irradiation. Further research should be done to improve the detection technique in food irradiation. (author)

  16. Jets from jets: re-clustering as a tool for large radius jet reconstruction and grooming at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, Benjamin; Nef, Pascal; Schwartzman, Ariel; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj

    2015-02-01

    Jets with a large radius R ≳ 1 and grooming algorithms are widely used to fully capture the decay products of boosted heavy particles at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Unlike most discriminating variables used in such studies, the jet radius is usually not optimized for specific physics scenarios. This is because every jet configuration must be calibrated, insitu, to account for detector response and other experimental effects. One solution to enhance the availability of large- R jet configurations used by the LHC experiments is jet re-clustering. Jet re-clustering introduces an intermediate scale r groomed jets. Jet re-clustering has the benefit that no additional large-R calibration is necessary, allowing the re-clustered large radius parameter to be optimized in the context of specific precision measurements or searches for new physics.

  17. VOLAR LOCKING PLATE OSTEOSYNTHESIS IN DISTAL END RADIUS FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyan Ranjan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Distal end Radius fractures account for about 20% of all the fracture treated in emergency department of Kosi & Seemanhcal area in Bihar. The majority of osteoporotic fractures occur as a result of fall from standing height on outstretched hand while in young patients, distal end radius fractures are seen secondary to RTA & sports activities. We conducted a study of a small group to evaluate the functional outcome of ORIF & volar locking plate fixation done for distal end radius fractures after one year. MATERIALS AND METHODS Records of 19 men and 41 women aged 17 to 78 years who underwent volar locking plate fixation for distal radial fractures were reviewed. According to AO-Classification of Distal End Radius fractures. 2 Patients had A2 Type of fracture, 3 had A3 Type, both B2 & B3 had 4 cases each, 15 of C1 Type, 21 of C2 type and 11 0f C3 Type. Functional outcome was assessed by using “Demerit point rating system” of Gartland & Werley. In all the patients at their final follow-up visit at 12 months. RESULTS Out of all these 60 patients, 9 cases had 10 complications, 2 cases developed Grade (I Arthritis, 2 cases developed Grade (II arthritis, 1 case developed superficial skin infection with medium nerve compression symptoms, 2 cases developed superficial skin infection which was resolved by continuous dressing on alternate days & 5 cases developed median nerve compression symptoms in which for 2 cases symptoms resolved with time, in rest 3 cases carpal Tunnel Decompression was done. Overall 63.3% result were excellent, 23.3% were good & 13.3% fair outcomes. The residual deformity was 0.70 the subjective score was 1.47 the objective score was 1.70, the total demerit score was as per modification Garland & Werley scoring groups (Mean values was 3.67. In all the cases, stainless steel plate was used. CONCLUSION In distal end radius fractures open reduction and internal fixation with volar locking compression plate followed by

  18. A modified surface-resistance approach for representing bare-soil evaporation: wind tunnel experiments under various atmospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, T.; Takeda, A.; Sugita, F.

    1997-01-01

    A physically based (i.e., nonempirical) representation of surface-moisture availability is proposed, and its applicability is investigated. This method is based on the surface-resistance approaches, and it uses the depth of evaporating surface rather than the water content of the surface soil as the determining factor of surface-moisture availability. A simple energy-balance model including this representation is developed and tested against wind tunnel experiments under various atmospheric conditions. This model can estimate not only the latent heat flux but also the depth of the evaporating surface simultaneously by solving the inverse problem of energy balance at both the soil surface and the evaporating surface. It was found that the depth of the evaporating surface and the latent heat flux estimated by the model agreed well with those observed. The agreements were commonly found out under different atmospheric conditions. The only limitation of this representation is that it is not valid under conditions of drastic change in the radiation input, owing to the influence of transient phase transition of water in the dry surface layer. The main advantage of the approach proposed is that it can determine the surface moisture availability on the basis of the basic properties of soils instead of empirical fitting, although further investigations on its practical use are needed

  19. AGE (Argon Geochronology Experiment): An Instrument for Geochronology on the Surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, T. D.; Bode, R.; Boynton, W. V.; Kring, D. A.; Williams, M.; Chutjian, A.; Darrach, M. R.; Cremers, D. A.; Wiens, R. C.; Baldwin, S. L.

    2003-01-01

    As our knowledge of the planet Mars continues to grow, one parameter that remains elusive is the absolute chronology of the planet s geological history. Although crater counts have provided a robust relative chronology, impactor fluxes are poorly enough known that there are places on Mars where the absolute age is uncertain by a factor of two or more. To resolve these uncertainties, it will be necessary to either analyze well-documented samples returned to the Earth from the Martian surface or to perform in situ measurements with sufficient precision. Sample return is still at least a decade away, and even then it might be from a biologically interesting area that might be geologically complex. Hence an in situ measurement, within an uncertainty of 20% or better, could greatly improve our knowledge of the history of Mars. With funding from the Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP), we have been working on an instrument to perform potassium-argon (K-Ar) and cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) dating in situ on the surface of Mars. For either of these techniques, it is necessary to measure the abundance of one or more major or minor elements (K in the case of KAr; all majors and minors in the case of CRE) and the abundance and isotopes composition of a noble gas (Ar in the case of K-Ar; He, Ne and Ar for CRE dating). The technology for either of these types of measurements exists, but has never before been integrated for a spacecraft. We refer to the instrument as AGE, the Argon Geochronology Experiment (although we will measure the noble gases He and Ne as well for CRE ages). We report here on the basic components that go into such an instrument, both those that use existing technology and those that had to be developed to create the integrated package.

  20. A generalized spectral radius formula and Olsen's question

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loring, Terry; Shulman, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    Let A be a C⁎C⁎-algebra and I be a closed ideal in A. For x∈Ax∈A, its image in A/IA/I is denoted by x˙, and its spectral radius is denoted by r(x)r(x). We prove that max{r(x),‖x˙‖}=inf‖(1+i)−1x(1+i)‖ (where the infimum is taken over all i∈Ii∈I such that 1+i1+i is invertible), which generalizes...... the spectral radius formula of Murphy and West. Moreover if r(x)C⁎C⁎-algebra. Using this we give a partial answer to an open question of C. Olsen: if p is a polynomial then for “almost every” operator T...

  1. On correspondence between atomic volume and atomic radius in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malyuchkov, O.T.

    1980-01-01

    Atomic radii for 68 metals and their allotropic modifications are calculated according to proposed carlier technique for recalculation of real structure to structures with coordination number 12. The comparison of obtained values with published data confirms the supposition on proportionality of the dependence between atomic volume and atomic radius. Atomic number is more sensitive to structural transformations than atomic radius and it can better characterize a tendency in electronic structure modification of a substance during phase transistions. Taking into considerations that in different structure modifications both the value of atomic volume and the correlation between the volume of ''rigid ball'' and peripherical part of atomic volume change, these changes can be used for qualitative assesment of a number of parameters of electronic structure of metals, alloys and compounds [ru

  2. Fractures of the shafts of the radius and ulna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, C.E.; Campbell, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    Although the clinical presentation of fracture of the forearm bones is usually quite obvious, thorough radiologic examination of the radius and ulna and adjacent wrist and elbow joints is mandatory. Standard views of the forearm of the patient include the AP and lateral projections. The degree of shortening, angulation, rotation, and comminution should be noted. The selected films must be long enough to include the adjacent elbow and wrist joints

  3. A note on norm estimates of the numerical radius

    OpenAIRE

    Sano, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    For a bounded linear operator $A$ on a Hilbert space $\\mathcal{H}$, let $\\| A \\|$ denote the operator norm and $w(A)$ the numerical radius. It is well-known that \\begin{equation*} \\frac{1}{2} \\| A \\| ≤q w(A) ≤q \\| A \\|. \\end{equation*} For equalities, we consider linear operators $A$ with $A^{2} = 0$ and normaloid matrices.

  4. PROXIMAL RADIUS RECONSTRUCTION BY METATARSAL OSTEOCHONDRAL AUTO GRAFT

    OpenAIRE

    Kammar; Prashanth Kumar; Gururaj; Viresh; Akash; Ajay

    2015-01-01

    17 Year Old student, Pavan presents with swelling since 8 months. Swelling was diffuse over forearm. Tenderness was present. No local rise of temperature. Range of m ovement at elbow was restricted and painful terminally. No distal neurovascular deficits. X - ray reveale d it to be an a neurysmal bone cyst of proximal right radius. FNAC showed Aneurysmal bone cyst for which curettage and bone grafting was done. Post 6 months tumour ...

  5. On the radiation beaming of bright X-ray pulsars and constraints on neutron star mass-radius relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Verhagen, Patrick A.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; van der Klis, Michiel; Lutovinov, Alexander A.; Larchenkova, Tatiana I.

    2018-03-01

    The luminosity of accreting magnetized neutron stars can largely exceed the Eddington value due to appearance of accretion columns. The height of the columns can be comparable to the neutron star radius. The columns produce the X-rays detected by the observer directly and illuminate the stellar surface, which reprocesses the X-rays and causes additional component of the observed flux. The geometry of the column and the illuminated part of the surface determine the radiation beaming. Curved space-time affects the angular flux distribution. We construct a simple model of the beam patterns formed by direct and reflected flux from the column. We take into account the possibility of appearance of accretion columns, whose height is comparable to the neutron star radius. We argue that depending on the compactness of the star, the flux from the column can be either strongly amplified due to gravitational lensing, or significantly reduced due to column eclipse by the star. The eclipses of high accretion columns result in specific features in pulse profiles. Their detection can put constraints on the neutron star radius. We speculate that column eclipses are observed in X-ray pulsar V 0332+53, leading us to the conclusion of large neutron star radius in this system (˜15 km if M ˜ 1.4 M⊙). We point out that the beam pattern can be strongly affected by scattering in the accretion channel at high luminosity, which has to be taken into account in the models reproducing the pulse profiles.

  6. Fractures of the distal radius in children: A retrospective evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Yazıcı

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study designed to evaluate the resultsof treatment, closed reduction and percutaneous wires, ofthe distal radius fractures in children.Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis wascarried out in children aged between 5-15 years who presentedwith a displaced fracture of the distal radius to ourhospital. They were initially treated with closed reductionand cast immobilization. If the fractures redisplaced treatedby percutaneous Kirschner (K- wire with scope undera general anaesthesia.Results: Totally 104 patients, who have distal radius fractureswere treated by closed reduction and immobilizationin a plaster cast. 13 patient who have distal radiusfractures were treated by closed reduction under generalanaesthesia and fixed by percutaneous Kirschner (K-wire. Patients with impaired the alignment of the fracturein late period were usually completely displaced fractures.(n=5, 4,3%, in early period, completely displaced fractures(n=5, 4,3% are superior to partial displaced fractures(n=2, 1,7%.Conclusion: In our study, when children with distal radiusfracture first come, they were treated by closed reductionand immobilization in a plaster cast. We thought that inredisplaced fractures patients were suitable for the closedreduction with percutaneous wire treatment.

  7. Characterizing SL2S galaxy groups using the Einstein radius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdugo, T.; Motta, V.; Foex, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aims. We aim to study the reliability of RA (the distance from the arcs to the center of the lens) as a measure of the Einstein radius in galaxy groups. In addition, we want to analyze the possibility of using RA as a proxy to characterize some properties of galaxy groups, such as luminosity (L......) and richness (N). Methods. We analyzed the Einstein radius, θE, in our sample of Strong Lensing Legacy Survey (SL2S) galaxy groups, and compared it with RA, using three different approaches: 1) the velocity dispersion obtained from weak lensing assuming a singular isothermal sphere profile (θE,I); 2) a strong.......7 ± 0.2)RA, θE,II = (0.4 ± 1.5) + (1.1 ± 0.4)RA, and θE,III = (0.4 ± 1.5) + (0.9 ± 0.3)RA for each method respectively. We found weak evidence of anti-correlation between RA and z, with Log RA = (0.58 ± 0.06) − (0.04 ± 0.1)z, suggesting a possible evolution of the Einstein radius with z, as reported...

  8. Forearm reconstruction after loss of radius: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manojlović Radovan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Osteomyelitis of the radius resulting in the radial clubhand is a very rare condition and few studies have been published about its prognosis and treatment. Case Outline. This is a case report of hematogenous osteomyelitis of the radius with a complete loss of the radius leaving only the distal radial metaphysis to carry the carpus. In order to achieve best functional results, four-step operative protocol was performed for reconstruction; lengthening of the forearm by external fixator, radioulnar transposition to create a one-bone forearm, plate removal and transposition of brachioradialis to the extensor pollicis longus as well as proximal row carpectomy. After nine years of the last operation, the function of the elbow and hands is good with acceptable cosmetic result. The forearm is 5 cm shorter and there has been a persistent mild limitation of palmar flexion. Conclusion. Creation of the one-bone forearm normalizes the elbow and wrist function, corrects forearm malalignment, and improves forearm growth potential.

  9. Is the proton radius puzzle evidence of extra dimensions?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahia, F.; Lemos, A.S. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Department of Physics, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2016-08-15

    The proton charge radius inferred from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy is not compatible with the previous value given by CODATA-2010, which, on its turn, essentially relies on measurements of the electron-proton interaction. The proton's new size was extracted from the 2S-2P Lamb shift in the muonic hydrogen, which showed an energy excess of 0.3 meV in comparison to the theoretical prediction, evaluated with the CODATA radius. Higher-dimensional gravity is a candidate to explain this discrepancy, since the muon-proton gravitational interaction is stronger than the electron-proton interaction and, in the context of braneworld models, the gravitational potential can be hugely amplified in short distances when compared to the Newtonian potential. Motivated by these ideas, we study a muonic hydrogen confined in a thick brane. We show that the muon-proton gravitational interaction modified by extra dimensions can provide the additional separation of 0.3 meV between the 2S and 2P states. In this scenario, the gravitational energy depends on the higher-dimensional Planck mass and indirectly on the brane thickness. Studying the behavior of the gravitational energy with respect to the brane thickness in a realistic range, we find constraints for the fundamental Planck mass that solve the proton radius puzzle and are consistent with previous experimental bounds. (orig.)

  10. Field experiment provides ground truth for surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R.; Grunewald, E.; Irons, T.; Dlubac, K.; Song, Y.; Bachman, H.N.; Grau, B.; Walsh, D.; Abraham, J.D.; Cannia, J.

    2012-01-01

    The need for sustainable management of fresh water resources is one of the great challenges of the 21st century. Since most of the planet's liquid fresh water exists as groundwater, it is essential to develop non-invasive geophysical techniques to characterize groundwater aquifers. A field experiment was conducted in the High Plains Aquifer, central United States, to explore the mechanisms governing the non-invasive Surface NMR (SNMR) technology. We acquired both SNMR data and logging NMR data at a field site, along with lithology information from drill cuttings. This allowed us to directly compare the NMR relaxation parameter measured during logging,T2, to the relaxation parameter T2* measured using the SNMR method. The latter can be affected by inhomogeneity in the magnetic field, thus obscuring the link between the NMR relaxation parameter and the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic material. When the logging T2data were transformed to pseudo-T2* data, by accounting for inhomogeneity in the magnetic field and instrument dead time, we found good agreement with T2* obtained from the SNMR measurement. These results, combined with the additional information about lithology at the site, allowed us to delineate the physical mechanisms governing the SNMR measurement. Such understanding is a critical step in developing SNMR as a reliable geophysical method for the assessment of groundwater resources.

  11. SCO shipments from Rocky Flats - Experience and current practice [Surface Contaminated Object

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracken, Gary; Morris, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    Decommissioning activities at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) are expected to generate approximately 251,000 cubic meters of low-level radioactive waste. Almost half of this will be characterized and shipped as the Department of Transportation ''Surface Contaminated Object'' (SCO) shipping class. In the 2 years since an SCO characterization method was implemented, almost 11,000 of the 18,000 cubic meters of low-level waste were SCO. RFETS experience to-date using an SCO waste characterization method has shown significant time and cost savings, reduced errors, and enhanced employee safety. SCO waste is characterized prior to packaging, near the point of generation, by any of the site's 300 Radiological Control Technicians using inexpensive radiological control survey instruments. This reduces on-site waste container moves and eliminates radiometric analysis at centrally located drum or crate counters. Containers too large for crate counters can also be characterized. Current instrumentation is not adequate to take full advantage of the SCO regulations. Future improvements in the SCO characterization and shipping process are focused on use of larger and/or reusable containers, extended-range instruments, and additional statistical methods, so that the full extent of the SCO regulations can be used

  12. Effect of glutamic acid on copper sorption onto kaolinite - Batch experiments and surface complexation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Lotfollah; Barthen, Robert; Stockmann, Madlen; Gruendig, Marion; Franke, Karsten; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2017-07-01

    High carbonate content of the European Kupferschiefer ore deposits is a challenge for acid copper leaching (pH ≤ 2). Therefore investigating the mobility behavior of Cu(II) under conditions related to an alternative, neutrophil biohydrometallurgical Cu(II) leaching approach is of interest. As glutamic acid (Glu) might be present as a component in the growth media, we studied its effects on the adsorption of Cu(II) onto kaolinite. The binary and ternary batch sorption measurements of Cu(II) and Glu onto kaolinite were performed in the presence of 10 mM NaClO 4 as background electrolyte and at a pH range from 4 to 9. Sorption experiments were modeled by the charge-distribution multi-site ion complexation (CD-MUSIC) model by using single sorption site (≡SOH) and monodentate surface complexation reactions. Glu sorption on kaolinite is weak (kaolinite mimics the Freundlich model. The proposed CD-MUSIC model provides a close fit to the experimental data and predicts the sorption of Cu(II), Cu(II)-Glu and Glu onto kaolinite as well as the effect of Glu on Cu(II) mobility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Wave-current interaction near the Gulf Stream during the surface wave dynamics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David W.; Liu, Antony K.; Peng, Chih Y.; Meindl, Eric A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study on the wave-current interaction near the local curvature of a Gulf Stream meander. The wave data were obtained from in situ measurements by a pitch-roll discus buoy during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) conducted off Wallops Island, Virginia, from October 1990 to March 1991. Owing to the advection of the Gulf Stream by the semidiurnal tide, the discus buoy was alternately located outside and inside the Gulf Stream. The directional wave measurements from the buoy show the changes in wave direction, wave energy, and directional spreading when waves encountered the current in the Gulf Stream meanders. A wave refraction model, using the ray-tracing method with an estimated Gulf Stream velocity field and meandering condition, was used to simulate wave refraction patterns and to estimate wave parameters at relative locations corresponding to buoy measurements. The numerical simulation shows that a focusing zone of wave rays was formed near the boundary and behind the crest of a simulated Gulf Stream meander. The focusing of wave rays causes changes in wave direction, increases in wave energy, and decreases in wave directional spreading, which are in good agreement with the results from the buoy measurements.

  14. Study on the Calculation of Pebble-Bed Reactor Multiplication Factor As a Function of Fuel Kernel Radius at Various Enrichments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuhair; Suwoto

    2009-01-01

    Main characteristics of PBR comes from utilization of coated particle fuels dispersed in pebble fuels . Because of vibration, fuel kernel can be grouped into cluster and in these cases, neutronic characteristics of pebble fuel significantly changes . In this study, cluster is modeled structural form consisting of uniform cubic cells with eight neighborhood TRISO particles . Neutronic characteristics was investigated by calculating pebble-bed reactor multiplication factor as a function of fuel kernel radius at various enrichments . The calculation results using MCNP5 code with ENDF/BVI neutron library show that k eff value depends on the average fuel radius and reaches its minimum when all kernels have the same radius, i.e. 0.0280 cm . With this radius, the total kernel surface area achieves maximum value . The dependence of k eff on fuel kernel radius decreases in relation to the increase in uranium enrichment . However, k eff value is not affected by fuel kernel radius when the uranium is 100% enriched . From these result, it can be concluded that, exception of uranium enrichment, the selection of fuel kernel radius should be considered thoroughly in designing a PBR, since this parameter provides significant influences on neutronic characteristics of the reactor. (author)

  15. A Predictor Analysis Framework for Surface Radiation Budget Reprocessing Using Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Patricia Allison

    Earth's Radiation Budget (ERB) is an accounting of all incoming energy from the sun and outgoing energy reflected and radiated to space by earth's surface and atmosphere. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) project produces and archives long-term datasets representative of this energy exchange system on a global scale. The data are comprised of the longwave and shortwave radiative components of the system and is algorithmically derived from satellite and atmospheric assimilation products, and acquired atmospheric data. It is stored as 3-hourly, daily, monthly/3-hourly, and monthly averages of 1° x 1° grid cells. Input parameters used by the algorithms are a key source of variability in the resulting output data sets. Sensitivity studies have been conducted to estimate the effects this variability has on the output data sets using linear techniques. This entails varying one input parameter at a time while keeping all others constant or by increasing all input parameters by equal random percentages, in effect changing input values for every cell for every three hour period and for every day in each month. This equates to almost 11 million independent changes without ever taking into consideration the interactions or dependencies among the input parameters. A more comprehensive method is proposed here for the evaluating the shortwave algorithm to identify both the input parameters and parameter interactions that most significantly affect the output data. This research utilized designed experiments that systematically and simultaneously varied all of the input parameters of the shortwave algorithm. A D-Optimal design of experiments (DOE) was chosen to accommodate the 14 types of atmospheric properties computed by the algorithm and to reduce the number of trials required by a full factorial study from millions to 128. A modified version of the algorithm was made

  16. Measurement Of Neutron Radius In Lead By Parity Violating Scattering Flash ADC DAQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Zafar [Christopher Newport Univ., Newport News, VA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    This dissertation reports the experiment PREx, a parity violation experiment which is designed to measure the neutron radius in 208Pb. PREx is performed in hall A of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility from March 19th to June 21st. Longitudionally polarized electrons at energy 1 GeV scattered at and angle of θlab = 5.8 ° from the Lead target. Beam corrected pairty violaing counting rate asymmetry is (Acorr= 594 ± 50(stat) ± 9(syst))ppb at Q2 = 0.009068GeV 2. This dissertation also presents the details of Flash ADC Data Acquisition(FADC DAQ) system for Moller polarimetry in Hall A of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The Moller polarimeter measures the beam polarization to high precision to meet the specification of the PREx(Lead radius experiment). The FADC DAQ is part of the upgrade of Moller polarimetery to reduce the systematic error for PREx. The hardware setup and the results of the FADC DAQ analysis are presented

  17. Numerical Experiments on the Computation of Ground Surface Temperature in an Atmospheric Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    computation of the ground surface temperature. It is hoped that this discussion will contribute to the improvement of the accuracy of computed ground surface temperature in the simulation of climatic changes .

  18. Effects of Nose Radius and Aerodynamic Loading on Leading Edge Receptivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerton, P. W.; Kerschen, E. J.

    1998-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the effects of airfoil thickness and mean aerodynamic loading on boundary-layer receptivity in the leading-edge region. The case of acoustic free-stream disturbances, incident on a thin cambered airfoil with a parabolic leading edge in a low Mach number flow, is considered. An asymptotic analysis based on large Reynolds number is developed, supplemented by numerical results. The airfoil thickness distribution enters the theory through a Strouhal number based on the nose radius of the airfoil, S = (omega)tau(sub n)/U, where omega is the frequency of the acoustic wave and U is the mean flow speed. The influence of mean aerodynamic loading enters through an effective angle-of-attack parameter ti, related to flow around the leading edge from the lower surface to the upper. The variation of the receptivity level is analyzed as a function of S, mu, and characteristics of the free-stream acoustic wave. For an unloaded leading edge, a finite nose radius dramatically reduces the receptivity level compared to that for a flat plate, the amplitude of the instability waves in the boundary layer being decreased by an order of magnitude when S = 0.3. Modest levels of aerodynamic loading are found to further decrease the receptivity level for the upper surface of the airfoil, while an increase in receptivity level occurs for the lower surface. For larger angles of attack close to the critical angle for boundary layer separation, a local rise in the receptivity level occurs for the upper surface, while for the lower surface the receptivity decreases. The effects of aerodynamic loading are more pronounced at larger values of S. Oblique acoustic waves produce much higher receptivity levels than acoustic waves propagating downstream parallel to the airfoil chord.

  19. The relationship between sea surface temperature anomalies and atmospheric circulation in general circulation model experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharin, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Several multi-year integrations of the Hamburg version of the ECMWF/T21 general circulation model driven by the sea surface temperature (SST) observed in the period 1970-1988 were examined to study the extratropical response of the atmospheric circulation to SST anomalies in the Northern Hemisphere in winter. In the first 19-years run SST anomalies were prescribed globally (GAGO run), and in two others SST variability was limited to extratropical regions (MOGA run) and to tropics (TOGA run), respectively. A canonical correlation analysis was applied to the monthly means to find the best correlated patterns of SST anomalies in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric flow. Contrary to expectation, the extratropical response in the GAGO run is not equal to the linear combination of the responses in the MOGA and TOGA runs. In the GAGO integration with globally prescribed SST the best correlated atmospheric pattern is global and is characterized by dipole structures of the same polarity in the North Atlantic and the North Pacific sectors. In the MOGA and TOGA experiments the atmospheric response is more local with main centers in the North Atlantic and North Pacific, respectively. The atmospheric modes found by the CCA were compared with the normal modes of the barotropic vorticity equation linearized about the 500 mb winter climate of the control integration driven by the climatological SST. The normal modes with smallest eigenvalues are similar to the canonical patterns of 500 mb geopotential height. The corresponding eigenvectors of the adjoint operator, which represent an external forcing optimal for exciting normal modes, have a longitudinal structure with maxima in regions characterized by enhanced high frequency baroclinic activity over both oceans. It was suggested that variability of storm tracks could play an important role in variability of the barotropic normal modes. (orig.)

  20. Effect of elbow flexion angles on stress distribution of the proximal ulnar and radius bones under a vertical load: measurement using resistance strain gauges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zhi-Tao; Yuan, Feng; Li, Bing; Ma, Ning

    2014-07-31

    This study aimed to explore the surface stress at the proximal ends of the ulna and radius at different elbow flexion angles using the resistance strain method. Eight fresh adult cadaveric elbows were tested. The forearms were fixed in a neutral position. Axial load increment experiments were conducted at four different elbow flexion angles (0°, 15°, 30°, and 45°). Surface stain was measured at six sites (tip, middle, and base of the coronoid process; back ulnar notch; olecranon; and anterolateral margin of the radial head). With the exception of the ulnar olecranon, the load-stress curves at each measurement site showed an approximately linear relationship under the four working conditions studied. At a vertical load of 500 N, the greatest stress occurred at the middle of the coronoid process when the elbow flexion angles were 0° and 15°. When the flexion angles were 30° and 45°, the greatest stress occurred at the base of the coronoid process. The stress on the radial head was higher than those at the measurement sites of the proximal end of the ulna. The resistance strain method for measuring elbow joint surface stress benefits biomechanics research on the elbow joint. Elbow joint surface stress distributions vary according to different elbow flexion angles.

  1. Reconstruction of the distal radius with non-vascularised fibular graft after resection of giant cell tumour of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humail, Syed Mujahid; Ghulam, Mustaff K K; Zaidi, Itaat Hussain

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate outcomes of wide resection and reconstruction of the distal radius with non-vascularised autogenous fibular grafts for giant cell tumour (GCT) of bone. Medical records of 7 men and 5 women aged 22 to 47 (mean, 31) years who underwent wide resection of the distal radius and reconstruction with non-vascularised autogenous fibular grafts for GCT of bone were reviewed. The mean length of the resected radius was 9 (range, 7-11) cm. The ipsilateral proximal fibula with a small portion of attached ligament was harvested. The articular surface of the graft was fixed to the scapholunate articular surface by Kirschner wires, and the ligament of the fibular head was sutured to the carpal ligaments. The graft was fixed to the proximal radius with a small dynamic compression plate. Iliac cancellous bone graft was added. Pain, instability, and functional status were assessed. Wrist joint movements were measured using a goniometer. The grip strength was measured. The operated and contralateral sides were compared. The mean follow-up was 24 (range, 20-27) months. All patients achieved radiological union after a mean of 16 (range, 14-20) weeks. The mean active range of movement in the operated wrists was 32º dorsiflexion, 38º palmar flexion, 15º radial deviations, 12º ulnar deviations, 50º supination, and 60º pronation. Compared with the contralateral wrists, the operated wrists regained 60% of the function, with satisfactory grip strength, and normal finger and thumb movements and hand sensation. No patient had recurrence after 2 years. Two patients had minor dorsal subluxation, which was resolved with a wrist brace. Three patients had superficial infection, which was resolved with intravenous antibiotics and dressings. Two patients had peroneal nerve palsy, which recovered completely in 12 weeks. Non-vascularised fibular grafts for reconstruction of the distal radius after resection of a GCT of bone achieved good cosmetic and functional outcomes.

  2. Prophylactic aortic root surgery in patients with Marfan syndrome : 10 years' experience with a protocol based on body surface area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalberts, Jan J. J.; van Tintelen, J. Peter; Hillege, Hans L.; Boonstra, Piet W.; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Waterbolk, T

    Background: Current guidelines recommending prophylactic aortic root replacement in Marfan syndrome are based on absolute diameters of the aortic root. However, aortic root diameter is a function of body surface area (BSA). Here, we report our experience with a protocol for prophylactic aortic root

  3. Determination of Surface Tension of Surfactant Solutions through Capillary Rise Measurements: An Image-Processing Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck-Iriart, Cristia´n; De-Candia, Ariel; Rodriguez, Javier; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we described an image processing procedure for the measurement of surface tension of the air-liquid interface using isothermal capillary action. The experiment, designed for an undergraduate course, is based on the analysis of a series of solutions with diverse surfactant concentrations at different ionic strengths. The objective of…

  4. Achieving Very Low Levels of Detection: An Improved Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Experiment for the Physical Chemistry Teaching Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Brian G.

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was designed and successfully introduced to complement the nanochemistry taught to undergraduate students in a useful and interesting way. Colloidal Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple, room-temperature method, and the resulting suspension was then used to study the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of methylene…

  5. Possible effect of static surface disorder on diffractive scattering of H2 from Ru(0001): Comparison between theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, G J; Wijzenbroek, Mark; Manson, J R

    2017-12-28

    Specific features of diffractive scattering of H 2 from metal surfaces can serve as fingerprints of the reactivity of the metal towards H 2 , and in principle theory-experiment comparisons for molecular diffraction can help with the validation of semi-empirical functionals fitted to experiments of sticking of H 2 on metals. However, a recent comparison of calculated and Debye-Waller (DW) extrapolated experimental diffraction probabilities, in which the theory was done on the basis of a potential energy surface (PES) accurately describing sticking to Ru(0001), showed substantial discrepancies, with theoretical and experimental probabilities differing by factors of 2 and 3. We demonstrate that assuming a particular amount of random static disorder to be present in the positions of the surface atoms, which can be characterized through a single parameter, removes most of the discrepancies between experiment and theory. Further improvement might be achievable by improving the accuracy of the DW extrapolation, the model of the H 2 rotational state distribution in the experimental beams, and by fine-tuning the PES. However, the question of whether the DW model is applicable to attenuation of diffractive scattering in the presence of a sizable van der Waals well (depth ≈ 50 meV) should also receive attention, in addition to the question of whether the amount of static surface disorder effectively assumed in the modeling by us could have been present in the experiments.

  6. Detailed determination of the fusion nuclear radius in reactions involving weakly bound projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Camacho, A.; Aguilera, E. F.; Quiroz, E. M.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed determination of the fusion radius parameter is performed within the Distorted Wave Born Approximation for reactions involving weakly bound projectiles. Specifically, a simultaneous X 2- analysis of elastic and fusion cross section data is done using a Woods-Saxon potential with volume and surface parts. The volume part is assumed to be responsible for fusion reactions while the surface part for all other direct reactions. It is proved that in order to fit fusion data, particularly for energies below the Coulomb barrier where fusion is enhanced, it is necessary to have a value of around 1.4 fm for the fusion radial parameter of the fusion potential (W F ). This value is much higher than that frequently used in Barrier Penetration models (1.0 fm). The calculations are performed for reactions involving the weakly bound projectile 9 Be with several medium mass targets. (Author)

  7. Experimental investigations of sensor-based surface following performed by a mobile manipulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reister, D.B.; Unseren, M.A.; Baker, J.E.; Pin, F.G.

    1994-10-01

    We discuss a series of surface following experiments using a range finder mounted on the end of an arm that is mounted on a vehicle. The goal is to keep the range finder at a fixed distance from an unknown surface and to keep the orientation of the range finder perpendicular to the surface. During the experiments, the vehicle moves along a predefined trajectory while planning software determines the position and orientation of the arm. To keep the range finder perpendicular to the surface, the planning software calculates the surface normal for the unknown surface. We assume that the unknown surface is a cylinder (the surface depends on x and y but does not depend on z). To calculate the surface normal, the planning software must calculate the locations (x,y) of points on the surface in world coordinates. The calculation requires data on the position and orientation of the vehicle, the position and orientation of the arm, and the distance from the range finder to the surface. We discuss four series of experiments. During the first series of experiments, the calculated surface normal values had large high frequency random variations. A filter was used to produce an average value for the surface normal and we limited the rate of change in the yaw angle target for the arm. We performed the experiment for a variety of concave and convex surfaces. While the experiments were qualitative successes, the measured distance to the surface was significantly different than the target. The distance errors were systematic, low frequency, and had magnitudes up to 25 mm. During the second series of experiments, we reduced the variations in the calculated surface normal values. While reviewing the data collected while following the surface of a barrel, we found that the radius of the calculated surface was significantly different than the measured radius of the barrel.

  8. NEUTRON STAR MASS–RADIUS CONSTRAINTS USING EVOLUTIONARY OPTIMIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, A. L.; Morsink, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 4-183 CCIS, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E1 (Canada); Fiege, J. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Leahy, D. A. [Department of Physics, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2016-12-20

    The equation of state of cold supra-nuclear-density matter, such as in neutron stars, is an open question in astrophysics. A promising method for constraining the neutron star equation of state is modeling pulse profiles of thermonuclear X-ray burst oscillations from hot spots on accreting neutron stars. The pulse profiles, constructed using spherical and oblate neutron star models, are comparable to what would be observed by a next-generation X-ray timing instrument like ASTROSAT , NICER , or a mission similar to LOFT . In this paper, we showcase the use of an evolutionary optimization algorithm to fit pulse profiles to determine the best-fit masses and radii. By fitting synthetic data, we assess how well the optimization algorithm can recover the input parameters. Multiple Poisson realizations of the synthetic pulse profiles, constructed with 1.6 million counts and no background, were fitted with the Ferret algorithm to analyze both statistical and degeneracy-related uncertainty and to explore how the goodness of fit depends on the input parameters. For the regions of parameter space sampled by our tests, the best-determined parameter is the projected velocity of the spot along the observer’s line of sight, with an accuracy of ≤3% compared to the true value and with ≤5% statistical uncertainty. The next best determined are the mass and radius; for a neutron star with a spin frequency of 600 Hz, the best-fit mass and radius are accurate to ≤5%, with respective uncertainties of ≤7% and ≤10%. The accuracy and precision depend on the observer inclination and spot colatitude, with values of ∼1% achievable in mass and radius if both the inclination and colatitude are ≳60°.

  9. Fractal analysis of bone architecture at distal radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomomitsu, Tatsushi; Mimura, Hiroaki; Murase, Kenya; Sone, Teruki; Fukunaga, Masao

    2005-01-01

    Bone strength depends on bone quality (architecture, turnover, damage accumulation, and mineralization) as well as bone mass. In this study, human bone architecture was analyzed using fractal image analysis, and the clinical relevance of this method was evaluated. The subjects were 12 healthy female controls and 16 female patients suspected of having osteoporosis (age range, 22-70 years; mean age, 49.1 years). High-resolution CT images of the distal radius were acquired and analyzed using a peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) system. On the same day, bone mineral densities of the lumbar spine (L-BMD), proximal femur (F-BMD), and distal radius (R-BMD) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We examined the correlation between the fractal dimension and six bone mass indices. Subjects diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis were divided into two groups (with and without vertebral fracture), and we compared measured values between these two groups. The fractal dimension correlated most closely with L-BMD (r=0.744). The coefficient of correlation between the fractal dimension and L-BMD was very similar to the coefficient of correlation between L-BMD and F-BMD (r=0.783) and the coefficient of correlation between L-BMD and R-BMD (r=0.742). The fractal dimension was the only measured value that differed significantly between both the osteopenic and the osteoporotic subjects with and without vertebral fracture. The present results suggest that the fractal dimension of the distal radius can be reliably used as a bone strength index that reflects bone architecture as well as bone mass. (author)

  10. Apollo experience report: A use of network simulation techniques in the design of the Apollo lunar surface experiments package support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, R. A.; Wilkes, J. N.

    1974-01-01

    A case study of data-communications network modeling and simulation is presented. The applicability of simulation techniques in early system design phases is demonstrated, and the ease with which model parameters can be changed and comprehensive statistics gathered is shown. The discussion of the model design and application also yields an insight into the design and implementation of the Apollo lunar surface experiments package ground-support system.

  11. Probing Sub-GeV Mass Strongly Interacting Dark Matter with a Low-Threshold Surface Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jonathan H

    2017-11-24

    Using data from the ν-cleus detector, based on the surface of Earth, we place constraints on dark matter in the form of strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs) which interact with nucleons via nuclear-scale cross sections. For large SIMP-nucleon cross sections, the sensitivity of traditional direct dark matter searches using underground experiments is limited by the energy loss experienced by SIMPs, due to scattering with the rock overburden and experimental shielding on their way to the detector apparatus. Hence, a surface-based experiment is ideal for a SIMP search, despite the much larger background resulting from the lack of shielding. We show using data from a recent surface run of a low-threshold cryogenic detector that values of the SIMP-nucleon cross section up to approximately 10^{-27}  cm^{2} can be excluded for SIMPs with masses above 100 MeV.

  12. Post-traumatic cystic lesion following fracture of the radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadimitriou, Nikolaos G.; Christophorides, John; Beslikas, Theodoros A.; Papadimitriou, Ageliki G.; Doulianaki, Eleni G.

    2005-01-01

    Post-traumatic cystic lesions are an uncommon complication of fractures in children. They are benign, asymptomatic, non-expansive and tend to resolve spontaneously. Their cause seems to be the invasion of bone-marrow fat by subperiosteal hematoma, which may be visible on radiographs during fracture consolidation of the newly formed subperiosteal bone. The case we present is of cyst formation following a fracture of the distal radius and we evaluate the role of yellow bone marrow in the pathogenesis of the cyst. Its typical features clear differentiation from other lesions, preventing unnecessary and, possibly, invasive examinations. (orig.)

  13. Management of fractures of the distal radius: surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, K B

    1999-01-01

    The new millennium represents a time for expanding our present knowledge of the treatment of distal radius fractures, based on the foundation of information that has been gathered over the past century. Treatment-oriented classifications have replaced the prior generalization applied to all "Colles fractures" and have directed preoperative planning. Newer external fixation frames, improved surgical technique, and superior instrumentation allow for safer reproducible ligamentotaxis. These current concepts of treatment along with a comprehensive therapy plan have provided the basis for enhanced recovery from these challenging injuries.

  14. Defuzzification Method for Ranking Fuzzy Numbers Through Radius of Gyration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Saneifard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aimed at designing a new method to rank fuzzy numbers by distance method. The purpose of the present study was to introduce a new method in order to value various fuzzy numbers effectively and at the same time to overcome the shortcomings of the previous studies. To fulfill the purpose of the study the proposed method was based on the radius of gyration point of ROG points and used the semi variance value of fuzzy numbers as benchmark. Finally, the findings are discussed as far as comparative examples are concerned to be useful to illustrate the advantage of the proposed method.

  15. Modelling Acoustic Wave Propagation in Axisymmetric Varying-Radius Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    A computationally fast and accurate model (a set of coupled ordinary differential equations) for fluid sound-wave propagation in infinite axisymmetric waveguides of varying radius is proposed. The model accounts for fluid heat conduction and fluid irrotational viscosity. The model problem is solved...... by expanding solutions in terms of cross-sectional eigenfunctions following Stevenson’s method. A transfer matrix can be easily constructed from simple model responses of a given waveguide and later used in computing the response to any complex wave input. Energy losses due to heat conduction and viscous...

  16. arXiv A Method to Determine the Maximum Defocused Proton Radius of a Self-Modulated Proton Bunch in AWAKE

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Marlene; Muggli, Patric

    The AWAKE experiment at CERN aims to drive GV/m plasma wakefields with a self-modulated proton drive bunch, and to use them for electron acceleration. During the self-modulation process, protons are defocused by the transverse plasma wakefields and form a halo around the focused bunch core. The two-screen setup integrated in AWAKE measures the transverse, time-integrated proton bunch distribution downstream the \\unit[10]{m} long plasma to detect defocused protons. By measuring the maximum radius of the defocused protons we attempt calculate properties of the self-modulation. In this article, we develop a routine to identify the maximum radius of the defocused protons, based on a standard contour method. We compare the maximum radius obtained from the contour to the logarithmic lineouts of the image to show that the determined radius identifies the edge of the distribution.

  17. Perbandingan Fungsi Extremitas Atas pada Fraktur Metafise Distal Radius Intraartikuler Usia Muda Antara Tindakan Operatif Dan Non Operatif dengan Penilaian Klinis Quickdash Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edi Burhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakFraktur metafise distal radius merupakan fraktur dengan insiden tertinggi kedua pada usia tua di luar fraktur daerah panggul. Di Rumah Sakit Dr. M. Djamil Padang terdapat 122 dari 612 kasus fraktur radius, antara Januari 2011 – Juni 2012. Tujuan utama terapi ini adalah pengembalian permukaan sendi ke posisi anatomis dengan fiksasi yang stabil dan pengembalian fungsi extremitas atas semaksimal mungkin. Metode: Penelitian ini berupa penelitian retrospektif yang dilakukan di poliklinik orthopaedi RSUP Dr M Djamil Padang pada bulan November-Desember 2012 pada pasien fraktur metafise distal radius intraartikuler usia muda yang mendapat tindakan operatif dibandingkan dengan kelompok non-operatif dengan penilaian klinis Quick DASH Score. Sampel yang digunakan sebanyak 30 orang dari 55 orang yang memenuhi kriteria inklusi. Hasil: Ada hubungan yang bermakna antara fungsi extremitas atas dengan penilaian Quick DASH Score antara tindakan operatif pada fraktur distal radius intraartikuler usia muda dengan tindakan non-operatif (p Fisher = 0,010. Tidak terdapat hubungan bermakna antara Quick DASH Score dengan jenis kelamin dan diagnosa kanan atau kiri. Pembahasan: Terdapat perbedaan yang bermakna antara pasien fraktur metafise distal radius intraartikuler pada usia muda yang mendapat tindakan operatif berupa ORIF dengan yang mendapatkan tindakan non-operatif berupa pemasangan Gips.Kata kunci: Fraktur Metafise Distal Radius, Tindakan Operatif dan Non Operatif, Quick Dash ScoreAbstractFracture metafise distal radius is fracture with second highest incident on old age besides a fracture in the pelvic area. In the Dr. M. Djamil Hospital found 122 from 612 cases fracture of radius from january 2011 to june 2012. The main purpose therapy is restore the joint in the surface position anatomically by fixation a stable and restore the function upper extremitas over their best. Method: This study is a retrospective conducted at the Orthopaedi clinic of Dr M

  18. Delayed Fracture Healing in Diabetics with Distal Radius Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pscherer, S; Sandmann, G H; Ehnert, S; Nussler, A K; Stöckle, U; Freude, T

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Diabetics may have an increased fracture risk, depending on disease duration, quality of metabolic adjustment and extent of comorbidities, and on an increased tendency to fall. The aim of this retrospective one-centre study consisted in detecting differences in fracture healing between patients with and without diabetes mellitus. Data of patients with the most common fracture among older patients were analyzed. MATERIAL AND METHODS Classification of distal radius fractures was established according to the AO classification. Inital assessment and followup were made by conventional x-rays with radiological default settings. To evaluate fracture healing, formation of callus and sclerotic border, assessment of the fracture gap, and evidence of consolidation signs were used. RESULTS The authors demonstrated that fracture morphology does not influence fracture healing regarding time span, neither concerning consolidation signs nor in fracture gap behavior. However, tendency for bone remodeling is around 70% lower in investigated diabetics than in non-diabetics, while probability for a successful fracture consolidation is 60% lower. CONCLUSIONS To corroborate the authors hypothesis of delayed fracture healing in patients with diabetes mellitus, prospective studies incorporating influencing factors like duration of metabolic disease, quality of diabetes control, medical diabetes treatment, comorbidities and secondary diseaseas, like chronic nephropathy and osteoporosis, have to be carried out. Key words: diabetes, delayed fracture healing, distal radius fractures, callus formation, blood glucose level, osteoblasts.

  19. Mapping the Pressure-radius Relationship of Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Fossati, Luca; Kubyshkina, Darya

    2017-10-01

    The radius of a planet is one of the most physically meaningful and readily accessible parameters of extra-solar planets. This parameter is extensively used in the literature to compare planets or study trends in the know population of exoplanets. However, in an atmosphere, the concept of a planet radius is inherently fuzzy. The atmospheric pressures probed by trasmission (transit) or emission (eclipse) spectra are not directly constrained by the observations, they vary as a function of the atmospheric properties and observing wavelengths, and further correlate with the atmospheric properties producing degenerate solutions.Here, we characterize the properties of exoplanet radii using a radiative-transfer model to compute clear- atmosphere transmission and emission spectra of gas-dominated planets. We explore a wide range of planetary temperatures, masses, and radii, sampling from 300 to 3000 K and Jupiter- to Earth-like values. We will discuss how transit and photospheric radii vary over the parameter space, and map the global trends in the atmospheric pressures associated with these radii. We will also highlight the biases introduced by the choice of an observing band, or the assumption of a clear/cloudy atmosphere, and the relevance that these biases take as better instrumentation improves the precision of photometric observations.

  20. Stellar Initial Mass Function: Trends With Galaxy Mass And Radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Taniya

    2017-06-01

    There is currently no consensus about the exact shape and, in particular, the universality of the stellar initial mass function (IMF). For massive galaxies, it has been found that near-infrared (NIR) absorption features, which are sensitive to the ratio of dwarf to giant stars, deviate from a Milky Way-like IMF; their modelling seems to require a larger fraction of low mass stars. There are now increasing results looking at whether the IMF varies not only with galaxy mass, but also radially within galaxies. The SDSS-IV/MaNGA integral-field survey will provide spatially resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 galaxies at R 2000 from 360-1000nm. Spectra of early-type galaxies were stacked to achieve high S/N which is particularly important for features in the NIR. Trends with galaxy radius and mass were compared to stellar population models for a range of absorption features in order to separate degeneracies due to changes in stellar population parameters, such as age, metallicity and element abundances, with potential changes in the IMF. Results for 611 galaxies show that we do not require an IMF steeper than Kroupa as a function of galaxy mass or radius based on the NaI index. The Wing-Ford band hints towards a steeper IMF at large radii however we do not have reliable measurements for the most massive galaxies.

  1. Low-energy electron diffraction experiment, theory and surface structure determination

    CERN Document Server

    Hove, Michel A; Chan, Chi-Ming

    1986-01-01

    Surface crystallography plays the same fundamental role in surface science which bulk crystallography has played so successfully in solid-state physics and chemistry. The atomic-scale structure is one of the most important aspects in the understanding of the behavior of surfaces in such widely diverse fields as heterogeneous catalysis, microelectronics, adhesion, lubrication, cor­ rosion, coatings, and solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces. Low-Energy Electron Diffraction or LEED has become the prime tech­ nique used to determine atomic locations at surfaces. On one hand, LEED has yielded the most numerous and complete structural results to date (almost 200 structures), while on the other, LEED has been regarded as the "technique to beat" by a variety of other surface crystallographic methods, such as photoemission, SEXAFS, ion scattering and atomic diffraction. Although these other approaches have had impressive successes, LEED has remained the most productive technique and has shown the most versatility...

  2. The PROCESS experiment: amino and carboxylic acids under Mars-like surface UV radiation conditions in low-earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblet, Audrey; Stalport, Fabien; Guan, Yuan Yong; Poch, Olivier; Coll, Patrice; Szopa, Cyril; Cloix, Mégane; Macari, Frédérique; Raulin, Francois; Chaput, Didier; Cottin, Hervé

    2012-05-01

    The search for organic molecules at the surface of Mars is a top priority of the next Mars exploration space missions: Mars Science Laboratory (NASA) and ExoMars (ESA). The detection of organic matter could provide information about the presence of a prebiotic chemistry or even biological activity on this planet. Therefore, a key step in interpretation of future data collected by these missions is to understand the preservation of organic matter in the martian environment. Several laboratory experiments have been devoted to quantifying and qualifying the evolution of organic molecules under simulated environmental conditions of Mars. However, these laboratory simulations are limited, and one major constraint is the reproduction of the UV spectrum that reaches the surface of Mars. As part of the PROCESS experiment of the European EXPOSE-E mission on board the International Space Station, a study was performed on the photodegradation of organics under filtered extraterrestrial solar electromagnetic radiation that mimics Mars-like surface UV radiation conditions. Glycine, serine, phthalic acid, phthalic acid in the presence of a mineral phase, and mellitic acid were exposed to these conditions for 1.5 years, and their evolution was determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy after their retrieval. The results were compared with data from laboratory experiments. A 1.5-year exposure to Mars-like surface UV radiation conditions in space resulted in complete degradation of the organic compounds. Half-lives between 50 and 150 h for martian surface conditions were calculated from both laboratory and low-Earth orbit experiments. The results highlight that none of those organics are stable under low-Earth orbit solar UV radiation conditions.

  3. Effects of dust deposition on iron cycle in the surface Mediterranean Sea: results from a mesocosm seeding experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagener

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil dust deposition is recognized as a major source of iron to the open ocean at global and regional scales. However, the processes that control the speciation and cycle of iron in the surface ocean after dust deposition are poorly documented mainly due to the logistical difficulties to investigate in-situ, natural dust events. The development of clean mesocosms in the frame of the DUNE project (a DUst experiment in a low Nutrient low chlorophyll Ecosystem was a unique opportunity to investigate these processes at the unexplored scale of one dust deposition event. During the DUNE-1-P mesocosm seeding experiment, iron stocks (dissolved and particulate concentrations in the water column and fluxes (export of particulate iron in sediment traps were followed during 8 days after an artificial dust seeding mimicking a wet deposition of 10 g m−2. The addition of dust at the surface of the mesocosms was immediately followed by a decrease of dissolved iron [dFe] concentration in the 0–10 m water column. This decrease was likely due to dFe scavenging on settling dust particles and mineral organic aggregates. The scavenging ratio of dissolved iron on dust particles averaged 0.37 ± 0.12 nmol mg−1. Batch dissolution experiments conducted in parallel to the mesocosm experiment showed a increase (up to 600% in dust iron dissolution capacity in dust-fertilized waters compared to control conditions. This study gives evidences of complex and unexpected effects of dust deposition on surface ocean biogeochemistry: (1 large dust deposition events may be a sink for surface ocean dissolved iron and (2 successive dust deposition events may induce different biogeochemical responses in the surface ocean.

  4. Surface wave observations during CoOP experiments and their relation to air-sea gas transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Tetsu; Uz, B. Mete; Wei, Hua; Edson, James B.; Frew, Nelson M.; McGillis, Wade R.; McKenna, Sean P.; Bock, Erik J.; Haußecker, Horst; Schimpf, Uwe

    Gas exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere is strongly influenced by physical processes in the near-surface waters. Surface waves are particularly important for gas fluxes because they enable faster transfer of gases across the diffusive sublayer by causing more frequent renewal of the skin layer. During the CoOP air-sea gas exchange experiments (1995; 1997), we obtained one of the most comprehensive data sets of physical processes at the air-sea interface in both near-shore and off-shore waters. During these experiments simultaneous measurements of short wind waves, surface films, wind stress, and transfer velocity were made from a towed or self-propelled catamaran with a wide range of wind stress and with varying surface film conditions. The results show that the wave spectra at higher wavenumbers are significantly reduced by surfactant at wind friction velocities below 0.2 m s-1. The surfactant effect may be quantified using the surface enrichment (difference between the CDOM fluorescence in microlayers and that in bulk water) with reasonable accuracy. During rain events the wave spectra are raised at higher wavenumbers (above 200 rad m-1) but are not affected at 100 rad m-1. The surfactant effect is also reduced during rain. The air-sea gas transfer velocity is roughly proportional to the wave spectra at higher wavenumbers but appears to be less sensitive to spectra of longer waves.

  5. Caries Experience and Distribution by Tooth Surfaces in Primary Molars in the Pre-school Child Population of Lodz, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzda-Zwiech, Agnieszka; Filipińska, Renata; Borowska-Strugińska, Beata; Żądzińska, Elżbieta; Wochna-Sobańska, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate caries experience in primary molars as well as the differences in caries prevalence and caries lesion location on individual tooth surfaces between first and second primary molars in pre-school children. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 307 children, aged 3 to 5 years, from randomly chosen kindergartens in Lodz, Poland. Caries experience was scored according to WHO recommendations. The caries intensity (dmft, dmfts) for first and second primary molars was calculated. In addition, the percentage of particular surfaces with caries was counted for each molar separately. The mean dmft for primary molars was 1.84 (dmfts=2.47) and dmft>0 was seen in 53.09% of the study subjects. While in the entire examined population dmft and dmfts for first and second molars did not differ significantly, in 5-year-old children, the left mandibular first molar was associated with a higher caries intensity than the left mandibular second molar (dmfts=0.465 vs 0.344, Z=-1.98, p=0.04). However, in 5-year-olds, higher caries occurrence was seen for occlusal surfaces of the tooth 85 than 84 (33.62% vs 20.68%, χ2=4.09, p=0.03). The distal surface was more frequently affected in first molars than in second molars in children aged 4 (85 vs 84, χ2=17.1, pprimary second molars. However, distal surfaces were affected more in first than second molars.

  6. M DWARF LUMINOSITY, RADIUS, AND α-ENRICHMENT FROM I-BAND SPECTRAL FEATURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad F.; Deshpande, Rohit; Robertson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of M dwarfs and their growing importance to studies of exoplanets, Galactic evolution, and stellar structure, methods for precisely measuring their fundamental stellar properties remain elusive. Existing techniques for measuring M dwarf luminosity, mass, radius, or composition are calibrated over a limited range of stellar parameters or require expensive observations. We find a strong correlation between the K S -band luminosity (M K ), the observed strength of the I-band sodium doublet absorption feature, and [Fe/H] in M dwarfs without strong Hα emission. We show that the strength of this feature, coupled with [Fe/H] and spectral type, can be used to derive M dwarf M K and radius without requiring parallax. Additionally, we find promising evidence that the strengths of the I-band sodium doublet and the nearby I-band calcium triplet may jointly indicate α-element enrichment. The use of these I-band features requires only moderate-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy to provide valuable information about the potential habitability of exoplanets around M dwarfs, and surface gravity and distance for M dwarfs throughout the Galaxy. This technique has immediate applicability for both target selection and candidate planet–host system characterization for exoplanet missions such as TESS and K2

  7. M DWARF LUMINOSITY, RADIUS, AND α-ENRICHMENT FROM I-BAND SPECTRAL FEATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad F.; Deshpande, Rohit; Robertson, Paul, E-mail: rct151@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2015-03-20

    Despite the ubiquity of M dwarfs and their growing importance to studies of exoplanets, Galactic evolution, and stellar structure, methods for precisely measuring their fundamental stellar properties remain elusive. Existing techniques for measuring M dwarf luminosity, mass, radius, or composition are calibrated over a limited range of stellar parameters or require expensive observations. We find a strong correlation between the K{sub S}-band luminosity (M{sub K}), the observed strength of the I-band sodium doublet absorption feature, and [Fe/H] in M dwarfs without strong Hα emission. We show that the strength of this feature, coupled with [Fe/H] and spectral type, can be used to derive M dwarf M{sub K} and radius without requiring parallax. Additionally, we find promising evidence that the strengths of the I-band sodium doublet and the nearby I-band calcium triplet may jointly indicate α-element enrichment. The use of these I-band features requires only moderate-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy to provide valuable information about the potential habitability of exoplanets around M dwarfs, and surface gravity and distance for M dwarfs throughout the Galaxy. This technique has immediate applicability for both target selection and candidate planet–host system characterization for exoplanet missions such as TESS and K2.

  8. Prevalence, risk surfaces and inter-municipality variations in caries experience in Danish children and adolescents in 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrisgaard, Pia Elisabeth; Qvist, Vibeke; Ekstrand, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to describe the caries experience, prevalence and distribution related to tooth type and surfaces in the primary and permanent dentition in children and adolescents in Denmark in 2012. In addition, to examine if explanatory factors influence the inter-municipal......-s/DMF. Conclusions The caries distribution within the primary and permanent dentition among 3-, 9-, 15- and 18-year-olds followed definite patterns concerning location on teeth and surfaces. Background factors only explained a minor part of the variation.......Objective The aim of this study was to describe the caries experience, prevalence and distribution related to tooth type and surfaces in the primary and permanent dentition in children and adolescents in Denmark in 2012. In addition, to examine if explanatory factors influence the inter......-municipality variation in caries experience. Materials and methods Data was collected in the public Child Dental Health Service. In total, 5636 caries registrations on 3-, 9-, 15- and 18-year-olds were collected in 35 of the 98 Danish municipalities. Caries experience was expressed by mean def-s/DMF-S and caries...

  9. Laboratory experiments to investigate radionuclide enrichment in the sea-surface microlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickmott, S.J.B.

    1982-02-01

    Samples of simulated seawater, and seawater from the Irish Sea, were contained in a plastic tank in the laboratory, and bubbles were passed through them to burst at the water surface. The emitted jet droplets, as representing the surface microlayer, were collected on filter papers. Such measurements are easier to perform than similar measurements at sea, and the lack of waves enables greater collection efficiencies to be obtained. The droplet samples were analysed for stable Na, 137 Cs and actinides, and compared with the concentrations in the bulk tank water, in order to examine possible concentration factors for radionuclides in the surface microlayer. (author)

  10. Optical characterization of gold chains and steps on the vicinal Si(557) surface: Theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Conor [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Struttura della Materia, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Department of Physics and European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF), University of Rome ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); McAlinden, Niall; McGilp, John F. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2012-06-15

    We present a joint experimental-theoretical study of the reflectance anisotropy of clean and gold-covered Si(557), a vicinal surface of Si(111) upon which gold forms quasi-one-dimensional (1D) chains parallel to the steps. By means of first-principles calculations, we analyse the close relationship between the various surface structural motifs and the optical properties. Good agreement is found between experimental and computed spectra of single-step models of both clean and Au-adsorbed surfaces. Spectral fingerprints of monoatomic gold chains and silicon step edges are identified. The role of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) on the surface optical properties is examined, and found to have little effect. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Rubber friction on road surfaces: Experiment and theory for low sliding speeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, B.; Persson, B. N. J. [PGI, FZ Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Oh, Y. R.; Nam, S. K.; Jeon, S. H. [Hankook Tire Co. LTD., 112 Gajeongbuk-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-725 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-21

    We study rubber friction for tire tread compounds on asphalt road surfaces. The road surface topographies are measured using a stylus instrument and atomic force microscopy, and the surface roughness power spectra are calculated. The rubber viscoelastic modulus mastercurves are obtained from dynamic mechanical analysis measurements and the large-strain effective modulus is obtained from strain sweep data. The rubber friction is measured at different temperatures and sliding velocities, and is compared to the calculated data obtained using the Persson contact mechanics theory. We conclude that in addition to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber surface by the road asperities, there is an important contribution to the rubber friction from shear processes in the area of contact. The analysis shows that the latter contribution may arise from rubber molecules (or patches of rubber) undergoing bonding-stretching-debonding cycles as discussed in a classic paper by Schallamach.

  12. Virtual laparoscopy: Initial experience with three-dimensional ultrasonography to characterize hepatic surface features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimoto, Tadashi, E-mail: tad_sekimoto@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Maruyama, Hitoshi, E-mail: maru-cib@umin.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Kondo, Takayuki, E-mail: takakondonaika@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Shimada, Taro, E-mail: bobtaro51@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Takahashi, Masanori, E-mail: machat1215@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Yokosuka, Osamu, E-mail: yokosukao@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Otsuka, Masayuki, E-mail: otsuka-m@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of General Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Miyazaki, Masaru, E-mail: masaru@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of General Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Mine, Yoshitaka, E-mail: yoshitaka.mine@toshiba.co.jp [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Ultrasound Systems Division, Ultrasound Systems Development Department, Otawara, Tochigi (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: To examine the potential utility of 3D-reconstructed sonograms to distinguish cirrhotic from non-cirrhotic livers by demonstrating hepatic surface characteristics. Materials and methods: A preliminary phantom study was performed to examine the potential resolution of 3D images, recognizing surface irregularities as a difference in height. In a prospective clinical study of 31 consecutive patients with ascites (21 cirrhosis, 10 non-cirrhosis), liver volume data were acquired by transabdominal mechanical scanning. The hepatic surface features of cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic patients were compared by 2 independent reviewers. Intra- and inter-operator/reviewer agreements were also examined. Results: The phantom study revealed that 0.4 mm was the minimum recognizable difference in height on the 3D sonograms. The hepatic surface image was successfully visualized in 74% patients (23/31). Success depended on the amount of ascites; visualization was 100% with ascites of 10 mm or more between the hepatic surface and abdominal wall. The images showed irregularity of the hepatic surface in all cirrhotic patients. The surface appearance was confirmed as being very similar in 3 patients who had both 3D sonogram and liver resection for transplantation. The ability to distinguish cirrhotic liver from non-cirrhotic liver improved with the use of combination of 2D- and 3D-imaging versus 2D-imaging alone (sensitivity, p = 0.02; accuracy, p = 0.02) or 3D-imaging alone (sensitivity, p = 0.03). Intra-/inter-operator and inter-reviewer agreement were excellent (κ = 1.0). Conclusion: 3D-based sonographic visualization of the hepatic surface showed high reliability and reproducibility, acting as a virtual laparoscopy method, and the technique has the potential to improve the diagnosis of cirrhosis.

  13. Virtual laparoscopy: Initial experience with three-dimensional ultrasonography to characterize hepatic surface features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Tadashi; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Kondo, Takayuki; Shimada, Taro; Takahashi, Masanori; Yokosuka, Osamu; Otsuka, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Masaru; Mine, Yoshitaka

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the potential utility of 3D-reconstructed sonograms to distinguish cirrhotic from non-cirrhotic livers by demonstrating hepatic surface characteristics. Materials and methods: A preliminary phantom study was performed to examine the potential resolution of 3D images, recognizing surface irregularities as a difference in height. In a prospective clinical study of 31 consecutive patients with ascites (21 cirrhosis, 10 non-cirrhosis), liver volume data were acquired by transabdominal mechanical scanning. The hepatic surface features of cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic patients were compared by 2 independent reviewers. Intra- and inter-operator/reviewer agreements were also examined. Results: The phantom study revealed that 0.4 mm was the minimum recognizable difference in height on the 3D sonograms. The hepatic surface image was successfully visualized in 74% patients (23/31). Success depended on the amount of ascites; visualization was 100% with ascites of 10 mm or more between the hepatic surface and abdominal wall. The images showed irregularity of the hepatic surface in all cirrhotic patients. The surface appearance was confirmed as being very similar in 3 patients who had both 3D sonogram and liver resection for transplantation. The ability to distinguish cirrhotic liver from non-cirrhotic liver improved with the use of combination of 2D- and 3D-imaging versus 2D-imaging alone (sensitivity, p = 0.02; accuracy, p = 0.02) or 3D-imaging alone (sensitivity, p = 0.03). Intra-/inter-operator and inter-reviewer agreement were excellent (κ = 1.0). Conclusion: 3D-based sonographic visualization of the hepatic surface showed high reliability and reproducibility, acting as a virtual laparoscopy method, and the technique has the potential to improve the diagnosis of cirrhosis

  14. Patterned gradient surface for spontaneous droplet transportation and water collection: simulation and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Xianhua; Zhu, Yiying; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong; Liao, Guanglan

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate spontaneous droplet transportation and water collection on wedge-shaped gradient surfaces consisting of alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. Droplets on the surfaces are modeled and simulated to analyze the Gibbs free energy and free energy gradient distributions. Big half-apex angle and great wettability difference result in considerable free energy gradient, corresponding to large driving force for spontaneous droplet transportation, thus causing the droplets to move towards the open end of the wedge-shaped hydrophilic regions, where the Gibbs free energy is low. Gradient surfaces are then fabricated and tested. Filmwise condensation begins on the hydrophilic regions, forming wedge-shaped tracks for water collection. Dropwise condensation occurs on the hydrophobic regions, where the droplet size distribution and departure diameters are controlled by the width of the regions. Condensate water from both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are collected directionally to the open end of the wedge-shaped hydrophilic regions, agreeing with the simulations. Directional droplet transport and controllable departure diameters make the branched gradient surfaces more efficient than smooth surfaces for water collection, which proves that gradient surfaces are potential in water collection, microfluidic devices, anti-fogging and self-cleaning. (paper)

  15. The radius of the proton is less than expected; La taille du proton est revue a la baisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grousson, M.

    2010-10-15

    A new measurement of the radius of the proton gives a value of 0.84184*10{sup -15} m which is less than the previously accepted value: 0.8768*10{sup -15} m. The last experiment is likely to give a more accurate value because it is based on the difference of energy levels of a hydrogen atom in which the electron has been replaced by a muon. (A.C.)

  16. [Radius reed osteotomy for supination deformity in children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkar, F; Dana, C; Salon, A; Glorion, C

    2013-12-01

    We report our experience and results in the use of reed pronating osteotomy in supination deformities secondary to obstetrical brachial plexus injury. This retrospective study involved 11 patients with paralytic supination of the forearm due to a brachial plexus injury. Other causes of paralytic supination were excluded. The surgical technique consisted of a proximal osteotomy of the ulna fixed by an intramedullary nail and a stable elastic reed osteotomy of the radius. The minimum postoperative follow-up was 2 years. Four boys and seven girls mean aged 8 years (5-12) were operated on between 2000 and 2010. The mean preoperative supination was measured at 63°. The final position average pronation was 37°. Loss of pronation was measured at 15°. No complication was observed. With a mean follow-up of 4 years (2-12), the reed osteotomy of radius associated with a proximal transverse osteotomy of ulna has proven itself effective for correction of paralytic supination of the forearm without complication or reoperation.

  17. Inclusive jet spectrum for small-radius jets

    CERN Document Server

    Dasgupta, Mrinal; Salam, Gavin P.; Soyez, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Following on our earlier work on leading-logarithmic (LLR) resummations for the properties of jets with a small radius, R, we here examine the phenomenological considerations for the inclusive jet spectrum. We discuss how to match the NLO predictions with small-R resummation. As part of the study we propose a new, physically-inspired prescription for fixed-order predictions and their uncertainties. We investigate the R-dependent part of the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) corrections, which is found to be substantial, and comment on the implications for scale choices in inclusive jet calculations. We also examine hadronisation corrections, identifying potential limitations of earlier analytical work with regards to their $p_t$-dependence. Finally we assemble these different elements in order to compare matched (N)NLO+LLR predictions to data from ALICE and ATLAS, finding improved consistency for the R-dependence of the results relative to NLO predictions.

  18. Extraction of the Proton Radius from Electron Scattering Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higinbotham, Douglas

    2017-09-01

    The proton radius is commonly extracted from elastic electron scattering data from fits that attempt to determine the slope of the cross section via extrapolations to zero momentum transfer. From the collection of published fits, it is clear that it is possible for different radii to be extracted from exactly the same data depending on how exactly the extraction is done. To understand the source of these differences, we review older fitting techniques and apply them to the modern data. This allows us to effectively make use of the idea of training data and then validation data. We also make use of statistical techniques such as cross validation and statistical bootstrapping to try to understand if certain data points in the world data are the source of these seemingly discrepant results. We will also discuss the interplay between bias and variance.

  19. Mass-radius relation for magnetized strange quark stars

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, A Perez; Paret, D Manreza

    2010-01-01

    We review the stability of magnetized strange quark matter (MSQM) within the phenomenological MIT bag model, taking into account the variation of the relevant input parameters, namely, the strange quark mass, baryon density, magnetic field and bag parameter. A comparison with magnetized asymmetric quark matter in $\\beta$-equilibrium as well as with strange quark matter (SQM) is presented. We obtain that the energy per baryon for MSQM decreases as the magnetic field increases, and its minimum value at vanishing pressure is lower than the value found for SQM, which implies that MSQM is more stable than non-magnetized SQM. The mass-radius relation for magnetized strange quark stars is also obtained in this framework.

  20. Fugitive dust control experiments using soil fixatives on vehicle traffic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winberg, M.R.; Wixom, V.E.

    1992-08-01

    This report presents the results of engineering scale dust control experiments using soil fixative for contamination control during handling of transuranic waste. These experiments focused on controlling dust during retrieval operations of buried waste where waste and soil are intimately mixed. Sources of dust generation during retrieval operations include digging, dumping, and vehicle traffic. Because contaminants are expected to attach to soil particles and move with the generated dust, control of the dust spread may be the key to contamination control. Dust control techniques examined in these experiments include the use of soil fixatives to control generation of fugitive dusts during vehicle traffic operations. Previous experiments conducted in FY 1990 included testing of the soil fixative, ENTAC. These experiments showed that ENTAC was effective in controlling dust generation but had several undesirable properties such as slow cure times and clogged the pumps and application nozzles. Therefore, other products would have to be evaluated to find a suitable candidate. As a result, two soil fixatives were tested in these present experiments, COHEREX-PM, an asphalt emulsion product manufactured by Witco Corporation and FLAMBINDER, a calcium lignosulfonate product manufactured by Flambeau Corporation. The results of the experiments include product performance and recommended application methods for application in a field deployable contamination control unit to be built in FY 1993

  1. Distal Radius Quantitative Ultrasound Measurements and Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özden Özyemiflçi Taflk›ran

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the quantitative ultrasound measurements and determine the related demographic, clinical and life style parameters. Material and Methods: A questionnaire including demographic features, systemic diseases, physical activity levels and other risk factors for osteoporosis was completed. Measurements of quantitative ultrasound (QUS were performed. Speed of sound (SOS (m/sec measurements were taken at the distal 1/3 radius of the nondominant extremity. Results: Among 2347 persons whom QUS measurements and questionnaires were completed, those aged 35 years and older and that were not taking antiosteoporotic treatment (N= 1867; 1654 women, 213 men were included for the analysis. Mean age of the participants were 52.1±10.7 years and mean SOS scores were 4142.8±185.8 m/sec. The variables that were statistically significant in either independent samples t test or analysis of variance were put in the linear regression analysis. In women, age, years since menopause and duration of lactation were independent predictors for SOS scores (constant= 4367.9 m/sec, age B: -3.8, ß: -0.197, p: 0.01; years since menopause: B: -3.9, ß: -0.211, p: 0.006; duration of lactation B: -0.4, ß: -0.086, p: 0.037. In men, age and level of education affected SOS scores independently (constant= 4271.3 m/sec, age B: -3.8, ß: -0.277, p: 0.001; level of education: B: 18.8, ß: 0.144, p: 0.036. Conclusion: Increasing age is associated with decrements in speed of sound measured by quantitative ultrasound at distal radius. It is important to give education about preventive measures on bone metabolism, especially during the lactation period. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2011;17:1-5

  2. Micrometer-sized Water Ice Particles for Planetary Science Experiments: Influence of Surface Structure on Collisional Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gärtner, S.; Fraser, H. J. [School of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Gundlach, B.; Ratte, J.; Blum, J. [Institut für Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik, TU Braunschweig, Mendelssohnstr. 3, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Headen, T. F.; Youngs, T. G. A.; Bowron, D. T. [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Oesert, J.; Gorb, S. N., E-mail: sabrina.gaertner@stfc.ac.uk, E-mail: helen.fraser@open.ac.uk [Zoologisches Institut, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Am Botanischen Garten 1-9, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2017-10-20

    Models and observations suggest that ice-particle aggregation at and beyond the snowline dominates the earliest stages of planet formation, which therefore is subject to many laboratory studies. However, the pressure–temperature gradients in protoplanetary disks mean that the ices are constantly processed, undergoing phase changes between different solid phases and the gas phase. Open questions remain as to whether the properties of the icy particles themselves dictate collision outcomes and therefore how effectively collision experiments reproduce conditions in protoplanetary environments. Previous experiments often yielded apparently contradictory results on collision outcomes, only agreeing in a temperature dependence setting in above ≈210 K. By exploiting the unique capabilities of the NIMROD neutron scattering instrument, we characterized the bulk and surface structure of icy particles used in collision experiments, and studied how these structures alter as a function of temperature at a constant pressure of around 30 mbar. Our icy grains, formed under liquid nitrogen, undergo changes in the crystalline ice-phase, sublimation, sintering and surface pre-melting as they are heated from 103 to 247 K. An increase in the thickness of the diffuse surface layer from ≈10 to ≈30 Å (≈2.5 to 12 bilayers) proves increased molecular mobility at temperatures above ≈210 K. Because none of the other changes tie-in with the temperature trends in collisional outcomes, we conclude that the surface pre-melting phenomenon plays a key role in collision experiments at these temperatures. Consequently, the pressure–temperature environment, may have a larger influence on collision outcomes than previously thought.

  3. MUREX: a land-surface field experiment to study the annual cycle of the energy and water budgets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Calvet

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The MUREX (monitoring the usable soil reservoir experimentally experiment was designed to provide continuous time series of field data over a long period, in order to improve and validate the Soil-vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT parameterisations employed in meteorological models. Intensive measurements were performed for more than three years over fallow farmland in southwestern France. To capture the main processes controlling land-atmosphere exchanges, the local climate was fully characterised, and surface water and energy fluxes, vegetation biomass, soil moisture profiles, surface soil moisture and surface and soil temperature were monitored. Additional physiological measurements were carried out during selected periods to describe the biological control of the fluxes. The MUREX data of 1995, 1996, and 1997 are presented. Four SVAT models are applied to the annual cycle of 1995. In general, they succeed in simulating the main features of the fallow functioning, although some shortcomings are revealed.Key words. Hydrology (evapotranspiration; soil moisture; water-energy interactions.

  4. EARLY RESULTS OF UNSTABLE DISTAL RADIUS FRACTURES- ORIF WITH LOCKING COMPRESSION PLATE VERSUS LIGAMENTOTAXIS WITH EXTERNAL FIXATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondeep Gayan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND External Fixation (EF and Open Reduction and Internal Fixation (ORIF have been the traditional surgical modalities for unstable distal radius fractures. The Locking Compression Plates (LCP acting as “internal external fixators” are particularly valuable in difficult situations of fractures. We undertook a study to evaluate the outcome of unstable distal radius fractures treated with ORIF with LCP versus those treated by ligamentotaxis with external fixators. MATERIALS AND METHODS A comparative study was carried out in a tertiary care centre with 30 cases of unstable distal radius fractures (15 cases in each group. In one group, open reduction and internal fixation with distal radius volar locking compression plate was carried out and in the other group ligamentotaxis with external fixator was done. The patients were treated and followed up over a period of one and a half year between June 2011 to November 2012. The fractures were classified according to AO classification (Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen: German for “Association for the Study of Internal Fixation” or AO. The functional results were evaluated at the end of 6 months according to Demerit point system of Gartland and Werley modified by Sarmiento (1975 and the anatomical results as per Lindstrom criteria (1959 modified by Sarmiento (1980. RESULTS Overall 86.66% (13 cases had good-to-excellent anatomical results in external fixator group as compared to 93.33% (14 cases in LCP group. The functional outcome was excellent in 80% (12 and good in 13.33% (2 cases in external fixator group as compared to 66.66% (10 excellent and 26.66% (4 good in LCP group. CONCLUSION Both open reduction and internal fixation with locking compression plate and ligamentotaxis with external fixators are good treatment modalities for unstable distal radius fractures. However, the choice should be guided by the fracture configuration, surgeons’ experience and patient’s profile.

  5. Tile Surface Thermocouple Measurement Challenges from the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Berger, Karen; Anderson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Hypersonic entry flight testing motivated by efforts seeking to characterize boundary layer transition on the Space Shuttle Orbiters have identified challenges in our ability to acquire high quality quantitative surface temperature measurements versus time. Five missions near the end of the Space Shuttle Program implemented a tile surface protuberance as a boundary layer trip together with tile surface thermocouples to capture temperature measurements during entry. Similar engineering implementations of these measurements on Discovery and Endeavor demonstrated unexpected measurement voltage response during the high heating portion of the entry trajectory. An assessment has been performed to characterize possible causes of the issues experienced during STS-119, STS-128, STS-131, STS-133 and STS-134 as well as similar issues encountered during other orbiter entries.

  6. Mechanisms for SAR imaging of ocean surface phenomena: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesecky, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Understanding the SAR response to surface wave is a central issue in the analysis of SAR ocean images. The imaging mechanism for gravity waves and the practical question of just which characteristics of the ocean wave field can be measured remotely using SAR were examined. Assessments of wave imaging theory are based primarily on comparisons of the directional wave height variance spectrum psi (K) measured by in situ buoys with estimates from SAR images. Other criteria are also recommended, e.g., the effects of focus adjustments. It is assumed that fluctuations in SAR image intensity are proportional to fluctuations in ocean surface height. If this were true, the Fourier power spectrum of a SAR image and corresponding surface measurements of psi would coincide. Differences between SAR estimates based on this hypothesis and buoy measurements of psi are then used to begin the assessment of rival wave imaging theories.

  7. String and Sticky Tape Experiments: Light Pipes, Hydrostatics, Surface Tension and a Milk Carton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, R. D., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a demonstration of light pipes using low-cost materials, relating it to fiber optics communication. Also provides several experiments in hydrostatics and hydrodynamics using the materials for light pipe. (JM)

  8. Surface roughening and rippling during plasma etching of silicon: Numerical investigations and a comparison with experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuda, Hirotaka; Nakazaki, Nobuya; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2014-01-01

    Atomic- or nanometer-scale surface roughening and rippling during Si etching in high-density Cl2 and Cl2/O2 plasmas have been investigated by developing a three-dimensional atomic-scale cellular model (ASCeM-3D), which is a 3D Monte Carlo-based simulation model for plasma-surface interactions and the feature profile evolution during plasma etching. The model took into account the behavior of Cl+ ions, Cl and O neutrals, and etch products and byproducts of SiClx and SiClxOy in microstructures ...

  9. Response of Ambulatory Human Subjects to Artificial Gravity (Short Radius Centrifugation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloski, William H.; Arya, Maneesh; Newby, Nathaniel; Tucker, Jon-Michael; Jarchow, Thomas; Young, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity results in significant adaptive changes, including cardiovascular deconditioning, muscle atrophy, bone loss, and sensorimotor reorganization, that place individuals at risk for performing physical activities after return to a gravitational environment. Planned missions to Mars include unprecedented hypogravity exposures that would likely result in unacceptable risks to crews. Artificial gravity (AG) paradigms may offer multisystem protection from the untoward effects of adaptation to the microgravity of space or the hypogravity of planetary surfaces. While the most effective AG designs would employ a rotating spacecraft, perceived issues may preclude their use. The questions of whether and how intermittent AG produced by a short radius centrifuge (SRC) could be employed have therefore sprung to the forefront of operational research. In preparing for a series of intermittent AG trials in subjects deconditioned by bed rest, we have examined the responses of several healthy, ambulatory subjects to SRC exposures.

  10. Three-dimensional analysis of deformities of the radius and ulna in congenital proximal radioulnar synostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, Motoko; Nakasone, Satoshi; Kinjo, Masaki; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Kanaya, Fuminori

    2018-01-01

    We reconstructed three-dimensional images of radius and ulna in 38 forearms of 25 patients with congenital proximal radioulnar synostosis from their computed tomographic studies. We also analysed correlations between the deformities of radius and ulna and degrees of fixed pronation of these forearms. The average ulnar deviation, flexion and internal rotation deformities of the radius were 6°, 3° and 18°, respectively. The average radial deviation, extension and internal rotation deformities of the ulna were 3°, 4° and 30°, respectively. The flexion deformity of the radius and the internal rotation deformity of the radius and ulna were correlated significantly with degree of fixed pronation. We conclude that the patients with congenital proximal radioulnar synostosis have remarkable flexion deformity of the radius and internal rotation deformity of the radius and ulna, which might impede forearm rotation after corrective surgery in the proximal part of the forearm.

  11. The Use of a Custom-made Prosthesis in the Treatment of Chondrosarcoma of Distal Radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzik, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The most common neoplasms of the distal radius are primary tumors, of which aneurysmal bone cysts and giant cell tumors are seen almost exclusively. Chondrosarcomas are most commonly located in the pelvis, ribs and proximal segments of the extremities; they rarely occur in forearm bones. Bone defects after distal radial resection can be replaced with bone grafts, both autogenous and allogenic. There is always a risk of failure of the bones to mend or slower synostosis, which necessitates the search for new treatments. Recently, custom-made prostheses have been used with increasing frequency. In early 2015, a 25-year-old male patient was admitted to the Department of Orthopedic Oncology in Brzozów on account of a tumor involving the epiphysis and metaphysis of the right distal radius. Imaging studies confirmed that the lesion was a neoplasm and a biopsy revealed a chondrosarcoma. Radical resection of the tumor was attempted and a custom-made prosthesis was inserted in the place of the bone defect. The prosthesis was designed and manufactured over 4 weeks. No complications occurred during the surgery or in the postoperative period. After the surgery, the forearm and wrist were in a plaster splint for 6 weeks and then rehabilitation was started. The treatment outcome was good. Now, three months after the surgery, the patient has good wrist mobility and efficient grip. Surgical treatment of malignant tumors of the distal radius with extensive bone resection poses the challenge of bone replacement and recovery of fair hand function. Commonly known and practised, reconstructions with autogenous or allogenic bone grafts enable partial restoration of the radiocarpal joint surface and DRUJ. The use of large bone grafts is associated with a risk of non-union and limited hand function even if the grafts are vascularized. Arthrodesis of the radiocarpal joint is currently performed less and less frequently. Custom-made prostheses appear to be a good solution. This method makes

  12. Measurement of the Neutron Radius of 208Pb Through Parity Violation in Electron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In contrast to the nuclear charge densities, which have been accurately measured with electron scattering, the knowledge of neutron densities still lack precision. Previous model-dependent hadron experiments suggest the difference between the neutron radius, Rn, of a heavy nucleus and the proton radius, Rp, to be in the order of several percent. To accurately obtain the difference, Rn-Rp, which is essentially a neutron skin, the Jefferson Lab Lead (208Pb) Radius Experiment (PREX) measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb at an energy of 1.06 GeV and a scattering angle of 5° . Since Z0 boson couples mainly to neutrons, this asymmetry provides a clean measurement of Rn with respect to Rp. PREX was conducted at the Jefferson lab experimental Hall A, from March to June 2010. The experiment collected a final data sample of 2x 107 helicity-window quadruplets. The measured parity-violating electroweak asymmetry APV = 0.656 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.014 (syst) ppm corresponds to a difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions, Rn-Rp = 0.33+0.16-0.18 fm and provides the first electroweak observation of the neutron skin as expected in a heavy, neutron-rich nucleus. The value of the neutron radius of 208Pb has important implications for models of nuclear structure and their application in atomic physics and astrophysics such as atomic parity non-conservation (PNC) and neutron stars.

  13. Challenges in Teaching "Colloid and Surface Chemistry"--A Danish Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.; Vigild, Martin E.

    2009-01-01

    Seven years ago we were asked, as one of our first teaching duties at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), to teach a 5 ECTS point course on "Colloid and Surface Chemistry". The topic is itself at the same time exciting and demanding, largely due to its multidisciplinary nature. Several "local" requirements posed…

  14. Evidence of water reorientation on model electrocatalytic surfaces from nanosecond-laser-pulsed experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Aráez, Nuria; Climent, Víctor; Feliu, Juan M

    2008-03-26

    The behavior of water at the interface formed between a quasi-perfect Pt(111) single-crystal electrode and an aqueous electrolyte solution is studied by means of the laser-induced temperature jump method. This method is based on the use of nanosecond laser pulses to suddenly increase the temperature at the interface. The measurement of the response of the interface toward the laser heating under coulostatic conditions provides evidence on the net orientation of water at the interface. Especially interesting is the study of the effect on the interfacial water caused by the selective deposition of foreign metal adatoms, because these bimetallic systems usually exhibit appealing electrocatalytic properties. The T-jump methodology shows that the surface composition strongly affects the interaction of water with the surface. The most representative parameter to characterize this interaction is the potential where water reorientation occurs; this potential shifts in different directions, depending on the relative values of the electronegativity of the adatom and the substrate. These results are discussed in the light of available information about the effect of adatom deposition on the work function and the surface potential of the modified surface. Finally, some implications on the enhancement of the electrocatalytic activity are briefly discussed.

  15. Surface meteorological conditions at benthic disturbance experiment site - INDEX area during austral winter 1997

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suryanarayana, A.; Murty, V.S.N.; RameshBabu, V.; Beena, B.S.

    fluxes and net surface heat gain. Maximum sunshine duration was 1 hour/day in June and 30 minutes/day in August. SST decreased from 28.2 degrees C in June to 25.8 degrees C in August. Southeasterly winds of speed 10 m/s during June contributed to a mean...

  16. Microbial analyses of groundwater and surfaces during the retrieval of experiment 3, A04, in MINICAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbeck, Lotta; Edlund, Johanna; Eriksson, Lena [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    The MINICAN project is located at the depth of 450 m in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) research tunnel. The aim of the project was to study corrosion of the cast iron inserts if a hole is introduced in the outer copper-canister. The experimental part of MINICAN started in 2007 and consists of five different experiment canisters (Table 1.1), denoted experiment A02-A06. Four of the MINICAN test copper canisters are surrounded by bentonite in a support steel cage, of which the bentonite in experiment A05 is fully compacted according to the KBS-3 approach (dry density 1,600 kg m{sup -3}) and experiments A02-A04 are compacted with bentonite to a lower density than will be used (dry density 1,300 kg m{sup -3}). Experiment A06 has no bentonite. In all the MINICAN copper canisters, holes with a diameter of 1 mm have been drilled to allow Aspo groundwater to come in contact with the interior cast iron inserts. This is done to mimic real accidental leakage during the KBS-3 type of long-time spent nuclear fuel storage. The project has been described in 1068871- Project Plan MINICAN, in AP TD F77.3-05-001, AP TD F77.3.08-44 and in AP TD F77.3.

  17. Microbial analyses of groundwater and surfaces during the retrieval of experiment 3, A04, in MINICAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallbeck, Lotta; Edlund, Johanna; Eriksson, Lena

    2011-12-01

    The MINICAN project is located at the depth of 450 m in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) research tunnel. The aim of the project was to study corrosion of the cast iron inserts if a hole is introduced in the outer copper-canister. The experimental part of MINICAN started in 2007 and consists of five different experiment canisters (Table 1.1), denoted experiment A02-A06. Four of the MINICAN test copper canisters are surrounded by bentonite in a support steel cage, of which the bentonite in experiment A05 is fully compacted according to the KBS-3 approach (dry density 1,600 kg m -3 ) and experiments A02-A04 are compacted with bentonite to a lower density than will be used (dry density 1,300 kg m -3 ). Experiment A06 has no bentonite. In all the MINICAN copper canisters, holes with a diameter of 1 mm have been drilled to allow Aspo groundwater to come in contact with the interior cast iron inserts. This is done to mimic real accidental leakage during the KBS-3 type of long-time spent nuclear fuel storage. The project has been described in 1068871- Project Plan MINICAN, in AP TD F77.3-05-001, AP TD F77.3.08-44 and in AP TD F77.3

  18. Results of the "Komplast" experiment on the long-term exposure of materials specimens on the ISS surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumov, Andrey; Novikov, Lev

    The "Komplast" materials experiment was designed by the Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center together with Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University and other Russian scientific institutes, and has been carried out since 1998. The aim of the experiment is to study the complex effects of space factors on specimens of various materials. Eight “Komplast” panels fitted with material specimens equipped UV-sensors and temperature sensors were located on the International Space Station (ISS) Functional Cargo Block (FGB) module exterior surface. The panels were sent into orbit with the FGB when it launched on November 20, 1998. Two of these panels were subsequently returned to Earth by Space Shuttle Discovery after 12 years of LEO exposure. The uniqueness of the "Komplast" experiment determined by long duration of open space exposure, which is much longer than in other similar experiments. For example LDEF: 1984-1990, HEEI (Space Station "Mir"): 1996-1997, MISSE-1, -2 (ISS): 1,5-2 years. In this work reveals laboratory research results of some materials specimens, which had been exposed on “Komplast” panels. A distinctive feature of this research was additional irradiation of specimens by atomic oxygen and electrons with energies of ~ 1-8 MeV in laboratory. In the interpretation of the experiment results was taken into account the specimens exposure temperature conditions on the ISS exterior surface and the conditions of their sunlit, defined by the above-mentioned sensors readings. Lot of attention was paid to the investigation of rubber materials specimens. The deformation, mechanical and relaxation characteristics were defined for the specimens. Also were investigations the seals-ability of model rubber seals after the long-term outer exposure. It was determined conservation volumetric deformation and relaxation characteristics of the exposed specimens and the localization of structural changes in the thin

  19. Mesopelagic Prokaryotes Alter Surface Phytoplankton Production during Simulated Deep Mixing Experiments in Eastern Mediterranean Sea Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Or Hazan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesopelagic prokaryotes (archaea and bacteria, which are transported together with nutrient-rich intermediate-water to the surface layer by deep convection in the oceans (e.g., winter mixing, upwelling systems, can interact with surface microbial populations. This interaction can potentially affect production rates and biomass of surface microbial populations, and thus play an important role in the marine carbon cycle and oceanic carbon sequestration. The Eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS is one of the most oligotrophic and warm systems in the world's oceans, with usually very shallow winter mixing (<200 m and lack of large-size spring algal blooms. In this study, we collected seawater (0–1,500 m in 9 different cruises at the open EMS during both the stratified and the mixed seasons. We show that the EMS is a highly oligotrophic regime, resulting in low autotrophic biomass and primary productivity and relatively high heterotrophic prokaryotic biomass and production. Further, we simulated deep water mixing in on-board microcosms using Levantine surface (LSW, ~0.5 m and intermediate (LIW, ~400 m waters at a 9:1 ratio, respectively and examined the responses of the microbial populations to such a scenario. We hypothesized that the LIW, being nutrient-rich (e.g., N, P and a “hot-spot” for microbial activity (due to the warm conditions that prevail in these depths, may supply the LSW with not only key-limiting nutrients but also with viable and active heterotrophic prokaryotes that can interact with the ambient surface microbial population. Indeed, we show that LIW heterotrophic prokaryotes negatively affected the surface phytoplankton populations, resulting in lower chlorophyll-a levels and primary production rates. This may be due to out-competition of phytoplankton by LIW populations for resources and/or by a phytoplankton cell lysis via viral infection. Our results suggest that phytoplankton in the EMS may not likely form blooms, even after

  20. Review of the near surface heater experiment at Oak Ridge, TN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    An experiment has been undertaken to assess the large scale effects that heat from a waste canister would have were the canister emplaced in shale. The experimental design includes a 10 foot long heater which will be buried at a depth of 55 feet and will run at 600 0 C for between six months and a year. The heater is surrounded by an array of thermocouples and stress gages. In addition, coupons of potential canister metals are affixed to the base of the heater. Before and after the experiment the permeability of the formation will be measured using a 85 Kr tracer. Laboratory tests supporting the field test are briefly reviewed

  1. Anatomical study of the radius and center of curvature of the distal femoral condyle

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    In this anatomical study, the anteroposterior curvature of the surface of 16 cadaveric distal femurs was examined in terms of radii and center point. Those two parameters attract high interest due to their significance for total knee arthroplasty. Basically, two different conclusions have been drawn in foregoing studies: (1) The curvature shows a constant radius and (2) the curvature shows a variable radius. The investigations were based on a new method combining three-dimensional laser-scanning and planar geometrical analyses. This method is aimed at providing high accuracy and high local resolution. The high-precision laser scanning enables the exact reproduction of the distal femurs - including their cartilage tissue - as a three-dimensional computer model. The surface curvature was investigated on intersection planes that were oriented perpendicularly to the surgical epicondylar line. Three planes were placed at the central part of each condyle. The intersection of either plane with the femur model was approximated with the help of a b-spline, yielding three b-splines on each condyle. The radii and center points of the circles, approximating the local curvature of the b-splines, were then evaluated. The results from all three b-splines were averaged in order to increase the reliability of the method. The results show the variation in the surface curvatures of the investigated samples of condyles. These variations are expressed in the pattern of the center points and the radii of the curvatures. The standard deviations of the radii for a 90 deg arc on the posterior condyle range from 0.6 mm up to 5.1 mm, with an average of 2.4 mm laterally and 2.2 mm medially. No correlation was found between the curvature of the lateral and medial condyles. Within the range of the investigated 16 samples, the conclusion can be drawn that the condyle surface curvature is not constant and different for all specimens when viewed along the surgical epicondylar axis. For the portion

  2. Photoemission from Low Work Function Coated Metal Surfaces A Comparison of Theory to Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kevin; Moody, Nathan A

    2005-01-01

    The development of rugged and/or self rejuvenating photocathodes with high quantum efficiency (QE) using the longest wavelength drive laser is of paramount importance for RF photo-injectors for high power FELs and accelerators. We report on our program to develop advanced photocathodes and to develop and validate models of photoemission from coated metals to analyze experimental data,* provide emission models usable by beam simulation codes,** and project performance. The model accounts for the effects of laser heating, thermal evolution, surface conditions, laser parameters, and material characteristics, and predicts current distribution and QE. The photoemission and QE from metals and dispenser photocathodes is evaluated: the later introduces complications such as coverage non-uniformity and field enhancement. The performance of the models is compared to our experimental results for dispenser photocathodes and cesiated surfaces (e.g., tungsten, silver, etc.) in which the time-dependent models are shown to a...

  3. Effect of glutamic acid on copper sorption onto kaolinite. Batch experiments and surface complexation modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimzadeh, Lotfallah; Barthen, Robert; Gruendig, Marion; Franke, Karsten; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna; Stockmann, Madlen

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we study the mobility behavior of Cu(II) under conditions related to an alternative, neutrophile biohydrometallurgical Cu(II) leaching approach. Sorption of copper onto kaolinite influenced by glutamic acid (Glu) was investigated in the presence of 0.01 M NaClO 4 by means of binary and ternary batch adsorption measurements over a pH range of 4 to 9 and surface complexation modeling.

  4. Effect of glutamic acid on copper sorption onto kaolinite. Batch experiments and surface complexation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimzadeh, Lotfallah; Barthen, Robert; Gruendig, Marion; Franke, Karsten; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Reactive Transport; Stockmann, Madlen [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we study the mobility behavior of Cu(II) under conditions related to an alternative, neutrophile biohydrometallurgical Cu(II) leaching approach. Sorption of copper onto kaolinite influenced by glutamic acid (Glu) was investigated in the presence of 0.01 M NaClO{sub 4} by means of binary and ternary batch adsorption measurements over a pH range of 4 to 9 and surface complexation modeling.

  5. A Silicon detector system on carbon fiber support at small radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Marvin E.

    2004-01-01

    The design of a silicon detector for a p(bar p) collider experiment will be described. The detector uses a carbon fiber support structure with sensors positioned at small radius with respect to the beam. A brief overview of the mechanical design is given. The emphasis is on the electrical characteristics of the detector. General principles involved in grounding systems with carbon fiber structures will be covered. The electrical characteristics of the carbon fiber support structure will be presented. Test results imply that carbon fiber must be regarded as a conductor for the frequency region of interest of 10 to 100 MHz. No distinction is found between carbon fiber and copper. Performance results on noise due to pick-up through the low mass fine pitch cables carrying the analogue signals and floating metal is discussed

  6. Failure of dual radius hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular cups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zatti Giovanni

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Many kind of hydroxyapatite-coated cups were used, with favorable results in short term studies; it was supposed that its use could improve osteointegration of the cup, enhancing thus stability and survivorship. The purpose of this study is to analyze the long term behavior of the hemispheric HA coated, Dual Radius Osteonics cup and to discuss the way of failure through the exam of the revised components and of both periacetabular and osteolysis tissue. Materials and Methods Between 1994 and 1997, at the Department of Orthopedic Sciences of the Insubria University, using the posterolateral approach, were implanted 276 Dual Radius Osteonics® in 256 patients, with mean age of 63 years. Results At a mean follow-up of 10 years (range 8–12 years, 183 cups in 165 patients, were available for clinical and radiographical evaluation. 22 Cups among the 183 were revised (11%. The cause of revision was aseptic loosening in 17 cases, septic loosening in one case, periprosthetic fracture in another case, osteolysis and polyethylene wear in two cases and, finally, recurrent dislocations in the last one. In the remaining patients, mean HHS increased from a preoperative value of 50,15 to a postoperative value of 92,69. The mean polyethylene wear was 1,25 mm (min. 0,08, max. 3,9 mm, with a mean annual wear of 0,17 mm. The mean acetabular migration on the two axis was 1,6 mm and 1,8 mm. Peri-acetabular osteolysis were recorded in 89% of the implants (163 cases. The cumulative survivorship (revision as endpoint at the time was 88,9%. Conclusion Our study confirms the bad behavior of this type of cup probably related to the design, to the method of HA fixation. The observations carried out on the revised cup confirm these hypotheses but did not clarify if the third body wear could be a further problem. Another interesting aspect is the high incidence of osteolysis, which are often asymptomatic becoming a problem for the surgeon as the

  7. The Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System: Experiences on Building a Collaborative Modeling Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, I.; Hutton, E.; Kettner, A.; Peckham, S. D.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    The Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System - CSDMS- develops a software platform with shared and coupled modules for modeling earth surface processes as a community resource. The framework allows prediction of water, sediment and nutrient transport through the landscape and seacape. The underlying paradigm is that the Earth surface we live on is a dynamic system; topography changes with seasons, with landslides and earthquakes, with erosion and deposition. The Earth Surface changes due to storms and floods, and important boundaries, like the coast, are ever-moving features. CSDMS sets out to make better predictions of these changes. Earth surface process modeling bridges the terrestrial, coastal and marine domains and requires understanding of the system over a range of time scales, which inherently needs interdisciplinarity. Members of CSDMS (~830 in July 2012) are largely from academic institutions (˜75%), followed by federal agencies (˜17%), and oil and gas companies (˜5%). Members and governmental bodies meet once annually and rely additionally on web-based information for communication. As an organization that relies on volunteer participation, CSDMS faces challenges to scientific collaboration. Encouraging volunteerism among its members to provide and adapt metadata and model code to be sufficiently standardized for coupling is crucial to building an integrated community modeling system. We here present CSDMS strategies aimed at providing the appropriate technical tools and cyberinfrastructure to support a variety of user types, ranging from advanced to novice modelers. Application of these advances in science is key, both into the educational realm and for managers and decision-makers. We discuss some of the implemented ideas to further organizational transparency and user engagement in small-scale governance, such as advanced trackers and voting systems for model development prioritization through the CSDMS wiki. We analyzed data on community

  8. Plasma-Surface Interaction Studies on DIII-D and Their Implications for Next-Step Fusion Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, D.G.

    2005-01-01

    Unique diagnostic and access features of the DIII-D tokamak, including a sample exposure system, have been used to carry out controlled and well-diagnosed plasma-surface interactions (PSI) experiments. An important contribution of the experiments has been the ability to link a given plasma exposure condition to a measured response of the plasma-facing surface and to thus understand the interaction. This has allowed for benchmarking certain aspects of erosion models, particularly near-surface particle transport. DIII-D has empirically quantified some of the PSI effects that will limit the operation availability and lifetime of future fusion devices, namely, net erosion limiting divertor plate lifetime and hydrogenic fuel retention in deposit layers. Cold divertor plasmas obtained with detachment can suppress net carbon divertor erosion, but many low-temperature divertor PSI phenomena remain poorly understood: nondivertor erosion sources, long-range particle transport, global erosion/deposition patterns, the enhancement of carbon erosion with neon impurity seeding, the sputtered carbon velocity distribution, and the apparent suppression of carbon chemical erosion in detachment. Long-term particle and energy fluences have reduced the chemical erosion yield of lower-divertor tiles. Plasma-caused modification of a material's erosion properties, including material mixing, will occur quickly and be important in long-pulse fusion devices, making prediction of PSI difficult in future devices

  9. Results of the Komplast experiment on the long-term exposure of materials specimens on the ISS surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumov, A. E.; Novikov, L. S.; Shaevich, S. K.; Aleksandrov, N. G.; Smirnova, T. N.; Nikishin, E. F.; Chernik, V. N.; Petukhov, V. P.; Voronina, E. N.; Sedov, V. V.; Salnikova, I. A.; Babaevskiy, P. G.; Kozlov, N. A.; Deev, I. S.; Startsev, O. V.; Shindo, D. J.; Golden, J. L.; Kravchenko, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Komplast materials experiment was designed by Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center together with Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University and other Russian scientific institutes, and has been carried out by Mission Control Moscow since 1998. The purpose of this experiment is to study the complex effect of the low Earth orbit environment on samples of various spacecraft materials. On November 20, 1998 the Komplast experiment began with the launch of the first International Space Station module Zarya, or Functional Cargo Block (FGB). Eight Komplast panels with samples of materials and sensors were installed on the outer surface of FGB module. Two of eight experiment panels were retrieved during Russian extravehicular activity in February 2011 after 12 years of space exposure and were subsequently returned to Earth by Space Shuttle "Discovery" on the STS-133/ULF-5 mission in March 2011. The article presents the results obtained from this unique long-duration experiment on board of the International Space Station.

  10. Helium-burning flashes on accreting neutron stars: effects of stellar mass, radius, and magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joss, P.C.; Li, F.K.

    1980-01-01

    We have computed the evolution of the helium-burning shell in an accreting neutron star for various values of the stellar mass (M), radius (R), and surface magnetic fields strength (B). As shown in previous work, the helium-burning shell is often unstable and undergoes thermonuclear flashes that result in the emission of X-ray bursts from the neutron-star surface. The dependence of the properties of these bursts upon the values of M and R can be described by simple scaling relations. A strong magnetic field decreases the radiative and conductive opacities and inhibits convection in the neutron-star surface layers. For B 12 gauss, these effects are unimportant; for B> or approx. =10 13 gauss, the enhancement of the electron thermal conductivity is sufficiently large to stabilize the helium-burning shell against thermonuclear flashes. For intermediate values of B, the reduced opacities increase the recurrence intervals between bursts and the energy released per burst, while the inhibition of convection increases the burst rise times to about a few seconds. If the magnetic field funnels the accreting matter onto the magnetic polar caps, the instability of the helium-burning shell will be very strongly suppressed. These results suggest that it may eventually be possible to extract information on the macroscopic properties of neutron stars from the observed features of X-ray burst sources

  11. MASS-RADIUS RELATIONSHIPS FOR VERY LOW MASS GASEOUS PLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Stevenson, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the Kepler spacecraft has detected a sizable aggregate of objects, characterized by giant-planet-like radii and modest levels of stellar irradiation. With the exception of a handful of objects, the physical nature, and specifically the average densities, of these bodies remain unknown. Here, we propose that the detected giant planet radii may partially belong to planets somewhat less massive than Uranus and Neptune. Accordingly, in this work, we seek to identify a physically sound upper limit to planetary radii at low masses and moderate equilibrium temperatures. As a guiding example, we analyze the interior structure of the Neptune-mass planet Kepler-30d and show that it is acutely deficient in heavy elements, especially compared with its solar system counterparts. Subsequently, we perform numerical simulations of planetary thermal evolution and in agreement with previous studies, show that generally, 10-20 M ⊕ , multi-billion year old planets, composed of high density cores and extended H/He envelopes can have radii that firmly reside in the giant planet range. We subject our results to stability criteria based on extreme ultraviolet radiation, as well as Roche-lobe overflow driven mass-loss and construct mass-radius relationships for the considered objects. We conclude by discussing observational avenues that may be used to confirm or repudiate the existence of putative low mass, gas-dominated planets.

  12. AO Distal Radius Fracture Classification: Global Perspective on Observer Agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Prakash; Teunis, Teun; Giménez, Beatriz Bravo; Verstreken, Frederik; Di Mascio, Livio; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2017-02-01

    Background  The primary objective of this study was to test interobserver reliability when classifying fractures by consensus by AO types and groups among a large international group of surgeons. Secondarily, we assessed the difference in inter- and intraobserver agreement of the AO classification in relation to geographical location, level of training, and subspecialty. Methods  A randomized set of radiographic and computed tomographic images from a consecutive series of 96 distal radius fractures (DRFs), treated between October 2010 and April 2013, was classified using an electronic web-based portal by an invited group of participants on two occasions. Results  Interobserver reliability was substantial when classifying AO type A fractures but fair and moderate for type B and C fractures, respectively. No difference was observed by location, except for an apparent difference between participants from India and Australia classifying type B fractures. No statistically significant associations were observed comparing interobserver agreement by level of training and no differences were shown comparing subspecialties. Intra-rater reproducibility was "substantial" for fracture types and "fair" for fracture groups with no difference accounting for location, training level, or specialty. Conclusion  Improved definition of reliability and reproducibility of this classification may be achieved using large international groups of raters, empowering decision making on which system to utilize. Level of Evidence  Level III.

  13. Effect of temperature on the acid-base properties of the alumina surface: microcalorimetry and acid-base titration experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Jean-Pierre; Marmier, Nicolas; Hurel, Charlotte; Morel-Desrosiers, Nicole

    2006-06-15

    Sorption reactions on natural or synthetic materials that can attenuate the migration of pollutants in the geosphere could be affected by temperature variations. Nevertheless, most of the theoretical models describing sorption reactions are at 25 degrees C. To check these models at different temperatures, experimental data such as the enthalpies of sorption are thus required. Highly sensitive microcalorimeters can now be used to determine the heat effects accompanying the sorption of radionuclides on oxide-water interfaces, but enthalpies of sorption cannot be extracted from microcalorimetric data without a clear knowledge of the thermodynamics of protonation and deprotonation of the oxide surface. However, the values reported in the literature show large discrepancies and one must conclude that, amazingly, this fundamental problem of proton binding is not yet resolved. We have thus undertaken to measure by titration microcalorimetry the heat effects accompanying proton exchange at the alumina-water interface at 25 degrees C. Based on (i) the surface sites speciation provided by a surface complexation model (built from acid-base titrations at 25 degrees C) and (ii) results of the microcalorimetric experiments, calculations have been made to extract the enthalpic variations associated respectively to first and second deprotonation of the alumina surface. Values obtained are deltaH1 = 80+/-10 kJ mol(-1) and deltaH2 = 5+/-3 kJ mol(-1). In a second step, these enthalpy values were used to calculate the alumina surface acidity constants at 50 degrees C via the van't Hoff equation. Then a theoretical titration curve at 50 degrees C was calculated and compared to the experimental alumina surface titration curve. Good agreement between the predicted acid-base titration curve and the experimental one was observed.

  14. Database of Pb - free soldering materials, surface tension and density, experiment vs. Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Moser

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies of surface tension and density by the maximum bubble pressure method and dilatometric technique were undertaken and the accumulated data for liquid pure components, binary, ternary and multicomponent alloys were used to create the SURDAT data base for Pb-free soldering materials. The data base enabled, also to compare the experimental results with those obtained by the Butler’s model and with the existing literature data. This comparison has been extended by including the experimental data of Sn-Ag-Cu-Sb alloys.

  15. Replication of surface micro-structures in isothermal moulding: Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Torbjörn Gerhard; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    storage and micro fluidic systems respectively. These devices are typically processed using injection moulding or hot embossing. In this work, we focus on isothermal moulding. This allows an investigation of the effect of the rheological properties of the polymer melt during processing on the ability......The forming of well-defined micro surface structures on polymer materials is important for the production of devices for biology and optics and well established in commercial polymer-processing operations. This is the case in for example the production of DVD discs used for high-density data...

  16. Antarctic Surface Reflectivity Measurements from the ANITA-3 and HiCal-1 Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorham, P. W.; Allison, P.; Banerjee, O.; Beatty, J. J.; Belov, K.; Besson, D. Z.; Binns, W. R.; Bugaev, V.; Cao, P.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J. M.; Connolly, A.; Dailey, B.; Dasgupta, P.; Deaconu, C.; Cremonesi, L.; Dowkontt, P. F.; Fox, B. D.; Gordon, J.; Hill, B.; Hupe, R.; Israel, M. H.; Jain, P.; Kowalski, J.; Lam, J.; Learned, J. G.; Liewer, K. M.; Liu, T. C.; Matsuno, S.; Miki, C.; Mottram, M.; Mulrey, K.; Nam, J.; Nichol, R. J.; Novikov, A.; Oberla, E.; Prohira, S.; Rauch, B. F.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Rotter, B.; Ratzlaff, K.; Russell, J.; Saltzberg, D.; Seckel, D.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Stafford, S.; Stockham, J.; Stockham, M.; Strutt, B.; Tatem, K.; Varner, G. S.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wissel, S. A.; Wu, F.; Young, R.

    The primary science goal of the NASA-sponsored ANITA project is measurement of ultra-high energy neutrinos and cosmic rays, observed via radio-frequency signals resulting from a neutrino or cosmic ray interaction with terrestrial matter (e.g. atmospheric or ice molecules). Accurate inference of the energies of these cosmic rays requires understanding the transmission/reflection of radio wave signals across the ice-air boundary. Satellite-based measurements of Antarctic surface reflectivity, using a co-located transmitter and receiver, have been performed more-or-less continuously for the last few decades. Our comparison of four different reflectivity surveys, at frequencies ranging from 2 to 45GHz and at near-normal incidence, yield generally consistent maps of high versus low reflectivity, as a function of location, across Antarctica. Using the Sun as an RF source, and the ANITA-3 balloon borne radio-frequency antenna array as the RF receiver, we have also measured the surface reflectivity over the interval 200-1000MHz, at elevation angles of 12-30∘. Consistent with our previous measurement using ANITA-2, we find good agreement, within systematic errors (dominated by antenna beam width uncertainties) and across Antarctica, with the expected reflectivity as prescribed by the Fresnel equations. To probe low incidence angles, inaccessible to the Antarctic Solar technique and not probed by previous satellite surveys, a novel experimental approach (“HiCal-1”) was devised. Unlike previous measurements, HiCal-ANITA constitute a bi-static transmitter-receiver pair separated by hundreds of kilometers. Data taken with HiCal, between 200 and 600MHz shows a significant departure from the Fresnel equations, constant with frequency over that band, with the deficit increasing with obliquity of incidence, which we attribute to the combined effects of possible surface roughness, surface grain effects, radar clutter and/or shadowing of the reflection zone due to Earth

  17. Metal on metal surface replacement of the hip. Experience of the McMinn prothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMinn, D; Treacy, R; Lin, K; Pynsent, P

    1996-08-01

    The historical failure of surface replacement has been due to the production of wear debris with subsequent bone resorption, loosening, and failure. To avoid these problems, a surface replacement using a metal on metal bearing allowing thin components and femoral design and instrumentation to avoid varus alignment has been designed. Two hundred thirty-five joints have been resurfaced with this prosthesis in almost 5 years. There have been no femoral neck fractures and no dislocations. There have been 4 designs differing in the method of fixation. In the press fit group, 6 of 70 hips had to be revised for aseptic loosening. In the cemented group, debonding of the cup occurred in 3 of 43 cases. Six patients had hydroxyapatite coated components and have had excellent clinical outcomes. The current design uses a peripherally expanded hydroxyapatite coated cup and a cemented metal head; 116 of this design have been implanted during a 19-month period with excellent outcome. Despite short followup the authors are hopeful that the combination of a polar metal on metal bearing with appropriate fixation will yield a method of preserving bone stock in the younger patient requiring arthroplasty.

  18. Atomic-scale investigation of nuclear quantum effects of surface water: Experiments and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Li, Xin-Zheng; Peng, Jinbo; Wang, En-Ge; Jiang, Ying

    2017-12-01

    Quantum behaviors of protons in terms of tunneling and zero-point motion have significant effects on the macroscopic properties, structure, and dynamics of water even at room temperature or higher. In spite of tremendous theoretical and experimental efforts, accurate and quantitative description of the nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) is still challenging. The main difficulty lies in that the NQEs are extremely susceptible to the structural inhomogeneity and local environments, especially when interfacial systems are concerned. In this review article, we will highlight the recent advances of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/S), which allows the access to the quantum degree of freedom of protons both in real and energy space. In addition, we will also introduce recent development of ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations at surfaces/interfaces, in which both the electrons and nuclei are treated as quantum particles in contrast to traditional ab initio molecular dynamics (MD). Then we will discuss how the combination of STM/S and PIMD are used to directly visualize the concerted quantum tunneling of protons within the water clusters and quantify the impact of zero-point motion on the strength of a single hydrogen bond (H bond) at a water/solid interface. Those results may open up the new possibility of exploring the exotic quantum states of light nuclei at surfaces, as well as the quantum coupling between the electrons and nuclei.

  19. Experiment Study on Determination of Surface Area of Finegrained Soils by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. Q.; Zhou, C. Y.; Fang, Y. G.; Lin, L. S.

    2017-12-01

    The specific surface area (SSA) has a great influence on the physical and chemical properties of fine-grained soils. Determination of specific surface area is an important content for fine-grained soils micro-meso analysis and characteristic research. In this paper, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) was adopted to determine the SSA of fine-grained soils including quartz, kaolinite, bentonite and natural Shenzhen soft clay. The test results show that the average values of SSA obtained by MIP are 0.78m2/g, 11.31m2/g, 57.28m2/g and 27.15m2/g respectively for very fine-grained quartz, kaolin, bentonite and natural Shenzhen soft clay, and that it is feasible to apply MIP to obtain the SSA of fine-grained soils through statistical analysis of 97 samples. Through discussion, it is necessary to consider the state of fine-grained soils such as pore ratio when the SSA of fine-grained soils is determined by MIP.

  20. Contact Radius and the Insulator-Metal Transition in Films Comprised of Touching Semiconductor Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, Deanna; Thimsen, Elijah

    2016-07-26

    Nanocrystal assemblies are being explored for a number of optoelectronic applications such as transparent conductors, photovoltaic solar cells, and electrochromic windows. Majority carrier transport is important for these applications, yet it remains relatively poorly understood in films comprised of touching nanocrystals. Specifically, the underlying structural parameters expected to determine the transport mechanism have not been fully elucidated. In this report, we demonstrate experimentally that the contact radius, between touching heavily doped ZnO nanocrystals, controls the electron transport mechanism. Spherical nanocrystals are considered, which are connected by a circular area. The radius of this circular area is the contact radius. For nanocrystals that have local majority carrier concentration above the Mott transition, there is a critical contact radius. If the contact radius between nanocrystals is less than the critical value, then the transport mechanism is variable range hopping. If the contact radius is greater than the critical value, the films display behavior consistent with metallic electron transport.

  1. Inverting Comet Acoustic Surface Sounding Experiment (CASSE) touchdown signals to measure the elastic modulus of comet material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W.; Faber, C.; Knapmeyer, M.; Witte, L.; Schröder, S.; Tune, J.; Möhlmann, D.; Roll, R.; Chares, B.; Fischer, H.; Seidensticker, K.

    2014-07-01

    The landing of Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is scheduled for November 11, 2014. Each of the three landing feet of Philae house a triaxial acceleration sensor of CASSE, which will thus be the first sensors to be in mechanical contact with the cometary surface. CASSE will be in listening mode to record the deceleration of the lander, when it impacts with the comet at a velocity of approx. 0.5 m/s. The analysis of this data yields information on the reduced elastic modulus and the yield stress of the comet's surface material. We describe a series of controlled landings of a lander model. The tests were conducted in the Landing & Mobility Test Facility (LAMA) of the DLR Institute of Space Systems in Bremen, Germany, where an industrial robot can be programmed to move landers or rovers along predefined paths, allowing to adapt landing procedures with predefined velocities. The qualification model of the Philae landing gear was used in the tests. It consists of three legs manufactured of carbon fiber and metal joints. A dead mass of the size and mass of the lander housing is attached via a damper above the landing gear to represent the lander structure as a whole. Attached to each leg is a foot with two soles and a mechanically driven fixation screw (''ice screw'') to secure the lander on the comet. The right soles, if viewed from the outside towards the lander body, house a Brüel & Kjaer DeltaTron 4506 triaxial piezoelectric accelerometer as used on the spacecraft. Orientation of the three axes was such that one of the axes, here the X-axis of the accelerometer, points downwards, while the Y- and Z-axes are horizontal. Data were recorded at a sampling rate of 8.2 kHz within a time gate of 2 s. In parallel, a video sequence was taken, in order to monitor the touchdown on the sand and the movement of the ice screws. Touchdown measurements were conducted on three types of ground with landing velocities between 0.1 to 1.1 m/s. Landings with low velocities were

  2. Oxygen isotope evidence for sorption of molecular oxygen to pyrite surface sites and incorporation into sulfate in oxidation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tichomirowa, Marion; Junghans, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate (i) the rate of O-isotope exchange between SO 4 and water molecules at low pH and surface temperatures typical for conditions of acid mine drainage (AMD) and (ii) the O- and S-isotope composition of sulfates produced by pyrite oxidation under closed and open conditions (limited and free access of atmospheric O 2 ) to identify the O source/s in sulfide oxidation (water or atmospheric molecular O 2 ) and to better understand the pyrite oxidation pathway. An O-isotope exchange between SO 4 and water was observed over a pH range of 0-2 only at 50 deg. C, whereas no exchange occurred at lower temperatures over a period of 8 a. The calculated half-time of the exchange rate for 50 deg. C (pH = 0 and 1) is in good agreement with former experimental data for higher and lower temperatures and excludes the possibility of isotope exchange for typical AMD conditions (T ≤ 25 deg. C, pH ≥ 3) for decades. Pyrite oxidation experiments revealed two dependencies of the O-isotope composition of dissolved sulfates: O-isotope values decreased with longer duration of experiments and increasing grain size of pyrite. Both changes are interpreted as evidence for chemisorption of molecular O 2 to pyrite surface sites. The sorption of molecular O 2 is important at initial oxidation stages and more abundant in finer grained pyrite fractions and leads to its incorporation in the produced SO 4 . The calculated bulk contribution of atmospheric O 2 in the dissolved SO 4 reached up to 50% during initial oxidation stages (first 5 days, pH 2, fine-grained pyrite fraction) and decreased to less than 20% after about 100 days. Based on the direct incorporation of molecular O 2 in the early-formed sulfates, chemisorption and electron transfer of molecular O 2 on S sites of the pyrite surface are proposed, in addition to chemisorption on Fe sites. After about 10 days, the O of all newly-formed sulfates originates only from water, indicating direct interaction

  3. Flow patterns and transport in Rayleigh surface acoustic wave streaming: combined finite element method and raytracing numerics versus experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommelt, Thomas; Gogel, Daniel; Kostur, Marcin; Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter; Wixforth, Achim

    2008-10-01

    This work presents an approach for determining the streaming patterns that are generated by Rayleigh surface acoustic waves in arbitrary 3-D geometries by finite element method (FEM) simulations. An efficient raytracing algorithm is applied on the acoustic subproblem to avoid the unbearable memory demands and computational time of a conventional FEM acoustics simulation in 3-D. The acoustic streaming interaction is modeled by a body force term in the Stokes equation. In comparisons between experiments and simulated flow patterns, we demonstrate the quality of the proposed technique.

  4. Preliminary thermal and thermomechanical modeling for the near surface test facility heater experiments at Hanford. Volume II: Appendix D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.; Remer, J.S.

    1978-12-01

    Appendix D is a complete set of figures illustrating the detailed calculations necessary for designing the heater experiments at the Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF) at Hanford, Washington. The discussion of the thermal and thermomechanical modeling that yielded these calculations is presented in Volume 1. A summary of the figures and the models they illustrate is given in table D1. The most important figures have also been included in the discussion in Volume 1, and Table D2 lists the figure numbers in this volume that correspond to figure numbers used there

  5. Design of experiment evaluation of sputtered thin film platinum surface metallization on alumina substrate for implantable conductive structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiele, P; Cvancara, P; Mueller, M; Stieglitz, T

    2017-07-01

    Reliability and reproducibility of implants and their fabrication are highly depending on the assembly and packaging procedures. Individual fabrication skills like soldering introduce inaccuracies and should be avoided as much as possible. Screen printing is often utilized for the metallization of ceramics. Using platinum/gold (Pt/Au) paste liquidus diffusion leads to a low adhesion strength of the Pt/Au pads after soldering. As an alternative, sputtering of thin film surface metallization was investigated. However, this alternative comes with a huge amount of different layer and parameter setups. In order to keep the amount of experiments and data acquisition in a reasonable magnitude, the Design of Experiment (DoE) evaluation displays a powerful tool. We found an optimal layer setup that maximizes the adhesion strength of the layer, while simultaneously minimizing the sheet resistance and removing the dependency of soldering time.

  6. Control Surface Fault Diagnosis with Specified Detection Probability - Real Event Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Blanke, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of actuator faults is crucial for aircraft since loss of actuation can have catastrophic consequences. For autonomous aircraft the steps necessary to achieve fault tolerance is limited when only basic and non-redundant sensor and actuators suites are present. Through diagnosis...... that exploits analytical redundancies it is, nevertheless, possible to cheaply enhance the level of safety. This paper presents a method for diagnosing control surface faults by using basic sensors and hardware available on an autonomous aircraft. The capability of fault diagnosis is demonstrated obtaining...... false alarm probability. A data based method is used to determine the validity of the methods proposed. Verification is achieved using real data and shows that the presented diagnosis method is efficient and could have avoided incidents where faults led to loss of aircraft....

  7. Comparing DNS and Experiments of Subcritical Flow Past an Isolated Surface Roughness Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Charles; Goldstein, David

    2009-11-01

    Results are presented from computational and experimental studies of subcritical roughness within a Blasius boundary layer. This work stems from discrepancies presented by Stephani and Goldstein (AIAA Paper 2009-585) where DNS results did not agree with hot-wire measurements. The near wake regions of cylindrical surface roughness elements corresponding to roughness-based Reynolds numbers Rek of about 202 are of specific concern. Laser-Doppler anemometry and flow visualization in water, as well as the same spectral DNS code used by Stephani and Goldstein are used to obtain both quantitative and qualitative comparisons with previous results. Conclusions regarding previous studies will be presented alongside discussion of current work including grid resolution studies and an examination of vorticity dynamics.

  8. [Study on Tracheal Intubation's Circular Arc Radius Measuring Method Based on Machine Vision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dong; Li, Genchi; Feng, Yunhao; Yang, Yonghuan; Hao, Xiali

    2015-03-01

    It is difficult to measure the circular arc radius for central angle less than 30 degrees. The existing measuring methods are of low efficiency and big error. Through designing the machine vision system and studying the image detecting method for measurement, It is obtained good results by using the new measurement for tracheal intubation's circular arc radius, Realized a rapid and accurate measurement of the circular arc radius, and expanded the application in the field of machine vision.

  9. On the determination of the proton RMS-radius from electron scattering data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, F.; Simon, G.G.; Walther, V.H.; Wendling, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that the proton rms radius should be determined from fiting a polynomial of second order to the low-q 2 form factors. The commonly used polynomial of first yields radius values which are too small. The proton rms radius has been redetermined from an analysis of the electron scattering data measured at three laboratories. The best fit value is [r 2 sub(E)]sup(1/2) = 0.87 +- 0.02 fm. (orig.) [de

  10. Experiments in a flighted conveyor comparing shear rates in compressed versus free surface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, Nicholas; Higgins, Hannah; Krupiarz, Kamila; O'Connor, Ryan

    2017-11-01

    Uniformity of granular flow rate is critical in industry. Experiments in a flighted conveyor system aim to fill a gap in knowledge of achieving steady mass flow rate by correlating velocity profile data with mass flow rate measurements. High speed images were collected for uniformly-shaped particles in a bottom-driven flow conveyor belt system from which the velocity profiles can be generated. The correlation of mass flow rates from the velocity profiles to the time-dependent mass measurements will determine energy dissipation rates as a function of operating conditions. The velocity profiles as a function of the size of the particles, speed of the belt, and outlet size, will be compared to shear rate relationships found in past experiments that focused on gravity-driven systems. The dimension of the linear shear and type of decaying transition to the stationary bed may appear different due to the compression versus dilation space in open flows. The application of this research can serve to validate simulations in discrete element modeling and physically demonstrate a process that can be further developed and customized for industry applications, such as feeding a biomass conversion reactor. Sponsored by NIU's Office of Student Engagement and Experiential Learning.

  11. Geophysical monitoring of near surface CO2 injection at Svelvik - Learnings from the CO2FieldLab experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querendez, Etor; Romdhane, Anouar; Jordan, Michael; Eliasson, Peder; Grimstad, Alv-Arne

    2014-05-01

    A CO2 migration field laboratory for testing monitoring methods and tools has been established in the glaciofluvial-glaciomarine Holocene deposits of the Svelvik ridge, near Oslo (Norway). At the site, feasibility, sensitivity, acquisition geometry and usefulness of various surface and subsurface monitoring tools are investigated during controlled CO2 injection experiments. In a first stage, a shallow CO2 injection experiment was conducted in September 2011. Approximately 1700 kg of CO2 was injected at 18 m depth below surface in an unconsolidated sand formation. The objectives of this experiment were to (i) detect and, where possible, quantify migrated CO2 concentrations at the surface and very shallow subsurface, (ii) evaluate the sensitivity of the monitoring tools and (iii) study the impact of the vadose zone on observed measurements. Results showed that all deployed monitoring tools (for surface and near-surface gas monitoring, subsurface water monitoring and subsurface geophysical monitoring) where able to detect the presence of CO2 even though the CO2 plume did not migrate vertically as expected in what was thought to be an homogeneous unconsolidated sand structure. The upper part of the site revealed to be more heterogeneous than expected, mainly due to the highly variable lamination and channelling of the morainic sediments and to the presence of pebble and cobble beds sporadically showing throughout the deposits. Building on the learnings from the 18m depth injection experiment, a second experiment is being planned for a deeper injection, at a depth of 65m. Re-processing of the appraisal 2D multi-channel seismic with state-of-the-art processing techniques, like Linear Radon coherent and random noise attenuation and Full Waveform Inversion followed by pre-stack depth migration, corroborate the presence of heterogeneities at the near surface. Based on the re-interpreted seismic sections, a more realistic 3D geomodel, where the complex topography of the site

  12. Volar versus dorsal fixed-angle fixation of dorsally unstable extra-articular distal radius fractures: a biomechanic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Todd A; Conrad, Bryan; Badman, Brian; Wright, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the biomechanic rigidity and strength of 3 fixed-angle plates used to treat extra-articular distal radius fractures that are dorsally unstable. Volar fixed-angle plates were compared with a dorsal fixed-angle nail plate. Three plate constructs were tested: the dorsal nail plate (DNP), distal volar radius (DVR) plate, and locking compression plate (LCP) volar distal radius plate. With anatomic, third-generation, artificial composite radii, dorsally unstable extra-articular distal radius fracture models were made by cutting a wedge osteotomy with an 8-mm dorsal gap 1 cm from the articular surface. These models were then fixed with the 3 implants by the method recommended by the manufacturer. The proximal radii of each specimen were attached to the base of a materials testing machine with a probe centered at the radial side of the lunate fossa. The specimens were loaded at a constant rate to failure under axial compression. Load and displacement were plotted graphically, and the resulting rigidities and strengths of each plate were assessed statistically. The DVR group had significantly greater stiffness than the LCP group. The DVR group had significantly higher maximum loads than both the DNP and LCP groups. There were no significant differences in yield loads. Both the DNP and DVR groups had significantly less displacement at yield than the LCP group. These 3 groups had similar yield loads. However, the LCP was less stiff than the DVR and had more displacement at yield than both the DVR and DNP. The yield load of all 3 implants was much higher than previously described loads for active wrist and finger motion.

  13. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis for distal radius fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-ming Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fractures of distal radius are common injury in all age groups. Cast treatment with or without close reduction is a viable option. However, the results are often unsatisfactory with restricted function. The open reduction and internal fixation often results in extensive soft tissue dissection and associated high rates of infection and delayed/nonunion. The distractor/external fixator have reported good functional and anatomical results but the incidence of pin traction infection nerve injury and cosmedic deformity are high. We introduced a modified operative technique for minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO for distal radial fracture and evaluated the functional outcomes and complications. Materials and Methods: 22 distal radial fractures (10 left, 12 right were treated using the MIPO technique and two small incisions with a palmar locking plate from August 2009 to August 2010. The wrist function was assessed according to Dienst wrist rating system, and postoperative complications were recorded. Results: According to Dienst wrist rating system, 13 patients showed excellent results, 6 cases showed good results and 3 patients had moderate results. No patient had poor results. Thus, the excellent and good rate was 86.4%. One patient had anesthesia in the thenar eminence and this symptom disappeared after 3 months. One patient had delayed healing in the proximal wrist crease. Two patients had mild pain on the ulnar side of the wrist and two patients had limited wrist joint function. Conclusion: The MIPO technique by using two small palmar incisions is safe and effective for treatment of distal radial fractures.

  14. Radial shortening following a fracture of the proximal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Andrew D; Watson, Bruce S; Will, Elizabeth M; Petrisor, Brad A; Walmsley, Phillip J; Court-Brown, Charles M; McQueen, Margaret M

    2011-06-01

    The Essex-Lopresti lesion is thought to be rare, with a varying degree of disruption to forearm stability probable. We describe the range of radial shortening that occurs following a fracture of the proximal radius, as well as the short-term outcome in these patients. Over an 18-month period, we prospectively assessed all patients with a radiographically confirmed proximal radial fracture. Patients noted to have ipsilateral wrist pain at initial presentation underwent bilateral radiography to determine whether there was disruption of the distal radio-ulnar joint suggestive of an Essex-Lopresti lesion. Outcome was assessed after a mean of 6 (1.5-12) months using clinical and radiographic results, including the Mayo elbow score (MES) and the short musculoskeletal function assessment (SMFA) questionnaire. One patient with a Mason type-I fracture was lost to follow-up after initial presentation. 60 patients had ipsilateral wrist pain at the initial assessment of 237 proximal radial fractures. Radial shortening of ≥ 2mm (range: 2-4mm) was seen in 22 patients (mean age 48 (19-79) years, 16 females). The most frequent mechanism of injury was a fall from standing height (10/22). 21 fractures were classified as being Mason type-I or type-II, all of which were managed nonoperatively. One Mason type-III fracture underwent acute radial head replacement. Functional outcome was assessed in 21 patients. We found an excellent or good MES in 18 of the 20 patients with a Mason type-I or type-II injury. The incidence of the Essex-Lopresti lesion type is possibly under-reported as there is a spectrum of injuries, and subtle disruptions often go unidentified. A full assessment of all patients with a proximal radial fracture is required in order to identify these injuries, and the index of suspicion is raised as the complexity of the fracture increases.

  15. Effect of isospin dependence of radius on transverse flow and fragmentation in isobaric pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Sakshi

    2013-11-01

    We study the role of nuclear structure effects through radius in reaction dynamics via transverse flow and multifragmentation of isobaric colliding pairs. Our study reveals that isospin-dependent radius [proposed by Royer and Rousseau [Eur. Phys. J. A10.1140/epja/i2008-10745-8 42, 541 (2009)] has significant effect towards isospin effects. The collective flow behavior and fragmentation pattern of neutron-rich system with respect to neutron-deficient system is found to get reversed with isospin-dependent radius compared to that with liquid drop radius.

  16. The separatrix radius measurement of field-reversed configuration plasma in FRX-L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shouyin; Tejero, Erik M.; Taccetti, Jose Martin; Wurden, Glen A.; Intrator, Thomas; Waganaar, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic pick-up coils and single turn flux loops are installed on the FRX-L device. The combination of the two measurements provides the excluded flux radius that approximates the separatrix radius of the field-reversed configuration plasma. Arrays of similar probes are used to map out local magnetic field dynamics beyond both ends of the theta-coil confinement region to help understand the effects of cusp locations on flux trapping during the FRC formation process. Details on the probe design and system calibrations are presented. The overall system calibration of excluded flux radius measurement is examined by replacing FRC plasma with a known radius aluminum conductor cylinder.

  17. Fractures of the bilateral distal radius and scaphoid: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozkan Korhan

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bilateral fractures of the distal radius and scaphoid are extremely rare injuries. Case presentation A patient with bilateral comminuted, displaced distal fractures of the radius and bilateral fractures of the scaphoid was treated via internal fixation of the scaphoid fractures with Herbert screws and internal fixation of the distal radius fractures with locked volar plating. Conclusion Rigid internal fixation of distal radius and scaphoid fractures is mandatory to start early active rehabilitation of the wrist without the need for wrist immobilization with a plaster or external skeletal fixation.

  18. Compatibility of lithium plasma-facing surfaces with high edge temperatures in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeski, R.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Merino, E.; Raitses, Y.; Schmitt, J. C.; Allain, J. P.; Bedoya, F.; Bialek, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Canik, J. M.; Buzi, L.; Koel, B. E.; Patino, M. I.; Capece, A. M.; Hansen, C.; Jarboe, T.; Kubota, S.; Peebles, W. A.; Tritz, K.

    2017-05-01

    High edge electron temperatures (200 eV or greater) have been measured at the wall-limited plasma boundary in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX). Flat electron temperature profiles are a long-predicted consequence of low recycling boundary conditions. Plasma density in the outer scrape-off layer is very low, 2-3 × 1017 m-3, consistent with a low recycling metallic lithium boundary. Despite the high edge temperature, the core impurity content is low. Zeff is estimated to be ˜1.2, with a very modest contribution (injection stops, the discharge density is allowed to drop, and the edge is pumped by the low recycling lithium wall. An upgrade to LTX-LTX-β, which includes a 35A, 20 kV neutral beam injector (on loan to LTX from Tri-Alpha Energy) to provide core fueling to maintain constant density, as well as auxiliary heating, is underway. LTX-β is briefly described.

  19. The risk injury to the posterior interosseous nerve in standard approaches to the proximal radius: a cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Nima; Kraus, Tanja; Weinberg, Annelie M; Weiglein, Andreas H; Grechenig, Wolfgang

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to provide guidance on the safe zones for the exposure of the proximal radius by measuring the distance from the PIN to various anatomical landmarks in the proximal forearm in pronation and supination. Twenty cadaveric arms were used for this study. On the anterior aspect of the forearm, the distance between insertion of the biceps tendon and the arcade of Frohse as well as the shortest distance between the PIN and the ulnar aspect of the radial neck were measured. On the posterior aspect of the forearm, the shortest distance between the PIN and the ulnar border of the interosseous membrane was measured at 30 and 50 mm distal to the articular surface of the radial head. The distance between the PIN and ulnar aspect of the radial neck had a mean of 21.6 mm in supination and 13.3 mm in pronation. The distance between the radial tuberosity and the arcade of Frohse was 18.6 mm. The mean distance between the PIN and the radial border of ulna at 30 mm distal to the articular surface of the proximal radius was 12.3 mm in supination and 22.3 mm in pronation. At 50 mm distal to the articular surface of the proximal radius the mean distance was 8 mm in supination and 16.2 mm in pronation. The course of this nerve is variable as it winds around the radial neck within the belly of the supinator muscle. Safe distances for dissection have been presented in our study.

  20. Numerical study of chemical reactions in a surface microdischarge tube with mist flow based on experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, T; Nishiyama, H

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a water treatment method of spraying solution into a discharge region has been developed and shows high energy efficiency. In this study, a simulation model of a water treatment method using a surface microdischarge (SMD) tube with mist flow is proposed for further understanding the detailed chemical reactions. Our model has three phases (plasma, gas and liquid) and three simulation steps. The carrier gas is humid air including 2% or 3% water vapour. The chemical species diffusion characteristics in the SMD tube and the concentrations in a droplet are clarified in a wide pH interval. The simulation results show that the chemical species generated on the SMD tube inner wall are diffused to the central axis and dissolved into fine droplets. Especially, OH radicals dissolve into droplets a few mm away from the SMD tube wall because of acidification of the droplets. Furthermore, the hydrogen peroxide density, which is the most important indicator of a radical reaction in water, is influenced by the initial solution pH. This pH dependence results from ozone self-decomposition in water. (paper)

  1. Numerical study of chemical reactions in a surface microdischarge tube with mist flow based on experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, T.; Nishiyama, H.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, a water treatment method of spraying solution into a discharge region has been developed and shows high energy efficiency. In this study, a simulation model of a water treatment method using a surface microdischarge (SMD) tube with mist flow is proposed for further understanding the detailed chemical reactions. Our model has three phases (plasma, gas and liquid) and three simulation steps. The carrier gas is humid air including 2% or 3% water vapour. The chemical species diffusion characteristics in the SMD tube and the concentrations in a droplet are clarified in a wide pH interval. The simulation results show that the chemical species generated on the SMD tube inner wall are diffused to the central axis and dissolved into fine droplets. Especially, OH radicals dissolve into droplets a few mm away from the SMD tube wall because of acidification of the droplets. Furthermore, the hydrogen peroxide density, which is the most important indicator of a radical reaction in water, is influenced by the initial solution pH. This pH dependence results from ozone self-decomposition in water.

  2. A dual wavelength imaging system for plasma-surface interaction studies on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, F; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2015-12-01

    A two-channel spectral imaging system based on a charge injection device radiation-hardened intensified camera was built for studies of plasma-surface interactions on divertor plasma facing components in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) tokamak. By means of commercially available mechanically referenced optical components, the two-wavelength setup images the light from the plasma, relayed by a fiber optic bundle, at two different wavelengths side-by-side on the same detector. Remotely controlled filter wheels are used for narrow bandpass and neutral density filters on each optical path allowing for simultaneous imaging of emission at wavelengths differing in brightness up to 3 orders of magnitude. Applications on NSTX-U will include the measurement of impurity influxes in the lower divertor strike point region and the imaging of plasma-material interaction on the head of the surface analysis probe MAPP (Material Analysis and Particle Probe). The diagnostic setup and initial results from its application on the lithium tokamak experiment are presented.

  3. Computer-assisted planning and navigation for corrective distal radius osteotomy, based on pre- and intraoperative imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobbe, J. G. G.; Strackee, S. D.; Schreurs, A. W.; Jonges, R.; Carelsen, B.; Vroemen, J. C.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Malunion after a distal radius fracture is very common and if symptomatic, is treated with a so-called corrective osteotomy. In a traditional distal radius osteotomy, the radius is cut at the fracture site and a wedge is inserted in the osteotomy gap to correct the distal radius pose. The standard

  4. The effect of three surface conditions, speed and running experience on vertical acceleration of the tibia during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boey, Hannelore; Aeles, Jeroen; Schütte, Kurt; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2017-06-01

    Research has focused on parameters that are associated with injury risk, e.g. vertical acceleration. These parameters can be influenced by running on different surfaces or at different running speeds, but the relationship between them is not completely clear. Understanding the relationship may result in training guidelines to reduce the injury risk. In this study, thirty-five participants with three different levels of running experience were recruited. Participants ran on three different surfaces (concrete, synthetic running track, and woodchip trail) at two different running speeds: a self-selected comfortable speed and a fixed speed of 3.06 m/s. Vertical acceleration of the lower leg was measured with an accelerometer. The vertical acceleration was significantly lower during running on the woodchip trail in comparison with the synthetic running track and the concrete, and significantly lower during running at lower speed in comparison with during running at higher speed on all surfaces. No significant differences in vertical acceleration were found between the three groups of runners at fixed speed. Higher self-selected speed due to higher performance level also did not result in higher vertical acceleration. These results may show that running on a woodchip trail and slowing down could reduce the injury risk at the tibia.

  5. The MUSE experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie E. J.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. The MUSE experiment seeks to resolve this puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  6. Solar-wind ion interaction with carbonates on the surface of Ceres: Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, C. A.; Bu, C.; Lopez, G. R.; McFadden, L. A.; Ruesch, O.; Li, J. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Bright carbonates deposits on the dark background of Ceres have been identified by Dawn's VIR spectrometer [1, 2], with a composition that varies from Na2CO3 at Oxo crater and the Cerealia and Vinalia Faculae where carbonates are most abundant, to MgCO3 or CaCO3 in other regions [2, 3]. Solar-wind plasma impacts the surface of airless planetary bodies with 1 keV/amu H and He ( 107 ions cm-2 s-1at 2.8 A.U.), causing chemical and physical changes that influence the optical spectra. We investigate the stability of carbonate salts under ion irradiation, monitoring the spectral and compositional change. Anhydrous Na2CO3 (natrite) powders (grains 80% original material reflectance. Both hydrous and anhydrous Na2CO3 show blue/green radio-luminescence under ion impact. Ion-induced darkening of Ceres' natrite deposits is expected to occur on a time-scale of 100 - 1000 years, significantly less than the age of Cerealia facula 7 Ma [4]; darkening can be reversed by exposure to water vapor. For Ceres bright regions of varied albedo, this suggests that the brightest areas are the more recent deposits or the most recently exposed to water by upwelling, venting, or sublimation of subsurface ice [5]. [1] DeSanctis et al (2016) Nature 536, 54 - 57 [2] Palumbo et al (2016) LPSC 47, 2166 [3] Tosi et al (2016) DPS48, 511.06 [4] Nathues et al (2017) APJ 153, 112-124 [5] Titus (2015) GRL 42, 2130-2136

  7. A Pluto-like radius and a high albedo for the dwarf planet Eris from an occultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicardy, B; Ortiz, J L; Assafin, M; Jehin, E; Maury, A; Lellouch, E; Hutton, R Gil; Braga-Ribas, F; Colas, F; Hestroffer, D; Lecacheux, J; Roques, F; Santos-Sanz, P; Widemann, T; Morales, N; Duffard, R; Thirouin, A; Castro-Tirado, A J; Jelínek, M; Kubánek, P; Sota, A; Sánchez-Ramírez, R; Andrei, A H; Camargo, J I B; da Silva Neto, D N; Gomes, A Ramos; Martins, R Vieira; Gillon, M; Manfroid, J; Tozzi, G P; Harlingten, C; Saravia, S; Behrend, R; Mottola, S; Melendo, E García; Peris, V; Fabregat, J; Madiedo, J M; Cuesta, L; Eibe, M T; Ullán, A; Organero, F; Pastor, S; de Los Reyes, J A; Pedraz, S; Castro, A; de la Cueva, I; Muler, G; Steele, I A; Cebrián, M; Montañés-Rodríguez, P; Oscoz, A; Weaver, D; Jacques, C; Corradi, W J B; Santos, F P; Reis, W; Milone, A; Emilio, M; Gutiérrez, L; Vázquez, R; Hernández-Toledo, H

    2011-10-26

    The dwarf planet Eris is a trans-Neptunian object with an orbital eccentricity of 0.44, an inclination of 44 degrees and a surface composition very similar to that of Pluto. It resides at present at 95.7 astronomical units (1 AU is the Earth-Sun distance) from Earth, near its aphelion and more than three times farther than Pluto. Owing to this great distance, measuring its size or detecting a putative atmosphere is difficult. Here we report the observation of a multi-chord stellar occultation by Eris on 6 November 2010 UT. The event is consistent with a spherical shape for Eris, with radius 1,163 ± 6 kilometres, density 2.52 ± 0.05 grams per cm(3) and a high visible geometric albedo, Pv = 0.96(+0.09)(-0.04). No nitrogen, argon or methane atmospheres are detected with surface pressure larger than ∼1 nanobar, about 10,000 times more tenuous than Pluto's present atmosphere. As Pluto's radius is estimated to be between 1,150 and 1,200 kilometres, Eris appears as a Pluto twin, with a bright surface possibly caused by a collapsed atmosphere, owing to its cold environment. We anticipate that this atmosphere may periodically sublimate as Eris approaches its perihelion, at 37.8 astronomical units from the Sun.

  8. Large radius of curvature measurement based on the evaluation of interferogram-quality metric in non-null interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongming; Dou, Jiantai; Du, Jinyu; Gao, Zhishan

    2018-03-01

    Non-null interferometry could use to measure the radius of curvature (ROC), we have presented a virtual quadratic Newton rings phase-shifting moiré-fringes measurement method for large ROC measurement (Yang et al., 2016). In this paper, we propose a large ROC measurement method based on the evaluation of the interferogram-quality metric by the non-null interferometer. With the multi-configuration model of the non-null interferometric system in ZEMAX, the retrace errors and the phase introduced by the test surface are reconstructed. The interferogram-quality metric is obtained by the normalized phase-shifted testing Newton rings with the spherical surface model in the non-null interferometric system. The radius curvature of the test spherical surface can be obtained until the minimum of the interferogram-quality metric is found. Simulations and experimental results are verified the feasibility of our proposed method. For a spherical mirror with a ROC of 41,400 mm, the measurement accuracy is better than 0.13%.

  9. Anthropometric study of the proximal radius: does radial head implant fit in all cases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Soo Hwan; Kim, Dong Yeop; Park, Hyunwoo; Song, Hyun Seok

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate anthropometry of the radial head and neck and compare the results with radial head prosthesis in current use. A total of 144 cases were analysed that underwent antero-posterior (AP) elbow radiographs in full supination and extension position between January 2013 and April 2013. Mean age was 54.3 years (range, 21-79). The distance between the articular surface and the radial tuberosity, the height of the radial head, the diameter of the radial head, and the width of the proximal radioulnar joint were measured. The specifications of 13 products from nine companies were compared with the parameters. The mean distance between the articular surface and the radial tuberosity was 19.6 mm. Mean height, diameter, and width of the proximal radioulnar joint were 10.6, 22.0, and 8.9 mm, respectively. A violation of the distal biceps insertion will occur in up to 87.5 % of the cases when some of the bipolar implants were used. The height of some of the implant heads was larger than the height of head in our study. Although the height and diameter of the radial head were similar to those of previous reports, the distance between the articular surface of the head and radial tuberosity was different. The anatomical parameters of the proximal radius of the cases, especially the distance between the articular surface of the head and the radial tuberosity, and the radial head implant specifications should be assessed when selecting a radial head implant.

  10. Evaluation of sarcopenia in patients with distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Hak; Koh, Young Do; Noh, Jung Ho; Gong, Hyun Sik; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2017-12-01

    Sarcopenia is more prevalent in patients with distal radius fracture (DRF) than in age- and sex-matched controls. Lower appendicular mass index in men and weaker grip strength in both men and women increase the likelihood of DRF. Sarcopenia is a core component of physical frailty that predisposes older people to falls and negatively impacts the activities of daily living. The objectives of this study were to compare the prevalence of sarcopenia in patients with DRF with that in age- and sex-matched controls without DRF; and evaluate the association between sarcopenia and the occurrence of DRF. We prospectively recruited 132 patients over 50 years of age who sustained DRF due to fall and 132 age- and sex-matched controls without DRF. A definition of sarcopenia was based on the consensus of the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia. Sarcopenic components including appendicular lean body mass, grip strength, and gait speed were compared between the two groups. Other factors assessed for the occurrence of DRF were age, gender, body mass index (BMI), lumbar, and hip bone mineral density (BMD) values. A conditional logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the associations between sarcopenia and the occurrence of DRF. A total of 39 (30%) of 132 DRF patients were sarcopenic, whereas 23 (17%) of the 132 controls were within the sarcopenic criteria (p = 0.048). The patient group had significantly lower lean body mass and weaker grip strength than those of the control group. However, there was no significant difference in gait speed between the two groups. According to regression analysis, lower appendicular mass index in men was associated with an increased incidence of DRF (odds ratio [OR] = 0.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.72, 0.95) while weaker grip strength and lower total hip BMD values were associated with the occurrence of DRF in both men (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.63, 0.92; and OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.64, 0.94, respectively) and women (OR

  11. Sensitivity experiments on the response of Vb cyclones to sea surface temperature and soil moisture changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Messmer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Extratropical cyclones of type Vb, which develop over the western Mediterranean and move northeastward, are major natural hazards that are responsible for heavy precipitation over central Europe. To gain further understanding in the governing processes of these Vb cyclones, the study explores the role of soil moisture and sea surface temperature (SST and their contribution to the atmospheric moisture content. Thereby, recent Vb events identified in the ERA-Interim reanalysis are dynamically downscaled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. Results indicate that a mean high-impact summer Vb event is mostly sensitive to an increase in the Mediterranean SSTs and rather insensitive to Atlantic SSTs and soil moisture changes. Hence, an increase of +5 K in Mediterranean SSTs leads to an average increase of 24 % in precipitation over central Europe. This increase in precipitation is mainly induced by larger mean upward moisture flux over the Mediterranean with increasing Mediterranean SSTs. This further invokes an increase in latent energy release, which leads to an increase in atmospheric instability, i.e. in convective available potential energy. Both the increased availability of atmospheric moisture and the increased instability of the atmosphere, which is able to remove extra moisture from the atmosphere due to convective processes, are responsible for the strong increase in precipitation over the entire region influenced by Vb events. Precipitation patterns further indicate that a strong increase in precipitation is found at the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea for increased Mediterranean SSTs. This premature loss in atmospheric moisture leads to a significant decrease in atmospheric moisture transport to central Europe and the northeastern flanks of the Alpine mountain chain. This leads to a reduction in precipitation in this high-impact region of the Vb event for an increase in Mediterranean SSTs of +5 K. Furthermore, the

  12. Search for life on Mars in surface samples: Lessons from the 1999 Marsokhod rover field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsom, Horton E.; Bishop, J.L.; Cockell, C.; Roush, T.L.; Johnson, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    The Marsokhod 1999 field experiment in the Mojave Desert included a simulation of a rover-based sample selection mission. As part of this mission, a test was made of strategies and analytical techniques for identifying past or present life in environments expected to be present on Mars. A combination of visual clues from high-resolution images and the detection of an important biomolecule (chlorophyll) with visible/near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy led to the successful identification of a rock with evidence of cryptoendolithic organisms. The sample was identified in high-resolution images (3 times the resolution of the Imager for Mars Pathfinder camera) on the basis of a green tinge and textural information suggesting the presence of a thin, partially missing exfoliating layer revealing the organisms. The presence of chlorophyll bands in similar samples was observed in visible/NIR spectra of samples in the field and later confirmed in the laboratory using the same spectrometer. Raman spectroscopy in the laboratory, simulating a remote measurement technique, also detected evidence of carotenoids in samples from the same area. Laboratory analysis confirmed that the subsurface layer of the rock is inhabited by a community of coccoid Chroococcidioposis cyanobacteria. The identification of minerals in the field, including carbonates and serpentine, that are associated with aqueous processes was also demonstrated using the visible/NIR spectrometer. Other lessons learned that are applicable to future rover missions include the benefits of web-based programs for target selection and for daily mission planning and the need for involvement of the science team in optimizing image compression schemes based on the retention of visual signature characteristics. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Nutrient Limitation in Surface Waters of the Oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean Sea: an Enrichment Microcosm Experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Tsiola, A.

    2015-12-01

    The growth rates of planktonic microbes in the pelagic zone of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea are nutrient limited, but the type of limitation is still uncertain. During this study, we investigated the occurrence of N and P limitation among different groups of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic (pico-, nano-, and micro-) plankton using a microcosm experiment during stratified water column conditions in the Cretan Sea (Eastern Mediterranean). Microcosms were enriched with N and P (either solely or simultaneously), and the PO4 turnover time, prokaryotic heterotrophic activity, primary production, and the abundance of the different microbial components were measured. Flow cytometric and molecular fingerprint analyses showed that different heterotrophic prokaryotic groups were limited by different nutrients; total heterotrophic prokaryotic growth was limited by P, but only when both N and P were added, changes in community structure and cell size were detected. Phytoplankton were N and P co-limited, with autotrophic pico-eukaryotes being the exception as they increased even when only P was added after a 2-day time lag. The populations of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus were highly competitive with each other; Prochlorococcus abundance increased during the first 2 days of P addition but kept increasing only when both N and P were added, whereas Synechococcus exhibited higher pigment content and increased in abundance 3 days after simultaneous N and P additions. Dinoflagellates also showed opportunistic behavior at simultaneous N and P additions, in contrast to diatoms and coccolithophores, which diminished in all incubations. High DNA content viruses, selective grazing, and the exhaustion of N sources probably controlled the populations of diatoms and coccolithophores.

  14. Influence of Workpiece Surface Topography on the Mechanisms of Liquid Lubrication in Strip Drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shimizu, I; Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Bech, Jakob Ilsted

    2001-01-01

    Plasto HydroDynamic Lubrication (MPHDL). On the other hand, when the radius on the edge is small MPHDL is impeded and MicroPlasto HydroStatic Lubrication (MPHSL) appears instead implying forward escape of the lubricant. The occurrence of these mechanisms are quantitatively explained by a mathematical model......The workpiece surface topography is an important factor controlling the mechanisms of lubrication in metal forming processes. In the present work, the microscopic lubrication mechanisms induced by lubricant trapped in pockets of the surface in strip drawing are studied. The experiments...... are performed with macroscopic model pockets in the surface studying the influence of the shape of the pockets on the lubrication mechanisms. A large radius of curvature on the rear edge and a small angle to the edge of the lubricant pocket induce a large area of backward escape of lubricant caused by Micro...

  15. Surface Finish and Residual Stresses Induced by Orthogonal Dry Machining of AA7075-T651.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Walid; Songmene, Victor; Bocher, Philippe

    2014-02-28

    The surface finish was extensively studied in usual machining processes (turning, milling, and drilling). For these processes, the surface finish is strongly influenced by the cutting feed and the tool nose radius. However, a basic understanding of tool/surface finish interaction and residual stress generation has been lacking. This paper aims to investigate the surface finish and residual stresses under the orthogonal cutting since it can provide this information by avoiding the effect of the tool nose radius. The orthogonal machining of AA7075-T651 alloy through a series of cutting experiments was performed under dry conditions. Surface finish was studied using height and amplitude distribution roughness parameters. SEM and EDS were used to analyze surface damage and built-up edge (BUE) formation. An analysis of the surface topography showed that the surface roughness was sensitive to changes in cutting parameters. It was found that the formation of BUE and the interaction between the tool edge and the iron-rich intermetallic particles play a determinant role in controlling the surface finish during dry orthogonal machining of the AA7075-T651 alloy. Hoop stress was predominantly compressive on the surface and tended to be tensile with increased cutting speed. The reverse occurred for the surface axial stress. The smaller the cutting feed, the greater is the effect of cutting speed on both axial and hoop stresses. By controlling the cutting speed and feed, it is possible to generate a benchmark residual stress state and good surface finish using dry machining.

  16. Radiographic diagnosis of scapholunate dissociation among intra-articular fractures of the distal radius: interobserver reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradl, Gertraud; Neuhaus, Valentin; Fuchsberger, Thomas; Guitton, Thierry G.; Prommersberger, Karl-Josef; Ring, David; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Shafritz, Adam B.; Garcia, Aida E.; Caputo, Andrew E.; Terrono, Andrew L.; Spoor, Andy B.; Eschler, Anica; Vochteloo, Anne J. H.; Beumer, Annechien; Barquet, Antonio; Kristan, Anze; van der Zwan, Arnard L.; Berner, Arne; Ilyas, Asif; Jubel, Axel; Sutker, Ben; Nolan, Betsy M.; Petrisor, Brad; Cross, Brian J.; Wills, Brian P. D.; Barreto, Camilo J. R.; Fernandes, Carlos H.; Swigart, Carrie; Zalavras, Charalampos; Goldfarb, Charles A.; Cassidy, Charles; Eaton, Charles; Wilson, Chris; Cheng, Christine J.; Wall, Christopher J.; Walsh, Christopher J.; Jones, Christopher M.; Garnavos, Christos; Klostermann, Cyrus; Kirkpatrick, D. Kay; Osei, Daniel A.; Rikli, Daniel A.; Wascher, Daniel C.; Polatsch, Daniel; Silva, Dario Mejia; Nelson, David L.; Kalainov, David M.; Ruchelsman, David; Hoffmann, David Victoria; Weiss, David; Eygendaal, Denise; van Deurzen, Derek F. P.; McKee, Desirae M.; Verbeek, Diederik O. F.; Hanel, Doug; Hutchinson, Douglas T.; Brilej, Drago; Harvey, Edward; Stojkovska Pemovska, Emilija; Calvo, Emilio; Hammerberg, Eric Mark; Hofmeister, Eric P.; Kaplan, F. Thomas D.; Suarez, Fabio; Beeres, Frank J. P.; Walter, Frank L.; Frykman, Gary K.; Pess, Gary M.; Kuzma, Gary R.; Dyer, George S. M.; Thomas, George; Kohut, Georges; Kraan, Gerald A.; DeSilva, Gregory; Della Rocca, Gregory J.; Lob, Guenter; Gadbled, Guillaume; Bamberger, H. Brent; Mc Cutchan, Hal; Goost, Hans; Kreder, Hans J.; Grünwald, Heinz; Broekhuyse, Henry; Kimball, Hervey L.; Durchholz, Holger; van der Heide, Huub; McGraw, Iain; Choueka, Jack; Forigua, Jaime E.; Nappi, James F.; Reid, James G.; Kellam, James; Boler, James M.; Biert, Jan; Fanuele, Jason C.; Tavakolian, Jason D.; Jones, Jedediah; Johnson, Jeff W.; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis; Murachovsky, Joel; Scheer, Johan H.; Rueger, Johannes M.; Erickson, John M.; McAuliffe, John; Boretto, Jorge G.; Rubio, Jorge; Ortiz, Jose A.; Ribeiro Filho, Jose Eduardo Grandi; Di Giovanni, José Fernando; Izzi, Joseph A.; Conflitti, Joseph M.; Abzug, Joshua M.; Cagnone, Juan Carlos; Adams, Julie; Chivers, Karel; Lee, Kendrick; Eng, Kevin; Malone, Kevin J.; Erol, Konul; Ponsen, Kornelis J.; Kabir, Koroush; Jeray, Kyle; Mica, Ladislav; Brunton, Lance M.; Adolfsson, Lars E.; Weiss, Lawrence; Katolik, Leonid; Paz, Lior; Poelhekke, Lodewijk M. S. J.; Escobar, Luis Felipe Naquira; Campinhos, Luiz Augusto B.; Abdel-Ghany, Mahmoud I.; Richard, Marc J. Richard; Swiontkowski, Marc; Rizzo, Marco; Pirpiris, Marinis; Boyer, Martin; Richardson, Martin; Kastelec, Matej; Turina, Matthias; Soong, Maximillian; Wood, Megan M.; Baskies, Michael; Behrman, Michael; Nancollas, Michael; Prayson, Michael; Quell, Michael; Verhofstad, Michael; Grafe, Michael W.; Kessler, Michael W.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; van de Sande, Michiel A. J.; Mckee, Mike; Patel, Milan M.; Merchant, Milind; Tyllianakis, Minos; Wiegand, Mischa Ralph; Waseem, Mohammad; Parnes, Nata; Wilson, Neil; Elias, Nelson; Shortt, Nicholas L.; Schep, Niels; Semenkin, Oleg M.; Henry, Patrick D. G.; Martineau, Paul A.; Jebson, Peter; Kloen, Peter; Brink, Peter R. G.; Schandelmaier, Peter; Blazar, Philip; Streubel, Philipp N.; Vial, Philippe; Choudhari, Pradeep; Inna, Prashanth; Costanzo, Ralph M.; de Bedout, Ramon; Hauck, Randy; Smith, Raymond Malcolm; Fricker, Renato M.; Omid, Reza; Buckley, Richard; Jenkinson, Richard; Hutchison, Richard L.; GIlbert, Richard S.; Page, Richard S.; Nelissen, Rob; Haverlag, Robert; Wagenmakers, Robert; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Klinefelter, Ryan; Calfee, Ryan P.; Moghtaderi, Sam; Spruijt, Sander; Kakar, Sanjeev; Kaplan, Saul; Duncan, Scott F.; Mitchell, Scott; Rowinski, Sergio; Dodds, Seth; Kennedy, Stephen A.; Westly, Stephen K.; Kronlage, Steve; Beldner, Steven; McCabe, Steven J.; Rhemrev, Steven J.; Gosens, Taco; Baxamusa, Taizoon; Apard, Thomas; Dienstknecht, Thomas; Varecka, Thomas F.; Hughes, Thomas; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Pillukat, Thomas; Wright, Thomas; Havenhill, Timothy G.; Omara, Timothy; Siff, Todd; Giordano, Vincenzo; Hammert, Warren C.; Satora, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the reliability and accuracy of diagnosis of scapholunate dissociation (SLD) among AO type C (compression articular) fractures of the distal radius. A total of 217 surgeons evaluated 21 sets of radiographs with type C fractures of the distal radius for which the status of the

  17. Non union of the neck of radius: a case report and review of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fractures of the neck of radius are frequent in trauma. They happen without being noticed at the moment of injury of the elbow or in the context of polytrauma. A case of non union of the radius neck occurring in a young person due to ignorance, during first consultation has been reported by the authors. They insist on the ...

  18. CT virtual reality in the preoperative workup of malunited distal radius fractures: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieger, Michael; Gruber, Hannes; Jaschke, Werner R.; Gabl, Markus; Mallouhi, Ammar

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of CT virtual preoperative planning in the surgical repositioning of malunited distal radius fracture. Eleven patients with malunited distal radius fracture underwent multislice CT of both wrists. A preoperative workup was performed in a virtual reality environment created from the CT data sets. Virtual planning comprised three main procedures, carrying out the virtual osteotomy of the radius, prediction of the final position of the distal radius after osteotomy and computer-assisted manufacturing of a repositioning device, which was later placed at the surgical osteotomy site to reposition objectively the distal radius fragment before fixation with the osteosynthesis. All patients tolerated the surgical procedure well. During surgery, the orthopedic surgeons were not required in any of the cases to alter the position of the distal radius that was determined by the repositioning device. At postoperative follow-up, the anatomic relationship of the distal radius was restored (radial inclination, 21.4 ; volar tilt, 10.3 ; ulnar variance, 0.5 mm). Clinically, a significant improvement of pronation (P=0.012), supination (P=0.01), flexion (P=0.001) and extension (P=0.006) was achieved. Pain decreased from 54 to 7 points. CT virtual reality is a valuable adjunct for the preoperative workup and surgical reposition of malunited distal radius fractures. (orig.)

  19. Classification and treatment of distal radius fractures: a survey among orthopaedic trauma surgeons and residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.M. Mulders (Marjolein A. M.); D. Rikli; J.C. Goslings (Carel); N.W.L. Schep (Niels)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Classification, the definition of an acceptable reduction and indications for surgery in distal radius fracturemanagement are still subject of debate. The purpose of this study was to characterise current distal radius fracture management in Europe. Methods: During the European

  20. Finite Larmor radius effect on thermal instability of a compressible plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.C.; Sharma, K.C.

    1978-01-01

    The thermal instability of a compressible plasma in the presence of a uniform vertical magnetic field is studied to include the effects of finiteness of the ion Larmor radius. When the instability sets in as stationary convection, both the compressibility and the finite Larmor radius are found to have stabilizing effect. The sufficient conditions for the nonexistence of overstability are investigated. (author)

  1. A new technique in the treatment of distal radius fractures: the Micronail(R)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, R.W.; Toonen, H.G.; Unen, J.M. van; Vugt, R. van; Werre, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In 2006, an intramedullar titanium osteosynthesis for the stabilization of distal radius fractures was introduced in The Netherlands: the Micronail(R). The Micronail(R) can be used in approximately 30% of distal radius fracture treatments. This article presents the introduction of this

  2. The MUSE experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Downie E. J.

    2014-01-01

    The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. The MUSE experiment seeks to resolve this puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new ph...

  3. Estimating surface soil moisture with the scanning low frequency microwave radiometer (SLFMR) during the Southern Great Plains 1997 (SGP97) hydrology experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitdewilligen, D.C.A.; Kustas, W.P.; Oevelen, van P.J.

    2003-01-01

    The scanning low frequency microwave radiometer (SLFMR) was used to map surface soil moisture (0-5 cm depth) during the Southern Great Plains 1997 (SGP97) hydrology experiment. On June 29, July 2, and July 3. surface soil moisture maps with a pixel resolution of 200 m were obtained using a soil

  4. Assessment of ipsilateral versus contralateral proximal fibula for use in distal radius osteoarticular reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinbo, Oluwaseun; Shamash, Steven; Strauch, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    Which fibula to harvest for distal radius reconstruction, ipsilateral or contralateral, is subject to debate. In this study, we investigated which proximal fibula is better suited for distal radius osteoarticular reconstruction based on radiographic parameters. Twenty-one proximal fibulas were harvested from adult cadavers. Radiographic fibular inclination angle (coronal plane) and radiographic fibular articular tilt (sagittal plane) were measured, and these parameters were compared with corresponding radius parameters. Mean radiographic fibular inclination angles were 25° (right) and 26° (left), and mean radiographic fibular articular tilts were 13° (right) and 13° (left). The native volar tilt of the radius is re-created when the ipsilateral proximal fibula (with proper styloid placement) is transferred to the ipsilateral wrist; conversely, a dorsal tilt is created when the contralateral proximal fibula is transferred. The ipsilateral proximal fibula is therefore a better radiographic match for distal radius osteoarticular reconstruction in the group we studied.

  5. Iconographical identification of the time for complete fusion of radius and fusion trace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Li; Wang Guohong; Zang Da; Li Fuxing; Xia Zhantong; Zhu Dixin; Xu Jianmin; Wu Yongchao

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the method for iconographical identification of complete fusion of radius and fusion trace. Methods: 31 cases under age 18 were photographed in the left wrists twice at anteroposterior position and the 30 degree and 45 degree vertical position by X ray in the same day, with 124 pictures exposed totally. For each case of the control group over 18, an anteroposterior picture was obtained and pictures at an angle with 6 cases, totally 17 pictures exposed. All the pictures were 141 exposed totally from 42 cases. A comparison then was made as for the morpha of the far-end of radius, the relationship with radius, the presence of low-density epiphyseal line and the fusion status of ulna between two groups. Results: Subject Group: the gap was extended into the frame of the radius and low density-epiphyseal line and gap existed in the base of proeessus styloldeus for patients with incomplete fusion. 8 cases of low-epiphyseal lines were found from multi-angle and multi-location. In the contrast group, the far-end gap was outside of the frame of radius and didn't extend into the frame of radius and the internal edge of the gap was normally closed by the bone cortex. Dense fusion line of the radius was not found in 7 cases (64%) and the ulna was completely fused. Conclusion: Different from that of fusion trace, low-density epiphyseal line of the radius was not found from multi-angle and multi-location. It was identified that the gap was within the flame of radius and the base of the ulna proeessus styloldeus was not completely fused. Non-thoroughly fusion in radius could be confirmed. (authors)

  6. Vertical profiles of droplet effective radius in shallow convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Conventional satellite retrievals can only provide information on cloud-top droplet effective radius (re. Given the fact that cloud ensembles in a satellite snapshot have different cloud-top heights, Rosenfeld and Lensky (1998 used the cloud-top height and the corresponding cloud-top re from the cloud ensembles in the snapshot to construct a profile of re representative of that in the individual clouds. This study investigates the robustness of this approach in shallow convective clouds based on results from large-eddy simulations (LES for clean (aerosol mixing ratio Na = 25 mg−1, intermediate (Na = 100 mg−1, and polluted (Na = 2000 mg−1 conditions. The cloud-top height and the cloud-top re from the modeled cloud ensembles are used to form a constructed re profile, which is then compared to the in-cloud re profiles. For the polluted and intermediate cases where precipitation is negligible, the constructed re profiles represent the in-cloud re profiles fairly well with a low bias (about 10 %. The method used in Rosenfeld and Lensky (1998 is therefore validated for nonprecipitating shallow cumulus clouds. For the clean, drizzling case, the in-cloud re can be very large and highly variable, and quantitative profiling based on cloud-top re is less useful. The differences in re profiles between clean and polluted conditions derived in this manner are however, distinct. This study also investigates the subadiabatic characteristics of the simulated cumulus clouds to reveal the effect of mixing on re and its evolution. Results indicate that as polluted and moderately polluted clouds develop into their decaying stage, the subadiabatic fraction

  7. Multiscale atomistic simulation of metal-oxygen surface interactions: Methodological development, theoretical investigation, and correlation with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Judith C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-01-09

    The purpose of this grant is to develop the multi-scale theoretical methods to describe the nanoscale oxidation of metal thin films, as the PI (Yang) extensive previous experience in the experimental elucidation of the initial stages of Cu oxidation by primarily in situ transmission electron microscopy methods. Through the use and development of computational tools at varying length (and time) scales, from atomistic quantum mechanical calculation, force field mesoscale simulations, to large scale Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) modeling, the fundamental underpinings of the initial stages of Cu oxidation have been elucidated. The development of computational modeling tools allows for accelerated materials discovery. The theoretical tools developed from this program impact a wide range of technologies that depend on surface reactions, including corrosion, catalysis, and nanomaterials fabrication.

  8. Droplet evaporation dynamics on a superhydrophobic surface with negligible hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Susmita; Garimella, Suresh V

    2013-08-27

    We report on experiments of droplet evaporation on a structured superhydrophobic surface that displays very high contact angle (CA ∼ 160 deg), and negligible contact angle hysteresis (evaporation is observed to occur in a constant-contact-angle mode, with contact radius shrinking for almost the entire duration of evaporation. Experiments conducted on Teflon-coated smooth surface (CA ∼ 120 deg) as a baseline also support an evaporation process that is dominated by a constant-contact-angle mode. The experimental results are compared with an isothermal diffusion model for droplet evaporation from the literature. Good agreement is observed for the Teflon-coated smooth surface between the analytical expression and experimental results in terms of the total time for evaporation, transient volume, contact angle, and contact radius. However, for the structured superhydrophobic surface, the experiments indicate that the time taken for complete evaporation of the droplet is greater than the predicted time, across all droplet volumes. This disparity is attributed primarily to the evaporative cooling at the droplet interface due to the high aspect ratio of the droplet and also the lower effective thermal conductivity of the substrate due to the presence of air gaps. This hypothesis is verified by numerically evaluating the temperature distribution along the droplet interface. We propose a generalized relation for predicting the instantaneous volume of droplets with initial CA > 90 deg, irrespective of the mode of evaporation.

  9. Experiment on the treatment of acid mine drainage with optimized biomedical stone particles by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Junzhen; Wang, Mingxin; Zhu, Zhitao

    2018-03-01

    The immobilized particles were used to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) in the study, which owns the characteristics of serious pollution and high managing cost. The immobilized particles were prepared with sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and medical stones. In order to investigate the interactive influence of medical stones on the particle properties, the salt modification condition, content, and size of the medical stone were taken as the influential factors. At the same time, the removal rate of SO 4 2- and Mn 2+ , the release of total irons (TFe) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) and pH value were taken as the response values in the experiment. On the basis of the orthogonal experimental research, a response surface model was established. The experimental analysis showed that the particles can get the best treatment effect, when using the salt-modified medical stone with the content of 15% and particle size of 200~300 mesh. At this time, the removal rates of Mn 2+ and SO 4 2- in wastewater were 83.10 and 96.22%, respectively. The release contents of TFe and COD were 2.99 mg L -1 and 1828.54 mg L -1 , respectively, and the pH value was 7.05. Then, biological medical stone particles were prepared according to the optimal ratio in the response surface experiment. The adaptability of biomedical stone particles was studied at different concentrations of SO 4 2- , Mn 2+ and pH value. The results showed that the high concentration of SO 4 2- inhibited the metabolism of SRB, while Mn 2+ had a less effect. The biomedical stone particles could regulate pH value very well.

  10. The COMET-L3 experiment on long-term melt. Concrete interaction and cooling by surface flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmeyer, H.; Cron, T.; Fluhrer, B.; Messemer, G.; Miassoedov, A.; Schmidt-Stiefel, S.; Wenz, T.

    2007-02-01

    The COMET-L3 experiment considers the long-term situation of corium/concrete interaction in an anticipated core melt accident of a light-water-reactor, after the metal melt is layered beneath the oxide melt. The experimental focus is on cavity formation in the basemat and the risk of long term basemat penetration. The experiment investigates the two-dimensional concrete erosion in a cylindrical crucible fabricated from siliceous concrete in the first phase of the test, and the influence of surface flooding in the second phase. Decay heating in the two-component metal and oxide melt is simulated by sustained induction heating of the metal phase that is overlaid by the oxide melt. The inner diameter of the concrete crucible was 60 cm, the initial mass of the melt was 425 kg steel and 211 kg oxide at 1665 C, resulting in a melt height of 450 mm. The net power to the metal melt was about 220 kW from 0 s to 1880 s, when the maximum erosion limit of the crucible was reached and heating was terminated. In the initial phase of the test (less than 100 s), the overheated, highly agitated metal melt causes intense interaction with the concrete, which leads to fast decrease of the initial melt overheat and reduction of the initially high concrete erosion rate. Thereafter, under quasistationary conditions until about 800 s, the erosion by the metal melt slows down to some 0.07 mm/s into the axial direction. Lateral erosion is a factor 3 smaller. Video observation of the melt surface shows an agitated melt with ongoing gas release from the decomposing concrete. Several periods of more intense gas release, gas driven splashing, and release of crusts from the concrete interface indicate the existence and iterative break-up of crusts that probably form at the steel/concrete interface. Surface flooding of the melt is initiated at 800 s by a shower from the crucible head with 0.375 litre water/s. Flooding does not lead to strong melt/water interactions, and no entrapment reactions or

  11. Characterizing the Retrieval of Cloud Optical Thickness and Droplet Effective Radius to Overlying Aerosols Using a General Inverse Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, O.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, S.

    2013-12-01

    The upwelling shortwave irradiance measured by the airborne Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) flying above a cloud and aerosol layer is influenced by the properties of the cloud and aerosol particles below, just as would the radiance measured from satellite. Unlike satellite measurements, those from aircraft provide the unique capability to fly a lower-level leg above the cloud, yet below the aerosol layer, to characterize the extinction of the aerosol layer and account for its impact on the measured cloud albedo. Previous work [Coddington et al., 2010] capitalized on this opportunity to test the effects of aerosol particles (or more appropriately, the effects of neglecting aerosols in forward modeling calculations) on cloud retrievals using data obtained during the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment/Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation of anthropogenic pollution (INTEX-A/ITCT) study. This work showed aerosols can cause a systematic bias in the cloud retrieval and that such a bias would need to be distinguished from a true aerosol indirect effect (i.e. the brightening of a cloud due to aerosol effects on cloud microphysics) as theorized by Haywood et al., [2004]. The effects of aerosols on clouds are typically neglected in forward modeling calculations because their pervasiveness, variable microphysical properties, loading, and lifetimes makes forward modeling calculations under all possible combinations completely impractical. Using a general inverse theory technique, which propagates separate contributions from measurement and forward modeling errors into probability distributions of retrieved cloud optical thickness and droplet effective radius, we have demonstrated how the aerosol presence can be introduced as a spectral systematic error in the distributions of the forward modeling solutions. The resultant uncertainty and bias in cloud properties induced by the aerosols is identified by the shape and peak of the posteriori

  12. Integrating Nutrient Enrichment and Forest Management Experiments in Sweden to Constrain the Process-Based Land Surface Model ORCHIDEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resovsky, A.; Luyssaert, S.; Guenet, B.; Peylin, P.; Lansø, A. S.; Vuichard, N.; Messina, P.; Smith, B.; Ryder, J.; Naudts, K.; Chen, Y.; Otto, J.; McGrath, M.; Valade, A.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding coupling between carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in forest ecosystems is key to predicting global change. Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated the positive response of stand-level photosynthesis and net primary production (NPP) to atmospheric CO2 enrichment, while N availability has been shown to exert an important control on the timing and magnitude of such responses. However, several factors complicate efforts to precisely represent ecosystem-level C and N cycling in the current generation of land surface models (LSMs), including sparse in-situ data, uncertainty with regard to key state variables and disregard for the effects of natural and anthropogenic forest management. In this study, we incorporate empirical data from N-fertilization experiments at two long-term manipulation sites in Sweden to improve the representation of C and N interaction in the ORCHIDEE land surface model. Our version of the model represents the union of two existing ORCHIDEE branches: 1) ORCHIDEE-CN, which resolves processes related to terrestrial C and N cycling, and 2) ORCHIDEE-CAN, which integrates a multi-layer canopy structure and includes representation of forest management practices. Using this new model branch (referred to as ORCHIDEE-CN-CAN), we aim to replicate the growth patterns of managed forests both with and without N limitations. Our hope is that the results, in combination with measurements of various ecosystem parameters (such as soil N) will facilitate LSM optimization, inform future model development, and reduce structural uncertainty in global change predictions.

  13. Characterizing near-surface elemental layering on Mars using gamma-ray spectroscopy: A proof-of-principle experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplowski, Patrick N.; Wilson, Jack T.; Beck, Andrew W.; Burks, Morgan; Goldsten, John O.; Lawrence, David J.

    2018-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy investigations characterize the chemical composition of planetary surfaces by measuring element-characteristic gamma rays with energies of ∼100 keV to ∼9 MeV. Over this energy range, the mean free path of a gamma ray varies from about 1 to 25 cm, therefore gamma-ray measurements sample subsurface composition. Many elements emit gamma rays at multiple, often widely spaced energies, so gamma-ray measurements can in principle also be used to identify depth-dependent variations in subsurface composition. We report results from laboratory measurements and radiation transport modeling designed to demonstrate this capability. The laboratory measurements verified the presence of depth-dependent gamma-ray signatures, and were then used to benchmark radiation transport simulations that were used to model realistic Mars-like scenarios. The models indicate that compositionally distinct subsurface deposits, buried to depths of ∼80 cm (125 g/cm2), can be identified using gamma-ray measurements. Going beyond identification to characterization (burial depth, relative composition of the layers) of the deposits requires knowledge of the vertical and horizontal variability in the water content of the near-surface surface materials, the local Galactic Cosmic Ray environment (magnitude and energy distribution), the depth-dependent neutron flux, gamma-ray production cross sections, and knowledge of the composition and column density of the atmosphere. The results of our experiments and models provided a basis for examining the utility of using orbiter- and lander-based gamma-ray measurements to identify subsurface deposits on Mars.

  14. Study of Ag induced bimetallic (Au-Ag) nanowires on silicon (5 5 12) surfaces: Experiment and theoretical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhukta, Anjan; Bagarti, Trilochan; Guha, Puspendu; Ravulapalli, Sathyavathi; Satpati, Biswarup; Rakshit, Bipul; Maiti, Paramita; Parlapalli, Venkata Satyam

    2017-10-01

    The reconstructed vicinal (high index) silicon surfaces, such as, Si (5 5 12) composes row-like structures that can be used as templates for growing aligned nanowires. By using a sub-monolayers of Ag, prior to Au deposition on reconstructed Si (5 512) surface, intermixing of Au and Ag, enhancement of aspect ratio of bimetallic Au-Ag nanowires with tunable morphology is reported. This is attributed to a combined effect of pre-grown Ag strips as nucleation centers for incoming Au ad-atoms and anisotropic Au-Ag intermixing. To achieve optimum conditions for the growth of larger aspect ratio Au-Ag nanostructures, the growth kinetics have been studied by varying growth and annealing temperatures. At ≈400 °C, the Ag diffused into silicon substrate and the inter-diffusion found to inhibit the formation of Au-Ag bimetallic nanostructures. Controlled experiments under ultra-high vacuum condition in a molecular beam epitaxy system and in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy measurements along with ex-situ scanning transmission and secondary electron microscopy measurements have been carried out to understand the bimetallic nanostructure growth. Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations based on kinematics of ad-atoms on an anisotropic template with a solid on solid model in which the relative ratios of binding energies (that are obtained from the Density Functional Theory) have been used and the KMC simulations results agree with the experimental observations. Advantage of having bimetallic structures as effective substrates for Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy application is demonstrated by detecting Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) molecule at the concentration of 10-7M.

  15. Simultaneous estimation of land surface scheme states and parameters using the ensemble Kalman filter: identical twin experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF in soil moisture assimilation applications is investigated in the context of simultaneous state-parameter estimation in the presence of uncertainties from model parameters, soil moisture initial condition and atmospheric forcing. A physically based land surface model is used for this purpose. Using a series of identical twin experiments in two kinds of initial parameter distribution (IPD scenarios, the narrow IPD (NIPD scenario and the wide IPD (WIPD scenario, model-generated near surface soil moisture observations are assimilated to estimate soil moisture state and three hydraulic parameters (the saturated hydraulic conductivity, the saturated soil moisture suction and a soil texture empirical parameter in the model. The estimation of single imperfect parameter is successful with the ensemble mean value of all three estimated parameters converging to their true values respectively in both NIPD and WIPD scenarios. Increasing the number of imperfect parameters leads to a decline in the estimation performance. A wide initial distribution of estimated parameters can produce improved simultaneous multi-parameter estimation performances compared to that of the NIPD scenario. However, when the number of estimated parameters increased to three, not all parameters were estimated successfully for both NIPD and WIPD scenarios. By introducing constraints between estimated hydraulic parameters, the performance of the constrained three-parameter estimation was successful, even if temporally sparse observations were available for assimilation. The constrained estimation method can reduce RMSE much more in soil moisture forecasting compared to the non-constrained estimation method and traditional non-parameter-estimation assimilation method. The benefit of this method in estimating all imperfect parameters simultaneously can be fully demonstrated when the corresponding non-constrained estimation method

  16. [Diagnostic value of CT scan for AO B3 fracture of distal radius].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S L; Wang, M Y; Lu, Y

    2017-08-18

    To determine whether 3-dimentional CT scans is able to effectively improve the detection rate of AO B3 distal radius fractures in clinics. From Jan 2013 to Jan 2014, 30 patients with distal radius fractures were retrospectively enrolled in this study, all the patients directly visited the skeletal trauma emergency department in Beijing Jishuitan Hospital post injury and all of them accepted open reduction and internal fixation of distal radius fractures at last. All the radiographic data including X ray films and 3-dimentional CT scans of these patients were collected. Two independent observers were required to make primary AO classifications for each fracture by X rays at first, then to make final AO classifications by 3-dimentional CT scans. Finally, the detection rates of CT scans and plain films for AO B3 distal radius fractures and B3.3 distal radius fractures were compared, the agreements of the two methods for diagnosing AO B3 and B3.3 fractures were calculated by Cohen's Kappa calculations. All the 30 fractures were confirmed to be AO B3 distal radius fractures intraoperatively, and 10 of them were B3.3 fractures. The results were completely consistent with the results of 3-dimensional CT scans. However, only 80%(24/30) AO B3 distal radius fractures and 60%(6/10) B3.3 distal radius fractures could be diagnosed only by X rays. The detection rate of CT scans was proved to be significantly higher than X rays for diagnosing B3 distal radius fractures(100% vs. 80%,PAO B3 distal radius fracture and B3.3 distal radius fracture (kappa=0). Most importantly, in the study process, two special kinds of B3 distal radius fracture were initially found and described by us. One was named as radial B3 fracture, and the other was named as ulna B3 fracture. 3-dimentional CT scans can effectively improve the detection rate of B3 and B 3.3 distal radius fractures, and also help find two special kinds of B3 fractures.

  17. Technical Note: How accurate can stalagmite formation temperatures be determined using vapour bubble radius measurements in fluid inclusions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spadin, F.; Marti, Dominik; Hidalgo-Staub, R.

    2015-01-01

    -induced vapour bubbles inside the inclusions. A reliable method for precisely measuring the radius of vapour bubbles is presented. The method is applied to stalagmite samples for which the formation temperature is known. An assessment of the bubble radius measurement accuracy and how this error influences......-of-principle investigation that the formation temperature of 10–20 yr old inclusions in a stalagmite taken from the Milandre cave is 9.87 ± 0.80 ◦C, while the mean annual surface temperature, that in the case of the Milandre cave correlates well with the cave temperature, was 9.6 ± 0.15 ◦C, calculated from actual...... measurements at that time, showing a very good agreement. Formation temperatures of inclusions formed during the last 450 yr are found in a temperature range between 8.4 and 9.6 ◦C, which corresponds to the calculated average surface temperature. Paleotemperatures can thus be determined within ±1.0 ◦C....

  18. Radiation-induced osteochondroma-like lesion in young rat radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, E.; Rodriguez, J.I.; Serrada, A.; Tellez, M.; Paniagua, R.

    1985-01-01

    To investigate the effects of radiation on the perichondrial groove of Ranvier in osteochondroma development, the external surface of the distal growth plate of the radius in both forelimbs of 30 ten-day-old rats was exposed to a single low dose of radiation (150 r), which was focused on the perichondrial groove. This induced the formation of a chondrocyte nest at the proximal external edge of the growth plate (five to nine days after irradiation). With advancing longitudinal growth of the bone, the chondrocyte nest occupied a diaphyseal position. At nine to 11 days the chondrocyte nest underwent endochondral ossification. At 13-15 days, this osteochondroma-like lesion began to regress with the disappearance of the chondrocyte nest. After 19-21 days, only an irregularly thickened cortical bone remains at the osteochondroma site. Although the possible role of the growth plate subjacent to the irradiated perichondrial groove must be taken into account, the continuity between the perichondrial groove and the osteochondroma, which is separated from the growth plate by the periosteal ring (bone bark), suggests that the perichondrial groove was involved in osteochondroma-like lesion development

  19. Evolution of radius and light scattering properties of single drying microdroplets of colloidal suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, J.; Kolwas, M.; Jakubczyk, D.; Derkachov, G.; Woźniak, M.; Kolwas, K.

    2017-11-01

    We report on observation of well-pronounced characteristic features of elastic light scattering of evaporating solution and suspension microdroplet of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and colloidal silica (SiO2) nanospheres in diethylene glycol (DEG) during SDS surface layer and structure formation (crystallization). For pure DEG/SDS solution droplet evaporation process, characteristic evaporation transitions manifested in the evolution of the droplet radius, a(t) for all the SDS concentrations (C = 20 mM, 40 mM and 100 mM) studied as well as well-pronounced intensity signals characterizing SDS soft gel-solid transitions for initial SDS concentrations, C > 40 mM. In the case of microdroplets composed of DEG/SDS with controlled addition of colloidal silica, the intensity fluctuations were enhanced and had profiles dependent on the initial composition of the suspension. Exemplary wet droplets at the initial evaporation stages and final dry aggregates of SDS and SDS/SiO2 were deposited on a substrate and observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Features of the deposited structures correlate well with the elastic scattered light measurements characterizing the drying processes.

  20. En bloc excision and autogenous fibular reconstruction for aggressive giant cell tumor of distal radius: a report of 12 cases and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhillon Mandeep S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Giant cell tumor (GCT of distal radius follows a comparatively aggressive behaviour. Wide excision is the management of choice, but this creates a defect at the distal end of radius. The preffered modalities for reconstruction of such a defect include vascularized/non-vascularized bone graft, osteoarticular allografts and custom-made prosthesis. We here present our experience with wide resection and non-vascularised autogenous fibula grafting for GCT of distal radius. Materials and methods Twelve patients with a mean age of 34.7 years (21-43 years with Campanacci Grade II/III GCT of distal radius were managed with wide excision of tumor and reconstruction with ipsilateral nonvascularised fibula, fixed with small fragment plate to the remnant of the radius. Primary autogenous iliac crest grafting was done at the fibuloradial junction in all the patients. Results Mean follow up period was 5.8 years (8.2-3.7 years. Average time for union at fibuloradial junction was 33 weeks (14-69 weeks. Mean grip strength of involved side was 71% (42-86%. The average range of movements were 52° forearm supination, 37° forearm pronation, 42° of wrist palmerflexion and 31° of wrist dorsiflexion with combined movements of 162°. Overall revised musculoskeletal tumor society (MSTS score averaged 91.38% (76.67-93.33% with five excellent, four good and three satisfactory results. There were no cases with graft related complications or deep infections, 3 cases with wrist subluxation, 2 cases with non union (which subsequently united with bone grafting and 1 case of tumor recurrence. Conclusion Although complication rate is high, autogenous non-vascularised fibular autograft reconstruction of distal radius can be considered as a reasonable option after en bloc excision of Grade II/III GCT.

  1. The radius of the quiescent neutron star in the globular cluster M13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A. W.; Heinke, C. O.; Steiner, A. W.; Campana, S.; Cohn, H. N.; Ho, W. C. G.; Lugger, P. M.; Servillat, M.

    2018-03-01

    X-ray spectra of quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries containing neutron stars can be fit with atmosphere models to constrain the mass and the radius. Mass-radius constraints can be used to place limits on the equation of state of dense matter. We perform fits to the X-ray spectrum of a quiescent neutron star in the globular cluster M13, utilizing data from ROSAT, Chandra and XMM-Newton, and constrain the mass-radius relation. Assuming an atmosphere composed of hydrogen and a 1.4M⊙ neutron star, we find the radius to be R_NS=12.2^{+1.5}_{-1.1} km, a significant improvement in precision over previous measurements. Incorporating an uncertainty on the distance to M13 relaxes the radius constraints slightly and we find R_NS=12.3^{+1.9}_{-1.7} km (for a 1.4M⊙ neutron star with a hydrogen atmosphere), which is still an improvement in precision over previous measurements, some of which do not consider distance uncertainty. We also discuss how the composition of the atmosphere affects the derived radius, finding that a helium atmosphere implies a significantly larger radius.

  2. Anatomical variations of the proximal radius and their effects on osteosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannicola, Giuseppe; Manauzzi, Erica; Sacchetti, Federico M; Greco, Alessandro; Bullitta, Gianluca; Vestri, Annarita; Cinotti, Gianluca

    2012-05-01

    In fractures of the radial head and neck requiring open reduction and internal fixation, osteosynthesis may be safely applied in a limited zone. We conducted a morphometric study of the proximal radius at the level of the safe zone to identify different morphologic types of this anatomical region. We analyzed 44 dried cadaveric radii. We measured the whole length of the radius, the length of the neck and head, and the minimum and maximum diameter of the radial head. The morphologic aspect of the neck-head curvature of the safe zone was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. The proximal radius at the level of the safe zone exhibited different radii of bending. In particular, we identified a morphologic type A, which showed a flat profile (25% of cases), morphologic types B and C, which showed a low concave curvature (64%), and a marked concave curvature (11%), respectively, of the safe zone. The profile of the proximal radius in the safe zone shows substantial morphologic variations that should be taken into account when operating on fractures of the proximal radius, to avoid malunions, pain, and stiffness of the elbow joint. A preoperative radiograph of the contralateral uninjured radius may be helpful in selecting the most appropriate internal fixation device to reconstruct the proximal radius after comminuted fractures. Knowledge of the proper bending radius of the safe zone allows the surgeon to select the most appropriate plate, and to achieve good fracture reduction and anatomical restoration of the proximal radius. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Initialization effects via the nuclear radius on transverse in-plane flow and its disappearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal Rajni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the dependence of collective transverse flow and its disappearance on initialization effects via the nuclear radius within the framework of the Isospin-dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics (IQMD model. We calculate the balance energy using different parametrizations of the radius available in the literature for the reaction of 12C+12C to explain its measured balance energy. A mass-dependent analysis of the balance energy through out the periodic table is also carried out by changing the default liquid drop IQMD radius.

  4. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Radius and Sacrum with Pulmonary Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Sharma Tandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumour (GCT is an uncommon primary bone tumour, and its multicentric presentation is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented to us with GCT of left distal radius. On the skeletal survey, osteolytic lesion was noted in her right sacral ala. Biopsy confirmed both lesions as GCT. Pulmonary metastasis was also present. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for distal radius and thorough curettage and bone grafting of the sacral lesion were done. Multicentric GCT involving distal radius and sacrum with primary sacral involvement is not reported so far to our knowledge.

  5. Simultaneous ipsilateral fractures of distal and proximal ends of the radius

    OpenAIRE

    El Kadi, Khalid Ibn; Benabid, Mounir; Saliou, Sarr; El Assil, Oussama; Marzouki, Amine; Lahrach, Kamal; Boutayeb, Fawzi

    2017-01-01

    We treated a patient with a rare combination of ipsilateral fractures of the distal and proximal ends of the radius. A man aged 42 years had simultaneous fractures of the distal and proximal ends of the radius (radial neck) following a roadside accident. The distal end fracture of the radius was treated with surgical reduction and T-plate volar fixation, and the undisplaced radial neck fracture was treated by an above elbow splintage for 2 weeks. The elbow mobilization was started at 2 weeks....

  6. Searches for high-mass supersymmetry using masses of large-radius jets

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Results are reported from two searches for supersymmetric particles in final states with multiple jets, including several b-tagged jets, with and without large missing transverse momentum. The data sample corresponds to 2.3 fb − 1 (2.7 fb − 1 without missing transverse momentum) of pp collisions recorded by the CMS experiment at √ s = 13 TeV. The searches focus on processes with massive, high multiplicity final states, such as gluino pair production with the gluino decaying to top quarks and a neutralino, and gluino pair production with R-parity violating gluino decay to top, bottom and strange quarks. Both searches use the quantity M J , the sum of the masses of the large-radius jets, to discriminate between signal and background, establish control regions for other discriminating variables, and as a central piece of the background estimation. The observed event yields are consistent with the standard model expectations, and the results are interpreted in terms of limits on simplified supersymmetric mo...

  7. Assessment of a novel biomechanical fracture model for distal radius fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumbach Sebastian Felix

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distal radius fractures (DRF are one of the most common fractures and often need surgical treatment, which has been validated through biomechanical tests. Currently a number of different fracture models are used, none of which resemble the in vivo fracture location. The aim of the study was to develop a new standardized fracture model for DRF (AO-23.A3 and compare its biomechanical behavior to the current gold standard. Methods Variable angle locking volar plates (ADAPTIVE, Medartis were mounted on 10 pairs of fresh-frozen radii. The osteotomy location was alternated within each pair (New: 10 mm wedge 8 mm / 12 mm proximal to the dorsal / volar apex of the articular surface; Gold standard: 10 mm wedge 20 mm proximal to the articular surface. Each specimen was tested in cyclic axial compression (increasing load by 100 N per cycle until failure or −3 mm displacement. Parameters assessed were stiffness, displacement and dissipated work calculated for each cycle and ultimate load. Significance was tested using a linear mixed model and Wald test as well as t-tests. Results 7 female and 3 male pairs of radii aged 74 ± 9 years were tested. In most cases (7/10, the two groups showed similar mechanical behavior at low loads with increasing differences at increasing loads. Overall the novel fracture model showed a significant different biomechanical behavior than the gold standard model (p Conclusion The novel biomechanical fracture model for DRF more closely mimics the in vivo fracture site and shows a significantly different biomechanical behavior with increasing loads when compared to the current gold standard.

  8. Polymer adsorption on curved surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkin, Handan; Janke, Wolfhard

    2017-12-01

    The conformational behavior of a coarse-grained finite polymer chain near an attractive spherical surface was investigated by means of multicanonical Monte Carlo computer simulations. In a detailed analysis of canonical equilibrium data over a wide range of sphere radius and temperature, we have constructed entire phase diagrams both for nongrafted and end-grafted polymers. For the identification of the conformational phases, we have calculated several energetic and structural observables such as gyration tensor based shape parameters and their fluctuations by canonical statistical analysis. Despite the simplicity of our model, it qualitatively represents in the considered parameter range real systems that are studied in experiments. The work discussed here could have experimental implications from protein-ligand interactions to designing nanosmart materials.

  9. Distal Clavicular Osteochondral Autograft Augmentation for Glenoid Bone Loss: A Comparison of Radius of Restoration Versus Latarjet Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwapisz, Adam; Fitzpatrick, Kelly; Cook, Jay B; Athwal, George S; Tokish, John M

    2018-04-01

    Bone loss in shoulder instability is a well-recognized cause of failure after stabilization surgery. Many approaches have been described to address glenoid bone loss, including coracoid transfer. This transfer can be technically difficult and has been associated with high complication rates. An ideal alternative to coracoid transfer would be an autologous source of fresh osteochondral graft with enough surface area to replace significant glenoid bone loss. The distal clavicle potentially provides such a graft source that is readily available and low-cost. To evaluate distal clavicular autograft reconstruction for instability-related glenoid bone loss, specifically comparing the width of the clavicular autograft with the width of an ipsilateral coracoid graft as prepared for a Latarjet procedure. Further, we sought to compare the articular cartilage thickness of the distal clavicle graft with that of the native glenoid. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-seven fresh-frozen cadaver specimens were dissected, and an open distal clavicle excision was performed. The coracoid process in each specimen was prepared as has been described for a classic Latarjet coracoid transfer. In each specimen, the distal clavicle graft was compared with the coracoid graft for size and potential of glenoid articular radius of restoration. The distal clavicle graft was also compared with the native glenoid for cartilage thickness. In all specimens, the distal clavicle grafts provided a greater radius of glenoid restoration than the coracoid grafts ( P Latarjet procedure and has the additional benefit of restoring articular cartilage to the glenoid. The articular cartilage thickness of the distal clavicle is within 1.4 mm of that of the native glenoid. The distal clavicular autograft may be a suitable option for reconstruction of instability-related glenoid bone loss. This graft provides a structural osteochondral autograft with a broader radius of reconstruction than that of a coracoid

  10. Mass radius relation of compact stars in the braneworld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Luis B.; Menezes, Débora P. [Depto de Física, CFM, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC CP-476, CEP 88.040-900 (Brazil); Alloy, Marcelo D., E-mail: luis.castro@pgfsc.ufsc.br, E-mail: alloy@uffs.edu.br, E-mail: debora.p.m@ufsc.br [Universidade Federal da Fronteira Sul, Chapecó, SC, CEP 89.812-000 (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    The braneworld scenario, based on the fact that the four dimension space-time is a hyper-surface of a five dimensional manifold, was shown to deal in a satisfactory way with the hierarchy problem. In this work we study macroscopic stellar properties of compact stars from the braneworld point of view. Using neutron star equations of state, we test the possibility of extra dimensions by solving the brane Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations obtained for three kinds of possible compact objects: hadronic, hybrid and quark stars. By comparing the macroscopic solutions with observational constraints, we establish a brane tension lower limit and the value for which the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations in the braneworld converge to the usual Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations.

  11. Teaching of distal radius shortening osteotomy: three-dimensional procedural simulator versus bone procedural simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naroura, Ismaël; Hidalgo Diaz, Juan José; Xavier, Fred; Baldairon, Florent; Favreau, Henri; Clavert, Philippe; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    In order to facilitate the learning of distal radius shortening osteotomy by junior surgeons, the main assumption was that using a three-dimensional procedural simulator was better than a bone procedural simulator. After viewing a video, ten junior surgeons performed a distal radius shortening osteotomy: five with a bone procedural simulator (Group 1) and five with a three-dimensional procedural simulator (Group 2). All subsequently performed the same surgery on fresh cadaveric bones. The duration of the procedure, shortening of the radius, and the level of osteotomy were significantly better in Group 2. The three-dimensional procedural simulator seems to teach distal radius osteotomy better than a bone model and could be useful in teaching and learning bone surgery of the wrist.

  12. Modification of ELESTRES code with new database of flux depression across the pellet radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Ki Sub; Park, Kwang Suk; Byun, Taek Sang; Suk, Ho Chun

    1995-01-01

    Modification of ELESTRES CANDU fuel performance code with new database of flux depression across the pellet radius is described, and application results of the improved ELESTRES to the fuel performance data are described. (Author) 4 refs., 4 figs

  13. Secondary shock features for large surface explosions: results from the Sayarim Military Range, Israel and other experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitterman, Y.

    2014-05-01

    A series of surface explosions was designed and conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel at the Sayarim Military Range in the Negev desert, including two large-scale explosions: approx. 82 tons of high explosives in 2009, and approx. 100 tons of low-grade ANFO explosives in 2011. The main goal of the explosions was to provide large controlled sources for calibration of global infrasound stations designated for monitoring nuclear tests; however, the geophysical experiment also provided valuable observations for shock wave research. High-pressure gauges were deployed at distances between 100 and 600 m to record air blast properties and to provide reliable estimation of the true charge yield compared to the design value. Secondary shock phenomena were clearly observed at all near-source gauges as characteristic shock wave shapes. Secondary shocks were also observed at numerous seismic and acoustic sensors deployed in the range 0.3-20 km as acoustic phases. Empirical relationships for standard air blast parameters (peak pressure and impulse) and for a new parameter called secondary shock time delay, as a function of distance, were established and analyzed. The standard parameters, scaled by the cubic root of the estimated TNT yield, were found to be consistent for all analyzed explosions. However, the scaled secondary shock delays were clearly separated for the 2009 and 2011 explosions, thus demonstrating dependence on the explosive type. Additionally, air blast records from other experiments were used to extend the charge and distance ranges for the secondary shock observation, and showed consistency with the Sayarim data. Analysis and interpretation of observed features of the secondary shock phenomenon are proposed and a new empirical relationship of scaled secondary shock delay versus scaled distance is established. The results suggest that the secondary shock delay can be used as a new additional waveform feature for simple and cost-effective explosive

  14. Follow-up of the fate of imazalil from post-harvest lemon surface treatment to a baking experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vass, Andrea; Korpics, Evelin; Dernovics, Mihály

    2015-01-01

    Imazalil is one of the most widespread fungicides used for the post-harvest treatment of citrus species. The separate use of peel during food preparation and processing may hitherto concentrate most of the imazalil into food products, where specific maximum residue limits hardly exist for this fungicide. In order to monitor comprehensively the path of imazalil, our study covered the monitoring of the efficiency of several washing treatments, the comparison of operative and related sample preparation methods for the lemon samples, the validation of a sample preparation technique for a fatty cake matrix, the preparation of a model cake sample made separately either with imazalil containing lemon peel or with imazalil spiking, the monitoring of imazalil degradation into α-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-1H-imidazole-1-ethanol because of the baking process, and finally the mass balance of imazalil throughout the washing experiments and the baking process. Quantification of imazalil was carried out with an LC-ESI-MS/MS set-up, while LC-QTOF was used for the monitoring of imazalil degradation. Concerning the washing, none of the addressed five washing protocols could remove more than 30% of imazalil from the surface of the lemon samples. The study revealed a significant difference between the extraction efficiency of imazalil by the EN 15662:2008 and AOAC 2007.1 methods, with the advantage of the former. The use of the model cake sample helped to validate a modified version of the EN 15662:2008 method that included a freeze-out step to efficiently recover imazalil (>90%) from the fatty cake matrix. The degradation of imazalil during the baking process was significantly higher when this analyte was spiked into the cake matrix than in the case of preparing the cake with imazalil-containing lemon peel (52% vs. 22%). This observation calls the attention to the careful evaluation of pesticide stability data that are based on solution spiking experiments.

  15. Effect of the Finite Ion Larmor Radius on the Kelvin‐Helmholtz Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchior, Henning; Popovich, M.

    1968-01-01

    The Kelvin‐Helmholtz instability is described with the effects of the finite ion Larmor radius included. The growth rate is computed for several values of the velocity shear and different density profiles. © 1968 American Institute of Physics......The Kelvin‐Helmholtz instability is described with the effects of the finite ion Larmor radius included. The growth rate is computed for several values of the velocity shear and different density profiles. © 1968 American Institute of Physics...

  16. Study on Oneself Developed to Apparatus Position of Measurement of BMD in the Distal Radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Man Seok; Song, Jae Yong; Lee, Hyun Kuk; Yu, Se Jong; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference of bone mineral density according to distal radius rotation and to develop the supporting tool to measure rotation angles. CT scanning and the measurement of BMD by DXA of the appropriate position of the forearm were performed on 20 males. Twenty healthy volunteers without any history of operations, anomalies, or trauma were enrolled. The CT scan was used to evaluate the cross sectional structure and the rotation angle on the horizontal plane of the distal radius. The rotational angle was measured by the m-view program on the PACS monitor. The DXA was used in 20 dried radii of cadaveric specimens in pronation and supination with five and ten degrees, respectively, including a neutral position (zero degrees) to evaluate the changes of BMD according to the rotation. The mean rotation angle of the distal radius on CT was 7.4 degrees of supination in 16 cases (80%), 3.3 degrees of pronation in three cases (15%), and zero degree of neutral in one case (9%), respectively. The total average rotation angle in 20 people was 5.4 degrees of supination. In the cadaveric study, the BMD of the distal radius was different according to the rotational angles. The lowest BMD was obtained at 3.3 degrees of supination. In the case of the measurement of BMD in the distal radius with a neutral position, the rotational angle of the distal radius is close to supination. Pronation is needed for the constant measurement of BMD in the distal radius with the rotation angle measuring at the lowest BMD and about five degrees of pronation of the distal radius is recommended.

  17. Mass-Radius Relations of Z and Higgs-Like Bosons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Relations between the rest mass and the effective radius are deduced for the Z boson and the experimentally discovered Higgs-like boson, in terms of a revised quantum electrodynamic (RQED theory. The latter forms an alternative to the Standard Model of elementary particles. This results in an effective radius of the order of 10 E-18 m for a rest mass of 125 GeV.

  18. "Osteoporosis and orthopods" incidences of osteoporosis in distal radius fracture from low energy trauma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bahari, Syah

    2007-07-01

    Fracture of the distal radius from low energy trauma is a common presentation to orthopaedic trauma services. This fragility type fracture is associated with underlying osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a \\'silent disease\\' where fragility fracture is a common presentation. Orthopaedic surgeons may be the only physician that these patients encounter. We found a high percentage of female patients who sustained a fragility fracture of the distal radius have an underlying osteoporosis. Further management of osteoporosis is important to prevent future fragility fractures.

  19. Exact solution of gyration radius of individual's trajectory for a simplified human mobility model

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xiao-Yong; Han, Xiao-Pu; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2010-01-01

    Gyration radius of individual's trajectory plays a key role in quantifying human mobility patterns. Of particular interests, empirical analyses suggest that the growth of gyration radius is slow versus time except the very early stage and may eventually arrive to a steady value. However, up to now, the underlying mechanism leading to such a possibly steady value has not been well understood. In this Letter, we propose a simplified human mobility model to simulate individual's daily travel wit...

  20. Comparison of Bone Density of Distal Radius With Hip and Spine Using DXA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Amiri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis diagnosis is usually based on examination of the hip bone and vertebrae density; however, the radius bone has gained attention recently in terms of feasibility and accessibility as it is done by portable devices with proper precision. This study aims to compare hip and spine density with radius, knowing whether radius may be an appropriate alternative for osteoporosis diagnosis. 120 females who were referred to one Densitometry Center checked their skeletal status using a hologic unit for densitometry of spine, femoral neck, and one-third radius. The patients were divided into three groups of healthy, osteopenic and osteoporotic based on WHO’s protocol. Concordance analysis was done to investigate the degree of similarity of diagnosis. In the study, there were 40, 41, and 39 individuals with normal, osteopenic, and osteoporotic bone densities, respectively which obtained from hip bone or vertebrae using the T-score criterion T-score of radius bone density has a direct linear relationship with these result. Osteoporosis diagnosis can be made based on radius densitometry.

  1. [Growth behaviour after fractures of the proximal radius: differences to the rest of the skeleton].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, A K; von Laer, L

    2014-12-01

    Fractures of the proximal end of the radius in the growth phase have three characteristics: the head of the radius articulates with two joint partners and is therefore indispensable for an undisturbed function of the elbow. The blood supply of the proximal end of the radius is via periosteal vessels in the sense of a terminal circulation which makes it extremely vulnerable. Severe trauma caused either by accidents or treatment, can result in partial or complete necrosis with deformity of the head and neck region of the radius. Radioulnar synostosis and chronic epiphysiolysis are irreversible complications which can occur after excessive physiotherapy. Despite a low potency growth plate, in young patients the proximal end of the radius shows an enormous spontaneous correction of dislocations. Side to side shifts, however, will not be remodeled. Therapy should be as atraumatic as possible. Due to the blood supply situation, with the appropriate indications the spontaneous correction and a brief period of immobilization without physiotherapy should be integrated into the therapy concept. If an operation is necessary, repeated traumatic repositioning maneuvers should be avoided and in case of doubt closed or careful open repositioning can be achieved with intramedullary nailing. In order to take the special characteristics of the proximal radius into consideration, the vulnerability and correction potential must be weighed up against each other. Therapy must be as atraumatic as possible. The spontaneous correction potential should be integrated into the primary therapy without overestimating this potential with respect to the extent and age of the patient.

  2. Bone Structure and Geometric Properties at the Radius and Tibia in Adolescent Endurance-Trained Cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Agüero, Alex; Olmedillas, Hugo; Gómez-Cabello, Alba; Casajús, José A; Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán

    2017-01-01

    To describe cortical and trabecular volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), bone mineral content (BMC), cross-sectional area (CSA), and bone strength indexes (BSIs) in adolescent endurance-trained cyclists (CYC) and compare them with controls (CON). Descriptive cohort study. Twenty-five male adolescent CYC and 17 CON. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to evaluate proximal and distal sites of the radius and tibia. Total, trabecular, and cortical BMC, vBMD, and CSA were measured. Also, cortical thickness, endosteal and periosteal circumferences, and different BSIs were calculated. Unadjusted analysis of variance and body weight-adjusted analysis of covariance tests were applied between cyclist and control groups. Cyclists were almost 12% lighter than CON (P proximal cortical BMC and vBMD in cyclists compared with CON at the radius (P proximal total and cortical BMC and vBMD, and cortical bone area at the tibia (P radius and total and trabecular BMC and vBMD at the tibia, diaphyseal radius cortical vBMD and tibia total vBMD, cortical BMC and area, and also for tibia cortical thickness and BSI. The rest of differences were no longer detectable and bone area at the distal radius become significantly higher in cyclist compared with CON (P radius and tibia than CON, some of these differences were explained in part by their lower body weight. However, even further adjustment, some differences remained, which indicates that further longitudinal studies are needed to better understand if cycling influences these differences.

  3. A New Injectable Brushite Cement: First Results in Distal Radius and Proximal Tibia Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryf, Christian; Goldhahn, Sabine; Radziejowski, Marek; Blauth, Michael; Hanson, Beate

    2009-08-01

    The restoration of metaphyseal defects remains a challenge for the treating surgeon. Although injectable brushite cements may help to refill bone defects stabilized with internal fixation, human data remains unavailable. The main goal of this prospective multicenter study was to observe the performance of this material in a clinical setting. The study conducted in seven trauma units included closed metaphyseal distal radius and proximal tibia fractures with bone defects, stabilized with internal fixation and subsequent filling with brushite cement. At 6- and 12-month follow-ups, patient satisfaction (visual analog scale [VAS]) was recorded, as well as complications. Thirty-eight proximal tibia fractures and 37 patients with distal radius fractures were included. Overall patient satisfaction with the treatment was high (mean VAS = 92 and 91 for proximal tibia and distal radius, respectively), despite the loss of reduction being described in 11% of proximal tibia and 24% of distal radius fractures; the majority of them included severe fracture types. Radiological evaluation showed postoperative cement leakage in 20 cases, where the majority occurred at the distal radius (n = 15). In 13 distal radius fractures, the leakage was resorbed by the final examination. The tested material showed good outcome in the majority of patients and adequate resorption characteristics, even in the case of extravasation. Stable internal fixation, sufficient bone quality, and no contact between the cement and joint are essential requirements for chronOS Inject, which can be considered as an alternative to existing augmentation materials.

  4. Outcome Analysis of Fernandez Osteotomy in Malunited Extra-Articular Fractures of Distal Radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, A; Kumar, S

    2016-07-01

    Deformity of wrist is very common after mal union of extra articular fractures over distal end of Radius. It causes limitation of movements too in different directions with or without pain. Deformity may be treated by different types of corrective osteotomy. We treated cases of this type of malunion with Fernandez osteotomy. This study is to observe the amount of correction and recovery of functional status in patients with malunited distal radius fractures treated with Fernandez osteotomy. This is a prospective study. We treated 10 cases of malunited radius with Fernandez osteotomy from February 2013 to October 2014 in the Departments of Orthopaedics, Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, India. There were six males and four females with mean age of thirty years (with range from twenty to forty years. Indications for surgical intervention include pain and functional deficit severe enough to interfere significantly with daily activities. Radius is exposed through distal dorsal radial incision and radial osteotomy done two and half centimetre proximal to the wrist joint and after achieving correction; gap is filled with iliac bone graft and fixed with contoured distal radius T-plate. Follow up was for an average one year and three months. Results were excellent in one, satisfactory in four cases, good in four cases and bad in one case. Fernandez osteotomy is valuable option for correction of malunited distal radius fracture especially in young demanding patients.

  5. Synthetical optimization of hydraulic radius and acoustic field for thermoacoustic cooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Huifang; Li Qing; Zhou Gang

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that the acoustic field and the hydraulic radius of the regenerator play key roles in thermoacoustic processes. The optimization of hydraulic radius strongly depends on the acoustic field in the regenerator. This paper investigates the synthetical optimization of hydraulic radius and acoustic field which is characterized by the ratio of the traveling wave component to the standing wave component. In this paper, we discussed the heat flux, cooling power, temperature gradient and coefficient of performance of thermoacoustic cooler with different combinations of hydraulic radiuses and acoustic fields. The calculation results show that, in the cooler's regenerator, due to the acoustic wave, the heat is transferred towards the pressure antinodes in the pure standing wave, while the heat is transferred in the opposite direction of the wave propagation in the pure traveling wave. The better working condition for the regenerator appears in the traveling wave phase region of the like-standing wave, where the directions of the heat transfer by traveling wave component and standing wave component are the same. Otherwise, the small hydraulic radius is not a good choice for acoustic field with excessively high ratio of traveling wave, and the small hydraulic radius is only needed by the traveling wave phase region of like-standing wave.

  6. Constraining the process-based land surface model ORCHIDEE by nutrient enrichment and forest management experiments in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofie Lansø, Anne; Resovsky, Alex; Guenet, Bertrand; Peylin, Philippe; Vuichard, Nicolas; Messina, Palmira; Smith, Benjamin; Ryder, James; Naudts, Kim; Chen, Yiying; Otto, Juliane; McGrath, Matthew; Valade, Aude; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the coupling between carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in terrestrial ecosystems is key to predicting global change. While numerous experimental studies have demonstrated the positive response of stand-level photosynthesis and net primary production (NPP) to atmospheric CO2 enrichment, N availability has been shown to exert an important control on the timing and magnitude of such responses. Forest management is also a key driver of C storage in such ecosystems but interactions between forest management and the N cycle as a C storage driver are not well known. In this study, we use data from N-fertilization experiments at two long-term forest manipulation sites in Sweden to inform and improve the representation of C and N interaction in the ORCHIDEE land surface model. Our version of the model represents the union of two ORCHIDEE branches; 1) ORCHIDEE-CN, which resolves processes related to terrestrial C and N cycling, and 2) ORCHIDEE-CAN, which integrates a multi-layer canopy structure and includes representation of forest management practices. Using this new model branch, referred to as ORCHIDEE-CN-CAN, we simulate the growth patterns of managed forests both with and without N limitations. Combining our simulated results with measurements of various ecosystem parameters (such as soil N) will aid in ecosystem model development, reducing structural uncertainty and optimizing parameter settings in global change simulations.

  7. High Temperature Surface Parameters for Solar Power

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butler, C. F; Jenkins, R. J; Rudkin, R. L; Laughridge, F. I

    1960-01-01

    ... at a given distance from the sun. Thermal conversion efficiencies with a concentration ratio of 50 have been computed for each surface when exposed to solar radiation at the Earth's mean orbital radius...

  8. Analysis of the three-dimensional anatomical variance of the distal radius using 3D shape models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Sebastian F; Binder, Jakob; Synek, Alexander; Mück, Fabian G; Chevalier, Yan; Euler, Ekkehard; Langs, Georg; Fischer, Lukas

    2017-03-09

    Various medical fields rely on detailed anatomical knowledge of the distal radius. Current studies are limited to two-dimensional analysis and biased by varying measurement locations. The aims were to 1) generate 3D shape models of the distal radius and investigate variations in the 3D shape, 2) generate and assess morphometrics in standardized cut planes, and 3) test the model's classification accuracy. The local radiographic database was screened for CT-scans of intact radii. 1) The data sets were segmented and 3D surface models generated. Statistical 3D shape models were computed (overall, gender and side separate) and the 3D shape variation assessed by evaluating the number of modes. 2) Anatomical landmarks were assigned and used to define three standardized cross-sectional cut planes perpendicular to the main axis. Cut planes were generated for the mean shape models and each individual radius. For each cut plane, the following morphometric parameters were calculated and compared: maximum width and depth, perimeter and area. 3) The overall shape model was utilized to evaluate the predictive value (leave one out cross validation) for gender and side identification within the study population. Eighty-six radii (45 left, 44% female, 40 ± 18 years) were included. 1) Overall, side and gender specific statistical 3D models were successfully generated. The first mode explained 37% of the overall variance. Left radii had a higher shape variance (number of modes: 20 female / 23 male) compared to right radii (number of modes: 6 female / 6 male). 2) Standardized cut planes could be defined using anatomical landmarks. All morphometric parameters decreased from distal to proximal. Male radii were larger than female radii with no significant side difference. 3) The overall shape model had a combined median classification probability for side and gender of 80%. Statistical 3D shape models of the distal radius can be generated using clinical CT-data sets. These models

  9. Numerical investigation of underground drain radius, depth and location on uplift pressure reduction (Case study: Tabriz diversion dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Salmasi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Water penetration from beneath of built structures on permeable soils causes uplift force along the contact of structure with foundation. This uplift force reduces hydraulic structure stability. Typically, these instabilities occur due to under-pressure development (uplift force, gradual inner degradation of foundation material (piping or sand boil phenomenon. Thus, it seems necessary to calculate the pressure applied to the contact surface of the dam. One method for preventing piping phenomenon, reduction in exit gradient as well as decrease of uplift force beneath diversion dams includes implementation of weep hole. This study aims to study the effect of radius, depth and location of pipe drains under stilling basin upon how much uplift force decreases. The benefit of this study in agricultural field for soil and water engineers is to have a safe design of lined canals, weirs or diversion dams. To do this, numerical simulation of Tabriz diversion dam with Geo-Studio software was carried out. Results showed that application of drain pipe under the structure reduced uplift force respect to without drain under the structure. Increasing of drain radius; caused reduction of uplift pressure more but increased of seepage flow slightly. Installation of drain in upper part of stilling basin had a tendency to decrease uplift pressure more. Existence of drain near the stilling basin bottom caused in more reducing of uplift pressure than of installation of it in deeper depth

  10. Integrated Verification Experiment data collected as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Source Region Program. Appendix B: Surface ground motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, T.A.; Baker, D.F.; Edwards, C.L.; Freeman, S.H.

    1993-10-01

    Surface ground motion was recorded for many of the Integrated Verification Experiments using standard 10-, 25- and 100-g accelerometers, force-balanced accelerometers and, for some events, using golf balls and 0.39-cm steel balls as surface inertial gauges (SIGs). This report contains the semi-processed acceleration, velocity, and displacement data for the accelerometers fielded and the individual observations for the SIG experiments. Most acceleration, velocity, and displacement records have had calibrations applied and have been deramped, offset corrected, and deglitched but are otherwise unfiltered or processed from their original records. Digital data for all of these records are stored at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  11. Spatial glyphosate and AMPA redistribution on the soil surface driven by sediment transport processes – A flume experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bento, Célia P.M.; Commelin, Meindert C.; Baartman, Jantiene E.M.; Yang, Xiaomei; Peters, Piet; Mol, Hans G.J.; Ritsema, Coen J.; Geissen, Violette

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of small-scale sediment transport on glyphosate and AMPA redistribution on the soil surface and on their off-site transport during water erosion events. Both a smooth surface (T1) and a surface with “seeding lines on the contour” (T2) were tested in a rainfall

  12. Machinability study on discontinuously reinforced aluminium composites (DRACs using response surface methodology and Taguchi’s design of experiments under dry cutting condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raviraj Shetty1

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of metal matrix composites with discontinuous reinforcement represents a well-established method for improving the strength and stiffness of a material. This paper discusses the use of Taguchi’s design of experiments and response surface methodology (RSM for minimising the surface roughness in turning of discontinuously reinforced aluminium composites (DRACs having aluminum alloy 6061 as the matrix and containing 15 vol. % of silicon carbide particles with a mean diameter of 25µm under dry cutting condition. The measured results are then collected and analysed with the help of a commercial software package MINITAB15. The experiments are conducted using Taguchi’s experimental design technique. The matrices of test conditions include cutting speed, feed rates and depth of cut. The effect of cutting parameters on surface roughness is evaluated and the optimum cutting condition for minimising the surface roughness is determined. A second-order model is established between the cutting parameters and the surface roughness using RSM. The experimental results reveal that the most significant machining parameter for surface roughness is feed, followed by cutting speed. The predicted values and measured values are fairly close, which indicates that the developed model can be effectively used to predict the surface roughness in the machining of DRACs.

  13. Ultrasound-induced oscillations of gas bubbles in contact with gelatin gel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Sosuke; Ando, Keita

    2017-11-01

    Ultrasound-induced dynamics of gas bubbles in the vicinity of deformable boundaries are studied experimentally, as a simplified model of sonoporation in medicine. In our experiment, 28-kHz underwater ultrasound was irradiated to a gas bubble nuclei (of radius from 60 μm to 200 μm) sitting at gel surfaces (of gelatin concentration from 6 wt% to 16 wt%) and the bubble dynamics were recorded by a high-speed camera. The repeated deformation of the gel surface was found to be in phase with volumetric oscillation of the bubble. A liquid jet, which can appear toward the collapse phase in the bubble oscillation in volume, produced localized surface deformation, which is an important observation in the context of sonoporation. We characterize the maximum displacement of the gel surface with varying the bubble nuclei radius (in comparison to the resonant radius fixed approximately at 117 μm). We also examine the phase difference between the ultrasound and the bubble dynamics under the influence of the deformable boundary. The Research Grant of Keio Leading-edge Laboratory of Science & Technology.

  14. The use of osteo-articular allografts for reconstruction after resection of the distal radius for tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoccianti, G; Campanacci, D A; Beltrami, G; Caldora, P; Capanna, R

    2010-12-01

    Several techniques have been described to reconstruct a mobile wrist joint after resection of the distal radius for tumour. We reviewed our experience of using an osteo-articular allograft to do this in 17 patients with a mean follow-up of 58.9 months (28 to 119). The mean range of movement at the wrist was 56° flexion, 58° extension, 84° supination and 80° pronation. The mean ISOLS-MSTS score was 86% (63% to 97%) and the mean patient-rated wrist evaluation score was 16.5 (3 to 34). There was no local recurrence or distant metastases. The procedure failed in one patient with a fracture of the graft and an arthrodesis was finally required. Union was achieved at the host-graft interface in all except two cases. No patient reported more than modest non-disabling pain and six reported no pain at all. Radiographs showed early degenerative changes at the radiocarpal joint in every patient. A functional pain-free wrist can be restored with an osteo-articular allograft after resection of the distal radius for bone tumour, thereby avoiding the donor site morbidity associated with an autograft. These results may deteriorate with time.

  15. The dorsal horizon view: detecting screw protrusion at the distal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Samuel James; Harvey, Jason N

    2011-10-01

    Extensor tendon injury after osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures is a well-documented complication. It has been shown to be associated with screw protrusion through the dorsal cortex, or plunging of the drill bit into the overlying tendon. It is difficult to determine screw length and protrusion using the standard anteroposterior and lateral intraoperative fluoroscopic images because of the triangular configuration of the distal radius and Lister tubercle. In fractures with a coronal split, it may be necessary to lag the dorsal fragment, necessitating longer screws and risking screw protrusion beyond the dorsal cortex. For these fractures, we use a radiographic view aimed along the long axis of the radius to detect screw protrusion. This was a retrospective case series involving 15 distal radius fractures. To obtain the dorsal horizon view, the wrist is hyperflexed and the beam of the image intensifier is aimed along the long axis of the radius. We evaluated 15 distal radius fractures with a coronal split component, where the dorsal horizon view was used to detect dorsal cortex screw protrusion. This view was used intraoperatively following the use of the standard views. We evaluated records and imaging to ascertain whether the use of this radiograph led to a change in intraoperative screw selection. Of the 15 cases, we changed screw selection as a result of the additional view in 4 patients. In 3 of these cases, the screw length was long, which was not apparent on standard intraoperative fluoroscopic views. The use of the dorsal horizon view is a useful adjunct to prevent screw protrusion beyond the dorsal cortex when performing osteosynthesis of the distal radius. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Outcome following distally locked volar plating for distal radius fractures with metadiaphyseal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matullo, Kristofer S; Dennison, David G

    2015-06-01

    The surgical treatment of metadiaphyseal distal radius fractures may be difficult due to the associated articular or periarticular extension that limits standard fixation techniques. Longer distal radius volar locking plates allow stable fixation of the distal fragments while providing standard plate fixation in the proximal radius. We hypothesize that this plating technique allows adequate fixation to both the distal radius and metadiaphyseal fragments. The purpose of the study is to describe the outcomes, radiographic parameters, secondary surgeries, and complication rate with this device. A retrospective chart review was conducted on adult patients with a distal radius fracture and metadiaphyseal involvement treated with a volar, distally locked plate. All patients were followed up for radiographic union, with a mean time of 219 days (range 38-575). Fracture patterns, outcomes of range of motion, grip strength, and complications, as well as injury, post open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF), and finally, healed radiographic parameters were recorded. Twenty patients with 21 fractures were included. At union, mean radiographic parameters were the following: volar tilt of 8°, radial inclination of 27°, radial height of 14 mm, and ulnar variance of -1 mm. The mean final range of motion was 52° flexion, 50° extension, 68° pronation, and 66° supination. Complications included one infection and one plate removal. Four patients developed a nonunion requiring secondary procedures. There were no incidents of hardware failure or adhesions requiring tenolysis. Distally locked long volar plating for metadiaphyseal distal radius fractures is a safe and effective treatment option for these complex fracture patterns allowing anatomic restoration of the radial shaft and distal radius.

  17. Compatibility of lithium plasma-facing surfaces with high edge temperatures in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeski, Dick

    2016-10-01

    High edge electron temperatures (200 eV or greater) have been measured at the wall-limited plasma boundary in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). High edge temperatures, with flat electron temperature profiles, are a long-predicted consequence of low recycling boundary conditions. The temperature profile in LTX, measured by Thomson scattering, varies by as little as 10% from the plasma axis to the boundary, determined by the lithium-coated high field-side wall. The hydrogen plasma density in the outer scrape-off layer is very low, 2-3 x 1017 m-3 , consistent with a low recycling metallic lithium boundary. The plasma surface interaction in LTX is characterized by a low flux of high energy protons to the lithium PFC, with an estimated Debye sheath potential approaching 1 kV. Plasma-material interactions in LTX are consequently in a novel regime, where the impacting proton energy exceeds the peak in the sputtering yield for the lithium wall. In this regime, further increases in the edge temperature will decrease, rather than increase, the sputtering yield. Despite the high edge temperature, the core impurity content is low. Zeff is 1.2 - 1.5, with a very modest contribution (injection stops, the discharge density is allowed to drop, and the edge is pumped by the low recycling lithium wall. An upgrade to LTX which includes a 35A, 20 kV neutral beam injector to provide core fueling to maintain constant density, as well as auxiliary heating, is underway. Two beam systems have been loaned to LTX by Tri Alpha Energy. Additional results from LTX, as well as progress on the upgrade - LTX- β - will be discussed. Work supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  18. Sidecut radius and the mechanics of turning-equipment designed to reduce risk of severe traumatic knee injuries in alpine giant slalom ski racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spörri, Jörg; Kröll, Josef; Gilgien, Matthias; Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    There is limited empirical knowledge about the effect of ski geometry, particularly in the context of injury prevention in alpine ski racing. We investigated the effect of sidecut radius on biomechanical variables related to the mechanics of turning. During a field experiment, six European Cup level athletes skied on three different pairs of giant slalom (GS) skis varying in sidecut radii (30 m, 35 m and 40 m). Using a video-based three-dimensional (3D) kinematic system, a 22-point body segment model of the athletes was reconstructed in 3D, and the variables ground reaction force, centre of mass (COM) speed, COM turn radius, ski turn radius, edge angle, fore/aft position and skid angle were calculated. While steering out of the fall line after gate passage, ground reaction force significantly differed between the 30 m and 40 m skis and between the 35 m and 40 m skis. These differences were mainly explainable by larger COM turn radii when skiing on the 40 m ski. During the same turn phase, significant differences in ski turn radius also were found, but there were no differences in edge angle, fore/aft position and skid angle. The sidecut-induced reduction in ground reaction force and the sidecut-induced increase in centre of mass and ski turn radius observed in this study provides indirect evidence of reduced self-steering of the ski. Self-steering plays a central role in the mechanism of anterior cruciate ligament rupture in alpine ski racing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Sidecut radius and the mechanics of turning—equipment designed to reduce risk of severe traumatic knee injuries in alpine giant slalom ski racing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spörri, Jörg; Kröll, Josef; Gilgien, Matthias; Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Background There is limited empirical knowledge about the effect of ski geometry, particularly in the context of injury prevention in alpine ski racing. We investigated the effect of sidecut radius on biomechanical variables related to the mechanics of turning. Methods During a field experiment, six European Cup level athletes skied on three different pairs of giant slalom (GS) skis varying in sidecut radii (30 m, 35 m and 40 m). Using a video-based three-dimensional (3D) kinematic system, a 22-point body segment model of the athletes was reconstructed in 3D, and the variables ground reaction force, centre of mass (COM) speed, COM turn radius, ski turn radius, edge angle, fore/aft position and skid angle were calculated. Results While steering out of the fall line after gate passage, ground reaction force significantly differed between the 30 m and 40 m skis and between the 35 m and 40 m skis. These differences were mainly explainable by larger COM turn radii when skiing on the 40 m ski. During the same turn phase, significant differences in ski turn radius also were found, but there were no differences in edge angle, fore/aft position and skid angle. Summary The sidecut-induced reduction in ground reaction force and the sidecut-induced increase in centre of mass and ski turn radius observed in this study provides indirect evidence of reduced self-steering of the ski. Self-steering plays a central role in the mechanism of anterior cruciate ligament rupture in alpine ski racing. PMID:26702014

  20. Structure and reactivity of oxalate surface complexes on lepidocrocite derived from infrared spectroscopy, DFT-calculations, adsorption, dissolution and photochemical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Susan C.; Biswakarma, Jagannath; Kang, Kyounglim; Schenkeveld, Walter D. C.; Hering, Janet G.; Kubicki, James D.; Kraemer, Stephan M.; Hug, Stephan J.

    2018-04-01

    Oxalate, together with other ligands, plays an important role in the dissolution of iron(hdyr)oxides and the bio-availability of iron. The formation and properties of oxalate surface complexes on lepidocrocite were studied with a combination of infrared spectroscopy (IR), density functional theory (DFT) calculations, dissolution, and photochemical experiments. IR spectra measured as a function of time, concentration, and pH (50-200 μM oxalate, pH 3-7) showed that several surface complexes are formed at different rates and in different proportions. Measured spectra could be separated into three contributions described by Gaussian line shapes, with frequencies that agreed well with the theoretical frequencies of three different surface complexes: an outer-sphere complex (OS), an inner-sphere monodentate mononuclear complex (MM), and a bidentate mononuclear complex (BM) involving one O atom from each carboxylate group. At pH 6, OS was formed at the highest rate. The contribution of BM increased with decreasing pH. In dissolution experiments, lepidocrocite was dissolved at rates proportional to the surface concentration of BM, rather than to the total adsorbed concentration. Under UV-light (365 nm), BM was photolyzed at a higher rate than MM and OS. Although the comparison of measured spectra with calculated frequencies cannot exclude additional possible structures, the combined results allowed the assignment of three main structures with different reactivities consistent with experiments. The results illustrate the importance of the surface speciation of adsorbed ligands in dissolution and photochemical reactions.

  1. The design, fabrication, and testing of beryllium capsules for resonant ultrasound experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, M.A.; Salzer, L.; Day, R.

    1999-01-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition targets require smooth and well-characterized deuterium/tritium (DT) ice layers. Los Alamos is developing Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) to measure the internal pressure in the targets at room temperature after filling with DT. RUS techniques also can detect and measure the amplitudes of low modal surface roughness perturbations of the target shell interior. The experiments required beryllium capsules with a nominal inside radius of 1 mm and a spherical outside radius of 3 mm. The capsules have various spherical harmonic contours up to mode 12 machined into their interior surfaces. The capsules are constructed from hemispheres using an epoxy adhesive and then filled to ∼270 atm with helium or deuterium gas. This paper describes the adhesive joint design, machining techniques, and interior geometry inspection techniques. It also describes the fixtures needed to assemble, fill, and pressure test the capsules

  2. Manual matching of perceived surface orientation is affected by arm posture–Evidence of calibration between proprioception and visual experience in near space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Durgin, Frank H.

    2011-01-01

    Proprioception of hand orientation (orientation production using the hand) is compared with manual matching of visual orientation (visual surface matching using the hand) in two experiments. In Experiment 1, using self-selected arm postures, the proportions of wrist and elbow flexion spontaneously used to orient the pitch of the hand (20% and 80% respectively) are relatively similar across both manual matching tasks and manual orientation production tasks for most participants. Proprioceptive error closely matched perceptual biases previously reported for visual orientation perception, suggesting calibration of proprioception to visual biases. A minority of participants, who attempted to use primarily wrist flexion while holding the forearm horizontal, performed poorly at the manual matching task, consistent with proprioceptive error caused by biomechanical constraints of their self-selected posture. In Experiment 2, postural choices were constrained to primarily wrist or elbow flexion without imposing biomechanical constraints (using a raised forearm). Identical relative offsets were found between the two constraint groups in manual matching and manual orientation production. The results support two claims: (1) manual orientation matching to visual surfaces is based on manual proprioception and (2) calibration between visual and proprioceptive experiences guarantees relatively accurate manual matching for surfaces within reach despite systematic visual biases in perceived surface orientation. PMID:22086494

  3. Adsorption of a Textile Dye on Commercial Activated Carbon: A Simple Experiment to Explore the Role of Surface Chemistry and Ionic Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Angela; Nunes, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an adsorption experiment is proposed using commercial activated carbon as adsorbent and a textile azo dye, Mordant Blue-9, as adsorbate. The surface chemistry of the activated carbon is changed through a simple oxidation treatment and the ionic strength of the dye solution is also modified, simulating distinct conditions of water…

  4. Bounds of the Spectral Radius and the Nordhaus-Gaddum Type of the Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianfei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Laplacian spectra are the eigenvalues of Laplacian matrix L(G=D(G-A(G, where D(G and A(G are the diagonal matrix of vertex degrees and the adjacency matrix of a graph G, respectively, and the spectral radius of a graph G is the largest eigenvalue of A(G. The spectra of the graph and corresponding eigenvalues are closely linked to the molecular stability and related chemical properties. In quantum chemistry, spectral radius of a graph is the maximum energy level of molecules. Therefore, good upper bounds for the spectral radius are conducive to evaluate the energy of molecules. In this paper, we first give several sharp upper bounds on the adjacency spectral radius in terms of some invariants of graphs, such as the vertex degree, the average 2-degree, and the number of the triangles. Then, we give some numerical examples which indicate that the results are better than the mentioned upper bounds in some sense. Finally, an upper bound of the Nordhaus-Gaddum type is obtained for the sum of Laplacian spectral radius of a connected graph and its complement. Moreover, some examples are applied to illustrate that our result is valuable.

  5. Acute Isolated Flexor Tendon Laceration Associated With a Distal Radius Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J Ryan; Alluri, Ram K; Ghiassi, Alidad

    2017-05-01

    Subacute rupture of the flexor tendons secondary to distal radius fractures is well documented. Recently, accounts of flexor tendon rupture following open reduction internal fixation have been associated with volar plate fixation. However, discovery of an occult traumatic flexor tendon laceration during fixation of an acute distal radius fracture is not well described. This case indicates the importance of careful preoperative and intraoperative examination of the flexor tendons in the setting of comminuted distal radius fractures. A forty-seven-year-old male sustained a comminuted, dorsally displaced distal radius fracture. Initial and post-reduction examinations revealed no gross functional abnormalities. Upon operative fixation of the fracture, laceration of the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendon to the index finger was incidentally noted at the level of the fracture site. Due to extensive dorsal comminution, shortening, and the presence of a lunate facet fragment, we performed volar fragment-specific and dorsal spanning bridge plate fixation. The proximal and distal ends of the FDP tendon were marked, but repair was deferred until implant removal. This allowed for proper informed consent and avoided potential compromise of the repair given the presence of a volar implant. Acute flexor tendon rupture secondary to closed distal radius fractures may go unnoticed if a high index of suspicion is not maintained. Delayed diagnosis of these ruptures convolutes the mechanism of injury and disrupts the recovery process. Hand surgeons should be vigilant in examining flexor tendon function during the preoperative evaluation, especially in the setting of acute high-energy injury.

  6. Distal Radius Allograft Reconstruction Utilizing a Step-Cut Technique After En Bloc Tumor Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Timothy J; Wysocki, Robert W; Cohen, Mark S

    2018-01-01

    En bloc resection of the distal radius is a common treatment for advanced and recurrent giant cell tumors and less commonly for sarcoma. Various reconstructive options exist, including ulnar transposition, osteoarticular autograft and allograft, and allograft arthrodesis. We present a technique of reconstruction using a distal radius bulk allograft with a step-cut to allow for precise restoration of proper length and to promote bony union. Preoperative templating is performed with affected and contralateral radiographs to assess the size of the expected bony defect, location of the step-cut, and the optimal size of the distal radius allograft required. A standard dorsal approach to the distal radius is utilized, and the tumor is resected. A proximal row carpectomy is performed, and the plate/allograft construct is applied to the remaining host bone. Iliac crest bone graft is harvested and introduced at the graft-bone interface and radiocarpal arthrodesis sites. We have previously reported outstanding union rates with the step-cut technique compared with a standard transverse cut. The technique described provides reproducible union and stabilization of the wrist and forearm with adequate function following en bloc resection of the distal radius for tumor.

  7. Scattering properties of alumina particle clusters with different radius of monomers in aerocraft plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingying; Bai, Lu; Wu, Zhensen; Guo, Lixin; Gong, Yanjun

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) algorithm is improved to generate the alumina particle cluster with different radius of monomers in the plume. Scattering properties of these alumina clusters are solved by the multiple sphere T matrix method (MSTM). The effect of the number and radius of monomers on the scattering properties of clusters of alumina particles is discussed. The scattering properties of two types of alumina particle clusters are compared, one has different radius of monomers that follows lognormal probability distribution, another has the same radius of monomers that equals the mean of lognormal probability distribution. The result show that the scattering phase functions and linear polarization degrees of these two types of alumina particle clusters are of great differences. For the alumina clusters with different radius of monomers, the forward scatterings are bigger and the linear polarization degree has multiple peaks. Moreover, the vary of their scattering properties do not have strong correlative with the change of number of monomers. For larger booster motors, 25-38% of the plume being condensed alumina. The alumina can scatter radiation from other sources present in the plume and effect on radiation transfer characteristics of plume. In addition, the shape, size distribution and refractive index of the particles in the plume are estimated by linear polarization degree. Therefore, accurate scattering properties calculation is very important to decrease the deviation in the related research.

  8. Surface water and atmospheric underway carbon data obtained during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Indian Ocean survey cruises (R/V Knorr, December 1998--January 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyr, A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment, and Resources Center; Allison, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

    1997-11-01

    This data documentation presents the results of the surface water and atmospheric underway measurements of mole fraction of carbon dioxide (xCO{sub 2}), sea surface salinity, and sea surface temperature, obtained during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) Indian Ocean survey cruises (December 1994--January 1996). Discrete and underway carbon measurements were made by members of the CO{sub 2} survey team. The survey team is a part of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study supported by the US Department of Energy to make carbon-related measurements on the WOCE global survey cruises. Approximately 200,000 surface seawater and 50,000 marine air xCO{sub 2} measurements were recorded.

  9. Aplikasi Pencarian Tempat Wisata Berbasiskan GPS dengan Metode Radius dan Rating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Yulianto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tourist place navigation application becomes more important for travelers, especially backpackers. Previous research had produced applications which can only show the route from the position of traveler to tourist place with map shown. The goal of the research is to use the radius and rating method that is still rare in the community to navigate tourist place. Output of the research is a GPS-based application that can display the search results of tourist sites based on rating and radius method, route from the traveler to the destination place, and description of the place. Development method used waterfall that contained user requirement, analysis, design, coding and testing, implementation, and maintenance. Conclusion of the research has shown that the developed application provided convenience in searching tourist places based on radius and rating, displaying route, and description of tourist places.

  10. Sistem Autentikasi Hotspot Menggunakan LDAP dan Radius pada Jaringan Internet Wireless Prodi Teknik Sistem Komputer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Herdinal Muttaqin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wireless network is a network utilizing radio waves that propagate openly. This network requires security to simplify the process by using user Authentication. One of technology that could be used in order to make it safer is a Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP and Remote Authentication Dila In User Service (RADIUS. Computer Systems Engineering Department is one of the study program in the Faculty of Engineering, University of Diponegoro that reserve the internet service everyday for students need. However, internet wireless network in this department is not yet safe enough,for the necessary to secure it’s need creating a security system with LDAP and RADIUS.The results of this study is a network authentication server using OpenLDAP and FreeRadius Hotspot that will be integrated with an account of Academic Information System, which is implemented on Prodi Computer Systems Engineering Department of the University of Diponegoro.

  11. The Splashback Radius of Halos from Particle Dynamics. I. The SPARTA Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Benedikt

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by the recent proposal of the splashback radius as a physical boundary of dark-matter halos, we present a parallel computer code for Subhalo and PARticle Trajectory Analysis (SPARTA). The code analyzes the orbits of all simulation particles in all host halos, billions of orbits in the case of typical cosmological N-body simulations. Within this general framework, we develop an algorithm that accurately extracts the location of the first apocenter of particles after infall into a halo, or splashback. We define the splashback radius of a halo as the smoothed average of the apocenter radii of individual particles. This definition allows us to reliably measure the splashback radii of 95% of host halos above a resolution limit of 1000 particles. We show that, on average, the splashback radius and mass are converged to better than 5% accuracy with respect to mass resolution, snapshot spacing, and all free parameters of the method.

  12. Effect of soil surface roughness on infiltration water, ponding and runoff on tilled soils under rainfall simulation experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Longshan; Hou, Rui; Wu, Faqi; Keesstra, Saskia

    2018-01-01

    Agriculture has a large effect on the properties of the soil and with that on soil hydrology. The partitioning of rainfall into infiltration and runoff is relevant to understand runoff generation, infiltration and soil erosion. Tillage manages soil surface properties and generates soil surface

  13. Sea quarks contribution to the nucleon magnetic moment and charge radius at the physical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufian, Raza Sabbir; Yang, Yi-Bo; Liang, Jian; Draper, Terrence; Liu, Keh-Fei; χ QCD Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    We report a comprehensive analysis of the light and strange disconnected-sea quarks contribution to the nucleon magnetic moment, charge radius, and the electric and magnetic form factors. The lattice QCD calculation includes ensembles across several lattice volumes and lattice spacings with one of the ensembles at the physical pion mass. We adopt a model-independent extrapolation of the nucleon magnetic moment and the charge radius. We have performed a simultaneous chiral, infinite volume, and continuum extrapolation in a global fit to calculate results in the continuum limit. We find that the combined light and strange disconnected-sea quarks contribution to the nucleon magnetic moment is μM(DI )=-0.022 (11 )(09 ) μN and to the nucleon mean square charge radius is ⟨r2⟩E(DI ) =-0.019 (05 )(05 ) fm2 which is about 1 /3 of the difference between the ⟨rp2⟩E of electron-proton scattering and that of a muonic atom and so cannot be ignored in obtaining the proton charge radius in the lattice QCD calculation. The most important outcome of this lattice QCD calculation is that while the combined light-sea and strange quarks contribution to the nucleon magnetic moment is small at about 1%, a negative 2.5(9)% contribution to the proton mean square charge radius and a relatively larger positive 16.3(6.1)% contribution to the neutron mean square charge radius come from the sea quarks in the nucleon. For the first time, by performing global fits, we also give predictions of the light and strange disconnected-sea quarks contributions to the nucleon electric and magnetic form factors at the physical point and in the continuum and infinite volume limits in the momentum transfer range of 0 ≤Q2≤0.5 GeV2 .

  14. Clinical and ultrasonographic evidence of a proximal positional fault of the radius. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo-Urriés, Miguel; Hidalgo-García, César; Bueno-Gracia, Elena; Estébanez-de-Miguel, Elena; Lucha-López, Orosia; Tricás-Moreno, José Miguel

    2014-06-01

    Positional faults are considered a possible underlying mechanism mimicking the symptoms of a joint sprain. Despite numerous clinical studies indicating the presence of positional faults, there is limited evidence of imaging studies confirming positional faults. This case report is a preliminary study that offers clinical and ultrasonographic evidence of a proximal positional fault of the radius, treated successfully with manual therapy techniques. Three weeks after a bike fall on the outstretched hand, the patient in this study presented with right wrist pain and a lack of progress with conventional conservative treatment (NSAIDs, rest and immobilization). Clinical findings indicating a proximal positional fault of the radius included pain during active pronation increased by associating a passive movement of the radius in a proximal direction and it was reduced by associating a passive movement of the radius in a distal direction. Ultrasonographic (US) images showed a reduction of radio-capitellar distance on the right side (11.4 mm) compared to the left side (13.3 mm). A positive response with a distal mobilization of the radius supported the proximal positional fault of the radius. After two manual therapy sessions, the patient had recovered normal asymptomatic function. The outcomes used to assess function and pain were active pronation range of motion, the Spanish version of the DASH questionnaire and a 0-10 numeric pain rating scale. Each measure was conducted prior and after each treatment session and one week post treatment. The patient was re-examined at 6 months follow-up, during which US images, demonstrated a normalization of the right radio-capitellar distance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Load transfer at the distal ulna following simulated distal radius fracture malalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Louis M; Greeley, Gillian S; Johnson, James A; King, Graham J W

    2015-02-01

    To measure the effects of distal radius malalignment on loading at the distal ulna. Using an adjustable mechanism to simulate angulated and translated malalignments, clinically relevant distal radius deformities were simulated in a cadaveric model. A custom-built load cell was inserted just proximal to the native ulna head to measure the resultant force and torque in the distal ulna. Loads were measured before and after transecting the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). There was an increase in distal ulna load and torque with increasing dorsal translation and angulation. Combined conditions of angulation and translation increased force and torque in the distal ulna to a greater extent than with either condition in isolation. Transecting the TFCC resulted in a reduction in distal ulna load and torque. A progressive increase in load at the distal ulna was observed with increasing severity of malalignment, which may be an important contributor to residual ulnar wrist pain and dysfunction. However, no clear-cut threshold of malalignment of a dorsally angulated and translated distal radius fracture was identified. These observations suggest that radius deformities cause articular incongruity, which increases TFCC tension and distal radioulnar joint load. Cutting of the TFCC decreased distal ulna loading, likely by releasing the articular constraining effect of the TFCC on the distal radioulnar joint, allowing the radius to rotate more freely with respect to the ulna. Anatomical reduction of a distal radius fracture minimizes the forces in the distal ulna and may reduce residual ulnar wrist pain and dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reconstruction of lower end of radius using vascularized upper end of fibula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koul Ashok

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Giant cell tumor is a fairly common locally invasive tumor in young adults. The lower end of the radius is the second commonest site for this tumor. The most common treatment for this tumor is curettage with or without bone grafting but it carries a significant rate of recurrence. Excision is the treatment of choice, especially for cases in which the cortex has been breached. After excision of the distal end of the radius, different procedures have been described to reconstruct the defect of distal radius. These include partial arthrodesis and hemiarthroplasty using the upper end of the fibula. The upper end of the fibula has a morphological resemblance to the lower end of the radius and has been used to replace the latter. Traditionally it was used as a ′free′ (non-vascularized graft. More recently the upper end of the fibula has been transferred as a vascularized transfer for the same purpose. Though vascularized transfer should be expected to be more physiological, its superiority over the technically simpler non-vascularized transfer has not been conclusively proven. Materials and Methods: Two patients are presented who had giant cell tumor of distal radius. They underwent wide local excision and reconstruction with free vascularized upper end of the fibula. Result: Follow-up period was two and a half years and 12 months respectively. Both patients have returned to routine work. One patient has excellent functional result and the other has a good result. Conclusion: Vascularized upper end of fibula transfer is a reliable method of reconstruction for loss of the distal end of the radius that restores local anatomy and physiology.

  17. In-situ measurements of the ATLAS large-radius jet response in 13 TeV pp collisions

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The response of the ATLAS experiment to groomed large (R=1.0) radius jets is measured {\\em in-situ} with 33 fb−1 of "$\\sqrt$"=13 TeV LHC proton--proton collisions collected in 2016. Results from several methods are combined. The jet transverse momentum scale and resolution are measured in events where the jet recoils against a reference object, either a calibrated photon, another jet, or a recoiling system of jets. The jet mass is constrained using mass peaks formed by boosted W-bosons and top quarks and by comparison to the jet mass calculated with track jets. Generally, the Monte Carlo description is found to be adequate. Small discrepancies are incorporated as {\\em in-situ} corrections. The constraint on the transverse momentum scale is 1-2% for pT< 2 TeV, that on the mass scale 2-4%. The pT (mass) resolution is constrained to 10% (20%).

  18. Scale-up considerations for surface collecting agent assisted in-situ burn crude oil spill response experiments in the Arctic: Laboratory to field-scale investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Robin J; Aggarwal, Srijan; Perkins, Robert A; Schnabel, William

    2017-04-01

    In the event of a marine oil spill in the Arctic, government agencies, industry, and the public have a stake in the successful implementation of oil spill response. Because large spills are rare events, oil spill response techniques are often evaluated with laboratory and meso-scale experiments. The experiments must yield scalable information sufficient to understand the operability and effectiveness of a response technique under actual field conditions. Since in-situ burning augmented with surface collecting agents ("herders") is one of the few viable response options in ice infested waters, a series of oil spill response experiments were conducted in Fairbanks, Alaska, in 2014 and 2015 to evaluate the use of herders to assist in-situ burning and the role of experimental scale. This study compares burn efficiency and herder application for three experimental designs for in-situ burning of Alaska North Slope crude oil in cold, fresh waters with ∼10% ice cover. The experiments were conducted in three project-specific constructed venues with varying scales (surface areas of approximately 0.09 square meters, 9 square meters and 8100 square meters). The results from the herder assisted in-situ burn experiments performed at these three different scales showed good experimental scale correlation and no negative impact due to the presence of ice cover on burn efficiency. Experimental conclusions are predominantly associated with application of the herder material and usability for a given experiment scale to make response decisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Collision free path generation in 3D with turning and pitch radius constraints for aerial vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøler, F.; La Cour-Harbo, A.; Bisgaard, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of trajectory generation in 3D for uninhabited aerial systems (UAS). The proposed algorithm for trajectory generation allows us to find a feasible collision-free 3D trajectory through a number of waypoints in an environment containing obstacles. Our approach...... assumes that most of the aircraft structural and dynamic limitations can be formulated as a turn radius constraint, and that any two consecutive waypoints have line-of-sight. The generated trajectories are collision free and also satisfy a constraint on the minimum admissible turning radius, while...

  20. Optimization of the bubble radius in a moving single bubble sonoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirheydari, Mona; Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Rezaee, Nastaran; Ebrahimi, Homa, E-mail: sadighi@sharif.ir [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, 11365-91, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-01

    A complete study of the hydrodynamic force on a moving single bubble sonoluminescence in N-methylformamide is presented in this work. All forces exerted, trajectory, interior temperature and gas pressure are discussed. The maximum values of the calculated components of the hydrodynamic force for three different radii at the same driving pressure were compared, while the optimum bubble radius was determined. The maximum value of the buoyancy force appears at the start of bubble collapse, earlier than the other forces whose maximum values appear at the moment of bubble collapse. We verified that for radii larger than the optimum radius, the temperature peak value decreases.

  1. Fuelling and self-regulation of AGN feedback at the Bondi radius of M84

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Helen

    2017-09-01

    We propose a deep observation to probe the gas flow gravitationally captured by the SMBH in M84, which is one of a very limited number of objects for which Chandra can spatially resolve the Bondi radius. The hot gas properties at the SMBH's sphere of influence are key to understanding how the AGN heating rate can respond to the large scale cooling rate. We will study the interactions at the Bondi radius between recent AGN outbursts and gravitationally captured intracluster medium, which likely mediate the self-adjustment of feedback. M84 represents an important intermediate example between the dormant AGN in NGC3115 and the highly active AGN in M87.

  2. Optimization of the bubble radius in a moving single bubble sonoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirheydari, Mona; Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Rezaee, Nastaran; Ebrahimi, Homa

    2011-01-01

    A complete study of the hydrodynamic force on a moving single bubble sonoluminescence in N-methylformamide is presented in this work. All forces exerted, trajectory, interior temperature and gas pressure are discussed. The maximum values of the calculated components of the hydrodynamic force for three different radii at the same driving pressure were compared, while the optimum bubble radius was determined. The maximum value of the buoyancy force appears at the start of bubble collapse, earlier than the other forces whose maximum values appear at the moment of bubble collapse. We verified that for radii larger than the optimum radius, the temperature peak value decreases.

  3. Fine-Tuning on the Effective Patch Radius Expression of the Circular Microstrip Patch Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Yilmaz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effective patch radius expression for the circular microstrip antennas is improved by means of several manipulations. Departing from previously proposed equations in the literature, one of the most accurate equations is picked up, and this equation is fine-tuned by means of Particle Swarm Optimization technique. Throughout the study, impacts of other parameters (such as the definition of the fitness/objective function, the degree-of-freedom in the proposed effective patch radius expression, the number of measured resonant frequency values are observed in a controlled manner. Finally, about 3% additional improvement is achieved over a very accurate formula, which was proposed earlier.

  4. On the ππ continuum in the nucleon form factors and the proton radius puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoferichter, M. [University of Washington, Institute for Nuclear Theory, Seattle, WA (United States); Kubis, B.; Ruiz de Elvira, J. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie) and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Hammer, H.W. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany); Meissner, U.G. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie) and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Institute for Advanced Simulation, and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    We present an improved determination of the ππ continuum contribution to the isovector spectral functions of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. Our analysis includes the most up-to-date results for the ππ → anti NN partial waves extracted from Roy-Steiner equations, consistent input for the pion vector form factor, and a thorough discussion of isospin-violating effects and uncertainty estimates. As an application, we consider the ππ contribution to the isovector electric and magnetic radii by means of sum rules, which, in combination with the accurately known neutron electric radius, are found to slightly prefer a small proton charge radius. (orig.)

  5. Giant cell tumour of proximal radius in a 48 years old lady.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kashif Mahmood; Minhas, Muhammad Saeed; Khan, Mohsin Ali; Bhatti, Anisuddin

    2014-03-01

    Giant cell tumour is a locally aggressive tumour of long-bones of epiphyseal region commonly occurring in adults aged 20-40 years. Most common location is distal femur, proximal tibia and distal radius. Different treatment options being used are curettage with bone graft or bone cement, resection with arthrodesis, reconstruction, radiation and chemotherapy. We are reporting a case of giant cell tumour of proximal radius in a 48 years old lady. It is very rare and only 4 cases have been reported in literature. It was treated by wide margin resection without reconstruction.

  6. On Possible Reduction of Equilibrium Radius of a Neutron Star Influenced by Superstrong Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Skobelev

    2012-01-01

    -decay suppression of a neutron in degenerate magnetized electron gas is formulated. Based on this, it is shown that, in superstrong magnetic field, equilibrium radius of a neutron star is approximately several times smaller than without the field influence. Therefore, we can make a prediction that in short-period pulsars, such fields can be observed. In fact, possible existence of new class of stellar objects is noted, the objects with superstrong magnetic field and supersmall radius about 1 km which we named minimagnetars. They can be detected by gravitational red shift of their radiation.

  7. Research on the Effects of Process Parameters on Surface Roughness in Wet-Activated Silicon Direct Bonding Base on Orthogonal Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei NIE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface roughness is a very important index in silicon direct bonding and it is affected by processing parameters in the wet-activated process. These parameters include the concentration of activation solution, holding time and treatment temperature. The effects of these parameters were investigated by means of orthogonal experiments. In order to analyze the wafer roughness more accurately, the bear ratio of the surface was used as the evaluation index. From the results of the experiments, it could be concluded that the concentration of the activation solution affected the roughness directly and the higher the concentration, the lower the roughness. Holding time did not affect the roughness as acutely as that of the concentration, but a reduced activation time decreased the roughness perceptibly. It was also discovered that the treatment temperature had a weak correlation with the surface roughness. Based on these conclusions, the parameters of concentration, temperature and holding time were optimized respectively as NH4OH:H2O2=1:1 (without water, 70 °C and 5 min. The results of bonding experiments proved the validity of the conclusions of orthogonal experiments.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9711

  8. Experiments on helium refrigerant at high speed of rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haseler, L.E.; Ball, A.; Scurlock, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Electrical machines with superconducting field windings can require helium refrigeration in a rotating system. Heat transfer measurements have been made on helium in a rotating open thermosyphon. Various heater surfaces have been used at the end of a 25 mm tube full of helium at a radial distance of 0.22 mm from the rotation axis for speeds up to 37 Hsub(z), for both boiling heat transfer in subcritical helium, and convective heat transfer in sub and supercritical helium. A larger rotor of 0.44 m radius, to rotate up to 60 Hz, has been constructed to extend the range of the experiments. (author)

  9. Imaging microchannel plate detectors for XUV sky survey experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barstow, M.A.; Fraser, G.W.; Milward, S.R.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the development of microchannel plate detectors for the Wide Field Camera (WFC) XUV (50-300 A) sky survey experiment on Rosat. A novel feature of the detector design is that the microchannel plates and their resistive anode readout are curved to the same radius as the WFC telescope focal surface. It is shown that curving the channel plates is not detrimental to gain uniformity. The paper describes the design of a curved resistive anode readout element and contrasts the present measurements of spatial resolution, global and local uniformity and temperature coefficient of resistance with the poor performance recently ascribed to resistive anodes in the literature. 18 references

  10. The White-Dwarf Mass-Radius Relation from 40 Eridani B and Other Nearby Visual Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Howard E.; Bergeron, P.; Bedard, A.

    2018-01-01

    The bright, nearby DA-type white dwarf (WD) 40 Eridani B is orbited by the M dwarf 40 Eri C, allowing determination of the WD's mass. Until recently, however, the mass depended on orbital elements determined four decades ago, and that mass was so low that it created several astrophysical puzzles. Using new astrometric measurements, the binary-star group at the U.S. Naval Observatory has revised the dynamical mass upward, to 0.573 ± 0.018 M⊙. We have used model-atmosphere analysis to update other parameters of the WD, including effective temperature, surface gravity, radius, and luminosity. We then comparethese results with WD interior models.Within the observational uncertainties, theoretical cooling tracks for CO-core WDs of its measured mass are consistent with the position of 40 Eri B in the H-R diagram; equivalently, the theoretical mass-radius relation (MRR) is consistent with the star's location in the mass-radius plane. This consistency is, however, achieved only if we assume a "thin'' outer hydrogen layer, with qH = MH/MWD ∼ 10–10.We discuss other evidence that a significant fraction of DA WDs have such thin H layers, in spite of expectation from canonical stellar-evolution theory of "thick'' H layers with qH ∼ 10–4 . The cooling age of 40 Eri B is ~122 Myr, and its total age is ~1.8 Gyr. We present the MRRs for 40 Eri B and three other nearby WDs in visual binaries with precise mass determinations, and show that the agreement of current theory with observation is excellent in all cases.However, astrophysical puzzles remain. The eccentricity of the BC orbit has remained high (0.43), even though the progenitor of B ought to have interacted tidally with C when it was an AGB star. This puzzle exists also for the Sirius and Procyon systems. If thin hydrogen layers are common among WDs, the mass scale will need to be shifted downwards by a few hundredths of a solar mass.

  11. The course of the posterior interosseous nerve in relation to the proximal radius: is there a reliable landmark?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, M; Wegmann, K; Lappen, S; Helf, C; Burkhart, K J; Müller, L P

    2015-04-01

    The posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) is closely related to the proximal radius, and it is at risk when approaching the proximal forearm from the ventral and lateral side. This anatomic study analyzes the location of the PIN in relation to the proximal radius depending on forearm rotation by means of a novel investigation design. The purpose of this study is to define landmarks to locate the PIN intraoperatively in order to avoid neurological complications. We dissected six upper extremities of fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens. The mean donor age at the time of death was 81.2 years. The PIN was dissected and marked on its course along the proximal forearm with a 0.3-mm flexible radiopaque thread. Three-dimensional (3D) X-ray scans were performed, and the location of the nerve was analyzed in neutral rotation, supination, and pronation. In the coronal view, the PIN crosses the radial neck/shaft at a mean of 33.4 (±5.9)mm below the radial head surface (RHS) in pronation and 16.9 (±5.0)mm in supination. It crosses 4.9 (±2.2)mm distal of the most prominent point of the radial tuberosity (RT) in pronation and 9.6 (±5.2)mm proximal in supination. In the sagittal view, the PIN crosses the proximal radius 61.8 (±2.9)mm below the RHS in pronation and 41.1 (±3.6)mm in supination. The nerve crosses 29.2 (±6.2)mm distal of the RT in pronation and 11.0 (±2.8)mm in supination. With this novel design, the RT could be defined as a useful landmark for intraoperative orientation. On a ventral approach, the PIN courses 10mm proximal of it in supination and 5mm distal of it in pronation. Laterally, pronation increases the distance of the PIN to the RT to approximately 3cm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Addressing the missing matter problem in galaxies through a new fundamental gravitational radius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capozziello, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' E. Pancini' ' , Università di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, Edificio G, Via Cinthia, I-80126, Napoli (Italy); Jovanović, P. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, P.O. Box 74, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia); Jovanović, V. Borka; Borka, D., E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it, E-mail: pjovanovic@aob.rs, E-mail: vborka@vin.bg.ac.rs, E-mail: dusborka@vin.bg.ac.rs [Atomic Physics Laboratory (040), Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate that the existence of a Noether symmetry in f ( R ) theories of gravity gives rise to a further gravitational radius, besides the standard Schwarzschild one, determining the dynamics at galactic scales. By this feature, it is possible to explain the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation and the rotation curve of gas-rich galaxies without the dark matter hypothesis.

  13. Nonunion of Fractures of the Ulna and Radius Diaphyses: Clinical and Radiological Results of Surgical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boussakri H

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aseptic nonunion of the radius and ulna is a major complication of forearm fractures, accounting for 2% to 10% of all forearm fractures. The aim of our study is to evaluate the functional and radiological results of surgical treatment of diaphyseal aseptic nonunion of the radius and ulna, with autologous bone grafting, decortication and internal plate fixation. A series of 21 patients (26 nonunions was retrospectively reviewed, the average age was 35 years with a mean of 31,58 years (range 12-44 years . The fractures included isolated radius (n=6 and ulna (n=10, and both radius and ulna (n=5. The Grace and Eversmann score was used to evaluate our results. Fifteen had very good results, five good and one average. Consolidation of the two bones was attained in 6.2 months. Therefore, the functional prognosis of the upper limb imposes the need for an adequate treatment. This management strategy has enabled us to have satisfactory results. However, the best treatment of nonunion remains the preventive treatment with an optimal management and care of the forearm fractures.

  14. Axial length/corneal radius of curvature ratio and refractive status in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim/Background: Associations between axial length (AL) to corneal radius of curvature (CR) ratio and refractive status in a healthy Nigerian adult population were studied. Materials and Methods: Healthy students and members of staff of Obafemi Awolowo Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile‑Ife, South West Nigeria, free of ...

  15. Polycarbonate and co-continuous polycarbonate/ABS blends: influence of notch radius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inberg, J.P.F.; Gaymans, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of notch tip radius in the range of 1–0.002 mm was studied on polycarbonate (PC) and co-continuous PC/acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene (ABS). Co-continuous PC/ABS blend was obtained by mixing PC and ABS containing 15% polybutadiene (PB) in a twin screw extruder. PC and PC/ABS specimens

  16. Factorization for jet radius logarithms in jet mass spectra at the LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolodrubetz, D.W.; Pietrulewicz, P.; Stewart, I.W.; Tackmann, F.J.; Waalewijn, W.J.

    2016-01-01

    To predict the jet mass spectrum at a hadron collider it is crucial to account for the resummation of logarithms between the transverse momentum of the jet and its invariant mass mJ. For small jet areas there are additional large logarithms of the jet radius R, which affect the convergence of the

  17. Predictions of Crystal Structure Based on Radius Ratio: How Reliable Are They?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Lawrence C.

    1985-01-01

    Discussion of crystalline solids in undergraduate curricula often includes the use of radius ratio rules as a method for predicting which type of crystal structure is likely to be adopted by a given ionic compound. Examines this topic, establishing more definitive guidelines for the use and reliability of the rules. (JN)

  18. Team physician #5. Salter-Harris type I fracture of the distal radius due to weightlifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, A P; Sponseller, P D

    1989-02-01

    A Salter-Harris Type I distal radius fracture was sustained by a skeletally immature adolescent while performing a supine bench press during weight training. Closed reduction was accomplished without difficulty. Fractures in adolescence due to weightlifting are rare but illustrate the need for proper instruction and supervision.

  19. Estimate for the size of the compactification radius of a one extra dimension universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Rosa, Felipe S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pascoal, F [DEPARTAMENTO DE FISICA; Oliveira, L F [CIDADE UNIV; Farina, C [INSTITUTO DE FISICA

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we use the Casimir effect to probe the existence of one extra dimension. We begin by evaluating the Casimir pressure between two plates in a M{sup 4} x S{sup 1} manifold, and then use an appropriate statistical analysis in order to compare the theoretical expression with a recent experimental data and set bounds for the compactification radius.

  20. Geometrical adaptation in ulna and radius of cerebral palsy patients: measures and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, M.; van de Giessen, M.; Vroemen, J. C.; Veeger, H. E. J.; Maas, M.; Strackee, S. D.; Kreulen, M.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of significant forearm bone torsion might affect planning and evaluating treatment regimes in cerebral palsy patients. We aimed to evaluate the influence of longstanding wrist flexion, ulnar deviation, and forearm pronation due to spasticity on the bone geometries of radius and ulna.