WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface radiative energy

  1. Surface solar radiation from geostationary satellites for renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Istvan; Liu, Hongqing; Heidinger, Andrew; Goldberg, Mitchell

    With the launch of the new Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-R, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will begin a new era of geostationary remote sensing. One of its flagship instruments, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), will expand frequency and coverage of multispectral remote sensing of atmospheric and surface properties. Products derived from ABI measurements will primarily be heritage meteorological products (cloud and aerosol properties, precipitation, winds, etc.), but some will be for interdisciplinary use, such as for the solar energy industry. The planned rapid observations (5-15 minutes) from ABI provide an opportunity to obtain information needed for solar energy applications where frequent observations of solar radiation reaching the surface are essential for planning and load management. In this paper we describe a physical, radiative-transfer-based algorithm for the retrieval of surface solar irradiance that uses atmospheric and surface parameters derived independently from multispectral ABI radiances. The algorithm is designed to provide basic radiation budget products (total solar irradiance at the surface), as well as products specifically needed for the solar energy industry (average, midday and clear-sky insolation, clear-sky days, diffuse and direct normal radiation, etc.). Two alternative algorithms, which require less ABI atmosphere and surface products or no explicit knowledge of the surface albedo, are also explored along with their limitations. The accuracy of surface solar radiation retrievals are assessed using long-term MODIS and GOES satellite data and surface measurements at the Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) network.

  2. Surface energy budget responses to radiative forcing at Summit, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathaniel B.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Cox, Christopher J.; Noone, David; Persson, P. Ola G.; Steffen, Konrad

    2017-02-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet surface temperatures are controlled by an exchange of energy at the surface, which includes radiative, turbulent, and ground heat fluxes. Data collected by multiple projects are leveraged to calculate all surface energy budget (SEB) terms at Summit, Greenland, for the full annual cycle from July 2013 to June 2014 and extend to longer periods for the radiative and turbulent SEB terms. Radiative fluxes are measured directly by a suite of broadband radiometers. Turbulent sensible heat flux is estimated via the bulk aerodynamic and eddy correlation methods, and the turbulent latent heat flux is calculated via a two-level approach using measurements at 10 and 2 m. The subsurface heat flux is calculated using a string of thermistors buried in the snow pack. Extensive quality-control data processing produced a data set in which all terms of the SEB are present 75 % of the full annual cycle, despite the harsh conditions. By including a storage term for a near-surface layer, the SEB is balanced in this data set to within the aggregated uncertainties for the individual terms. November and August case studies illustrate that surface radiative forcing is driven by synoptically forced cloud characteristics, especially by low-level, liquid-bearing clouds. The annual cycle and seasonal diurnal cycles of all SEB components indicate that the non-radiative terms are anticorrelated to changes in the total radiative flux and are hence responding to cloud radiative forcing. Generally, the non-radiative SEB terms and the upwelling longwave radiation component compensate for changes in downwelling radiation, although exact partitioning of energy in the response terms varies with season and near-surface characteristics such as stability and moisture availability. Substantial surface warming from low-level clouds typically leads to a change from a very stable to a weakly stable near-surface regime with no solar radiation or from a weakly stable to neutral

  3. Urban Surface Radiative Energy Budgets Determined Using Aircraft Scanner Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Rickman, Doug L.; Estes, Maury G.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    the surface energy budget. Knowledge of it is important in any attempt to describe the radiative and mass fluxes which occur at the surface. Use of energy terms in modeling surface energy budgets allows the direct comparison of various land surfaces encountered in a urban landscape, from vegetated (forest and herbaceous) to non-vegetated (bare soil, roads, and buildings). These terms are also easily measured using remote sensing from aircraft or satellite platforms allowing one to examine the spacial variability. The partitioning of energy budget terms depends on the surface type. In natural landscapes, the partitioning is dependent on canopy biomass, leaf area index, aerodynamic roughness, and moisture status, all of which are influenced by the development stage of the ecosystem. In urban landscapes, coverage by man-made materials substantially alters the surface face energy budget. The remotely sensed data obtained from aircraft and satellites, when properly calibrated allows the measurement of important terms in the radiative surface energy budget a urban landscape scale.

  4. Radiation exchange between persons and surfaces for building energy simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorre, Mette Havgaard; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Dreau, Jerome Le

    2015-01-01

    Thermal radiation within buildings is a significant component of thermal comfort. Typically the methods applied for calculating view factors between a person and its building surfaces requires great computational time. This research developed a view factor calculation method suitable for building...

  5. Estimating radiative feedbacks from stochastic fluctuations in surface temperature and energy imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proistosescu, C.; Donohoe, A.; Armour, K.; Roe, G.; Stuecker, M. F.; Bitz, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    Joint observations of global surface temperature and energy imbalance provide for a unique opportunity to empirically constrain radiative feedbacks. However, the satellite record of Earth's radiative imbalance is relatively short and dominated by stochastic fluctuations. Estimates of radiative feedbacks obtained by regressing energy imbalance against surface temperature depend strongly on sampling choices and on assumptions about whether the stochastic fluctuations are primarily forced by atmospheric or oceanic variability (e.g. Murphy and Forster 2010, Dessler 2011, Spencer and Braswell 2011, Forster 2016). We develop a framework around a stochastic energy balance model that allows us to parse the different contributions of atmospheric and oceanic forcing based on their differing impacts on the covariance structure - or lagged regression - of temperature and radiative imbalance. We validate the framework in a hierarchy of general circulation models: the impact of atmospheric forcing is examined in unforced control simulations of fixed sea-surface temperature and slab ocean model versions; the impact of oceanic forcing is examined in coupled simulations with prescribed ENSO variability. With the impact of atmospheric and oceanic forcing constrained, we are able to predict the relationship between temperature and radiative imbalance in a fully coupled control simulation, finding that both forcing sources are needed to explain the structure of the lagged-regression. We further model the dependence of feedback estimates on sampling interval by considering the effects of a finite equilibration time for the atmosphere, and issues of smoothing and aliasing. Finally, we develop a method to fit the stochastic model to the short timeseries of temperature and radiative imbalance by performing a Bayesian inference based on a modified version of the spectral Whittle likelihood. We are thus able to place realistic joint uncertainty estimates on both stochastic forcing and

  6. Influences of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages on the land surface fluxes and radiative temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lianhong; Meyers, Tilden; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Hanson, Paul J.; Yang, Bai; Heuer, Mark; Hosman, Kevin P.; Liu, Qing; Riggs, Jeffery S.; Sluss, Dan; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2007-01-01

    The interest of this study was to develop an initial assessment on the potential importance of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages for land-atmosphere interactions, an issue that has been largely neglected so far. We conducted flux tower observations and model simulations at a temperate deciduous forest site in central Missouri in the summer of 2004. The model used was the comprehensive terrestrial ecosystem Fluxes and Pools Integrated Simulator (FAPIS). We first examined FAPIS performance by testing its predictions with and without the representation of biomass energy storages against measurements of surface energy and CO2 fluxes. We then evaluated the magnitudes and temporal patterns of the biomass energy storages calculated by FAPIS. Finally, the effects of biomass energy storages on land-atmosphere exchanges of sensible and latent heat fluxes and variations of land surface radiative temperature were investigated by contrasting FAPIS simulations with and without these storage terms. We found that with the representation of the two biomass energy storage terms, FAPIS predictions agreed with flux tower measurements fairly well; without the representation, however, FAPIS performance deteriorated for all predicted surface energy flux terms although the effect on the predicted CO2 flux was minimal. In addition, we found that the biomass heat storage and biochemical energy storage had clear diurnal patterns with typical ranges from -50 to 50 and -3 to 20 W m-2, respectively; these typical ranges were exceeded substantially when there were sudden changes in atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, FAPIS simulations without the energy storages produced larger sensible and latent heat fluxes during the day but smaller fluxes (more negative values) at night as compared with simulations with the energy storages. Similarly, without-storage simulations had higher surface radiative temperature during the day but lower radiative temperature at night, indicating that the

  7. An intercomparison and validation of satellite-based surface radiative energy flux estimates over the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihelä, Aku; Key, Jeffrey R.; Meirink, Jan Fokke; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Palo, Timo; Karlsson, Karl-Göran

    2017-05-01

    Accurate determination of radiative energy fluxes over the Arctic is of crucial importance for understanding atmosphere-surface interactions, melt and refreezing cycles of the snow and ice cover, and the role of the Arctic in the global energy budget. Satellite-based estimates can provide comprehensive spatiotemporal coverage, but the accuracy and comparability of the existing data sets must be ascertained to facilitate their use. Here we compare radiative flux estimates from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Synoptic 1-degree (SYN1deg)/Energy Balanced and Filled, Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) surface energy budget, and our own experimental FluxNet / Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring cLoud, Albedo and RAdiation (CLARA) data against in situ observations over Arctic sea ice and the Greenland Ice Sheet during summer of 2007. In general, CERES SYN1deg flux estimates agree best with in situ measurements, although with two particular limitations: (1) over sea ice the upwelling shortwave flux in CERES SYN1deg appears to be underestimated because of an underestimated surface albedo and (2) the CERES SYN1deg upwelling longwave flux over sea ice saturates during midsummer. The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer-based GEWEX and FluxNet-CLARA flux estimates generally show a larger range in retrieval errors relative to CERES, with contrasting tendencies relative to each other. The largest source of retrieval error in the FluxNet-CLARA downwelling shortwave flux is shown to be an overestimated cloud optical thickness. The results illustrate that satellite-based flux estimates over the Arctic are not yet homogeneous and that further efforts are necessary to investigate the differences in the surface and cloud properties which lead to disagreements in flux retrievals.

  8. Surface Radiation Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, Paul W. (Principal Investigator)

    The Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) data sets contain global 3-hourly, daily and monthly averages of surface longwave and shortwave radiative properties, cloud amount, and meteorological properties computed using models. The main input data for these models include cloud information, top-of-atmosphere radiances and profiles of atmospheric water vapor and temperature. Some of the input data include Earth Radiation Budget Energy (ERBE) top-of-atmosphere clear-sky albedo and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) radiances and cloud amount. SRB parameters derived for the renewable energy community are also available from the Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) data set. Other SRB data are available from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). [Mission Objectives] The objective of the SRB Project is to produce and archive a global data set of shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) surface and top of the atmosphere parameters. The data generated in the SRB project may be used in conjunction with other data sets to facilitate the development of renewable energy resources and increase understanding of radiative properties within the meteorological community. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1983-07-01; Stop_Date=2005-06-30] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180].

  9. High energy radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vosburgh, K.G.

    1975-01-01

    The high energy radiation detector described comprises a set of closely spaced wedge reflectors. Each wedge reflector is composed of three sides forming identical isoceles triangles with a common apex and an open base forming an equilateral triangle. The length of one side of the base is less than the thickness of the coat of material sensitive to high energy radiation. The wedge reflectors reflect the light photons spreading to the rear of the coat in such a way that each reflected track is parallel to the incident track of the light photon spreading rearwards. The angle of the three isosceles triangles with a common apex is between 85 and 95 deg. The first main surface of the coat of high energy radiation sensitive material is in contact with the projecting edges of the surface of the wedge reflectors of the reflecting element [fr

  10. Revisiting the Cause of the 1989-2009 Arctic Surface Warming Using the Surface Energy Budget: Downward Infrared Radiation Dominates the Surface Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sukyoung; Gong, Tingting; Feldstein, Steven B.; Screen, James A.; Simmonds, Ian

    2017-10-01

    The Arctic has been warming faster than elsewhere, especially during the cold season. According to the leading theory, ice-albedo feedback warms the Arctic Ocean during the summer, and the heat gained by the ocean is released during the winter, causing the cold-season warming. Screen and Simmonds (2010; SS10) concluded that the theory is correct by comparing trend patterns in surface air temperature (SAT), surface turbulence heat flux (HF), and net surface infrared radiation (IR). However, in this comparison, downward IR is more appropriate to use. By analyzing the same data used in SS10 using the surface energy budget, it is shown here that over most of the Arctic the skin temperature trend, which closely resembles the SAT trend, is largely accounted for by the downward IR, not the HF, trend.

  11. Surface dose measurements under stretched, perforated thermoplast sheets and under protective wound dressings for high energy photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudenraus, J.; Christ, G.

    2000-01-01

    Patient fixation masks made of perforated thermoplast sheets are widely used in radiotherapy. These masks in particular serve to immobilize the head and neck region during radiation treatment. We placed samples made of differently stretched, perforated mask material on the surface of a white polystyrene (RW3) phantom and measured for high energy photon beams from Co-60 radiation up to 25 MV bremsstrahlung the dose increase resulting from the build-up under the hole and bridge areas. Depending on the energy of the incident beam and the thickness of the stretched mask material we observed a dose increase under the bridges at the phantom surface of 55% up to 140% compared to the dose without a layer of mask material. Under a hole the dose increase is almost half the value found under a bridge. However, deeper than 1 mm under the phantom surface this difference in dose increase under holes and bridges decreases to less than 10%. The mean dose increase under a perforated thermoplast sheet is lower than the dose increase under a homogeneous sheet made of the same material with the same mean thickness. Radiation induced skin lesions or an ulcerating tumour, respectively, may require a protective wound dressing under a patient fixation mask during radiation therapy. Choosing a thin hydrocolloid wound dressing the additional dose increase of the skin, compared to the dose increase due to the fixation mask, can be kept low. (orig.) [de

  12. Radiative Energy Budgets of Phototrophic Surface-Associated Microbial Communities and their Photosynthetic Efficiency Under Diffuse and Collimated Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Brodersen, Kasper E; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the radiative energy budgets of a heterogeneous photosynthetic coral reef sediment and a compact uniform cyanobacterial biofilm on top of coastal sediment. By combining electrochemical, thermocouple and fiber-optic microsensor measurements of O 2 , temperature and light, we could calculate the proportion of the absorbed light energy that was either dissipated as heat or conserved by photosynthesis. We show, across a range of different incident light regimes, that such radiative energy budgets are highly dominated by heat dissipation constituting up to 99.5% of the absorbed light energy. Highest photosynthetic energy conservation efficiency was found in the coral sediment under low light conditions and amounted to 18.1% of the absorbed light energy. Additionally, the effect of light directionality, i.e., diffuse or collimated light, on energy conversion efficiency was tested on the two surface-associated systems. The effects of light directionality on the radiative energy budgets of these phototrophic communities were not unanimous but, resulted in local spatial differences in heat-transfer, gross photosynthesis, and light distribution. The light acclimation index, E k , i.e., the irradiance at the onset of saturation of photosynthesis, was >2 times higher in the coral sediment compared to the biofilm and changed the pattern of photosynthetic energy conservation under light-limiting conditions. At moderate to high incident irradiances, the photosynthetic conservation of absorbed energy was highest in collimated light; a tendency that changed in the biofilm under sub-saturating incident irradiances, where higher photosynthetic efficiencies were observed under diffuse light. The aim was to investigate how the physical structure and light propagation affected energy budgets and light utilization efficiencies in loosely organized vs. compact phototrophic sediment under diffuse and collimated light. Our results suggest that the optical properties and the

  13. Influence of inhomogeneous surface heat capacity on the estimation of radiative response coefficients in a two-zone energy balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungmin; Choi, Yong-Sang

    2018-04-01

    Observationally constrained values of the global radiative response coefficient are pivotal to assess the reliability of modeled climate feedbacks. A widely used approach is to measure transient global radiative imbalance related to surface temperature changes. However, in this approach, a potential error in the estimate of radiative response coefficients may arise from surface inhomogeneity in the climate system. We examined this issue theoretically using a simple two-zone energy balance model. Here, we dealt with the potential error by subtracting the prescribed radiative response coefficient from those calculated within the two-zone framework. Each zone was characterized by the different magnitude of the radiative response coefficient and the surface heat capacity, and the dynamical heat transport in the atmosphere between the zones was parameterized as a linear function of the temperature difference between the zones. Then, the model system was forced by randomly generated monthly varying forcing mimicking time-varying forcing like an observation. The repeated simulations showed that inhomogeneous surface heat capacity causes considerable miscalculation (down to -1.4 W m-2 K-1 equivalent to 31.3% of the prescribed value) in the global radiative response coefficient. Also, the dynamical heat transport reduced this miscalculation driven by inhomogeneity of surface heat capacity. Therefore, the estimation of radiative response coefficients using the surface temperature-radiation relation is appropriate for homogeneous surface areas least affected by the exterior.

  14. Radiation energy detector and analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation detector array and a method for measuring the spectral content of radiation. The radiation sensor or detector is an array or stack of thin solid-electrolyte batteries. The batteries, arranged in a stack, may be composed of independent battery cells or may be arranged so that adjacent cells share a common terminal surface. This common surface is possible since the polarity of the batteries with respect to an adjacent battery is unrestricted, allowing a reduction in component parts of the assembly and reducing the overall stack length. Additionally, a test jig or chamber for allowing rapid measurement of the voltage across each battery is disclosed. A multichannel recorder and display may be used to indicate the voltage gradient change across the cells, or a small computer may be used for rapidly converting these voltage readings to a graph of radiation intensity versus wavelength or energy. The behavior of the batteries when used as a radiation detector and analyzer are such that the voltage measurements can be made at leisure after the detector array has been exposed to the radiation, and it is not necessary to make rapid measurements as is now done

  15. Nuclear energy and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.; Johnson, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Both the light water reactor and the Canadian heavy water reactor systems produce electricity cheaply and efficiently. They produce some fissionable byproducts, which can be recycled to extend energy sources many-fold. Besides the production of electrical power, the nuclear industry produces various radioistopes used for treatment of cancer, in diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine, in ionization smoke detectors, and as radioactive tracers with various technological applications including the study of the mechanisms of life. The increment in environmental radiation levels resulting from operation of nuclear power reactors represents a very small fraction of the radiation levels to which we are all exposed from natural sources, and of the average radiation exposures resulting from diagnostic procedures in the healing arts. The total health hazard of the complete nuclear power cycle is generally agreed to be smaller than the hazards associated with the generation of an equal amount of electricity from most other currently available sources of energy. The hazards from energy production in terms of shortened life expectancy are much smaller in all cases than the resulting increase in health and life expectancy. (auth)

  16. GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Release-3.0 data sets contains global 3-hourly, daily, monthly/3-hourly, and monthly averages of surface and top-of...

  17. Fire-induced albedo change and surface radiative forcing in sub-Saharan Africa savanna ecosystems: Implications for the energy balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dintwe, Kebonye; Okin, Gregory S.; Xue, Yongkang

    2017-06-01

    Surface albedo is a critical parameter that controls surface energy balance. In dryland ecosystems, fires play a significant role in decreasing surface albedo, resulting in positive radiative forcing. Here we investigate the long-term effect of fire on surface albedo. We devised a method to calculate short-, medium-, and long-term effect of fire-induced radiative forcing and their relative effects on energy balance. We used Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data in our analysis, covering different vegetation classes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Our analysis indicated that mean short-term fire-induced albedo change in SSA was -0.022, -0.035, and -0.041 for savannas, shrubland, and grasslands, respectively. At regional scale, mean fire-induced albedo change in savannas was -0.018 and -0.024 for northern sub-Saharan of Africa and the southern hemisphere Africa, respectively. The short-term mean fire-induced radiative forcing in burned areas in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) was 5.41 W m-2, which contributed continental and global radiative forcings of 0.25 and 0.058 W m-2, respectively. The impact of fire in surface albedo has long-lasting effects that varies with vegetation type. The long-term energetic effects of fire-induced albedo change and associated radiative forcing were, on average, more than 19 times greater across SSA than the short-term effects, suggesting that fires exerted far more radiative forcing than previously thought. Taking into account the actual duration of fire's effect on surface albedo, we conclude that the contribution of SSA fires, globally and throughout the year, is 0.12 W m-2. These findings provide crucial information on possible impact of fire on regional climate variability.

  18. Dosimetry of high energy radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Sahare, P D

    2018-01-01

    High energy radiation is hazardous to living beings and a threat to mankind. The correct estimation of the high energy radiation is a must and a single technique may not be very successful. The process of estimating the dose (the absorbed energy that could cause damages) is called dosimetry. This book covers the basic technical knowledge in the field of radiation dosimetry. It also makes readers aware of the dangers and hazards of high energy radiation.

  19. Surface radiation budget in the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) effort and in the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlock, Thomas P.; Smith, G. L.; Rose, Fred G.

    1990-01-01

    The surface radiation budget (SRB) and the atmospheric radiative flux divergence (ARD) are vital components of the weather and climate system. The importance of radiation in a complex international scientific endeavor, the GEWEX of the World Climate Research Programme is explained. The radiative transfer techniques and satellite instrumentation that will be used to retrieve the SRB and ARD later in this decade with the CERES are discussed; CERES is a component of the Earth Observing System satellite program. Examples of consistent SRB and ARD retrievals made with Nimbus-7 and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project data from July 1983 are presented.

  20. Sound radiation from finite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    A method to account for the effect of finite size in acoustic power radiation problem of planar surfaces using spatial windowing is developed. Cremer and Heckl presents a very useful formula for the power radiating from a structure using the spatially Fourier transformed velocity, which combined...... with spatially windowing of a plane waves can be used to take into account the finite size. In the present paper, this is developed by means of a radiation impedance for finite surfaces, that is used instead of the radiation impedance for infinite surfaces. In this way, the spatial windowing is included...... in the radiation formula directly, and no pre-windowing is needed. Examples are given for the radiation efficiency, and the results are compared with results found in the literature....

  1. Radiation versus radiation: nuclear energy in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.; Anderer, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper seeks to provide a proper perspective on radiation exposures from nuclear energy. Instead of comparing these exposures with other pollutants, natural and man-made, it assesses the radiation doses that result from the human environment and from the entire fuel cycle associated with nuclear generated electricity. It explores radiation versus radiation, not only in terms of absolute levels but, more importantly, of the enormous variability characterizing many radiation sources. The quantitative findings and their implications are meant to contribute to a balanced understanding of the radiological impact of nuclear energy, and so to help to bridge the information gap that is perceived to exist on this issue. The 1988 Unscear report and its seven scientific annexes provide an authoritative and dispassionate factual basis for examining radiation levels from all sources, natural and man-made. It is the main source for this paper. (author)

  2. The influence of the solar radiation model on the calcutated solar radiation from a horizontal surface to a tilted surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Lund, Hans; Furbo, Simon

    2004-01-01

    in the calculation. The weather data are measured at the solar radiation measurement station, SMS at the Department of Civil Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark. In this study the weather data are combined with solar collector calculations based on solar collector test carried out at Solar Energy...... Center, SEC, Denmark. With measured solar radiation on horizontal and the different solar radiation processing models the total radiation is calculated on differently tilted and oriented surfaces and compared with the measured solar radiation on the different surfaces. Further, the impact on the yearly......Measured solar radiation data are most commonly available as total solar radiation on a horizontal surface. When using solar radiation measured on horizontal to calculate the solar radiation on tilted surfaces and thereby the thermal performance of different applications such as buildings and solar...

  3. Surface meteorology and Solar Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, Paul W. (Principal Investigator)

    The Release 5.1 Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) data contains parameters formulated for assessing and designing renewable energy systems. Parameters fall under 11 categories including: Solar cooking, solar thermal applications, solar geometry, tilted solar panels, energy storage systems, surplus product storage systems, cloud information, temperature, wind, other meteorological factors, and supporting information. This latest release contains new parameters based on recommendations by the renewable energy industry and it is more accurate than previous releases. On-line plotting capabilities allow quick evaluation of potential renewable energy projects for any region of the world. The SSE data set is formulated from NASA satellite- and reanalysis-derived insolation and meteorological data for the 10-year period July 1983 through June 1993. Results are provided for 1 degree latitude by 1 degree longitude grid cells over the globe. Average daily and monthly measurements for 1195 World Radiation Data Centre ground sites are also available. [Mission Objectives] The SSE project contains insolation and meteorology data intended to aid in the development of renewable energy systems. Collaboration between SSE and technology industries such as the Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewables ( HOMER ) may aid in designing electric power systems that employ some combination of wind turbines, photovoltaic panels, or diesel generators to produce electricity. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1983-07-01; Stop_Date=1993-06-30] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180].

  4. ISLSCP II Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Radiation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains global Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) and a few top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation budget parameters on a 1-degree x 1-degree spatial...

  5. ISLSCP II Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Radiation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains global Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) and a few top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation budget parameters on a 1-degree x 1-degree spatial...

  6. Multisource Estimation of Long-term Global Terrestrial Surface Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, L.; Sheffield, J.

    2017-12-01

    Land surface net radiation is the essential energy source at the earth's surface. It determines the surface energy budget and its partitioning, drives the hydrological cycle by providing available energy, and offers heat, light, and energy for biological processes. Individual components in net radiation have changed historically due to natural and anthropogenic climate change and land use change. Decadal variations in radiation such as global dimming or brightening have important implications for hydrological and carbon cycles. In order to assess the trends and variability of net radiation and evapotranspiration, there is a need for accurate estimates of long-term terrestrial surface radiation. While large progress in measuring top of atmosphere energy budget has been made, huge discrepancies exist among ground observations, satellite retrievals, and reanalysis fields of surface radiation, due to the lack of observational networks, the difficulty in measuring from space, and the uncertainty in algorithm parameters. To overcome the weakness of single source datasets, we propose a multi-source merging approach to fully utilize and combine multiple datasets of radiation components separately, as they are complementary in space and time. First, we conduct diagnostic analysis of multiple satellite and reanalysis datasets based on in-situ measurements such as Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA), existing validation studies, and other information such as network density and consistency with other meteorological variables. Then, we calculate the optimal weighted average of multiple datasets by minimizing the variance of error between in-situ measurements and other observations. Finally, we quantify the uncertainties in the estimates of surface net radiation and employ physical constraints based on the surface energy balance to reduce these uncertainties. The final dataset is evaluated in terms of the long-term variability and its attribution to changes in individual

  7. Radiation Level Changes at RAM Package Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opperman, Erich [Washington Savannah River Company; Hawk, Mark B [ORNL; Kapoor, Ashok [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Packaging and Transportation; Natali, Ronald [R. B. Natali Consulting, Inc.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will explore design considerations required to meet the regulations that limit radiation level variations at external surfaces of radioactive material (RAM) packages. The radiation level requirements at package surfaces (e.g. TS-R-1 paragraphs 531 and 646) invoke not only maximum radiation levels, but also strict limits on the allowable increase in the radiation level during transport. This paper will explore the regulatory requirements by quantifying the amount of near surface movement and/or payload shifting that results in a 20% increase in the radiation level at the package surface. Typical IP-2, IP-3, Type A and Type B packaging and source geometries will be illustrated. Variations in surface radiation levels are typically the result of changes in the geometry of the surface due to an impact, puncture or crush event, or shifting and settling of radioactive contents.

  8. Surface Radiation from GOES: A Physical Approach; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

    2012-09-01

    Models to compute Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) have been in development over the last 3 decades. These models can be classified as empirical or physical, based on the approach. Empirical models relate ground based observations with satellite measurements and use these relations to compute surface radiation. Physical models consider the radiation received from the earth at the satellite and create retrievals to estimate surface radiation. While empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation for the solar energy industry the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from NOAA that computes GHI using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the GOES satellites. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and uses those properties in a radiative transfer model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, University of Wisconsin and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a 4 km GHI and DNI product every 30 minutes. This paper presents an outline of the methodology and a comprehensive validation using high quality ground based solar data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) (http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/surfrad/sitepage.html) and Integrated Surface Insolation Study (ISIS) http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/isis/isissites.html), the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sun Spot One (SS1) stations.

  9. Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy data - over 200 satellite-derived meteorology and solar energy parameters, monthly averaged from 22 years of data, global solar...

  10. Estimation of surface energy fluxes under complex terrain of Mt. Qomolangma over the Tibetan Plateau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Xuelong; Su, Zhongbo; Ma, Y.; Yang, K.; Wang, B.

    2013-01-01

    Surface solar radiation is an important parameter in surface energy balance models and in estimation of evapotranspiration. This study developed a DEM based radiation model to estimate instantaneous clear sky solar radiation for surface energy balance system to obtain accurate energy absorbed by the

  11. Decadal Changes in Surface Radiative Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, M.

    2009-05-01

    Recent evidence suggests that radiative fluxes incident at the Earth surface are not stable over time but undergo significant changes on decadal timescales. This is not only found in the thermal spectral range, where an increase in the downwelling flux is expected with the increasing greenhouse effect, but also in the solar range. Observations suggest that surface solar radiation, after decades of decline ("global dimming"), reversed into a "brightening" since the mid-1980s at widespread locations. This presentation gives an update on recent investigations related to the decadal variations in these fluxes, based on both observational and modeling approaches. Updated observational data, archived at the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) at ETH Zurich, suggest a continuation of surface solar brightening beyond the year 2000 at numerous locations, yet less pronounced and coherent than during the 1990s, with more regions with no clear changes or declines. Current global climate models as used in the IPCC-AR4 report typically do not reproduce the observed decadal variations to their full extent. Modeling attempts to improve this situation are under way at ETH, based on a global climate model which includes a sophisticated interactive treatment of aerosol and cloud microphysics (ECHAM5-HAM). Further the impact of the decadal changes in surface radiative forcings on different aspects of the global climate system and climate change is discussed, such as 20th century day- and nighttime warming, evapotranspiration changes and the varying intensity of the hydrological cycle as well as the terrestrial carbon cycle. Selected related references: Wild, M., and Co-authors, 2005: From dimming to brightening: Decadal changes in solar radiation at the Earth's surface. Science, 308, 847-850 Wild, M., 2007: Decadal changes in surface radiative fluxes and their importance in the context of global climate change, in: Climate Variability and Extremes during the Past 100 years, Advances

  12. The surface energy of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Ruban, Andrei; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1998-01-01

    We have used density functional theory to establish a database of surface energies for low index surfaces of 60 metals in the periodic table. The data may be used as a consistent starting point for models of surface science phenomena. The accuracy of the database is established in a comparison...

  13. High energy radiation from neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruderman, M.

    1985-04-01

    Topics covered include young rapidly spinning pulsars; static gaps in outer magnetospheres; dynamic gaps in pulsar outer magnetospheres; pulse structure of energetic radiation sustained by outer gap pair production; outer gap radiation, Crab pulsar; outer gap radiation, the Vela pulsar; radioemission; and high energy radiation during the accretion spin-up of older neutron stars. 26 refs., 10 figs

  14. Sensitivity of surface temperature to radiative forcing by contrail cirrus in a radiative-mixing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Ulrich; Mayer, Bernhard

    2017-11-01

    Earth's surface temperature sensitivity to radiative forcing (RF) by contrail cirrus and the related RF efficacy relative to CO2 are investigated in a one-dimensional idealized model of the atmosphere. The model includes energy transport by shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiation and by mixing in an otherwise fixed reference atmosphere (no other feedbacks). Mixing includes convective adjustment and turbulent diffusion, where the latter is related to the vertical component of mixing by large-scale eddies. The conceptual study shows that the surface temperature sensitivity to given contrail RF depends strongly on the timescales of energy transport by mixing and radiation. The timescales are derived for steady layered heating (ghost forcing) and for a transient contrail cirrus case. The radiative timescales are shortest at the surface and shorter in the troposphere than in the mid-stratosphere. Without mixing, a large part of the energy induced into the upper troposphere by radiation due to contrails or similar disturbances gets lost to space before it can contribute to surface warming. Because of the different radiative forcing at the surface and at top of atmosphere (TOA) and different radiative heating rate profiles in the troposphere, the local surface temperature sensitivity to stratosphere-adjusted RF is larger for SW than for LW contrail forcing. Without mixing, the surface energy budget is more important for surface warming than the TOA budget. Hence, surface warming by contrails is smaller than suggested by the net RF at TOA. For zero mixing, cooling by contrails cannot be excluded. This may in part explain low efficacy values for contrails found in previous global circulation model studies. Possible implications of this study are discussed. Since the results of this study are model dependent, they should be tested with a comprehensive climate model in the future.

  15. Sensitivity of surface temperature to radiative forcing by contrail cirrus in a radiative-mixing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schumann

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Earth's surface temperature sensitivity to radiative forcing (RF by contrail cirrus and the related RF efficacy relative to CO2 are investigated in a one-dimensional idealized model of the atmosphere. The model includes energy transport by shortwave (SW and longwave (LW radiation and by mixing in an otherwise fixed reference atmosphere (no other feedbacks. Mixing includes convective adjustment and turbulent diffusion, where the latter is related to the vertical component of mixing by large-scale eddies. The conceptual study shows that the surface temperature sensitivity to given contrail RF depends strongly on the timescales of energy transport by mixing and radiation. The timescales are derived for steady layered heating (ghost forcing and for a transient contrail cirrus case. The radiative timescales are shortest at the surface and shorter in the troposphere than in the mid-stratosphere. Without mixing, a large part of the energy induced into the upper troposphere by radiation due to contrails or similar disturbances gets lost to space before it can contribute to surface warming. Because of the different radiative forcing at the surface and at top of atmosphere (TOA and different radiative heating rate profiles in the troposphere, the local surface temperature sensitivity to stratosphere-adjusted RF is larger for SW than for LW contrail forcing. Without mixing, the surface energy budget is more important for surface warming than the TOA budget. Hence, surface warming by contrails is smaller than suggested by the net RF at TOA. For zero mixing, cooling by contrails cannot be excluded. This may in part explain low efficacy values for contrails found in previous global circulation model studies. Possible implications of this study are discussed. Since the results of this study are model dependent, they should be tested with a comprehensive climate model in the future.

  16. In situ photoemission spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation for O2 translational kinetic energy induced oxidation processes of partially-oxidized Si(001) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraoka, Yuden; Yoshigoe, Akitaka

    2001-01-01

    The influence of translational kinetic energy of incident O 2 molecules for the passive oxidation process of partially-oxidized Si(001) surfaces has been studied by photoemission spectroscopy. The translational kinetic energy of O 2 molecules was controlled up to 3 eV by a supersonic seed beam technique using a high temperature nozzle. Two translational kinetic energy thresholds (1.0 eV and 2.6 eV) were found out in accordance with the first-principles calculation for the oxidation of clean surfaces. Si-2p photoemission spectra measured in representative translational kinetic energies revealed that the translational kinetic energy dependent oxidation of dimers and the second layer (subsurface) backbonds were caused by the direct dissociative chemisorption of O 2 molecules. Moreover, the difference in chemical bonds for oxygen atoms was found out to be as low and high binding energy components in O-1s photoemission spectra. Especially, the low binding energy component increased with increasing the translational kinetic energy that indicates the translational kinetic energy induced oxidation in backbonds. (author)

  17. Deflagration wave with radiative energy transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamba, Moritake; Niu, Keishiro.

    1981-02-01

    Numerical calculations are carried out to analyze spatial structures of stationary deflagration waves formed in slab targets. In the analysis, radiative energy transport is taken into account. Profiles of radiative energy flux differ depending on the states of the outer-layer material of the target (solid or plasma). However radiative energy transport plays a negligible role in deflagration-wave structures formed by light-ion beam. (author)

  18. Radiation curable coatings having nonadherent surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaske, J.E.; Georgas, N.T.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation polymerizable coatings having nonadherent surfaces are provided utilizing nonaqueous emulsions of a liquid alkyl hydrogen polysiloxane in a radiation polymerizable polyethylenic liquid. Polyacrylates in combination with amines, and ultraviolet photosensitizers are particularly contemplated for rapid nonair inhibited ultraviolet cure. 13 claims

  19. SURFACE ENERGY BALANCE OVER ORANGE ORCHARD USING SURFACE RENEWAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Barbagallo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Reliable estimation of surface sensible and latent heat flux is the most important process to appraise energy and mass exchange among atmosphere and biosphere. In this study the surface energy fluxes were measured over an irrigated orange orchard during 2005-2008 monitoring periods using a Surface Renewal- Energy Balance approach. The experimental area is located in a representative orchard growing area of eastern Sicily (Italy. The performance of Surface Renewal (SR analysis for estimating sensible heat flux (H was analysed and evaluated in terms of correlation with H fluxes from the eddy covariance (EC method. Study revealed that the mean available energy (RN- G and latent heat flux (LE were of about 300 W m-2 and 237 W m-2, respectively, during dry periods and unstable-case atmospheric conditions. The estimated crop coefficient Kc values for the orchard crop averaged close to 0.80, which is considerably higher than previous FAO studies that found the value to be 0.65 for citrus with 70% of ground cover. The intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (LI PAR by the crop was measured and relationships between LAI and crop coefficient (Kc were established.

  20. Radiative decay of surface plasmons on nonspherical silver particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.W.; Ferrell, T.L.; Callcott, T.A.; Arakawa, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the radiation emitted by electron-bombarded silver particles. Electron micrographs have shown that the particles, obtained by heating thin (5 nm) silver films, were oblate (flattened) with minor axes aligned along the substrate normal. The characteristic wavelength obtained by bombarding these particles with 15-keV electrons was found to vary with angle of photon emission. We have modeled this wavelength shift as a result of the mixture of radiation from dipole and quadrupole surface-plasmon oscillations on oblate spheroids. Experimental observations of the energy, polarization, and angular distribution of the emitted radiation are in good agreement with theoretical calculations

  1. Global distribution of Earth's surface shortwave radiation budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hatzianastassiou

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The monthly mean shortwave (SW radiation budget at the Earth's surface (SRB was computed on 2.5-degree longitude-latitude resolution for the 17-year period from 1984 to 2000, using a radiative transfer model accounting for the key physical parameters that determine the surface SRB, and long-term climatological data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP-D2. The model input data were supplemented by data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction - National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP-NCAR and European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF Global Reanalysis projects, and other global data bases such as TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS and Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS. The model surface radiative fluxes were validated against surface measurements from 22 stations of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN covering the years 1992-2000, and from 700 stations of the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA, covering the period 1984-2000. The model is in good agreement with BSRN and GEBA, with a negative bias of 14 and 6.5 Wm-2, respectively. The model is able to reproduce interesting features of the seasonal and geographical variation of the surface SW fluxes at global scale. Based on the 17-year average model results, the global mean SW downward surface radiation (DSR is equal to 171.6 Wm-2, whereas the net downward (or absorbed surface SW radiation is equal to 149.4 Wm-2, values that correspond to 50.2 and 43.7% of the incoming SW radiation at the top of the Earth's atmosphere. These values involve a long-term surface albedo equal to 12.9%. Significant increasing trends in DSR and net DSR fluxes were found, equal to 4.1 and 3.7 Wm-2, respectively, over the 1984-2000 period (equivalent to 2.4 and 2.2 Wm-2 per decade, indicating an increasing surface solar radiative heating. This surface SW radiative heating is primarily attributed to clouds, especially low-level, and secondarily to

  2. Surface energy of explosive nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, Nicolas; Bidault, Xavier; Soulard, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    Recent experimental studies show that nanostructuration has a substantial impact on the detonation of high explosives: a nanostructured one leads to smaller nanodiamonds than a microstructured one. Whether it comes from a higher surface energy or from porosity, the origin of these different behaviors must be investigated. The surface energy of TATB nanoparticles with a radius from 2 nm upto 60 nm has been determined by means of ReaxFF-based simulations. Then, using the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and the equation of states of the bulk material, the contribution of this excess energy to the heating of a shock-compressed nanostructured (and porous) material is evaluated and compared to the thermal effect due to its porosity collapse. A maximum temperature increase of 50 K is found for 4-nm nanoparticles, which remains negligible when compared to the few hundred degrees induced by the compaction work.

  3. Natural radiation contribution to renewable energy searching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, M.; Lopez, A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Flores, M.; Huerta, M., E-mail: miguel.balcazar@inin.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos, Alejandro Volta 655, 58290 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    High anomalies of naturally occurring radon in geothermal fields are becoming an additional geophysics tool for determining the areas of geothermal activity underground. Under close collaboration with the Federal Electricity Board in Mexico (CFE), we have study four geothermal fields (Los Azufres, Tres Virgenes, Humeros and Acoculco) for extending the energy potentially. The heat source in hydrothermal systems produces geothermal gasses, which transport radon to the surface faster than the common diffusion process in absence of a geothermal activity. This paper presents: mechanism of radon production, main physical and chemical features that make it an excellent indicator for locating heat sources of geothermal reservoirs, the detection basis of in situ radon concentration using a high sensitive radiation chamber and the planning experimental strategy for successful use of this technique. (author)

  4. Natural radiation contribution to renewable energy searching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcazar, M.; Lopez, A.; Flores, M.; Huerta, M.

    2014-08-01

    High anomalies of naturally occurring radon in geothermal fields are becoming an additional geophysics tool for determining the areas of geothermal activity underground. Under close collaboration with the Federal Electricity Board in Mexico (CFE), we have study four geothermal fields (Los Azufres, Tres Virgenes, Humeros and Acoculco) for extending the energy potentially. The heat source in hydrothermal systems produces geothermal gasses, which transport radon to the surface faster than the common diffusion process in absence of a geothermal activity. This paper presents: mechanism of radon production, main physical and chemical features that make it an excellent indicator for locating heat sources of geothermal reservoirs, the detection basis of in situ radon concentration using a high sensitive radiation chamber and the planning experimental strategy for successful use of this technique. (author)

  5. Determination of Energy Fluxes Over Agricultural Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Argete

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available An energy budget was conducted over two kinds if surfaces: grass and corn canopy. The net radiative flux and the soil heat flux were directly measured while the latent and sensible heat flux were calculated from the vertical profiles if wet and dry-bulb temperature and wind speed. The crop storage flux was also estimated. Using the gradient or aerodynamic equations, the calculated fluxes when compared to the measured fluxes in the context of an energy budget gave an SEE = 63 Wm-2 over grass and SEE = 81 Wm-2 over corn canopy. The calculated fluxes compared reasonably well with those obtained using the Penman equations.For an energy budget research with limited instrumentation, the aerodynamic method performed satisfactorily in estimating the daytime fluxes, when atmospheric conditions are fully convective, but failed when conditions were stably stratified as during nighttime.

  6. Electromagnetic Energy Radiated from Mobile Phone Alters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [5,6] Electromagnetic energy is a form of energy emitted and absorbed by charged particles, has ... Background: Electromagnetic energy radiated from mobile phones did not show significant effect on the blood pressure, heart rate, ..... Case definitions for acute coronary heart disease in epidemiology and clinical research ...

  7. Radiation protection in nuclear energy. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The conference was convened to provide a forum for the exchange of international views on the principles of radiation protection for regulators and practitioners, to highlight issues of current importance, to examine the problems encountered in applying the principles of radiation protection, and, where possible, to identify generic solutions. A special session entitled ''The dose-response relationship: implications for nuclear energy'', and a panel on ''Radiation protection education and training'' were included in the conference programme. Refs, figs and tabs

  8. CERES Energy Balanced and Filled(EBAF) Surface Monthly means data in netCDF

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Energy Balanced and Filled (EBAF) Surface product provides computed monthly mean surface radiative fluxes...

  9. Radiative capture of slow electrons by tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, O.M.; Belkina, G.M.; Samarin, S.N.; Yakovlev, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Isochromatic spectra of radiation capture of slow electrons by the surface of mono- and polycrystal tungsten recorded on 322 and 405 nm wave lengths are presented. The effect of oxygen adsorption on isochromates of the (110) face of tungsten monocrystal is investigated. The obtained isochromatic spectra are compared with energy band structure of tungsten. Based on the analysis of the obtained experimental results it is assumed that optical transition to the final state at the energy of 7.3 eV relatively to Fermi level is conditioned by surface states of the tungsten face (110)

  10. Secondary radiation yield from a surface of heavy targets, irradiated by protons of average energies (E sub p approx 1 GeV)

    CERN Document Server

    Krupnyj, G I; Yanovich, A A

    2001-01-01

    Experimental data on the nuclear reaction rates of threshold rhodium, indium, phosphorus, sulfur, aluminium, carbon, niobium and bismuth activated detectors are presented. The detectors were set up on the cylindrical surface of full absorption targets: tungsten, uranium and chloride with the molar ratios of the 70 % NaCl and 30 % PbCl sub 2 salts. The targets were irradiated by protons with the energies from 0.8 to 1.21 GeV. Growth of the reaction rate with increasing reaction of primary protons and raising atomic number of the targets, presence of the target profile, where the maximum reaction rate is observed, are noted

  11. Nuclear energy, radiation and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few decades, energy has been the subject of much debate. Energy is the backbone of technology and economic development. Today, most machines run on electricity and they are needed to make anything and everything. Hence, our energy requirements have spiraled in the years following the industrial revolution. This rapid increase in use of energy has created problems of demand and supply in addition to the environmental consciousness which picked momentum in last decades of 20 th century. The impending crisis the world over due to overuse of nonrenewable energy sources to reduce this gap shall soon lead to a situation for all concerned to take a prudent decision to tap other sources of energy, including relatively new renewable sources. Future economic growth crucially depends on the long-term availability of energy from sources that are affordable, accessible and environmentally friendly. The drive for more energy has had the happy consequences of spawning new technologies and improving earlier ones. Emphasis on renewable sources has resulted in viable harnessing of solar, wind and tidal energies. Even though these sources offer relatively clean energy, their potential to supply reliable energy in large scale in an economically viable way is limited. Nuclear energy offers a major source of commercial energy, which is economic, reliable and environmentally benign

  12. Measurement of solar energy radiation in Abu Dhabi, UAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.D.; Kubo, I.; Ohadi, M.; Alili, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents data on measurement of actual solar radiation in Abu Dhabi (24.43 deg. N, 54.45 deg. E). Global solar radiation and surface temperatures were measured and analyzed for one complete year. High resolution, real-time solar radiation and other meteorological data were collected and processed. Daily and monthly average solar radiation values were calculated from the one-minute average recorded values. The highest daily and monthly mean solar radiation values were 369 and 290 W/m 2 , respectively. The highest one-minute average daily solar radiation was 1041 W/m 2 . Yearly average daily energy input was 18.48 MJ/m 2 /day. Besides the global solar radiation, the daily and monthly average clearness indexes along with temperature variations are discussed. When possible, global solar energy radiation and some meteorological data are compared with corresponding data in other Arab state capitals. The data collected indicate that Abu Dhabi has a strong potential for solar energy capture

  13. Radiation monitoring in high energy research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyajima, Mitsuhiro

    1975-01-01

    In High Energy Physics Research Laboratory, construction of high energy proton accelerator is in progress. The accelerator is a cascaded machine comprising Cockcroft type (50 keV), linac (20 MeV), booster synchrotron (500 MeV), and synchrotron (8-12 GeV). Its proton beam intensity is 1x10 13 photons/pulse, and acceleration is carried out at the rate of every 2 minutes. The essential problems of radiation control in high energy accelerators are those of various radiations generated secondarily by proton beam and a number of induced radiations simultaneously originated with such secondary particles. In the Laboratory, controlled areas are divided into color-coded four regions, red, orange, yellow and green, based on each dose-rate. BF 3 counters covered with thick paraffin are used as neutron detectors, and side-window GM tubes, NaI (Tl) scintillators and ionization chambers as γ-detectors. In red region, however, ionization chambers are applied to induced radiation detection, and neutrons are not monitored. NIM standards are adopted for the circuits of all above monitors considering easy maintenance, economy and interchangeability. Notwithstanding the above described systems, these monitors are not sufficient to complete the measurement of whole radiations over wide energy region radiated from the accelerators. Hence separate radiation field measurement is required periodically. An example of the monitoring systems in National Accelerator Laboratory (U.S.) is referred at the last section. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, D. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site, first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1), second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2), and third ARM Mobile Facility (AMF3) at Oliktok Point (OLI). A SEBS was also deployed with the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site, before it was decommissioned. Data from these sites, including the retired TWP, are available in the ARM Data Archive. The SEBS consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes.

  15. Energy spectroscopy studies of radiation-induced damaged surfaces and interfaces in SiO 2/Si by light charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhongquan, Ma; Qi, Guo; Tao, Jin

    1992-09-01

    In this paper, the three different experimental techniques of AES (Auger electron spectroscopy), ARXPS (angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) with C- V measurements have been applied to study damaged surfaces and interfaces of SiO 2Si in MOS. The defects, appearing at the surface of the dielectric layer and the interface between SiO 2 and Si, induced by energetic electron and/or hydrogen ion (H +) beams, were independently investigated using ARXPS and AES combined with DLTS, respectively. The more intermediate oxidation states, such as Si 1+, Si 2+ and Si 3+, corresponding to Si 2O, SiO and Si 2O 3 clusters formed at the surface and the transition regions, were obtained for the irradiated sample. The changes of the intensity, full width at half maximum (fwhm) and binding energy of each ARXPS spectrum with take-off angle showed that silicon-rich clusters or chains, and about 4.8 Å of an amorphous silicon, actually existed in the outermost surface as a result of preferential sputtering of oxygen by electron ionization and displacement by H +. The Si 2p core-level spectra were analyzed in terms of five chemically shifted components corresponding to the basic Si binding units SiO n with n = 0, 1, ⋯, 4. The concentration of these bonding units as a function of effective depth of emission was essentially in agreement with the random-bonding model. But some separation into a silicon-rich phase was also evident at intermediate stoichiometries and stacks. In addition, more dangling bonds of Si were present overall in the oxide layer, which acted with an amphoteric character and caused the defect states to lie in the lower half of the bandgap.

  16. Radiation exposure from nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The information booklet contains the following papers which were already reported: 1) Scientific advisory committee of the German Bundesaerztekammer (medical board): Statement on the subject hazard by nuclear power plants (Deutsches Aerzteblatt - Aerztliche Mitteilung 1975, p. 2821 et sequ.). 2) Recommendation of the German Commission on Radiological Protection dated from Feb. 19, 1976: On the toxicity of inhaled hot particles, especially plutonium. 3) Statement of the German Commission on Radiological Protection dated from Dec. 16, 1976: Comparability of natural radiation exposure with the exposure from nuclear facilities. 4) Report of the German Federal Goverment on Environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure in the year of 1975 (Bundestagsdrucksache 8/311 dated from Apr 22, 1977). (orig./HP) [de

  17. Solar radiation calculation methodology for building exterior surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Flor, Francisco Jose Sanchez; Ortiz Cebolla, Rafael; Luis Molina Felix, Jose; Alvarez Dominguez, Servando [E S. Ingenieros. Grupo de Termotecnia, Avda. de los descubrimientos, s/n 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2005-11-01

    The present article shows a new methodology of calculation of the direct, diffuse and reflected incident solar radiation, in all type of surfaces, either in open urban environments or inside buildings. This methodology is applicable in problems related to solar access (space heating in buildings, shadowing of open spaces), solar gains (space cooling in buildings), and daylighting. Solar radiation is the most important contribution to the surface and volumetric energy balance during the daytime. Particularly, solar radiation is the main contributor to heat gains in buildings, especially in residential buildings, where internal gains are very low. Utilization of daylight in buildings may result in significant savings in electricity consumption for lighting while creating a higher quality indoor environment. Additional energy savings may also be realized during cooling season, when reduction of internal heat gains due to electric lighting results in a corresponding reduction of cooling energy consumption. The analysis of the existing calculation methods and proposed in the scientific bibliography for the calculation of the solar radiation in problems of solar access in winter, solar gains in summer, and daylighting, takes us to the necessity of outlining a new and complete methodology. This new methodology is applicable to all these problems with a great accuracy and calculation speed. (author)

  18. Chambers nuclear energy and radiation dictionary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, P.M.B.

    1992-01-01

    This Dictionary is designed to make it easier for those who are concerned about nuclear power and radiation to learn more about nuclear energy and to come to an informed opinion. The first two of the 11 chapters which precede the dictionary proper describe the properties of the atomic nucleus which make nuclear energy possible and then the problems which have to be overcome in harnessing this energy. The next two chapters discuss the many different kinds of power stations which rely on fission and then the methods of fusion which may produce power in the next century. There are then two chapters on nuclear safety and on the production and enrichment of uranium fuel, together with methods for its eventual disposal. These are followed by a chapter on nuclear bombs of various kinds and one on how nuclear and other forms of radiation can be detected. There is then a chapter which relates the radiation resulting from nuclear fission to other kinds of radiation. The next chapter discusses some basic biology particularly cancer. Finally, the biological effects of radiation are described before comparing the amounts of man-made radiation to that which comes naturally from outer space and from the rocks beneath us. This then leads to the radiation limits which are determined by the various regulartory authorities and the kinds of evidence upon which their decisions are based. (Author)

  19. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic

  20. Surface radiation budget and cloud radiative forcing from pan-Arctic Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, C. J.; Long, C. N.; Crepinsek, S.; Maturilli, M.; McComiskey, A. C.; Miller, N.; Konopleva-Akish, E.; Kustov, V. Y.; Shupe, M.; Steffen, K.; Stanitski, D.; Starkweather, S.; Stone, R. S.; Uttal, T.; Walden, V. P.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring and forecasting of the seasonal melt of snow and ice in the Arctic is a priority need as Arctic climate changes and the number of stakeholders increases. Seasonal snow and ice melt represent the largest annual perturbation to the surface net radiation budget. Radiative interactions between clouds, the surface and the atmosphere play an important role on scales of minutes to decades, but models insufficiently represent cloud properties. Furthermore, the surface radiation budget is not directly observed from satellite platforms. Direct observations from the surface must therefore be used to document the physical and correlative relationships between variables, and to provide a baseline target for data sets with more comprehensive spatial representation. High-quality, continuous, long-term observations of radiative fluxes are collected from land stations surrounding the Arctic Basin as part of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). The International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) facilitates international collaboration amongst station scientists and other topic experts for the purposes of streamlining pan-Arctic synthesis studies. The IASOA Radiation Working Group is currently analyzing the data acquired from Barrow, Alaska (1993-2015), Alert, Canada (2004-2014), Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard (1993-2015), Eureka, Canada (2007-2015), and Tiksi, Russia (2011-2015). The measurements include upwelling and downwelling longwave and shortwave fluxes, as well as direct and diffuse shortwave flux components, and surface meteorology. The observations are post-processed using the Radiative Flux Analysis (RFA) method, which, in addition to basic quality control, provides value-added metrics such as cloud radiative forcing (CRF), optical depth, and fractional sky cover. Here, we present a spatial and temporal analysis of the surface radiation budget and calculated variables from the pan-Arctic BSRN stations. Particular attention is given to inter

  1. A radiation analysis of lunar surface habitats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, G.; Wilson, J.W.; Tripathi, R.K.; Clowdsley, M.S.; Nealy, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis is performed on the radiation environment found on the surface of the Moon, and applied to different possible lunar base mission scenarios. An optimization technique has been used to minimize the astronaut radiation exposure and at the same time control the effect of shielding, in terms of mass addition and material choice, as a mission cost driver. The optimization process performs minimization of mass along all phases of a mission scenario, considered in terms of time frame, equipment, location, crew characteristics and performance required, radiation exposure annual and career limit constraints (those proposed in NCRP 132), and implementation of the ALARA principle. In the lunar environment manned habitats are to host future crews involved in the construction and/or in the utilization of moon based infrastructure. Three different kinds of lunar missions are considered in the analysis, Moon Base Construction Phase, during which astronauts are on the surface just to build an outpost for future resident crews, Moon Base Outpost Phase, during which astronaut crews are resident but continuing exploration and installation activities, and Moon Base Routine Phase, with shifting resident crews. In each scenario various kinds of habitats, from very simple shelters to more complex bases, are considered in detail (e.g. shape, thickness, materials, etc) with considerations of various shielding strategies. The results for all scenarios clearly showed that the direct exposure to the space environment like in transfers and EVAs phases gives the most of the dose, with the proposed shielded habitats and shelters giving quite a good protection from radiation. Operational constraints on hardware and scenarios have all been considered by the optimization techniques. Within the limits of this preliminary analysis, the three Moon Base related mission scenarios are perfectly feasible from the astronaut radiation safety point of view with the currently adopted and proposed

  2. Surface treatment of CFRP composites using femtosecond laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, V.; Sharma, S. P.; de Moura, M. F. S. F.; Moreira, R. D. F.; Vilar, R.

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, we investigate the surface treatment of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites by laser ablation with femtosecond laser radiation. For this purpose, unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy matrix composites were treated with femtosecond laser pulses of 1024 nm wavelength and 550 fs duration. Laser tracks were inscribed on the material surface using pulse energies and scanning speeds in the range 0.1-0.5 mJ and 0.1-5 mm/s, respectively. The morphology of the laser treated surfaces was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. We show that, by using the appropriate processing parameters, a selective removal of the epoxy resin can be achieved, leaving the carbon fibers exposed. In addition, sub-micron laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are created on the carbon fibers surface, which may be potentially beneficial for the improvement of the fiber to matrix adhesion in adhesive bonds between CFRP parts.

  3. High energy radiation in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    Certain basic recommendations on the use of supervoltage radiation and radioisotope teletherapy in the treatment of malignant growths have been made by an expert study group which met in Vienna in August this y ear. The group, convened jointly by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, was composed of 20 radiotherapists and radiation physicists from 12 countries. High energy radiation, used in the treatment of malignant tumours, can be either in the form of gamma- or X-rays or in the form of beams of accelerated electrons. The source of radiation is kept at a certain distance from the patient. The study group was agreed on the value of supervoltage radiotherapy, including gamma-ray and high voltage x-ray therapy as well as electron beam therapy. The required gamma radiation can be obtained from large sources of radioactive materials like cobalt 60 or caesium 137, while electron beams are produced by high voltage accelerators. The experts considered the sources in four broad categories: large supervoltage units, intermediate units, small isotope units and units of electron beams or very high energy x-rays. Each group of source was described including its usage. The experts made it clear that while supervoltage radiation should be a part of an organized radiotherapy department, the radiation facilities at any particular establishment should not be of the supervoltage type alone. The high energy facilities could be fruitfully used only when there was a background of general radiotherapy. The group emphasized that supervoltage radiotherapy, in common with other forms of radiotherapy, should be conducted only by adequately trained and qualified personnel, including radiation physicists, and specified the training and qualifications required of such personnel. It was felt that specialized training was one of the main requirements at the present stage and the training programmes of IAEA and WHO should be utilized extensively for this

  4. Annual Cycles of Surface Shortwave Radiative Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, Anne C.; Smith, G. Louis; Gupta, Shashi K.; Stackhouse, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    The annual cycles of surface shortwave flux are investigated using the 8-yr dataset of the surface radiation budget (SRB) components for the period July 1983-June 1991. These components include the downward, upward, and net shortwave radiant fluxes at the earth's surface. The seasonal cycles are quantified in terms of principal components that describe the temporal variations and empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) that describe the spatial patterns. The major part of the variation is simply due to the variation of the insolation at the top of the atmosphere, especially for the first term, which describes 92.4% of the variance for the downward shortwave flux. However, for the second term, which describes 4.1% of the variance, the effect of clouds is quite important and the effect of clouds dominates the third term, which describes 2.4% of the variance. To a large degree the second and third terms are due to the response of clouds to the annual cycle of solar forcing. For net shortwave flux at the surface, similar variances are described by each term. The regional values of the EOFs are related to climate classes, thereby defining the range of annual cycles of shortwave radiation for each climate class.

  5. Energy conservation potential of surface modification technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, H.K.; Horne, D.M.; Silberglitt, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    This report assesses the energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries. The energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries is assessed by estimating their friction and wear tribological sinks and the subsequent reduction in these sinks when surface modified tools are used. Ion implantation, coatings, and laser and electron beam surface modifications are considered.

  6. Dosimetry of Low-Energy Beta Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Jette

    Useful techniques and procedures for derermination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy beta radiation were studied and evaluated. The four techniques included were beta spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical...... low-energy beta radiation field a moderated spectrum from a carbon-14 source was used. The measured responce of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreemant with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated response to electrons...

  7. On surface Raman scattering and luminescence radiation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Filipov, V; Schwarz, U; Armbrüster, M; Leithe-Jasper, A; Tanaka, T; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-02-03

    The discrepancy between Raman spectra of boron carbide obtained by Fourier transform Raman and conventional Raman spectrometry is systematically investigated. While at photon energies below the exciton energy (1.560 eV), Raman scattering of bulk phonons of boron carbide occurs, photon energies exceeding the fundamental absorption edge (2.09 eV) evoke additional patterns, which may essentially be attributed to luminescence or to the excitation of Raman-active processes in the surface region. The reason for this is the very high fundamental absorption in boron carbide inducing a very small penetration depth of the exciting laser radiation. Raman excitations essentially restricted to the boron carbide surface region yield spectra which considerably differ from bulk phonon ones, thus indicating structural modifications.

  8. Seasonal contrast in the surface energy balance of the Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. L.; Slingo, A.; Barnard, J. C.; Kassianov, E.

    2009-07-01

    Over much of the world, heating of the surface by sunlight is balanced predominately by evaporative cooling. However, at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) in Niamey, Niger, evaporation makes a significant contribution to the surface energy balance only at the height of the rainy season, when precipitation has replenished the reservoir of soil moisture. The AMF was placed at Niamey from late 2005 to early 2007 to provide measurements of surface fluxes in coordination with geostationary satellite retrievals of radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere, as part of the RADAGAST experiment to calculate atmospheric radiative divergence. We use observations at the mobile facility to investigate how the surface adjusts to radiative forcing throughout the year. The surface response to solar heating varies with changes in atmospheric water vapor associated with the seasonal reversal of the West African monsoon, which modulates the greenhouse effect and the ability of the surface to radiate thermal energy directly to space. During the dry season, sunlight is balanced mainly by longwave radiation and the turbulent flux of sensible heat. The ability of longwave radiation to cool the surface drops after the onset of southwesterly surface winds at Niamey, when moist, oceanic air flows onshore, increasing local column moisture and atmospheric opacity. Following the onset of southwesterly flow, evaporation remains limited by the supply of moisture from precipitation. By the height of the rainy season, however, sufficient precipitation has accumulated that evaporation is controlled by incident sunlight, and radiative forcing of the surface is balanced comparably by the latent, sensible, and longwave fluxes. Evaporation increases with the leaf area index, suggesting that plants are a significant source of atmospheric moisture and may tap moisture stored beneath the surface that accumulated during a previous rainy season. Surface radiative forcing

  9. Comparison of surface energy fluxes with satellite-derived surface energy flux estimates from a shrub-steppe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkham, Randy R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This thesis relates the components of the surface energy balance (i.e., net radiation, sensible and latent heat flux densities, soil heat flow) to remotely sensed data for native vegetation in a semi-arid environment. Thematic mapper data from Landsat 4 and 5 were used to estimate net radiation, sensible heat flux (H), and vegetation amount. Several sources of ground truth were employed. They included soil water balance using the neutron thermalization method and weighing lysimeters, and the measurement of energy fluxes with the Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) technique. Sensible and latent heat flux were measured at four sites on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site using a weighing lysimeter and/or BREB stations. The objective was to calibrate an aerodynamic transport equation that related H to radiant surface temperature. The transport equation was then used with Landsat thermal data to generate estimates of H and compare these estimates against H values obtained with BREB/lysimeters at the time of overflight. Landsat and surface meteorologic data were used to estimate the radiation budget terms at the surface. Landsat estimates of short-wave radiation reflected from the surface correlate well with reflected radiation measured using inverted Eppley pyranometers. Correlation of net radiation estimates determined from satellite data, pyranometer, air temperature, and vapor pressure compared to net radiometer values obtained at time of overflight were excellent for a single image, but decrease for multiple images. Soil heat flux, GT, is a major component of the energy balance in arid systems and G{sub T} generally decreases as vegetation cover increases. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values generated from Landsat thermatic mapper data were representative of field observations of the presence of green vegetation, but it was not possible to determine a single relationship between NDVI and GT for all sites.

  10. Evaluation of Arctic broadband surface radiation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Matsui

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ surface radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure incoming and outgoing shortwave (SW and thermal infrared, or longwave (LW, radiation. Enhancements may include various sensors for measuring irradiance in narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers that keep sensors and shading devices trained on the sun along its diurnal path. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating stations in a pristine undisturbed setting free of artificial blockage (such as from buildings and towers and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data in the Arctic include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the protective glass domes of the radiometers and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, comparisons are made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse SW measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of arctic radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both SW and LW measurements. Solutions to these operational problems that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols are proposed.

  11. Dosimetry of low-energy beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, J.

    1996-08-01

    Useful techniques and procedures for determination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy β radiation field were studied and evaluated in this project. The four different techniques included were β spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical low-energy β radiation field a moderated spectrum from a 14 C source (E β , max =156 keV) was chosen for the study. The measured response of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreement with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated responses to electrons indicates an additional dead layer thickness of about 12 μm in the Si(Li) detector. The depth-dose profiles measured with extrapolation chambers at two laboratories agreed very well, and it was confirmed that the fitting procedure previously reported for 147 Pm depth-dose profiles is also suitable for β radiation from 14 C. An increasing difference between measured and MC calculated dose rates for increasing absorber thickness was found, which is explained by limitations of the EGS4 code for transport of very low-energy electrons (below 10-20 keV). Finally a study of the thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) response of BeO thin film dosemeters to β radiation for radiation fields with maximum β energies ranging from 67 keV to 2.27 MeV is reported. For maximum β energies below approximately 500 keV, a decrease in the response amounting to about 20% was observed. It is thus concluded that a β dose higher than about 10 μGy can be measured with these dosemeters to within 0 to -20% independently of the βenergy for E β , max values down to 67 keV. (au) 12 tabs., 38 ills., 71 refs

  12. Ionizing radiation, nuclear energy and radiation protection for school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucena, E.A.; Reis, R.G.; Pinho, A.S.; Alves, A.S.; Rio, M.A.P.; Reis, A.A.; Silva, J.W.S.; Paula, G.A. de; Goncalves Junior, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays in 1895, ionizing radiation has been applied in many sectors of society, such as medicine, industry, safety, construction, engineering and research. However, population is unaware of both the applications of ionizing radiation and their risks and benefits. It can be seen that most people associate the terms 'radiation' and 'nuclear energy' with the atomic bomb or cancer, most likely because of warlike applications and the stealthy way radioactivity had been treated in the past. Thus, it is necessary to clarify the population about the main aspects related to the applications, risks and associated benefits. These knowledge can be disseminated in schools. Brazilian legislation for basic education provides for topics such as nuclear energy and radioactivity to high school students. However, some factors hamper such an educational practice, namely, few hours of class, textbooks do not address the subject, previous concepts obtained in the media, difficulty in dealing with the subject in the classroom, phobia, etc. One solution would be the approximation between schools and institutions that employ technologies involving radioactivity, which would allow students to know the practices, associated radiological protection, as well as the risks and benefits to society. Currently, with the increasing application of ionizing radiation, especially in medicine, it is necessary to demystify the use of radioactivity. (author)

  13. Surface energy budget and turbulent fluxes at Arctic terrestrial sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, Andrey; Persson, Ola; Uttal, Taneil; Konopleva-Akish, Elena; Crepinsek, Sara; Cox, Christopher; Fairall, Christopher; Makshtas, Alexander; Repina, Irina

    2017-04-01

    Determination of the surface energy budget (SEB) and all SEB components at the air-surface interface are required in a wide variety of applications including atmosphere-land/snow simulations and validation of the surface fluxes predicted by numerical models over different spatial and temporal scales. Here, comparisons of net surface energy budgets at two Arctic sites are made using long-term near-continuous measurements of hourly averaged surface fluxes (turbulent, radiation, and soil conduction). One site, Eureka (80.0 N; Nunavut, Canada), is located in complex topography near a fjord about 200 km from the Arctic Ocean. The other site, Tiksi (71.6 N; Russian East Siberia), is located on a relatively flat coastal plain less than 1 km from the shore of Tiksi Bay, a branch of the Arctic Ocean. We first analyzed diurnal and annual cycles of basic meteorological parameters and key SEB components at these locations. Although Eureka and Tiksi are located on different continents and at different latitudes, the annual course of the surface meteorology and SEB components are qualitatively similar. Surface energy balance closure is a formulation of the conservation of energy principle. Our direct measurements of energy balance for both Arctic sites show that the sum of the turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes and the ground (conductive) heat flux systematically underestimate the net radiation by about 25-30%. This lack of energy balance closure is a fundamental and pervasive problem in micrometeorology. We discuss a variety of factors which may be responsible for the lack of SEB closure. In particular, various storage terms (e.g., air column energy storage due to radiative and/or sensible heat flux divergence, ground heat storage above the soil flux plate, energy used in photosynthesis, canopy biomass heat storage). For example, our observations show that the photosynthesis storage term is relatively small (about 1-2% of the net radiation), but about 8-12% of the

  14. Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in liquid xenon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We calculated the adhesion energy, the surface traction and the surface energy of liquid xenon using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The value of the adhesion energy for liquid xenon at a reduced density of 0.630 was found to be 0.591 J/m2 and the surface traction has a peak at z = 3.32 Å. It was observed ...

  15. Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in liquid xenon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We calculated the adhesion energy, the surface traction and the surface energy of liquid xenon using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The value of the adhesion energy for liquid xenon at a reduced density of 0.630 was found to be 0.591 J/m2 and the surface traction has a peak at = 3.32 Å. It was observed that the ...

  16. Comparison of surface energy fluxes with satellite-derived surface energy flux estimates from a shrub-steppe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkham, R.R.

    1993-12-01

    This thesis relates the components of the surface energy balance (i.e., net radiation, sensible and latent heat flux densities, soil heat flow) to remotely sensed data for native vegetation in a semi-arid environment. Thematic mapper data from Landsat 4 and 5 were used to estimate net radiation, sensible heat flux (H), and vegetation amount. Several sources of ground truth were employed. They included soil water balance using the neutron thermalization method and weighing lysimeters, and the measurement of energy fluxes with the Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) technique. Sensible and latent heat flux were measured at four sites on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site using a weighing lysimeter and/or BREB stations. The objective was to calibrate an aerodynamic transport equation that related H to radiant surface temperature. The transport equation was then used with Landsat thermal data to generate estimates of H and compare these estimates against H values obtained with BREB/lysimeters at the time of overflight. Landsat and surface meteorologic data were used to estimate the radiation budget terms at the surface. Landsat estimates of short-wave radiation reflected from the surface correlate well with reflected radiation measured using inverted Eppley pyranometers. Correlation of net radiation estimates determined from satellite data, pyranometer, air temperature, and vapor pressure compared to net radiometer values obtained at time of overflight were excellent for a single image, but decrease for multiple images. Soil heat flux, G T , is a major component of the energy balance in arid systems and G T generally decreases as vegetation cover increases. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values generated from Landsat thermatic mapper data were representative of field observations of the presence of green vegetation, but it was not possible to determine a single relationship between NDVI and G T for all sites

  17. Potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, H.F. III.

    1976-01-01

    Research into potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 is described. Topics covered include: the fuzzy interface between surface chemistry catalysis and organometallic chemistry; potential energy surfaces for elementary fluorine hydrogen reactions; structure, energetics, and reactivity of carbenes; and the theory of self-consistent electron pairs

  18. Martian sub-surface ionising radiation: biosignatures and geology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Ward

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The surface of Mars, unshielded by thick atmosphere or global magnetic field, is exposed to high levels of cosmic radiation. This ionising radiation field is deleterious to the survival of dormant cells or spores and the persistence of molecular biomarkers in the subsurface, and so its characterisation is of prime astrobiological interest. Here, we present modelling results of the absorbed radiation dose as a function of depth through the Martian subsurface, suitable for calculation of biomarker persistence. A second major implementation of this dose accumulation rate data is in application of the optically stimulated luminescence technique for dating Martian sediments.

    We present calculations of the dose-depth profile in the Martian subsurface for various scenarios: variations of surface composition (dry regolith, ice, layered permafrost, solar minimum and maximum conditions, locations of different elevation (Olympus Mons, Hellas basin, datum altitude, and increasing atmospheric thickness over geological history. We also model the changing composition of the subsurface radiation field with depth compared between Martian locations with different shielding material, determine the relative dose contributions from primaries of different energies, and discuss particle deflection by the crustal magnetic fields.

  19. The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA): A database for the worldwide measured surface energy fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Martin; Ohmura, Atsumu; Schär, Christoph; Müller, Guido; Hakuba, Maria Z.; Mystakidis, Stefanos; Arsenovic, Pavle; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2017-02-01

    The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) is a database for the worldwide measured energy fluxes at the Earth's surface. GEBA is maintained at ETH Zurich (Switzerland) and has been founded in the 1980s by Prof. Atsumu Ohmura. It has continuously been updated and currently contains around 2500 stations with 500`000 monthly mean entries of various surface energy balance components. Many of the records extend over several decades. The most widely measured quantity available in GEBA is the solar radiation incident at the Earth's surface ("global radiation"). The data sources include, in addition to the World Radiation Data Centre (WRDC) in St. Petersburg, data reports from National Weather Services, data from different research networks (BSRN, ARM, SURFRAD), data published in peer-reviewed publications and data obtained through personal communications. Different quality checks are applied to check for gross errors in the dataset. GEBA is used in various research applications, such as for the quantification of the global energy balance and its spatiotemporal variation, or for the estimation of long-term trends in the surface fluxes, which enabled the detection of multi-decadal variations in surface solar radiation, known as "global dimming" and "brightening". GEBA is further extensively used for the evaluation of climate models and satellite-derived surface flux products. On a more applied level, GEBA provides the basis for engineering applications in the context of solar power generation, water management, agricultural production and tourism. GEBA is publicly accessible over the internet via www.geba.ethz.ch.

  20. Energy harvesting devices for harvesting energy from terahertz electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novack, Steven D.; Kotter, Dale K.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2012-10-09

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  1. Evaluating solar radiation on a tilted surfaces - a study case in Timis (Romania)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasar, C; Prostean, O; Prostean, G

    2016-01-01

    In the last years the usage of solar energy has grown considerably in Romania, as well as in Europe, stimulated by various factors as government programs, green pricing policies, decreasing of photovoltaic components cost etc. Also, the rising demand of using Solar Energy Conversion Systems (SECS) is driven by the desire of individuals or companies to obtain energy from a clean renewable source. In many applications, remote consumers far from other energetic grids can use solar systems more cost-effectively than extending the grid to reach the location. Usually the solar energy is measured or forecast on horizontal surface, but in SECS there is needed the total solar radiation incident on the collector surface, that is oriented in a position that maximize the harvested energy. There are many models that convert the solar radiation from horizontal surface to a tilted surface, but they use empirical coefficients and the accuracy is influenced by different facts as geographical location or sky conditions. Such models were used considering measured values for solar radiation on horizontal plane, in the western part of Romania. Hourly values measured for global solar irradiation on the horizontal plane, diffuse solar irradiation on the horizontal plane and reflected solar irradiation by ground are used to compute the total solar radiation incident on different tilted surfaces. The calculated incident radiation is then compared with the real radiation measured on tilted surface in order to evaluate the performance of the considered conversion models. (paper)

  2. Lunar surface fission power supplies: Radiation issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, M.G.; Lee, S.K.

    1994-01-01

    A lunar space fission power supply shield that uses a combination of lunar regolith and materials brought from earth may be optimal for early lunar outposts and bases. This type of shield can be designed such that the fission power supply does not have to be moved from its landing configuration, minimizing handling and required equipment on the lunar surface. Mechanisms for removing heat from the lunar regolith are built into the shield, and can be tested on earth. Regolith activation is greatly reduced compared with a shield that uses only regolith, and it is possible to keep the thermal conditions of the fission power supply close to those seen in free space. For a well designed shield, the additional mass required to be brought from earth should be less than 1,000 kg. Detailed radiation transport calculations confirm the feasibility of such a shield

  3. Seismology: energy radiation from the Sumatra earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Sidao; Kanamori, Hiroo; Helmberger, Don

    2005-03-31

    We determined the duration of high-frequency energy radiation from Indonesia's great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (26 December 2004) to be about 500 seconds. This duration can be translated into a rupture length of about 1,200 km, which is more than twice as long as that inferred from body-wave analyses performed soon after the event. Our analysis was able rapidly to define the extent of rupture, thereby aiding the assessment of seismic hazard in the immediate future.

  4. Energy Savings Potential of Radiative Cooling Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Nicholas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Weimin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Alvine, Kyle J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Katipamula, Srinivas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP), conducted a study to estimate, through simulation, the potential cooling energy savings that could be achieved through novel approaches to capturing free radiative cooling in buildings, particularly photonic ‘selective emittance’ materials. This report documents the results of that study.

  5. Surface Energy and Setting Process of Contacting Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Musokhranov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a challenge in terms of ensuring an accuracy of the relative position of the conjugated surfaces that is to determine a coefficient of friction. To solve it, there is a proposal to use the surface energy, as a tool that influences the contacting parts nature. Presently, energy of the surface layers at best is only stated, but not used in practice.Analysis of the conditions of interaction between two contacting surfaces, such as seizing and setting cannot be explained only from the position of the roughness parameters. It is found that these phenomena are explained by the appearing gripe (setting bridges, which result from the energy of interaction between two or more adjacent surfaces. The emerging phenomenon such as micro welding, i.e. occurring bonds, is caused by the overflow of energy, according to the theory of physics, from the surface with a high level of energy to the surface with the smaller one to balance the system as a whole.The paper shows that through the use of process, controlling the depth of the surface layer and creating a certain structure, the energy level of the material as a whole can be specified. And this will allow us to provide the necessary performance and mechanical properties. It means to create as many gripe bridges as possible to ensure continuous positioning i.e. a fixed connection of the contacting surfaces.It was determined that to increase a value of the friction coefficient, the physical and mechanical properties of the surface layer of the parts material must be taken into account, namely, in the part body accumulate the energy to be consumed for forming the surface.The paper gives recommendations for including the parts of the surface energy in the qualitative indicators of characteristics. This will make a technologist, when routing a process, to choose such operations and modes to provide the designer-specified parameters not only of the accuracy and surface finish, but also of the

  6. Surface energy and surface tension of liquid metal nanodrops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shebzukhov A.A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A unitary approach has been proposed for the calculation of surface energy and surface tension of nanoparticle being in equilibrium with its saturated vapor on both flat and curved surfaces at given temperature. The final equations involve parameters dependent on the type of premelting structure: bcc, fcc or hcp.

  7. Surface energy and surface tension of liquid metal nanodrops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebzukhova, M. A.; Shebzukhov, A. A.

    2011-05-01

    A unitary approach has been proposed for the calculation of surface energy and surface tension of nanoparticle being in equilibrium with its saturated vapor on both flat and curved surfaces at given temperature. The final equations involve parameters dependent on the type of premelting structure: bcc, fcc or hcp.

  8. Surface energy and surface tension of liquid metal nanodrops

    OpenAIRE

    Shebzukhov A.A.; Shebzukhova M.A.

    2011-01-01

    A unitary approach has been proposed for the calculation of surface energy and surface tension of nanoparticle being in equilibrium with its saturated vapor on both flat and curved surfaces at given temperature. The final equations involve parameters dependent on the type of premelting structure: bcc, fcc or hcp.

  9. Energy balance in coherent electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Coisson, R

    1994-01-01

    Bunched charges, as in the 'free electron laser', radiate more energy than unbunched ones. For a better understanding of how the forces between particles determine the conservation of energy, we take the simple model of two charges within a wavelength of a sinusodoidal wave, and show that the relative phase of the particle's motion with respect to the wave is modified by the force between the two particles, and this explains the extra work done by the wave. The phase shift is proportional to the emitted field and depends on the retardation (particle distance divided by speed of light), and turns out to be independent of distance. (author)

  10. Imaging Using Energy Discriminating Radiation Detector Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willson, Paul D.; Clajus, Martin; Tuemer, Tuemay O.; Visser, Gerard; Cajipe, Victoria

    2003-01-01

    Industrial X-ray radiography is often done using a broad band energy source and always a broad band energy detector. There exist several major advantages in the use of narrow band sources and or detectors, one of which is the separation of scattered radiation from primary radiation. ARDEC has developed a large detector array system in which every detector element acts like a multi-channel analyzer. A radiographic image is created from the number of photons detected in each detector element, rather than from the total energy absorbed in the elements. For high energies, 25 KeV to 4 MeV, used in radiography, energy discriminating detectors have been limited to less than 20,000 photons per second per detector element. This rate is much too slow for practical radiography. Our detector system processes over two million events per second per detector pixel, making radiographic imaging practical. This paper expounds on the advantages of the ARDEC radiographic imaging process

  11. Imaging Using Energy Discriminating Radiation Detector Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Paul D.; Clajus, Martin; Tümer, Tümay O.; Visser, Gerard; Cajipe, Victoria

    2003-08-01

    Industrial X-ray radiography is often done using a broad band energy source and always a broad band energy detector. There exist several major advantages in the use of narrow band sources and or detectors, one of which is the separation of scattered radiation from primary radiation. ARDEC has developed a large detector array system in which every detector element acts like a multi-channel analyzer. A radiographic image is created from the number of photons detected in each detector element, rather than from the total energy absorbed in the elements. For high energies, 25 KeV to 4 MeV, used in radiography, energy discriminating detectors have been limited to less than 20,000 photons per second per detector element. This rate is much too slow for practical radiography. Our detector system processes over two million events per second per detector pixel, making radiographic imaging practical. This paper expounds on the advantages of the ARDEC radiographic imaging process.

  12. Mars Surface Ionizing Radiation Environment: Need for Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Kim, M. Y.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Tripathi, R. K.; Singleterry, R. C.; Shinn, J. L.; Suggs, R.

    1999-01-01

    Protection against the hazards from exposure to ionizing radiation remains an unresolved issue in the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise [1]. The major uncertainty is the lack of data on biological response to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures but even a full understanding of the physical interaction of GCR with shielding and body tissues is not yet available and has a potentially large impact on mission costs. "The general opinion is that the initial flights should be short-stay missions performed as fast as possible (so-called 'Sprint' missions) to minimize crew exposure to the zero-g and space radiation environment, to ease requirements on system reliability, and to enhance the probability of mission success." The short-stay missions tend to have long transit times and may not be the best option due to the relatively long exposure to zero-g and ionizing radiation. On the other hand the short-transit missions tend to have long stays on the surface requiring an adequate knowledge of the surface radiation environment to estimate risks and to design shield configurations. Our knowledge of the surface environment is theoretically based and suffers from an incomplete understanding of the physical interactions of GCR with the Martian atmosphere, Martian surface, and intervening shield materials. An important component of Mars surface robotic exploration is the opportunity to test our understanding of the Mars surface environment. The Mars surface environment is generated by the interaction of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPEs) with the Mars atmosphere and Mars surface materials. In these interactions, multiple charged ions are reduced in size and secondary particles are generated, including neutrons. Upon impact with the Martian surface, the character of the interactions changes as a result of the differing nuclear constituents of the surface materials. Among the surface environment are many neutrons diffusing from

  13. Net Surface Shortwave Radiation from GOES Imagery—Product Evaluation Using Ground-Based Measurements from SURFRAD

    OpenAIRE

    Inamdar, Anand; Guillevic, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The Earth’s surface net radiation controls the energy and water exchanges between the Earth’s surface and the atmosphere, and can be derived from satellite observations. The ability to monitor the net surface radiation over large areas at high spatial and temporal resolution is essential for many applications, such as weather forecasting, short-term climate prediction or water resources management. The objective of this paper is to derive the net surface radiation in the shortwave domain at h...

  14. Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    ARL-TR-8155 ● SEP 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model... Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model) by Clayton Walker and Gail Vaucher Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL...2017 June 28 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ROTC Internship

  15. SAFARI 2000 Surface Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SMART), Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Surface-sensing Measurements for Radiative Transfer (SMART) and Chemical, Optical, and Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere (COMMIT) consist...

  16. Emulsion polymerization with high energy radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannett, V.T.; Stahel, E.P.

    1992-01-01

    High energy radiation, particularly that of cobalt-60 or caesium-137 gamma-rays, provides in principle an ideal initiator for emulsion polymerization. The high free radical yields from the radiolysis of the aqueous phase combined with the high kinetic chain lengths associated with emulsion polymerization lead to a highly effective utilization of the radiation. There are other important advantages compared with the use of chemical initiators such as potassium persulfate. These are outlined in the chapter, together with some attendant disadvantages. Radiation-induced initiation is temperature independent, and low temperature polymerizations can be conducted with ease. Monomers that mainly terminate their growing chains by chain transfer to monomer give higher molecular weights at lower temperatures. Industrially, vinyl acetate is an important example of such a monomer, and it has been studied using radiation initiation. Both laboratory and pilot plant studies have been carried out and reported. The results are summarized in this chapter. Styrene is the classical example of a material that under a number of conditions closely obeys the so-called ideal Smith-Ewart kinetics. It has been found that under similar conditions but substituting radiation for potassium persulfate as the initiator, ideal kinetics were closely followed. Most of the conventional and some non-standard vinyl and diene monomers have been studied to some extent with radiation-initiated polymerizations in emulsion. To conserve space however, this chapter presents and discusses the results obtained only with styrene and vinyl acetate, both in laboratory and pilot plant investigations. Other monomers and special situations are referenced either directly or to the other available reviews. (orig.)

  17. Energy saving estimation on radiation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinuta, Hidetoshi

    1982-01-01

    The Irradiation Application Group, Radiation Utilization Study Committee, Japan Atomic Industrial Forum Inc., has examined radiation process from the viewpoint of energy saving for one year. In this paper, the results related to the cross-linking of cable coating and rubber are reported. In these fields, the chemical cross-linking is made generally by mixing cross-linking agents in raw materials and passing through the atmosphere with large heat source, but the effect of energy saving when this process is substituted with electron beam cross-linking was calculated for trial. The application of electron beam irradiation to the reform of cable coating has been carried out from old time, but it is mostly for appliance wires of up to 1.5 mm thickness, and it has not been applied to high voltage power cables. The present state of the cross-linking method for high voltage power cables, the comparison of electron beam cross-linking and other methods from the viewpoint of energy saving and others are described. It was shown that the electron beam cross-linking is very effective means for energy saving, but the actual application in Japan is still few. (Kako, I.)

  18. Radiative energy transfer in molecular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1992-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to study radiative interactions in gray as well as nongray gases under different physical and flow conditions. After preliminary fluid-dynamical considerations, essential governing equations for radiative transport are presented that are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Auxiliary relations for relaxation times and spectral absorption models are also provided. For specific applications, several simple gaseous systems are analyzed. The first system considered consists of a gas bounded by two parallel plates having the same temperature. Within the gas there is a uniform heat source per unit volume. For this system, both vibrational nonequilibrium effects and radiation conduction interactions are studied. The second system consists of fully developed laminar flow and heat transfer in a parallel plate duct under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For this system, effects of gray surface emittance are studied. With the single exception of a circular geometry, the third system is considered identical to the second system. Here, the influence of nongray walls is also studied.

  19. On the measurement of the surface energy budget over a land ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The measurement of surface energy balance over a land surface in an open area in Bangalore is reported. Measurements of all variables needed to calculate the surface energy balance on time scales longer than a week are made. Components of radiative fluxes are measured while sensible and latent heat fluxes are ...

  20. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generates electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy conversion are mentioned. (author)

  1. Radiation energy transfer in RNA polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempner, E. S.; Salovey, R.; Bernstein, S. L.

    1996-11-01

    Ribozymes are a special class of polyribonucleotide (RNA) molecules which possess intrinsic catalytic activity, capable of cleaving nucleic acid substrates. RNA molecules were synthesized containing a hammerhead ribozyme moiety of 52 nucleotides linked to an inactive leader sequence, for total lengths of either 262 or 1226 nucleotides. These RNAs were frozen and irradiated with high energy electrons. Surviving ribozyme activity was determined, using the ability of the irradiated ribozymes to cleave a labeled substrate. From the same irradiated samples, the amount of intact RNA remaining was determined following denaturing gel electrophoresis. Radiation target analyses of these data revealed a structural target size of 80 kDa and a ribozyme activity target size of 15 kDa for the smaller ribozyme, and 319 and 16 kDa, respectively, for the larger ribozyme. The disparity in target size for activity vs structure indicates that, in contrast to proteins, there is no spread of radiation damage far from the primary site of ionization in RNA molecules. The smaller target size for activity indicates that only primary ionizations occurring in the specific active region are effective. This is similar to the case for oligosaccharides. It is concluded that the presence of the ribose sugar in the polymer chain restricts radiation damage to a small region and prevents major energy transfer throughout the molecule.

  2. Parallel Study of HEND, RAD, and DAN Instrument Response to Martian Radiation and Surface Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiniez Sierra, Luz Maria; Jun, Insoo; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton; Mitrofanov, Igor; Zeitlin, Cary

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear detection methods are being used to understand the radiation environment at Mars. JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) assets on Mars include: Orbiter -2001 Mars Odyssey [High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND)]; Mars Science Laboratory Rover -Curiosity [(Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD); Dynamic Albedo Neutron (DAN))]. Spacecraft have instruments able to detect ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. Instrument response on orbit and on the surface of Mars to space weather and local conditions [is discussed] - Data available at NASA-PDS (Planetary Data System).

  3. ENSO impact on surface radiative fluxes as observed from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, R. T.; Grodsky, S. A.; Zhang, B.; Busalacchi, A.; Chen, W.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the impact of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on surface radiative fluxes over the tropical Pacific using satellite observations and fluxes derived from selected atmospheric reanalyses. Agreement between the two in this region is important because reanalysis information is frequently used to assess surface energy budget sensitivity to ENSO. We found that during the traditional ENSO, the maximum variance of anomalous incoming solar radiation is located just west of the dateline and coincides with the area of the largest anomalous SST gradient. It can reach up to 60 W/m2 and lags behind the Niño3 index by about a month, suggesting a response to anomalous SST gradient. The magnitude of longwave anomaly is only half that large and varies in phase with the SST anomaly. Similar anomalies were derived from outputs: from the European Centre for Medium-Weather Forecasts Reanalysis Interim (ERA-I), from the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis version 2 (MERRA-2), from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1 (R1), and from the Japanese JRA55 reanalysis. Among the four reanalyses used, results from ERA-I are the closest to observations. We have also investigated the surface wind divergence/convergence and found that the main factor limiting eastward excursions of convection is the surface wind convergence. Due to the wind divergence pattern normally present over the eastern cold tongue, anomalous convection extends into the eastern equatorial Pacific only during the strongest warm events. Our analysis also considers the El Niño Modoki events, for which the radiation flux patterns are shifted westward following the SST pattern.

  4. NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Data and Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Release-3.0 data sets contains global 3-hourly, daily, monthly/3-hourly, and monthly averages of surface and top-of...

  5. Distributed modeling of surface solar radiation based on aerosol optical depth and sunshine duration in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaofan; Zhao, Na; Ma, Yue

    2018-02-01

    Surface solar radiation, as a major component of energy balance, is an important driving condition for nutrient and energy cycle in the Earth system. The spatial distribution of total solar radiation at 10 km×10 km resolution in China was simulated with Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data from remote sensing and observing sunshine hours data from ground meteorological stations based on Geographic Information System (GIS). The results showed that the solar radiation was significantly different in the country, and affected by both sunshine hours and AOD. Sunshine hours are higher in the Northwest than that in the Northeast, but solar radiation is lower because of the higher AOD, especially in autumn and winter. It was suggested that the calculation accuracy of solar radiation was limited if just based on sunshine hours, and AOD can be considered as the influencing factor which would help to improve the simulation accuracy of the total solar radiation and realize the solar radiation distributed simulation.

  6. Models for prediction of global solar radiation on horizontal surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The estimation of global solar radiation continues to play a fundamental role in solar engineering systems and applications. This paper compares various models for estimating the average monthly global solar radiation on horizontal surface for Akure, Nigeria, using solar radiation and sunshine duration data covering years ...

  7. On Averaging Timescales for the Surface Energy Budget Closure Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, A. A.; Fairall, C. W.; Persson, O. P. G.; Uttal, T.; Blomquist, B.; McCaffrey, K.

    2017-12-01

    An accurate determination of the surface energy budget (SEB) and all SEB components at the air-surface interface is of obvious relevance for the numerical modelling of the coupled atmosphere-land/ocean/snow system over different spatial and temporal scales, including climate modelling, weather forecasting, environmental impact studies, and many other applications. This study analyzes and discusses comprehensive measurements of the SEB and the surface energy fluxes (turbulent, radiative, and ground heat) made over different underlying surfaces based on the data collected during several field campaigns. Hourly-averaged, multiyear data sets collected at two terrestrial long-term research observatories located near the coast of the Arctic Ocean at Eureka (Canadian Archipelago) and Tiksi (East Siberia) and half-hourly averaged fluxes collected during a year-long field campaign (Wind Forecast Improvement Project 2, WFIP 2) at the Columbia River Gorge (Oregon) in areas of complex terrain. Our direct measurements of energy balance show that the sum of the turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes systematically underestimate the available energy at half-hourly and hourly time scales by around 20-30% at these sites. This imbalance of the surface energy budget is comparable to other terrestrial sites. Surface energy balance closure is a formulation of the conservation of energy principle (the first law of thermodynamics). The lack of energy balance closure at hourly time scales is a fundamental and pervasive problem in micrometeorology and may be caused by inaccurate estimates of the energy storage terms in soils, air and biomass in the layer below the measurement height and above the heat flux plates. However, the residual energy imbalance is significantly reduced at daily and monthly timescales. Increasing the averaging time to daily scales substantially reduces the storage terms because energy locally entering the soil, air column, and vegetation in the morning is

  8. Bridging the Radiative Transfer Models for Meteorology and Solar Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y.; Sengupta, M.

    2017-12-01

    Radiative transfer models are used to compute solar radiation reaching the earth surface and play an important role in both meteorology and solar energy studies. Therefore, they are designed to meet the needs of specialized applications. For instance, radiative transfer models for meteorology seek to provide more accurate cloudy-sky radiation compared to models used in solar energy that are geared towards accuracy in clear-sky conditions associated with the maximum solar resource. However, models for solar energy applications are often computationally faster, as the complex solution of the radiative transfer equation is parameterized by atmospheric properties that can be acquired from surface- or satellite-based observations. This study introduces the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) recent efforts to combine the advantages of radiative transfer models designed for meteorology and solar energy applictions. A fast all-sky radiation model, FARMS-NIT, was developed to efficiently compute narrowband all-sky irradiances over inclined photovoltaic (PV) panels. This new model utilizes the optical preperties from a solar energy model, SMARTS, to computes surface radiation by considering all possible paths of photon transmission and the relevent scattering and absorption attenuation. For cloudy-sky conditions, cloud bidirectional transmittance functions (BTDFs) are provided by a precomputed lookup table (LUT) by LibRadtran. Our initial results indicate that FARMS-NIT has an accuracy that is similar to LibRadtran, a highly accurate multi-stream model, but is significantly more efficient. The development and validation of this model will be presented.

  9. Solar energy converter using surface plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Sunlight is dispersed over a diffraction grating formed on the surface of a conducting film on a substrate. The angular dispersion controls the effective grating period so that a matching spectrum of surface plasmons is excited for parallel processing on the conducting film. The resulting surface plasmons carry energy to an array of inelastic tunnel diodes. This solar energy converter does not require different materials for each frequency band, and sunlight is directly converted to electricity in an efficient manner by extracting more energy from the more energetic photons.

  10. Components of near-surface energy balance derived from satellite soundings – Part 1: Net available energy

    OpenAIRE

    K. Mallick; A. Jarvis; G. Wohlfahrt; G. Kiely; T. Hirano; A. Miyata; S. Yamamoto; L. Hoffmann

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a relatively simple method for recovering global fields of near-surface net available energy (the sum of the sensible and latent heat flux or the difference between the net radiation and surface heat accumulation) using satellite visible and infra-red products derived from the AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) and MODIS (MOderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) platforms. The method focuses on first specifying net surface radiation by con...

  11. Radiation induced diffusion as a method to protect surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumvol, I.J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation induced diffusion forms a coating adeherent and without interface on the surface of metalic substrates. This coating improves the behaviour of metal to corrosion and abrasion. The effect of radiation induced diffusion of tin and calcium on pure iron surface is described and analyzed in this work. (author) [pt

  12. A simulation of laser energy absorption by nanowired surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Miguel F.S.; Ramos, Alexandre F.

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent advances on research about laser inertial fusion energy, to increase the portion of energy absorbed by the target's surface from lasers remains as an important challenge. The plasma formed during the initial instants of laser arrival shields the target and prevents the absorption of laser energy by the deeper layers of the material. One strategy to circumvent that effect is the construction of targets whose surfaces are populated with nanowires. The nanowired surfaces have increased absorption of laser energy and constitutes a promising pathway for enhancing laser-matter coupling. In our work we present the results of simulations aiming to investigate how target's geometrical properties might contribute for maximizing laser energy absorption by material. Simulations have been carried out using the software FLASH, a multi-physics platform developed by researchers from the University of Chicago, written in FORTRAN 90 and Python. Different tools for generating target's geometry and analysis of results were developed using Python. Our results show that a nanowired surfaces has an increased energy absorption when compared with non wired surface. The software for visualization developed in this work also allowed an analysis of the spatial dynamics of the target's temperature, electron density, ionization levels and temperature of the radiation emitted by it. (author)

  13. Energy saving estimation on radiation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Hideaki; Maekawa, H.; Ito, Y.; Nishikawa, I.; Fujii, H.; Murata, K.

    1982-01-01

    When the quantity of paint used for industrial coating is assumed to be 420,000 tons, it is estimated that the area being coated is 2.8 billion m 2 , the petroleum required for pretreatment steam, drying and baking is 1.68 million tons, and the required amount of energy saving is 120,000 tons per year in terms of petroleum. The authors examined how the adoption of electron beam curing for surface coating contributes to the energy saving. So far, it has been said that electron beam curing is more efficient than thermal or light curing in energy consumption, but the premise condition was not clear. The theoretical energy requirement for thermal curing, light curing and electron beam curing was calculated and compared. The comparison of the measured values was also performed. The amount of energy required for thermal curing, UV light curing and electron beam curing was roughly 100:10:1, and the cost of energy for them was 50:5:1. In spite of the large merit of electron beam curing, it has not spread as expected, because of the repayment cost of the facility and the cost of inert gas required for the process. Energy saving is brought about by electron beam curing, but the overall cost must be examined case by case. (Kako, I.)

  14. Surface energy of metal alloy nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takrori, Fahed M.; Ayyad, Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of surface energy of alloy nanoparticles experimentally is still a challenge therefore theoretical work is necessary to estimate its value. In continuation of our previous work on the calculation of the surface energy of pure metallic nanoparticles we have extended our work to calculate the surface energy of different alloy systems, namely, Co-Ni, Au-Cu, Cu-Al, Cu-Mg and Mo-Cs binary alloys. It is shown that the surface energy of metallic binary alloy decreases with decreasing particle size approaching relatively small values at small sizes. When both metals in the alloy obey the Hume-Rothery rules, the difference in the surface energy is small at the macroscopic as well as in the nano-scale. However when the alloy deviated from these rules the difference in surface energy is large in the macroscopic and in the nano scales. Interestingly when solid solution formation is not possible at the macroscopic scale according to the Hume-Rothery rules, it is shown it may form at the nano-scale. To our knowledge these findings here are presented for the first time and is challenging from fundamental as well as technological point of views.

  15. Simulation of Solar Radiation Incident on Horizontal and Inclined Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Basunia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A computer model was developed to simulate the hourly, daily and monthly average of daily solar radiation on horizontal and inclined surfaces. The measured hourly and daily solar radiation was compared with simulated radiation, and favourable agreement was observed for the measured and predicted values on clear days. The measured and simulated monthly averages of total (diffuse and beam daily solar radiation were compared and a reasonable agreement was observed for a number of stations in Japan. The simulation showed that during the rice harvesting season, September to October, there is a daily average of 14.7 MJ/m2 of solar irradiation on a horizontal surface in Matsuyama, Japan. There is a similar amount of solar radiation on a horizontal surface during the major rice harvesting season, November to December, in Bangladesh. This radiation can be effectively utilized for drying rough rice and other farm crops.

  16. Sorption Energy Maps of Clay Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    1999-01-01

    A molecular-level understanding of mineral-water interactions is critical for the evaluation and prediction of the sorption properties of clay minerals that may be used in various chemical and radioactive waste disposal methods. Molecular models of metal sorption incorporate empirical energy force fields, based on molecular orbital calculations and spectroscopic data, that account for Coulombic, van der Waals attractive, and short-range repulsive energies. The summation of the non-bonded energy terms at equally-spaced grid points surrounding a mineral substrate provides a three dimensional potential energy grid. The energy map can be used to determine the optimal sorption sites of metal ions on the exposed surfaces of the mineral. By using this approach, we have evaluated the crystallographic and compositional control of metal sorption on the surfaces of kaolinite and illite. Estimates of the relative sorption energy and most stable sorption sites are derived based on a rigid ion approximation

  17. The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) version 2017: a database for worldwide measured surface energy fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Martin; Ohmura, Atsumu; Schär, Christoph; Müller, Guido; Folini, Doris; Schwarz, Matthias; Zyta Hakuba, Maria; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2017-08-01

    The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) is a database for the central storage of the worldwide measured energy fluxes at the Earth's surface, maintained at ETH Zurich (Switzerland). This paper documents the status of the GEBA version 2017 dataset, presents the new web interface and user access, and reviews the scientific impact that GEBA data had in various applications. GEBA has continuously been expanded and updated and contains in its 2017 version around 500 000 monthly mean entries of various surface energy balance components measured at 2500 locations. The database contains observations from 15 surface energy flux components, with the most widely measured quantity available in GEBA being the shortwave radiation incident at the Earth's surface (global radiation). Many of the historic records extend over several decades. GEBA contains monthly data from a variety of sources, namely from the World Radiation Data Centre (WRDC) in St. Petersburg, from national weather services, from different research networks (BSRN, ARM, SURFRAD), from peer-reviewed publications, project and data reports, and from personal communications. Quality checks are applied to test for gross errors in the dataset. GEBA has played a key role in various research applications, such as in the quantification of the global energy balance, in the discussion of the anomalous atmospheric shortwave absorption, and in the detection of multi-decadal variations in global radiation, known as global dimming and brightening. GEBA is further extensively used for the evaluation of climate models and satellite-derived surface flux products. On a more applied level, GEBA provides the basis for engineering applications in the context of solar power generation, water management, agricultural production and tourism. GEBA is publicly accessible through the internet via http://www.geba.ethz.ch. Supplementary data are available at https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.873078.

  18. Radiation protection for human interplanetary spaceflight and planetary surface operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, B.C. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[DLR Inst. of Aerospace Medicine, Cologne (Germany)]|[NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Radiation protection issues are reviewed for five categories of radiation exposure during human missions to the moon and Mars: trapped radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays, solar flare particle events, planetary surface emissions, and on-board radiation sources. Relative hazards are dependent upon spacecraft and vehicle configurations, flight trajectories, human susceptibility, shielding effectiveness, monitoring and warning systems, and other factors. Crew cabins, interplanetary mission modules, surface habitats, planetary rovers, and extravehicular mobility units (spacesuits) provide various degrees of protection. Countermeasures that may be taken are reviewed relative to added complexity and risks that they could entail, with suggestions for future research and analysis.

  19. Proceedings of workshop on surface finishing by radiation curing technology: radiation curing for better finishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This book compiled the paper presented at this workshop. The papers discussed are 1. Introduction to radiation curing, 2. Radiation sources -ultraviolet and electron beams, 3. UV/EB curing of surface coating - wood and nonwood substrates, 4. Development of EPOLA (epoxidised palm oil products acrylate) and its application, 5. Development of radiation-curable resin based natural rubber

  20. Radiation grafting of methacrylate onto carbon nanofiber surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evora, M.C.; Klosterman, D.; Lafdi, K.; Li, L.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation can be used to modify and improve the properties of materials. Electron beam irradiation has potential application in modifying the structure of carbon fibers in order to produce useful defects in the graphite structure and create reactive sites. In this study, vapor grown carbon nano fibers (VGCF) were irradiated with a high energy (3 MeV) electron beam in air to dose of 1000 kGy to create active sites and added to methyl methacrylate (MMA) dissolved in water/methanol (50% V). The irradiated samples were analyzed by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy to assess the impact on surface and bulk properties. Oxygen was readily incorporated enhancing the dispersion of VGCF. Raman spectroscopy analyses indicated that the sample irradiated and preirradiated grafted sample with MMA had the intensity ratio increased. (author)

  1. ESTIMATION OF TOTAL SOLAR RADIATION INCIDENT ON AN INCLINED SURFACE OF A SOUTH-FACING GREENHOUSE ROOF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RONOH E.K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation is the driving force for the surface energy balance in buildings such as greenhouses. Greenhouses are generally tilted towards the sun in order to maximize the solar irradiance on the surfaces. Precise computation of the solar radiation received on these surfaces assumes an important role in the energy simulation. It is practical to calculate the total solar irradiance on inclined surfaces based on the solar global and diffuse radiation intensities on horizontal surfaces. This study focused on estimating the total solar radiation incident on inclined greenhouse roof surfaces. In this work, a south-facing thermal box inclined at 26.5° from the horizontal was used for solar radiation measurements. Additionally, recorded solar radiation data were retrieved for the study location and used to develop an empirical correlation. The conversion factors for the beam, the diffuse and the reflected solar radiation components were essential in the prediction of the total solar radiation incident on the tilted surface. The measured solar radiation data were then compared with the simulated data. The model performance was assessed using both graphical and statistical methods. Overall, locally calibrated data led to a satisfactory improvement in estimation of the total solar radiation on an inclined surface.

  2. Nonlinear radiation of waves at combination frequencies due to radiation-surface wave interaction in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naggar, I.A.; Hussein, A.M.; Khalil, Sh.M.

    1992-09-01

    Electromagnetic waves radiated with combination frequencies from a semi-bounded plasma due to nonlinear interaction of radiation with surface wave (both of P-polarization) has been investigated. Waves are radiated both into vacuum and plasma are found to be P-polarized. We take into consideration the continuity at the plasma boundary of the tangential components of the electric field of the waves. The case of normal incidence of radiation and rarefield plasma layer is also studied. (author). 7 refs

  3. Investigation of zones with increased ground surface gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butkus, D.V.; Morkunas, G.S.; Styro, B.I.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the increased gamma radiation zones of soils were conducted in the South-Western part of the Litvinian. The shores of lakes in the north-eastern part of the Suduva high land were investigated. the maximum values of the gamma radiation dose rates were distributed along the lake shores at a distance of 1 m from the water surface, while farther than 1.5 m from it the dose rate was close to the natural value. The increased gamma radiation intensity zones on the ground surface were found only at the northern (Lake Reketija) or the western shore (other lakes under investigation). The highest values of the gamma radiation dose 200-600 μR/h (0.5-1.5 nGy/s) were observed in the comparatively small areas (up to several square metres). The gamma radiation intensity of soil surface increased strongly moving towards the point where the maximum intensity was obsered. 10 figs

  4. Surface energy and viscoelasticity influence caramel adhesiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Ty B; Foegeding, Edward Allen

    2017-08-26

    Adhesion is an important textural attribute that directs consumer eating patterns and behaviors and can be a negative attribute during food processing. The objectives of this study were to modify caramel formulation and compare adhesion to different materials to quantify the influence of surface energetics and viscoelasticity on caramel adhesiveness. Mechanical adhesion was viewed in the context of pressure sensitive tack theory, where adhesion is controlled by viscoelasticity of the adhesive material and the surface energy relationship of material and probe. Caramel samples varied in total amount of fat and protein, and mechanical adhesion was measured using a series of materials with total surface energies of 39.7-53.2 mJ/m 2 . Adhesiveness decreased as fat and protein content increased, with a significant effect of total surface energy. Viscoelasticity was modeled using creep recovery data fit to a four-element Burger mechanistic model. Burger model parameters representing retarded elasticity correlated strongly with adhesiveness. The results suggest two zones of adhesion based on formulation, one driven by both surface energy relationships-most notably dispersive and total surface energy-and viscoelasticity, and the other driven solely by viscoelasticity. Relationships between mechanical properties and adhesion have been explored but are still not well understood, and could aid in the design of food products with a controlled level of adhesion. The results of this study indicate the importance of considering material surface energy when measuring mechanical adhesion or texture profile analysis. Understanding the relationships between viscoelastic behavior and adhesion can be used to make inferences on perceived texture. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in liquid xenon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 77; Issue 6. Adhesion energy, surface ... 2 G A Adebayo1. Department of Physics, University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria; Department of Pure and Applied Physics, College of Pure and Applied Science, Caleb University, Imota, Lagos, Nigeria ...

  6. SAFARI 2000 Surface Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SMART), Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Surface-sensing Measurements for Radiative Transfer (SMART) and Chemical, Optical, and Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere (COMMIT) consist of a suite...

  7. Surface Plasmon-Assisted Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodekatos, Georgios; Schünemann, Stefan; Tüysüz, Harun

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from plasmonic noble metals in combination with semiconductors promises great improvements for visible light-driven photocatalysis, in particular for energy conversion. This review summarizes the basic principles of plasmonic photocatalysis, giving a comprehensive overview about the proposed mechanisms for enhancing the performance of photocatalytically active semiconductors with plasmonic devices and their applications for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion. The main focus is on gold and, to a lesser extent, silver nanoparticles in combination with titania as semiconductor and their usage as active plasmonic photocatalysts. Recent advances in water splitting, hydrogen generation with sacrificial organic compounds, and CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons for solar fuel production are highlighted. Finally, further improvements for plasmonic photocatalysts, regarding performance, stability, and economic feasibility, are discussed for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion.

  8. The importance of surface finish to energy performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Geoff B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Power generation in solar energy systems, thermal control in buildings and mitigation of the Urban Heat Island problem, are all sensitive to directional response to incoming radiation. The radiation absorption and emission profile also plays a crucial role in each system's response and depends strongly on surface finish. This important sensitivity needs wider recognition in materials data sheets, system modeling, plus in materials and environmental engineering. The impact of surface roughness on thermal response of natural and man-made external environments is examined. Important examples will be given of the role of surface finish within each class. Total emittance links to the way surface finish influences directional emittance E(θ. Smooth surface thermal emittance on PV module covers, many solar absorbers, some roof paints, polished concrete, and glass windows can be up to 15% different from insulator results based on fully diffuse models of the same material. Widespread evidence indicates smooth metals and low-E solar absorber surfaces cool faster, and smooth insulators slower than previously thought. Matt paint is cooler than low sheen paint under the same solar heating impacts and normal concrete cooler than polished. Emittance for water is the prime environmental example of oblique impacts as it reflects strongly at oblique incidence, which leads to a significant drop in E(θ. Ripples or waves however raise water's average emittance. A surprise in this work was the high sensitivity of total E and its angular components to roughness in the depth range of 0.1–0.8 μm, which are well under ambient thermal IR wavelengths of 3–30 μm but common in metal finishing. Parallel energy flows such as evaporation and convective cooling vary if emittance varies. Thermal image analysis can provide insights into angular radiative effects.

  9. Precise estimation of total solar radiation on tilted surface

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rajeev

    The estimated values of hourly solar radiation have also been compared with 15 years measured ... systems. The total solar radiation at different orientation and slope is needed to calculate the efficiency of the installed solar energy systems. To calculate ... includes both a direct component from the Sun itself and a diffuse.

  10. The influence of surface type on the absorbed radiation by a human under hot, dry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, A. W.; Vanos, J. K.

    2018-01-01

    Given the predominant use of heat-retaining materials in urban areas, numerous studies have addressed the urban heat island mitigation potential of various "cool" options, such as vegetation and high-albedo surfaces. The influence of altered radiational properties of such surfaces affects not only the air temperature within a microclimate, but more importantly the interactions of long- and short-wave radiation fluxes with the human body. Minimal studies have assessed how cool surfaces affect thermal comfort via changes in absorbed radiation by a human ( R abs) using real-world, rather than modeled, urban field data. The purpose of the current study is to assess the changes in the absorbed radiation by a human—a critical component of human energy budget models—based on surface type on hot summer days (air temperatures > 38.5∘C). Field tests were conducted using a high-end microclimate station under predominantly clear sky conditions over ten surfaces with higher sky view factors in Lubbock, Texas. Three methods were used to measure and estimate R abs: a cylindrical radiation thermometer (CRT), a net radiometer, and a theoretical estimation model. Results over dry surfaces suggest that the use of high-albedo surfaces to reduce overall urban heat gain may not improve acute human thermal comfort in clear conditions due to increased reflected radiation. Further, the use of low-cost instrumentation, such as the CRT, shows potential in quantifying radiative heat loads within urban areas at temporal scales of 5-10 min or greater, yet further research is needed. Fine-scale radiative information in urban areas can aid in the decision-making process for urban heat mitigation using non-vegetated urban surfaces, with surface type choice is dependent on the need for short-term thermal comfort, or reducing cumulative heat gain to the urban fabric.

  11. On the measurement of the surface energy budget over a land ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the seasonal time scale, the net longwave radiation is the largest energy loss term at the experi- mental site. The seasonal variation in the energy sink term is small compared to that in the energy source term. 1. Introduction. Land surface temperature is an important meteoro- logical variable and is required in many practi-.

  12. Radiation collimator for use with high energy radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malak, S.P.

    1978-01-01

    A collimator is described for use with a beam of radiation, and in particular, for use in controlling the cross-sectional size and shape of the radiation beam and intercepting undesired off-focus radiation in an x-ray apparatus. The collimator is positioned adjacent to the source of radiation and embodies a plurality longitudinally extending leaves pivotally mounted on and between two supports, the leaves move about their pivots to close overlapping relation to define a hollow cone. The cone defines an aperture at its narrow end which can be adjusted in size and shape by rotation of the two supports which are adaptable to being moved one relative to the other, to cause an expansion or contraction of the hollow cone and correspondingly an increase or decrease of the cross-sectional size and/or shape of the radiation beam passing through the aperture

  13. Energy Department radiation rhetoric, actions at odds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-01-01

    Only months after Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary pledged that DOE would open-quotes come cleanclose quotes about past radiation abuses, the department is refusing to release individual exposure records of former workers at its heavily contaminated Fernald uranium plant. At the same time O'Leary was flying around the country to tout a new era of openness at the department, top DOE officials in January told attorneys representing the Fernald workers that individual exposure records would not be forthcoming. While agreeing to provide general health data, DOE specifically refused to disclose the names of the workers involved or their specific exposure histories at the plant, citing privacy concerns. The workers' attorneys contend the privacy concerns are spurious since every former Fernald worker contacted about possible overexposure has waived the privacy privilege and authorized DOE to release his or her records. The attorneys also note that DOE under the Bush administration released worker exposure information related to its Hanford, Wash., plant after the government and outside attorneys agreed to a protective order that assured privacy rights were not violated. The Fernald workers' attorneys maintain DOE is refusing to disclose the names of the workers to ensure that no additional workers are contacted by the attorneys and told about their possible overexposure - and the pending litigation seeking compensation for the alleged injuries. And as DOE remains silent, the attorneys say, the former Fernald workers are going without medical treatment for any possible radiation-related ailments they may have suffered as a result of working at the plant

  14. Solar radiation practical modeling for renewable energy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Daryl Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Written by a leading scientist with over 35 years of experience working at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Solar Radiation: Practical Modeling for Renewable Energy Applications brings together the most widely used, easily implemented concepts and models for estimating broadband and spectral solar radiation data. The author addresses various technical and practical questions about the accuracy of solar radiation measurements and modeling. While the focus is on engineering models and results, the book does review the fundamentals of solar radiation modeling and solar radiation m

  15. Summertime influences of tidal energy advection on the surface energy balance in a mangrove forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Barr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove forests are ecosystems susceptible to changing water levels and temperatures due to climate change as well as perturbations resulting from tropical storms. Numerical models can be used to project mangrove forest responses to regional and global environmental changes, and the reliability of these models depends on surface energy balance closure. However, for tidal ecosystems, the surface energy balance is complex because the energy transport associated with tidal activity remains poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify impacts of tidal flows on energy dynamics within a mangrove ecosystem. To address the research objective, an intensive 10-day study was conducted in a mangrove forest located along the Shark River in the Everglades National Park, FL, USA. Forest–atmosphere turbulent exchanges of energy were quantified with an eddy covariance system installed on a 30-m-tall flux tower. Energy transport associated with tidal activity was calculated based on a coupled mass and energy balance approach. The mass balance included tidal flows and accumulation of water on the forest floor. The energy balance included temporal changes in enthalpy, resulting from tidal flows and temperature changes in the water column. By serving as a net sink or a source of available energy, flood waters reduced the impact of high radiational loads on the mangrove forest. Also, the regression slope of available energy versus sink terms increased from 0.730 to 0.754 and from 0.798 to 0.857, including total enthalpy change in the water column in the surface energy balance for 30-min periods and daily daytime sums, respectively. Results indicated that tidal inundation provides an important mechanism for heat removal and that tidal exchange should be considered in surface energy budgets of coastal ecosystems. Results also demonstrated the importance of including tidal energy advection in mangrove biophysical models that are used for predicting ecosystem

  16. The Influence of Rain Sensible Heat and Subsurface Energy Transport on the Energy Balance at the Land Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollet, S.J.; Cvijanovic, I.; Schüttemeyer, D.; Maxwell, R.M.; Moene, A.F.; Bayer, P.

    2009-01-01

    In land surface models, which account for the energy balance at the land surface, subsurface heat transport is an important component that reciprocally influences ground, sensible, and latent heat fluxes and net radiation. In most models, subsurface heat transport parameterizations are commonly

  17. Energies, health, medicine. Low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This file concerns the biological radiation effects with a special mention for low radiation doses. The situation of knowledge in this area and the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are detailed, the different directions of researches are given. The radiation doses coming from medical examinations are given and compared with natural radioactivity. It constitutes a state of the situation on ionizing radiations, known effects, levels, natural radioactivity and the case of radon, medicine with diagnosis and radiotherapy. (N.C.)

  18. Photoelectron spectroscopy in the energy region 30 to 800 eV using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindau, I.; Spicer, W.E.

    1979-01-01

    With the advent of synchrotron radiation, the photoemission techniques were extended to a continous range of excitation energies in the far ultraviolet and soft X-ray regions, adding tremendously to the usefulness of photoemission as a probe of the electronic structure of materials. In this paper, the application of photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation to the studies of oxygen chemisorption/oxidation of Si surfaces, metal overlayers on III-V semiconductor surfaces, chemisorption on transition metal surfaces, and the surface electronic structure of CuNi alloys is discussed. (Auth.)

  19. Europa's surface radiation environment and considerations for in-situ sampling and biosignature detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheim, T.; Paranicas, C.; Hand, K. P.

    2017-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa is embedded deep within the Jovian magnetosphere and is thus exposed to bombardment by charged particles, from thermal plasma to more energetic particles at radiation belt energies. In particular, energetic charged particles are capable of affecting the uppermost layer of surface material on Europa, in some cases down to depths of several meters (Johnson et al., 2004; Paranicas et al., 2009, 2002). Examples of radiation-induced surface alteration include sputtering, radiolysis and grain sintering; processes that are capable of significantly altering the physical properties of surface material. Radiolysis of surface ices containing sulfur-bearing contaminants from Io has been invoked as a possible explanation for hydrated sulfuric acid detected on Europa's surface (Carlson et al., 2002, 1999) and radiolytic production of oxidants represents a potential source of energy for life that could reside within Europa's sub-surface ocean (Chyba, 2000; Hand et al., 2007; Johnson et al., 2003; Vance et al., 2016). Accurate knowledge of Europa's surface radiation environment is essential to the interpretation of space and Earth-based observations of Europa's surface and exosphere. Furthermore, future landed missions may seek to sample endogenic material emplaced on Europa's surface to investigate its chemical composition and to search for biosignatures contained within. Such material would likely be sampled from the shallow sub-surface, and thus, it becomes crucial to know to which degree this material is expected to have been radiation processed.Here we will present modeling results of energetic electron and proton bombardment of Europa's surface, including interactions between these particles and surface material. In addition, we will present predictions for biosignature destruction at different geographical locations and burial depths and discuss the implications of these results for surface sampling by future missions to Europa's surface.

  20. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    A new global potential energy surface (PES) is being generated for O(P-3) + H2 yields OH + H. This surface is being fit using the rotated Morse oscillator method, which was used to fit the previous POL-CI surface. The new surface is expected to be more accurate and also includes a much more complete sampling of bent geometries. A new study has been undertaken of the reaction N + O2 yields NO + O. The new studies have focused on the region of the surface near a possible minimum corresponding to the peroxy form of NOO. A large portion of the PES for this second reaction has been mapped out. Since state to state cross sections for the reaction are important in the chemistry of high temperature air, these studies will probably be extended to permit generation of a new global potential for reaction.

  1. Relationships between surface solar radiation and wheat yield in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Barrera, Sara; Rodriguez-Puebla, Concepción

    2017-04-01

    Here we examine the role of solar radiation to describe wheat-yield variability in Spain. We used Partial Least Square regression to capture the modes of surface solar radiation that drive wheat-yield variability. We will show that surface solar radiation introduces the effects of teleconnection patterns on wheat yield and also it is associated with drought and diurnal temperature range. We highlight the importance of surface solar radiation to obtain models for wheat-yield projections because it could reduce uncertainty with respect to the projections based on temperatures and precipitation variables. In addition, the significance of the model based on surface solar radiation is greater than the previous one based on drought and diurnal temperature range (Hernandez-Barrera et al., 2016). According to our results, the increase of solar radiation over Spain for 21st century could force a wheat-yield decrease (Hernandez-Barrera et al., 2017). Hernandez-Barrera S., Rodríguez-Puebla C. and Challinor A.J. 2016 Effects of diurnal temperature range and drought on wheat yield in Spain. Theoretical and Applied Climatology. DOI: 10.1007/s00704-016-1779-9 Hernandez-Barrera S., Rodríguez-Puebla C. 2017 Wheat yield in Spain and associated solar radiation patterns. International Journal of Climatology. DOI: 10.1002/joc.4975

  2. Evaluation of Satellite-Based Surface Energy Budget Products with Surface Measurements Over the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Loeb, N. G.; Lenters, J. D.; Spence, C.; Blanken, P.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's climate is fundamentally driven by the global energy balance. While Earth's energy budget at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) is well understood, satellite-based estimates of the global mean surface energy budget yield an imbalance of 15-20 Wm-2. The data products used to infer the components of the surface energy budget are often based upon physical or empirical models and ancillary input data sets of varying quality. In order to make progress, comparisons between satellite-based estimates of the surface energy budget components and direct surface measurements are critically needed. This study evaluates surface radiative fluxes from NASA CERES EBAF and surface turbulent heat fluxes from OAFLUX by comparing them with surface station measurements from the Great Lakes Evaporation Network (GLEN). The GLEN measurements are collected using instruments on lighthouses in the Great Lakes, and include surface evaporation measurement via eddy covariance technique. The evaluation is performed for 3 offshore and 1 nearshore Great Lakes sites. We highlight results for Stannard Rock in Lake Superior, which is the farthest lighthouse from shore ( 40km from the nearest land). Relative to the GLEN observations, the OAFLUX underestimates latent heat flux by 12 Wm-2 (19 Wm-2) at Stannard Rock (4-station average), in part due to its weaker near surface wind speed, and overestimates sensible heat flux by 12 Wm-2 (6 Wm-2), which is partly contributed by its colder surface air temperature. The CERES EBAF-Surface overestimates the surface downward all-sky shortwave (longwave) flux by 8 Wm-2 (7 Wm-2) at Stannard Rock, and is comparable to the 4-station average. As a result, the surface estimated using EBAF-Surface and OAFLUX receives 16 Wm-2 (13 Wm-2) more than the GLEN observations at Stannard Rock (4-station average). The above surface energy flux differences will be further discussed based on a comparison between the input data sets used in the satellite-based estimates and

  3. Shielding Factors for Gamma Radiation from Activity Deposited on Structures and Ground Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Hedemann

    1985-01-01

    -source strength. The radiation sources considered in the model are fallout radioactivity deposited on roofs, outer walls, and ground surfaces. For any combination of source strength on roof, outer wall, and ground surface, the model calculates shielding factors for specified photon energies. The input data...... are the dimensions of the house, the thickness of the walls and floors, the window dimensions, and the size of the surrounding ground surface. The fallout source strength on the surfaces is allowed to have different values due to different deposition velocities to these surfaces. This feature of the model also makes...

  4. The role of radiation penetration in the energy budget of the snowpack at Summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kuipers Munneke

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the summer surface energy balance at Summit, Greenland, are presented (8 June–20 July 2007. These measurements serve as input to an energy balance model that searches for a surface temperature for which closure of all energy terms is achieved. A good agreement between observed and modelled surface temperatures was found, with an average difference of 0.45°C and an RMSE of 0.85°C. It turns out that penetration of shortwave radiation into the snowpack plays a small but important role in correctly simulating snow temperatures. After 42 days, snow temperatures in the first meter are 3.6–4.0°C higher compared to a model simulation without radiation penetration. Sensitivity experiments show that these results cannot be reproduced by tuning the heat conduction process alone, by varying snow density or snow diffusivity. We compared the two-stream radiation penetration calculations with a sophisticated radiative transfer model and discuss the differences. The average diurnal cycle shows that net shortwave radiation is the largest energy source (diurnal average of +61 W m−2, net longwave radiation the largest energy sink (−42 W m−2. On average, subsurface heat flux, sensible and latent heat fluxes are the remaining, small heat sinks (−5, −5 and −7 W m−2, respectively, although these are more important on a subdaily timescale.

  5. Obtaining evapotranspiration and surface energy fluxes with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, SEBAL (Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land), a remote sensing based evapotranspiration model, has been applied with Landsat ETM+ sensor for the estimation of actual ... The land uses in this study area consists of irrigated agriculture, rain-fed agriculture and livestock grazing. The obtained results ...

  6. Potential energy surface of alanine polypeptide chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2006-01-01

    The multidimensional potential energy surfaces of the peptide chains consisting of three and six alanine (Ala) residues have been studied with respect to the degrees of freedom related to the twist of these molecules relative to the peptide backbone (these degrees of freedom are responsible...

  7. The Energy Under Our Feet: A Study of Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, I.

    2016-12-01

    In this experiment I tested if asphalt pavement can produce enough solar heat to produce energy through a system that uses water, solar energy and heat. A setup that can conserve the water and prevent it from evaporating, as well as measuring the energy production is required to run this experiment. I have done a lot of research on this experiment and found that there are several variables that impact the results of this experiment. 1. The surface temperature compared to the air temperature 2. The Geographical location of the pavement 3. The time of the year 4. Cloud coverage for the day Overall there will be many variables I will have to keep out of the experiment such as temperature ranges, season changes and geographical location. My constant will be my location at 33.7086o North and 117.9564o West. Asphalt pavements do not reflect the sunlight and hence heat up faster than a light surface that would reflect the sunlight. This means the Asphalt absorbs the solar radiation, which increases the temperature of the air around the asphalt contributing to what is known as the urban heat island effect. This heating in turn contributes to the formation of smog and ozone products. With the population still growing this would also mean an increase in this temperature and hence an increase in smog and ozone, creating a significant health concern. Cities need to start looking at ways to cool their pavement and find ways to harvest the energy created by their streets. Installing pipes with water can provide that solution and not only reduce the heat reflected from the pavement but also harvest energy from this setup, and decrease the smog production and maintain a balance in ozone levels. As well as the asphalt needed to run the testing, a Stirling engine is required. A Stirling Engine is a highly efficient engine that can run on a variety of heat sources. Because it is highly compatible with alternative energy and renewable energy sources it could become increasingly

  8. Potential energy surface of triplet O4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukku, Yuliya; Varga, Zoltan; Truhlar, Donald G

    2018-03-28

    We present a global ground-state potential energy surface (PES) for the triplet spin state of O 4 that is suitable for treating high-energy vibrational-rotational energy transfer and collision-induced dissociation in electronically adiabatic spin-conserving O 2 -O 2 collisions. The surface is based on MS-CASPT2/maug-cc-pVTZ electronic structure calculations with scaled external correlation; the active space has 16 electrons in 12 orbitals. The global ground-state potential energy surface was fitted by a many-body approach with an accurate O-O pairwise interaction and a fit of the many-body interaction potential to 10 180 electronic structure data points. The many-body fit is based on permutationally invariant polynomials in terms of bond-order functions of the six interatomic distances; the bond-order functions are mixed exponential-Gaussian functions. The geometries calculated and used for the fit include geometry scans corresponding to dissociative and vibrationally excited diatom-diatom collisions of O 2 , scans corresponding to O 3 interacting with O, additional geometries identified by running trajectories, and geometries along linear synchronous transit paths connecting randomly selected points. The global O 4 PES includes subsurfaces describing the interaction of diatomic molecules with other diatomic molecules or interactions of triatomic molecules and an atom. The interaction of ozone with a ground-state oxygen atom occurs on the triplet O 4 surface, and our surface includes high-energy points with O 3 -O geometries as well as O 2 -O 2 geometries and O 2 -O-O geometries.

  9. Removing device and method for radiation-contaminated concrete surface layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Kiyoshi.

    1996-01-01

    When a radiation-contaminated concrete surface layer is crushed, peeled or melted, and the products generated by the procedures are captured by sucking, the activity of the products is measured. It is judged whether the result is higher than a predetermined level or not, and when the activity is lowered to a predetermined level or less, the portion to be crushed, peeled or melted is moved and the radiation-contaminated concrete surface layer is thus successively removed. In the device of the present invention, microwave energy, millimeter wave energy, or AC arc plasma is used as an energy irradiation means. With such procedures, the contaminated concrete surface layer can be removed efficiently with neither more nor less. (T.M.)

  10. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  11. Surface analysis with low energy ion scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taglauer, E.; Heiland, W.

    1976-01-01

    Principles and applications of low energy ion scattering for surface analysis are presented. Basic features are the binary collision concept, the scattering cross-sections and the ion neutralization process. The potential and the limitations of the method are outlined. Some pertinent experimental aspects are considered. In a number of examples the performance of the technique is demonstrated for qualitative composition analysis and for studies of surface structures. Finally a few comparisons are made with other techniques, such as AES, LEED, or SIMS. (orig.) [de

  12. Near-surface climate and surface energy budget of Larsen C ice shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kuipers Munneke

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Data collected by two automatic weather stations (AWS on the Larsen C ice shelf, Antarctica, between 22 January 2009 and 1 February 2011 are analyzed and used as input for a model that computes the surface energy budget (SEB, which includes melt energy. The two AWSs are separated by about 70 km in the north–south direction, and both the near-surface meteorology and the SEB show similarities, although small differences in all components (most notably the melt flux can be seen. The impact of subsurface absorption of shortwave radiation on melt and snow temperature is significant, and discussed. In winter, longwave cooling of the surface is entirely compensated by a downward turbulent transport of sensible heat. In summer, the positive net radiative flux is compensated by melt, and quite frequently by upward turbulent diffusion of heat and moisture, leading to sublimation and weak convection over the ice shelf. The month of November 2010 is highlighted, when strong westerly flow over the Antarctic Peninsula led to a dry and warm föhn wind over the ice shelf, resulting in warm and sunny conditions. Under these conditions the increase in shortwave and sensible heat fluxes is larger than the decrease of net longwave and latent heat fluxes, providing energy for significant melt.

  13. Global Surface Net-Radiation at 5 km from MODIS Terra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Verma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reliable and fine resolution estimates of surface net-radiation are required for estimating latent and sensible heat fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. However, currently, fine resolution estimates of net-radiation are not available and consequently it is challenging to develop multi-year estimates of evapotranspiration at scales that can capture land surface heterogeneity and are relevant for policy and decision-making. We developed and evaluated a global net-radiation product at 5 km and 8-day resolution by combining mutually consistent atmosphere and land data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS on board Terra. Comparison with net-radiation measurements from 154 globally distributed sites (414 site-years from the FLUXNET and Surface Radiation budget network (SURFRAD showed that the net-radiation product agreed well with measurements across seasons and climate types in the extratropics (Wilmott’s index ranged from 0.74 for boreal to 0.63 for Mediterranean sites. Mean absolute deviation between the MODIS and measured net-radiation ranged from 38.0 ± 1.8 W∙m−2 in boreal to 72.0 ± 4.1 W∙m−2 in the tropical climates. The mean bias was small and constituted only 11%, 0.7%, 8.4%, 4.2%, 13.3%, and 5.4% of the mean absolute error in daytime net-radiation in boreal, Mediterranean, temperate-continental, temperate, semi-arid, and tropical climate, respectively. To assess the accuracy of the broader spatiotemporal patterns, we upscaled error-quantified MODIS net-radiation and compared it with the net-radiation estimates from the coarse spatial (1° × 1° but high temporal resolution gridded net-radiation product from the Clouds and Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES. Our estimates agreed closely with the net-radiation estimates from the CERES. Difference between the two was less than 10 W·m−2 in 94% of the total land area. MODIS net-radiation product will be a valuable resource for the

  14. Inconing solar radiation estimates at terrestrial surface using meteorological satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, N.; Almeida, F.C. de.

    1982-11-01

    By using the digital images of the visible channel of the GOES-5 meteorological satellite, and a simple radiative transfer model of the earth's atmosphere, the incoming solar radiation reaching ground is estimated. A model incorporating the effects of Rayleigh scattering and water vapor absorption, the latter parameterized using the surface dew point temperature value, is used. Comparisons with pyranometer observations, and parameterization versus radiosonde water vapor absorption calculation are presented. (Author) [pt

  15. Automated analysis of damages for radiation in plastics surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, C.; Camacho M, E.; Tavera, L.; Balcazar, M.

    1990-02-01

    Analysis of damages done by the radiation in a polymer characterized by optic properties of polished surfaces, of uniformity and chemical resistance that the acrylic; resistant until the 150 centigrade grades of temperature, and with an approximate weight of half of the glass. An objective of this work is the development of a method that analyze in automated form the superficial damages induced by radiation in plastic materials means an images analyst. (Author)

  16. Energy redistribution in diatomic molecules on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asscher, M.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1984-04-01

    Translational and internal degrees of freedom of a scattered beam of NO molecules from a Pt(111) single crystal surface were measured as a function of scattering angle and crystal temperature in the range 450 to 1250K. None of the three degrees of freedom were found to fully accommodate to the crystal temperature, the translational degree being the most accommodated and the rotational degree of freedom the least. A precursor state model is suggested to account for the incomplete accommodation of translational and vibrational degrees of freedom as a function of crystal temperature and incident beam energy. The vibrational accommodation is further discussed in terms of a competition between desorption and vibrational excitation processes, thus providing valuable information on the interaction between vibrationally excited molecules and surfaces. Energy transfer into rotational degrees of freedom is qualitatively discussed

  17. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  18. Surface free energy of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene modified by electron and gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul-Kader, A.M.; Turos, A.; Radwan, R.M.; Kelany, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface free energy of biocompatible polymers is important factor which affects the surface properties such as wetting, adhesion and biocompatibility. In the present work, the change in the surface free energy of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) samples, which is produced by electron beam and gamma ray irradiation were, investigated. Mechanism of the changes in surface free energy induced by irradiations of doses ranging from 25 to 500 kGy was studied. FTIR technique was applied for sample analysis. Contact angle measurements showed that wettability and surface free energy of samples have increased with increasing the irradiation dose, where the values of droplet contact angle of the samples decrease gradually with increasing the radiation dose. The increase in the wettability and surface free energy of the irradiated samples are attributed to formation of hydrophilic groups on the polymer surface by the oxidation, which apparently occurs by exposure of irradiated samples to the air.

  19. Radiation of fast positrons interacting with periodic microstructure on the surface of a crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epp, V., E-mail: epp@tspu.edu.ru [Tomsk State Pedagogical University, ul. Kievskaya 60, 634061 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, pr. Lenina 36, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Janz, J.G., E-mail: Yanc@tpu.ru [Tomsk Polytechnic University, pr. Lenina 34, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Kaplin, V.V., E-mail: kaplin@tpu.ru [Tomsk Polytechnic University, pr. Lenina 34, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • New tunable crystalline source of X-ray radiation is described. • Radiation is emitted by the channeling relativistic particles. • A set of crystal plates offers more effective monitoring of the photon energy. • Formulae describing the radiation properties are obtained. - Abstract: Radiation of positrons passing through a set of equidistant crystal plates is calculated. Each plate is of thickness of half of the particle trajectory period at planar channeling in a thick crystal. Positively charged particle entering the first plate at an angle smaller than the critical channeling angle is captured into channeling mode and changes the direction of its transversal velocity to reversed. Between the half-wave plates the particle moves along a straight line. The proposed setup can be realized as a set of equidistant ridges on the surface of a single crystal. Passing through such set of half-wave crystal plates the particle moves on quasi-undulator trajectories. Properties of the particle radiation emitted during their passage through such “multicrystal undulator” are calculated. The radiation spectrum in each particular direction is discrete, and the frequency of the first harmonic and the number of harmonics in the spectrum depend on the distance between the plates, on energy of the particles and on the averaged potential energy of atomic planes of the crystal. The radiation is bound to a narrow cone in the direction of the average particle velocity and polarized essentially in a plane orthogonal to the atomic planes in the crystal.

  20. Radiation processing of liquid with low energy electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makuuchi, Keizo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2003-02-01

    Radiation induced emulsion polymerization, radiation vulcanization of NR latex (RVNRL) and radiation degradation of natural polymers were selected and reviewed as the radiation processing of liquid. The characteristic of high dose rate emulsion polymerization is the occurrence of cationic polymerization. Thus, it can be used for the production of new materials that cannot be obtained by radical polymerization. A potential application will be production of polymer emulsion that can be used as water-borne UV/EB curing resins. The technology of RVNRL by {gamma}-ray has been commercialized. RVNRL with low energy electron accelerator is under development for further vulcanization cost reduction. Vessel type irradiator will be favorable for industrial application. Radiation degradation of polysaccharides is an emerging and promising area of radiation processing. However, strict cost comparison between liquid irradiation with low energy EB and state irradiation with {gamma}-ray should be carried out. (author)

  1. Radiation processing of liquid with low energy electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makuuchi, Keizo

    2003-01-01

    Radiation induced emulsion polymerization, radiation vulcanization of NR latex (RVNRL) and radiation degradation of natural polymers were selected and reviewed as the radiation processing of liquid. The characteristic of high dose rate emulsion polymerization is the occurrence of cationic polymerization. Thus, it can be used for the production of new materials that cannot be obtained by radical polymerization. A potential application will be production of polymer emulsion that can be used as water-borne UV/EB curing resins. The technology of RVNRL by γ-ray has been commercialized. RVNRL with low energy electron accelerator is under development for further vulcanization cost reduction. Vessel type irradiator will be favorable for industrial application. Radiation degradation of polysaccharides is an emerging and promising area of radiation processing. However, strict cost comparison between liquid irradiation with low energy EB and state irradiation with γ-ray should be carried out. (author)

  2. Coherent and Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Graphene Surface Plasmon Polarirons Excited by Cyclotron Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tao; Gong, Sen; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Liu, Diwei; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinran; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Peiheng; Liu, Shenggang

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation can revolutionize modern science and technology. To this date, it remains big challenges to develop intense, coherent and tunable THz radiation sources that can cover the whole THz frequency region either by means of only electronics (both vacuum electronics and semiconductor electronics) or of only photonics (lasers, for example, quantum cascade laser). Here we present a mechanism which can overcome these difficulties in THz radiation generation. Due to the natural periodicity of 2π of both the circular cylindrical graphene structure and cyclotron electron beam (CEB), the surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) dispersion can cross the light line of dielectric, making transformation of SPPs into radiation immediately possible. The dual natural periodicity also brings significant excellences to the excitation and the transformation. The fundamental and hybrid SPPs modes can be excited and transformed into radiation. The excited SPPs propagate along the cyclotron trajectory together with the beam and gain energy from the beam continuously. The radiation density is enhanced over 300 times, up to 105 W/cm2. The radiation frequency can be widely tuned by adjusting the beam energy or chemical potential. This mechanism opens a way for developing desired THz radiation sources to cover the whole THz frequency regime. PMID:26525516

  3. Shielding Factors for Gamma Radiation from Activity Deposited on Structures and Ground Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Hedemann

    1985-01-01

    A computer model DEPSHIELD for the calculation of shielding factors for gamma radiation at indoor residences in multistorey and single-family houses has been developed. The model is based on the exponential point kernel that links the radiation flux density at a given detector point to a point......-source strength. The radiation sources considered in the model are fallout radioactivity deposited on roofs, outer walls, and ground surfaces. For any combination of source strength on roof, outer wall, and ground surface, the model calculates shielding factors for specified photon energies. The input data...... it possible to determine the dose reduction effect from a decontamination of the different surfaces. The model has been used in a study of the consequences of land contamination of Danish territory after hypothetical core-melt accidents at the Barseback nuclear power plant in Sweden. The model has also been...

  4. Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transport as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleckler, P. J.; Randall, D. A.; Boer, G.; Colman, R.; Dix, M.; Galin, V.; Helfand, M.; Kiehl, J.; Kitoh, A.; Lau, W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ocean surface net energy flux simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models constrained by realistically-varying sea surface temperatures and sea ice as part of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project. In general, the simulated energy fluxes are within the very large observational uncertainties. However, the annual mean oceanic meridional heat transport that would be required to balance the simulated surface fluxes is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean heat transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions. It is suggested that improved treatment of cloud radiative effects should help in the development of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models.

  5. The role of clouds in the surface energy balance over the Amazon forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltahir, E.A.B.; Humphries, E.J. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Deforestation in the Amazon region will initially impact the energy balance at the land surface through changes in land cover and surface hydrology. However, continuation of this human activity will eventually lead to atmospheric feedbacks, including changes in cloudiness which may play an important role in the final equilibrium of solar and terrestrial radiation at the surface. In this study, the different components of surface radiation over an undisturbed forest in the Amazon region are computed using data from the Amazon region micrometerological experiment (ARME). Several measures of cloudiness are defined: two estimated from the terrestrial radiation measurements, and one from the solar radiation measurements. The sensitivity of the surface fluxes of solar and terrestrial radiation to natural variability in cloudiness is investigated to infer the potential role of the cloudiness feedback in the surface energy balance. The results of this analysis indicate that a 1% decrease in cloudiness would increase net solar radiation by ca. 1.6 W/m 2 . However, the overall magnitude of this feedback, due to total deforestation of the Amazon forest, is likely to be of the same order as the magnitude of the decrease in net solar radiation due to the observed increase in surface albedo following deforestation. Hence, the total change in net solar radiation is likely to have a negligible magnitude. In contrast to this conclusion, we find that terrestrial radiation is likely to be more strongly affected; reduced cloudiness will decrease net terrestrial radiation; a 1% decrease in cloudiness induces a reduction in net terrestrial radiation of ca. 0.7 W/m 2 ; this process augments the similar effects of the predicted warming and drying in the boundary layer. Due to the cloudiness feedback, the most significant effect of large-scale deforestation on the surface energy balance is likely to be in the modification of the terrestrial radiation field rather than the classical albedo

  6. Scattered ionizing radiations from low-energy focus plasma and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Scattered ionizing radiation emissions from a low-energy plasma focus (0.1. kJ Mather-type) device ... widely used in personnel moni- toring (dosimetry) service for ionizing radiation, medical, industrial and research ... Thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD-500) (high sensitivity, simple re-use and minimum fading) chips are ...

  7. Influence of snow cover changes on surface radiation and heat balance based on the WRF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingxue; Liu, Tingxiang; Bu, Kun; Yang, Jiuchun; Chang, Liping; Zhang, Shuwen

    2017-10-01

    The snow cover extent in mid-high latitude areas of the Northern Hemisphere has significantly declined corresponding to the global warming, especially since the 1970s. Snow-climate feedbacks play a critical role in regulating the global radiation balance and influencing surface heat flux exchange. However, the degree to which snow cover changes affect the radiation budget and energy balance on a regional scale and the difference between snow-climate and land use/cover change (LUCC)-climate feedbacks have been rarely studied. In this paper, we selected Heilongjiang Basin, where the snow cover has changed obviously, as our study area and used the WRF model to simulate the influences of snow cover changes on the surface radiation budget and heat balance. In the scenario simulation, the localized surface parameter data improved the accuracy by 10 % compared with the control group. The spatial and temporal analysis of the surface variables showed that the net surface radiation, sensible heat flux, Bowen ratio, temperature and percentage of snow cover were negatively correlated and that the ground heat flux and latent heat flux were positively correlated with the percentage of snow cover. The spatial analysis also showed that a significant relationship existed between the surface variables and land cover types, which was not obviously as that for snow cover changes. Finally, six typical study areas were selected to quantitatively analyse the influence of land cover types beneath the snow cover on heat absorption and transfer, which showed that when the land was snow covered, the conversion of forest to farmland can dramatically influence the net radiation and other surface variables, whereas the snow-free land showed significantly reduced influence. Furthermore, compared with typical land cover changes, e.g., the conversion of forest into farmland, the influence of snow cover changes on net radiation and sensible heat flux were 60 % higher than that of land cover changes

  8. Surface modification of fluorocarbon polymers by synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kanda, K; Matsui, S; Ideta, T; Ishigaki, H

    2003-01-01

    The surface modification of a poly (tetrafluoroethylene) sheet was carried out by synchrotron radiation in the soft X-ray region. The poly (tetrafluoroethylene) substrate was exposed to synchrotron radiation while varying the substrate temperature from room temperature to 200degC. The contact angle of the modified surfaces with a water drop decreased from 96deg to 72deg by the irradiation at room temperature, while the contact angle increased to 143deg by the irradiation at the substrate temperature of 200degC. Scanning electron microscopy suggested that this repellence was ascribable to the microstructure of the poly (tetrafluoroethylene) surface. We succeeded in controlling the wettability of the poly (tetrafluoroethylene) surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic by irradiation of the soft X-ray light. (author)

  9. Biocompatibility of Er:YSGG laser radiated root surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthin, Hartmut; Ertl, Thomas P.; Schmidt, Dirk; Purucker, Peter; Bernimoulin, J.-P.; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed Er:YAG and Er:YSGG lasers are well known to be effective instruments for the ablation of dental hard tissues. Developments in the last years made it possible to transmit the laser radiation at these wavelengths with flexible fibers. Therefore the application in the periodontal pocket may be possible. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-vitro conditions to generate a bioacceptable root surface. Twenty extracted human teeth, stored in an antibiotic solution, were conventionally scaled, root planed and axially separated into two halves. Two main groups were determined. With the first group laser radiation was carried out without and in the second group with spray cooling. The laser beam was scanned about root surface areas. Laser parameters were varied in a selected range. The biocompatibility was measured with the attachment of human gingival fibroblasts and directly compared to conventionally treated areas of the root surfaces. The fibroblasts were qualified and counted in SEM investigations. On conventionally treated areas gingival fibroblasts show the typical uniform cover. In dependance on the root roughness after laser treatment the fibroblasts loose the typical parallel alignment to the root surface. With spray cooling a better in-vitro attachment could be obtained. Without spray cooling the higher increase in temperature conducted to less bioacceptance by the human gingival fibroblasts to the root surface. These results show the possibility of producing bioacceptable root surfaces with pulsed laser radiation in the range of very high water absorption near 3 micrometer.

  10. Homogenization of a surface solar radiation dataset over Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, Veronica; Brunetti, Michele; Maugeri, Maurizio; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Wild, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Observational data cannot be used for climate research without a clear knowledge about the state of the data in terms of temporal homogeneity. The main steps and results of the homogenization procedure applied to a surface solar radiation dataset over the Italian territory for the period 1959-2013 are discussed.

  11. Thermodynamic limits of energy harvesting from outgoing thermal radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddhiraju, Siddharth; Santhanam, Parthiban; Fan, Shanhui

    2018-04-17

    We derive the thermodynamic limits of harvesting power from the outgoing thermal radiation from the ambient to the cold outer space. The derivations are based on a duality relation between thermal engines that harvest solar radiation and those that harvest outgoing thermal radiation. In particular, we derive the ultimate limit for harvesting outgoing thermal radiation, which is analogous to the Landsberg limit for solar energy harvesting, and show that the ultimate limit far exceeds what was previously thought to be possible. As an extension of our work, we also derive the ultimate limit of efficiency of thermophotovoltaic systems.

  12. MEASUREMENTS OF TOTAL ENERGY RADIATED FROM AN ARGON ARCJET

    Science.gov (United States)

    to the 7.2 power when the peak (centerline) temperature at the arcjet exit plane was 23,000 R. Total radiated energy from the arcjet , including the...downstream-directed component from the cathode face, was found to be less than 0.8% of the net jet power under these conditions. This rather low level...The total energy radiation of an argon arcjet was measured by a simple collimated thermopile. Radiation from the luminous jet was found to vary as T

  13. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, L.B. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to calculate accurate potential energy surfaces (PES) for both reactive and nonreactive systems. To do this the electronic Schrodinger equation must be solved. Our approach to this problem starts with multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) reference wavefunctions. These reference wavefunctions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to accurately describe changes in electronic structure over a broad range of geometries. Electron correlation effects are included via multireference, singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) calculations. With this approach, the authors are able to provide useful predictions of the energetics for a broad range of systems.

  14. Assessment of Satellite Surface Radiation Products in Highland Regions with Tibet Instrumental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Koike, Toshio; Stackhouse, Paul; Mikovitz, Colleen

    2006-01-01

    This study presents results of comparisons between instrumental radiation data in the elevated Tibetan Plateau and two global satellite products: the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment - Surface Radiation Budget (GEWEX-SRB) and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project - Flux Data (ISCCP-FD). In general, shortwave radiation (SW) is estimated better by ISCCP-FD while longwave radiation (LW) is estimated better by GEWEX-SRB, but all the radiation components in both products are under-estimated. Severe and systematic errors were found in monthly-mean SRB SW (on plateau-average, -48 W/sq m for downward SW and -18 W/sq m for upward SW) and FD LW (on plateau-average, -37 W/sq m for downward LW and -62 W/sq m for upward LW) for radiation. Errors in monthly-mean diurnal variations are even larger than the monthly mean errors. Though the LW errors can be reduced about 10 W/sq m after a correction for altitude difference between the site and SRB and FD grids, these errors are still higher than that for other regions. The large errors in SRB SW was mainly due to a processing mistake for elevation effect, but the errors in SRB LW was mainly due to significant errors in input data. We suggest reprocessing satellite surface radiation budget data, at least for highland areas like Tibet.

  15. Effect of MeV Electron Radiation on Europa’s Surface Ice Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudipati, Murthy; Henderson, Bryana; Bateman, Fred

    2017-10-01

    MeV electrons that impact Europa’s trailing hemisphere and cause both physical and chemical alteration of the surface and near-surface. The trailing hemisphere receives far lower fluxes above 25 MeV as compared with lower energy particles, but can cause significant chemical and physical modifications at these energies. With NASA's planned Europa Clipper mission and a Europa Lander Concept on the horizon, it is critical to understand and quantify the effect of Europa’s radiation environment on the surface and near surface.Electrons penetrate through ice by far the deepest at any given energy compared to protons and ions, making the role of electrons very important to understand. In addition, secondary radiation - Bremsstrahlung, in X-ray wavelengths - is generated during high-energy particle penetration through solids. Secondary X-rays are equally lethal to life and penetrate even deeper than electrons, making the cumulative effect of radiation on damaging organic matter on the near surface of Europa a complex process that could have effects several meters below Europa’s surface. Other physical properties such as coloration could be caused by radiation.In order to quantify this effect under realistic Europa trailing hemisphere conditions, we devised, built, tested, and obtained preliminary results using our ICE-HEART instrument prototype totally funded by JPL’s internal competition funding for Research and Technology Development. Our Ice Chamber for Europa High-Energy Electron And Radiation-Environment Testing (ICE-HEART) operates at ~100 K. We have also implemented a magnet that is used to remove primary electrons subsequent to passing through an ice column, in order to determine the flux of secondary X-radiation and its penetration through ice.Some of the first results from these studies will be presented and their relevance to understand physical and chemical properties of Europa’s trailing hemisphere surface.This work has been carried out at Jet

  16. Response of monitoring instruments to high-energy photon radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Haridas, G; Pradhan, S D; Nayak, A R; Bhagwat, A M

    2000-01-01

    Response of commercially available monitoring instruments to high-energy photon radiation was studied under the stored beam condition of a few milliamperes in the storage ring of the Synchrotron Radiation Source, INDUS-I, at Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), Indore. The storage ring has a circumference of 18.96 m, where electrons at 450 MeV are stored for a few hours, during which the emitted synchrotron radiation is exploited for scientific research and other applications. Radiation environment near storage ring has bremsstrahlung photons of various energies (maximum 450 MeV). A study has indicated underestimation of dose by conventional radiation monitoring instruments by a factor of 2-4. Response after transmission of photons through massive shield was also studied, which indicated spectral degradation and good response by the survey meters.

  17. Comparative Assessment of Satellite-Retrieved Surface Net Radiation: An Examination on CERES and SRB Datasets in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Pan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Surface net radiation plays an important role in land–atmosphere interactions. The net radiation can be retrieved from satellite radiative products, yet its accuracy needs comprehensive assessment. This study evaluates monthly surface net radiation generated from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES and the Surface Radiation Budget project (SRB products, respectively, with quality-controlled radiation data from 50 meteorological stations in China for the period from March 2000 to December 2007. Our results show that surface net radiation is generally overestimated for CERES (SRB, with a bias of 26.52 W/m2 (18.57 W/m2 and a root mean square error of 34.58 W/m2 (29.49 W/m2. Spatially, the satellite-retrieved monthly mean of surface net radiation has relatively small errors for both CERES and SRB at inland sites in south China. Substantial errors are found at northeastern sites for two datasets, in addition to coastal sites for CERES. Temporally, multi-year averaged monthly mean errors are large at sites in western China in spring and summer, and in northeastern China in spring and winter. The annual mean error fluctuates for SRB, but decreases for CERES between 2000 and 2007. For CERES, 56% of net radiation errors come from net shortwave (NSW radiation and 44% from net longwave (NLW radiation. The errors are attributable to environmental parameters including surface albedo, surface water vapor pressure, land surface temperature, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI of land surface proxy, and visibility for CERES. For SRB, 65% of the errors come from NSW and 35% from NLW radiation. The major influencing factors in a descending order are surface water vapor pressure, surface albedo, land surface temperature, NDVI, and visibility. Our findings offer an insight into error patterns in satellite-retrieved surface net radiation and should be valuable to improving retrieval accuracy of surface net radiation. Moreover, our

  18. ENSO surface longwave radiation forcing over the tropical Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Pavlakis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the spatial and temporal variation of the surface longwave radiation (downwelling and net over a 21-year period in the tropical and subtropical Pacific Ocean (40 S–40 N, 90 E–75 W. The fluxes were computed using a deterministic model for atmospheric radiation transfer, along with satellite data from the ISCCP-D2 database and reanalysis data from NCEP/NCAR (acronyms explained in main text, for the key atmospheric and surface input parameters. An excellent correlation was found between the downwelling longwave radiation (DLR anomaly and the Niño-3.4 index time-series, over the Niño-3.4 region located in the central Pacific. A high anti-correlation was also found over the western Pacific (15–0 S, 105–130 E. There is convincing evidence that the time series of the mean downwelling longwave radiation anomaly in the western Pacific precedes that in the Niño-3.4 region by 3–4 months. Thus, the downwelling longwave radiation anomaly is a complementary index to the SST anomaly for the study of ENSO events and can be used to asses whether or not El Niño or La Niña conditions prevail. Over the Niño-3.4 region, the mean DLR anomaly values range from +20 Wm−2 during El Niño episodes to −20 Wm−2 during La Niña events, while over the western Pacific (15–0 S, 105–130 E these values range from −15 Wm−2 to +10 Wm−2, respectively. The long- term average (1984–2004 distribution of the net downwelling longwave radiation at the surface over the tropical and subtropical Pacific for the three month period November-December-January shows a net thermal cooling of the ocean surface. When El Niño conditions prevail, the thermal radiative cooling in the central and south-eastern tropical Pacific becomes weaker by 10 Wm−2 south of the equator in the central Pacific (7–0 S, 160–120 W for the three-month period of NDJ, because the DLR increase is larger than the increase in surface thermal emission. In contrast, the

  19. Changes in surface energy partitioning in China over the past three decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yitian; Hsu, Pang-Chi; Cheng, Chi-Han

    2017-05-01

    Surface energy balance and the partitioning of sensible heat flux (SHF) and latent heat flux (LHF) play key roles in land-atmosphere feedback. However, the lack of long-term observations of surface energy fluxes, not to mention spatially extensive ones, limits our understanding of how the surface energy distribution has responded to a warming climate over recent decades (1979-2009) at the national scale in China. Using four state-of-the-art reanalysis products with long-term surface energy outputs, we identified robust changes in surface energy partitioning, defined by the Bowen ratio (BR = SHF/LHF), over different climate regimes in China. Over the past three decades, the net radiation showed an increasing trend over almost the whole of China. The increase in available radiative energy flux, however, was balanced by differential partitioning of surface turbulent fluxes, determined by local hydrological conditions. In semi-arid areas, such as Northeast China, the radiative energy was transferred largely into SHF. A severe deficiency in near-surface and soil moistures led to a significant decreasing trend in LHF. The combined effect of increased SHF and decreased LHF resulted in significant upward trends in the BR and surface warming over Northeast China. In contrast, in the wet monsoon regions, such as southern China, increased downward net radiation favored a rise in LHF rather than in SHF, leading to a significant decreasing trend in the BR. Meanwhile, the increased LHF partly cancelled out the surface warming. The warming trend in southern China was smaller than that in Northeast China. In addition to impacts on heat-related events, the changes in the BR also reflected recent cases of extreme drought in China. Our results indicate that information regarding the BR may be valuable for drought monitoring, especially in regions prone to such conditions.

  20. The effect of surface roughness on the transmission of microwave radiation through a planetary surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    To account for surface roughness, the transmission of microwave radiation through a planetary surface to an observer is treated by a Monte Carlo technique. Sizable effects are found near the limb of the planet, and they should be included in analyses of high-resolution observations and high-precision integrated disk observations.

  1. Radiation exchange factors between specular inner surfaces of a rectangular enclosure such as transplant production unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Ghany, Ahmed M.; Kozai, Toyoki

    2006-01-01

    General mathematical relations are presented for the specular exchange factors, F S , of diffuse radiation exchange between the inner surfaces of a rectangular enclosure. Three of these surfaces are specular reflectors, diffuse emitters and the fourth surface is a diffuse reflector, diffuse emitter. This enclosure can be used as a transplant production unit with artificial lighting for electric energy saving purposes. An image system and the crossed string method are used to derive these relations. The resulting expressions are conceptually simple and similar to the commonly known expressions of the exchange factors between diffuse surfaces, F. The accuracy of the presented F S relations was examined for different numbers of multiple reflections, N, on the specular surfaces and for different aspect ratios (ratio of the width, w to the height, h). The results proved that the relations are accurate and strongly satisfy the well-known relation of the radiation exchange between enclosure surfaces and satisfy the reciprocity relation. For any aspect ratio, considering N of 150 between highly reflective surfaces (ρ = 0.99) is sufficient to estimate the F S factors without any possible error. Using specular reflecting surfaces in such cases significantly reduces the electric energy consumption used for lighting

  2. Changing to electret by low energy radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuchi, Ryoichi; Nonomura, Takuo; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Mitsuaki

    1990-01-01

    The surface potential, surface charge density and thermally stimulated current of the FEP films which were changed to electrets by irradiating 170 keV electron beam were measured, and the relationship among their measured values was investigated. As the result, it was known that the mean value of surface potential was proportional to surface charge density. Besides, according to the results of measurement of surface charge density and thermally stimulated current, also positive charges seemed to exist in the samples irradiated with electron beam. The measurements of surface potential, surface charge density and thermally stimulated current are reported. There are the FEP film surfaces irradiated with electron beam on which potential distributed largely changing from positive to negative, and on which only negative potential distributed with relatively small change. Thermally stimulated current is due to the polarization in samples and the relaxation phenomena of trapped charges. As FEP is assumed to be without polarity, the latter cause is conceivable, and also positive charges seemed to exist. (K.I.)

  3. Surface ultraviolet radiation over east Siberia: seasonal variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhalev

    Full Text Available The results of spectral measurements of the daily near-noon surface direct solar ultraviolet radiation in the wavelength range of 295–345 nm obtained in Irkutsk (East Siberia for the time interval of 1998–2000 are presented. For the period under consideration, the seasonal UV radiation variations are analysed that are associated with the total ozone dynamics, the transition of cyclonic and anticyclonic (Siberian anticyclone periods, the presence of snow cover, and other factors. The analysis reveals an asymmetric behaviour of the seasonal course in ground-level UV radiation around the time of the summer solstice, with seasonal variation dependence on the wavelength. We have determined the irregular variations of surface UV radiation that is typical for the region, with their properties dependent on the season and on the spectral range analysed. The similarity of the above noted features from year to year was revealed.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (Transmission and scattering of radiation; instruments and techniques – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics

  4. Surface temperatures in New York City: Geospatial data enables the accurate prediction of radiative heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandehari, Masoud; Emig, Thorsten; Aghamohamadnia, Milad

    2018-02-02

    Despite decades of research seeking to derive the urban energy budget, the dynamics of thermal exchange in the densely constructed environment is not yet well understood. Using New York City as a study site, we present a novel hybrid experimental-computational approach for a better understanding of the radiative heat transfer in complex urban environments. The aim of this work is to contribute to the calculation of the urban energy budget, particularly the stored energy. We will focus our attention on surface thermal radiation. Improved understanding of urban thermodynamics incorporating the interaction of various bodies, particularly in high rise cities, will have implications on energy conservation at the building scale, and for human health and comfort at the urban scale. The platform presented is based on longwave hyperspectral imaging of nearly 100 blocks of Manhattan, in addition to a geospatial radiosity model that describes the collective radiative heat exchange between multiple buildings. Despite assumptions in surface emissivity and thermal conductivity of buildings walls, the close comparison of temperatures derived from measurements and computations is promising. Results imply that the presented geospatial thermodynamic model of urban structures can enable accurate and high resolution analysis of instantaneous urban surface temperatures.

  5. Radiative energy loss of jets in hot / cold nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peigne, S.

    1996-01-01

    The radiative energy loss encountered by a high energy quark or gluon propagating in a nuclear medium is estimated. Under reasonable assumptions it is found to be larger by at least an order of magnitude in hot compared to cold matter. (author)

  6. The surface energy balance of a polygonal tundra site in northern Siberia – Part 2: Winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Boike

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present the winter time surface energy balance at a polygonal tundra site in northern Siberia based on independent measurements of the net radiation, the sensible heat flux and the ground heat flux from two winter seasons. The latent heat flux is inferred from measurements of the atmospheric turbulence characteristics and a model approach. The long-wave radiation is found to be the dominant factor in the surface energy balance. The radiative losses are balanced to about 60 % by the ground heat flux and almost 40 % by the sensible heat fluxes, whereas the contribution of the latent heat flux is small. The main controlling factors of the surface energy budget are the snow cover, the cloudiness and the soil temperature gradient. Large spatial differences in the surface energy balance are observed between tundra soils and a small pond. The ground heat flux released at a freezing pond is by a factor of two higher compared to the freezing soil, whereas large differences in net radiation between the pond and soil are only observed at the end of the winter period. Differences in the surface energy balance between the two winter seasons are found to be related to differences in snow depth and cloud cover which strongly affect the temperature evolution and the freeze-up at the investigated pond.

  7. A radiometric model of an earth radiation budget radiometer optical system with diffuse-specular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) is to fly on NASA's Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and on NOAA F and NOAA G. Large spatial scale earth energy budget data will be derived primarily from measurements made by the ERBE nonscanning instrument (ERBE-NS). A description is given of a mathematical model capable of simulating the radiometric response of any of the ERBE-NS earth viewing channels. The model uses a Monte Carlo method to accurately account for directional distributions of emission and reflection from optical surfaces which are neither strictly diffuse nor strictly specular. The model computes radiation exchange factors among optical system components, and determines the distribution in the optical system of energy from an outside source. Attention is also given to an approach for implementing the model and results obtained from the implementation.

  8. New method to estimate surface upwelling long-wave radiation from MODIS cloud-free data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunlei; Tang, Bo-Hui; Huo, Xing; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2017-06-12

    As an important component in the surface radiation budget, surface upwelling longwave radiation (SULR) is an outcome of the land surface energy exchange and mainly represents the capability of thermal radiation from the surface of the Earth. Existing satellite-derived SULR products are too coarse to support high-resolution numerical models, and their accuracy needs to be improved. In this study, an equivalent temperature is introduced through which a "split-window" atmospheric correction algorithm is developed for MODIS data to estimate the instantaneous clear-sky SULR. It is a simple and feasible method that is particularly applicable to MODIS data to acquire relatively high precision SULR under clear skies from which qualified water vapor contents (WVC) and thermal channel brightness temperatures are available. The root mean square errors (RMSEs) are less than 13 W/m 2 for all WVC sub-ranges with the viewing zenith angle (VZA) less than 30°, or for all sub-ranges with the VZA less than 60° and the WVC less than 3.5 g/cm 2 . Also, applications and comparisons with the LST-emissivity method are made by using ground measurements which are collected from the network of surface radiation budget network data (SURFRAD) at the moment of MODIS overpass. Results show that the proposed model has high computational efficiency to estimate SULR from MODIS cloud-free data.

  9. Utilisation of total solar radiation energy in the photosynthetic production of radish, red beet and bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesław Nowakowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilisation of total solar radiation energy in the photosynthetic production of radish, red beet and bean is expressed as per cent of solar radiation accumulated in the carbon of -the dry mass per 1 cm2 of the assimilation surface area. Utilisation of this energy ranges from 2.6 to 8.4 per cent in radish, from 1.7 to 7.5 per cent in beet and from 1.9 to 4.9 per cent in bean.

  10. Examining mitigation schemes for synchrotron radiation in high-energy hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermo, G.; Sagan, D.; Zimmermann, F.

    2018-02-01

    At high proton-beam energies, beam-induced synchrotron radiation is an important source of heating, of beam-related vacuum pressure increase, and of primary photoelectrons, which can give rise to an electron cloud. We use the synrad3d code developed at Cornell to simulate the photon distributions in the arcs of several existing, planned, or proposed highest-energy hadron colliders to analyze the efficiency of several techniques developed, or proposed, to mitigate the negative effects of synchrotron radiation, such as a sawtooth surface and slots in the beam screen.

  11. UV and IR laser radiation's interaction with metal film and teflon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedenev, A. V.; Alekseev, S. B.; Goncharenko, I. M.; Koval', N. N.; Lipatov, E. I.; Orlovskii, V. M.; Shulepov, M. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2003-04-01

    The interaction of Xe ([lambda] [similar] 1.73 [mu]m) and XeCl (0.308 [mu]m) laser radiation with surfaces of metal and TiN-ceramic coatings on glass and steel substrates has been studied. Correlation between parameters of surface erosion versus laser-specific energy was investigated. Monitoring of laser-induced erosion on smooth polished surfaces was performed using optical microscopy. The correlation has been revealed between characteristic zones of thin coatings damaged by irradiation and energy distribution over the laser beam cross section allowing evaluation of defects and adhesion of coatings. The interaction of pulsed periodical CO2 ([lambda] [similar] 10.6 [mu]m), and Xe ([lambda] [similar] 1.73 [mu]m) laser radiation with surfaces of teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene—PTFE) has been studied. Monitoring of erosion track on surfaces was performed through optical microscopy. It has been shown that at pulsed periodical CO2-radiation interaction with teflon the sputtering of polymer with formation of submicron-size particles occurs. Dependencies of particle sizes, form, and sputtering velocity on laser pulse duration and target temperature have been obtained.

  12. Chorus Wave Energy Budget Analysis in the Earth's Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancarte, J.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F.

    2016-12-01

    Whistler-mode chorus emissions are important electromagnetic waves in the Earth's magnetosphere, where they continuously scatter and accelerate electrons of the outer radiation belt, controlling radiation hazards to satellites and astronauts. Here, we present an analysis of Van Allen Probes electric and magnetic field VLF waveform data, evaluating the wave energy budget, and show that a significant fraction of the energy corresponds to very oblique waves. Such waves, with a generally much smaller (up to 10 times) magnetic power than parallel waves, typically have comparable or even larger total energy. Very oblique waves may turn out to be a crucial agent of energy redistribution in the Earth's radiation belts and also provide nonlinear effects due to wave-particle interaction through the Landau resonance due to the significant electric field component parallel to the background magnetic field.

  13. Radiation and energy balance of lettuce culture inside a polyethylene greenhouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisina, V. de A.; Escobedo, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to describe the radiation and energy balance, during the lettuce (Lactuca sativa, L. cv. Verônica) crop cycle inside a polyethylene greenhouse. The radiation and energy balance was made inside a tunnel greenhouse with polyethylene cover (100 mm) and in an external area, both areas with 35 m 2 . Global, reflected and net radiation, soil heat flux and air temperature (dry and humid) were measured during the crop cycle. A Datalogger, which operated at 1 Hz frequency, storing 5 minutes averages was utilized. The global (K↓) and reflected (K) radiations showed that the average transmission of global radiation (K↓in / K↓ex) was almost constant, near to 79.59%, while the average ratio of reflected radiation (Kin / Kex) was 69.21% with 8.47% standard-deviation. The normalized curves of short-wave net radiation, in relation to the global radiation (K*/ K↓), found for both environments, were almost constant at the beginning of cycle; this relation decreased in the final stage of culture. The normalized relation (Rn/ K↓) was bigger in the external area, about 12%, when the green culture covered the soil surface. The long-wave radiation balance average (L*) was bigger outside, about 50%. The energy balance, estimated in terms of vertical fluxes, showed that, for the external area, in average, 83.07% of total net radiation was converted in latent heat evaporation (LE), and 18% in soil heat flux (G), and 9.96% in sensible heat (H), while inside of the greenhouse, 58.71% of total net radiation was converted in LE, 42.68% in H, and 28.79% in G. (author) [pt

  14. A model investigation of annual surface ultraviolet radiation in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabziparvar, A.-A.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, there has been some concern regarding solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation received at the earth,s surface because of its biological hazards affecting living organisms. Although the geographical distribution of ground-based UV network is relatively good in some continents,but over Asia, the number of UV instruments are not sufficient for meteorological and biological purposes. Iran, as an Asian country, is also suffering from the lack of UV monitoring network with the exception of one ground-based UV spectrophotometer site (Brower III) at Esfahan. Using a complex radiative transfer model and various meteorological data (for 8 years) such as total column ozone, cloudiness, surface albedo, surface air pressure, relative humidity, visibility and daily total solar radiation (TSR), the geographical distribution of annual integrated biological surface UV irradiances such as UVB, erythema and cataracts are calculated. The comparison is made for cloud-free and all-sky conditions for eight selected cities distributed from the southern tip of the country (25 N-60 E) to the northern border (39 N-48 E). It is shown that the difference between the annual UV at south and north in all-sky condition is larger than the differences in cloud-free condition. The ratio of some biological UV irradiances at southern cities to the same component at northern cities shows a factor of two and more which is quite significant. The possible reasons which might cause such differences are discussed

  15. Nanostructure enhanced near-field radiative heat transfer and designs for energy conversion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingnan; Lin, Chungwei; Teo, Koon Hoo

    2017-09-01

    Near-field radiative heat transfer can exceed the blackbody limit, and this property has been explored toward energy transfer and conversion applications, such as thermophtovoltaic (TPV) devices, radiative cooling devices, and thermoradiative (TR) devices. The coupling of resonant modes between two surfaces is important in near- field heat transfer and near-field TPV and TR systems. It was shown that the coupling of resonant modes enhances the transmissivity between two coupled objects, which further determines the radiative heat transfer and energy conversion. Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), which are surface resonances existing on metal surfaces, are commonly used for such systems. While the frequency of SPP resonance is fixed for a planar emitter, a nanostructured emitter supports additional resonances such as SPP or cavity modes with lower frequencies that are closer to the bandgap energy of a typical PV cell. We show that the nanostructured designs significantly improves the near-field radiative power transfer, and electric power output for a TR system.

  16. The development of gamma energy identify algorithm for compact radiation sensors using stepwise refinement technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hyun Jun [Div. of Radiation Regulation, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ye Won; Kim, Hyun Duk; Cho, Gyu Seong [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Yun [Dept. of of Electronics and Information Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    A gamma energy identifying algorithm using spectral decomposition combined with smoothing method was suggested to confirm the existence of the artificial radio isotopes. The algorithm is composed by original pattern recognition method and smoothing method to enhance the performance to identify gamma energy of radiation sensors that have low energy resolution. The gamma energy identifying algorithm for the compact radiation sensor is a three-step of refinement process. Firstly, the magnitude set is calculated by the original spectral decomposition. Secondly, the magnitude of modeling error in the magnitude set is reduced by the smoothing method. Thirdly, the expected gamma energy is finally decided based on the enhanced magnitude set as a result of the spectral decomposition with the smoothing method. The algorithm was optimized for the designed radiation sensor composed of a CsI (Tl) scintillator and a silicon pin diode. The two performance parameters used to estimate the algorithm are the accuracy of expected gamma energy and the number of repeated calculations. The original gamma energy was accurately identified with the single energy of gamma radiation by adapting this modeling error reduction method. Also the average error decreased by half with the multi energies of gamma radiation in comparison to the original spectral decomposition. In addition, the number of repeated calculations also decreased by half even in low fluence conditions under 104 (/0.09 cm{sup 2} of the scintillator surface). Through the development of this algorithm, we have confirmed the possibility of developing a product that can identify artificial radionuclides nearby using inexpensive radiation sensors that are easy to use by the public. Therefore, it can contribute to reduce the anxiety of the public exposure by determining the presence of artificial radionuclides in the vicinity.

  17. Glass transition near the free surface studied by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikorski, M.

    2008-06-01

    A comprehensive picture of the glass transition near the liquid/vapor interface of the model organic glass former dibutyl phthalate is presented in this work. Several surface-sensitive techniques using x-ray synchrotron radiation were applied to investigate the static and dynamic aspects of the formation of the glassy state from the supercooled liquid. The amorphous nature of dibutyl phthalate close to the free surface was confirmed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction studies. Results from X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate a uniform electron density distribution close to the interface excluding the possibility of surface freezing down to 175 K. Dynamics on sub-μm length-scales at the surface was studied with coherent synchrotron radiation via x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. From the analysis of the dispersion relation of the surface modes, viscoelastic properties of the dibutyl phthalate are deduced. The Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic media was found to describe well the properties of the liquid/vapor interface below room temperature. The data show that the viscosity at the interface matches the values reported for bulk dibutyl phthalate. The scaled relaxation rate at the surface agrees with the bulk data above 210 K. Upon approaching the glass transition temperature the free surface was observed to relax considerably faster close to the liquid/vapor interface than in bulk. The concept of higher relaxation rate at the free surface is also supported by the results of the quasielastic nuclear forward scattering experiment, during which dynamics on molecular length scales around the calorimetric glass transition temperature is studied. The data were analyzed using mode-coupling theory of the glass transition and the model of the liquid(glass)/vapor interface, predicting inhomogeneous dynamics near the surface. The quasielastic nuclear forward scattering data can be explained when the molecular mobility is assumed to decrease with the increasing

  18. Glass transition near the free surface studied by synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikorski, M.

    2008-06-15

    A comprehensive picture of the glass transition near the liquid/vapor interface of the model organic glass former dibutyl phthalate is presented in this work. Several surface-sensitive techniques using x-ray synchrotron radiation were applied to investigate the static and dynamic aspects of the formation of the glassy state from the supercooled liquid. The amorphous nature of dibutyl phthalate close to the free surface was confirmed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction studies. Results from X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate a uniform electron density distribution close to the interface excluding the possibility of surface freezing down to 175 K. Dynamics on sub-{mu}m length-scales at the surface was studied with coherent synchrotron radiation via x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. From the analysis of the dispersion relation of the surface modes, viscoelastic properties of the dibutyl phthalate are deduced. The Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic media was found to describe well the properties of the liquid/vapor interface below room temperature. The data show that the viscosity at the interface matches the values reported for bulk dibutyl phthalate. The scaled relaxation rate at the surface agrees with the bulk data above 210 K. Upon approaching the glass transition temperature the free surface was observed to relax considerably faster close to the liquid/vapor interface than in bulk. The concept of higher relaxation rate at the free surface is also supported by the results of the quasielastic nuclear forward scattering experiment, during which dynamics on molecular length scales around the calorimetric glass transition temperature is studied. The data were analyzed using mode-coupling theory of the glass transition and the model of the liquid(glass)/vapor interface, predicting inhomogeneous dynamics near the surface. The quasielastic nuclear forward scattering data can be explained when the molecular mobility is assumed to decrease with the increasing

  19. Medical radiation dosimetry theory of charged particle collision energy loss

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Accurate radiation dosimetry is a requirement of radiation oncology, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. It is necessary so as to satisfy the needs of patient safety, therapeutic and diagnostic optimisation, and retrospective epidemiological studies of the biological effects resulting from low absorbed doses of ionising radiation. The radiation absorbed dose received by the patient is the ultimate consequence of the transfer of kinetic energy through collisions between energetic charged particles and atoms of the tissue being traversed. Thus, the ability of the medical physicist to both measure and calculate accurately patient dosimetry demands a deep understanding of the physics of charged particle interactions with matter. Interestingly, the physics of charged particle energy loss has an almost exclusively theoretical basis, thus necessitating an advanced theoretical understanding of the subject in order to apply it appropriately to the clinical regime. ​ Each year, about one-third of the worl...

  20. Radiation energy devaluation in diffusion combusting flows of natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhanlall, Deodat; Munda, Josiah L.; Jiang, Peixue

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: CFD (Computational fluid dynamics) is used to evaluate the thermodynamic second-law effects of thermal radiation in turbulent diffusion natural gas flames. Radiative heat transfer processes in gas and at solid walls are identified as important causes of energy devaluation in the combusting flows. The thermodynamic role of thermal radiation cannot be neglected when compared to that of heat conduction and convection, mass diffusion, chemical reactions, and viscous dissipation. An energy devaluation number is also defined, with which the optimum fuel–air equivalence for combusting flows can be determined. The optimum fuel–air equivalence ratio for a natural gas flame is determined to be 0.7. The CFD model is validated against experimental measurements. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic effects of thermal radiation in combusting flows analyzed. • General equation for second-law analyses of combusting flows extended. • Optimum fuel–air equivalence ratio determined for natural gas flame

  1. Lunar surface gravimeter and the search for gravitational radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    A search for gravitational radiation predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity was made, using the Moon as an instrumented antenna. Data were analyzed from the Lunar Surface Gravimeter Experiment (LSG), part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) deployed on the moon. It was a component of the United States of America's Apollo 17 manned space flight mission in December, 1972. The LSG can observe accelerations of the lunar surface in the frequency range from approximately 0 to 16 hertz with a nominal sensitivity of approximately a few parts in 10 9 of lunar gravity. A secondary objective of the LSG was to measure the tidal effects on the moon and to serve as a one axis seismometer. A calculation of the sensitivity of gravitational radiation detectors enables computation of upper limits of the incident flux for the frequency regions searched. These included the millihertz region, where a search for excitation of the fundamental free modes of the moon established an upper limit of 1.4 x 10 13 ergs/(cm 2 -sec) for continuous gravitational radiation; and the 1 hertz region, where an exploration of higher order free mode excitations set a maximum flux of 5.7 x 10 12 ergs/(cm 2 -sec). Also described is an experiment to search for pulsed radiation with frequency components in the 1 hertz region. Seismic data from the LSG is converted into a form suitable for performing a coincidence analysis with two of the gravitational radiation detectors at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago, and the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland. Continuous lunar seismic data in the time period December 15-25, 1973 was converted into the format of the absolute value of the time derivative of the power

  2. Effect of radiation energy and intracellular iron dose on iron oxide nanoparticle enhancement of radiation cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Courtney M.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Thompson, Ella S.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Gladstone, David J.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are one of several high-Z materials currently being investigated for their ability to enhance the cytotoxic effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation. Studies with iron oxide, silver, gold, and hafnium oxide suggest radiation dose, radiation energy, cell type, and the type and level of metallic nanoparticle are all critical factors in achieving radiation enhancement in tumor cells. Using a single 4 Gy radiation dose, we compared the level of tumor cell cytotoxicity at two different intracellular iron concentrations and two different radiation energies in vitro. IONPs were added to cell culture media at concentrations of 0.25 mg Fe/mL and 1.0 mg Fe/mL and incubated with murine breast adenocarcinoma (MTG-B) cells for 72 hours. Extracellular iron was then removed and cells were irradiated at either 662 keV or 10 MV. At the 0.25 mg Fe/mL dose (4 pg Fe/cell), radiation energy did not affect the level of cytotoxicity. However with 1.0 mg Fe/mL (9 pg Fe/cell), the higher 10 MV radiation energy resulted in 50% greater cytotoxicity as compared to cells without IONPs irradiated at this energy. These results suggest IONPs may be able to significantly enhance the cytotoxic effects of radiation and improve therapeutic ratio if they can be selectively associated with cancer cells and/or tumors. Ongoing in vivo studies of IONP radiation enhancement in a murine tumor model are too immature to draw conclusions from at this time, however preliminary data suggests similar effectiveness of IONP radiation enhancement at 6 MV and 18 MV energy levels. In addition to the IONP-based radiation enhancement demonstrated here, the use of tumor-localized IONP with an externally delivered, non-toxic alternating magnetic field affords the opportunity to selectively heat and kill tumor cells. Combining IONP-based radiation sensitization and heat-based cytotoxicity provides a unique and potentially highly effective opportunity for therapeutic ratio enhancement.

  3. Current radiation protection activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program of the Radiation Safety Section is described in this paper. The Section has two main components: (1) the development of consensus safety documentation and (2) the use of that documentation as the basis for assisting countries to deal safely with their applications of radiation and radioactivity. Main activities of the section are listed for each of these components. Activities include documentation, coordinated research programs, and assistance to developing countries. 14 tabs

  4. Clear-sky radiative closure for the Cabauw Baseline Surface Radiation Network site, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, P.; Knap, W.H.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; Stammes, P.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a clear-sky shortwave closure analysis is presented for the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) site of Cabauw, Netherlands (51.97°N, 4.93°E). The analysis is based on an exceptional period of fine weather during the first half of May 2008, resulting in a selection of 72

  5. Artificial upwelling using the energy of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, A.

    2016-02-01

    The ocean is an important component of climate and climate change, since the heat capacity of a few meters of the upper ocean is equivalent to the heat capacity of the entire atmosphere. (Solar radiation and IR balance in the atmosphere are of course major factors as well.) Artificial upwelling devices using the energy of surface waves, similar to those developed by Vershinskiy, Pshenichnyy, and Soloviev (1987), can bring cold water from below the thermocline to the sea surface. Their wave-inertia pump consisted of a vertical tube, a valve, and a buoy to keep the device afloat. The device operated by using energy of surface waves to create an upward flow of water in the tube. An outlet valve at the top of the unit synchronized the operation of the device with surface waves and prevented back-splashing. A single device with a 100 m long and 1.2 m diameter tube is able to produce up to 1 m3s-1 flow of deep water to the surface. With a 10oC temperature difference over 100 m depth, the negative heat supply rate to the sea surface is 42 MW, which is equivalent to a 42 Wm-2 heat flux, if distributed over 1 km2 area. Such flux is comparable to the average net air-sea flux. This type of artificial upwelling can cool down the sea surface, modify climate on a regional scale and possibly help mitigate hurricanes. The cold water brought from the deep layer, however, has a larger density than the surface water and therefore has a tendency to sink back down. In this work, the efficiency of wave-inertia pumps has been estimated for different environmental conditions using a computational fluid dynamics model. The cooled near-surface layer of the ocean will be getting more heat from the sun, which is a detrimental consequence. Cloud seeding can help to mitigate this extra warming. A synergistic approach to climate engineering can thus reduce detriments and increase potential benefits of this system to society.

  6. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum energy path for the addition of a hydrogen atom to N2 is characterized in CASSCF/CCI calculations using the (4s3p2d1f/3s2p1d) basis set, with additional single point calculations at the stationary points of the potential energy surface using the (5s4p3d2f/4s3p2d) basis set. These calculations represent the most extensive set of ab initio calculations completed to date, yielding a zero point corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation of approx. 8.5 kcal mol/1. The lifetime of the HN2 species is estimated from the calculated geometries and energetics using both conventional Transition State Theory and a method which utilizes an Eckart barrier to compute one dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling effects. It is concluded that the lifetime of the HN2 species is very short, greatly limiting its role in both termolecular recombination reactions and combustion processes.

  7. Atmospheric impacts on climatic variability of surface incident solar radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's climate is driven by surface incident solar radiation (Rs. Direct measurements have shown that Rs has undergone significant decadal variations. However, a large fraction of the global land surface is not covered by these observations. Satellite-derived Rs has a good global coverage but is of low accuracy in its depiction of decadal variability. This paper shows that daily to decadal variations of Rs, from both aerosols and cloud properties, can be accurately estimated using globally available measurements of Sunshine Duration (SunDu. In particular, SunDu shows that since the late 1980's Rs has brightened over Europe due to decreases in aerosols but dimmed over China due to their increases. We found that variation of cloud cover determines Rs at a monthly scale but that aerosols determine the variability of Rs at a decadal time scale, in particular, over Europe and China. Because of its global availability and long-term history, SunDu can provide an accurate and continuous proxy record of Rs, filling in values for the blank areas that are not covered by direct measurements. Compared to its direct measurement, Rs from SunDu appears to be less sensitive to instrument replacement and calibration, and shows that the widely reported sharp increase in Rs during the early 1990s in China was a result of instrument replacement. By merging direct measurements collected by Global Energy Budget Archive with those derived from SunDu, we obtained a good coverage of Rs over the Northern Hemisphere. From this data, the average increase of Rs from 1982 to 2008 is estimated to be 0.87 W m−2 per decade.

  8. Program package for processing energy spectra of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stejskalova, E.

    1985-01-01

    A library of programs for processing energy spectra of nuclear radiation using an ICL 4-72 computer is described. The library is available at the computer centre of the Prague universities and bears the acronym JADSPE. The programs perform the computation of positions, areas and half-widths of lines in the energy spectrum of the radiation, they give a graphic representation of the course of energy spectra on the printer and on the CALCOMP recorder; they also perform the addition or subtraction of energy spectra with possible aligning of the beginnings or ends of the spectra or of maximums of chosen lines. A model function in the form of a symmetric Gaussian function is used for the computation of parameters of spectral lines, and the variation of the background with energy is assumed to be linear. (author)

  9. Mechanism of Hydrophilicity by Radiation-Induced Surface Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honjo, Yoshio; Furuya, Masahiro; Takamasa, Tomoji; Okamoto, Koji

    When a metal oxide is irradiated by gamma rays, the irradiated surface becomes hydrophilic. This surface phenomenon is called as radiation-induced surface activation (RISA) hydrophilicity. In order to investigate gamma ray-induced and photoinduced hydrophilicity, the contact angles of water droplets on a titanium dioxide surface were measured in terms of irradiation intensity and time for gamma rays of cobalt-60 and for ultraviolet rays. Reciprocals of the contact angles increased in proportion to the irradiation time before the contact angles reached its super-hydrophilic state. The irradiation time dependency is equal to each other qualitatively. In addition, an effect of ambient gas was investigated. In pure argon gas, the contact angle remains the same against the irradiation time. This clearly indicates that certain humidity is required in ambient gas to take place of RISA hydrophilicity. A single crystal titanium dioxide (100) surface was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). After irradiation with gamma rays, a peak was found in the O1s spectrum, which indicates the adsorption of dissociative water to a surface 5-fold coordinate titanium site, and the formation of a surface hydroxyl group. We conclude that the RISA hydrophilicity is caused by chemisorption of the hydroxyl group on the surface.

  10. A Linear Regression Model for Global Solar Radiation on Horizontal Surfaces at Warri, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Okundamiya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The growing anxiety on the negative effects of fossil fuels on the environment and the global emission reduction targets call for a more extensive use of renewable energy alternatives. Efficient solar energy utilization is an essential solution to the high atmospheric pollution caused by fossil fuel combustion. Global solar radiation (GSR data, which are useful for the design and evaluation of solar energy conversion system, are not measured at the forty-five meteorological stations in Nigeria. The dearth of the measured solar radiation data calls for accurate estimation. This study proposed a temperature-based linear regression, for predicting the monthly average daily GSR on horizontal surfaces, at Warri (latitude 5.020N and longitude 7.880E an oil city located in the south-south geopolitical zone, in Nigeria. The proposed model is analyzed based on five statistical indicators (coefficient of correlation, coefficient of determination, mean bias error, root mean square error, and t-statistic, and compared with the existing sunshine-based model for the same study. The results indicate that the proposed temperature-based linear regression model could replace the existing sunshine-based model for generating global solar radiation data. Keywords: air temperature; empirical model; global solar radiation; regression analysis; renewable energy; Warri

  11. Reference-free total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of semiconductor surfaces with synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckhoff, Burkhard; Fliegauf, Rolf; Kolbe, Michael; Müller, Matthias; Weser, Jan; Ulm, Gerhard

    2007-10-15

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a well-established method to monitor lowest level contamination on semiconductor surfaces. Even light elements on a wafer surface can be excited effectively when using high-flux synchrotron radiation in the soft X-ray range. To meet current industrial requirements in nondestructive semiconductor analysis, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) operates dedicated instrumentation for analyzing light element contamination on wafer pieces as well as on 200- and 300-mm silicon wafer surfaces. This instrumentation is also suited for grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis and conventional energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of buried and surface nanolayered structures, respectively. The most prominent features are a high-vacuum load-lock combined with an equipment front end module and a UHV irradiation chamber with an electrostatic chuck mounted on an eight-axis manipulator. Here, the entire surface of a 200- or a 300-mm wafer can be scanned by monochromatized radiation provided by the plane grating monochromator beamline for undulator radiation in the PTB laboratory at the electron storage ring BESSY II. This beamline provides high spectral purity and high photon flux in the range of 0.078-1.86 keV. In addition, absolutely calibrated photodiodes and Si(Li) detectors are used to monitor the exciting radiant power respectively the fluorescence radiation. Furthermore, the footprint of the excitation radiation at the wafer surface is well-known due to beam profile recordings by a CCD during special operation conditions at BESSY II that allow for drastically reduced electron beam currents. Thus, all the requirements of completely reference-free quantitation of TXRF analysis are fulfilled and are to be presented in the present work. The perspectives to arrange for reference-free quantitation using X-ray tube-based, table-top TXRF analysis are also addressed.

  12. Forces on nuclei moving on autoionizing molecular potential energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2017-01-14

    Autoionization of molecular systems occurs in diatomic molecules and in small biochemical systems. Quantum chemistry packages enable calculation of complex potential energy surfaces (CPESs). The imaginary part of the CPES is associated with the autoionization decay rate, which is a function of the molecular structure. Molecular dynamics simulations, within the framework of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, require the definition of a force field. The ability to calculate the forces on the nuclei in bio-systems when autoionization takes place seems to rely on an understanding of radiative damages in RNA and DNA arising from the release of slow moving electrons which have long de Broglie wavelengths. This work addresses calculation of the real forces on the nuclei moving on the CPES. By using the transformation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, previously used by Madelung, we proved that the classical forces on nuclei moving on the CPES correlated with the gradient of the real part of the CPES. It was proved that the force on the nuclei of the metastable molecules is time independent although the probability to detect metastable molecules exponentially decays. The classical force is obtained from the transformed Schrödinger equation when ℏ=0 and the Schrödinger equation is reduced to the classical (Newtonian) equations of motion. The forces on the nuclei regardless on what potential energy surface they move (parent CPES or product real PESs) vary in time due to the autoionization process.

  13. A land surface scheme for atmospheric and hydrologic models: SEWAB (Surface Energy and Water Balance)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengelkamp, H.T.; Warrach, K.; Raschke, E. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1997-12-31

    A soil-vegetation-atmosphere-transfer scheme is presented here which solves the coupled system of the Surface Energy and Water Balance (SEWAB) equations considering partly vegetated surfaces. It is based on the one-layer concept for vegetation. In the soil the diffusion equations for heat and moisture are solved on a multi-layer grid. SEWAB has been developed to serve as a land-surface scheme for atmospheric circulation models. Being forced with atmospheric data from either simulations or measurements it calculates surface and subsurface runoff that can serve as input to hydrologic models. The model has been validated with field data from the FIFE experiment and has participated in the PILPS project for intercomparison of land-surface parameterization schemes. From these experiments we feel that SEWAB reasonably well partitions the radiation and precipitation into sensible and latent heat fluxes as well as into runoff and soil moisture Storage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein Landoberflaechenschema wird vorgestellt, das den Transport von Waerme und Wasser zwischen dem Erdboden, der Vegetation und der Atmosphaere unter Beruecksichtigung von teilweise bewachsenem Boden beschreibt. Im Erdboden werden die Diffusionsgleichungen fuer Waerme und Feuchte auf einem Gitter mit mehreren Schichten geloest. Das Schema SEWAB (Surface Energy and Water Balance) beschreibt die Landoberflaechenprozesse in atmosphaerischen Modellen und berechnet den Oberflaechenabfluss und den Basisabfluss, die als Eingabedaten fuer hydrologische Modelle genutzt werden koennen. Das Modell wurde mit Daten des FIFE-Experiments kalibriert und hat an Vergleichsexperimenten fuer Landoberflaechen-Schemata im Rahmen des PILPS-Projektes teilgenommen. Dabei hat sich gezeigt, dass die Aufteilung der einfallenden Strahlung und des Niederschlages in den sensiblen und latenten Waermefluss und auch in Abfluss und Speicherung der Bodenfeuchte in SEWAB den beobachteten Daten recht gut entspricht. (orig.)

  14. The Surface Radiation Budget and Cloud Climate Interactions as a Part of CERES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cess, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    Work that has been completed is described in reprints and preprints, and summaries in terms of broad categories are given as follows: (1) The Relationship between Surface and Satellite Shortwave Radiative Fluxes; (2) Cloud-Climate Interactions in Atmospheric General Circulation Models; (3) Absorption of Shortwave radiation by clouds; (4) Clear-sky atmospheres shortwave radiation; and (5) Surface shortwave radiation measurements.

  15. Radiation monitors in national laboratory for high energy physics (NORM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyajima, Mitsuhiro

    1991-01-01

    In National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, in order to monitor these fields of radiation and radioactivity, the network of radiation monitors (NORM) is in operation. This continuous, centralized radiation monitoring system was designed and manufactured for the condition of adapting to the change and expansion of laboratories, accelerators and attached facilities. The NORM is composed of SARM, STATION and CENTER having different roles and functions, respectively. Those three components and their design are reported. Stand Alone Radiation Monitors (SARM) are installed at (1) controlled area of frequent entrance, (2) border area between controlled and non-controlled areas and (3) site border. STATION is installed in the control rooms to provide the operators with information on radioactivity, radiation interlocks, radiation alarms, etc. and it transmits those informations to CENTER. CENTER is installed in the radiation administration room to show in real-time the data from SARMs and STATIONs. It also holds the two-years data on disks for analysis of radiation fields and documentation. NORM started to operate in 1980, and is now extended to have eight STATIONs and 200 SARMs. (J.P.N.)

  16. Radiation monitors in national laboratory for high energy physics (NORM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyajima, Mitsuhiro (National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1991-08-01

    In National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, in order to monitor these fields of radiation and radioactivity, the network of radiation monitors (NORM) is in operation. This continuous, centralized radiation monitoring system was designed and manufactured for the condition of adapting to the change and expansion of laboratories, accelerators and attached facilities. The NORM is composed of SARM, STATION and CENTER having different roles and functions, respectively. Those three components and their design are reported. Stand Alone Radiation Monitors (SARM) are installed at (1) controlled area of frequent entrance, (2) border area between controlled and non-controlled areas and (3) site border. STATION is installed in the control rooms to provide the operators with information on radioactivity, radiation interlocks, radiation alarms, etc. and it transmits those informations to CENTER. CENTER is installed in the radiation administration room to show in real-time the data from SARMs and STATIONs. It also holds the two-years data on disks for analysis of radiation fields and documentation. NORM started to operate in 1980, and is now extended to have eight STATIONs and 200 SARMs. (J.P.N.).

  17. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, L., E-mail: ludek@isibrno.cz [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Mikmeková, E. [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lejeune, M. [LPMC – Faculte des Sciences d’Amiens, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex 2 (France)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Using proper irradiation parameters, adsorbed hydrocarbons are released from surfaces. • Slow electrons remove hydrocarbons instead of depositing carbon. • Prolonged irradiation with very slow electrons does not create defects in graphene. - Abstract: Electron-beam-induced deposition of various materials from suitable precursors has represented an established branch of nanotechnology for more than a decade. A specific alternative is carbon deposition on the basis of hydrocarbons as precursors that has been applied to grow various nanostructures including masks for subsequent technological steps. Our area of study was unintentional electron-beam-induced carbon deposition from spontaneously adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. This process traditionally constitutes a challenge for scanning electron microscopy practice preventing one from performing any true surface studies outside an ultrahigh vacuum and without in-situ cleaning of samples, and also jeopardising other electron-optical devices such as electron beam lithographs. Here we show that when reducing the energy of irradiating electrons sufficiently, the e-beam-induced deposition can be converted to e-beam-induced release causing desorption of hydrocarbons and ultimate cleaning of surfaces in both an ultrahigh and a standard high vacuum. Using series of experiments with graphene samples, we demonstrate fundamental features of e-beam-induced desorption and present results of checks for possible radiation damage using Raman spectroscopy that led to optimisation of the electron energy for damage-free cleaning. The method of preventing carbon contamination described here paves the way for greatly enhanced surface sensitivity of imaging and substantially reduced demands on vacuum systems for nanotechnological applications.

  18. The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA version 2017: a database for worldwide measured surface energy fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wild

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA is a database for the central storage of the worldwide measured energy fluxes at the Earth's surface, maintained at ETH Zurich (Switzerland. This paper documents the status of the GEBA version 2017 dataset, presents the new web interface and user access, and reviews the scientific impact that GEBA data had in various applications. GEBA has continuously been expanded and updated and contains in its 2017 version around 500 000 monthly mean entries of various surface energy balance components measured at 2500 locations. The database contains observations from 15 surface energy flux components, with the most widely measured quantity available in GEBA being the shortwave radiation incident at the Earth's surface (global radiation. Many of the historic records extend over several decades. GEBA contains monthly data from a variety of sources, namely from the World Radiation Data Centre (WRDC in St. Petersburg, from national weather services, from different research networks (BSRN, ARM, SURFRAD, from peer-reviewed publications, project and data reports, and from personal communications. Quality checks are applied to test for gross errors in the dataset. GEBA has played a key role in various research applications, such as in the quantification of the global energy balance, in the discussion of the anomalous atmospheric shortwave absorption, and in the detection of multi-decadal variations in global radiation, known as global dimming and brightening. GEBA is further extensively used for the evaluation of climate models and satellite-derived surface flux products. On a more applied level, GEBA provides the basis for engineering applications in the context of solar power generation, water management, agricultural production and tourism. GEBA is publicly accessible through the internet via http://www.geba.ethz.ch. Supplementary data are available at https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.873078.

  19. Gibbs free energy, surface stress and melting point of nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Wenhua; Hu, Wangyu

    2013-01-01

    Two approaches to calculating Gibbs free energy of nanoparticle are compared. It is found that the contribution from the vibrational entropy of surface atoms of nanoparticle to its Gibbs free energy can be ignored, and Jiang et al.'s formula [J. Phys. Chem. B 105 (2001) 6275] [27] for calculating surface stress is only valid around room temperature. Furthermore, an approximate relationship between surface stress and surface free energy of nanoparticles is revealed. Finally, the reason why effect of size dependent surface energy on melting point of nanoparticle was neglected is clarified

  20. Radiative Properties of Smoke and Aerosol Over Land Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    This talk discusses smoke and aerosol's radiative properties with particular attention to distinguishing the measurement over clear sky from clouds over land, sea, snow, etc. surfaces, using MODIS Airborne Simulator data from (Brazil, arctic sea ice and tundra and southern Africa, west Africa, and other ecosystems. This talk also discusses the surface bidirectional reflectance using Cloud Absorption Radiometer, BRDF measurements of Saudi Arabian desert, Persian Gulf, cerrado and rain forests in Brazil, sea ice, tundra, Atlantic Ocean, Great Dismal Swamp, Kuwait oil fire smoke. Recent upgrades to instrument (new TOMS UVA channels at 340 and 380 planned use in Africa (SAFARI 2000) and possibly for MEIDEX will also be discussed. This talk also plans to discuss the spectral variation of surface reflectance over land and the sensitivity of off-nadir view angles to correlation between visible near-infrared reflectance for use in remote sensing of aerosol over land.

  1. Soil heat flux and day time surface energy balance closure at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soil heat flux is a critical component of the surface energy balance along with the ... and prediction techniques. Evaporation measured .... Both incident and reflected solar radiation sensors are developed using wide spectrum photodiodes. The accuracy, resolution and range of the sensors used in the hydro-meteorological ...

  2. Surface energy balance of seasonal snow cover for snow-melt ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study describes time series analysis of snow-melt, radiation data and energy balance for a seasonal snow cover at Dhundi field station of SASE, which lies in Pir Panjal range of the. N–W Himalaya, for a winter season from 13 January to 12 April 2005. The analysis shows that mean snow surface temperature remains ...

  3. High Energy Ion Acceleration by Extreme Laser Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-14

    published in the internationally leading journal Physical Review Letters. We continued to progress this pionee 15.  SUBJECT TERMS ion therapy, heavy ion ...Thomson parabola spectrometer: To separate and provide a measurement of the charge -to-mass ratio and energy spectrum of the different ion species...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0015 High energy ion acceleration by extreme laser radiation pressure Paul McKenna UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE VIZ ROYAL COLLEGE

  4. A study of build-up effects in high-energy radiation fields using a TEPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Stevenson, G.R.; Aroua, A.; Sannikov, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    A dose of 2 mSv close to the body surface of a pregnant woman is considered by ICRP to assure a dose limit of 1 mSv to the foetus. Such an assumption depends on the energy spectrum and composition of the external radiation field and it was tested in radiation fields containing high-energy particles similar to those found around high-energy particle accelerators and in air-craft. Measurements of dose and dose equivalent were performed as a function of wall thickness using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) in radiation fields at the CERN-EU Reference Radiation Facility. Results are presented both with respect to integral quantities and event size spectra. The decrease in dose and dose equivalent at a depth equivalent to that of the foetus was typically 10% in a high-energy stray radiation field and in the case of PuBe source neutrons amounted to only 30%. It is concluded that it would be prudent under such exposure conditions to limit the dose of a pregnant woman to 1 mSv in order to assure that the dose to the foetus remains below the same limit. (author)

  5. Experimental determination of the thermal contact conductance between two solid surfaces by the energy pulse technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Gerson Antonio

    1979-01-01

    An experimental procedure for the determination of the thermal contact conductance between two solid surfaces as a function of the contact pressure and the energy of the laser radiation has been developed using the laser pulse method. A rubi laser with variable energy levels was employed as a radiating pulse energy source. The laser beam was allowed to impinge perpendicularly on the front face of a electrolytic iron 73 4 . The temperature fluctuations resulting on the back surface of the sample was detected by a thermocouple, which Is coupled to a PDP-11/45 Computer 32 Kbytes of memory, through a Analog-Digital Converter. A theoretical function, derived exclusively for the problem mentioned in this work, was adjusted by a method of least square fitting of experimental results. This adjustment yielded the value of a parameter related to the contact conductance between two surfaces. The experimental error obtained for the thermal contact conductance was +- 4.9%. (author)

  6. Comment on 'Modelling of surface energies of elemental crystals'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinping; Luo Xiaoguang; Hu Ping; Dong Shanliang

    2009-01-01

    Jiang et al (2004 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16 521) present a model based on the traditional broken-bond model for predicting surface energies of elemental crystals. It is found that bias errors can be produced in calculating the coordination numbers of surface atoms, especially in the prediction of high-Miller-index surface energies. (comment)

  7. Radiation shielding activities at the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, Enrico; Vaz, Pedro

    2000-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has devoted considerable effort over the years to radiation shielding issues. The issues are addressed through international working groups. These activities are carried out in close co-ordination and co-operation with the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). The areas of work include: basic nuclear data activities in support of radiation shielding, computer codes, shipping cask shielding applications, reactor pressure vessel dosimetry, shielding experiments database. The method of work includes organising international code comparison exercises and benchmark studies. Training courses on radiation shielding computer codes are organised regularly including hands-on experience in modelling skills. The scope of the activity covers mainly reactor shields and spent fuel transportation packages, but also fusion neutronics and in particular shielding of accelerators and irradiation facilities. (author)

  8. The energy balance of the earth's surface : a practical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de H.A.R.

    1982-01-01

    This study is devoted to the energy balance of the earth's surface with a special emphasis on practical applications. A simple picture of the energy exchange processes that take place at the ground is the following. Per unit time and area an amount of radiant energy is supplied to the surface. This

  9. Rectenna that converts infrared radiation to electrical energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W.

    2016-09-06

    Technologies pertaining to converting infrared (IR) radiation to DC energy are described herein. In a general embodiment, a rectenna comprises a conductive layer. A thin insulator layer is formed on the conductive layer, and a nanoantenna is formed on the thin insulator layer. The thin insulator layer acts as a tunnel junction of a tunnel diode.

  10. Radiation therapy. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    This catalog lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Radiation Therapy, and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 30 April 2001. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. These are noted in the catalogue

  11. Automated calculation of surface energy fluxes with high-frequency lake buoy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolway, R. Iestyn; Jones, Ian D; Hamilton, David P.; Maberly, Stephen C; Muroaka, Kohji; Read, Jordan S.; Smyth, Robyn L; Winslow, Luke A.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Heat Flux Analyzer is a program used for calculating the surface energy fluxes in lakes according to established literature methodologies. The program was developed in MATLAB for the rapid analysis of high-frequency data from instrumented lake buoys in support of the emerging field of aquatic sensor network science. To calculate the surface energy fluxes, the program requires a number of input variables, such as air and water temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and short-wave radiation. Available outputs for Lake Heat Flux Analyzer include the surface fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat and their corresponding transfer coefficients, incoming and outgoing long-wave radiation. Lake Heat Flux Analyzer is open source and can be used to process data from multiple lakes rapidly. It provides a means of calculating the surface fluxes using a consistent method, thereby facilitating global comparisons of high-frequency data from lake buoys.

  12. Radiation processing of natural polymers using low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu

    2004-01-01

    Radiation processing is widely used in Japan and the economic scale of radiation application amounted to about 71 b$ (ratio relative to GDP: 1.7%) in total. It consisted of 60 b$ (85%) in industry, 10 b$ (14%) in medicine and 1 b$ (1%) in agriculture. Irradiation using gamma-ray from 60 Co and electron beam is commercially used for the sterilization and modification of materials. Utilization of natural polymers by radiation has been investigated for recycling the natural resources and reducing the environmental pollution. Polysaccharides such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin were easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities, i.e. anti-bacterial activity, elicitor activity, plant growth promotion, suppression of environmental stress on plants. Radiation degraded chitosan was effective to enhance the growth of plants in tissue culture. Low energy electron beam (EB) irradiation has a variety of applications and good safety. A self-shielded low energy electron accelerator system needs an initial investment much lower than a 60 Co facility. It was demonstrated that the liquid sample irradiation system using low energy EB was effective not only for the preparation of degraded polysaccharides but also for radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex (RVNRL). Some carbohydrate derivatives, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), carboxymethyl-starch and carboxymethyl-chitin/chitosan, can be crosslinked under certain radiation condition and produced the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use. Treatment of soybean seeds by low energy EB enhanced the growth and the number of rhizobia on the root. (author)

  13. Quasi-real-time monitoring of SW radiation budget using geostationary satellite for Climate study and Renewable energy. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, H.; Nakajima, T. Y.; Kuze, H.; Takamura, T.; Pinker, R. T.; Nakajima, T.

    2013-12-01

    Solar radiation is the only source of energy that drives the weather and climate of the Earth's surface. Earth is warmed by incoming solar radiation, and emitted energy to space by terrestrial radiation due to its temperature. It has been kept to the organisms viable environment by the effect of heating and cooling. Clouds can cool the Earth by reflecting solar radiation and also can keep the Earth warm by absorbing and emitting terrestrial radiation. They are important in the energy balance at the Earth surface and the Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) and are connected complicatedly into the Earth system as well as other climate feedback processes. Thus it is important to estimate Earth's radiation budget for better understanding of climate and environmental change. We have shared several topics related to climate change. Energy issues close to the climate change, it is an environmental problems. Photovoltaics is one of the power generation method to converts from solar radiation to electric power directly. It does not emit greenhouse gases during power generation. Similarly, drainage, exhaust, vibration does not emit. PV system can be distributed as a small power supply in urban areas and it can installed to near the power demand points. Also solar thermal is heat generator with high efficiency. Therefor it is an effective energy source that the solar power is expected as one of the mitigation of climate change (IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation). It is necessary to real-time-monitoring of the surface solar radiation for safety operation of electric power system. We introduce a fusion analysis of renewable energy and Quasi-real-time analysis of SW radiation budget. Sample of estimated PV power mapping using geostationary satellite.

  14. Evaluation of the Reanalysis Surface Incident Shortwave Radiation Products from NCEP, ECMWF, GSFC, and JMA Using Satellite and Surface Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotong Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation incident at the Earth’s surface (Rs is an essential component of the total energy exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Reanalysis data have been widely used, but a comprehensive validation using surface measurements is still highly needed. In this study, we evaluated the Rs estimates from six current representative global reanalyses (NCEP–NCAR, NCEP-DOE; CFSR; ERA-Interim; MERRA; and JRA-55 using surface measurements from different observation networks [GEBA; BSRN; GC-NET; Buoy; and CMA] (674 sites in total and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES EBAF product from 2001 to 2009. The global mean biases between the reanalysis Rs and surface measurements at all sites ranged from 11.25 W/m2 to 49.80 W/m2. Comparing with the CERES-EBAF Rs product, all the reanalyses overestimate Rs, except for ERA-Interim, with the biases ranging from −2.98 W/m2 to 21.97 W/m2 over the globe. It was also found that the biases of cloud fraction (CF in the reanalyses caused the overestimation of Rs. After removing the averaged bias of CERES-EBAF, weighted by the area of the latitudinal band, a global annual mean Rs values of 184.6 W/m2, 180.0 W/m2, and 182.9 W/m2 were obtained over land, ocean, and the globe, respectively.

  15. New theory of radiative energy transfer in free electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, E.

    1976-01-01

    A new theory of radiative energy transfer in free, statistically stationary electromagnetic fields is presented. It provides a model for energy transport that is rigorous both within the framework of the stochastic theory of the classical field as well as within the framework of the theory of the quantized field. Unlike the usual phenomenological model of radiative energy transfer that centers around a single scalar quantity (the specific intensity of radiation), our theory brings into evidence the need for characterizing the energy transport by means of two (related) quantities: a scalar and a vector that may be identified, in a well-defined sense, with ''angular components'' of the average electromagnetic energy density and of the average Poynting vector, respectively. Both of them are defined in terms of invariants of certain new electromagnetic correlation tensors. In the special case when the field is statistically homogeneous, our model reduces to the usual one and our angular component of the average electromagnetic energy density, when multiplied by the vacuum speed of light, then acquires all the properties of the specific intensity of radiation. When the field is not statistically homogeneous our model approximates to the usual phenomenological one, provided that the angular correlations between plane wave modes of the field extend over a sufficiently small solid angle of directions about the direction of propagation of each mode. It is tentatively suggested that, when suitably normalized, our angular component of the average electromagnetic energy density may be interpreted as a quasi-probability (general quantum-mechancial phase-space distribution function, such as Wigner's) for the position and the momentum of a photon

  16. Parametric plasma surface instabilities with p-polarized radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rappaport, H.L.

    1994-01-01

    The authors argue that parametric plasma surface mode excitation is a viable broadband instability mechanism in the microwave regime since the wavelength of incident radiation can be large compared to plasma ion density gradient scale lengths. The authors restrict their attention to plasmas which are uniform in the planes perpendicular to the density gradients. The boundary region is characterized by three parameters: (1) the ion density gradient length; (2) the electron Debye length; and (3) the excursion of boundary electrons as they move in response to monochromatic p-polarized radiation. A thin vacuum plasma transition layer, in which the ion density gradient scale length is large compared with the Debye length and the electron excursion, is included in the analysis of plasma stability. The recently proposed Lagrangian Frame Two-Plasmon Decay mode (LFTPD) is investigated in the regime in which the instability is not resonantly coupled to surface waves propagating along the boundary region. In this case they have found both spatially dependent growth rate profiles and spatially dependent transit layer magnetic fields due to nonlinear surface currents. LFTPD growth rate profiles are displayed as a function of pump amplitude. The results of a time domain simulation of this mode is also shown

  17. Net Surface Shortwave Radiation from GOES Imagery—Product Evaluation Using Ground-Based Measurements from SURFRAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand K. Inamdar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Earth’s surface net radiation controls the energy and water exchanges between the Earth’s surface and the atmosphere, and can be derived from satellite observations. The ability to monitor the net surface radiation over large areas at high spatial and temporal resolution is essential for many applications, such as weather forecasting, short-term climate prediction or water resources management. The objective of this paper is to derive the net surface radiation in the shortwave domain at high temporal (half-hourly and spatial resolution (~1 km using visible imagery from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES. The retrieval algorithm represents an adaptation to GOES data of a standard algorithm initially developed for the NASA-operated Clouds and Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES scanner. The methodology relies on: (1 the estimation of top of atmosphere shortwave radiation from GOES spectral measurements; and (2 the calculation of net surface shortwave (SW radiation accounting for atmospheric effects. Comparison of GOES-retrieved net surface shortwave radiation with ground-measurements at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA Surface Radiation (SURFRAD stations yields very good agreement with average bias lower than 5 W·m−2 and root mean square difference around 70 W·m−2. The algorithm performance is usually higher over areas characterized by low spatial variability in term of land cover type and surface biophysical properties. The technique does not involve retrieval and assessment of cloud properties and can be easily adapted to other meteorological satellites around the globe.

  18. Impact of buildings on surface solar radiation over urban Beijing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Bin; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Gu, Yu; He, Cenlin; Lee, Wee-Liang; Chang, Xing; Li, Qinbin; Wang, Shuxiao; Tseng, Hsien-Liang R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hao, Jiming

    2016-05-12

    The rugged surface of an urban area due to varying buildings can interact with solar beams and affect both the magnitude and spatiotemporal distribution of surface solar fluxes. Here we systematically examine the impact of buildings on downward surface solar fluxes over urban Beijing by using a 3-D radiation parameterization that accounts for 3-D building structures vs. the conventional plane-parallel scheme. We find that the resulting downward surface solar flux deviations between the 3-D and the plane-parallel schemes are generally ±1–10 W m-2 at 800 m grid resolution and within ±1 W m-2 at 4 km resolution. Pairs of positive–negative flux deviations on different sides of buildings are resolved at 800 m resolution, while they offset each other at 4 km resolution. Flux deviations from the unobstructed horizontal surface at 4 km resolution are positive around noon but negative in the early morning and late afternoon. The corresponding deviations at 800 m resolution, in contrast, show diurnal variations that are strongly dependent on the location of the grids relative to the buildings. Both the magnitude and spatiotemporal variations of flux deviations are largely dominated by the direct flux. Furthermore, we find that flux deviations can potentially be an order of magnitude larger by using a finer grid resolution. Atmospheric aerosols can reduce the magnitude of downward surface solar flux deviations by 10–65 %, while the surface albedo generally has a rather moderate impact on flux deviations. The results imply that the effect of buildings on downward surface solar fluxes may not be critically significant in mesoscale atmospheric models with a grid resolution of 4 km or coarser. However, the effect can play a crucial role in meso-urban atmospheric models as well as microscale urban dispersion models with resolutions of 1 m to 1 km.

  19. Radiation effect of low energy electron beam on plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Hidefumi; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu

    2000-01-01

    Radiation effect of low energy electron beam (EB) on the growth of maize, barley and soybean was investigated. Seeds of maize, barley and soybean were irradiated in the dose range of 2 to 20 kGy using EB with different energy from 150 to 250 keV. Growth promotion was observed for irradiated seeds of maize and soybean at the dose up to 10 kGy. Especially, significant promotion of root growth was observed for irradiated barley and soybean. It was also found for soybean that phytoalexin induction activity was clearly enhanced by low energy EB irradiation. (author)

  20. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Limao-Vieira, P. [Laboratorio de Colisoes Atomicas e Moleculares, Departamento de Fisica, CEFITEC, FCT-Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Williart, A.; Garcia, G. [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain); Huerga, C.; Tellez, M. [Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  1. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G.; Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C.; Blanco, F.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Williart, A.; Garcia, G.; Huerga, C.; Tellez, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  2. Structures, systems and methods for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novack, Steven D [Idaho Falls, ID; Kotter, Dale K [Shelley, ID; Pinhero, Patrick J [Columbia, MO

    2011-12-06

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  3. Energy Accommodation from Surface Catalyzed Reactions in Air Plasmas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Understanding energy transport at the gas-surface interface between catalytic/reacting surfaces exposed to highly dissociated plasmas remains a significant research...

  4. Surface free energy of alkali and transition metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqra, Fathi; Ayyad, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Size dependent surface free energy of spherical, cubic and disk Au nanoparticles. - Highlights: • A model to account for the surface free energy of metallic nanoparticles is described. • The model requires only the cohesive energy of the nanoparticle. • The surface free energy of a number of metallic nanoparticles has been calculated, and the obtained values agree well with existing data. • Surface energy falls down very fast when the number of atoms is less than hundred. • The model is applicable to any metallic nanoparticle. - Abstract: This paper addresses an interesting issue on the surface free energy of metallic nanoparticles as compared to the bulk material. Starting from a previously reported equation, a theoretical model, that involves a specific term for calculating the cohesive energy of nanoparticle, is established in a view to describe the behavior of surface free energy of metallic nanoparticles (using different shapes of particle: sphere, cube and disc). The results indicate that the behavior of surface energy is very appropriate for spherical nanoparticle, and thus, it is the most realistic shape of a nanoparticle. The surface energy of copper, silver, gold, platinum, tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, paladium and alkali metallic nanoparticles is only prominent in the nanoscale size, and it decreases with the decrease of nanoparticle size. Thus, the surface free energy plays a more important role in determining the properties of nanoparticles than in bulk materials. It differs from shape to another, and falls down as the number of atoms (nanoparticle size) decreases. In the case of spherical nanoparticles, the onset of the sharp decrease in surface energy is observed at about 110 atom. A decrease of 16% and 45% in surface energy is found by moving from bulk to 110 atom and from bulk to 5 atom, respectively. The predictions are consistent with the reported data

  5. High-energy outer radiation belt dynamic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Y.T.; Nightingale, R.W.; Rinaldi, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Specification of the average high-energy radiation belt environment in terms of phenomenological montages of satellite measurements has been available for some time. However, for many reasons both scientific and applicational (including concerns for a better understanding of the high-energy radiatino background in space), it is desirable to model the dynamic response of the high-energy radiation belts to sources, to losses, and to geomagnetic activity. Indeed, in the outer electron belt, this is the only mode of modeling that can handle the large intensity fluctuations. Anticipating the dynamic modeling objective of the upcoming Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) program, we have undertaken to initiate the study of the various essential elements in constructing a dynamic radiation belt model based on interpretation of satellite data according to simultaneous radial and pitch-angle diffusion theory. In order to prepare for the dynamic radiation belt modeling based on a large data set spanning a relatively large segment of L-values, such as required for CRRES, it is important to study a number of test cases with data of similar characteristics but more restricted in space-time coverage. In this way, models of increasing comprehensiveness can be built up from the experience of elucidating the dynamics of more restrictive data sets. The principal objectives of this paper are to discuss issues concerning dynamic modeling in general and to summarize in particular the good results of an initial attempt at constructing the dynamics of the outer electron radiation belt based on a moderately active data period from Lockheed's SC-3 instrument flown on board the SCATHA (P78-2) spacecraft. Further, we shall discuss the issues brought out and lessons learned in this test case

  6. Heat rejection efficiency research of new energy automobile radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, W. S.; Shen, W. X.; Zhang, L. W.

    2018-03-01

    The driving system of new energy vehicle has larger heat load than conventional engine. How to ensure the heat dissipation performance of the cooling system is the focus of the design of new energy vehicle thermal management system. In this paper, the heat dissipation efficiency of the radiator of the hybrid electric vehicle is taken as the research object, the heat dissipation efficiency of the radiator of the new energy vehicle is studied through the multi-working-condition enthalpy difference test. In this paper, the test method in the current standard QC/T 468-2010 “automobile radiator” is taken, but not limited to the test conditions specified in the standard, 5 types of automobile radiator are chosen, each of them is tested 20 times in simulated condition of different wind speed and engine inlet temperature. Finally, regression analysis is carried out for the test results, and regression equation describing the relationship of radiator heat dissipation heat dissipation efficiency air side flow rate cooling medium velocity and inlet air temperature is obtained, and the influence rule is systematically discussed.

  7. Changing surface-atmosphere energy exchange and refreezing capacity of the lower accumulation area, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charalampidis, C.; Van As, D.; Box, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    negative surface mass budget (SMB) and surface meltwater run-off. The observed run-off was due to a large ice fraction in the upper 10 m of firn that prevented meltwater from percolating to available pore volume below. Analysis reveals an anomalously low 2012 summer-averaged albedo of 0.71 (typically ∼ 0...... energy fluxes. The model reproduces the observed melt rates as well as the SMB for each season. A sensitivity analysis reveals that 71 % of the additional solar radiation in 2012 was used for melt, corresponding to 36 % (0.64 m) of the 2012 surface lowering. The remaining 64 % (1.14 m) of surface...

  8. The relevance of rooftops: Analyzing the microscale surface energy balance in the Chicago region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Radhika

    Spatial structure in climate variables often exist over very short length scales within an urban area, and this structure is a result of various site-specific features. In order to analyze the seasonal and diurnal energy flows that take place at a microclimatic surface, this work develops a semi-empirical energy balance model. For this, radiation fluxes and meteorological measurements are determined by direct observation; sensible heat and latent heat fluxes by parameterizations; and the heat storage flux by a 1-D mechanistic model that allows analysis of the temperature profile and heat storage within an underlying slab. Two sites receive detailed study: an anthropogenic site, being a University of Chicago building rooftop, and a natural site, outside Chicago in the open country. Two identical sets of instruments record measurements contemporaneously from these locations during June-November 2007, the entire period for which analyses are carried out. The study yields seasonal trends in surface temperature, surface-to-air temperature contrast and net radiation. At both sites, a temporal hysteresis between net radiation and heat storage flux indicates that surplus energy absorbed during daylight is released to the atmosphere later in the evening. The surface energy balance model responds well to site specific features for both locations. An analysis of the surface energy balance shows that the flux of sensible heat is the largest non-radiative contributor to the roof's surface cooling, while the flux of latent heat (also referred to as evaporative cooling) is the largest heat sink for the soil layer. In the latter part of the study, the surface energy balance model is upgraded by adding the capability to compute changes in surface temperature and non-radiative fluxes for any specified set of thermal and reflective roof properties. The results of this analysis allow an examination of the relationship between the roof temperature, the heat flux entering the building

  9. Development of high energy radiation resistant elastomeric composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, C.; Patni, M.J.; Pandya, M.V.; Desai, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Stabilizer formulations are developed for the elastomeric composites which can withstand high energy radiations to the total dose of 200 MRads. The elastomeric materials used are general purpose formulations based on Ethylene propylene diene (EPDM) and Chlorosulfonated polyethylene (CSP). The stabilizers are synthesized from highly aromatic ring compounds in the oligomeric and polymeric form, in the laboratory. The polymeric stabilizers are found to have better radiation resistance compared to the former one when the performance was evaluated using standard methodology. Dielectric analysis, FTIR and wide angle x-ray diffraction are used to follow the physico-chemical changes taking place in the bulk when subjected to the performance test

  10. The Diurnal Cycle of the Boundary Layer, Convection, Clouds, and Surface Radiation in a Coastal Monsoon Environment (Darwin Australia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Peter T.; Long, Charles N.; Protat, Alain

    2012-08-01

    The diurnal variation of convection and associated cloud and radiative properties remains a significant issue in global NWP and climate models. This study analyzes observed diurnal variability of convection in a coastal monsoonal environment examining the interaction of convective rain clouds, their associated cloud properties, and the impact on the surface radiation and corresponding boundary layer structure during periods where convection is suppressed or active on the large scale. The analysis uses data from the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) as well as routine measurements from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Both active monsoonal and large-scale suppressed (buildup and break) conditions are examined and demonstrate that the diurnal variation of rainfall is much larger during the break periods and the spatial distribution of rainfall is very different between the monsoon and break regimes. During the active monsoon the total net radiative input to the surface is decreased by more than 3 times the amount than during the break regime - this total radiative cloud forcing is found to be dominated by the shortwave (SW) cloud effects because of the much larger optical thicknesses and persistence of long-lasting anvils and cirrus cloud decks associated with the monsoon regime. These differences in monsoon versus break surface radiative energy contribute to low-level air temperature differences in the boundary layer over the land surfaces.

  11. Effect of surface wettability caused by radiation induced surface activation on leidenfrost condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamasa, T.; Hazuku, T.; Tamura, N.; Okamoto, K. [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Mishima, K. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); Furuya, M. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Improving the limit of boiling heat transfer or critical heat flux requires that the cooling liquid can contact the heating surface, or a high-wettability, highly hydrophilic heating surface, even if a vapor bubble layer is generated on the surface. From this basis, we investigated surface wettability and Leidenfrost condition using metal oxides irradiated by {gamma}-rays. In our previous study, contact angle, an indicator of macroscopic wettability, of a water droplet on metal oxide at room temperature was measured by image processing of the images obtained by a CCD video camera. The results showed that the surface wettability on metal oxide pieces of titanium, Zircaloy No. 4, SUS-304, and copper was improved significantly by the Radiation Induced Surface Activation (RISA) phenomenon. To delineate the effect of Radiation Induced Surface Activation (RISA) on heat transferring phenomena, the Leidenfrost condition and quenching of metal oxides irradiated by {gamma}-rays were investigated. In the Leidenfrost experiment, when the temperature of the heating surface reached the wetting limit temperature, water-solid contact vanished because a stable vapor film existed between the droplet and the metal surface; i.e., a Leidenfrost condition obtained. The wetting limit temperature increased with integrated irradiation dose. After irradiation, the wet length and the duration of contact increased, and the contact angle decreased. In the quenching test, high surface wettability, or a highly hydrophilic condition, of a simulated fuel rod made of SUS was achieved, and the quenching velocities were increased up to 20-30% after 300 kGy 60Co {gamma}-ray irradiation.

  12. Radiative energy loss of neighboring subjets arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine

    We compute the in-medium energy loss probability distribution of two neighboring subjets at leading order, in the large-$N_c$ approximation. Our result exhibits a gradual onset of color decoherence of the system and accounts for two expected limiting cases. When the angular separation is smaller than the characteristic angle for medium-induced radiation, the two-pronged substructure lose energy coherently as a single color charge, namely that of the parent parton. At large angular separation the two subjets lose energy independently. Our result is a first step towards quantifying effects of energy loss as a result of the fluctuation of the multi-parton jet substructure and therefore goes beyond the standard approach to jet quenching based on single parton energy loss. We briefly discuss applications to jet observables in heavy-ion collisions.

  13. Unified limiting form of graviton radiation at extreme energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ciafaloni, Marcello; Coradeschi, Francesco; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    We derive the limiting form of graviton radiation in gravitational scattering at transplanckian energies ($E\\gg M_P$) and small deflection angles. We show that --- owing to the graviton's spin 2 --- such limiting form unifies the soft- and Regge- regimes of emission, by covering a broad angular range, from forward fragmentation to deeply central region. The single-exchange emission amplitudes have a nice expression in terms of the transformation phases of helicity amplitudes under rotations. As a result, the multiple-exchange emission amplitudes can be resummed via an impact parameter $b$-space factorization theorem that takes into account all coherence effects. We then see the emergence of an energy spectrum of the emitted radiation which, being tuned on $\\hbar/R \\sim M_P^2/E \\ll M_P$, is reminiscent of Hawking's radiation. Such a spectrum is much softer than the one na\\"ively expected for increasing input energies and neatly solves a potential energy crisis. Furthermore, by including rescattering correction...

  14. Analysis of surface with low energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, A.; Miranda, J.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear techniques applied to element analysis presents different characteristics depending on projectile energy. It can seen observed than an energy (E ≅ 1 MeV) exists which separate two regions for which sensitivity, information analysis and resolution in detection are different. For this work, we describe for the energy region E ≤ 1 MeV, the advantage of the three most used techniques which are PIXE, RBS y RNR. (Author)

  15. Multiple scattering effects with cyclical terms in active remote sensing of vegetated surface using vector radiative transfer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The energy transport in a vegetated (corn) surface layer is examined by solving the vector radiative transfer equation using a numerical iterative approach. This approach allows a higher order that includes the multiple scattering effects. Multiple scattering effects are important when the optical t...

  16. Projections onto the Pareto surface in multicriteria radiation therapy optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokrantz, Rasmus; Miettinen, Kaisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate or reduce the error to Pareto optimality that arises in Pareto surface navigation when the Pareto surface is approximated by a small number of plans. Methods: The authors propose to project the navigated plan onto the Pareto surface as a postprocessing step to the navigation. The projection attempts to find a Pareto optimal plan that is at least as good as or better than the initial navigated plan with respect to all objective functions. An augmented form of projection is also suggested where dose–volume histogram constraints are used to prevent that the projection causes a violation of some clinical goal. The projections were evaluated with respect to planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered by step-and-shoot and sliding window and spot-scanned intensity modulated proton therapy. Retrospective plans were generated for a prostate and a head and neck case. Results: The projections led to improved dose conformity and better sparing of organs at risk (OARs) for all three delivery techniques and both patient cases. The mean dose to OARs decreased by 3.1 Gy on average for the unconstrained form of the projection and by 2.0 Gy on average when dose–volume histogram constraints were used. No consistent improvements in target homogeneity were observed. Conclusions: There are situations when Pareto navigation leaves room for improvement in OAR sparing and dose conformity, for example, if the approximation of the Pareto surface is coarse or the problem formulation has too permissive constraints. A projection onto the Pareto surface can identify an inaccurate Pareto surface representation and, if necessary, improve the quality of the navigated plan

  17. Projections onto the Pareto surface in multicriteria radiation therapy optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokrantz, Rasmus; Miettinen, Kaisa

    2015-10-01

    To eliminate or reduce the error to Pareto optimality that arises in Pareto surface navigation when the Pareto surface is approximated by a small number of plans. The authors propose to project the navigated plan onto the Pareto surface as a postprocessing step to the navigation. The projection attempts to find a Pareto optimal plan that is at least as good as or better than the initial navigated plan with respect to all objective functions. An augmented form of projection is also suggested where dose-volume histogram constraints are used to prevent that the projection causes a violation of some clinical goal. The projections were evaluated with respect to planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered by step-and-shoot and sliding window and spot-scanned intensity modulated proton therapy. Retrospective plans were generated for a prostate and a head and neck case. The projections led to improved dose conformity and better sparing of organs at risk (OARs) for all three delivery techniques and both patient cases. The mean dose to OARs decreased by 3.1 Gy on average for the unconstrained form of the projection and by 2.0 Gy on average when dose-volume histogram constraints were used. No consistent improvements in target homogeneity were observed. There are situations when Pareto navigation leaves room for improvement in OAR sparing and dose conformity, for example, if the approximation of the Pareto surface is coarse or the problem formulation has too permissive constraints. A projection onto the Pareto surface can identify an inaccurate Pareto surface representation and, if necessary, improve the quality of the navigated plan.

  18. Radiation processing with high-energy X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.; Stichelbaut, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    The physical, chemical or biological characteristics of selected commercial products and materials can be improved by radiation processing. The ionizing energy can be provided by accelerated electrons with energies between 75 keV and 10 MeV, gamma rays from cobalt-60 with average energies of 1.25 MeV or X-rays with maximum energies up to 7.5 MeV. Electron beams are preferred for thin products, which are processed at high speeds. Gamma rays are used for products that are too thick for treatment with electron beams. High-energy X-rays can also be used for these purposes because their penetration in solid materials is similar to or even slightly greater than that of gamma rays. Previously, the use of X-rays had been inhibited by their slower processing rates and higher costs when compared with gamma rays. Since then, the price of cobalt-60 sources has been increased and the radiation intensity from high-energy, high-power X-ray generators has also increased. For facilities requiring at least 2 MCi of cobalt-60, the capital and operating costs of X-ray facilities with equivalent processing rates can be less than that of gamma-ray irradiators. Several high-energy electron beam facilities have been equipped with removable X-ray targets so that irradiation processes can be done with either type of ionizing energy. A new facility is now being built which will be used exclusively in the X-ray mode to sterilize medical products. Operation of this facility will show that high-energy, high-power X-ray generators are practical alternatives to large gamma-ray sources. (author)

  19. Radiative corrections to high-energy neutrino scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rujula, A. de; Petronzio, R.; Savoy-Navarro, A.

    1979-01-01

    Motivated by precise neutrino experiments, the electromagnetic radiative corrections to the data are reconsidered. The usefulness is investigated and the simplicity demonstrated of the 'leading log' approximation: the calculation to order α ln (Q/μ), α ln (Q/msub(q)). Here Q is an energy scale of the overall process, μ is the lepton mass and msub(q) is a hadronic mass, the effective quark mass in a parton model. The leading log radiative corrections to dsigma/dy distributions and to suitably interpreted dsigma/dx distributions are quark-mass independent. The authors improve upon the conventional leading log approximation and compute explicitly the largest terms that lie beyond the leading log level. In practice this means that the model-independent formulae, though approximate, are likely to be excellent estimates everywhere except at low energy or very large y. It is pointed out that radiative corrections to measurements of deviations from the Callan-Gross relation and to measurements of the 'sea' constituency of nucleons are gigantic. The QCD inspired study of deviations from scaling is of particular interest. The authors compute, beyond the leading log level, the radiative corrections of the QCD predictions. (Auth.)

  20. Modeling of a nanoscale flexoelectric energy harvester with surface effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhi

    2017-04-01

    This work presents the modeling of a beam energy harvester scavenging energy from ambient vibration based on the phenomenon of flexoelectricity. By considering surface elasticity, residual surface stress, surface piezoelectricity and bulk flexoelectricity, a modified Euler-Bernoulli beam model for the energy harvester is developed. After deriving the requisite energy expressions, the extended Hamilton's principle and the assumed-modes method are employed to obtain the discrete electromechanical Euler-Lagrange's equations. Then, the expressions of the steady-state electromechanical responses are given for harmonic base excitation. Numerical simulations are conducted to show the output voltage and the output power of the flexoelectric energy harvesters with different materials and sizes. Particular emphasis is given to the surface effects on the performance of the energy harvesters. It is found that the surface effects are sensitive to the beam geometries and the surface material constants, and the effect of residual surface stress is more significant than that of the surface elasticity and the surface piezoelectricity. The axial deformation of the beam is also considered in the model to account for the electromechanical coupling due to piezoelectricity, and results indicate that piezoelectricity will diminish the output electrical quantities for the case investigated. This work could lead to the development of flexoelectric energy harvesters that can make the micro- and nanoscale sensor systems autonomous.

  1. Sunshine-based estimation of global solar radiation on horizontal surface at Lake Van region (Turkey)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duzen, Hacer; Aydin, Harun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The global solar radiation at Lake Van region is estimated. ► This study is unique for the Lake Van region. ► Solar radiation around Lake Van has the highest value at the east-southeast region. ► The annual average solar energy potential is obtained as 750–2458 kWh/m 2 . ► Results can be used to estimate evaporation. - Abstract: In this study several sunshine-based regression models have been evaluated to estimate monthly average daily global solar radiation on horizontal surface of Lake Van region in the Eastern Anatolia region in Turkey by using data obtained from seven different meteorological stations. These models are derived from Angström–Prescott linear regression model and its derivatives such as quadratic, cubic, logarithmic and exponential. The performance of this regression models were evaluated by comparing the calculated clearness index and the measured clearness index. Several statistical tests were used to control the validation and goodness of the regression models in terms of the coefficient of determination, mean percent error, mean absolute percent error, mean biased error, mean absolute biased error, root mean square error and t-statistic. The results of all the regression models are within acceptable limits according to the statistical tests. However, the best performances are obtained by cubic regression model for Bitlis, Gevaş, Hakkari, Muş stations and by quadratic regression model for Malazgirt, Tatvan and Van stations to predict global solar radiation. The spatial distributions of the monthly average daily global solar radiation around the Lake Van region were obtained with interpolation of calculated solar radiation data that acquired from best fit models of the stations. The annual average solar energy potential for Lake Van region is obtained between 750 kWh/m 2 and 2485 kWh/m 2 with annual average of 1610 kWh/m 2 .

  2. Radiation protection and atomic energy legislation in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, L.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation protection and atomic energy laws of the Nordic countries Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden are presented in this report in their status of March 1, 1984. As a background to this legislation the Nordic co-operation is briefly reviewed and the common basis for the legal texts is given. Some historical remarks for the legislation of each country are included. (orig./HP)

  3. Energy storage and dispersion of surface acoustic waves trapped in a periodic array of mechanical resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2009-01-01

    confined to the electrode as compared to the total mechanical energy is calculated and is found to be increasing for increasing aspect ratio and to tend to a definite limit for the two families of surface waves. This observation is in support of the interpretation that high aspect ratio electrodes act......It has been shown previously that surface acoustic waves can be efficiently trapped and slowed by steep ridges on a piezoelectric substrate, giving rise to two families of shear-horizontal and vertically polarized surface waves. The mechanisms of energy storage and dispersion are explored by using...... the finite element method to model surface acoustic waves generated by high aspect ratio electrodes. A periodic model is proposed including a perfectly matched layer to simulate radiation conditions away from the sources, from which the modal distributions are found. The ratio of the mechanical energy...

  4. Surface energy and work function of elemental metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Rosengaard, N. M.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed an ab initio study of the surface energy and the work function for six close-packed surfaces of 40 elemental metals by means of a Green’s-function technique, based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the tight-binding and atomic-sphere approximations. The results...... are in excellent agreement with a recent full-potential, all-electron, slab-supercell calculation of surface energies and work functions for the 4d metals. The present calculations explain the trend exhibited by the surface energies of the alkali, alkaline earth, divalent rare-earth, 3d, 4d, and 5d transition...

  5. Radiation induced synthesis of gold/iron-oxide composite nanoparticles using high-energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Nakagawa, Takashi; Kojima, Takao; Taniguci, Ryoichi; Okuda, Shuichi; Yamamoto, Takao A.

    2008-01-01

    Composite nanoparticles consisting of gold and iron oxide were synthesized in aqueous solution systems by using a high-energy electron beam. The electron irradiation induces radiation-chemical reaction to form metallic gold nanoparticles. These gold nanoparticles were firmly immobilized on the surface of the support iron oxide nanoparticles. Surface of the support iron oxide nanoparticles are almost fully coated with fine gold nanoparticles. The size of these gold nanoparticles depended on the concentrations of gold ions, polymers and iron oxide nanoparticles in the solutions before the irradiation.

  6. TEA HF laser with a high specific radiation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchikin, A. V.; Andreev, M. V.; Losev, V. F.; Panchenko, Yu. N.

    2017-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of the chemical HF laser with a non-chain reaction are presented. The possibility of the total laser efficiency of 5 % is shown when a traditional C-to-C pumping circuit with the charging voltage of 20-24 kV is used. It is experimentally shown that the specific radiation output energy of 21 J/l is reached at the specific pump energy of 350 J/l in SF6/H2 = 14/1 mixture at the total pressure of 0.27 bar.

  7. Energy dispersive spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation: intensity considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skelton, E.F.; Elam, W.T.; Qadri, S.B.; Webb, A.W.; Schiferl, D.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed considerations are given to the reliability of energy dependent integrated intensity data collected from the pressure cavity of a diamond-anvil pressure cell illuminated with heterochromatic radiation from a synchrotron storage ring. It is demonstrated that at least in one run, the electron beam current cannot be used to correct for energy-intensity variations of the incident beam. Rather there appears to be an additional linear relationship between the decay of the synchrotron beam and the magnitude of the background intensity. 13 refs., 7 figs

  8. Secondary radiation dose during high-energy total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janiszewska, M.; Raczkowski, M. [Lower Silesian Oncology Center, Medical Physics Department, Wroclaw (Poland); Polaczek-Grelik, K. [University of Silesia, Medical Physics Department, Katowice (Poland); Szafron, B.; Konefal, A.; Zipper, W. [University of Silesia, Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Katowice (Poland)

    2014-05-15

    The goal of this work was to assess the additional dose from secondary neutrons and γ-rays generated during total body irradiation (TBI) using a medical linac X-ray beam. Nuclear reactions that occur in the accelerator construction during emission of high-energy beams in teleradiotherapy are the source of secondary radiation. Induced activity is dependent on the half-lives of the generated radionuclides, whereas neutron flux accompanies the treatment process only. The TBI procedure using a 18 MV beam (Clinac 2100) was considered. Lateral and anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior fractions were investigated during delivery of 2 Gy of therapeutic dose. Neutron and photon flux densities were measured using neutron activation analysis (NAA) and semiconductor spectrometry. The secondary dose was estimated applying the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. The main contribution to the secondary dose is associated with fast neutrons. The main sources of γ-radiation are the following: {sup 56}Mn in the stainless steel and {sup 187}W of the collimation system as well as positron emitters, activated via (n,γ) and (γ,n) processes, respectively. In addition to 12 Gy of therapeutic dose, the patient could receive 57.43 mSv in the studied conditions, including 4.63 μSv from activated radionuclides. Neutron dose is mainly influenced by the time of beam emission. However, it is moderated by long source-surface distances (SSD) and application of plexiglass plates covering the patient body during treatment. Secondary radiation gives the whole body a dose, which should be taken into consideration especially when one fraction of irradiation does not cover the whole body at once. (orig.) [German] Die zusaetzliche Dosis durch sekundaere Neutronen- und γ-Strahlung waehrend der Ganzkoerperbestrahlung mit Roentgenstrahlung aus medizinischen Linearbeschleunigern wurde abgeschaetzt. Bei der Emission hochenergetischer Strahlen zur Teletherapie finden hauptsaechlich im Beschleuniger

  9. Arctic and Antarctic diurnal and seasonal variations of snow albedo from multiyear Baseline Surface Radiation Network measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xianwei; Zender, Charles S

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes diurnal and seasonal variations of snow albedo at four Baseline Surface Radiation Network stations in the Arctic and Antarctica from 2003 to 2008 to elucidate similarities and differences in snow albedo diurnal cycles across geographic zones and to assess how diurnal changes in snow albedo affect the surface energy budget. At the seasonal scale, the daily albedo for the perennial snow at stations South Pole and Georg von Neumayer in Antarctica has a similar symmetric varia...

  10. Impact of buildings on surface solar radiation over urban Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zhao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The rugged surface of an urban area due to varying buildings can interact with solar beams and affect both the magnitude and spatiotemporal distribution of surface solar fluxes. Here we systematically examine the impact of buildings on downward surface solar fluxes over urban Beijing by using a 3-D radiation parameterization that accounts for 3-D building structures vs. the conventional plane-parallel scheme. We find that the resulting downward surface solar flux deviations between the 3-D and the plane-parallel schemes are generally ±1–10 W m−2 at 800 m grid resolution and within ±1 W m−2 at 4 km resolution. Pairs of positive–negative flux deviations on different sides of buildings are resolved at 800 m resolution, while they offset each other at 4 km resolution. Flux deviations from the unobstructed horizontal surface at 4 km resolution are positive around noon but negative in the early morning and late afternoon. The corresponding deviations at 800 m resolution, in contrast, show diurnal variations that are strongly dependent on the location of the grids relative to the buildings. Both the magnitude and spatiotemporal variations of flux deviations are largely dominated by the direct flux. Furthermore, we find that flux deviations can potentially be an order of magnitude larger by using a finer grid resolution. Atmospheric aerosols can reduce the magnitude of downward surface solar flux deviations by 10–65 %, while the surface albedo generally has a rather moderate impact on flux deviations. The results imply that the effect of buildings on downward surface solar fluxes may not be critically significant in mesoscale atmospheric models with a grid resolution of 4 km or coarser. However, the effect can play a crucial role in meso-urban atmospheric models as well as microscale urban dispersion models with resolutions of 1 m to 1 km.

  11. Nuclear energy - Radioprotection - Procedure for radiation protection monitoring in nuclear installations for external exposure to weakly penetrating radiation, especially to beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a procedure for radiation protection monitoring in nuclear installations for external exposure to weakly penetrating radiation, especially to beta radiation and describes the procedure in radiation protection monitoring for external exposure to weakly penetrating radiation in nuclear installations. This radiation comprises β - radiation, β + radiation and conversion electron radiation as well as photon radiation with energies below 15 keV. This International Standard describes the procedure in radiation protection planning and monitoring as well as the measurement and analysis to be applied. It applies to regular nuclear power plant operation including maintenance, waste handling and decommissioning. The recommendations of this International Standard may also be transferred to other nuclear fields including reprocessing, if the area-specific issues are considered. This International Standard may also be applied to radiation protection at accelerator facilities and in nuclear medicine, biology and research facilities

  12. Critical assessment of Pt surface energy - An atomistic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Seol, Donghyuk; Lee, Byeong-Joo

    2018-04-01

    Despite the fact that surface energy is a fundamental quantity in understanding surface structure of nanoparticle, the results of experimental measurements and theoretical calculations for the surface energy of pure Pt show a wide range of scattering. It is necessary to further ensure the surface energy of Pt to find the equilibrium shape and atomic configuration in Pt bimetallic nanoparticles accurately. In this article, we critically assess and optimize the Pt surface energy using a semi-empirical atomistic approach based on the second nearest-neighbor modified embedded-atom method interatomic potential. That is, the interatomic potential of pure Pt was adjusted in a way that the surface segregation tendency in a wide range of Pt binary alloys is reproduced in accordance with experimental information. The final optimized Pt surface energy (mJ/m2) is 2036 for (100) surface, 2106 for (110) surface, and 1502 for (111) surface. The potential can be utilized to find the equilibrium shape and atomic configuration of Pt bimetallic nanoparticles more accurately.

  13. Can climate sensitivity be estimated from short-term relationships of top-of-atmosphere net radiation and surface temperature?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Bing; Min Qilong; Sun Wenbo; Hu Yongxiang; Fan, Tai-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Increasing the knowledge in climate radiative feedbacks is critical for current climate studies. This work focuses on short-term relationships between global mean surface temperature and top-of-atmosphere (TOA) net radiation. The relationships may be used to characterize the climate feedback as suggested by some recent studies. As those recent studies, an energy balance model with ocean mixed layer and both radiative and non-radiative heat sources is used here. The significant improvement of current model is that climate system memories are considered. Based on model simulations, short-term relationship between global mean surface temperature and TOA net radiation (or the linear striation feature as suggested by previous studies) might represent climate feedbacks when the system had no memories. However, climate systems with the same short-term feedbacks but different memories would have a similar linear striation feature. This linear striation feature reflects only fast components of climate feedbacks and may not represent the total climate feedback even when the memory length of climate systems is minimal. The potential errors in the use of short-term relationships in estimations of climate sensitivity could be big. In short time scales, fast climate processes may overwhelm long-term climate feedbacks. Thus, the climate radiative feedback parameter obtained from short-term data may not provide a reliable estimate of climate sensitivity. This result also suggests that long-term observations of global surface temperature and TOA radiation are critical in the understanding of climate feedbacks and sensitivities.

  14. Surface Energy Balance in Jakarta and Neighboring Regions As Simulated Using Fifth Mesoscale Model (MM5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yopi Ilhamsyah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present research was to assess the surface energy balance particularly in terms of the computed surface energy and radiation balance and the development of boundary layer over Jakarta and Neighboring Regions (JNR by means of numerical model of fifth generation of Mesoscale Model (MM5. The MM5 with four domains of 9 kilometers in spatial resolution presenting the outermost and the innermost of JNR is utilized. The research focuses on the third and fourth domains covering the entire JNR. The description between radiation and energy balance at the surface is obtained from the model. The result showed that energy balance is higher in the city area during daytime. Meanwhile, energy components, e.g., surface sensible and latent heat flux showed that at the sea and in the city areas were higher than other areas. Moreover, ground flux showed eastern region was higher than others. In general, radiation and energy balance was higher in the daytime and lower in the nighttime for all regions. The calculation of Bowen Ratio, the ratio of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes, was also higher in the city area, reflecting the dominations of urban and built-up land in the region. Meanwhile, Bowen Ratio in the rural area dominated by irrigated cropland was lower. It is consistent with changes of land cover properties, e.g. albedo, soil moisture, and thermal characteristics. In addition, the boundary layer is also higher in the city. Meanwhile western region dominated by suburban showed higher boundary layer instead of eastern region.

  15. Energy transfer from lower energy to higher-energy electrons mediated by whistler waves in the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyar, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    We study the problem of energy exchange between waves and particles, which leads to energization of the latter, in an unstable plasma typical of the radiation belts. The ongoing Van Allen Probes space mission brought this problem among the most discussed in space physics. A free energy which is present in an unstable plasma provides the indispensable condition for energy transfer from lower energy particles to higher-energy particles via resonant wave-particle interaction. This process is studied in detail by the example of electron interactions with whistler mode wave packets originated from lightning-induced emission. We emphasize that in an unstable plasma, the energy source for electron energization is the energy of other particles, rather than the wave energy as is often assumed. The way by which the energy is transferred from lower energy to higher-energy particles includes two processes that operate concurrently, in the same space-time domain, or sequentially, in different space-time domains, in which a given wave packet is located. In the first process, one group of resonant particles gives the energy to the wave. The second process consists in wave absorption by another group of resonant particles, whose energy therefore increases. We argue that this mechanism represents an efficient means of electron energization in the radiation belts.

  16. Diagnosing Model Errors in Simulations of Solar Radiation on Inclined Surfaces: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yu; Sengupta, Manajit

    2016-06-01

    Transposition models have been widely used in the solar energy industry to simulate solar radiation on inclined PV panels. Following numerous studies comparing the performance of transposition models, this paper aims to understand the quantitative uncertainty in the state-of-the-art transposition models and the sources leading to the uncertainty. Our results suggest that an isotropic transposition model developed by Badescu substantially underestimates diffuse plane-of-array (POA) irradiances when diffuse radiation is perfectly isotropic. In the empirical transposition models, the selection of empirical coefficients and land surface albedo can both result in uncertainty in the output. This study can be used as a guide for future development of physics-based transposition models.

  17. Using surface remote sensors to derive radiative characteristics of Mixed-Phase Clouds: an example from M-PACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. de Boer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice water paths are found to range between 11.0–366.4 (0.5–114.1 gm−2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286–2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm−2.

  18. Attenuation of glazing energy using linear patterns on the glass surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiang-Jiun Lin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glazing energy resulting from solar radiation can be the main source to vary the thermal field inside of a building. As the glass material is loaded by intensive solar radiation, the glazing energy, greatly induced, will result in the drastic increase in interior temperatures and yield the energy demand for air conditioning loads. Reducing energy consumption is imperative; therefore, this article presents the patterned glass technology which incorporates linearly and uniaxially symmetric patterns throughout the exterior surface of glass to attenuate the solar energy entering indoors. By imposing the patterns over the glass surface, the glazing energy can be reduced due to the increase in the incident angle and the decrease in the solar energy loading on the glass. The thermal performance of the linearly patterned glass is evaluated by computational fluid dynamics technique. Based on computational fluid dynamics–evaluated results, as the patterned glass is applied on the window opening, the interior solar heat is able to be decreased. Moreover, the glazing energy can be strongly associated with the pattern design. Increasing the patterned angle and decreasing the patterned space help reduce solar effect on the interior temperatures.

  19. Characterization of transceive surface element designs for 7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate: radiative antenna and microstrip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, O; Raaijmakers, A J E; Klomp, D W J; Lagendijk, J J W; Luijten, P R; van den Berg, C A T

    2012-01-21

    Ultra-high field magnetic resonance (≥7 tesla) imaging (MRI) faces challenges with respect to efficient spin excitation and signal reception from deeply situated organs. Traditional radio frequency surface coil designs relying on near-field coupling are suboptimal at high field strengths. Better signal penetration can be obtained by designing a radiative antenna in which the energy flux is directed to the target location. In this paper, two different radiative antenna designs are investigated to be used as transceive elements, which employ different dielectric permittivities for the antenna substrate. Their transmit and receive performances in terms of B(+)(1), local SAR (specific absorption rate) and SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) were compared using extensive electromagnetic simulations and MRI measurements with traditional surface microstrip coils. Both simulations and measurements demonstrated that the radiative element shows twofold gain in B(+)(1) and SNR at 10 cm depth, and additionally a comparable SAR peak value. In terms of transmit performance, the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 37 showed a 24% more favorable local SAR(10g avg)/(B(+)(1))(2) ratio than the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 90. In receive, the radiative element with a dielectric permittivity of 90 resulted in a 20% higher SNR for shallow depths, but for larger depths this difference diminished compared to the radiative element with a dielectric permittivity of 37. Therefore, to image deep anatomical regions effectively, the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 37 is favorable.

  20. Surface technologies 2006-Alternative energies and policy options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Surfaces are the immediate contact between anything in our world. Literally, every industry utilizes coatings and surface modifications in order to create surfaces tailored to specific needs, protect underlying substrates, or modify their behavior. Surface and coating technologies are essential to a large variety of different industrial sectors, including transportation, manufacturing, food and biomedical engineering, energy, resources, and materials science and technology. The present paper explains the limitations for alternative energy technologies, with a focus on fuel cell technology development and the alternative energy sector, based on the outcomes of presentations and facilitated discussion groups during a Canadian national workshop series. Options for technological improvements of alternative energy systems are presented in combination with national and international policy choices, which could positively influence research and development in the alternative energy sector

  1. Radiative forcing by changes in surface albedo caused by changes in vegetation

    OpenAIRE

    Kvalevåg, Maria Malene

    2005-01-01

    The human influence on vegetation causes changes in the surface reflective properties. By using MODIS land cover and MODIS surface albedo products, an estimation of radiative forcing due to surface albedo changes caused by vegetation changes is performed. A potential natural vegetation data set is used to compute radiative forcing estimates from pre agricultural times to present. A combination between MODIS blacksky and whitesky albedo and diffuse and direct radiation at gr...

  2. Energy and carbon balances in cheatgrass, an essay in autecology. [Shortwave radiation, radiowave radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinds, W.T.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment to determine the fates of energy and carbon in cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) was carried out on steep (40/sup 0/) north- and south-facing slopes on a small earth mound, using many small lysimeters to emulate swards of cheatgrass. Meteorological conditions and energy fluxes that were measured included air and soil temperatures, relative humidity, wind speed, incoming shortwave radiation, net all-wave radiation, heat flux to the soil, and evaporation and transpiration separately. The fate of photosynthetically fixed carbon during spring growth was determined by analysis of the plant tissues into mineral nutrients, crude protein, crude fat, crude fiber, and nitrogen-free extract (NFE) for roots, shoots, and seeds separately. (auth)

  3. Interconnection getting energy from the Sun and the radiating Earth in cosmos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumayev, E.E.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Biosphere comprises atmosphere of itself. In our models must be reflected track record of atmosphere, one or another image is described attraction of air masses, that air, which we breath and in which we live. And not only motion. As well as energy of atmosphere, which nearly does not delay a sunshine, a is warmed by the heat, the infrared radiating a surface of the Earth and ocean. Enormous role play else two factors. First, the evaporation and condensation moisture, formation an clouds snow, ice, fallout of precipitation. Changing a phase condition of water brings about the big expenses or separation of energy and is one of the reasons, defining condition of atmosphere, but consequently, climate. Besides, rainfall, nature an clouds. Their distribution on the territory, moisture of atmosphere and ground alongside with sharing the temperatures is a most important factor, influencing upon the condition of alive part biosphere, which carries a name an biota and comprises of itself flora and fauna. The second factor, defining energy of atmosphere, - an interaction of ocean and atmosphere. One good storm in the North Atlantic will send atmosphere of more energy than for the whole it gets from solar radiation just. Thereby, model must be capable to describe processes of energy of ocean, its interaction with atmosphere, formation sea ice glacier and etc. Very important feature speakers biosphere is an activity its potential part. Depending on the nature of vegetation is changed terrestrial surface, the ability to reflect solar radiation. Besides, features of atmosphere and ocean hang from the intensity of geochemistry cycles, nature of rotation of materials in nature. Main role in making an greenhouse of rotation of materials in the nature. Main role in making of greenhouse effect play water vapors and carbon dioxide. Role of greenhouse effect in shaping climate Land us If in 'ts atmosphere was not a water pair and acid, which delay a heat radiation of planet

  4. Surface free energy for systems with integrable boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goehmann, Frank; Bortz, Michael; Frahm, Holger

    2005-01-01

    The surface free energy is the difference between the free energies for a system with open boundary conditions and the same system with periodic boundary conditions. We use the quantum transfer matrix formalism to express the surface free energy in the thermodynamic limit of systems with integrable boundary conditions as a matrix element of certain projection operators. Specializing to the XXZ spin-1/2 chain we introduce a novel 'finite temperature boundary operator' which characterizes the thermodynamical properties of surfaces related to integrable boundary conditions

  5. Dual hierarchical biomimic superhydrophobic surface with three energy states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Hung; Hsu, Tsung-Hsing; Chuang, Yun-Ju; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2009-07-01

    A low hysteresis surface prepared by two-length-scaled hierarchical textures to mimic the Lotus effect is proposed. The fabricated textures incorporate self-masked nanorods on microextrusions. A high static contact angle (160°) and low hysteresis (˜2.7°) are obtained and comparable to the surface properties of a natural lotus leaf. The stability of hydrophobicity is described with respect to three energy states (nonwetting, microwetting, and nanowetting) based on dynamic contact angle analysis by droplet impinging onto the surface. The estimated texture-induced energy barrier based on the principle of energy conservation is in good agreement to those estimated from Laplace's law.

  6. Shallow groundwater effect on land surface temperature and surface energy balance under bare soil conditions: modeling and description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Alkhaier

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding when and how groundwater affects surface temperature and energy fluxes is significant for utilizing remote sensing in groundwater studies and for integrating aquifers within land surface models. To investigate the shallow groundwater effect under bare soil conditions, we numerically exposed two soil profiles to identical metrological forcing. One of the profiles had shallow groundwater. The different responses that the two profiles manifested were inspected regarding soil moisture, temperature and energy balance at the land surface. The findings showed that the two profiles differed in three aspects: the absorbed and emitted amounts of energy, the portioning out of the available energy and the heat fluency in the soil. We concluded that due to their lower albedo, shallow groundwater areas reflect less shortwave radiation and consequently get a higher magnitude of net radiation. When potential evaporation demand is sufficiently high, a large portion of the energy received by these areas is consumed for evaporation. This increases the latent heat flux and reduces the energy that could have heated the soil. Consequently, lower magnitudes of both sensible and ground heat fluxes are caused to occur. The higher soil thermal conductivity in shallow groundwater areas facilitates heat transfer between the top soil and the subsurface, i.e. soil subsurface is more thermally connected to the atmosphere. For the reliability of remote sensors in detecting shallow groundwater effect, it was concluded that this effect can be sufficiently clear to be detected if at least one of the following conditions occurs: high potential evaporation and high contrast between day and night temperatures. Under these conditions, most day and night hours are suitable for shallow groundwater depth detection.

  7. Shining light on radiation detection and energy transfer : Triazole ligands used for detection of radiation and lanthanide binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Some substances, fluorophores, absorb light and then emit that light again as fluorescence. Apart from absorption of light, some of these substances can also emit light after having absorbed energy from radiation. A substance which can absorb radiation and emit the energy as light is called a

  8. Unravelling radiative energy transfer in solid-state lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikov, Rustamzhon; Press, Daniel Aaron; Ganesh Kumar, Baskaran; Sadeghi, Sadra; Nizamoglu, Sedat

    2018-01-01

    Today, a wide variety of organic and inorganic luminescent materials (e.g., phosphors, quantum dots, etc.) are being used for lighting and new materials (e.g., graphene, perovskite, etc.) are currently under investigation. However, the understanding of radiative energy transfer is limited, even though it is critical to understand and improve the performance levels of solid-state lighting devices. In this study, we derived a matrix approach that includes absorption, reabsorption, inter-absorption and their iterative and combinatorial interactions for one and multiple types of fluorophores, which is simplified to an analytical matrix. This mathematical approach gives results that agree well with the measured spectral and efficiency characteristics of color-conversion light-emitting diodes. Moreover, it also provides a deep physical insight by uncovering the entire radiative interactions and their contribution to the output optical spectrum. The model is universal and applicable for all kinds of fluorophores.

  9. Proceedings of national executive management seminar on surface finishing by radiation curing technology: radiation curing for better finishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This book compiled the paper presented at this seminar. The papers discussed are 1. Incentives for investment in the manufacturing sector (in Malaysia) 2.Trends and prospect of surface finishing by radiation curing technology in Malaysia 3. Industrial application of radiation curing

  10. Evaluation of satellite and reanalysis-based global net surface energy flux and uncertainty estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Richard; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    The net surface energy flux is central to the climate system yet observational limitations lead to substantial uncertainty (Trenberth and Fasullo, 2013; Roberts et al., 2016). A combination of satellite-derived radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere (TOA) adjusted using the latest estimation of the net heat uptake of the Earth system, and the atmospheric energy tendencies and transports from the ERA-Interim reanalysis are used to estimate surface energy flux globally (Liu et al., 2015). Land surface fluxes are adjusted through a simple energy balance approach using relations at each grid point with the consideration of snowmelt to improve regional realism. The energy adjustment is redistributed over the oceans using a weighting function to avoid meridional discontinuities. Uncertainties in surface fluxes are investigated using a variety of approaches including comparison with a range of atmospheric reanalysis input data and products. Zonal multiannual mean surface flux uncertainty is estimated to be less than 5 Wm-2 but much larger uncertainty is likely for regional monthly values. The meridional energy transport is calculated using the net surface heat fluxes estimated in this study and the result shows better agreement with observations in Atlantic than before. The derived turbulent fluxes (difference between the net heat flux and the CERES EBAF radiative flux at surface) also have good agreement with those from OAFLUX dataset and buoy observations. Decadal changes in the global energy budget and the hemisphere energy imbalances are quantified and present day cross-equator heat transports is re-evaluated as 0.22±0.15 PW southward by the atmosphere and 0.32±0.16 PW northward by the ocean considering the observed ocean heat sinks (Roemmich et al., 2006) . Liu et al. (2015) Combining satellite observations and reanalysis energy transports to estimate global net surface energy fluxes 1985-2012. J. Geophys. Res., Atmospheres. ISSN 2169-8996 doi: 10.1002/2015JD

  11. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Mechanism of energy transfer from an optical-breakdown plasma to a metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, E. A.; Kovalev, A. S.; Popov, Aleksandr M.; Seleznev, B. V.

    1990-03-01

    A two-dimensional theoretical model is developed for the description of the transfer of energy from a surface-breakdown plasma, maintained by CO2 laser radiation, to a target. An investigation is reported of the efficiency of the interaction of laser radiation with a target as a function of the radiation intensity and spot size. A strong localization of the laser interaction is shown to be due to a heat-conduction energy flux, whereas the energy deposited outside the irradiation spot is due to radiative energy transfer at ultraviolet frequencies.

  12. The Radiation Environment on the Martian Surface and during MSL's Cruise to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Martin, Cesar; Boettcher, Stephan; Koehler, Jan; Guo, Jingnan; Brinza, David E.; Reitz, Guenther; Posner, Arik; the MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    An important part of assessing present and past habitability of Mars is to understand and characterize "life limiting factors" on the surface, such as the radiation environment. Radiation exposure is also a major concern for future human missions and characterizing the radiation environment, both on the surface of Mars and inside the spacecraft during the cruise to Mars, provides critical information to aid in the planning for future human exploration of Mars. RAD was the first MSL instrument to start collecting data, beginning its science investigation during cruise (10 days after launch) and making the first ever measurements of the radiation environment on another planet. RAD is an energetic particle analyzer designed to characterize a broad spectrum of energetic particle radiation including galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, and secondary neutrons created both in the Mars atmosphere and regolith. RAD observations consist of a time series of periodic (typically hourly) measurements of charged particles from protons (Z=1) up to iron (Z=26) for energies above >10 MeV/nucleon, as well as neutrons from 10 to ~ 100 MeV. These synoptic observations are designed to characterize both the short term variability associated with the onset of solar energetic particle events as well as the long term variability of galactic cosmic rays over the solar cycle. RAD measurements will also be used to quantify the flux of biologically hazardous radiation at the surface of Mars today, and determine how these fluxes vary on diurnal, seasonal, solar cycle and episodic (flare, storm) timescales. These measurements will allow calculations of the depth in rock or soil to which this flux, when integrated over long timescales, provides a lethal dose for known terrestrial organisms. Through such measurements, we can learn how deep below the surface life would have to be, or have been in the past, to be protected. This talk will discuss the results obtained during the ~7 months

  13. Energy levels, lifetimes and radiative data of W LV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao-bin; Sun, Rui; Koike, Fumihiro; Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Dong, Chen-zhong

    2018-01-01

    Calculations of energy levels, radiative data and lifetimes are reported for tungsten Ca-like ion (W LV) by using multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method. The GRASP2K package is adopted to carry out a large-scale systematic computation with a restricted active space treatment; the Breit interaction and QED effects are included in subsequent relativistic configuration interaction calculations. The energies and lifetimes of the lowest 119 levels are listed; the main leading configuration of the levels is of the ground state configuration [Ne]3s23p63d2 and the first excited configuration [Ne]3s23p53d3. The wavelengths, radiative rates and oscillator strengths for relatively strong E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions are listed. Comparisons with earlier experimental and theoretical values are made. The average relative deviations of energy levels from the NIST results and E1 transition wavelengths from the EBIT experimental results have turned to be only 0.20% and 0.13%, respectively. The other present results are in reasonable agreement with available data. These agreements confirm the reliability and accuracy of the current results. The present datasets may help us with the investigation of the electron-electron correlation effects in complex multi-electron highly charged heavy ions and of the diagnosis of tungsten impurity plasmas in fusion science.

  14. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Ti VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Keenan, F. P.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2013-08-01

    We report on calculations of energy levels, radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths for transitions among the lowest 253 levels of the (1s22s22p6) 3s23p5, 3s3p6, 3s23p43d, 3s3p53d, 3s23p33d2, 3s23p44s, 3s23p44p and 3s23p44d configurations of Ti VI. The general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package and flexible atomic code are adopted for the calculations. Radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths are reported for all electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions among the 253 levels, although calculations have been performed for a much larger number of levels. Comparisons are made with existing available results and the accuracy of the data is assessed. Additionally, lifetimes for all 253 levels are listed, although comparisons with other theoretical results are limited to only 88 levels. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 1% (within 0.03 Ryd), whereas results for other parameters are probably accurate to better than 20%. A reassessment of the energy level data on the National Institute of Standards and Technology website for Ti VI is suggested.

  15. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Ti VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, K M; Keenan, F P; Msezane, A Z

    2013-01-01

    We report on calculations of energy levels, radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths for transitions among the lowest 253 levels of the (1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 ) 3s 2 3p 5 , 3s3p 6 , 3s 2 3p 4 3d, 3s3p 5 3d, 3s 2 3p 3 3d 2 , 3s 2 3p 4 4s, 3s 2 3p 4 4p and 3s 2 3p 4 4d configurations of Ti VI. The general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package and flexible atomic code are adopted for the calculations. Radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths are reported for all electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions among the 253 levels, although calculations have been performed for a much larger number of levels. Comparisons are made with existing available results and the accuracy of the data is assessed. Additionally, lifetimes for all 253 levels are listed, although comparisons with other theoretical results are limited to only 88 levels. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 1% (within 0.03 Ryd), whereas results for other parameters are probably accurate to better than 20%. A reassessment of the energy level data on the National Institute of Standards and Technology website for Ti VI is suggested. (paper)

  16. Quantifying Surface Energy Flux Estimation Uncertainty Using Land Surface Temperature Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, A. N.; Hunsaker, D.; Thorp, K.; Bronson, K. F.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing with thermal infrared is widely recognized as good way to estimate surface heat fluxes, map crop water use, and detect water-stressed vegetation. When combined with net radiation and soil heat flux data, observations of sensible heat fluxes derived from surface temperatures (LST) are indicative of instantaneous evapotranspiration (ET). There are, however, substantial reasons LST data may not provide the best way to estimate of ET. For example, it is well known that observations and models of LST, air temperature, or estimates of transport resistances may be so inaccurate that physically based model nevertheless yield non-meaningful results. Furthermore, using visible and near infrared remote sensing observations collected at the same time as LST often yield physically plausible results because they are constrained by less dynamic surface conditions such as green fractional cover. Although sensitivity studies exist that help identify likely sources of error and uncertainty, ET studies typically do not provide a way to assess the relative importance of modeling ET with and without LST inputs. To better quantify model benefits and degradations due to LST observational inaccuracies, a Bayesian uncertainty study was undertaken using data collected in remote sensing experiments at Maricopa, Arizona. Visible, near infrared and thermal infrared data were obtained from an airborne platform. The prior probability distribution of ET estimates were modeled using fractional cover, local weather data and a Penman-Monteith mode, while the likelihood of LST data was modeled from a two-source energy balance model. Thus the posterior probabilities of ET represented the value added by using LST data. Results from an ET study over cotton grown in 2014 and 2015 showed significantly reduced ET confidence intervals when LST data were incorporated.

  17. Energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau : surface energy balance and turbulent heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Zhongbo; Zhang, Ting; Ma, Yaoming; Jia, Li; Wen, Jun

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents an overview and an outlook of studies on energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau with focuses on the estimation of energy balance terms and turbulent heat fluxes. On the basis of the surface energy balance calculations, we show that the phenomena of the energy

  18. Energy and water cycle over the Tibetan Plateau: surface energy balance and turbulent heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Z.; Zhang, T.; Ma, Y.; Jia, L.; Wen, J.

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents an overview and an outlook of studies on energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau with focuses on the estimation of energy balance terms and turbulent heat fluxes. On the basis of the surface energy balance calculations, we show that the phenomena of the energy

  19. Representing Global Reactive Potential Energy Surfaces Using Gaussian Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Brian; Marshall, Paul; Zhao, Bin; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2017-04-06

    Representation of multidimensional global potential energy surfaces suitable for spectral and dynamical calculations from high-level ab initio calculations remains a challenge. Here, we present a detailed study on constructing potential energy surfaces using a machine learning method, namely, Gaussian process regression. Tests for the 3 A″ state of SH 2 , which facilitates the SH + H ↔ S( 3 P) + H 2 abstraction reaction and the SH + H' ↔ SH' + H exchange reaction, suggest that the Gaussian process is capable of providing a reasonable potential energy surface with a small number (∼1 × 10 2 ) of ab initio points, but it needs substantially more points (∼1 × 10 3 ) to converge reaction probabilities. The implications of these observations for construction of potential energy surfaces are discussed.

  20. Ab initio adiabatic and quasidiabatic potential energy surfaces of H ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    s12039-015-1022-8. Ab initio adiabatic and quasidiabatic potential energy surfaces of H. ++. CN system. BHARGAVA ANUSURI and SANJAY KUMAR. ∗. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036, India.

  1. Radiation degradation of marine polysaccharides by low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Fumio; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Kume, Tamikazu

    2003-01-01

    The radiation degradations of marine polysaccharides by both gamma Co-60 and electron beam irradiations are investigated. Polysaccharides and oligosaccharides can be produced by degradation of corresponding polysaccharides including marine polysaccharides such as alginates, chitin chitosan and carrageenan. The viscosity of alginate, chitosan and carrageenan solution decreases markedly with increase of the low energy electron beam irradiation time and the beam current. Furthermore, the viscosity is reduced sharply in short time for polysaccharide solution with low concentration, for instance carrageenan solution of 1%. (author)

  2. Cosmic gamma radiation of ultra high energy of primordial origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino Filho, F.G. de.

    1984-01-01

    The quantum mechanical effects near a collapsing black hole as shown by Stephen W.Hawking in 1974 to produce streaming particles through tunneling effect was explored in the context of cosmic gamma ray production. In this thesis, we show the possible production of gamma rays of high energies (ν approx 10 41 Hz) in the initial stages of the formation of the Universe by the explosion of primordial mini black holes. These mini black hole explosions happening at 10 -43 s to 10 -37 s after the start perhaps may account for the existing universal cosmic background radiation of 2.7 0 K. (Author) [pt

  3. Topographic forcing and related uncertainties on glacier surface energy balance in High Mountain Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, M.; Rupper, S.; Shean, D. E.

    2017-12-01

    Topography directly influences the amount of global radiation, as well as other key energy flux terms, arriving on a glacier surface. This is particularly important in regions of variable and complex topography such as High Mountain Asia (HMA). In this region surface energy and mass balance estimates often rely heavily on modeling, and thus require accurate accounting of topography through available remote sensing platforms. Our previous work shows that topographic shading from surrounding terrain can alter the mean daily potential direct shortwave radiation by upwards of 20% for some valley glaciers. In this work, we find in regions of high topographic relief that shading frequently dominates in the ablation zone rather than the accumulation zone, contrary to the findings of some previous studies. This however, is largely dependent on the valley aspect and relative relief of nearby terrain. In addition, we examine the impact of topography, primarily topographic shading, on components of surface energy balance for a large sample of glaciers across different regions in HMA. Our results show that while the impact of topographic shading is highly variable throughout HMA, the magnitude of influence can often be predicted based on simple characteristics such as latitude, valley aspect, and orientation of the immediate surrounding topography. We also explore the uncertainty in topographic shading and in calculated surface energy due to the spatial resolution and accuracy of DEMs. In particular, we compare the shading and energy balance results utilizing a suite of DEMs, including 2 m, 8 m, and 30 m World View DEMs, 30 m ASTER GDEM, 30 m SRTM DEM, and 30 m ALOS DEM. These results will help us improve glacier energy and mass balance modeling accuracy, and demonstrate limitations and uncertainties when modeling changes in surface energy fluxes due to surrounding topography for mountain glaciers.

  4. NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget: First Results From The Release 4 GEWEX Integrated Data Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, Paul; Cox, Stephen; Gupta, Shashi; Mikovitz, J. Colleen; zhang, taiping

    2016-04-01

    The NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) project produces shortwave and longwave surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes for the 1983-near present time period. Spatial resolution is 1 degree. The current release 3 (available at gewex-srb.larc.nasa.gov) uses the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) DX product for pixel level radiance and cloud information. This product is subsampled to 30 km. ISCCP is currently recalibrating and recomputing their entire data series, to be released as the H product, at 10km resolution. The ninefold increase in pixel number should help improve the RMS of the existing products and allow for future higher resolution SRB gridded product (e.g. 0.5 degree). In addition to the input data improvements, several important algorithm improvements have been made. Most notable has been the adaptation of Angular Distribution Models (ADMs) from CERES to improve the initial calculation of shortwave TOA fluxes, from which the surface flux calculations follow. Other key input improvements include a detailed aerosol history using the Max Planck Institut Aerosol Climatology (MAC), temperature and moisture profiles from HIRS, and new topography, surface type, and snow/ice. Here we present results for the improved GEWEX Shortwave and Longwave algorithm (GSW and GLW) with new ISCCP data, the various other improved input data sets and the incorporation of many additional internal SRB model improvements. As of the time of abstract submission, results from 2007 have been produced with ISCCP H availability the limiting factor. More SRB data will be produced as ISCCP reprocessing continues. The SRB data produced will be released as part of the Release 4.0 Integrated Product, recognizing the interdependence of the radiative fluxes with other GEWEX products providing estimates of the Earth's global water and energy cycle (I.e., ISCCP, SeaFlux, LandFlux, NVAP, etc.).

  5. Reconnoitering the effect of shallow groundwater on land surface temperature and surface energy balance using MODIS and SEBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Alkhaier

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of observing shallow groundwater depth and areal extent using satellite measurements can support groundwater models and vast irrigation systems management. Moreover, these measurements can help to include the effect of shallow groundwater on surface energy balance within land surface models and climate studies, which broadens the methods that yield more reliable and informative results. To examine the capacity of MODIS in detecting the effect of shallow groundwater on land surface temperature and the surface energy balance in an area within Al-Balikh River basin in northern Syria, we studied the interrelationship between in-situ measured water table depths and land surface temperatures measured by MODIS. We, also, used the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS to calculate surface energy fluxes, evaporative fraction and daily evaporation, and inspected their relationships with water table depths. We found out that the daytime temperature increased while the nighttime temperature decreased when the depth of the water table increased. And, when the water table depth increased, net radiation, latent and ground heat fluxes, evaporative fraction and daily evaporation decreased, while sensible heat flux increased. This concords with the findings of a companion paper (Alkhaier et al., 2012. The observed clear relationships were the result of meeting both conditions that were concluded in the companion paper, i.e. high potential evaporation and big contrast in day-night temperature. Moreover, the prevailing conditions in this study area helped SEBS to yield accurate estimates. Under bare soil conditions and under the prevailing weather conditions, we conclude that MODIS is suitable for detecting the effect of shallow groundwater because it has proper imaging times and adequate sensor accuracy; nevertheless, its coarse spatial resolution is disadvantageous.

  6. Reconnoitering the effect of shallow groundwater on land surface temperature and surface energy balance using MODIS and SEBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhaier, F.; Su, Z.; Flerchinger, G. N.

    2012-07-01

    The possibility of observing shallow groundwater depth and areal extent using satellite measurements can support groundwater models and vast irrigation systems management. Moreover, these measurements can help to include the effect of shallow groundwater on surface energy balance within land surface models and climate studies, which broadens the methods that yield more reliable and informative results. To examine the capacity of MODIS in detecting the effect of shallow groundwater on land surface temperature and the surface energy balance in an area within Al-Balikh River basin in northern Syria, we studied the interrelationship between in-situ measured water table depths and land surface temperatures measured by MODIS. We, also, used the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) to calculate surface energy fluxes, evaporative fraction and daily evaporation, and inspected their relationships with water table depths. We found out that the daytime temperature increased while the nighttime temperature decreased when the depth of the water table increased. And, when the water table depth increased, net radiation, latent and ground heat fluxes, evaporative fraction and daily evaporation decreased, while sensible heat flux increased. This concords with the findings of a companion paper (Alkhaier et al., 2012). The observed clear relationships were the result of meeting both conditions that were concluded in the companion paper, i.e. high potential evaporation and big contrast in day-night temperature. Moreover, the prevailing conditions in this study area helped SEBS to yield accurate estimates. Under bare soil conditions and under the prevailing weather conditions, we conclude that MODIS is suitable for detecting the effect of shallow groundwater because it has proper imaging times and adequate sensor accuracy; nevertheless, its coarse spatial resolution is disadvantageous.

  7. Surface Radiation Budget (SURFRAD) Network 1-Hour Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radiation measurements at SURFRAD stations cover the range of the electromagnetic spectrum that affects the earth/atmosphere system. Direct solar radiation is...

  8. Use of MODIS Images to Quantify the Radiation and Energy Balances in the Brazilian Pantanal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio H. de C. Teixeira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available MODIS images during the year 2012 were used for modelling of the radiation and energy balance components with the application of the SAFER algorithm (Simple Algorithm for Evapotranspiration Retrieving in the Brazilian Pantanal area. Pixels from the main sub-regions of Barão de Melgaço (BR, Paiaguás (PA and Nhecolândia (NH were extracted in order to process microclimatic comparisons. In general, the net radiation (Rn relied much more on the global solar radiation (RG levels than on water conditions and ecosystem types, in accordance with the low Rn standard deviation values. The fraction of the available energy used as latent heat flux (λE were, on average, 65, 50 and 49% for the BR, PA and NH sub-regions, respectively. Horizontal heat advection, identified by the negative values of sensible heat flux (H, made several pixels with λE values higher than those for Rn in the middle of the year. Taking the evaporative fraction (Ef as a surface moisture indicator, the Tree-Lined Savanna (TLS was considered the moister ecosystem class, with 58% of the available energy being used as λE, while the driest one was the modified ecosystem Anthropogenic Changes (AC, presenting a λE/Rn fraction of 0.46. According to the spatial and temporal consistencies, and after comparisons with other previous point and large-scale studies, the SAFER algorithm proved to have sensibility to quantify and compare the large-scale radiation and energy balance components in the different ecosystems of the Brazilian Pantanal. The algorithm is useful for monitoring the energy exchange dynamics among the different terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem types throughout the seasons of the year.

  9. An energy dispersive time resolved liquid surface reflectometer

    CERN Document Server

    Garrett, R F; King, D J; Dowling, T L; Fullagar, W

    2001-01-01

    Two designs are presented for an energy dispersive liquid surface reflectometer with time resolution in the milli-second domain. The designs utilise rotating crystal and Laue analyser optics respectively to energy analyse a pink synchrotron X-ray beam after reflection from a liquid surface. Some performance estimates are presented, along with results of a test experiment using a laboratory source and solid state detector.

  10. Calculation of the surface free energy of fcc copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Ming; Lai Yanqing; Tian Zhongliang; Liu Yexiang

    2009-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations with the modified analytic embedded-atom method we calculate the Gibbs free energy and surface free energy for fcc Cu bulk, and further obtain the Gibbs free energy of nanoparticles. Based on the Gibbs free energy of nanoparticles, we have investigated the heat capacity of copper nanoparticles. Calculation results indicate that the Gibbs free energy and the heat capacity of nanoparticles can be divided into two parts: bulk quantity and surface quantity. The molar heat capacity of the bulk sample is lower compared with the molar heat capacity of nanoparticles, and this difference increases with the decrease in the particle size. It is also observed that the size effect on the thermodynamic properties of Cu nanoparticles is not really significant until the particle is less than about 20 nm. It is the surface atoms that decide the size effect on the thermodynamic properties of nanoparticles

  11. Influence of the Surface and Cloud Nonuniformities in the Solar Energy Fluxes in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozwadowska, A.; Cahalan, R. F.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Solar energy fluxes reaching the surface and absorbed by it are basic components of the energy balance of the Arctic. They depend mainly on the solar zenith angle, a state of the atmosphere, especially the cloudiness, and the surface albedo. However, they can also be modified by variabilities in the surface albedo and cloud optical thickness. The surface of the Arctic can be highly nonuniform. The surface of the Arctic Ocean, which covers the huge part of the Arctic can be view as a mosaic of sea water, sea ice, snow and, in the melting period, melting ponds. In our paper, results are presented of Monte Carlo simulations of the expected influence of nonuniform cloud structure and nonuniform surface albedo on radiative fluxes at the Arctic surface. In particular, the plane parallel biases in the surface absorptance and atmospheric transmittance are studied. The bias is defined as the difference between the real absorptance or transmittance (i.e. nonuniform conditions) averaged over a given area, and the uniform or plane parallel case with the same mean cloud optical thickness and the same mean surface albedo. The dependence of the biases is analysed with respect to the following: domain averaged values of the cloud optical thickness and surface albedo, scales of their spatial variabilities, correlation between cloud optical thickness and cloud albedo variabilities, cloud height, and the solar zenith angle. Ranges of means and standard deviations of the input parameters typical of Arctic conditions are obtained from the SHEBA experiment.

  12. Modeling Plant-Atmosphere Interactions and Ramifications on the Surface Energy Balance in Arctic Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, R.; Cunningham, P.; Wilson, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    There is broad recognition that the melting of the permafrost in arctic landscapes could have pronounced global climatological impacts. The evolution of the permafrost and its impacts on the carbon and water balances is directly related to balances in the surface energy budget. There are a number of factors that are expected to impact the net heat flux at the surface of the soil including regional atmospheric conditions. However, ultimately this surface energy balance is controlled by local processes including evaporation from the surface, transpiration from vegetation as well as radiative and convective heat transfer. These four processes are directly impacted by coupling between the vegetation and atmosphere, and thus depend heavily upon the horizontal and vertical vegetation structure. If shrubs replace grasses in the arctic ecosystem there will be net shifts in the heat transfer to the ground. For example, the solar radiation that is absorbed by shrubs is separated from the soil by a stem space through which winds blow. In order for the energy to reach the soil it must warm the air and then warm the soil, however some of the warm air is mixed into the atmosphere and diffused. This structural feature can act in a fashion similar to a closed canopy forest, which frequently have cooler temperatures below the canopy than nearby grasslands An atmospheric hydrodynamics model, HIGRAD, has been enhanced to simulate complex, three-dimensional plant-atmosphere interactions at extremely high resolution (~0.1 m in all three directions). The model represents the transport of momentum, heat, moisture, and CO2 and their exchange between the vegetation and surrounding air. HIGRAD was used to simulate coupled atmosphere/vegetation systems representative of heterogeneous shrub and tussock grass surrounding a thermokarst. In these simulations shrubs, uneven grasses, and a thermokarst depression are explicitly resolved, and atmospheric conditions are similar to those of summer

  13. Intermolecular potential energy surface for CS2 dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhpour, Hossein; Mombeini, Zainab; Namazian, Mansoor; Coote, Michelle L

    2011-04-15

    A new four-dimensional intermolecular potential energy surface for CS(2) dimer is obtained by ab initio calculation of the interaction energies for a range of configurations and center-of-mass separation distances for the first time. The calculations were performed using the supermolecular approach at the Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) level of theory with the augmented correlation consistent basis sets (aug-cc-pVxZ, x = D, T) and corrected for the basis-set superposition error using the full counterpoise correction method. A two-point extrapolation method was used to extrapolate the calculated energy points to the complete basis set limit. The effect of using the higher levels of theory, quadratic configuration interaction containing single, double, and perturbative triple excitations QCISD(T) and coupled cluster singles, doubles and perturbative triples excitations CCSD(T), on the shape of potential energy surface was investigated. It is shown that the MP2 level of theory apparently performs extremely poorly for describing the intermolecular potential energy surface, overestimating the total energy by a factor of nearly 1.73 in comparison with the QCISD(T) and CCSD(T) values. The value of isotropic dipole-dipole dispersion coefficient (C(6) ) of CS(2) fluid was obtained from the extrapolated MP2 potential energy surface. The MP2 extrapolated energy points were fitted to well-known analytical potential functions using two different methods to represent the potential energy surface analytically. The most stable configuration of the dimer was determined at R = 6.23 au, α = 90°, β = 90°, and γ = 90°, with a well depth of 3.980 kcal mol(-1) at the MP2 level of theory. Finally, the calculated second virial coefficients were compared with experimental values to test the quality of the presented potential energy surface. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for CS2: determination of molecular vibrational energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Ekadashi; Carreón-Macedo, José-Luis; Cuervo, Javier E; Schröder, Markus; Brown, Alex

    2013-08-15

    The ground state potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for CS2 have been determined at the CASPT2/C:cc-pVTZ,S:aug-cc-pV(T+d)Z level of theory. The potential energy surface has been fit to a sum-of-products form using the neural network method with exponential neurons. A generic interface between neural network potential energy surface fitting and the Heidelberg MCTDH software package is demonstrated. The potential energy surface has also been fit using the potfit procedure in MCTDH. For fits to the low-energy regions of the potential, the neural network method requires fewer parameters than potfit to achieve high accuracy; global fits are comparable between the two methods. Using these potential energy surfaces, the vibrational energies have been computed for the four most abundant CS2 isotopomers. These results are compared to experimental and previous theoretical data. The current potential energy surfaces are shown to accurately reproduce the low-lying vibrational energies within a few wavenumbers. Hence, the potential energy and dipole moments surfaces will be useful for future study on the control of quantum dynamics in CS2.

  15. Position-sensitive radiation monitoring (surface contamination monitor). Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    The Shonka Research Associates, Inc. Position-Sensitive Radiation Monitor both detects surface radiation and prepares electronic survey map/survey report of surveyed area automatically. The electronically recorded map can be downloaded to a personal computer for review and a map/report can be generated for inclusion in work packages. Switching from beta-gamma detection to alpha detection is relatively simple and entails moving a switch position to alpha and adjusting the voltage level to an alpha detection level. No field calibration is required when switching from beta-gamma to alpha detection. The system can be used for free-release surveys because it meets the federal detection level sensitivity limits requires for surface survey instrumentation. This technology is superior to traditionally-used floor contamination monitor (FCM) and hand-held survey instrumentation because it can precisely register locations of radioactivity and accurately correlate contamination levels to specific locations. Additionally, it can collect and store continuous radiological data in database format, which can be used to produce real-time imagery as well as automated graphics of survey data. Its flexible design can accommodate a variety of detectors. The cost of the innovative technology is 13% to 57% lower than traditional methods. This technology is suited for radiological surveys of flat surfaces at US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) sites or similar public or commercial sites

  16. Trends in surface solar radiation in Spain since the 1980s: the role of the changes in the radiative effects of aerosols and clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Mateos, David; Wild, Martin; Calbó, Josep; Antón, Manuel; Enriquez-Alonso, Aaron; Sanchez-Romero, Alex

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of decadal variations in surface solar radiation, although the analyses of long-term time series in some areas with major gaps in observations, such as in Spain, are still pending. In the first part of this work, a previously published surface solar radiation dataset in Spain is described (for more details, see Sanchez-Lorenzo et al., 2013) based on the longest series with ground-based records of global and diffuse solar radiation, most of them starting in the early 1980s and ending in 2012. Particular emphasis is placed upon the homogenization of this dataset in order to ensure the reliability of the trends. The linear trend in the mean annual series of global solar radiation shows a significant increase since 1981 of 4.0 Wm-2 (or 2.4 %) per decade. These results are in line with the increase of global solar radiation (i.e. brightening period) reported at many worldwide observation sites (Wild, 2009). In addition, the annual mean diffuse solar radiation series shows a significant decrease during the last three decades, but it is disturbed by strong increases in 1983 and 1991-1992, which might reflect the effects of the El Chichón and Pinatubo volcanic eruptions as a result of enhanced scattering of the aerosols emitted during these large volcanic eruptions. As clouds and aerosols are the main sources of uncertainty in the determination of the energy balance of the Earth, there is a growing interest in the evaluation of their radiative effects and their impact on the decadal variability of the surface solar radiation. Hence, in the second part of this work, the changes of the combined radiative effects of clouds and aerosols in Spain since the 1980s are investigated (for more details, see Mateos et al., 2013). In particular, the global solar radiation data above mentioned and radiative transfer simulations fed with reanalysis data of ozone, water vapour and surface albedo, are used to evaluate the cloud and aerosol

  17. Surface Relaxations, Surface Energies and Electronic Structures of BaSnO3 (001) Surfaces: Ab Initio Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slassi, A.; Hammi, M.; El Rhazouani, O.

    2017-07-01

    The surface relaxations, surface energies and electronic structures of BaO- and SnO2-terminated BaSnO3 (001) surfaces have been studied by employing the first-principles density functional theory. For both terminations, we find that the upper-layer Ba and Sn atoms move inward, whereas upper-layer O atoms move outward from the surface. Moreover, the largest relaxations are occurred on the first-layer atoms of both terminations. The surface rumpling of BaO-terminated BaSnO3 (001) is slightly less than that of the SnO2-terminated BaSnO3 (001) surface. The surface energies show that both terminated surfaces are energetically stable and favorable. Finally, the surface band gap is slightly decreased for the BaO termination, while it is dramatically decreased for the SnO2 termination.

  18. Surface morphology effects in a vibration based triboelectric energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafari, A.; Sodano, H. A.

    2018-01-01

    Despite the abundance of ambient mechanical energy in our environment, it is often neglected and left unused. However, recent studies have demonstrated that mechanical vibrations can be harvested and used to power small wireless electronic devices, such as micro electromechanical sensors (MEMS) and actuators. Most commonly, these energy harvesters convert vibration into electrical energy by utilizing piezoelectric, electromagnetic or electrostatic effects. Recently, triboelectric based energy harvesters have shown to be among the simplest and most cost-effective techniques for scavenging mechanical energy. The basis of triboelectric energy harvesters is the periodic contact and separation of two surfaces with opposite triboelectric properties which results in induced charge flow through an external load. Here, a vibration driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is fabricated and the effect of micro/nano scale surface modification is studied. The TENG produces electrical energy on the basis of periodic out-of-plane charge separation between gold and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with opposite triboelectric charge polarities. By introducing micro/nano scale surface modifications to the PDMS and gold, the TENG’s power output is further enhanced. This work demonstrates that the morphology of the surfaces in a TENG device is important and by increasing the effective surface area through micro/nano scale modification, the power output of the device can increase by 118%. Moreover, it is shown that unlike many TENGs proposed in the literature, the fabricated device has a high RMS open circuit voltage and short circuit current and can perform for an extended period of time.

  19. Coastal polynyas in the southern Weddell Sea: Variability of the surface energy budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfrew, Ian A.; King, John C.; Markus, Thorsten

    2002-06-01

    The surface energy budget of coastal polynyas in the southern Weddell Sea has been evaluated for the period 1992-1998 using a combination of satellite observations, meteorological data, and simple physical models. The study focuses on polynyas that habitually form off the Ronne Ice Shelf. The coastal polynya areal data are derived from an advanced multichannel polynya detection algorithm applied to passive microwave brightness temperatures. The surface sensible and latent heat fluxes are calculated via a fetch-dependent model of the convective-thermal internal boundary layer. The radiative fluxes are calculated using well-established empirical formulae and an innovative cloud model. Standard meteorological variables that are required for the flux calculations are taken from automatic weather stations and from the National Centers for Environmental Production/National Center for Atmospheric Research reanalyses. The 7 year surface energy budget shows an overall oceanic warming due to the presence of coastal polynyas. For most of the period the summertime oceanic warming, due to the absorption of shortwave radiation, is approximately in balance with the wintertime oceanic cooling. However, the anomalously large summertime polynya of 1997-1998 allowed a large oceanic warming of the region. Wintertime freezing seasons are characterized by episodes of high heat fluxes interspersed with more quiescent periods and controlled by coastal polynya dynamics. The high heat fluxes are primarily due to the sensible heat flux component, with smaller complementary latent and radiative flux components. The average freezing season area-integrated energy exchange is 3.48 × 1019 J, with contributions of 63, 22, and 15% from the sensible, latent, and radiative components, respectively. The average melting season area-integrated energy exchange is -5.31 × 1019 J, almost entirely due to the radiative component. There is considerable interannual variability in the surface energy budget

  20. Radiation protection and dosimetry problems around medium energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, R.; Pavlovic, S.; Markovic, S.; Boreli, F.

    1995-01-01

    In the Institute of Nuclear Sciences 'VINCA', the Accelerator Installation 'TESLA', which is an ion accelerator facility consisting of an isochronous cyclotron 'VINCY', a heavy ion source, a D - / H - ion source, three low energy and five high energy experimental channels is now under construction. The Tesla Accelerator Installation should by the principal facility for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, biology, and material science, as well as for production of radioisotopes, medical diagnostics and therapy with radioisotopes and accelerated particle beams. Some problems in defining radiation protection and safety programme, particularly problems in construction appropriate shielding barriers at the Accelerator Installation 'TESLA' are discussed in this paper. (author) 1 fig., 9 refs

  1. Electromagnetic radiation from nuclear collisions at RHIC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Turbide, Simon; Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    The hot and dense strongly interacting matter created in collisions of heavy nuclei at RHIC energies is modeled with relativistic hydrodynamics, and the spectra of real and virtual photons produced at mid-rapidity in these events are calculated. Several different sources are considered, and their relative importance is compared. Specifically, we include jet fragmentation, jet-plasma interactions, the emission of radiation from the thermal medium and from primordial hard collisions. Our calculations consistently take into account jet energy loss, as evaluated in the AMY formalism. We obtain results for the spectra, the nuclear modification factor (R_AA), and the azimuthal anisotropy (v_2) that agree with the photon measurements performed by the PHENIX collaboration at RHIC.

  2. Energy distributions and radiation transport in uranium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.; Bathke, C.; Maceda, E.; Choi, C.

    1976-01-01

    Electron energy distribution functions have been calculated in a 235 U-plasma at 1 atmosphere for various plasma temperatures (5000 to 8000 0 K) and neutron fluxes (2 x 10 12 to 2 x 10 16 neutrons/(cm 2 -sec)). Two sources of energetic electrons are included; namely fission-fragment and electron-impact ionization, resulting in a high-energy tail superimposed on the thermalized electron distribution. Consequential derivations from equilibrium collision rates are of interest relative to direct pumping of lasers and radiation emission. Results suggest that non-equilibrium excitation can best be achieved with an additive gas such as helium or in lower temperature plasmas requiring UF 6 . An approximate analytic model, based on continuous electron slowing, has been used for survey calculations. Where more accuracy is required, a Monte Carlo technique is used which combines an analytic representation of Coulombic collisions with a random-walk treatment of inelastic collisions

  3. Energy nonlinearity in radiation detection materials: Causes and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, J.E.; Jordan, D.V.; Peurrung, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenology and present theoretical understanding of energy nonlinearity (nonproportionality) in radiation detection materials is reviewed, with emphasis on gamma-ray spectroscopy. Scintillators display varying degrees and patterns of nonlinearity, while semiconductor detectors are extremely linear, and gas detectors show a characteristic form of nonproportionality associated with core levels. The relation between nonlinear response (to both primary particles and secondary electrons) and spectrometer resolution is also discussed. We review the qualitative ideas about the origin of nonlinearity in scintillators that have been proposed to date, with emphasis on transport and recombination of electronic excitations. Recent computational and experimental work on the basic physics of scintillators is leading towards a better understanding of energy nonlinearity and should result in new, more linear scintillator materials in the near future

  4. Polymers under ionizing radiation: the study of energy transfers to radiation induced defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced defects created in polymers submitted to ionizing radiations, under inert atmosphere, present the same trend as a function of the dose. When the absorbed dose increases, their concentrations increase then level off. This behavior can be assigned to energy transfers from the polymer to the previously created macromolecular defects; the latter acting as energy sinks. During this thesis, we aimed to specify the influence of a given defect, namely the trans-vinylene, in the behavior of polyethylene under ionizing radiations. For this purpose, we proposed a new methodology based on the specific insertion, at various concentrations, of trans-vinylene groups in the polyethylene backbone through chemical synthesis. This enables to get rid of the variety of created defects on one hand and on the simultaneity of their creation on the other hand. Modified polyethylenes, containing solely trans-vinylene as odd groups, were irradiated under inert atmosphere, using either low LET beams (gamma, beta) or high LET beams (swift heavy ions). During irradiations, both macromolecular defects and H 2 emission were quantified. According to experimental results, among all defects, the influence of the trans-vinylene on the behavior of polyethylene is predominant. (author) [fr

  5. Possibility of radiation application to development of substitute energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaetsu, Isao

    1980-01-01

    Interest in the technique utilizing biomass is growing as one of the alternate energies to be developed accompanying the advance of chronic, long-lasting oil crisis, and its investigation has begun as a national project in respective government offices. Biomass is essentially equal to the amount of vegetable resources composed of the raw materials of cellulose and starch groups. The authors made some consideration on the contribution of radiation to the saccharification and fermentation of cellulose. First, the trend of the technique for utilizing cellulose resources is reported, and next, the utilization of radiation to the preliminary treatment of cellulose raw material and the technique for fixing enzymes and bacteria with radiation and its application to the development of resources are described. Finally, the saccharification of cellulose resources with fixed enzymes and bacteria is described. Although it is difficult at the present stage to make full economical comparison among various saccharification methods, according to the calculation made by the authors, in the comparison of the UC method by Wilke and others (mechanical crushing - saccharification of enzymatic aqueous solution) with the method introducing the fixation technique (preliminary irradiation - saccharification by fixed enzymes), the saccharifying cost is 6.56 cents/pound in case of the former, and 4.53 cents/pound in case of the latter. Since the technique is not established in many points, it is desired to improve efficiency by simplifying the pretreatment, saccharification and fermentation processes as far as possible. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Ultralow energy ion beam surface modification of low density polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenton, Martyn J; Bradley, James W; van den Berg, Jaap A; Armour, David G; Stevens, Gary C

    2005-12-01

    Ultralow energy Ar+ and O+ ion beam irradiation of low density polyethylene has been carried out under controlled dose and monoenergetic conditions. XPS of Ar+-treated surfaces exposed to ambient atmosphere show that the bombardment of 50 eV Ar+ ions at a total dose of 10(16) cm(-2) gives rise to very reactive surfaces with oxygen incorporation at about 50% of the species present in the upper surface layer. Using pure O+ beam irradiation, comparatively low O incorporation is achieved without exposure to atmosphere (approximately 13% O in the upper surface). However, if the surface is activated by Ar+ pretreatment, then large oxygen contents can be achieved under subsequent O+ irradiation (up to 48% O). The results show that for very low energy (20 eV) oxygen ions there is a dose threshold of about 5 x 10(15) cm(-2) before surface oxygen incorporation is observed. It appears that, for both Ar+ and O+ ions in this regime, the degree of surface modification is only very weakly dependent on the ion energy. The results suggest that in the nonequilibrium plasma treatment of polymers, where the ion flux is typically 10(18) m(-2) s(-1), low energy ions (<50 eV) may be responsible for surface chemical modification.

  7. Estimation of Downwelling Surface Longwave Radiation under Heavy Dust Aerosol Sky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlei Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The variation of aerosols, especially dust aerosol, in time and space plays an important role in climate forcing studies. Aerosols can effectively reduce land surface longwave emission and re-emit energy at a colder temperature, which makes it difficult to estimate downwelling surface longwave radiation (DSLR with satellite data. Using the latest atmospheric radiative transfer code (MODTRAN 5.0, we have simulated the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR and DSLR under different land surface types and atmospheric profile conditions. The results show that dust aerosol has an obvious “warming” effect to longwave radiation compared with other aerosols; that aerosol longwave radiative forcing (ALRF increased with the increasing of aerosol optical depth (AOD; and that the atmospheric water vapor content (WVC is critical to the understanding of ALRF. A method is proposed to improve the accuracy of DSLR estimation from satellite data for the skies under heavy dust aerosols. The AOD and atmospheric WVC under cloud-free conditions with a relatively simple satellite-based radiation model yielding the high accurate DSLR under heavy dust aerosol are used explicitly as model input to reduce the effects of dust aerosol on the estimation of DSLR. Validations of the proposed model with satellites data and field measurements show that it can estimate the DSLR accurately under heavy dust aerosol skies. The root mean square errors (RMSEs are 20.4 W/m2 and 24.2 W/m2 for Terra and Aqua satellites, respectively, at the Yingke site, and the biases are 2.7 W/m2 and 9.6 W/m2, respectively. For the Arvaikheer site, the RMSEs are 23.2 W/m2 and 19.8 W/m2 for Terra and Aqua, respectively, and the biases are 7.8 W/m2 and 10.5 W/m2, respectively. The proposed method is especially applicable to acquire relatively high accurate DSLR under heavy dust aerosol using MODIS data with available WVC and AOD data.

  8. Simulated Effects of Land Cover Conversion on the Surface Energy Budget in the Southwest of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangbo Gao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the coupled WRF/SSiB model, accompanied by a Karst Rocky Desertification (KRD map of the Guizhou Karst Plateau (GKP of China, was applied to detect how the changed vegetation and soil characteristics over the GKP modify the energy balance at the land surface. The results indicated that land degradation led to reduced net radiation by inducing more upward shortwave and longwave radiation, which were associated with increasing surface albedo and temperature, respectively. The KRD also resulted in changed surface energy partitioning into sensible and latent heat fluxes. The latent heat flux at land surface was reduced substantially due to the higher surface albedo and stomatal resistance, the lower Leaf Area Index (LAI and roughness length in the degradation experiment, while the sensible heat flux increased, mainly because of the higher surface temperature. Furthermore, the moisture flux convergence was reduced, owing to the lower atmospheric heating and the relative subsidence. However, compared with the reduced evaporation, the decrease in moisture flux convergence contributed much less to the reduced precipitation. Precipitation strongly affects soil moisture, vegetation growth and phenology, and thus evaporation and convective latent heating, so when precipitation was changed, a feedback loop was created.

  9. Surface energy and work function of the light actinides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollár, J.; Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1994-01-01

    We have calculated the surface energy and work function of the light actinides Fr, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, and Pu by means of a Green's-function technique based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the tight-binding representation. In these calculations we apply an energy functional which...

  10. Controlling Energy Radiations of Electromagnetic Waves via Frequency Coding Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haotian; Liu, Shuo; Wan, Xiang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Dan; Li, Lianlin; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-09-01

    Metamaterials are artificial structures composed of subwavelength unit cells to control electromagnetic (EM) waves. The spatial coding representation of metamaterial has the ability to describe the material in a digital way. The spatial coding metamaterials are typically constructed by unit cells that have similar shapes with fixed functionality. Here, the concept of frequency coding metamaterial is proposed, which achieves different controls of EM energy radiations with a fixed spatial coding pattern when the frequency changes. In this case, not only different phase responses of the unit cells are considered, but also different phase sensitivities are also required. Due to different frequency sensitivities of unit cells, two units with the same phase response at the initial frequency may have different phase responses at higher frequency. To describe the frequency coding property of unit cell, digitalized frequency sensitivity is proposed, in which the units are encoded with digits "0" and "1" to represent the low and high phase sensitivities, respectively. By this merit, two degrees of freedom, spatial coding and frequency coding, are obtained to control the EM energy radiations by a new class of frequency-spatial coding metamaterials. The above concepts and physical phenomena are confirmed by numerical simulations and experiments.

  11. Energy loss in grazing proton-surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juaristi, J.I.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    The energy loss of fast protons, with energy E > 100 keV, specularly reflected on a solid surface with glancing angle of incidence of the order of a mrad is analysed on theoretical grounds. Two different contributions can be distinguished: i) energy losses originating from the interaction with the valence band, accounted for through an induced force, and ii) the excitation of electron bound states of the target atoms. The results are compared with available experimental data. (orig.)

  12. The "Chocolate Experiment"--A Demonstration of Radiation Absorption by Different Colored Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    In the typical "cookbook" experiment comparing the radiation absorption rates of different colored surfaces, students' hands are commonly used as a measurement instrument to demonstrate that dull black and silvery surfaces are good and poor absorbers of radiation, respectively. However, college students are often skeptical about using…

  13. Radiation environment in the tunnel of a high-energy proton accelerator at energies near 1 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCaslin, J.B.; Sun, R.K.S.; Swanson, W.P.

    1987-12-01

    Neutron energy spectra, fluence distributions and rates in the FNAL Tevatron tunnel are summarized. This work has application to radiation damage to electronics and research equipment at high energy accelerators, as well as to radiological protection. 7 refs., 4 figs

  14. Chemical reactions on platinum-group metal surfaces studied by synchrotron-radiation-based spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Hiroshi; Nakai, Ikuyo; Nagasaka, Masanari; Amemiya, Kenta; Ohta, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    A new version of synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray spectroscopy, wave-length-dispersive near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (dispersive-NEXAFS), and fast x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been applied to mechanistic studies on several surface catalytic reactions on platinum-group-metal surfaces. In this review, our approach using above techniques to understand the reaction mechanism and actual application studies on three well-known catalytic surface reactions, CO oxidation on Pt(111) and Pd(111), NO reduction on Rh(111), and H 2 O formation on Pt(111), are introduced. Spectroscopic monitoring of the progress of the surface reactions enabled us to detect reaction intermediates and analyze the reaction kinetics quantitatively which provides information on reaction order, rate constant, pre-exponential factor, activation energy and etc. Such quantitative analyses combined with scanning tunneling microscopy and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations revealed significant contribution of the adsorbate configurations and their dynamic changes to the reaction mechanisms of the above fundamental catalytic surface reactions. (author)

  15. Urban surface energy fluxes based on remotely-sensed data and micrometeorological measurements over the Kansai area, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukeyasu, T.; Ueyama, M.; Ando, T.; Kosugi, Y.; Kominami, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The urban heat island is associated with land cover changes and increases in anthropogenic heat fluxes. Clear understanding of the surface energy budget at urban area is the most important for evaluating the urban heat island. In this study, we develop a model based on remotely-sensed data for the Kansai area in Japan and clarify temporal transitions and spatial distributions of the surface energy flux from 2000 to 2016. The model calculated the surface energy fluxes based on various satellite and GIS products. The model used land surface temperature, surface emissivity, air temperature, albedo, downward shortwave radiation and land cover/use type from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) under cloud free skies from 2000 to 2016 over the Kansai area in Japan (34 to 35 ° N, 135 to 136 ° E). Net radiation was estimated by a radiation budget of upward/downward shortwave and longwave radiation. Sensible heat flux was estimated by a bulk aerodynamic method. Anthropogenic heat flux was estimated by the inventory data. Latent heat flux was examined with residues of the energy budget and parameterization of bulk transfer coefficients. We validated the model using observed fluxes from five eddy-covariance measurement sites: three urban sites and two forested sites. The estimated net radiation roughly agreed with the observations, but the sensible heat flux were underestimated. Based on the modeled spatial distributions of the fluxes, the daytime net radiation in the forested area was larger than those in the urban area, owing to higher albedo and land surface temperatures in the urban area than the forested area. The estimated anthropogenic heat flux was high in the summer and winter periods due to increases in energy-requirements.

  16. Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Release 2 Shortwave Daily Data in Native Format (SRB_REL2_SW_DAILY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, Paul W. (Principal Investigator)

    This data set contains upward and downward fluxes, photosynthetically active radiative flux, aerosol and cloud optical depth, cloud fraction, and solar zenith angle measured at three hourly intervals for each day for the entire globe between 07/01/1983 and 10/31/1995. These SW surface radiative parameters were derived with the Shortwave algorithm of the NASA World Climate Research Programme/Global Energy and Water-Cycle Experiment (WCRP/GEWEX) Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Project. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1983-07-01; Stop_Date=1998-07-26] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=1 degree; Longitude_Resolution=Ranges from 1 degree (tropics and subtropics) to 120 degrees (the poles).; Temporal_Resolution=daily; Temporal_Resolution_Range=daily].

  17. Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Release 2 Shortwave 3 hourly Data in Native Format (SRB_REL2_SW_3HRLY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, Paul W. (Principal Investigator)

    The SRB data include the average upward and downward fluxes, photosynthetically active radiative flux, aerosol and cloud optical depth, cloud fraction, and solar zenith angle measured at three hourly intervals for each day for the entire globe between 07/01/1983 and 10/31/1995. These SW surface radiative parameters were derived with the Shortwave algorithm of the NASA World Climate Research Programme/Global Energy and Water-Cycle Experiment (WCRP/GEWEX) Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Project. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1983-07-01; Stop_Date=1998-07-26] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=1 degree; Longitude_Resolution=Ranges from 1 degree (tropics and subtropics) to 120 degrees (the poles).; Temporal_Resolution=3 hourly; Temporal_Resolution_Range=3 hourly].

  18. Radiative Heat Transfer with Nanowire/Nanohole Metamaterials for Thermal Energy Harvesting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Yung

    Recently, nanostructured metamaterials have attracted lots of attentions due to its tunable artificial properties. In particular, nanowire/nanohole based metamaterials which are known of the capability of large area fabrication were intensively studied. Most of the studies are only based on the electrical responses of the metamaterials; however, magnetic response, is usually neglected since magnetic material does not exist naturally within the visible or infrared range. For the past few years, artificial magnetic response from nanostructure based metamaterials has been proposed. This reveals the possibility of exciting resonance modes based on magnetic responses in nanowire/nanohole metamaterials which can potentially provide additional enhancement on radiative transport. On the other hand, beyond classical far-field radiative heat transfer, near-field radiation which is known of exceeding the Planck's blackbody limit has also become a hot topic in the field. This PhD dissertation aims to obtain a deep fundamental understanding of nanowire/nanohole based metamaterials in both far-field and near-field in terms of both electrical and magnetic responses. The underlying mechanisms that can be excited by nanowire/nanohole metamaterials such as electrical surface plasmon polariton, magnetic hyperbolic mode, magnetic polariton, etc., will be theoretically studied in both far-field and near-field. Furthermore, other than conventional effective medium theory which only considers the electrical response of metamaterials, the artificial magnetic response of metamaterials will also be studied through parameter retrieval of far-field optical and radiative properties for studying near-field radiative transport. Moreover, a custom-made AFM tip based metrology will be employed to experimentally study near-field radiative transfer between a plate and a sphere separated by nanometer vacuum gaps in vacuum. This transformative research will break new ground in nanoscale radiative heat

  19. Ab initio Potential Energy Surface for H-H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    Ab initio calculations employing large basis sets are performed to determine an accurate potential energy surface for H-H2 interactions for a broad range of separation distances. At large distances, the spherically averaged potential determined from the calculated energies agrees well with the corresponding results determined from dispersion coefficients; the van der Waals well depth is predicted to be 75 +/- (mu)E(sub h). Large basis sets have also been applied to reexamine the accuracy of theoretical repulsive potential energy surfaces. Multipolar expansions of the computed H-H2 potential energy surface are reported for four internuclear separation distances (1.2, 1.401, 1.449, and 1.7a(sub 0) of the hydrogen molecule. The differential elastic scattering cross section calculated from the present results is compared with the measurements from a crossed beam experiment.

  20. Elastic layer under axisymmetric indentation and surface energy effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarit, Pong-in; Senjuntichai, Teerapong; Rungamornrat, Jaroon

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a continuum-based approach is adopted to investigate the contact problem of an elastic layer with finite thickness and rigid base subjected to axisymmetric indentation with the consideration of surface energy effects. A complete Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity is employed to consider the influence of surface stresses. The indentation problem of a rigid frictionless punch with arbitrary axisymmetric profiles is formulated by employing the displacement Green's functions, derived with the aid of Hankel integral transform technique. The problem is solved by assuming the contact pressure distribution in terms of a linear combination of admissible functions and undetermined coefficients. Those coefficients are then obtained by employing a collocation technique and an efficient numerical quadrature scheme. The accuracy of proposed solution technique is verified by comparing with existing solutions for rigid indentation on an elastic half-space. Selected numerical results for the indenters with flat-ended cylindrical and paraboloidal punch profiles are presented to portray the influence of surface energy effects on elastic fields of the finite layer. It is found that the presence of surface stresses renders the layer stiffer, and the size-dependent behavior of elastic fields is observed in the present solutions. In addition, the surface energy effects become more pronounced with smaller contact area; thus, the influence of surface energy cannot be ignored in the analysis of indentation problem especially when the indenter size is very small such as in the case of nanoindentation.

  1. Observations of surface radiation and stratospheric processes at Thule Air Base, Greenland, during the IPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Muscari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ground-based measurements of atmospheric parameters have been carried out for more than 20 years at the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC station at Thule Air Base (76.5°N, 68.8°W, on the north-western coast of Greenland. Various instruments dedicated to the study of the lower and middle polar atmosphere are installed at Thule in the framework of a long standing collaboration among Danish, Italian, and US research institutes and universities. This effort aims at monitoring the composition, structure and dynamics of the polar stratosphere, and at studying the Arctic energy budget and the role played by different factors, such as aerosols, water vapour, and surface albedo. During the International Polar Year (IPY, in winter 2008-2009, an intensive measurement campaign was conducted at Thule within the framework of the IPY project “Ozone layer and UV radiation in a changing climate evaluated during IPY” (ORACLE-O3 which sought to improve our understanding of the complex mechanisms that lead to the Arctic stratospheric O3 depletion. The campaign involved a lidar system, measuring aerosol backscatter and depolarization ratios up to 35 km and atmospheric temperature profiles from 25 to 70 km altitude, a ground-based millimeter-wave spectrometer (GBMS used to derive stratospheric mixing ratio profiles of different chemical species involved in the stratospheric ozone depletion cycle, and then ground-based radiometers and a Cimel sunphotometer to study the Arctic radiative budget at the surface. The observations show that the surface radiation budget is mainly regulated by the longwave component throughout most of the year. Clouds have a significant impact contributing to enhance the role of longwave radiation. Besides clouds, water vapour seasonal changes produce the largest modification in the shortwave component at the surface, followed by changes in surface albedo and in aerosol amounts. For what concerns the

  2. Decadal variability of surface solar radiation over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.

    2015-12-01

    Observations show that national average surface solar radiation (Rs) decreased by -8.0 W m-2 per decade from 1960 to 1990 and sharply increased from 1990 to 1993. However, none of the state-of-the-art climate models can reproduce such decrease/increase of Rs. This study shows that Rs observations over China have significant inhomogeneity. Before 1989, Rs was calculated as a sum of direct (Rsdir) and diffuse (Rsdif) solar radiation observations measured by pyrheliometers and shaded pyranometers separately. Due to technical limitations and irregular calibration, pyranometers before 1990 had a strong sensitivity drift problem, which introduced crucial spurious decreasing trends into Rsdif and Rs data. From 1990 to 1993, instruments and measurement methods were replaced and measuring stations were restructured in China, which resulted in an abrupt increase in the observed Rs. Rs calculated from Sunshine duration (SunDu) provide a reliable reference in assessing decadal variability of Rs. SunDu derived Rs have no sensitivity drift problem because of its daily changed recording material. SunDu-derived Rs averaged over China decreased by -2.9 W m-2 per decade from 1961 to 1990, and had a negligible trend afterward. During the period of 1994-2012 when Rs observations were free of inhomogeneity mentioned above, the observed and SunDu-derived Rs consistently show a negligible trend, being less than 0.1 W m-2 per decade. These trends can be reproduced by high-quality CMIP5 Earth System Models (ESM). This level of agreement is due to the incorporation of a near real emission inventory of atmospheric aerosols by CMIP5 ESMs. Rs from ERA-Interim has a good agreement with SunDu-derived Rs. However, ERA-interim does not allow aerosol loading to change annually. ERA-Interim Rs shows an unreliable increasing trend of 1.9 W m-2 per decade from 1990 to 2013 because it does not include the impact of recent increased atmospheric aerosols over China. GEWEX Rs calculated from ISCCP cloud

  3. Radiation-heterogeneous processes on the surface of stainless steel in contact with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibov, A.; Agayev, T.N.; Velibekova, G.Z.; Ismayilov, Sh.S.; Aliyev, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Stainless steels are one of prevailing materials of nuclear power engineering. Under operating conditions in real systems they are exposed to influence of ionizing radiation in contact with various environments. Therefore in the processes of corrosion and destruction of stainless steels special significance takes on surface processes and subsequent heterogeneous processes with their participation. In this report the results of research of nuclear-heterogeneous processes regularities in contact with stainless steel of nuclear reactors with water under influence of γ-quanta in the temperature range 300-573 K are given. Radiolytic processes in water are investigated comprehensively and therefore it was taken as modelling system for titration of surface defects and secondary electrons, emitted from metal. It was determined, that radiation processes in stainless steel give rise to the increasing of energy output of molecular hydrogen at water radiolysis from 0.45 molecule/100 eV at pure water radiolysis at 296 K up to 3.4 molecule/100 eV at the presence of stainless steel at 300 K. With increase of temperature the output of molecular hydrogen increases up to 8.2 molecule/100 eV at 573 K. Processes of lattice damage in samples of stainless steel under influence of γ-rays were investigated by electrophysical method. Influence of γ-radiation on stainless steel in contact with water at temperatures T ≤ 423 K and initial values of radiation dose D ≤ 200 kGy given rise to the reduction of electrical resistivity of samples. At doses D≥200 kGy electrical resistivity is increased. Increase of temperature from 333 K up to 423 K lead to the reduction of dose value, at which the transition to resistance increase, from 200 kGy up to 100 kGy occurs. At T≥523 K insoluble oxide phase is formed on a surface of metal which give rise to the increase of electrical resistivity of stainless steel samples. Surface oxide film formed in contact of stainless steel + H 2 O

  4. Evaluation of the surface free energy of plant surfaces: toward standardizing the procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Victoria; Khayet, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Plant surfaces have been found to have a major chemical and physical heterogeneity and play a key protecting role against multiple stress factors. During the last decade, there is a raising interest in examining plant surface properties for the development of biomimetic materials. Contact angle measurement of different liquids is a common tool for characterizing synthetic materials, which is just beginning to be applied to plant surfaces. However, some studies performed with polymers and other materials showed that for the same surface, different surface free energy values may be obtained depending on the number and nature of the test liquids analyzed, materials' properties, and surface free energy calculation methods employed. For 3 rough and 3 rather smooth plant materials, we calculated their surface free energy using 2 or 3 test liquids and 3 different calculation methods. Regardless of the degree of surface roughness, the methods based on 2 test liquids often led to the under- or over-estimation of surface free energies as compared to the results derived from the 3-Liquids method. Given the major chemical and structural diversity of plant surfaces, it is concluded that 3 different liquids must be considered for characterizing materials of unknown physico-chemical properties, which may significantly differ in terms of polar and dispersive interactions. Since there are just few surface free energy data of plant surfaces with the aim of standardizing the calculation procedure and interpretation of the results among for instance, different species, organs, or phenological states, we suggest the use of 3 liquids and the mean surface tension values provided in this study.

  5. Shielding factors for gamma radiation from activity deposited on structures and ground surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.

    1982-11-01

    This report describes a computer model that calculates shielding factors for indoor residence in multistorey and single-family houses for gamma radiation from activity despoited on roofs, outer walls, and ground surfaces. The dimensions of the buildings including window areas and the nearby surroundings has to be speficied in the calculations. Shielding factors can be calculated for different photon energies and for a uniform surface activity distribution as well as for separate activity on roof, outer wall, and ground surface achieved from decontamination or different deposition velocities. For a given area with a known distribution of different houses a weighted shielding factor can be calculated as well as a time-averaged one based on a given residence time distribution for work/school, home, outdoors, and transportation. Calculated shielding factors are shown for typical Danish houses. To give an impression of the sensitivity of the shielding factor on the parameters used in the model, variations were made in some of the most important parameters: wall thickness, road and ground width, percentage of outer wall covered by windows, photon energy, and decontamination percentage for outer walls, ground and roofs. The uncertainity of the calculations is discussed. (author)

  6. Effects of solar radiation, terrestrial radiation and lunar interior heat flow on surface temperature at the nearside of the Moon: Based on numerical calculation and data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yutian; Wang, Xueqiang; Bi, Shengshan; Wu, Jiangtao; Huang, Shaopeng

    2017-09-01

    Surface temperature at the nearside of the Moon (Ts,n) embraces an abundance of valuable information to be explored, and its measurement contributes to studying Earth's energy budget. On a basis of a one-dimensional unsteady heat-transfer model, this paper ran a quantitative calculation that how much the Ts,n varies with the changes of different heat sources, including solar radiation, terrestrial radiation, and lunar interior heat flow. The results reveal that solar radiation always has the most important influence on Ts,n not only during lunar daytime (by means of radiation balance) but also during lunar nighttime (by means of lunar regolith heat conduction). Besides, the effect of terrestrial radiation is also unavoidable, and measuring the variation of lunar nighttime low temperature is exactly helpful in observing Earth outgoing radiation. Accordingly, it is practical to establish a Moon-base observatory on the Moon. For verification, the Apollo 15 mission temperature data was used and analyzed as well. Moreover, other 9 typical lunar areas were selected and the simulation was run one after another in these areas after proper model amendation. It is shown that the polar regions on the Moon are the best areas for establishing Moon-base observatory.

  7. Performance Evaluation of Radiation Sensors for the Solar Energy Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Vuilleumier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rotating Shadowband Irradiometers (RSI and SPN1 Sunshine Pyranometers allow determining the diffuse and direct components of solar radiation without sun trackers; they can be deployed in networks for continuous field operation with modest maintenance. Their performances are evaluated here by analyzing their errors with respect to well characterized references. The analysis is based on 1‑minute data recorded over a 15‑month period at the Payerne BSRN station in Switzerland. The analysis was applied both to the whole dataset and data subsets reflecting particular conditions to allow a better understanding of how instrument performance depends on such conditions.The overall performance for measuring global horizontal irradiance (GHI is satisfactory with deviations compatible with an expanded uncertainty of ±25 Wm−2 (±10 %. For diffuse horizontal irradiance (DfHI, RSIs exhibited errors on the order of ±20 Wm−2 (±13 % with some of them being affected by small systematic negative biases on the order of −5 Wm−2 (median. SPN1s underestimate DfHI by about −10 Wm−2 (median with a relatively large range of the expanded error distribution between −45 Wm−2 and 20 Wm−2 (−35 % to 13 %. For direct normal irradiance (DNI, the extended error range for RSIs is on the order of ±40 Wm−2 (±5–6 % with some instruments presenting no bias while others are affected by median biases up to −15 Wm−2. SPN1s exhibit a relatively large median bias of 40 Wm−2, and an extended range of the error distribution between −45 Wm−2 and 125 Wm−2 (−6 % to 19 %. Typical errors on the integrated yearly energy per unit surface area are on the order of a few percent or less (< 5 % for RSI with negligible errors on DNI for some RSI instruments. SPN1 integrated errors are negligible for GHI, but on the order of −8 % for DfHI, and between 9 % and 11 % for DNI.For RSIs, GHI and DfHI errors showed

  8. Effect of localized surface-plasmon mode on exciton transport and radiation emission in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslyak, Oleksiy; Cherqui, Charles; Dunlap, David H; Piryatinski, Andrei

    2014-07-17

    We report on a general theoretical approach to study exciton transport and emission in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) in the presence of a localized surface-plasmon (SP) mode within a metal nanoparticle interacting via near-field coupling. We derive a set of quantum mechanical equations of motion and approximate rate equations that account for the exciton, SP, and the environmental degrees of freedom. The material equations are complemented by an expression for the radiated power that depends on the exciton and SP populations and coherences, allowing for an examination of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation that would be measured in experiment. Numerical simulations for a (6,5) SWNT and cone-shaped Ag metal tip (MT) have been performed using this methodology. Comparison with physical parameters shows that the near-field interaction between the exciton-SP occurs in a weak coupling regime, with the diffusion processes being much faster than the exciton-SP population exchange. In such a case, the effect of the exciton population transfer to the MT with its subsequent dissipation (i.e., the Förster energy transfer) is to modify the exciton steady state distribution while reducing the equilibration time for excitons to reach a steady sate distribution. We find that the radiation distribution is dominated by SP emission for a SWNT-MT separation of a few tens of nanometers due to the fast SP emission rate, whereas the exciton-SP coherences can cause its rotation.

  9. Generating surface states in a Weyl semimetal by applying electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Oindrila; Sen, Diptiman

    2017-04-01

    We show that the application of circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation on the surface of a Weyl semimetal can generate states at that surface. These states can be characterized by their surface momentum. The Floquet eigenvalues ei θ of these states come in complex conjugate pairs rather than being equal to ±1 . If the amplitude of the radiation is small, we find some unusual bulk-boundary relations: the values of θ of the surface states lie at the extrema of the θ 's of the bulk system, and the peaks of the Fourier transforms of the surface state wave functions lie at the momenta where the bulk θ 's have extrema. For the case of zero surface momentum, we can analytically derive scaling relations between the decay length of the surface states and the amplitude and penetration length of the radiation. For topological insulators, we again find that circularly polarized radiation can generate states on the top surface; these states have much larger decay lengths than the surface states which are present even in the absence of radiation. Finally, we show that radiation can generate surface states for trivial insulators also.

  10. Fracture surface energy of the Punchbowl fault, San Andreas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Judith S; Chester, Frederick M; Kronenberg, Andreas K

    2005-09-01

    Fracture energy is a form of latent heat required to create an earthquake rupture surface and is related to parameters governing rupture propagation and processes of slip weakening. Fracture energy has been estimated from seismological and experimental rock deformation data, yet its magnitude, mechanisms of rupture surface formation and processes leading to slip weakening are not well defined. Here we quantify structural observations of the Punchbowl fault, a large-displacement exhumed fault in the San Andreas fault system, and show that the energy required to create the fracture surface area in the fault is about 300 times greater than seismological estimates would predict for a single large earthquake. If fracture energy is attributed entirely to the production of fracture surfaces, then all of the fracture surface area in the Punchbowl fault could have been produced by earthquake displacements totalling <1 km. But this would only account for a small fraction of the total energy budget, and therefore additional processes probably contributed to slip weakening during earthquake rupture.

  11. The effects of high energy radiation on the pulping properties of Pinus radiation and Eucalyptus regnans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, K.G.; Garland, C.P.; Higgins, H.G.

    1976-01-01

    Studies have been made of the effects of high energy radiation on the pulping behaviour of Eucalyptus regnans and Pinus radiata. Pre-irradiation of wood chips with small doses of 60 Co gamma radiation (up to about 0.2 Mrad) caused little degradation of the cellulose, and had only minor effects on the kraft pulping properties of both wood species. Pulp yield, Kappa number and strength properties of the pulps showed little change. There was also little effect on the bisulphite cooking of Pinus radiata. As the dose was increased to 1 Mrad, degradation of cellulose (as indicated by degree of polymerisation measurements) became significant, and Kraft pulp yields from both woods showed small reductions. The Kappa number and physical properties of these pulps were little affected at this dose level. A gamma radiation dose of 10 Mrad produced marked depolymerisation of the cellulose, and big reductions in kraft and neutral sulphite semi-chemical pulp yields. The kraft pulps showed a much higher lignin content. Some low dose (0.15 Mrad) irradiations on thin chips were carried out with a 1 MeV electron accelerator. In contrast to comparable gamma irradiations, this treatment produced discernible changes in kraft pulping behaviour. The pulp yield, under the same cooking conditions, appears to be slightly higher, but the Lignin content of the pulp was increased. (Author)

  12. Photon energy scale determination and commissioning with radiative Z decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondu Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL is composed of 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. It has been designed to be fast, compact, and radiation hard, with fine granularity and excellent energy resolution. Obtaining the design resolution is a crucial challenge for the SM Higgs search in the two photon channel at the LHC, and more generally good photon calibration and knowledge of the photon energy scale is required for analyses with photons in the final state. The behavior of photons and electrons in the calorimeter is not identical, making the use of a dedicated standard candle for photons, complementary to the canonical highyield Z decay to electrons, highly desirable. The use of Z decays to a pair of muons, where one of the muons emits a Bremsstrahlung photon, can be such a standard candle. These events, which can be cleanly selected, are a source of high-purity, relatively high-pt photons. Their kinematics are well-constrained by the Z boson mass and the precision on the muon momenta, and can be used for numerous calibration and measurement purposes. This proceeding presents the event selection method and the results of the photon energy scale measurement via Z0 → μμγ events as well as their use in evaluating the efficiency of photon identification requirements, based on data recorded by the CMS experiment in 2010.

  13. The near-surface electron radiation environment of Saturn's moon Mimas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheim, T. A.; Hand, K. P.; Paranicas, C.; Howett, C. J. A.; Hendrix, A. R.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2017-04-01

    Saturn's inner mid-size moons are exposed to a number of external weathering processes, including charged particle bombardment and UV photolysis, as well as deposition of E-ring grains and interplanetary dust. While optical remote sensing observations by several instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft have revealed a number of weathering patterns across the surfaces of these moons, it is not entirely clear which external process is responsible for which observed weathering pattern. Here we focus on Saturn's moon Mimas and model the effect of energetic electron bombardment across its surface. By using a combination of a guiding center, bounce-averaged charged particle tracing approach and a particle physics code, we investigate how the radiation dose due to energetic electrons is deposited with depth at different locations. We predict a lens-shaped electron energy deposition pattern that extends down to ∼cm depths at low latitudes centered around the apex of the leading hemisphere (90° W). These results are consistent with previous remote sensing observations of a lens-shaped color anomaly observed by the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument as well as a thermal inertia anomaly observed by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). Our results confirm that these features are produced by MeV electrons that have a penetration depth into the surface comparable to the effective sampling depths of these instruments. On the trailing hemisphere we predict a similar lens-shaped electron energy deposition pattern, whose effects have to date not been observed by the Cassini remote sensing instruments. We suggest that no corresponding lens-shaped weathering pattern has been observed on the trailing hemisphere because of the comparatively short range of lower energy (<1 MeV) electrons into surface ice, as well as competing effects from cold plasma, neutral, and dust bombardment.

  14. Silica gel surface as chemical reagent in radiation chemical transformations of adsorbed compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Strelko, V.V.; Strazhesko, D.N.; Denisov, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    Studied is the mechanism of the ionizing radiation effect on the heterogeneous systems, containing dispersed silica gels as one of the components. Radiation-chemical transformations of substances adsorbed by silica gels (radiolysis and radiation- chemical synthesis) are characterized by increased yields and by sufficient change of reaction selectivity in comparison with homogeneous medium. It is shown that in silica gel case, surface may also participate in radiolysis and in radiation-chemical synthesis as a chemical agent, generating hot hydrogen atoms and active surface SiO- and Si- radicals into the reaction zone under radiation. The data obtained are analyzed from the point of view of peculiarities of the building of i-O bonds and also of the chemical properties of the silica gel surface. It testifies that silica gel sorbents may be viewed as peculiar effective chemical agents in radiation- chemical reactions of adsorbed substances

  15. Stellar and Extragalactic Radiation at the Earth's Surface Jean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Reviving a calculation made by Eddington in the 1920s, and using the most recent and comprehensive databases available on stars and galaxies, including more than 2,500,000 stars and around 20,000 galaxies we have computed their total radiation received at the Earth just outside its atmosphere. This radiation ...

  16. Surface/interfacial free energies and the surface tension of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, M.S.; Desai, P.D.; Solomon, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review literature on surface/interfacial free energies and surface tension of UO/sub 2 +- x/. The data available in the literature are reviewed and critical evaluation and analyses of the available data are made by comparing them not only with each other, but also with the estimated values based on the available theoretical models. In light of the complexity of the material and the problems associated with the available literature data, no recommendations of surface/interfacial free energies and surface tension values are possible at this time. However, an attempt is made to point out problems associated with the data in general and also to develop procedures that can be used to analyze surface energies

  17. Energy dependent response of plastic scintillation detectors to photon radiation of low to medium energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenau, Melanie; Radeck, Désirée; Bambynek, Markus; Sommer, Holger; Flühs, Dirk; Spaan, Bernhard; Eichmann, Marion

    2016-08-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors are promising candidates for the dosimetry of low- to medium-energy photons but quantitative knowledge of their energy response is a prerequisite for their correct use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the energy dependent response of small scintillation detectors (active volume plastic scintillator BC400. Different detectors made from BC400 were calibrated at a number of radiation qualities ranging from 10 to 280 kV and at a (60)Co beam. All calibrations were performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, the National Metrology Institute of Germany. The energy response in terms of air kerma, dose to water, and dose to the scintillator was determined. Conversion factors from air kerma to dose to water and to dose to the scintillator were derived from Monte Carlo simulations. In order to quantitatively describe the energy dependence, a semiempirical model known as unimolecular quenching or Birks' formula was fitted to the data and from this the response to secondary electrons generated within the scintillator material BC400 was derived. The detector energy response in terms of air kerma differs for different scintillator sizes and different detector casings. It is therefore necessary to take attenuation within the scintillator and in the casing into account when deriving the response in terms of dose to water from a calibration in terms of air kerma. The measured energy response in terms of dose to water for BC400 cannot be reproduced by the ratio of mean mass energy-absorption coefficients for polyvinyl toluene to water but shows evidence of quenching. The quenching parameter kB in Birks' formula was determined to be kB = (12.3 ± 0.9) mg MeV(-1) cm(-2). The energy response was quantified relative to the response to (60)Co which is the common radiation quality for the calibration of therapy dosemeters. The observed energy dependence could be well explained with the assumption of ionization quenching as described

  18. Microbiology of the surface water samples in the high background radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motamedifar, Mohammad; Zamani, Khosrow; Sedigh, Hadi; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Taeb, Shahram; Haghani, M.; Mortazavi, Seyed Ali Reza; Soofi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Residents of high background radiation areas of Ramsar have lived in these areas for many generations and received radiation doses much higher than the dose limit recommended by ICRP for radiation workers. The radioactivity of the high background radiation areas of Ramsar is reported to be due to 226 Ra and its decay products, which have been brought to the surface by the waters of hot springs. Over the past years the department has focused on different aspects of the health effects of the elevated levels of natural radiation in Ramsar. This study was aimed to perform a preliminary investigation on the bioeffects of exposure to elevated levels of natural radiation on the microbiology of surface water samples. Water samples were collected from surface water streams in Talesh Mahalleh district, Ramsar as well as a nearby area with normal levels of background radiation. Only two strains of bacteria, that is, Providencia stuartii and Shimwellia blattae, could be isolated from the water samples collected from high background radiation areas, while seven strains (Escherichia coli, Enterobacter asburiae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella dysenteriae, Buttiauxella agerstis, Tatumella punctuata and Raoultella ornithinolytica) were isolated from the water samples collected from normal background radiation areas. All the bacteria isolated from water samples of high and normal background radiation areas were sensitive to ultraviolet radiation, heat, betadine, alcohol, and deconex. Although other investigators have reported that bacteria isolated from hot springs show radioresistance, the results reported here do not reveal any adaptive response. (author)

  19. Optimization (ALARA) of radiation protection at Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weadock, A.A.; Jones, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Maintaining worker and public exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is a key objective of the Department of Energy (DOE). Responsibility for occupational ALARA program policy and guidance resides within the DOE Office of Health. Current Office of Health initiatives related to ALARA include the development of additional regulatory guidance related to ALARA program implementation at DOE contractor facilities, the review of ALARA program status at various facilities and the production of technical reports summarizing this status, and the support of various mechanisms to improve communication among the DOE ALARA community. The Office of Health also monitors revisions to radiogenic risk estimates and radiation protection recommendations to evaluate adequacy of current DOE limits and impacts of potentially revised limits. (author)

  20. Interaction of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharonyan, F.A.; Kanevskij, B.L.; Vardanyan, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The formation of the bump and black-body cutoff in the cosmic-ray (CR) spectrum arising from the π-meson photoproduction reaction in collisions of CR protons with the microwave background radiation (MBR) photons is studied. A kinetic equation which describes CR proton propagation in MBR with account of a catastrophic of the π-meson photoproduction process is derived. The equilibrium CR proton spectrum obtained from the solution of the stationary kinetic equation is in general agreement with spectrum obtained under assumption of continuous energy loss approximation. However spectra from local sources especially for the times of propagation t>10 9 years differ noticeably from those obtained in the continuous loss approximation. 24 refs.; 5 figs

  1. Radiative polarization in high-energy storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mane, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Electron and positron beams circulating in high-energy storage rings become spontaneously polarized by the emission of synchrotron radiation. The asymptotic degree of polarization that can be attained is strongly affected by so-called depolarizing resonances. Detailed experimental measurements of the polarization were made SPEAR about ten years ago, but due to lack of a suitable theory only a limited theoretical fit to the data has so far been achieved. The author presents a general formalism for calculating depolarizing resonances, which has been coded into a computer program called SMILE, and use it to fit the SPEAR data. By the use of suitable approximations, the author is able to fit both higher order and nonlinear resonances, and thereby to interpret many hitherto unexplained features in the data, and to resolve a puzzle concerning the asymmetry of certain resonance widths seen in the data. 18 refs., 2 figs

  2. Radiative polarization in high-energy storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mane, S.R.

    1989-03-01

    Electron and positron beams circulating in high-energy storage rings become spontaneously polarized by the emission of synchrotron radiation. The asymptotic degree of polarization that can be attained is strongly affected by so-called depolarizing resonances. Detailed experimental measurements of the polarization were made SPEAR about ten years ago, but due to lack of a suitable theory only a limited theoretical fit to the data has so far been achieved. I present a general formalism for calculating depolarizing resonances, which as been coded into a computer program called SMILE, and use it to fit the SPEAR data. By the use of suitable approximations, I am able to fit both higher order and nonlinear resonances, and thereby to interpret many hitherto unexplained features in the data, and to resolve a puzzle concerning the asymmetry of certain resonance widths seen in the data. 18 refs., 2 figs

  3. Interaction of Repetitively Pulsed High Energy Laser Radiation With Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, Manfred

    1986-10-01

    The paper is concerned with laser target interaction processes involving new methods of improving the overall energy balance. As expected theoretically, this can be achieved with high repetition rate pulsed lasers even for initially highly reflecting materials, such as metals. Experiments were performed by using a pulsed CO2 laser at mean powers up to 2 kW and repetition rates up to 100 Hz. The rates of temperature rise of aluminium for example were thereby increased by lore than a factor of 3 as compared to cw-radiation of comparable power density. Similar improvements were found for the overall absorptivities that were increased by this method by more than an order of magnitude.

  4. A Remote Sensing Analysis on the Spatiotemporal Variation of Land Surface Albedo and Emissivity in South Florida: An Implication for Surface-Atmosphere Energy and Water Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, H. P.; Melesse, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Land use /land cover has wide range of impacts from surface energy budget to radiative forcing of climate change. This study aims to analyze the variation in two radiative properties, albedo and emissivity in South Florida landscape to investigate how radially distinct surfaces lead to a energy and moisture contrast on the near-surface atmosphere and eventually to surface-induced climate. Maps of land surface albedo and emissivity were prepared using algorithms that convert narrow-band spectral reflectance to total short-wave albedo, and vegetation index to emissivity from Landsat -5 TM images of several different summer dates. A comparative analysis was made using the zonal statistics in ArcGIS. Relatively higher albedos were found over cultivated and developed lands (0.17 - 0.21) than in forests and herbaceous wetland (0.09 - 0.16). The emissivities, on the other hand, are lower for developed and drained lands. Average albedo exhibits a slight increase whereas emissivity is found to be decreasing through time. Urban areas showing higher albedos, a unique occurrence in this landscape, store less short-wave radiation, however, their lower emissivities points to increased storage of long-wave radiation. The results imply that the emissivity perhaps play a dominant role in heat island development and initiation of local circulation in urbanized South Florida.

  5. Radiation doses by radiation diagnostics at the border of a hospital. Calculation model for Nuclear Energy Law regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.; Thijssen, T.; De Jong, R.

    2000-01-01

    According to the Nuclear Energy Law in the Netherlands radiation doses at the border of a specific institute (e.g. hospitals) must be determined which can not simply be done by measurements. In this article a model calculation for radiation diagnostics is described

  6. Surface properties of Ti-6Al-4V alloy part I: Surface roughness and apparent surface free energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yingdi; Chibowski, Emil; Szcześ, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys are the most often used implants material in dental treatment and orthopedics. Topography and wettability of its surface play important role in film formation, protein adhesion, following osseointegration and even duration of inserted implant. In this paper, we prepared Ti-6Al-4V alloy samples using different smoothing and polishing materials as well the air plasma treatment, on which contact angles of water, formamide and diiodomethane were measured. Then the apparent surface free energy was calculated using four different approaches (CAH, LWAB, O-W and Neumann's Equation of State). From LWAB approach the components of surface free energy were obtained, which shed more light on the wetting properties of samples surface. The surface roughness of the prepared samples was investigated with the help of optical profilometer and AFM. It was interesting whether the surface roughness affects the apparent surface free energy. It was found that both polar interactions the electron donor parameter of the energy and the work of water adhesion increased with decreasing roughness of the surfaces. Moreover, short time plasma treatment (1min) caused decrease in the surface hydrophilic character, while longer time (10min) treatment caused significant increase in the polar interactions and the work of water adhesion. Although Ti-6Al-4V alloy has been investigated many times, to our knowledge, so far no paper has been published in which surface roughness and changes in the surface free energy of the alloy were compared in the quantitative way in such large extent. This novel approach deliver better knowledge about the surface properties of differently smoothed and polished samples which may be helpful to facilitate cell adhesion, proliferation and mineralization. Therefore the results obtained present also potentially practical meaning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. On the pattern of CO2 radiative forcing and poleward energy transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Xia, Yan; Tan, Xiaoxiao

    2017-10-01

    A set of general circulation model experiments are conducted to analyze how the poleward energy transport (PET) is related to the spatial pattern of CO2 radiative forcing. The effects of forcing pattern are affirmed by comparing the conventional doubling CO2 experiment, in which the forcing pattern is inhomogeneous, to a set of forcing homogenization experiments, in which the top of atmosphere (TOA), surface, or atmospheric forcing distribution is homogenized respectively. In addition, we separate and compare the effects of CO2 forcing to various feedbacks on atmospheric and oceanic PETs, by using a set of radiative kernels that we have developed for both TOA and surface radiation fluxes. The results here show that both the enhancement of atmospheric PET and weakening of oceanic PET during global warming are directly driven by the meridional gradients of the CO2 forcing. Interestingly, the overall feedback effect is to reinforce the forcing effect, mainly through the cloud feedback in the case of atmospheric PET and the albedo feedback in the case of the oceanic PET. Contrary to previous studies, we find that the water vapor feedback only has a weak effect on atmospheric PET. The Arctic warming amplification, which strongly affects atmospheric PET, is sensitive to the CO2 forcing pattern.

  8. Energy dependence of radiation interaction parameters of some organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohinder; Tondon, Akash; Sandhu, B. S.; Singh, Bhajan

    2018-04-01

    Gamma rays interact with a material through photoelectric absorption, Compton scattering, Rayleigh scattering and Pair production in the intermediate energy range. The probability of occurrence of a particular type of process depends on the energy of incident gamma rays, atomic number of the material, scattering angle and geometrical conditions. Various radiological parameters for organic compounds, namely ethylene glycol (C2H6O2), propylene glycol (C3H8O2), glycerin (C3H8O3), isoamyl alcohol (C5H12O), butanone (C4H8O), acetophenone (C8H8O2), cyclohexanone (C6H10O), furfural (C5H4O2), benzaldehyde (C7H6O), cinnamaldehyde (C9H8O), glutaraldehyde (C5H8O2), aniline (C6H7N), benzyl amine (C6H7N), nitrobenzene (C6H5NO2), ethyl benzene (C8H10), ethyl formate (C3H6O2) and water (H2O) are presented at 81, 122, 356 and 511 keV energies employing NaI(Tl) scintillation detector in narrow-beam transmission geometry. The radiation interaction parameters such as mass attenuation, molar extinction and mass energy absorption coefficients, half value layer, total atomic and effective electronic cross-sections and CT number have been evaluated for these organic compounds. The general trend of values of mass attenuation coefficients, half value layer, molar extinction coefficients, total atomic and effective electronic cross-sections and mass energy absorption coefficients shows a decrease with increase in incident gamma photon energy. The values of CT number are found to increases linearly with increase of effective atomic number (Zeff). The variation in CT number around Zeff ≈ 3.3 shows the peak like structure with respect to water and the correlation between CT number and linear attenuation coefficient is about 0.99. Appropriate equations are fitted to these experimentally determined parameters for the organic compounds at incident photon energy ranging from 81 keV to 511 keV used in the present study. Experimental values are compared with the theoretical data obtained using Win

  9. Evaluation of different models to estimate the global solar radiation on inclined surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demain, C.; Journée, M.; Bertrand, C.

    2012-04-01

    Global and diffuse solar radiation intensities are, in general, measured on horizontal surfaces, whereas stationary solar conversion systems (both flat plate solar collector and solar photovoltaic) are mounted on inclined surface to maximize the amount of solar radiation incident on the collector surface. Consequently, the solar radiation incident measured on a tilted surface has to be determined by converting solar radiation from horizontal surface to tilted surface of interest. This study evaluates the performance of 14 models transposing 10 minutes, hourly and daily diffuse solar irradiation from horizontal to inclined surface. Solar radiation data from 8 months (April to November 2011) which include diverse atmospheric conditions and solar altitudes, measured on the roof of the radiation tower of the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium in Uccle (Longitude 4.35°, Latitude 50.79°) were used for validation purposes. The individual model performance is assessed by an inter-comparison between the calculated and measured solar global radiation on the south-oriented surface tilted at 50.79° using statistical methods. The relative performance of the different models under different sky conditions has been studied. Comparison of the statistical errors between the different radiation models in function of the clearness index shows that some models perform better under one type of sky condition. Putting together different models acting under different sky conditions can lead to a diminution of the statistical error between global measured solar radiation and global estimated solar radiation. As models described in this paper have been developed for hourly data inputs, statistical error indexes are minimum for hourly data and increase for 10 minutes and one day frequency data.

  10. Establishing a diffuse solar radiation model for determining the optimum tilt angle of solar surfaces in Tabass, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorasanizadeh, H.; Mohammadi, K.; Mostafaeipour, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Optimum tilt angles of solar surfaces in the Iranian city of Tabass are determined. • Due to lack of measured diffuse data, a new two variables diffuse model is established. • The monthly optimum tilt varies between 0° and 64° and the best annual tilt is 32°. • The semi-yearly tilt strategy of 10° for warm and 55° for cold periods are suggested. • Radiation components obtained for horizontal, tilted and vertical surfaces are compared. - Abstract: In this study the optimum tilt angle for south-facing solar surfaces in Tabass, Iran, for the fixed monthly, seasonal, semi-yearly and yearly adjustments were calculated. Due to lack of measured diffuse solar radiation data, to predict the horizontal diffuse radiation nine diffuse models from three different categories were established. Based on some statistical indicators the three degree model, in which both clearness index and relative sunshine duration are variables, was recognized the best. The monthly optimum tilt varies from 0° in June and July up to 64° in December and the yearly optimum tilt is around 32°, which is very close to latitude of Tabass (33.36°). For different adjustments, particularly for a vertically mounted surface, the received monthly mean daily solar radiation components and the annual solar energy gains were calculated and compared. Total yearly extra solar gain for the monthly, seasonal, semi-yearly and yearly optimally adjusted surfaces compared to that of horizontal surface are 23.15%, 21.55%, 21.23% and 13.76%, respectively. The semi-yearly tilt adjustment of 10° for warm period (April–September) and 55° for cold period (October–March) is highly recommended, since it provides almost the same level of annual solar energy gain as those of monthly and seasonal adjustments

  11. A Surface Temperature Initiated Closure (STIC) for surface energy balance fluxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallick, Kaniska; Jarvis, Andrew J.; Boegh, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The use of Penman–Monteith (PM) equation in thermal remote sensing based surface energy balance modeling is not prevalent due to the unavailability of any direct method to integrate thermal data into the PM equation and due to the lack of physical models expressing the surface (or stomatal) and b...

  12. Surface energies of metals in both liquid and solid states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqra, Fathi; Ayyad, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Although during the last years one has seen a number of systematic studies of the surface energies of metals, the aim and the scientific meaning of this research is to establish a simple and a straightforward theoretical model to calculate accurately the mechanical and the thermodynamic properties of metal surfaces due to their important application in materials processes and in the understanding of a wide range of surface phenomena. Through extensive theoretical calculations of the surface tension of most of the liquid metals, we found that the fraction of broken bonds in liquid metals (f) is constant which is equal to 0.287. Using our estimated f value, the surface tension (γ m ), surface energy (γ SV ), surface excess entropy (-dγ/dT), surface excess enthalpy (H s ), coefficient of thermal expansion (α m and α b ), sound velocity (c m ) and its temperature coefficient (-dc/dT) have been calculated for more than sixty metals. The results of the calculated quantities agree well with available experimental data.

  13. Surface energies of metals in both liquid and solid states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aqra, Fathi, E-mail: fathiaqra2009@hotmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hebron University, P.O. Box 40, Hebron, West Bank, Palestine (Country Unknown); Ayyad, Ahmed [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hebron University, P.O. Box 40, Hebron, West Bank, Palestine (Country Unknown)

    2011-05-15

    Although during the last years one has seen a number of systematic studies of the surface energies of metals, the aim and the scientific meaning of this research is to establish a simple and a straightforward theoretical model to calculate accurately the mechanical and the thermodynamic properties of metal surfaces due to their important application in materials processes and in the understanding of a wide range of surface phenomena. Through extensive theoretical calculations of the surface tension of most of the liquid metals, we found that the fraction of broken bonds in liquid metals (f) is constant which is equal to 0.287. Using our estimated f value, the surface tension ({gamma}{sub m}), surface energy ({gamma}{sub SV}), surface excess entropy (-d{gamma}/dT), surface excess enthalpy (H{sub s}), coefficient of thermal expansion ({alpha}{sub m} and {alpha}{sub b}), sound velocity (c{sub m}) and its temperature coefficient (-dc/dT) have been calculated for more than sixty metals. The results of the calculated quantities agree well with available experimental data.

  14. Self-energies and the interactions of particles with surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, J.R.; Ritchie, R.H.; Echenique, P.M.; Gras-Marti, A.

    1987-01-01

    We have in this paper reviewed the method of treating many-body problems by means of an effective interaction self-energy. We have developed an alternatvie approach to the self-energy which is simpler and more straight-forward than standard methods, and we have illustrated its use with two examples of a charge interacting with a metal surface. In each case the self-energy produces the classical image potential together with corrections due to quantum mechanical effects. This method has also been successfully applied to the problem of an atom interacting with a surface. Corrections to the Van der Waals dispersion force are obtained, and via the non-conservative imaginary parts to /summation//sub i/(z) we discuss transition rates and energy exchange. 14 refs., 1 fig

  15. Near-surface climate and surface energy budget of Larsen C ice shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831891; van den Broeke, M.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643; King, J.C.; Gray, T.; Reijmer, C.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229345956

    2012-01-01

    Data collected by two automatic weather stations (AWS) on the Larsen C ice shelf, Antarctica, between 22 January 2009 and 1 February 2011 are analyzed and used as input for a model that computes the surface energy budget (SEB), which includes melt energy. The two AWSs are separated by about 70 km in

  16. Near-surface climate and surface energy budget of Larsen C ice shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.; van den Broeke, Michiel; King, J.C.; Gray, T.; Reijmer, C.H.

    2011-01-01

    Data collected by two automatic weather stations (AWS) on the Larsen C ice shelf, Antarctica, between 22 January 2009 and 1 February 2011 are analyzed and used as input for a model that computes the surface energy budget (SEB), including melt energy. The two AWSs are separated by about 70 km in the

  17. Exchange energy of inhomogenous electron gas near a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglio, L.; Tosi, M.P.; March, N.H.

    1980-12-01

    Using the first-order density matrix of an infinite-barrier model of a metal surface, the exchange energy density can be evaluated exactly as a function of distance z from the barrier. This result is compared with the local approximation -3/4e 2 (3/π)sup(1/3) rhosup(4/3)(z) where rho is the electron density in the model. The local approximation is demonstrated to be quantitatively accurate at all z. The integrated surface exchange energy is given to within 3% by the local theory. (author)

  18. He-, Ne-, and Ar-phosgene intermolecular potential energy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munteanu, Cristian R.; Henriksen, Christian; Felker, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Using the CCSD(T) model, we evaluated the intermolecular potential energy surfaces of the He-, Ne-, and Ar-phosgene complexes. We considered a representative number of intermolecular geometries for which we calculated the corresponding interaction energies with the augmented (He complex) and double......-phosgene surfaces were found to have absolute minima of -72.1, -140.4, and -326.6 cm -1 at distances between the rare-gas atom and the phosgene center of mass of 3.184, 3.254, and 3.516 Å, respectively. The potentials were further used in the evaluation of rovibrational states and the rotational constants...

  19. An adaptive interpolation scheme for molecular potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Larsson, Elisabeth; Heryudono, Alfa

    2016-08-01

    The calculation of potential energy surfaces for quantum dynamics can be a time consuming task—especially when a high level of theory for the electronic structure calculation is required. We propose an adaptive interpolation algorithm based on polyharmonic splines combined with a partition of unity approach. The adaptive node refinement allows to greatly reduce the number of sample points by employing a local error estimate. The algorithm and its scaling behavior are evaluated for a model function in 2, 3, and 4 dimensions. The developed algorithm allows for a more rapid and reliable interpolation of a potential energy surface within a given accuracy compared to the non-adaptive version.

  20. Surface free energy analysis of adsorbents used for radioiodine adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-García, C.M. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz (Spain); Román, S., E-mail: sroman@unex.es [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz (Spain); González, J.F.; Sabio, E. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz (Spain); Ledesma, B. [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Energética y de los Materiales, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz (Spain)

    2013-10-01

    In this work, the surface free energy of biomass-based activated carbons, both fresh and impregnated with triethylenediamine, has been evaluated. The contribution of Lifshitz van der Waals components was determined by the model proposed by van Oss et al. The results obtained allowed predicting the most probable configurations of the impregnant onto the carbon surface and its influence on the subsequent adsorption of radioactive methyl iodide.

  1. Calculated surface-energy anomaly in the 3d metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, M.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Mirbt, S.

    1992-01-01

    Local-spin-density theory and a Green’s-function technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method have been used to calculate the surface energy of the 3d metals. The theory explains the variation of the values derived from measurements of the surface tension of liquid metals including...... the pronounced anomaly occurring between vanadium and nickel in terms of a decrease in the d contribution caused by spin polarization....

  2. Atmospheric components of the surface energy budget over young sea ice: Results from the N-ICE2015 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, Von P.; Hudson, Stephen R.; Cohen, Lana; Murphy, Sarah Y.; Granskog, Mats A.

    2017-08-01

    The Norwegian young sea ice campaign obtained the first measurements of the surface energy budget over young, thin Arctic sea ice through the seasonal transition from winter to summer. This campaign was the first of its kind in the North Atlantic sector of the Arctic. This study describes the atmospheric and surface conditions and the radiative and turbulent heat fluxes over young, thin sea ice. The shortwave albedo of the snow surface ranged from about 0.85 in winter to 0.72-0.80 in early summer. The near-surface atmosphere was typically stable in winter, unstable in spring, and near neutral in summer once the surface skin temperature reached 0°C. The daily average radiative and turbulent heat fluxes typically sum to negative values (-40 to 0 W m-2) in winter but then transition toward positive values of up to nearly +60 W m-2 as solar radiation contributes significantly to the surface energy budget. The sensible heat flux typically ranges from +20-30 W m-2 in winter (into the surface) to negative values between 0 and -20 W m-2 in spring and summer. A winter case study highlights the significant effect of synoptic storms and demonstrates the complex interplay of wind, clouds, and heat and moisture advection on the surface energy components over sea ice in winter. A spring case study contrasts a rare period of 24 h of clear-sky conditions with typical overcast conditions and highlights the impact of clouds on the surface radiation and energy budgets over young, thin sea ice.

  3. Tantalum surface oxidation: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment, and electron polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yongling [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Bo, Maolin [Yangtze Normal University, College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Chongqing 408100 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Liu, Yonghui [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Sun, Chang Q. [NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Huang, Yongli, E-mail: huangyongli@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Graphical abstract: The bond, electron and energy relaxation result in core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Highlights: • Increasing the oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. • Electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to sp-hydrated oxygen, creating dipole moment that decreases the work function. • Oxygen chemisorption modified valence density-of-state (DOS) for Ta with four excessive DOS features: O−Ta bonding, O{sup 2−} lone pairs, Ta+ electron holes, and the lone-pair polarized Ta dipoles. • The bond, electron and energy relaxation between surface undercoordinated atoms are responsible for core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Abstract: A combination of photoelectron spectrometric analysis and density functional theory calculations has enabled reconciliation of the bond-energy-electron relaxation for the Ta(100, 110, 111) surfaces chemisorbed with oxygen at different coverages. Results show that increasing oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. Valence electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to oxygen to create four excessive DOS features in terms of O−Ta bonding, lone pairs of oxygen, Ta{sup +} electron holes, and polarized Ta dipoles. Oxidation proceeds in the following dynamics: oxygen gets electrons from two neighboring Ta atoms left behind Ta{sup +}; the sp{sup 3}-orbital hybridization takes place with additional two electron lone pairs, the lone pairs polarize the other two Ta neighbors becoming dipoles. X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis results in the 4f binding energy of an isolated Ta atom and its shift upon bond formation and oxidation. Exercises provide not only a promising numerical approach for the quantitative information about the bond and electronic behavior but also consistent

  4. Free energy surfaces in the superconducting mixed state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnemore, D. K.; Fang, M. M.; Bansal, N. P.; Farrell, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    The free energy surface for Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O1O has been measured as a function of temperature and magnetic field to determine the fundamental thermodynamic properties of the mixed state. The change in free energy, G(H)-G(O), is found to be linear in temperature over a wide range indicating that the specific heat is independent of field.

  5. Surface Passivation and Junction Formation Using Low Energy Hydrogen Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    New applications for high current, low energy hydrogen ion implants on single crystal and polycrystal silicon grain boundaries are discussed. The effects of low energy hydrogen ion beams on crystalline Si surfaces are considered. The effect of these beams on bulk defects in crystalline Si is addressed. Specific applications of H+ implants to crystalline Si processing are discussed. In all of the situations reported on, the hydrogen beams were produced using a high current Kaufman ion source.

  6. Low Energy Surface Activation of Zirconia Based Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the influence of low energy surface activation technique on the biaxial flexure strength of zirconia frameworks. Zirconia discs were prepared by cutting CAD/CAM zirconia blocks. Sintered discs were airborne particle abraded using one of the following particles: 30 μm alumina particles, 50 μm alumina particles, or modified round edges 30 μm alumina particles at low pressure. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, surface roughness, and biaxial flexure strength tests were performed (n = 20). Fractured specimens were fractographically analyzed (α = 0.05). Low energy surface activation resulted in 7% monoclinic crystallographic transformation, increasing surface roughness from 0.05 to 0.3 μm and in significant increase in biaxial flexure strength (1718 MPa) compared 30 μm (1064 MPa), 50 μm (1210 MPa), and as-sintered specimens (1150 MPa). Low energy surface activation of zirconia specimens improved the biaxial flexure strength of zirconia frameworks without creation of surface damage. Clinical implications: by controlling particle size and shape of alumina, the flexure strength of zirconia restorations could be increased usinglow pressure particle abrasion.

  7. Downscaling Satellite Land Surface Temperatures in Urban Regions for Surface Energy Balance Study and Heat Index Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; Bah, A.; Prakash, S.; Nouri, N.; Blake, R.

    2017-12-01

    A great percentage of the world's population reside in urban areas that are exposed to the threats of global and regional climate changes and associated extreme weather events. Among them, urban heat islands have significant health and economic impacts due to higher thermal gradients of impermeable surfaces in urban regions compared to their surrounding rural areas. Therefore, accurate characterization of the surface energy balance in urban regions are required to predict these extreme events. High spatial resolution Land surface temperature (LST) in the scale of street level in the cities can provide wealth of information to study surface energy balance and eventually providing a reliable heat index. In this study, we estimate high-resolution LST maps using combination of LandSat 8 and infrared based satellite products such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and newly launched Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R Series (GOES-R). Landsat 8 provides higher spatial resolution (30 m) estimates of skin temperature every 16 days. However, MODIS and GOES-R have lower spatial resolution (1km and 4km respectively) with much higher temporal resolution. Several statistical downscaling methods were investigated to provide high spatiotemporal LST maps in urban regions. The results reveal that statistical methods such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) can provide reliable estimations of LST downscaling with 2K accuracy. Other methods also were tried including aggregating (up-scaling) the high-resolution data to a coarse one to examine the limitations and to build the model. Additionally, we deployed flux towers over distinct materials such as concrete, asphalt, and rooftops in New York City to monitor the sensible and latent heat fluxes through eddy covariance method. To account for the incoming and outgoing radiation, a 4-component radiometer is used that can observe both incoming and outgoing longwave and shortwave radiation. This

  8. Shielding technology for high energy radiation production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Heon Il

    2004-06-01

    In order to develop shielding technology for high energy radiation production facility, references and data for high energy neutron shielding are searched and collected, and calculations to obtain the characteristics of neutron shield materials are performed. For the evaluation of characteristics of neutron shield material, it is chosen not only general shield materials such as concrete, polyethylene, etc., but also KAERI developed neutron shields of High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) mixed with boron compound (B 2 O 3 , H 2 BO 3 , Borax). Neutron attenuation coefficients for these materials are obtained for later use in shielding design. The effect of source shape and source angular distribution on the shielding characteristics for several shield materials is examined. This effect can contribute to create shielding concept in case of no detail source information. It is also evaluated the effect of the arrangement of shield materials using current shield materials. With these results, conceptual shielding design for PET cyclotron is performed. The shielding composite using HDPE and concrete is selected to meet the target dose rate outside the composite, and the dose evaluation is performed by configuring the facility room conceptually. From the result, the proper shield configuration for this PET cyclotron is proposed

  9. Activities of the Radiation Shielding Information Center and a report on codes/data for high energy radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussin, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    From the very early days in its history Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) has been involved with high energy radiation transport. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was an early sponsor of RSIC until the completion of the Apollo Moon Exploration Program. In addition, the intranuclear cascade work of Bertini at Oak Ridge National Laboratory provided valuable resources which were made available through RSIC. Over the years, RSIC has had interactions with many of the developers of high energy radiation transport computing technology and data libraries and has been able to collect and disseminate this technology. The current status of this technology will be reviewed and prospects for new advancements will be examined

  10. Earthquake Energy Distribution along the Earth Surface and Radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, P.; Krumm, F.; Riguzzi, F.; Doglioni, C.; Suele, B.; Wang, K.; Panza, G.F.

    2010-07-01

    The global earthquake catalog of seismic events with M W ≥ 7.0, for the time interval from 1950 to 2007, shows that the depth distribution of earthquake energy release is not uniform. The 90% of the total earthquake energy budget is dissipated in the first ∼30km, whereas most of the residual budget is radiated at the lower boundary of the transition zone (410 km - 660 km), above the upper-lower mantle boundary. The upper border of the transition zone at around 410 km of depth is not marked by significant seismic energy release. This points for a non-dominant role of the slabs in the energy budged of plate tectonics. Earthquake number and energy release, although not well correlated, when analysed with respect to the latitude, show a decrease toward the polar areas. Moreover, the radiated energy has the highest peak close to (±5 o ) the so-called tectonic equator defined by Crespi et al. (2007), which is inclined about 30 o with respect to the geographic equator. At the same time the presence of a clear axial co- ordination of the radiated seismic energy is demonstrated with maxima at latitudes close to critical (±45 o ). This speaks about the presence of external forces that influence seismicity and it is consistent with the fact that Gutenberg-Richter law is linear, for events with M>5, only when the whole Earth's seismicity is considered. These data are consistent with an astronomical control on plate tectonics, i.e., the despinning (slowing of the Earth's angular rotation) of the Earth's rotation caused primarily by the tidal friction due to the Moon. The mutual position of the shallow and ∼660 km deep earthquake energy sources along subduction zones allows us to conclude that they are connected with the same slab along the W-directed subduction zones, but they may rather be disconnected along the opposed E-NE-directed slabs, being the deep seismicity controlled by other mechanisms. (author)

  11. Decomposing Shortwave Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Variability in Terms of Surface and Atmospheric Contributions Using CERES Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, N. G.; Wong, T.; Wang, H.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's climate is determined by the exchange of radiant energy between the Sun, Earth and space. The absorbed solar radiation (ASR) fuels the climate system, providing the energy required for atmospheric and oceanic motions, while the system cools by emitting outgoing longwave (LW) radiation to space. A central objective of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is to produce a long-term global climate data record of Earth's radiation budget along with the associated atmospheric and surface properties that influence it. CERES data products utilize a number of data sources, including broadband radiometers measuring incoming and reflected solar radiation and OLR, polar orbiting and geostationary spectral imagers, meteorological, aerosol and ozone assimilation data, and snow/sea-ice maps based on microwave radiometer data. Here we use simple diagnostic model of Earth's albedo and CERES Energy Balanced and Filled (EBAF) Ed4.0 data for March 2000-February 2016 to quantify interannual variations in SW TOA flux associated with surface albedo and atmospheric reflectance and transmittance variations. Surface albedo variations account for <0.5% of the total SW TOA flux variance over the tropics and 4% globally. Variations in atmospheric reflectance and transmittance account for virtually all of the total SW TOA flux variance over the tropics and only 81% globally. The remaining 15% of the global SW TOA flux variance is explained by the co-variance of surface albedo and atmospheric reflectance/transmittance. Equatorward of 60-degree latitude, the atmospheric contribution exceeds that of the surface by at least an order-of-magnitude. In contrast, the surface and atmospheric variations contribute equally poleward of 60S and surface variations account for twice as much as the atmosphere poleward of 60N. However, as much as 40% of the total SW TOA flux variance poleward of 60N is explained by the covariance of surface albedo and atmospheric reflectance

  12. Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Microcontamination Analysis on Silicon Wafer Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaura, Norikatsu

    1997-10-01

    As dimensions in state-of-the-art CMOS devices shrink to less than 0.1 pm, even low levels of impurities on wafer surfaces can cause device degradation. Conventionally, metal contamination on wafer surfaces is measured using Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TXRF). However, commercially available TXRF systems do not have the necessary sensitivity for measuring the lower levels of contamination required to develop new CMOS technologies. In an attempt to improve the sensitivity of TXRF, this research investigates Synchrotron Radiation TXRF (SR TXRF). The advantages of SR TXRF over conventional TXRF are higher incident photon flux, energy tunability, and linear polarization. We made use of these advantages to develop an optimized SR TXRF system at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). The results of measurements show that the Minimum Detection Limits (MDLs) of SR TXRF for 3-d transition metals are typically at a level-of 3x10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2}, which is better than conventional TXRF by about a factor of 20. However, to use our SR TXRF system for practical applications, it was necessary to modify a commercially available Si (Li) detector which generates parasitic fluorescence signals. With the modified detector, we could achieve true MDLs of 3x10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} for 3-d transition metals. In addition, the analysis of Al on Si wafers is described. Al analysis is difficult because strong Si signals overlap the Al signals. In this work, the Si signals are greatly reduced by tuning the incident beam energy below the Si K edge. The results of our measurements show that the sensitivity for Al is limited by x-ray Raman scattering. Furthermore, we show the results of theoretical modeling of SR TXRF backgrounds consisting of the bremsstrahlung generated by photoelectrons, Compton scattering, and Raman scattering. To model these backgrounds, we extended conventional theoretical models by taking into account several aspects particular

  13. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  14. Energy dependence of ulrathin LiF-dosemeters for high energy electrons and high energy X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupfer, T.

    1977-02-01

    The energy dependence of ultrathin LiF-dosemeters for high energy electrons (5-40 MeV) and high energy X-radiation (6 MV, 42 MV) is experimentally determined. The experimental values are compared to values calculted earlier by other authors. The influence of the thickness of the dosemeters have been considered by comparison of experimental values for 0.03 mm thick dosemeters and theoretical values for 0.13 mm and 0.38 mm thick ones. Also different commersially available dosemeters have been compared by experiments. It is difficult to draw any other conclutions about the energy dependence than that the variation of the relative responce is within +- 3 percent (2S). However the results seems to be sulficient for clinical applications

  15. Remote sensing of global surface shortwave radiation and PAR over the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Catherine H.; Byers, Michael L.

    1992-12-01

    During the past few years many methods have been proposed for estimating surface radiative fluxes (shortwave radiation, photosynthetically active radiation - PAR) from satellite observations. We have developed algorithms for computing the shortwave radiative flux (shortwave irradiance) at the ocean surface from visible radiance observations and they have been found to be quite successful under most atmospheric and cloud conditions. For broken clouds, however, the simple plane parallel assumption for solving the radiative transfer equations may need to be corrected to account for cloud geometry. The estimation of PAR is simpler because the most commonly used satellite radiance measurements cover a similar region of the solar spectrum. We are in the process of producing global $ARDNSW and PAR as a contribution to the Sequoia 2000 project (to implement a distributed processing system designed for the needs of global change researchers). Results from our algorithms developed for Sequoia and preliminary global surface solar irradiance and PAR fields are presented and discussed.

  16. Plasma Treatment Maintains Surface Energy of the Implant Surface and Enhances Osseointegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando P. S. Guastaldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface energy of the implant surface has an impact on osseointegration. In this study, 2 surfaces: nonwashed resorbable blasting media (NWRBM; control and Ar-based nonthermal plasma 30 days (Plasma 30 days; experimental, were investigated with a focus on the surface energy. The surface energy was characterized by the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaelble method and the chemistry by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. Five adult beagle dogs received 8 implants (n=2 per surface, per tibia. After 2 weeks, the animals were euthanized, and half of the implants (n=20 were removal torqued and the other half were histologically processed (n=20. The bone-to-implant contact (BIC and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO were evaluated on the histologic sections. The XPS analysis showed peaks of C, Ca, O, and P for the control and experimental surfaces. While no significant difference was observed for BIC parameter (P>0.75, a higher level for torque (P<0.02 and BAFO parameter (P<0.01 was observed for the experimental group. The surface elemental chemistry was modified by the plasma and lasted for 30 days after treatment resulting in improved biomechanical fixation and bone formation at 2 weeks compared to the control group.

  17. Radiation Fields in High Energy Accelerators and their impact on Single Event Effects

    CERN Document Server

    García Alía, Rubén; Wrobel, Frédéric; Brugger, Markus

    Including calculation models and measurements for a variety of electronic components and their concerned radiation environments, this thesis describes the complex radiation field present in the surrounding of a high-energy hadron accelerator and assesses the risks related to it in terms of Single Event Effects (SEE). It is shown that this poses not only a serious threat to the respective operation of modern accelerators but also highlights the impact on other high-energy radiation environments such as those for ground and avionics applications. Different LHC-like radiation environments are described in terms of their hadron composition and energy spectra. They are compared with other environments relevant for electronic component operation such as the ground-level, avionics or proton belt. The main characteristic of the high-energy accelerator radiation field is its mixed nature, both in terms of hadron types and energy interval. The threat to electronics ranges from neutrons of thermal energies to GeV hadron...

  18. Potential energy surfaces for Ж = , Ne- Ba nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    112Ba nu- clei in an axially deformed relativistic mean field approach. A quadratic constraint scheme is applied to determine the complete energy surface for a wide range of the quadrupole deformation. The NL3, NL-RA1 and TM1 parameter sets ...

  19. Surface segregation energies in transition-metal alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1999-01-01

    We present a database of 24 x 24 surface segregation energies of single transition metal impurities in transition-metal hosts obtained by a Green's-function linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method in conjunction with the coherent potential and atomic sphere approximations including a multipole correction...

  20. Inelastic surface vibrations versus energy-dependent nucleus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Limitations of the static Woods–Saxon potential and the applicability of the energy- dependent Woods–Saxon potential (EDWSP) model within the framework of one-dimensional. Wong formula to explore the sub-barrier fusion data are highlighted. The inelastic surface exci- tations of the fusing nuclei are found to ...

  1. Soil heat flux and day time surface energy balance closure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soil heat flux is an important input component of surface energy balance. Estimates of soil heat flux were made in the year 2008 using soil temperature data at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south Kerala. Hourly values of soil heat flux from 00 to 24 LST are presented for selected days typical of the winter, ...

  2. Surface energy, CO2 fluxes and sea ice

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gulev, SK

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current state of observation, parameterization and evaluation of surface air-sea energy and gas fluxes, and sea ice, for the purposes of monitoring and predicting the state of the global ocean. The last 10 years have been...

  3. The evaporative fraction as a measure of surface energy partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Cuenca, R.H. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The evaporative fraction is a ratio that expresses the proportion of turbulent flux energy over land surfaces devoted to evaporation and transpiration (evapotranspiration). It has been used to characterize the energy partition over land surfaces and has potential for inferring daily energy balance information based on mid-day remote sensing measurements. The HAPEX-MOBILHY program`s SAMER system provided surface energy balance data over a range of agricultural crops and soil types. The databases from this large-scale field experiment was analyzed for the purpose of studying the behavior and daylight stability of the evaporative fraction in both ideal and general meteorological conditions. Strong linear relations were found to exist between the mid-day evaporative fraction and the daylight mean evaporative fraction. Statistical tests however rejected the hypothesis that the two quantities were equal. The relations between the evaporative fraction and the surface soil moisture as well as soil moisture in the complete vegetation root zone were also explored.

  4. The evaporative fraction as a measure of surface energy partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W.E. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Cuenca, R.H. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States))

    1990-01-01

    The evaporative fraction is a ratio that expresses the proportion of turbulent flux energy over land surfaces devoted to evaporation and transpiration (evapotranspiration). It has been used to characterize the energy partition over land surfaces and has potential for inferring daily energy balance information based on mid-day remote sensing measurements. The HAPEX-MOBILHY program's SAMER system provided surface energy balance data over a range of agricultural crops and soil types. The databases from this large-scale field experiment was analyzed for the purpose of studying the behavior and daylight stability of the evaporative fraction in both ideal and general meteorological conditions. Strong linear relations were found to exist between the mid-day evaporative fraction and the daylight mean evaporative fraction. Statistical tests however rejected the hypothesis that the two quantities were equal. The relations between the evaporative fraction and the surface soil moisture as well as soil moisture in the complete vegetation root zone were also explored.

  5. Inelastic surface vibrations versus energy-dependent nucleus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Limitations of the static Woods–Saxon potential and the applicability of the energy dependent Woods–Saxon potential (EDWSP) model within the framework of one-dimensional Wong formula to explore the sub-barrier fusion data are highlighted. The inelastic surface excitations of the fusing nuclei are found to be ...

  6. The energy balance experiment EBEX-2000. Part III: Behaviour and quality of the radiation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohsiek, W.; Liebethal, C.; Foken, T.; Vogt, R.; Oncley, S.P.; Bernhofer, C.; Debruin, H.A.R.

    2007-01-01

    An important part of the Energy Balance Experiment (EBEX-2000) was the measurement of the net radiation and its components. Since the terrain, an irrigated cotton field, could not be considered homogeneous, radiation measurements were made at nine sites using a variety of radiation instruments,

  7. Multiwavelength pyrometer for gray and non-gray surfaces in the presence of interfering radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel L. P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting the temperature of gray and non-gray bodies in the presence of interfering radiation are presented. A gray body has a constant emissivity less than 1 and a non-gray body has an emissivity which varies with wavelength. The emissivity and reflectivity of the surface is determined over a range of wavelengths. Spectra are also measured of the extraneous interference radiation source and the surface of the object to be measured in the presence of the extraneous interference radiation source. An auxiliary radiation source is used to determine the reflectivity of the surface and also the emissivity. The measured spectrum of the surfaces in the presence of the extraneous interference radiation source is set equal to the emissivity of the surface multiplied by a Planck function containing a temperature term T plus the surface reflectivity multiplied by the spectrum of the extraneous interference radiation source. The equation is then solved for T to determine the temperature of the surface.

  8. Radiation flaw detector for testing non-uniform surface bodies of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valevich, M.I.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation flaw detector for testing bodies of revolution with non-uniform surface, welded joints, etc., based on spatial filtration and differentiation of ionizing radiation flux has been described. The calculation of the most important unit of flaw detector - integrators - is made. Experimental studies of the sensitivity have shown, that the radiation flaw detector can be used for rapid testing of products with the sensitivity comparable with the sensitivity of radiographic testing of steel

  9. Energy loss of light ions scattered off Al(110) single crystal surfaces at low energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausmann, S; Hofner, C; Schlathölter, Thomas; Franke, H; Narmann, A; Heiland, W

    We present energy loss data taken after grazing incidence scattering of H+, H-0, He2+, He+, and He-0 off an Al(110) surface, The data is evaluated by means of a procedure that allows to extract surface electron density parameters. The obtained density parameters will be compared to those obtained

  10. Exploring the free energy surfaces of clusters using reconnaissance metadynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribello, Gareth A.; Cuny, Jérôme; Eshet, Hagai; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-09-01

    A new approach is proposed for exploring the low-energy structures of small to medium-sized aggregates of atoms and molecules. This approach uses the recently proposed reconnaissance metadynamics method [G. A. Tribello, M. Ceriotti, and M. Parrinello. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107(41), 17509 (2010), 10.1073/pnas.1011511107] in tandem with collective variables that describe the average structure of the coordination sphere around the atoms/molecules. We demonstrate this method on both Lennard-Jones and water clusters and show how it is able to quickly find the global minimum in the potential energy surface, while exploring the finite temperature free energy surface.

  11. Three-dimensional potential energy surface of Ar–CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro, E-mail: y-sumiyoshi@gunma-u.ac.jp [Division of Pure and Applied Science, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 4-2 Aramaki, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8510 (Japan); Endo, Yasuki [Department of Basic Science, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2015-01-14

    A three-dimensional intermolecular potential energy surface of the Ar–CO complex has been determined by fitting most of the previously reported spectroscopic data, where observed transition frequencies by microwave, millimeter-wave, submillimeter-wave, and infrared spectroscopy were reproduced simultaneously within their experimental accuracies. A free rotor model Hamiltonian considering all the freedom of motions for an atom-diatom system was applied to calculate vibration-rotation energies. A three-dimensional potential energy surface obtained by ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T)-F12b/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory was parameterized by a model function consisting of 46 parameters. They were used as initial values for the least-squares analysis of the experimental data. A total of 20 parameters were optimized to reproduce all the spectroscopic data.

  12. Recent Advancements in the Numerical Simulation of Surface Irradiance for Solar Energy Applications: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yu; Sengupta, Manajit; Deline, Chris

    2017-06-27

    This paper briefly reviews the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's recent efforts on developing all-sky solar irradiance models for solar energy applications. The Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS) utilizes the simulation of clear-sky transmittance and reflectance and a parameterization of cloud transmittance and reflectance to rapidly compute broadband irradiances on horizontal surfaces. FARMS delivers accuracy that is comparable to the two-stream approximation, but it is approximately 1,000 times faster. A FARMS-Narrowband Irradiance over Tilted surfaces (FARMS-NIT) has been developed to compute spectral irradiances on photovoltaic (PV) panels in 2002 wavelength bands. Further, FARMS-NIT has been extended for bifacial PV panels.

  13. Low-energy ion-beam deposition apparatus equipped with surface analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Hideki; Aoki, Yasushi; Nagai, Siro.

    1994-10-01

    A sophisticated apparatus for low energy ion beam deposition (IBD) was installed at Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment of JAERI in March 1991. The apparatus is composed of an IBD system and a real time/in-situ surface analysis system for diagnosing deposited thin films. The IBD system provides various kinds of low energy ion down to 10 eV with current density of 10 μA/cm 2 and irradiation area of 15x15 mm 2 . The surface analysis system consists of RHEED, AES, ISS and SIMS. This report describes the characteristics and the operation procedure of the apparatus together with some experimental results on depositing thin carbon films. (author)

  14. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars science laboratory's curiosity rover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassler, D.M.; Zeitlin, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F.; Ehresmann, B.; Rafkin, S.; Eigenbrode, J.L.; Brinza, D.E.; Weigle, G.; Böttcher, S.; Böhm, E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Köhler, J.; Martin, C.; Reitz, G.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Kim, M.-H.; Grinspoon, D.; Bullock, M.A.; Posner, A.; Gómez-Elvira, J.; Vasavada, A.; Grotzinger, J.P.; MSL Science Team, the|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/292012217

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory’s Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose

  15. Validation of solar radiation surfaces from MODIS and reanalysis data over topographically complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd A. Schroeder; Robbie Hember; Nicholas C. Coops; Shunlin Liang

    2009-01-01

    The magnitude and distribution of incoming shortwave solar radiation (SW) has significant influence on the productive capacity of forest vegetation. Models that estimate forest productivity require accurate and spatially explicit radiation surfaces that resolve both long- and short-term temporal climatic patterns and that account for topographic variability of the land...

  16. Simulations of radiation pressure experiments narrow down the energy and momentum of light in matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethune-Waddell, Max; Chau, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Consensus on a single electrodynamic theory has yet to be reached. Discord was seeded over a century ago when Abraham and Minkowski proposed different forms of electromagnetic momentum density and has since expanded in scope with the gradual introduction of other forms of momentum and force densities. Although degenerate sets of electrodynamic postulates can be fashioned to comply with global energy and momentum conservation, hope remains to isolate a single theory based on detailed comparison between force density predictions and radiation pressure experiments. This comparison is two-fold challenging because there are just a handful of quantitative radiation pressure measurements over the past century and the solutions developed from different postulates, which consist of approximate expressions and inferential deductions, are scattered throughout the literature. For these reasons, it is appropriate to conduct a consolidated and comprehensive re-analysis of past experiments under the assumption that the momentum and energy of light in matter are degenerate. We create a combined electrodynamic/fluid dynamic simulation testbed that uses five historically significant sets of electrodynamic postulates, including those by Abraham and Minkowski, to model radiation pressure under diverse configurations with minimal assumptions. This leads to new interpretations of landmark investigations of light momentum, including the Balazs thought experiment, the Jones–Richards and Jones–Leslie measurements of radiation pressure on submerged mirrors, observations of laser-deformed fluid surfaces, and experiments on optical trapping and tractor beaming of dielectric particles. We discuss the merits and demerits of each set of postulates when compared to available experimental evidence and fundamental conservation laws. Of the five sets of postulates, the Abraham and Einstein–Laub postulates provide the greatest consistency with observations and the most physically plausible

  17. Solar radiation modeling and measurements for renewable energy applications: data and model quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Daryl R.

    2005-01-01

    Measurement and modeling of broadband and spectral terrestrial solar radiation is important for the evaluation and deployment of solar renewable energy systems. We discuss recent developments in the calibration of broadband solar radiometric instrumentation and improving broadband solar radiation measurement accuracy. An improved diffuse sky reference and radiometer calibration and characterization software for outdoor pyranometer calibrations are outlined. Several broadband solar radiation model approaches, including some developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, for estimating direct beam, total hemispherical and diffuse sky radiation are briefly reviewed. The latter include the Bird clear sky model for global, direct beam, and diffuse terrestrial solar radiation; the Direct Insolation Simulation Code (DISC) for estimating direct beam radiation from global measurements; and the METSTAT (Meteorological and Statistical) and Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) models that estimate solar radiation from meteorological data. We conclude that currently the best model uncertainties are representative of the uncertainty in measured data

  18. Quantitative evaluating the energy field of pulsed x radiation backscattered in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosarev, V.D; Mukhin, V.P.

    1985-01-01

    Air background (fraction of radiation, backscattered in air) taken into account when conducting measurements using the devices with operating principle based on the dependence of backscattered γ-quanta flux density reo.istered in the given time interval (strobe) on the measured parameters is evaluated. It is shown that the energy of γ-quanta backscattered in an air layer energy of pulsed x radiation background in a strobe is defined not only by initial radiation energy and collimation angle but by the strobe location on time axis in relation to the radiated pulse as well i.e. by air layer location in space

  19. The upper bound of radiation energy in the Myers-Perry black hole collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwak, Bogeun; Lee, Bum-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the upper bound of the radiation energy in the head-on collision of two Myers-Perry black holes. Initially, the two black holes are far away from each other, and they become one black hole after the collision. We have obtained the upper bound of the radiation energy thermodynamically allowed in the process. The upper bound of the radiation energy is obtained in general dimensions. The radiation bound depends on the alignments of rotating axes for a given initial condition due to spin-spin interaction. We have found that the collision may not be occurred for a initially ultra-spinning black hole.

  20. SUNYA Regional Climate Model Simulations of East Asia Summer Monsoon: Effects of Cloud Vertical Structure on the Surface Energy Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gong and Wei-Chyung Wang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We used the State University of New York at Albany (SUNYA regional climate model to study the effect of cloud vertical distribution in affecting the surface energy balance of the East Asia summer monsoon (EASM. Simulations were conducted for the summers of 1988 and 1989, during which large contrast in the intra-seasonal cloud radiative forcing (CRF was observed at the top of the atmosphere. The model results indicate that both the high and low clouds are persistent throughout the summer months in both years. Because of large cloud water, low clouds significantly reduce the solar radiation flux reaching the surface, which nevertheless still dominate the surface energy balance, accounting for more than 50% of the surface heating. The low clouds also contribute significantly the downward longwave radiation to the surface with values strongly dependent on the cloud base temperature. The presence of low clouds effectively decreases the temperature and moisture gradients near surface, resulting in a substantial decrease in the sensible and latent heat fluxes from surface, which partially compensate the decrease of the net radiative cooling of the surface. For example, in the two days, May 8 and July 11 of 1988, the total cloud cover of 80% is simulated, but the respective low cloud cover (water was 63% (114 gm-2 and 22% (21 gm-2. As a result, the downward solar radiation is smaller by 161 Wm-2 in May 8. On the other hand, the cloud temperature was _ lower, yielding 56 Wm-2 smaller downward longwave radiation. The near surface temperature and gradient is more than _ smaller (and moisture gradient, leading to 21 and 81 Wm-2 smaller sensible heat and latent heat fluxes. It is also demonstrated that the model is capable to reproduce the intraseasonal variation of shortwave CRF, and catches the relationship between total cloud cover and SW CRF. The model results show the dominance of high cloud on the regional mean longwave CRF and low cloud on the intra

  1. Modeling solar radiation at the Earth's surface recent advances

    CERN Document Server

    Badescu, Viorel

    2008-01-01

    Solar radiation data is important for a wide range of applications, e.g. in engineering, agriculture, health sector, and in many fields of the natural sciences. A few examples showing the diversity of applications may include: architecture and building design e.g. air conditioning and cooling systems; solar heating system design and use; solar power generation; weather and climate prediction models; evaporation and irrigation; calculation of water requirements for crops; monitoring plant growth and disease control; skin cancer research. Solar radiation data must be provided in a variety of f

  2. Rotational Energy Transfer of N2 Gas Determined Using a New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Rotational energy transfer between two N2 molecules is a fundamental process of some importance. Exchange is expected to play a role, but its importance is somewhat uncertain. Rotational energy transfer cross sections of N2 also have applications in many other fields including modeling of aerodynamic flows, laser operations, and linewidth analysis in nonintrusive laser diagnostics. A number of N2-N2 rigid rotor potential energy surface (PES) has been reported in the literature.

  3. Triangulating Nucleic Acid Conformations Using Multicolor Surface Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskowski, Ryan A; Armstrong, Rachel E; Greenbaum, Nancy L; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2016-02-23

    Optical ruler methods employing multiple fluorescent labels offer great potential for correlating distances among several sites, but are generally limited to interlabel distances under 10 nm and suffer from complications due to spectral overlap. Here we demonstrate a multicolor surface energy transfer (McSET) technique able to triangulate multiple points on a biopolymer, allowing for analysis of global structure in complex biomolecules. McSET couples the competitive energy transfer pathways of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) with gold-nanoparticle mediated Surface Energy Transfer (SET) in order to correlate systematically labeled points on the structure at distances greater than 10 nm and with reduced spectral overlap. To demonstrate the McSET method, the structures of a linear B-DNA and a more complex folded RNA ribozyme were analyzed within the McSET mathematical framework. The improved multicolor optical ruler method takes advantage of the broad spectral range and distances achievable when using a gold nanoparticle as the lowest energy acceptor. The ability to report distance information simultaneously across multiple length scales, short-range (10-50 Å), mid-range (50-150 Å), and long-range (150-350 Å), distinguishes this approach from other multicolor energy transfer methods.

  4. Nano Sensing and Energy Conversion Using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iltai (Isaac Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanophotonic technique has been attracting much attention in applications of nano-bio-chemical sensing and energy conversion of solar energy harvesting and enhanced energy transfer. One approach for nano-bio-chemical sensing is surface plasmon resonance (SPR imaging, which can detect the material properties, such as density, ion concentration, temperature, and effective refractive index in high sensitivity, label-free, and real-time under ambient conditions. Recent study shows that SPR can successfully detect the concentration variation of nanofluids during evaporation-induced self-assembly process. Spoof surface plasmon resonance based on multilayer metallo-dielectric hyperbolic metamaterials demonstrate SPR dispersion control, which can be combined with SPR imaging, to characterize high refractive index materials because of its exotic optical properties. Furthermore, nano-biophotonics could enable innovative energy conversion such as the increase of absorption and emission efficiency and the perfect absorption. Localized SPR using metal nanoparticles show highly enhanced absorption in solar energy harvesting. Three-dimensional hyperbolic metamaterial cavity nanostructure shows enhanced spontaneous emission. Recently ultrathin film perfect absorber is demonstrated with the film thickness is as low as ~1/50th of the operating wavelength using epsilon-near-zero (ENZ phenomena at the wavelength close to SPR. It is expected to provide a breakthrough in sensing and energy conversion applications using the exotic optical properties based on the nanophotonic technique.

  5. A new era in nuclear energy science. When will radiation application receive citizenship ranking along with energy utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabata, Yoneho; Tagawa, Seiichi; Saito, Naoki; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Japan has been obtaining definite results in these decades in both fields of nuclear power generation (energy utilization) and radiation application thus contributing to a sustainable development of the world. The present special issue of 'Atom Eye' introduces (1) Japanese achievements in cooperative relationships with developing countries in the field of radiation applications, (2) history of research and development of radiation-utilization techniques in Japan, (3) present status of quantum-beam applications in life-science, medial application, and nano-technology, etc, (4) applications of high-intensity neutron source, (5) cancer therapy using high-energy heavy-ion beams, (6) radiation sterilizations, (7) radiation mutations, (8) three interviewer's reports visiting several research institutes of radiation applications in Japan, and introduction of (9) a bencher enterprise and also (10) an accelerator business. (S. Ohno)

  6. Collective migration of adsorbed atoms on a solid surface in the laser radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, V V; Ignat'ev, D V; Telegin, Gennadii G

    2004-01-01

    The lateral (in the substrate plane) interaction between dipoles induced in particles adsorbed on a solid surface is studied in a comparatively weak laser radiation field with a Gaussian transverse distribution. It is shown that the particles migrate over the surface in the radial direction either outside an illuminated spot with the formation of a 'crater' or inside the spot with the formation of a 'mound'. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  7. Influence of Surface Energy Effects on Elastic Fields of a Layered Elastic Medium under Surface Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supakorn Tirapat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of a layered elastic half space under the action of axisymmetric surface loading and the influence of the surface energy effects. The boundary value problems for the bulk and the surface are formulated based on classical linear elasticity and a complete Gurtin-Murdoch constitutive relation. An analytical technique using Love’s representation and the Hankel integral transform is employed to derive an integral-form solution for both displacement and stress fields. An efficient numerical quadrature is then applied to accurately evaluate all involved integrals. Selected numerical results are presented to portray the influence of various parameters on elastic fields. Numerical results indicate that the surface stress displays a significant influence on both displacement and stress fields. It is also found that the layered half space becomes stiffer with the presence of surface stresses. In addition, unlike the classical elasticity solution, size-dependent behavior of elastic fields is noted. The present analytical solutions provide fundamental understanding of the influence of surface energy on layered elastic materials. It can also be used as a benchmark solution for the development of numerical techniques such as FEM and BEM, for analysis of more complex problems involving a layered medium under the influence of surface energy effects.

  8. The us of low-energy laser for prevention and treatment of local radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovich, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    Possibilities for usage of laser biostimulation therapy in medicine were considered. Laser radiation stimulates activity of enzymatic systems. Nucleic acid synthesis increases under the action of laser radiation (LR). Stimulation of LR was observed at tissue level. Low-energy laser therapy was used to cut short early skin radiation injuries during photon radiotherapy of tumors. Efficiency of laser radiation methods for treatment of early and delayed radiation injuries was shown. Lasers of unimpaired intensity are used for prophylaxis of radiation injuries during radiotherapy of malignant tumors

  9. Evaluations of Surface Shortwave and Longwave Radiation from Earth System Models of CMIP5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Wang, K.; Wild, M.

    2017-12-01

    Surface shortwave radiation (Rs) and longwave radiation (Ld) are the key components of energy budget in the climate system. Studies have shown that the biases of simulated clouds display significant spatial pattern, which may introduce an important spatial pattern of the biases of simulated Rs and Ld. Therefore the evaluation results of global climate model Rs and Ld simulations may depend on the location of the ground observations. In this study, comprehensive ground-based observations were used to evaluate the Rs and Ld simulations from Earth System Models (ESMs) in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). We found that CMIP5 still overestimate Rs and underestimate Ld. We also quantified the representation of ground-based observations and their uncertainties in the global estimations of Rs and Ld. After removing the biases of CMIP5 ESMs, the globally averaged Rs is estimated to be 185 W m-2 from 2000 to 2005, and the globally averaged Ld from 1992 to 2005 is estimated to be 341 W m-2.

  10. Subthreshold radiation-induced processes in the bulk and on surfaces and interfaces of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, N.

    1998-01-01

    A review is given on the processes induced under irradiation by electronic encounters and by elastic encounters below the knock-on threshold. It is pointed out that electronic encounters cause bond scission that results in defect formation and sputtering in a variety of materials. The conditions for generation of permanent radiation-induced process as a consequence of electronic encounters are critically examined. Two critical issues are localization of electronic excitation energy and energetics. Self-trapping of excitons is one way of localization; otherwise defects are involved in localization and therefore in radiation-induced processes (RIP) by electronic excitation. Arguments on energetics indicate presence of linear and nonlinear electronic process with respect to the density of excitation. The registration of energetic heavy-ion tracks is explained in terms of non-linear electronic processes. The difference in the processes in the bulk, on surfaces and at interfaces is critically discussed. The possible contribution of subthreshold elastic encounters to thermodynamically driven interface reaction is also discussed. (orig.)

  11. Energy Exchange between Weakly Ionized Gas and a Metal Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polikarpov, A. Ph.; Polikarpov, Ph. J.; Borisov, S. F.

    2008-12-01

    An attempt to describe heat exchange of low ionized gas with a metal surface has been made with the use of DSMC approach and kinetic Monte-Carlo method. Modeling is adhered to concrete experimental conditions at which thin tungsten wire is placed in plasma and dependence of a heat flow on wire surface temperature, gas pressure, gas nature and a degree of ionization is investigated. As a result of simulation temperature profiles near the wire surface for nitrogen and argon as well as dependence of relative heat flow in a gas/surface system on temperature and degree of ionization with consideration of energy accommodation have been obtained. In the case of nitrogen the chemical charge-transfer reaction is taken into account.

  12. Stellar and Extragalactic Radiation at the Earth's Surface Jean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ipi × dex (−0.4 mi). (7). We will use these formulae in estimating the stellar and extragalactic contributions. 3. Stellar radiation. We have used the data given by the CDS, Strasbourg for N = 2,552,323 stars. The data are available in tables grouping stars in magnitude intervals of m = 0.25, either in BT or VT magnitudes.

  13. Sensitivity of surface radiation budget to clouds over the Asian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cloud type variations. Using ISCCP monthly mean cloud properties, Ockert-Bell and Hartmann (1992). (hereafter referred as OH92) carried out the most extensive investigation of cloud type–radiation interaction over TOA by means of multivariable linear regression. Ringer et al (1997) made a similar study on regional scale ...

  14. Stellar and Extragalactic Radiation at the Earth's Surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Reviving a calculation made by Eddington in the 1920s, and using the most recent and comprehensive databases available on stars and galaxies, including more than 2,500,000 stars and around 20,000 galaxies we have computed their total radiation received at the Earth just outside its atmosphere.

  15. Solar Irradiance Changes And Photobiological Effects At Earth's Surface Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian; Neale, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth for decades. Although there is some direct biological damage on the surface from redistributed radiation several studies have indicated that the greatest long term threat is from ozone depletion and subsequent heightened solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It is known that organisms exposed to this irradiation experience harmful effects such as sunburn and even direct damage to DNA, proteins, or other cellular structures. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In the present work, we employed a radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light). Using biological weighting functions we have considered a wide range of effects, including: erythema and skin cancer in humans; inhibition of photosynthesis in the diatom Phaeodactylum sp. and dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans inhibition of carbon fixation in Antarctic phytoplankton; inhibition of growth of oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Otana) seedlings; and cataracts. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance, but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in

  16. Potential energy surface for ? dissociation including spin-orbit effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Matthew R.; Aquino, Adelia J. A.; de Jong, Wibe A.; Granucci, Giovanni; Hase, William L.

    2012-10-01

    Previous experiments [J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 2833 (2012)] have studied the dissociation of 1,2-diiodoethane radical cation ( ? ) and found a one-dimensional distribution of translational energy, an odd finding considering most product relative translational energy distributions are two-dimensional. The goal of this study is to obtain an accurate understanding of the potential energy surface (PES) topology for the unimolecular decomposition reaction ? → C2H4I+ + I•. This is done through comparison of many single-reference electronic structure methods, coupled-cluster single-point (energy) calculations, and multi-reference energy calculations used to quantify spin-orbit (SO) coupling effects. We find that the structure of the ? reactant has a substantial effect on the role of the SO coupling on the reaction energy. Both the BHandH and MP2 theories with an ECP/6-31++G** basis set, and without SO coupling corrections, provide accurate models for the reaction energetics. MP2 theory gives an unsymmetric structure with different C-I bond lengths, resulting in a SO energy for ? similar to that for the product I-atom and a negligible SO correction to the reaction energy. In contrast, DFT gives a symmetric structure for ? , similar to that of the neutral C2H4I2 parent, resulting in a substantial SO correction and increasing the reaction energy by 6.0-6.5 kcalmol-1. Also, we find that, for this system, coupled-cluster single-point energy calculations are inaccurate, since a small change in geometry can lead to a large change in energy.

  17. Development of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Textbooks for Elementary School Students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, E.; Choi, Y.; Yang, J.; Lee, S.

    2015-01-01

    The textbooks for elementary school students were developed to help future generations make value judgments based on appropriate information about nuclear energy and radiation. The themes and educational contents of the 13 lessons, to be delivered in one semester at elementary school level, were selected by the educational requirements of students, science teachers, and experts. The “Radiation and Life” textbook for elementary school students consists of the following chapters: – Chapter 1. What is nuclear energy and radiation?, – Chapter 2. Who discovered the nuclear energy and radiation?, – Chapter 3. Why is nuclear energy and radiation important?, – Chapter 4. Is nuclear energy and radiation dangerous?, – Chapter 5. Let’s learn about what to do when an accident occurs, – Chapter 6. How are nuclear energy and radiation used?, – Chapter 7. What is nuclear power generation?, – Chapter 8. Why is radiation used for food?, – Chapter 9. What is medical radiation?, – Chapter 10. What kind of irradiated products are in our daily lives?, – Chapter 11. What jobs are related to nuclear energy and radiation?, – Chapter 12. What are energies of future?, – Chapter 13. Concept of Talk-talk (a study review game). The general trend in recent educational curriculum development suppresses national education course organizations and authorities and expands the autonomy and authority of regions and schools. The derived textbook contents are expected to be helpful as first textbooks for the autonomous selection of education about nuclear energy and radiation for use in creative experiences developed at the school level. (author)

  18. Constraining Agricultural Irrigation Surface Energy Budget Feedbacks in Atmospheric Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufforth, M. E.; Desai, A. R.; Suyker, A.

    2017-12-01

    The expansion and modernization of irrigation increased the relevance of knowing the effects it has on regional weather and climate feedbacks. We conducted a set of observationally-constrained simulations determining the result irrigation exhibits on the surface energy budget, the atmospheric boundary layer, and regional precipitation feedbacks. Eddy covariance flux tower observations were analyzed from two irrigated and one rain-fed corn/soybean rotation sites located near Mead, Nebraska. The evaluated time period covered the summer growing months of June, July, and August (JJA) during the years when corn grew at all three sites. As a product of higher continuous surface moisture availability, the irrigated crops had significantly higher amounts of energy partitioned towards latent heating than the non-irrigated site. The daily average peak of latent heating at the rain-fed site occurred before the irrigated sites and was approximately 45 W/m2 lower. Land surface models were evaluated on their ability to reproduce these effects, including those used in numerical weather prediction and those used in agricultural carbon cycle projection. Model structure, mechanisms, and parameters that best represent irrigation-surface energy impacts will be compared and discussed.

  19. The role of surface energy fluxes in pan-Arctic snow cover changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xiaogang; Lettenmaier, Dennis P; Groisman, Pavel Ya; Dery, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    We analyze snow cover extent (SCE) trends in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) northern hemisphere weekly satellite SCE data using the Mann-Kendall trend test and find that North American and Eurasian snow cover in the pan-Arctic have declined significantly in spring and summer over the period of satellite record beginning in the early 1970s. These trends are reproduced, both in trend direction and statistical significance, in reconstructions using the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) hydrological model. We find that spring and summer surface radiative and turbulent fluxes generated in VIC have strong correlations with satellite observations of SCE. We identify the role of surface energy fluxes and determine which is most responsible for the observed spring and summer SCE recession. We find that positive trends in surface net radiation (SNR) accompany most of the SCE trends, whereas modeled latent heat (LH) and sensible heat (SH) trends associated with warming on SCE mostly cancel each other, except for North America in spring, and to a lesser extent for Eurasia in summer. In spring over North America and summer in Eurasia, the SH contribution to the observed snow cover trends is substantial. The results indicate that ΔSNR is the primary energy source and ΔSH plays a secondary role in changes of SCE. Compared with ΔSNR and ΔSH, ΔLH has a minor influence on pan-Arctic snow cover changes.

  20. Energy Fluxes above Three Disparate Surfaces in a Temperate Mesoscale Coastal Catchment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringgaard, Rasmus; Herbst, Mathias; Friborg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    , eddy-covariance systems have been installed over an agricultural field, over a spruce [Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.] plantation, and on wet grassland. Measurements started in fall 2008, and the first annual series showed large differences in evaporative response among the surfaces. The annual sum...... was about 500 mm for the wet grassland and spruce plantation, while it was about 300 mm for the irrigated agricultural site. In winter, the actual evapotranspiration rate of the grassland and the forest were much larger than the available energy evaluated from the radiation balance, while at the same time...

  1. Linking atmospheric synoptic transport, cloud phase, surface energy fluxes, and sea-ice growth: observations of midwinter SHEBA conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, P. Ola G.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Perovich, Don; Solomon, Amy

    2017-08-01

    Observations from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project are used to describe a sequence of events linking midwinter long-range advection of atmospheric heat and moisture into the Arctic Basin, formation of supercooled liquid water clouds, enhancement of net surface energy fluxes through increased downwelling longwave radiation, and reduction in near-surface conductive heat flux loss due to a warming of the surface, thereby leading to a reduction in sea-ice bottom growth. The analyses provide details of two events during Jan. 1-12, 1998, one entering the Arctic through Fram Strait and the other from northeast Siberia; winter statistics extend the results. Both deep, precipitating frontal clouds and post-frontal stratocumulus clouds impact the surface radiation and energy budget. Cloud liquid water, occurring preferentially in stratocumulus clouds extending into the base of the inversion, provides the strongest impact on surface radiation and hence modulates the surface forcing, as found previously. The observations suggest a minimum water vapor threshold, likely case dependent, for producing liquid water clouds. Through responses to the radiative forcing and surface warming, this cloud liquid water also modulates the turbulent and conductive heat fluxes, and produces a thermal wave penetrating into the sea ice. About 20-33 % of the observed variations of bottom ice growth can be directly linked to variations in surface conductive heat flux, with retarded ice growth occurring several days after these moisture plumes reduce the surface conductive heat flux. This sequence of events modulate pack-ice wintertime environmental conditions and total ice growth, and has implications for the annual sea-ice evolution, especially for the current conditions of extensive thinner ice.

  2. Artificial ocean upwelling utilizing the energy of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Artificial upwelling can bring cold water from below the thermocline to the sea surface. Vershinsky, Pshenichnyy, and Soloviev (1987) developed a prototype device, utilizing the energy of surface waves to create an upward flow of water in the tube. This is a wave-inertia pump consisting of a vertical tube, a valve, and a buoy to keep the device afloat. An outlet valve at the top of the unit synchronizes the operation of the device with surface waves and prevents back-splashing. A single device with a 100 m long and 1.2 m diameter tube is able to produce up to 1 m3s-1 flow of deep water to the surface. With a 10 oC temperature difference over 100 m depth, the negative heat supply rate to the sea surface is 42 MW, which is equivalent to a 42 Wm-2 heat flux, if distributed over 1 km2 area. Such flux is comparable to the average net air-sea flux. A system of artificial upwelling devices can cool down the sea surface, modify climate on a regional scale and possibly help mitigate hurricanes. The cold water brought from a deeper layer, however, has a larger density than the surface water and therefore has a tendency to sink back down. In this work, the efficiency of wave-inertia pumps and climatic consequences are estimated for different environmental conditions using a computational fluid dynamics model.

  3. Monte-Carlo study on primary knock-on atom energy spectrum produced by neutron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wei; Liu Yongkang; Deng Yongjun; Ma Jimin

    2012-01-01

    Computational method on energy distribution of primary knock-on atom (PKA) produced by neutron radiation was built in the paper. Based on the DBCN card in MCNP, reaction position, reaction type and energy transfer between neutrons and atoms were recorded. According to statistic of these data, energy and space distributions of PKAs were obtained. The method resolves preferably randomicity of random number and efficiency of random sampling computation. The results show small statistical fluctuation and well statistical. Three-dimensional figure of energy and space distribution of PKAs were obtained, which would be important to evaluate radiation capability of materials and study radiation damage by neutrons. (authors)

  4. High energy radiation from black holes gamma rays, cosmic rays, and neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles D

    2009-01-01

    Bright gamma-ray flares observed from sources far beyond our Milky Way Galaxy are best explained if enormous amounts of energy are liberated by black holes. The highest- energy particles in nature--the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays--cannot be confined by the Milky Way's magnetic field, and must originate from sources outside our Galaxy. Understanding these energetic radiations requires an extensive theoretical framework involving the radiation physics and strong-field gravity of black holes. In High Energy Radiation from Black Holes, Charles Dermer and Govind Menon present a systemat

  5. A Numerical Simulation for Prediction of Infrared Radiation Emitted from Plain Surfaces with Different Geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakilabadi K.A.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, infrared radiation exiting plain surfaces with different geometries is numerically simulated. Surfaces under consideration are assumed to have steady uniform heat generation inside. Moreover, the boundaries of the surfaces are considered to be at the surroundings temperature. Infrared radiation is calculated based on the temperature profile determined for the surface. The temperature profile of the surface is determined assuming the two dimensional heat conduction equations to govern the problem. The physical domain is transformed into the appropriate computational domain and the governing equation is mapped into the suitable forms in the new coordinate system of variables. After that the temperature profile of the surface is computed, the infrared radiation distribution of the surface is evaluated based on the equations given in the manuscript. The temperature profile as well as the IR images are given in the results section. It is concluded that the maximum value of infrared radiation of the surface occurs at the center. Moreover, it is concluded that among surfaces with equal areas, the one having the largest perimeter has the least value of IR at its center.

  6. Convection and surface tension profiles for aqueous droplet under microwave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Yushin; Asada, Masahiro; Asakuma, Yusuke; Honda, Itsuro; Phan, Chi; Parmar, Harisinh; Pareek, Vishnu; Evans, Geoffrey

    2014-08-01

    Application of microwave irradiation for chemical processes, such as emulsification and polymerization, has been reported [1,2]. Surfactant free emulsion can be produced with the help of microwave irradiation. Surface tension is an important property for the industrial process such as foaming/defoaming, wetting/dewetting and flotation. Similarly, the interfacial tension plays crucial role in separation and mixing process of two immiscible liquids, which are important unit operations of the fundamental chemical engineering. In practice, surface and interfacial tensions are often altered by introducing surfactants. In our previous research [3,4], specific property for surface tension of water droplet with salt under microwave radiation was found. For example, lower surface tension after the radiation was measured. The formation of nano-bubble will explain this behavior. Normally, the surface tension of aqueous solution increases with the salt concentration because cation and anion collect water molecule more strongly as a solvation. However, the exact mechanism of surface tension reduction by microwave radiation is not clear. We tried not only measurement of surface tension but also convection in the droplet during microwave radiation. This study investigates the influence of microwave on surface tension of aqueous solution. Moreover, relation between the concentration, temperature and droplet shape, which are related with surface tension.

  7. Erosive potential of energy drinks on the dentine surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Shelon C S; Bandeca, Matheus C; Silva, Carolina N; Cavassim, Rodrigo; Borges, Alvaro H; Sampaio, José E C

    2013-02-19

    Considering the current high consumption of energy drinks, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the influence of energy drinks in removing the smear layer and exposing dentinal tubules on root surface. Dentine root surfaces were exposed using a diamond bur. Forty movements of scaling were performed in the area prepared in order to create a smear layer. One hundred and thirty specimens were obtained from 35 teeth. Specimens were randomly distributed into 12 groups (n = 10) and divided into subgroups according to the application: topical (n = 5) and friction (n = 5). Twelve energy drinks were evaluated: RedBull, Burn, TNT, Flash Power, Flying Horse, Sports Drink, Ionic, Hot Power, Army Power, Gladiator and Bug. Distilled water was used as a control group. The specimens were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. Topical application: a significant influence of energy drinks on smear layer removal was found for FlyingHorse and Bug when compared with the control group. Friction application: significant smear layer removal was found for Burn, FlyingHorse, Gladiator, SportsDrinks, when compared with the control group. Comparing the different application forms, a statistically significant difference was found for Army Power. Considering the significant smear layer removal, energy drinks can be an important etiological factor for cervical dentine hypersensitivity.

  8. Full Mission Astronaut Radiation Exposure Assessments for Long Duration Lunar Surface Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Anne M.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Qualls, Garry D.; Blattnig, Steve B.; Lee, Kerry T.; Fry, Dan J.; Stoffle, Nicholas N.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Slaba, Tony C.; Walker, Steven A.; hide

    2010-01-01

    Risk to astronauts due to ionizing radiation exposure is a primary concern for missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and will drive mission architecture requirements, mission timelines, and operational practices. Both galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and solar particle event (SPE) environments pose a risk to astronauts for missions beyond LEO. The GCR environment, which is made up of protons and heavier ions covering a broad energy spectrum, is ever present but varies in intensity with the solar cycle, while SPEs are sporadic events, consisting primarily of protons moving outward through the solar system from the sun. The GCR environment is more penetrating and is more difficult to shield than SPE environments, but lacks the intensity to induce acute effects. Large SPEs are rare, but they could result in a lethal dose, if adequate shielding is not provided. For short missions, radiation risk is dominated by the possibility of a large SPE. Longer missions also require planning for large SPEs; adequate shielding must be provided and operational constraints must allow astronauts to move quickly to shielded locations. The dominant risk for longer missions, however, is GCR exposure, which accumulates over time and can lead to late effects such as cancer. SPE exposure, even low level SPE exposure received in heavily shielded locations, will increase this risk. In addition to GCR and SPE environments, the lunar neutron albedo resulting mainly from the interaction of GCRs with regolith will also contribute to astronaut risk. Full mission exposure assessments were performed for proposed long duration lunar surface mission scenarios. In order to accomplish these assessments, radiation shielding models were developed for a proposed lunar habitat and rover. End-to-End mission exposure assessments were performed by first calculating exposure rates for locations in the habitat, rover, and during extra-vehicular activities (EVA). Subsequently, total mission exposures were evaluated for

  9. Surface modifications of polypropylene by high energy carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, A.; Chakraborty, V.; Dutta, R.K.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    Polypropylene was irradiated with 12 C ions of 3.6 and 5.4 MeV energies using 3 MV tandem accelerator. The surface modification was investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Optical changes were monitored by UV-VIS and FTIR spectroscopy. At the lowest ion fluence, only blister formation of various sizes (1-6 μm) was observed. Polymer when irradiated at a fluence of 1x10 14 ions/cm 2 exhibited a network structure. A comparative study on dose dependence of surface and bulk modification has been described. (author)

  10. Effect of surface energy of solid surfaces on the micro- and macroscopic properties of adsorbed BSA and lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Indu; Pattanayek, Sudip K

    2017-07-01

    The surface energy, a macroscopic property, depends on the chemical functionality and micro- and macroscopic roughness of the surface. The adsorption of two widely used proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme on surfaces of four different chemical functionalities were done to find out the interrelation between macroscopic and microscopic properties. We have observed the secondary structure of protein after its adsorption. In addition, we observed the variation of surface energy of proteins due to variation in adsorption time, change in protein concentration and effect of a mixture of proteins. Surfaces of three different chemical functionalities namely, amine, hydroxyl and octyl were obtained through self-assembled monolayer on silica surfaces and were tested for responses towards adsorption of lysozyme and BSA. The adsorbed lysozyme has higher surface energy than the adsorbed BSA on amine and octyl surfaces. On hydroxyl functional surface, the surface energy due to the adsorbed lysozyme or BSA increases slowly with time. The surface energy of the adsorbed protein increases gradually with increasing protein concentration on hydrophobic surfaces. On hydrophilic surfaces, with increasing BSA concentration in bulk solution, the surface energy of the adsorbed protein on GPTMS and amine surfaces is maximum at 1μM concentration. During the adsorption from a mixture of BSA and lysozyme on octyl surface, first lysozyme adsorbs and subsequent BSA adsorption leads to a high surface energy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. The interaction of low energy ion beams with surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Armour, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    Four of the most important physical processes which occur during ion plating and allied techniques (1) ion-induced (and energetic-atom-induced) desorption of adsorbed impurities from the substrate surface, (2) ion penetration and entrapment in the substrate and coating, (3) ion-induced sputtering of substrate and coating atoms and (4) recoil displacement of substrate and coating atoms leading to their intermixing. The ion and energetic atom energy range of importance is from thermal energies to the order of 1keV. Current understanding of these processes, supported by discussion of available experimental data, is reviewed. (Auth.)

  12. A Predictor Analysis Framework for Surface Radiation Budget Reprocessing Using Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Patricia Allison

    Earth's Radiation Budget (ERB) is an accounting of all incoming energy from the sun and outgoing energy reflected and radiated to space by earth's surface and atmosphere. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) project produces and archives long-term datasets representative of this energy exchange system on a global scale. The data are comprised of the longwave and shortwave radiative components of the system and is algorithmically derived from satellite and atmospheric assimilation products, and acquired atmospheric data. It is stored as 3-hourly, daily, monthly/3-hourly, and monthly averages of 1° x 1° grid cells. Input parameters used by the algorithms are a key source of variability in the resulting output data sets. Sensitivity studies have been conducted to estimate the effects this variability has on the output data sets using linear techniques. This entails varying one input parameter at a time while keeping all others constant or by increasing all input parameters by equal random percentages, in effect changing input values for every cell for every three hour period and for every day in each month. This equates to almost 11 million independent changes without ever taking into consideration the interactions or dependencies among the input parameters. A more comprehensive method is proposed here for the evaluating the shortwave algorithm to identify both the input parameters and parameter interactions that most significantly affect the output data. This research utilized designed experiments that systematically and simultaneously varied all of the input parameters of the shortwave algorithm. A D-Optimal design of experiments (DOE) was chosen to accommodate the 14 types of atmospheric properties computed by the algorithm and to reduce the number of trials required by a full factorial study from millions to 128. A modified version of the algorithm was made

  13. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L; Brinza, David E; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P

    2014-01-24

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  14. Mars' Surface Radiation Environment Measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brinza, David E.; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A.; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P.; MSL Science Team; Kemppinen, Osku; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Léveillé, Richard; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Berger, Thomas; Matthia, Daniel; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Cécile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, François; Sautter, Violaine; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agnès; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Blaney, Diana; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; DeFlores, Lauren; Ehlmann, Bethany; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Fisk, Martin; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Vaniman, David; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Leshin, Laurie; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Hamilton, Victoria; Peterson, Joseph; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Clark, Benton; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Madsen, Morten Bo; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Bridges, John C.; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Newsom, Horton; Ollila, Ann; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  15. Surface and top-of-atmosphere radiative feedback kernels for CESM-CAM5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergrass, Angeline G.; Conley, Andrew; Vitt, Francis M.

    2018-02-01

    Radiative kernels at the top of the atmosphere are useful for decomposing changes in atmospheric radiative fluxes due to feedbacks from atmosphere and surface temperature, water vapor, and surface albedo. Here we describe and validate radiative kernels calculated with the large-ensemble version of CAM5, CESM1.1.2, at the top of the atmosphere and the surface. Estimates of the radiative forcing from greenhouse gases and aerosols in RCP8.5 in the CESM large-ensemble simulations are also diagnosed. As an application, feedbacks are calculated for the CESM large ensemble. The kernels are freely available at https://doi.org/10.5065/D6F47MT6" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.5065/D6F47MT6, and accompanying software can be downloaded from https://github.com/apendergrass/cam5-kernels" target="_blank">https://github.com/apendergrass/cam5-kernels.

  16. Solar irradiance changes and photobiological effects at earth's surface following astrophysical ionizing radiation events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian C; Neale, Patrick J; Snyder, Brock R

    2015-03-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in surface-level solar ultraviolet radiation. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In this work, we employed the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV) radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light) for clear-sky conditions and fixed aerosol parameter values. We also considered a wide range of biological effects on organisms ranging from humans to phytoplankton. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA-damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in very limited geographical areas; instead we found a net increase for most of the modeled time-space region. This result has implications for proposed climate changes associated with ionizing radiation events.

  17. A critical assessment of direct radiative effects of different aerosol types on surface global radiation and its components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Xiangao

    2014-01-01

    A critical assessment of direct radiative effects of different aerosol types on surface global, direct and diffuse radiation is presented. The analysis is based on measurements of aerosol optical properties and surface solar radiation (SSR) of cloud-free days at the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) and Aerosol Robotic Network station (AERONET) of Xianghe over the North China Plain between October 2004 and May 2012. Six aerosol types are classified based on aerosol size and absorption from the AERONET retrieval products, including two coarse-mode dominated aerosol types: dust (DU: fine mode fraction (FMF)<0.4) and polluted dust (PD: FMF within 0.4–0.7) and four fine-mode dominated aerosol types (FMF>0.7) but with different single scattering albedo (SSA): highly absorbing (HA: SSA<0.85), moderately absorbing (MA: SSA within 0.85–0.90), slightly absorbing (SA: SSA within 0.90–0.95) and very weakly absorbing (WA: SSA>0.95). Dramatic differences in aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE) on global SSR and its components between the six aerosol types have been revealed. ADRE efficiency on global SSR for solar zenight angle (SZA) between 55° and 65° ranges from −106 W m −2 for WA to −181 W m −2 for HA. The minimum ADRE efficiency on diffuse SSR is derived for HA aerosols, being 113 W m −2 that is about half of that by DU, the maximum value of six aerosol types. ADRE efficiency on global SSR by DU and PD (−141 to −150 W m −2 for SZA between 55° and 65°) is comparable to that by MA, although 100 W m −2 more direct SSR is extincted by DU and PD than by MA. DU and PD induce more diffuse SSR than MA that offsets larger reduction of direct SSR by DU and PD. Implications of the results to related researches are detailed discussed. The results are derived from aerosol and radiation data in the North China Plain, however the method can be used to any other stations with similar measurements. - Highlights: • A statistical method is developed to

  18. Measurements of the spectrum and energy dependence of X-ray transition radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    The results of experiments designed to test the theory of X-ray transition radiation and to verify the predicted dependence of the characteristic features of the radiation on the radiator dimensions are presented. The X-ray frequency spectrum produced by 5- to 9-GeV electrons over the range 4 to 30 keV was measured with a calibrated single-crystal Bragg spectrometer, and at frequencies up to 100 keV with an NaI scintillator. The interference pattern in the spectrum and the hardening of the radiation with increasing foil thickness are clearly observed. The energy dependence of the total transition-radiation intensity was studied using a radiator with large dimensions designed to yield energy-dependent signals at very high particle energies, up to E/mc-squared approximately equal to 100,000. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  19. Supramolecular Surface Photochemistry: Cascade Energy Transfer between Encapsulated Dyes Aligned on a Clay Nanosheet Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Takamasa; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Ramamurthy, V

    2016-03-29

    Three coumarin derivatives (7-propoxy coumarin, coumarin-480, and coumarin-540a, 2, 3, and 4, respectively) having different absorption and emission spectra were encapsulated within a water-soluble organic capsule formed by the two positively charged ammonium-functionalized cavitand octaamine (OAm, 1). Guests 2, 3, and 4 absorb in ultraviolet, violet, and blue regions and emit in violet, blue, and green regions, respectively. Energy transfer between the above three coumarin@(OAm)2 complexes assembled on the surface of a saponite clay nanosheet was investigated by steady-state and time-resolved emission techniques. Judging from their emission and excitation spectra, we concluded that the singlet-singlet energy transfer proceeded from 2 to 3, from 2 to 4, and from 3 to 4 when OAm-encapsulated 2, 3, and 4 were aligned on a clay surface as two-component systems. Under such conditions, the energy transfer efficiencies for the paths 2* to 3, 2* to 4, and 3* to 4 were calculated to be 33, 36, and 50% in two-component systems. When all three coumarins were assembled on the surface and 2 was excited, the energy transfer efficiencies for the paths 2* to 3, 2* to 4, and 3* to 4 were estimated to be 32, 34, and 33%. A comparison of energy transfer efficiencies of the two-component and three-component systems revealed that excitation of 2 leads to emission from 4. Successful merging of supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry by demonstrating novel multi-step energy transfer in a three-component dye encapsulated system on a clay surface opens up newer opportunities for exploring such systems in an artificial light-harvesting phenomenon.

  20. Low energy atomic and molecular collision with graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bercu, M.; Grecu, V. V.

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of atomic and molecular species of hydrogen with basal plane of graphite has been investigated by means of atomic cluster models of 10, 24 and 48 carbon atoms using Hartree-Fock - Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals (HF-LCAO) theory at the ab-initio and semiempirical level of approximation. The last approach was based on an original package developed for carbon clusters. Atomic migration between consecutive basal planes was described by cluster models of two sheets of carbon atoms. Our contribution presents the theoretical results about atomic and molecular interactions with graphite. It was found for H atom bonding energy the value 2.6 eV, using the largest cluster model. The migration of H atoms above the surface and between consecutive basal planes was simulated by extended calculations of potential energy in each point of a mesh containing 450 points describing a local surface of 0.25 nm 2 . A 3D interpolation approach gives the image of a hypersurface potential energy projection at a given distance to the graphite surface. The semi-quantitative results have indicated two significant facts related to atomic species migration. The first is that H atom has the smallest displacement barrier along C-C bonds at a distance of 1.3 A from the basal plane. In the case of absorbed atoms between graphite basal planes an almost free motion channel has been found parallel to the surface. The interaction potential barrier for H atom collision with graphite surface at the center of the carbon ring has been calculated neglecting surface vibration modes and found to be 5.9 eV . The hyperfine interaction between the electron of hydrogen and the proton has been taken as a measure of the interaction between the incident atom and the target local states. The isotropic hyperfine constant obtained at the level of the semiempiric calculations was found to be 402 Gs at the equilibrium position of H atom above a C atom at a distance of 1.3 A. The corresponding value

  1. Surface free energy of polypropylene and polycarbonate solidifying at different solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chibowski, Emil; Terpilowski, Konrad

    2009-01-01

    Advancing and receding contact angles of water, formamide, glycerol and diiodomethane were measured on polypropylene (PP) and polycarbonate (PC) sample surfaces which solidified at Teflon, glass or stainless steel as matrix surfaces. Then from the contact angle hystereses (CAH) the apparent free energies γ s tot of the surfaces were evaluated. The original PP surface is practically nonpolar, possessing small electron donor interaction (γ s - =1.91mJ/m 2 ), as determined from the advancing contact angles of these liquids. It may result from impurities of the polymerization process. However, it increases up to 8-10 mJ/m 2 for PP surfaces contacted with the solids. The PC surfaces both original and modified show practically the same γ s - =6.56.7mJ/m 2 . No electron acceptor interaction is found on the surfaces. The γ s tot of modified PP and PC surfaces depend on the kind of probe liquid and contacted solid surface. The modified PP γ s tot values determined from CAH of polar liquids are greater than that of original surface and they increase in the sequence: Teflon, glass, stainless steel surface, at which they solidified. No clear dependence is observed between γ s tot and dielectric constant or dipole moment of the polar probe liquids. The changes in γ s tot of the polymer surfaces are due to the polymer nature and changes in its surface structure caused by the structure and force field of the contacting solid. It has been confirmed by AFM images.

  2. Constructing ab initio and empirical potential energy surfaces for water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kain, Jacqueline Sophie

    2001-01-01

    The infrared spectrum of water is possibly one of the most well studied and yet portions of it are still poorly understood. Recently, significant advances have been made in assigning water spectra using variational nuclear calculations. The major factor determining the accuracy of ro-vibrational spectra of water is the accuracy of the underlying Potential Energy Surface. Even the most accurate ab initio Potential Energy Surface does not reproduce the Born-Oppenheimer surface to sufficient accuracy for spectroscopic studies. Furthermore, effects beyond this model such as the adiabatic correction, the relativistic correction and the non-adiabatic correction have to be considered. This thesis includes a discussion on how the relativistic correction was calculated, for the water molecule, from first-order perturbation theory. The relativistic correction improved vibrational stretching motion while making the prediction of the bending modes far worse. For rotational motion the relativistic effect had an increasing effect with increasing Ka. A further alteration to the ab initio calculations is introduced by adjusting the barrier to linearity in the water potential. This alteration to the barrier was considered in order to compensate for the lack of convergence of quantum chemical calculations of the Born-Oppenheimer surface. This barrier attempts to represent the change in the potential from linear to equilibrium. We show the improvements this has on the calculated energy levels by comparison with the HITRAN database. This then led the way to the improved spectroscopic potential presented here in this thesis. This new spectroscopic potential reduces the overall standard deviation significantly for vibrational and rotational energy levels. (author)

  3. Electronic structure, molecular bonding and potential energy surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedenberg, K. [Ames Laboratory, IA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    By virtue of the universal validity of the generalized Born-Oppenheimer separation, potential energy surfaces (PES`) represent the central conceptual as well as quantitative entities of chemical physics and provide the basis for the understanding of most physicochemical phenomena in many diverse fields. The research in this group deals with the elucidation of general properties of PES` as well as with the quantitative determination of PES` for concrete systems, in particular pertaining to reactions involving carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen molecules.

  4. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Accardo, Angelo

    2014-06-10

    Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data. 2014 International Union of Crystallography.

  5. Optical power and energy radiated by natural lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Mason G.; Krider, E. Philip

    2013-02-01

    Calibrated measurements of the visible and near-infrared radiation produced by both negative and positive cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning strokes have been made at distances of 5 to 32 km in southern Arizona (AZ) and the central Great Plains using a photodiode sensor with a flat spectral response between 0.4 and 1.0 µm. Time-correlated video images (60 fps) of the channel development provided information about the types of strokes that were detected and reports from the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network indicated their locations, polarities, and estimates of their peak current. In our sample of negative strokes that were suitable for analysis, there were 23 first (or only) strokes (FS), 19 subsequent strokes that created new ground contacts (NGC), and 101 subsequent strokes that re-illuminated a preexisting channel (PEC). We also analyzed 10 positive strokes (in nine flashes), and 73 of the larger impulses that were radiated by intracloud discharges (CPs). Assuming that these events can be approximated as isotropic sources and that the effects of atmospheric extinction are negligible, the peak optical power (Po), total optical energy (Eo), and characteristic widths of the sources (tcw = Eo/Po) have been computed. Median values of Po for negative FS, NGC, and PEC strokes were 1.8 × 1010 W, 1.1 × 1010 W, and 4.4 × 109 W, respectively. Median values of Eo were 3.6 × 106 J, 3.5 × 106 J, and 1.2 × 106 J, respectively. The median characteristic widths of negative FS, NGC, and PEC strokes were 229 µs, 244 µs, and 283 µs, respectively. Positive CG strokes produced a median Po, Eo, and tcw of 1.9 × 1010 W, 9.3 × 106 J, and 497 µs, respectively. Estimates of the space-and-time-average power per unit length (ℓo) in the lower portion of negative FS, NGC, and PEC channels had medians of 2.8 × 106 W/m, 3.2 × 106 W/m, and 1.4 × 106 W/m, respectively, and the median ℓo for four positive strokes was 8.8 × 106 W/m. Median values for the estimated peak

  6. The Effects of Great Plains Irrigation on the Surface Energy Balance, Regional Circulation, and Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Huber

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation provides a needed source of water in regions of low precipitation. Adding water to a region that would otherwise see little natural precipitation alters the partitioning of surface energy fluxes, the evolution of the planetary boundary layer, and the atmospheric transport of water vapor. The effects of irrigation are investigated in this paper through the employment of the Advanced Research (ARW Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF using a pair of simulations representing the extremes of an irrigated and non-irrigated U.S. Great Plains region. In common with previous studies, irrigation in the Great Plains alters the radiation budget by increasing latent heat flux and cooling the surface temperatures. These effects increase the net radiation at the surface, channeling that energy into additional latent heat flux, which increases convective available potential energy and provides downstream convective systems with additional energy and moisture. Most noteworthy in this study is the substantial influence of irrigation on the structure of the Great Plains Low-level Jet (GPLLJ. The simulation employing irrigation is characterized by a positive 850-mb geopotential height anomaly, a result interpreted by quasi-geostrophic theory to be a response to low-level irrigation-induced cooling. The modulation of the regional-scale height pattern associated with the GPLLJ results in weaker flow southeast of the 850-mb anomaly and stronger flow to the northwest. Increased latent heat flux in the irrigated simulation is greater than the decrease in regional transport, resulting in a net increase in atmospheric moisture and a nearly 50% increase in July precipitation downstream of irrigated regions without any change to the number of precipitation events.

  7. Reductions in soil surface albedo as a function of biochar application rate: implications for global radiative forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verheijen, Frank G A; Bastos, Ana Catarina; Keizer, Jan Jacob; Jeffery, Simon; Van der Velde, Marijn; Penížek, Vít; Beland, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Biochar can be defined as pyrolysed (charred) biomass produced for application to soils with the aim of mitigating global climate change while improving soil functions. Sustainable biochar application to soils has been estimated to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by 71–130 Pg CO 2 -C e over 100 years, indicating an important potential to mitigate climate change. However, these estimates ignored changes in soil surface reflection by the application of dark-coloured biochar. Through a laboratory experiment we show a strong tendency for soil surface albedo to decrease as a power decay function with increasing biochar application rate, depending on soil moisture content, biochar application method and land use. Surface application of biochar resulted in strong reductions in soil surface albedo even at relatively low application rates. As a first assessment of the implications for climate change mitigation of these biochar–albedo relationships, we applied a first order global energy balance model to compare negative radiative forcings (from avoided CO 2 emissions) with positive radiative forcings (from reduced soil surface albedos). For a global-scale biochar application equivalent to 120 t ha −1 , we obtained reductions in negative radiative forcings of 5 and 11% for croplands and 11 and 23% for grasslands, when incorporating biochar into the topsoil or applying it to the soil surface, respectively. For a lower global biochar application rate (equivalent to 10 t ha −1 ), these reductions amounted to 13 and 44% for croplands and 28 and 94% for grasslands. Thus, our findings revealed the importance of including changes in soil surface albedo in studies assessing the net climate change mitigation potential of biochar, and we discuss the urgent need for field studies and more detailed spatiotemporal modelling. (letter)

  8. Dose equivalent measurements in mixed and time varying radiation fields around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields behind the shielding of high-energy accelerators are a challenging task. Several radiation components (photons, neutrons, charged particles, muons, etc.), spanning a wide range of energies, contribute to the total dose equivalent. The radiation fields are produced by beam losses interacting with structural material during the acceleration or at the ejection to experimental areas or other accelerators. The particle beam is usually not continuous but separated in "bunches" or pulses, which further complicates dose measurements at high-energy accelerators. An ideal dosimeter for operational radiation protection should measure dose equivalent for any composition of radiation components in the entire energy range even when the field is strongly pulsed. The objective of this work was to find out if an ionisation chamber operated as a "recombination chamber" and a TEPC instrument using the variance-covariance method ("Sievert Instrument") are capable ...

  9. Gamma radiation fields from activity deposited on road and soil surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.

    1993-12-01

    Radioactive material deposited in the environment after an accidental release would cause exposure of the population living in the affected areas. The radiation field will depend on many factors such as radionuclide composition, surface contamination density, removal of activity by weathering and migration, and protective measures like decontamination, ploughing and covering by asphalt. Methods are described for calculation of air kerma rate from deposited activity on road and soil surfaces, both from the initially deposited activity and from activity distributed in the upper layer of soil as well as from activity covered by asphalt or soil. Air kerma rates are calculated for different source geometries and the results are fitted to a power-exponential function of photon energy, depth distributions in soil and horizontal dimensions. Based on this function calculations of air kerma rate can easily be made on a personal computer or programmable pocket calculator for specific radionuclide compositions and different horizontal and vertical distributions of the deposited activity. The calculations are compared to results from other methods like the Monte Carlo method and good agreement is found between the results. (au) (7 tabs., 12 ills., 8 refs.)

  10. Ab initio surface core-level shifts and surface segregation energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, Börje

    1993-01-01

    We have calculated the surface core-level energy shifts of the 4d and 5d transition metals by means of local-density theory and a Green’s-function technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method. Final-state effects are included by treating the core-ionized atom as an impurity located...

  11. Future projections of the Greenland ice sheet energy balance driving the surface melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Franco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, simulations at 25 km resolution are performed over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, using the regional climate model MAR forced by four RCP scenarios from three CMIP5 global circulation models (GCMs, in order to investigate the projected changes of the surface energy balance (SEB components driving the surface melt. Analysis of 2000–2100 melt anomalies compared to melt results over 1980–1999 reveals an exponential relationship of the GrIS surface melt rate simulated by MAR to the near-surface air temperature (TAS anomalies, mainly due to the surface albedo positive feedback associated with the extension of bare ice areas in summer. On the GrIS margins, the future melt anomalies are preferentially driven by stronger sensible heat fluxes, induced by enhanced warm air advection over the ice sheet. Over the central dry snow zone, the surface albedo positive feedback induced by the increase in summer melt exceeds the negative feedback of heavier snowfall for TAS anomalies higher than 4 °C. In addition to the incoming longwave flux increase associated with the atmosphere warming, GCM-forced MAR simulations project an increase of the cloud cover decreasing the ratio of the incoming shortwave versus longwave radiation and dampening the albedo feedback. However, it should be noted that this trend in the cloud cover is contrary to that simulated by ERA-Interim–forced MAR for recent climate conditions, where the observed melt increase since the 1990s seems mainly to be a consequence of more anticyclonic atmospheric conditions. Finally, no significant change is projected in the length of the melt season, which highlights the importance of solar radiation absorbed by the ice sheet surface in the melt SEB.

  12. CO dimer: new potential energy surface and rovibrational calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Richard; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2013-08-15

    The spectrum of CO dimer was investigated by solving the rovibrational Schrödinger equation on a new potential energy surface constructed from coupled-cluster ab initio points. The Schrödinger equation was solved with a Lanczos algorithm. Several 4D (rigid monomer) global ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) were made using a previously reported interpolating moving least-squares (IMLS) fitting procedure specialized to describe the interaction of two linear fragments. The potential has two nonpolar minima giving rise to a complicated set of energy level stacks, which are very sensitive to the shapes and relative depths of the two wells. Although the CO dimer has defied previous attempts at an accurate purely ab initio description our best surface yields results in good agreement with experiment. Root-mean-square (rms) fitting errors of less than 0.1 cm(-1) were obtained for each of the fits using 2226 ab initio data at different levels. This allowed direct assessment of the quality of various levels of ab initio theory for prediction of spectra. Our tests indicate that standard CCSD(T) is slow to converge the interaction energy even when sextuple zeta bases as large as ACV6Z are used. The explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12b method was found to recover significantly more correlation energy (from singles and doubles) at the CBS limit. Correlation of the core-electrons was found to be important for this system. The best PES was obtained by extrapolation of calculations at the CCSD(T)(AE)-F12b/CVnZ-F12 (n = 3,4) levels. The calculated energy levels were compared to 105 J ≤ 10 levels from experiment. The rms error for 68 levels with J ≤ 6 is only 0.29 cm(-1). The calculated energy levels were assigned stack labels using several tools. New stacks were found. One of them, stack y1, has an energy lower than many previously known stacks and may be observable.

  13. Study on the energy performance of glazing surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia MOGA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A proper thermal design of the building envelope represents an important factor for the energy economics. Glazing surfaces represent one of the important elements in the hygrothermal design activity of a building envelope. The window’s thermal performance has also a strong influence on the thermal performance of the opaque area of the wall. This fact imposed the research of the real interaction, of cooperation and of mutual influences of the characteristics between the two components of the wall of the building envelope, respectively the opaque and the glazing area. Optimal constructive details for the opaque and glazing area of the wall need to be properly designed in order to achieve the required thermal and energy performances imposed for new types of buildings, e.g. passive houses, zero energy buildings.

  14. Surface roughness control by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahad, Inam Ul; Obeidi, Muhannad Ahmed; Budner, Bogusław; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Brabazon, Dermot

    2017-10-01

    Surface roughness control of polymeric materials is often desirable in various biomedical engineering applications related to biocompatibility control, separation science and surface wettability control. In this study, Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) polymer films were irradiated with Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons in nitrogen environment and investigations were performed on surface roughness modification via EUV exposure. The samples were irradiated at 3 mm and 4 mm distance from the focal spot to investigate the effect of EUV fluence on topography. The topography of the EUV treated PET samples were studied by AFM. The detailed scanning was also performed on the sample irradiated at 3 mm. It was observed that the average surface roughness of PET samples was increased from 9 nm (pristine sample) to 280 nm and 253 nm for EUV irradiated samples. Detailed AFM studies confirmed the presence of 1.8 mm wide period U-shaped channels in EUV exposed PET samples. The walls of the channels were having FWHM of about 0.4 mm. The channels were created due to translatory movements of the sample in horizontal and transverse directions during the EUV exposure. The increased surface roughness is useful for many applications. The nanoscale channels fabricated by EUV exposure could be interesting for microfluidic applications based on lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices.

  15. Non-spherical surface wave amplitude radiation patterns identified from spectral ratios of the 2016 and 2013 DPRK nuclear tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, G. A.; Ford, S. R.; Myers, S.; Pasyanos, M.; Walter, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    The 6 January 2016, 12 February 2013 and 25 May 2009 declared nuclear explosions at the Punggye-ri test site in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) were all closely located providing an opportunity to perform differential analysis. We used spectral ratios of surface waves between 50 and 10 sec period between the co-located events to isolate relative explosion amplitude radiation patterns by the cancelation of propagation and site effects. We calculated the spectral ratios using a dense array of 72 NIED F-NET stations across Japan and all available IMS, IC and IU network stations. Analyses of Rayleigh waves indicated non-spherical radiation for the 2016 and 2013 tests relative to 2009. The 2016/2009 and 2013/2009 event pairs had ellipsoidal radiation patterns. The 2016/2009 pair had an ellipse major axis oriented 123 degrees from north and the 2013/2009 pair was oriented 33 degrees from north. This suggests that both 2016 and 2013 explosions have non-spherical radiation and also that the radiation between 2016 and 2013 were rotated by 90 degrees. This radiation pattern was strongest in the 20 and 33 sec period band but was also observed in the 10 and 50 sec band with higher scatter. We did not discern any Love wave radiation patterns but there is high scatter possibly due to a lower long-period signal to noise ratio on the horizontal relative to the vertical components. There are several possible source models that can theoretically cause non-spherical radiation, for example topography, spall damage, or tectonic release. One implication we have identified is that the radiation pattern makes it problematic for the use of surface waves in relative relocations, typically more robust for earthquakes. The amount of departure from purely spherical radiation is consistent with the 20-30% CLVD and 60-70% isotropic components estimated from regional long-period moment tensor solutions for the two explosions. This work performed under the auspices of the US

  16. Surface photo reaction processes using synchrotron radiation; Hoshako reiki ni yoru hyomenko hanno process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaizumi, Y. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute for Materials Research; Yoshigoe, A. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan); Urisu, T. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan). Institute for Molecular Science

    1997-08-20

    This paper introduces the surface photo reaction processes using synchrotron radiation, and its application. A synchrotron radiation process using soft X-rays contained in electron synchrotron radiated light as an excited light source has a possibility of high-resolution processing because of its short wave length. The radiated light can excite efficiently the electronic state of a substance, and can induce a variety of photochemical reactions. In addition, it can excite inner shell electrons efficiently. In the aspect of its application, it has been found that, if radiated light is irradiated on surfaces of solids under fluorine-based reaction gas or Cl2, the surfaces can be etched. This technology is utilized practically. With regard to radiated light excited CVD process, it may be said that anything that can be deposited by the ordinary plasma CVD process can be deposited. Its application to epitaxial crystal growth may be said a nano processing application in thickness direction, such as forming an ultra-lattice structure, the application being subjected to expectation. In micromachine fabricating technologies, a possibility is searched on application of a photo reaction process of the radiated light. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Development of a Cerenkov radiation sensor to detect low-energy beta-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Han, Ki-Tek; Shin, Sang Hun; Seo, Jeong Ki; Jeon, Dayeong; Lee, Bongsoo

    2013-11-01

    We fabricated a novel fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor using a Cerenkov radiator for measuring beta-particles. Instead of employing a scintillator, transparent liquids having various refractive indices were used as a Cerenkov radiator to serve as a sensing material. The experimental results showed that the amount of Cerenkov radiation due to the interaction with beta-particles increased as the refractive index of the Cerenkov radiator was increased as a results of a decrease of the Cerenkov threshold energy for electrons. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis of freeform refractive surfaces forming various radiation patterns using interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voznesenskaya, Anna; Mazur, Iana; Krizskiy, Pavel

    2017-09-01

    Optical freeform surfaces are very popular today in such fields as lighting systems, sensors, photovoltaic concentrators, and others. The application of such surfaces allows to obtain systems with a new quality with a reduced number of optical components to ensure high consumer characteristics: small size, weight, high optical transmittance. This article presents the methods of synthesis of refractive surface for a given source and the radiation pattern of various shapes using a computer simulation cubic spline interpolation.

  19. Surface energy budget of landfast sea ice during the transitions from winter to snowmelt and melt pond onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Else, B.G.T.; Papakyriakou, T.N.; Raddatz, R.

    2014-01-01

    Relatively few sea ice energy balance studies have successfully captured the transition season of warming, snowmelt, and melt pond formation. In this paper, we report a surface energy budget for landfast sea ice that captures this important period. The study was conducted in the Canadian Arctic......) combined with the seasonal increase in incoming shortwave radiation then triggered snowmelt onset. Melt progressed with a rapid reduction in albedo and attendant increases in shortwave energy absorption, resulting in melt pond formation 8 days later. The key role of longwave radiation in initiating melt...... onset supports past findings, and confirms the importance of clouds and water vapor associated with synoptic weather systems. However, we also observed a period of strong turbulent energy exchange associated with the passage of a cyclone. The cyclone event occurred shortly after melt pond formation...

  20. Measuring surface energy and evapotranspiration across Caribbean mangrove forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomasino, D.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Price, R.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal mangroves lose large amounts of water through evapotranspiration (ET) that can be equivalent to the amount of annual rainfall in certain years. Satellite remote sensing has been used to estimate surface energy and ET variability in many forested ecosystems, yet has been widely overlooked in mangrove forests. Using a combination of long-term datasets (30-year) acquired from the NASA Landsat 5 and 7 satellite databases, the present study investigated ET and surface energy balance variability between two mangrove forest sites in the Caribbean: 1) Everglades National Park (ENP; Florida, USA) and 2) Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve (SKBR; Quintana Roo, Mexico). A satellite-derived surface energy balance model was used to estimate ET in tall and scrub mangroves environments at ENP and SKBR. Results identified significant differences in soil heat flux measurements and ET between the tall and scrub mangrove environments. Scrub mangroves exhibited the highest soil heat flux coincident with the lowest biophysical indices (i.e., Fractional Vegetation Cover, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index) and ET rates. Mangrove damage and mortality was observed on the satellite images following strong tropical storms and associated with anthropogenic modifications and resulted in low values in spectral vegetation indices, higher soil heat flux, and higher ET. Recovery of the spectral characteristics, soil heat flux and ET was within 1-2 years following hurricane disturbance while, degradation caused by human disturbance persisted for many years. Remotely sensed ET of mangrove forests can provide estimates over a few decades and provide us with some understanding of how these environments respond to disturbances to the landscape in periods where no ground data exists or in locations that are difficult to access. Moreover, relationships between energy and water balance components developed for the coastal mangroves of Florida and Mexico could be

  1. An integrated evaluation of land surface energy fluxes over China in seven reanalysis/modeling products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyu; Fu, Congbin; Guo, Weidong

    2017-08-01

    An integrated evaluation of monthly mean land surface energy fluxes over China in seven reanalysis and land model products during the period 1979-2015 is conducted. Observations from seven field sites are used to evaluate these flux products, including four reanalysis data sets and three produced by off-line land surface models. In general, the expected seasonal variations and spatial patterns in major climatic regimes are well reproduced by all reanalysis and modeling products. However, large differences among the four reanalysis products are found, while the three off-line land surface modeling products correlate well with each other. Looking at the Bowen ratio, it is found that the off-line land surface models convert a larger fraction of surface available energy into sensible heat flux compared to the reanalysis products in all climatic regimes. There are three centers of high interannual variability in sensible heat located in West China, Northeast China, and the eastern Inner Mongolia, respectively. In addition, the sensible heat flux agrees better with observations at grassland sites than at forest sites, while the latent heat flux and net radiation are significantly overestimated at forest sites in all the flux products. Besides, mean square errors of the fluxes are decomposed into biases, correlations, and differences in standard deviation. Finally, based on a ranking system adopted to quantitatively evaluate the performance of each data set, it is found that the surface energy fluxes in ERA-Interim and JRA-25 agree well with observations and the ensemble mean of all these products remains reasonably realistic as well.

  2. Radiation of transient high-current arcs: energy measurements in the optical range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauchire, J M; Hong, D; Rabat, H; Riquel, G

    2012-01-01

    When no protection is used, the radiation emitted by a high-power electric arc can be dangerous for the eyes and the skin of a person. To ensure effective protection, it is first necessary to know the energy emitted by such arcs. The aim of our work was to experimentally determine the energy emitted by high-current (from 4 to 40 kA) transient arcs, for two different (10 cm and 2 m) lengths and for electrodes in copper or steel. These experiments enabled the radiative energy of the arcs to be quantified and also showed the influence of metal vapors in the spectral distribution of the radiation.

  3. The effects of viscosity on sound radiation near solid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morfey, C.L.; Sorokin, Sergey; Gabard, G.

    2012-01-01

    Although the acoustic analogy developed by Lighthill, Curle, and Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings for sound generation by unsteady flow past solid surfaces is formally exact, it has become accepted practice in aeroacoustics to use an approximate version in which viscous quadrupoles are neglected. Here...

  4. Trapped surfaces due to concentration of gravitational radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beig, R.; O Murchadha, N.

    1991-01-01

    Sequences of global, asympotically flat solutions to the time-symmetric initial value constraints of general relativity in vacuo are constructed which develop outer trapped surfaces for large values of the argument. Thus all such configurations must gravitationally collapse. A new proof of the positivity of mass in the strong-field regime is also found. (Authors) 22 refs

  5. Microphysics, Radiation and Surface Processes in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to test the representation of cloud processes used in climate models is to use observations together with Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs). The CRMs use more sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes, and they can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems (size about 2-200 km). The CRMs also allow explicit interaction between out-going longwave (cooling) and in-coming solar (heating) radiation with clouds. Observations can provide the initial conditions and validation for CRM results. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model, a CRM, has been developed and improved at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center over the past two decades. The GCE model has been used to understand the following: 1) water and energy cycles and their roles in the tropical climate system; 2) the vertical redistribution of ozone and trace constituents by individual clouds and well organized convective systems over various spatial scales; 3) the relationship between the vertical distribution of latent heating (phase change of water) and the large-scale (pre-storm) environment; 4) the validity of assumptions used in the representation of cloud processes in climate and global circulation models; and 5) the representation of cloud microphysical processes and their interaction with radiative forcing over tropical and midlatitude regions. Four-dimensional cloud and latent heating fields simulated from the GCE model have been provided to the TRMM Science Data and Information System (TSDIS) to develop and improve algorithms for retrieving rainfall and latent heating rates for TRMM and the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS). More than 90 referred papers using the GCE model have been published in the last two decades. Also, more than 10 national and international universities are currently using the GCE model for research and teaching. In this talk, five specific major GCE improvements: (1

  6. The Role of Surface Energy Exchange for Simulating Wind Inflow: An Evaluation of Multiple Land Surface Models in WRF for the Southern Great Plains Site Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, Sonia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Osuna, Jessica [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Newman, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Biraud, Sebastien [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to investigate choice of land surface model (LSM) on the near-surface wind profile, including heights reached by multi-megawatt wind turbines. Simulations of wind profiles and surface energy fluxes were made using five LSMs of varying degrees of sophistication in dealing with soil-plant-atmosphere feedbacks for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility in Oklahoma. Surface-flux and wind-profile measurements were available for validation. The WRF model was run for three two-week periods during which varying canopy and meteorological conditions existed. The LSMs predicted a wide range of energy-flux and wind-shear magnitudes even during the cool autumn period when we expected less variability. Simulations of energy fluxes varied in accuracy by model sophistication, whereby LSMs with very simple or no soil-plant-atmosphere feedbacks were the least accurate; however, the most complex models did not consistently produce more accurate results. Errors in wind shear also were sensitive to LSM choice and were partially related to the accuracy of energy flux data. The variability of LSM performance was relatively high, suggesting that LSM representation of energy fluxes in the WRF model remains a significant source of uncertainty for simulating wind turbine inflow conditions.

  7. High-energy electron irradiation of NdFeB permanent magnets: Dependence of radiation damage on the electron energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizen, Teruhiko [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)]. E-mail: bizen@spring8.or.jp; Asano, Yoshihiro [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Marechal, Xavier-Marie [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Seike, Takamitsu [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Aoki, Tsuyoshi [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fukami, Kenji [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hosoda, Naoyasu [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yonehara, Hiroto [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takagi, Tetsuya [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hara, Toru [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Tanaka, Takashi [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kitamura, Hideo [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2007-05-11

    High-energy electron-beam bombardment of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-type permanent magnets induces radiation damage characterized by a drop in the magnetic field. Experiments carried out at the SPring-8 booster synchrotron, with 4, 6, and 8 GeV electrons, show that the drop in magnetic field is energy dependent. Electromagnetic shower simulations suggest that most of the radiation damage happens in a small region around the irradiation axis, and that the contribution of neutrons with large scattering angles or with low energies to the magnetic field change is small.

  8. Energy density and energy flow of surface waves in a strongly magnetized graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2018-01-01

    General expressions for the energy density and energy flow of plasmonic waves in a two-dimensional massless electron gas (as a simple model of graphene) are obtained by means of the linearized magneto-hydrodynamic model and classical electromagnetic theory when a strong external magnetic field perpendicular to the system is present. Also, analytical expressions for the energy velocity, wave polarization, wave impedance, transverse and longitudinal field strength functions, and attenuation length of surface magneto-plasmon-polariton waves are derived, and numerical results are prepared.

  9. A model to calculate solar radiation fluxes on the Martian surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente-Retortillo Álvaro

    2015-0