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Sample records for surface proteins including

  1. Efficacy of humidity retention bags for the reduced adsorption and improved cleaning of tissue proteins including prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secker, T J; Pinchin, H E; Hervé, R C; Keevil, C W

    2015-01-01

    Increasing drying time adversely affects attachment of tissue proteins and prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel, and reduces the efficacy of commercial cleaning chemistries. This study tested the efficacy of commercial humidity retention bags to reduce biofouling on surgical stainless steel and to improve subsequent cleaning. Surgical stainless steel surfaces were contaminated with ME7-infected brain homogenates and left to dry for 15 to 1,440 min either in air, in dry polythene bags or within humidity retention bags. Residual contamination pre/post cleaning was analysed using Thioflavin T/SYPRO Ruby dual staining and microscope analysis. An increase in biofouling was observed with increased drying time in air or in sealed dry bags. Humidity retention bags kept both protein and prion-associated amyloid minimal across the drying times both pre- and post-cleaning. Therefore, humidity bags demonstrate a cheap, easy to implement solution to improve surgical instrument reprocessing and to potentially reduce associated hospital acquired infections.

  2. Vibration of Piezoelectric Nanowires Including Surface Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ansari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, surface and piezoelectric effects on the vibration behavior of nanowires (NWs are investigated by using a Timoshenko beam model. The electric field equations and the governing equations of motion for the piezoelectric NWs are derived with the consideration of surface effects. By the exact solution of the governing equations, an expression for the natural frequencies of NWs with simply-supported boundary conditions is obtained. The effects of piezoelectricity and surface effects on the vibrational behavior of Timoshenko NWs are graphically illustrated. A comparison is also made between the predictions of Timoshenko beam model and those of its Euler-Bernoulli counterpart. Additionally, the present results are validated through comparison with the available data in the literature.

  3. Protein surface shielding agents in protein crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hašek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization process can be controlled by protein surface shielding agents blocking undesirable competitive adhesion modes during non-equilibrium processes of deposition of protein molecules on the surface of growing crystalline blocks. The hypothesis is based on a number of experimental proofs from diffraction experiments and also retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. The molecules adhering temporarily on the surface of protein molecules change the propensity of protein molecules to deposit on the crystal surface in a definite position and orientation. The concepts of competitive adhesion modes and protein surface shielding agents acting on the surface of molecules in a non-equilibrium process of protein crystallization provide a useful platform for the control of crystallization. The desirable goal, i.e. a transient preference of a single dominating adhesion mode between protein molecules during crystallization, leads to uniform deposition of proteins in a crystal. This condition is the most important factor for diffraction quality and thus also for the accuracy of protein structure determination. The presented hypothesis is a generalization of the experimentally well proven behaviour of hydrophilic polymers on the surface of protein molecules of other compounds

  4. Proteins at surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efimova, Y.M.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding protein adsorption is of vital importance in many fields of medicine and industry that can be divided into two categories: those in which it is desired to minimize adsorption, and those in which protein adsorption is desired. The first category covers materials for kidney dialysis

  5. [Biological properties of Lactobacillus surface proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buda, Barbara; Dylus, Ewa; Górska-Frączek, Sabina; Brzozowska, Ewa; Gamian, Andrzej

    2013-04-04

    Lactobacillus, a genus of Gram-positive bacteria, includes many strains of probiotic microflora. Probiotics, by definition, are living microorganisms that exert beneficial effects on the host organism. The morphology and physiology of the Lactobacillus bacterial genus are described. The structure of the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is discussed. The surface S-layer of Lactobacillus composed of proteins (SLP) with low molecular mass is presented. Cell surface proteins participating in the regulation of growth and survival of the intestinal epithelium cells are characterized. The influence of stress factors such as increased temperature, pH, and enzymes of gastric and pancreatic juice on SLP expression is described. The ability of binding of heavy metal ions by S-layer proteins is discussed. The characteristics of these structures, including the ability to adhere to epithelial cells, and the inhibition of invasion of pathogenic microflora of type Shigella, Salmonella, Escherichia coli and Clostridium and their toxins, are presented. 

  6. Ceramic substrate including thin film multilayer surface conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Joseph Ambrose; Peterson, Kenneth A.

    2017-05-09

    A ceramic substrate comprises a plurality of ceramic sheets, a plurality of inner conductive layers, a plurality of vias, and an upper conductive layer. The ceramic sheets are stacked one on top of another and include a top ceramic sheet. The inner conductive layers include electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of each ceramic sheet excluding the top ceramic sheet. The vias are formed in each of the ceramic sheets with each via being filled with electrically conductive material. The upper conductive layer includes electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of the top ceramic sheet. The upper conductive layer is constructed from a stack of four sublayers. A first sublayer is formed from titanium. A second sublayer is formed from copper. A third sublayer is formed from platinum. A fourth sublayer is formed from gold.

  7. Monitoring of tritium-contaminated surfaces, including skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surette, R.A.; Wood, M.J.

    1994-05-01

    We have examined various commercially available tritium surface contamination monitors along with different swipe media and techniques for direct and indirect (swipe) monitoring of contaminated surfaces, including skin. None of the methods or instruments evaluated were more sensitive than the swipe and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) method. Swipe measurements with open-window proportional counters were, in general, less than half as sensitive as LSC, but have the advantages of having the results available almost immediately, and no sample preparation is required. The Nuclear Measurement Corporation's PC-55 is the most suitable instrument we tested for the analysis of routine swipe measurement. The PC-55 was about one third as sensitive as LSC when used with Ontario Hydro filter paper swipe media. Surface contamination measurement results can be obtained within minutes using the PC-55, compared to hours using LSC. The selection of swipe media for use with proportional counter-based instruments is critical. A medium that is electrically insulating can develop an electrostatic charge on its surface; this may alter the field gradient in the detector and may adversely influence the results. Although the PC-55 is sufficiently sensitive and very convenient, operational experience with the instrument is needed before recommending that it replace current LSC methods. The PC-55's susceptibility to internal tritium contamination may limit its practical usefulness. Because of the complexity of using live animals to evaluate direct and indirect methods for assessing skin contamination, pig skin was investigated as a possible substitute. We concluded that, for the first few hours post-exposure, pig skin mimics the kinetics of animal skin that has contacted a tritium-contaminated surface. (author). 30 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  8. Exploration Technology Development including Surface Acoustic Wave RFID chips

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project is focused on maturing future surface exploration technologies and instrumentation and working towards flight instrumentation and systems to support...

  9. Characterizing the statistical properties of protein surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Ji Hyun; Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Bialek, William

    Proteins and their interactions form the body of the signaling transduction pathway in many living systems. In order to ensure the accuracy as well as the specificity of signaling, it is crucial that proteins recognize their correct interaction partners. How difficult, then, is it for a protein to discriminate its correct interaction partner(s) from the possibly large set of other proteins it may encounter in the cell? An important ingredient of recognition is shape complementarity. The ensemble of protein shapes should be constrained by the need for maintaining functional interactions while avoiding spurious ones. To address this aspect of protein recognition, we consider the ensemble of proteins in terms of the shapes of their surfaces. We take into account the high-resolution structures of E.coli non-DNA-binding cytoplasmic proteins, retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We aim to characterize the statistical properties of the protein surfaces at two levels: First, we study the intrinsic dimensionality at the level of the ensemble of the surface objects. Second, at the level of the individual surfaces, we determine the scale of shape variation. We further discuss how the dimensionality of the shape space is linked to the statistical properties of individual protein surfaces. Jhb and WB acknowledge support from National Science Foundation Grants PHY-1305525 and PHY-1521553. AFB acknowledges support from the Human Frontier Science Program.

  10. Olkiluoto surface hydrological modelling: Update 2012 including salt transport modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karvonen, T.

    2013-11-01

    Posiva Oy is responsible for implementing a final disposal program for spent nuclear fuel of its owners Teollisuuden Voima Oyj and Fortum Power and Heat Oy. The spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed at a depth of about 400-450 meters in the crystalline bedrock at the Olkiluoto site. Leakages located at or close to spent fuel repository may give rise to the upconing of deep highly saline groundwater and this is a concern with regard to the performance of the tunnel backfill material after the closure of the tunnels. Therefore a salt transport sub-model was added to the Olkiluoto surface hydrological model (SHYD). The other improvements include update of the particle tracking algorithm and possibility to estimate the influence of open drillholes in a case where overpressure in inflatable packers decreases causing a hydraulic short-circuit between hydrogeological zones HZ19 and HZ20 along the drillhole. Four new hydrogeological zones HZ056, HZ146, BFZ100 and HZ039 were added to the model. In addition, zones HZ20A and HZ20B intersect with each other in the new structure model, which influences salinity upconing caused by leakages in shafts. The aim of the modelling of long-term influence of ONKALO, shafts and repository tunnels provide computational results that can be used to suggest limits for allowed leakages. The model input data included all the existing leakages into ONKALO (35-38 l/min) and shafts in the present day conditions. The influence of shafts was computed using eight different values for total shaft leakage: 5, 11, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 l/min. The selection of the leakage criteria for shafts was influenced by the fact that upconing of saline water increases TDS-values close to the repository areas although HZ20B does not intersect any deposition tunnels. The total limit for all leakages was suggested to be 120 l/min. The limit for HZ20 zones was proposed to be 40 l/min: about 5 l/min the present day leakages to access tunnel, 25 l/min from

  11. Chloroplast Protein Turnover: The Influence of Extraplastidic Processes, Including Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Izumi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Most assimilated nutrients in the leaves of land plants are stored in chloroplasts as photosynthetic proteins, where they mediate CO2 assimilation during growth. During senescence or under suboptimal conditions, chloroplast proteins are degraded, and the amino acids released during this process are used to produce young tissues, seeds, or respiratory energy. Protein degradation machineries contribute to the quality control of chloroplasts by removing damaged proteins caused by excess energy from sunlight. Whereas previous studies revealed that chloroplasts contain several types of intraplastidic proteases that likely derived from an endosymbiosed prokaryotic ancestor of chloroplasts, recent reports have demonstrated that multiple extraplastidic pathways also contribute to chloroplast protein turnover in response to specific cues. One such pathway is autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process that leads to the vacuolar or lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic components in eukaryotic cells. Here, we describe and contrast the extraplastidic pathways that degrade chloroplasts. This review shows that diverse pathways participate in chloroplast turnover during sugar starvation, senescence, and oxidative stress. Elucidating the mechanisms that regulate these pathways will help decipher the relationship among the diverse pathways mediating chloroplast protein turnover.

  12. Interactions between whey proteins and kaolinite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, S.; Villa-Garcia, M.A.; Rendueles, M.; Diaz, M.

    2008-01-01

    The nature of the interactions between whey proteins and kaolinite surfaces was investigated by adsorption-desorption experiments at room temperature, performed at the isoelectric point (IEP) of the proteins and at pH 7. It was found that kaolinite is a strong adsorbent for proteins, reaching the maximum adsorption capacity at the IEP of each protein. At pH 7.0, the retention capacity decreased considerably. The adsorption isotherms showed typical Langmuir characteristics. X-ray diffraction data for the protein-kaolinite complexes showed that protein molecules were not intercalated in the mineral structure, but immobilized at the external surfaces and the edges of the kaolinite. Fourier transform IR results indicate the absence of hydrogen bonding between kaolinite surfaces and the polypeptide chain. The adsorption patterns appear to be related to electrostatic interactions, although steric effects should be also considered

  13. VASCo: computation and visualization of annotated protein surface contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thallinger Gerhard G

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural data from crystallographic analyses contain a vast amount of information on protein-protein contacts. Knowledge on protein-protein interactions is essential for understanding many processes in living cells. The methods to investigate these interactions range from genetics to biophysics, crystallography, bioinformatics and computer modeling. Also crystal contact information can be useful to understand biologically relevant protein oligomerisation as they rely in principle on the same physico-chemical interaction forces. Visualization of crystal and biological contact data including different surface properties can help to analyse protein-protein interactions. Results VASCo is a program package for the calculation of protein surface properties and the visualization of annotated surfaces. Special emphasis is laid on protein-protein interactions, which are calculated based on surface point distances. The same approach is used to compare surfaces of two aligned molecules. Molecular properties such as electrostatic potential or hydrophobicity are mapped onto these surface points. Molecular surfaces and the corresponding properties are calculated using well established programs integrated into the package, as well as using custom developed programs. The modular package can easily be extended to include new properties for annotation. The output of the program is most conveniently displayed in PyMOL using a custom-made plug-in. Conclusion VASCo supplements other available protein contact visualisation tools and provides additional information on biological interactions as well as on crystal contacts. The tool provides a unique feature to compare surfaces of two aligned molecules based on point distances and thereby facilitates the visualization and analysis of surface differences.

  14. Including Finite Surface Span Effects in Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finite span on the jet-surface interaction noise source and the jet mixing noise shielding and reflection effects is considered using recently acquired experimental data. First, the experimental setup and resulting data are presented with particular attention to the role of surface span on far-field noise. These effects are then included in existing empirical models that have previously assumed that all surfaces are semi-infinite. This extended abstract briefly describes the experimental setup and data leaving the empirical modeling aspects for the final paper.

  15. Metabolic behavior of cell surface biotinylated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, J.F.; Lee, E.

    1989-01-01

    The turnover of proteins on the surface of cultured mammalian cells was measured by a new approach. Reactive free amino or sulfhydryl groups on surface-accessible proteins were derivatized with biotinyl reagents and the proteins solubilized from culture dishes with detergent. Solubilized, biotinylated proteins were then adsorbed onto streptavidin-agarose, released with sodium dodecyl sulfate and mercaptoethanol, and separated on polyacrylamide gels. Biotin-epsilon-aminocaproic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (BNHS) or N-biotinoyl-N'-(maleimidohexanoyl)hydrazine (BM) were the derivatizing agents. Only 10-12 bands were adsorbed onto streptavidin-agarose from undervatized cells or from derivatized cells treated with free avidin at 4 degrees C. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing-sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis resolved greater than 100 BNHS-derivatized proteins and greater than 40 BM-derivatized proteins. There appeared to be little overlap between the two groups of derivatized proteins. Short-term pulse-chase studies showed an accumulation of label into both groups of biotinylated proteins up until 1-2 h of chase and a rapid decrease over the next 1-5 h. Delayed appearance of labeled protein at the cell surface was attributed to transit time from site of synthesis. The unexpected and unexplained rapid disappearance of pulse-labeled proteins from the cell surface was invariant for all two-dimensionally resolved proteins and was sensitive to temperature reduction to 18 degrees C. Long-term pulse-chase experiments beginning 4-8 h after the initiation of chase showed the disappearance of derivatized proteins to be a simple first-order process having a half-life of 115 h in the case of BNHS-derivatized proteins and 30 h in the case of BM-derivatized proteins

  16. Competitive Protein Adsorption - Multilayer Adsorption and Surface Induced Protein Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    and that the outcome of IgG adsorption is much more sensitive to surface characteristics than the outcome of albumin adsorption. Using high concentrations of protein solution and hydrophobic polymer surfaces during adsorption can induce IgG aggregation, which is observed as extremely high IgG adsorptions. Besides......In this study, competitive adsorption of albumin and IgG (immunoglobulin G) from human serum solutions and protein mixtures onto polymer surfaces is studied by means of radioactive labeling. By using two different radiolabels (125I and 131I), albumin and IgG adsorption to polymer surfaces...... is monitored simultaneously and the influence from the presence of other human serum proteins on albumin and IgG adsorption, as well as their mutual influence during adsorption processes, is investigated. Exploring protein adsorption by combining analysis of competitive adsorption from complex solutions...

  17. Surface protein composition of Aeromonas hydrophila strains virulent for fish: identification of a surface array protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, J.S.G.; Trust, T.J.

    1988-02-01

    The surface protein composition of members of a serogroup of Aeromonas hydrophila was examined. Immunoblotting with antiserum raised against formalinized whole cells of A. hydrophila TF7 showed a 52K S-layer protein to be the major surface protein antigen, and impermeant Sulfo-NHS-Biotin cell surface labeling showed that the 52K S-layer protein was the only protein accessible to the Sulfo-NHS-Biotin label and effectively masked underlying outer membrane (OM) proteins. In its native surface conformation the 52K S-layer protein was only weakly reactive with a lactoperoxidase /sup 125/I surface iodination procedure. A UV-induced rough lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutant of TF7 was found to produce an intact S layer, but a deep rough LPS mutant was unable to maintain an array on the cell surface and excreted the S-layer protein into the growth medium, indicating that a minimum LPS oligosaccharide size required for A. hydrophila S-layer anchoring. The native S layer was permeable to /sup 125/I in the lactoperoxidase radiolabeling procedure, and two major OM proteins of molecular weights 30,000 and 48,000 were iodinated. The 48K species was a peptidoglycan-associated, transmembrane protein which exhibited heat-modifiable SDS solubilization behavior characteristic of a porin protein. A 50K major peptidoglycan-associated OM protein which was not radiolabeled exhibited similar SDS heat modification characteristics and possibly represents a second porin protein.

  18. Surface protein composition of Aeromonas hydrophila strains virulent for fish: identification of a surface array protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, J.S.G.; Trust, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    The surface protein composition of members of a serogroup of Aeromonas hydrophila was examined. Immunoblotting with antiserum raised against formalinized whole cells of A. hydrophila TF7 showed a 52K S-layer protein to be the major surface protein antigen, and impermeant Sulfo-NHS-Biotin cell surface labeling showed that the 52K S-layer protein was the only protein accessible to the Sulfo-NHS-Biotin label and effectively masked underlying outer membrane (OM) proteins. In its native surface conformation the 52K S-layer protein was only weakly reactive with a lactoperoxidase 125 I surface iodination procedure. A UV-induced rough lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutant of TF7 was found to produce an intact S layer, but a deep rough LPS mutant was unable to maintain an array on the cell surface and excreted the S-layer protein into the growth medium, indicating that a minimum LPS oligosaccharide size required for A. hydrophila S-layer anchoring. The native S layer was permeable to 125 I in the lactoperoxidase radiolabeling procedure, and two major OM proteins of molecular weights 30,000 and 48,000 were iodinated. The 48K species was a peptidoglycan-associated, transmembrane protein which exhibited heat-modifiable SDS solubilization behavior characteristic of a porin protein. A 50K major peptidoglycan-associated OM protein which was not radiolabeled exhibited similar SDS heat modification characteristics and possibly represents a second porin protein

  19. Roughness of the globular protein surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timchenko, A.A.; Galzitskaya, O.V.; Serdyuk, I.N.

    1998-01-01

    Protein surface analysis using high resolution X ray shows that this surface has a two-level organization, on the micro- and macro-scales. On the micro-scale (2-7 Angstroem), the surface is characterized by the d = 2.1 fractal dimension which is intrinsic to surface with weak deformation and reflects the local atomic group packing. On the macro-scale the large scale surface defects are revealed which are interpreted as the result of secondary structure elements packing

  20. Potential energy surface for ? dissociation including spin-orbit effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Matthew R.; Aquino, Adelia J. A.; de Jong, Wibe A.; Granucci, Giovanni; Hase, William L.

    2012-10-01

    Previous experiments [J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 2833 (2012)] have studied the dissociation of 1,2-diiodoethane radical cation ( ? ) and found a one-dimensional distribution of translational energy, an odd finding considering most product relative translational energy distributions are two-dimensional. The goal of this study is to obtain an accurate understanding of the potential energy surface (PES) topology for the unimolecular decomposition reaction ? → C2H4I+ + I•. This is done through comparison of many single-reference electronic structure methods, coupled-cluster single-point (energy) calculations, and multi-reference energy calculations used to quantify spin-orbit (SO) coupling effects. We find that the structure of the ? reactant has a substantial effect on the role of the SO coupling on the reaction energy. Both the BHandH and MP2 theories with an ECP/6-31++G** basis set, and without SO coupling corrections, provide accurate models for the reaction energetics. MP2 theory gives an unsymmetric structure with different C-I bond lengths, resulting in a SO energy for ? similar to that for the product I-atom and a negligible SO correction to the reaction energy. In contrast, DFT gives a symmetric structure for ? , similar to that of the neutral C2H4I2 parent, resulting in a substantial SO correction and increasing the reaction energy by 6.0-6.5 kcalmol-1. Also, we find that, for this system, coupled-cluster single-point energy calculations are inaccurate, since a small change in geometry can lead to a large change in energy.

  1. Protein crystallization on polymeric film surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermani, Simona; Falini, Giuseppe; Minnucci, Massimiliano; Ripamonti, Alberto

    2001-04-01

    Polymeric films containing ionizable groups, such as sulfonated polystyrene, cross-linked gelatin films with adsorbed poly- L-lysine or entrapped poly- L-aspartate and silk fibroin with entrapped poly- L-lysine or poly- L-aspartate, have been tested as heterogeneous nucleant surfaces for proteins. Concanavalin A from jack bean and chicken egg-white lysozyme were used as models. It was found that the crystallization of concanavalin A by the vapor diffusion technique, is strongly influenced by the presence of ionizable groups on the film surface. Both the induction time and protein concentration necessary for the crystal nucleation decrease whereas the nucleation density increases on going from the reference siliconized cover slip to the uncharged polymeric surfaces and even more to the charged ones. Non-specific attractive and local interactions between the protein and the film surface might promote molecular collisions and the clustering with the due symmetry for the formation of the crystal nuclei. The results suggest that the studied polymeric film surfaces could be particularly useful for the crystallization of proteins from solutions at low starting concentration, thus using small quantities of protein, and for proteins with very long crystallization time.

  2. Proteins in solution: Fractal surfaces in solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tscheliessnig

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the surface of a protein in solution, as well of the interface between protein and 'bulk solution', is introduced. The experimental technique of small angle X-ray and neutron scattering is introduced and described briefly. Molecular dynamics simulation, as an appropriate computational tool for studying the hydration shell of proteins, is also discussed. The concept of protein surfaces with fractal dimensions is elaborated. We finish by exposing an experimental (using small angle X-ray scattering and a computer simulation case study, which are meant as demonstrations of the possibilities we have at hand for investigating the delicate interfaces that connect (and divide protein molecules and the neighboring electrolyte solution.

  3. Modulating Protein Adsorption on Oxygen Plasma Modified Polysiloxane Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marletta, G.

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper we report the study on the adsorption behaviour of three model globular proteins, Human Serum Albumin, Lactoferrin and Egg Chicken Lysozyme onto both unmodified surfaces of a silicon-based polymer and the corresponding plasma treated surfaces. In particular, thin films of hydrophobic polysiloxane (about 90 degree of static water contact angle, WCA) were converted by oxygen plasma treatment at reduced pressure into very hydrophilic phases of SiOx (WCA less than 5 degree). The kinetics of protein adsorption processes were investigated by QCM-D technique, while the chemical structure and topography of the protein adlayer have been studied by Angular resolved-XPS and AFM respectively. It turned out that Albumin and Lysozyme exhibited the opposite preferential adsorption respectively onto the hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, while Lactoferrin did not exhibit significant differences. The observed protein behaviour are discussed both in terms of surface-dependent parameters, including surface free energy and chemical structure, and in terms of protein-dependent parameters, including charge as well as the average molecular orientation in the adlayers. Finally, some examples of differential adsorption behaviour of the investigated proteins are reported onto nanopatterned polysiloxane surfaces consisting of hydrophobic nanopores surrounded by hydrophilic (plasma-treated) matrix and the reverse

  4. Arginine inhibits adsorption of proteins on polystyrene surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yui Shikiya

    Full Text Available Nonspecific adsorption of protein on solid surfaces causes a reduction of concentration as well as enzyme inactivation during purification and storage. However, there are no versatile inhibitors of the adsorption between proteins and solid surfaces at low concentrations. Therefore, we examined additives for the prevention of protein adsorption on polystyrene particles (PS particles as a commonly-used material for vessels such as disposable test tubes and microtubes. A protein solution was mixed with PS particles, and then adsorption of protein was monitored by the concentration and activity of protein in the supernatant after centrifugation. Five different proteins bound to PS particles through electrostatic, hydrophobic, and aromatic interactions, causing a decrease in protein concentration and loss of enzyme activity in the supernatant. Among the additives, including arginine hydrochloride (Arg, lysine hydrochloride, guanidine hydrochloride, NaCl, glycine, and glucose, Arg was most effective in preventing the binding of proteins to PS particles as well as activity loss. Moreover, even after the mixing of protein and PS particles, the addition of Arg caused desorption of the bound protein from PS particles. This study demonstrated a new function of Arg, which expands the potential for application of Arg to proteins.

  5. Protein-mediated surface structuring in biomembranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggio B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipids and proteins of biomembranes exhibit highly dissimilar conformations, geometrical shapes, amphipathicity, and thermodynamic properties which constrain their two-dimensional molecular packing, electrostatics, and interaction preferences. This causes inevitable development of large local tensions that frequently relax into phase or compositional immiscibility along lateral and transverse planes of the membrane. On the other hand, these effects constitute the very codes that mediate molecular and structural changes determining and controlling the possibilities for enzymatic activity, apposition and recombination in biomembranes. The presence of proteins constitutes a major perturbing factor for the membrane sculpturing both in terms of its surface topography and dynamics. We will focus on some results from our group within this context and summarize some recent evidence for the active involvement of extrinsic (myelin basic protein, integral (Folch-Lees proteolipid protein and amphitropic (c-Fos and c-Jun proteins, as well as a membrane-active amphitropic phosphohydrolytic enzyme (neutral sphingomyelinase, in the process of lateral segregation and dynamics of phase domains, sculpturing of the surface topography, and the bi-directional modulation of the membrane biochemical reactivity.

  6. Selectivity by Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Protein Interactions Can Be Driven by Protein Surface Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David K.; Karanicolas, John

    2015-01-01

    Small-molecules that inhibit interactions between specific pairs of proteins have long represented a promising avenue for therapeutic intervention in a variety of settings. Structural studies have shown that in many cases, the inhibitor-bound protein adopts a conformation that is distinct from its unbound and its protein-bound conformations. This plasticity of the protein surface presents a major challenge in predicting which members of a protein family will be inhibited by a given ligand. Here, we use biased simulations of Bcl-2-family proteins to generate ensembles of low-energy conformations that contain surface pockets suitable for small molecule binding. We find that the resulting conformational ensembles include surface pockets that mimic those observed in inhibitor-bound crystal structures. Next, we find that the ensembles generated using different members of this protein family are overlapping but distinct, and that the activity of a given compound against a particular family member (ligand selectivity) can be predicted from whether the corresponding ensemble samples a complementary surface pocket. Finally, we find that each ensemble includes certain surface pockets that are not shared by any other family member: while no inhibitors have yet been identified to take advantage of these pockets, we expect that chemical scaffolds complementing these “distinct” pockets will prove highly selective for their targets. The opportunity to achieve target selectivity within a protein family by exploiting differences in surface fluctuations represents a new paradigm that may facilitate design of family-selective small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. PMID:25706586

  7. Identification and characterization of the surface proteins of Clostridium difficile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dailey, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Several clostridial proteins were detected on the clostridial cell surface by sensitive radioiodination techniques. Two major proteins and six minor proteins comprised the radioiodinated proteins on the clostridial cell surface. Cellular fractionation of surface radiolabeled C. difficile determined that the radioiodinated proteins were found in the cell wall fraction of C. difficile and surprisingly were also present in the clostridial membrane. Furthermore, an interesting phenomenon of disulfide-crosslinking of the cell surface proteins of C. difficile was observed. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were found in both the membrane and cell wall fractions. In addition, the cell surface proteins of C. difficile were found to be released into the culture medium. In attempts to further characterize the clostridial proteins recombinant DNA techniques were employed. In addition, the role of the clostridial cell surface proteins in the interactions of C. difficile with human PMNs was also investigated.

  8. Accurate prediction of peptide binding sites on protein surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Petsalaki

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Many important protein-protein interactions are mediated by the binding of a short peptide stretch in one protein to a large globular segment in another. Recent efforts have provided hundreds of examples of new peptides binding to proteins for which a three-dimensional structure is available (either known experimentally or readily modeled but where no structure of the protein-peptide complex is known. To address this gap, we present an approach that can accurately predict peptide binding sites on protein surfaces. For peptides known to bind a particular protein, the method predicts binding sites with great accuracy, and the specificity of the approach means that it can also be used to predict whether or not a putative or predicted peptide partner will bind. We used known protein-peptide complexes to derive preferences, in the form of spatial position specific scoring matrices, which describe the binding-site environment in globular proteins for each type of amino acid in bound peptides. We then scan the surface of a putative binding protein for sites for each of the amino acids present in a peptide partner and search for combinations of high-scoring amino acid sites that satisfy constraints deduced from the peptide sequence. The method performed well in a benchmark and largely agreed with experimental data mapping binding sites for several recently discovered interactions mediated by peptides, including RG-rich proteins with SMN domains, Epstein-Barr virus LMP1 with TRADD domains, DBC1 with Sir2, and the Ago hook with Argonaute PIWI domain. The method, and associated statistics, is an excellent tool for predicting and studying binding sites for newly discovered peptides mediating critical events in biology.

  9. The Electrophoretic Mobility of Proteins near Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Perumal; Singh, Avtar; Rafailovich, Miriam; Sokolov, Jonathan

    2004-03-01

    We have attempted to apply the methods developed for surface DNA electrophoresis (1) for proteomics. Droplets of FITC stained Abumin, Poly- L-Lysine, or Casein purchased from Sigma were deposited on glass cover slips. The droplets were then place in contact with a TBE buffer solution contained in a cell molded from PDMS. Pt electrodes were inserted into the cell and a voltage was a applied. The motion of the protein was then imaged with a Leica Confocal microscope as a function of buffer concentration, distance from the surface, and applied voltage. The mobilities were then compared with those of uncharged one micron florescent Polystyrene beads. References: 1)Henzel WJ, Watanabe C, Stults JT., !0 Protein Identification: The Origins of Peptide Mass Fingerprinting. !1 J. American Society for Mass Spectrometry. 14 (September 2003): 931-942 2)Mathesius U, Imin N, Natera SH, Rolfe BG., !0 Proteomics as a functional genomics tool. !1 Methods of Molecular Biology 236: 395-414. *Work supported in part by the NSF-MRSEC program

  10. Preventing protein adsorption from a range of surfaces using an aqueous fish protein extract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pillai, Saju; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Meyer, Rikke L.

    2009-01-01

    We utilize an aqueous extract of fish proteins (FPs) as a coating for minimizing the adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg) and human serum albumin (HSA). The surfaces include stainless steel (SS), gold (Au), silicon dioxide (SiO2), and poly(styrene) (PS). The adsorption processes (kinetics and adsorbed...

  11. In vitro study of proteins surface activity by tritium probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernysheva, M.G.; Badun, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    A new technique for in vitro studies of biomacromolecules interactions, their adsorption at aqueous/organic liquid interfaces and distribution in the bulk of liquid/liquid systems was developed. The method includes (1) tritium labeling of biomolecules by tritium thermal activation method and (2) scintillation phase step with organic phase, which can be concerned as a model of cellular membrane. Two globular proteins lysozyme and human serum albumin tested. We have determined the conditions of tritium labeling when labeled by-products can be easy separated by means of dialysis and size-exclusion chromatography. Scintillation phase experiments were conducted for three types of organic liquids. Thus, the influences of the nature of organic phase on proteins adsorption and its distribution in the bulk of aqueous/organic liquid system were determined. It was found that proteins possess high surface activity at aqueous/organic liquid interface. Furthermore, values of hydrophobicity of globular proteins were found by the experiment. (author)

  12. Surface display of proteins by Gram-negative bacterial autotransporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourez Michael

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Expressing proteins of interest as fusions to proteins of the bacterial envelope is a powerful technique with many biotechnological and medical applications. Autotransporters have recently emerged as a good tool for bacterial surface display. These proteins are composed of an N-terminal signal peptide, followed by a passenger domain and a translocator domain that mediates the outer membrane translocation of the passenger. The natural passenger domain of autotransporters can be replaced by heterologous proteins that become displayed at the bacterial surface by the translocator domain. The simplicity and versatility of this system has made it very attractive and it has been used to display functional enzymes, vaccine antigens as well as polypeptides libraries. The recent advances in the study of the translocation mechanism of autotransporters have raised several controversial issues with implications for their use as display systems. These issues include the requirement for the displayed polypeptides to remain in a translocation-competent state in the periplasm, the requirement for specific signal sequences and "autochaperone" domains, and the influence of the genetic background of the expression host strain. It is therefore important to better understand the mechanism of translocation of autotransporters in order to employ them to their full potential. This review will focus on the recent advances in the study of the translocation mechanism of autotransporters and describe practical considerations regarding their use for bacterial surface display.

  13. Nonlocal continuum-based modeling of breathing mode of nanowires including surface stress and surface inertia effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2014-01-01

    Nonlocal and surface effects significantly influence the mechanical response of nanomaterials and nanostructures. In this work, the breathing mode of a circular nanowire is studied on the basis of the nonlocal continuum model. Both the surface elastic properties and surface inertia effect are included. Nanowires can be modeled as long cylindrical solid objects. The classical model is reformulated using the nonlocal differential constitutive relations of Eringen and Gurtin–Murdoch surface continuum elasticity formalism. A new frequency equation for the breathing mode of nanowires, including small scale effect, surface stress and surface inertia is presented by employing the Bessel functions. Numerical results are computed, and are compared to confirm the validity and accuracy of the proposed method. Furthermore, the model is used to elucidate the effect of nonlocal parameter, the surface stress, the surface inertia and the nanowire orientation on the breathing mode of several types of nanowires with size ranging from 0.5 to 4 nm. Our results reveal that the combined surface and small scale effects are significant for nanowires with diameter smaller than 4 nm.

  14. Nonlocal continuum-based modeling of breathing mode of nanowires including surface stress and surface inertia effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2014-05-01

    Nonlocal and surface effects significantly influence the mechanical response of nanomaterials and nanostructures. In this work, the breathing mode of a circular nanowire is studied on the basis of the nonlocal continuum model. Both the surface elastic properties and surface inertia effect are included. Nanowires can be modeled as long cylindrical solid objects. The classical model is reformulated using the nonlocal differential constitutive relations of Eringen and Gurtin-Murdoch surface continuum elasticity formalism. A new frequency equation for the breathing mode of nanowires, including small scale effect, surface stress and surface inertia is presented by employing the Bessel functions. Numerical results are computed, and are compared to confirm the validity and accuracy of the proposed method. Furthermore, the model is used to elucidate the effect of nonlocal parameter, the surface stress, the surface inertia and the nanowire orientation on the breathing mode of several types of nanowires with size ranging from 0.5 to 4 nm. Our results reveal that the combined surface and small scale effects are significant for nanowires with diameter smaller than 4 nm.

  15. Nanocoating of titanium implant surfaces with organic molecules. Polysaccharides including glycosaminoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna Aleksandra; Svava, Rikke; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2012-01-01

    Long-term stability of titanium implants are dependent on a variety of factors. Nanocoating with organic molecules is one of the method used to improve osseointegration. Nanoscale modification of titanium implants affects surface properties, such as hydrophilicity, biochemical bonding capacity...... with focus on polysaccharides including glycosaminoglycans, and how these molecules change surface properties, cell reactions and affect on osseointegartion. The included in vitro studies demonstrated increased cell adhesion, proliferation and mineralization of a number of the tested polysaccharide...

  16. RPE cell surface proteins in normal and dystrophic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, V.M.; Hall, M.O.

    1986-01-01

    Membrane-bound proteins in plasma membrane enriched fractions from cultured rat RPE were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Membrane proteins were characterized on three increasingly specific levels. Total protein was visualized by silver staining. A maximum of 102 separate proteins were counted in silver-stained gels. Glycoproteins were labeled with 3H-glucosamine or 3H-fucose and detected by autoradiography. Thirty-eight fucose-labeled and 61-71 glucosamine-labeled proteins were identified. All of the fucose-labeled proteins were labeled with glucosamine-derived radioactivity. Proteins exposed at the cell surface were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination prior to preparation of membranes for two-dimensional analysis. Forty separate 125I-labeled surface proteins were resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis/autoradiography. Comparison with the glycoprotein map showed that a number of these surface labeled proteins were glycoproteins. Two-dimensional maps of total protein, fucose-labeled, and glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins, and 125I-labeled surface proteins of membranes from dystrophic (RCS rdy-p+) and normal (Long Evans or RCS rdy+p+) RPE were compared. No differences in the total protein or surface-labeled proteins were observed. However, the results suggest that a 183K glycoprotein is more heavily glycosylated with glucosamine and fucose in normal RPE membranes as compared to membranes from dystrophic RPE

  17. A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration light reflecting surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, R.H.; Sweatt, W.

    1985-11-21

    A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration bendable light reflecting surface is disclosed herein. This apparatus includes a structural assembly comprised of a rectangular plate which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, and which has a front side defining the multi-aberration light reflecting surface and an opposite back side, and a plurality of straight leg members rigidly connected with the back side of the plate and extending rearwardly therefrom. The apparatus also includes a number of different adjustment mechanisms, each of which is connected with specific ones of the leg members. These mechanisms are adjustably movable in different ways for applying corresponding forces to the leg members in order to bend the rectangular plate and light reflecting surface into different predetermined curvatures and which specifically include quadratic and cubic curvatures corresponding to different optical aberrations.

  18. Conserved cysteine residues provide a protein-protein interaction surface in dual oxidase (DUOX) proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitzler, Jennifer L; Hinde, Sara; Bánfi, Botond; Nauseef, William M; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2013-03-08

    Intramolecular disulfide bond formation is promoted in oxidizing extracellular and endoplasmic reticulum compartments and often contributes to protein stability and function. DUOX1 and DUOX2 are distinguished from other members of the NOX protein family by the presence of a unique extracellular N-terminal region. These peroxidase-like domains lack the conserved cysteines that confer structural stability to mammalian peroxidases. Sequence-based structure predictions suggest that the thiol groups present are solvent-exposed on a single protein surface and are too distant to support intramolecular disulfide bond formation. To investigate the role of these thiol residues, we introduced four individual cysteine to glycine mutations in the peroxidase-like domains of both human DUOXs and purified the recombinant proteins. The mutations caused little change in the stabilities of the monomeric proteins, supporting the hypothesis that the thiol residues are solvent-exposed and not involved in disulfide bonds that are critical for structural integrity. However, the ability of the isolated hDUOX1 peroxidase-like domain to dimerize was altered, suggesting a role for these cysteines in protein-protein interactions that could facilitate homodimerization of the peroxidase-like domain or, in the full-length protein, heterodimeric interactions with a maturation protein. When full-length hDUOX1 was expressed in HEK293 cells, the mutations resulted in decreased H2O2 production that correlated with a decreased amount of the enzyme localized to the membrane surface rather than with a loss of activity or with a failure to synthesize the mutant proteins. These results support a role for the cysteine residues in intermolecular disulfide bond formation with the DUOX maturation factor DUOXA1.

  19. Monte Carlo Simulation of Protein Adsorption on Energetically Heterogeneous Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Danwanichakul, Panu

    2014-01-01

    The modified triangular-well potential model was applied to incorporate the effect of surface energy on the adsorption of particles or proteins on energetically heterogeneous surfaces. The method is convenient in simulating the adsorption on heterogeneous surface of which different region possesses different free energy. Spherical particles with attractive forces were added on the surface and underwent surface diffusion before they were quenched in place. It was seen that the ratio of surface...

  20. Structures of multidomain proteins adsorbed on hydrophobic interaction chromatography surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gospodarek, Adrian M; Sun, Weitong; O'Connell, John P; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-12-05

    In hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), interactions between buried hydrophobic residues and HIC surfaces can cause conformational changes that interfere with separations and cause yield losses. This paper extends our previous investigations of protein unfolding in HIC chromatography by identifying protein structures on HIC surfaces under denaturing conditions and relating them to solution behavior. The thermal unfolding of three model multidomain proteins on three HIC surfaces of differing hydrophobicities was investigated with hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS). The data were analyzed to obtain unfolding rates and Gibbs free energies for unfolding of adsorbed proteins. The melting temperatures of the proteins were lowered, but by different amounts, on the different surfaces. In addition, the structures of the proteins on the chromatographic surfaces were similar to the partially unfolded structures produced in the absence of a surface by temperature as well as by chemical denaturants. Finally, it was found that patterns of residue exposure to solvent on different surfaces at different temperatures can be largely superimposed. These findings suggest that protein unfolding on various HIC surfaces might be quantitatively related to protein unfolding in solution and that details of surface unfolding behavior might be generalized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Biological properties of Lactobacillus surface proteins 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Buda

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus, a genus of Gram-positive bacteria, includes many strains of probiotic microflora. Probiotics, by definition, are living microorganisms that exert beneficial effects on the host organism. The morphology and physiology of the Lactobacillus bacterial genus are described. The structure of the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is discussed. The surface S-layer of Lactobacillus composed of proteins (SLP with low molecular mass is presented. Cell surface proteins participating in the regulation of growth and survival of the intestinal epithelium cells are characterized. The influence of stress factors such as increased temperature, pH, and enzymes of gastric and pancreatic juice on SLP expression is described. The ability of binding of heavy metal ions by S-layer proteins is discussed. The characteristics of these structures, including the ability to adhere to epithelial cells, and the inhibition of invasion of pathogenic microflora of type Shigella, Salmonella, Escherichia coli and Clostridium and their toxins, are presented. 

  2. Characterizing the Escherichia coli O157:H7 proteome including protein associations with higher order assemblies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rembert Pieper

    Full Text Available The recent outbreak of severe infections with Shiga toxin (Stx producing Escherichia coli (STEC serotype O104:H4 highlights the need to understand horizontal gene transfer among E. coli strains, identify novel virulence factors and elucidate their pathogenesis. Quantitative shotgun proteomics can contribute to such objectives, allowing insights into the part of the genome translated into proteins and the connectivity of biochemical pathways and higher order assemblies of proteins at the subcellular level.We examined protein profiles in cell lysate fractions of STEC strain 86-24 (serotype O157:H7, following growth in cell culture or bacterial isolation from intestines of infected piglets, in the context of functionally and structurally characterized biochemical pathways of E. coli. Protein solubilization in the presence of Triton X-100, EDTA and high salt was followed by size exclusion chromatography into the approximate M(r ranges greater than 280 kDa, 280-80 kDa and 80-10 kDa. Peptide mixtures resulting from these and the insoluble fraction were analyzed by quantitative 2D-LC-nESI-MS/MS. Of the 2521 proteins identified at a 1% false discovery rate, representing 47% of all predicted E. coli O157:H7 gene products, the majority of integral membrane proteins were enriched in the high M(r fraction. Hundreds of proteins were enriched in a M(r range higher than that predicted for a monomer supporting their participation in protein complexes. The insoluble STEC fraction revealed enrichment of aggregation-prone proteins, including many that are part of large structure/function entities such as the ribosome, cytoskeleton and O-antigen biosynthesis cluster.Nearly all E. coli O157:H7 proteins encoded by prophage regions were expressed at low abundance levels or not detected. Comparative quantitative analyses of proteins from distinct cell lysate fractions allowed us to associate uncharacterized proteins with membrane attachment, potential participation in

  3. Survey of surface proteins from the pathogenic Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain 7448 using a biotin cell surface labeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reolon, Luciano Antonio; Martello, Carolina Lumertz; Schrank, Irene Silveira; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of the repertoire of proteins exposed on the cell surface by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae), the etiological agent of enzootic pneumonia in pigs, is critical to understand physiological processes associated with bacterial infection capacity, survival and pathogenesis. Previous in silico studies predicted that about a third of the genes in the M. hyopneumoniae genome code for surface proteins, but so far, just a few of them have experimental confirmation of their expression and surface localization. In this work, M. hyopneumoniae surface proteins were labeled in intact cells with biotin, and affinity-captured biotin-labeled proteins were identified by a gel-based liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach. A total of 20 gel slices were separately analyzed by mass spectrometry, resulting in 165 protein identifications corresponding to 59 different protein species. The identified surface exposed proteins better defined the set of M. hyopneumoniae proteins exposed to the host and added confidence to in silico predictions. Several proteins potentially related to pathogenesis, were identified, including known adhesins and also hypothetical proteins with adhesin-like topologies, consisting of a transmembrane helix and a large tail exposed at the cell surface. The results provided a better picture of the M. hyopneumoniae cell surface that will help in the understanding of processes important for bacterial pathogenesis. Considering the experimental demonstration of surface exposure, adhesion-like topology predictions and absence of orthologs in the closely related, non-pathogenic species Mycoplasma flocculare, several proteins could be proposed as potential targets for the development of drugs, vaccines and/or immunodiagnostic tests for enzootic pneumonia.

  4. Survey of surface proteins from the pathogenic Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain 7448 using a biotin cell surface labeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Antonio Reolon

    Full Text Available The characterization of the repertoire of proteins exposed on the cell surface by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae, the etiological agent of enzootic pneumonia in pigs, is critical to understand physiological processes associated with bacterial infection capacity, survival and pathogenesis. Previous in silico studies predicted that about a third of the genes in the M. hyopneumoniae genome code for surface proteins, but so far, just a few of them have experimental confirmation of their expression and surface localization. In this work, M. hyopneumoniae surface proteins were labeled in intact cells with biotin, and affinity-captured biotin-labeled proteins were identified by a gel-based liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach. A total of 20 gel slices were separately analyzed by mass spectrometry, resulting in 165 protein identifications corresponding to 59 different protein species. The identified surface exposed proteins better defined the set of M. hyopneumoniae proteins exposed to the host and added confidence to in silico predictions. Several proteins potentially related to pathogenesis, were identified, including known adhesins and also hypothetical proteins with adhesin-like topologies, consisting of a transmembrane helix and a large tail exposed at the cell surface. The results provided a better picture of the M. hyopneumoniae cell surface that will help in the understanding of processes important for bacterial pathogenesis. Considering the experimental demonstration of surface exposure, adhesion-like topology predictions and absence of orthologs in the closely related, non-pathogenic species Mycoplasma flocculare, several proteins could be proposed as potential targets for the development of drugs, vaccines and/or immunodiagnostic tests for enzootic pneumonia.

  5. Hinderin, a five-domains protein including coiled-coil motifs that binds to SMC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiselli Giancarlo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structural maintenance of chromosome proteins SMC1 and SMC3 play an important role in the maintenance of chromosomal integrity by preventing the premature separation of the sister chromatids at the onset of anaphase. The two proteins are constitutive components of the multimeric complex cohesin and form dimers by interacting at their central globular regions. Results In order to identify proteins that by binding to SMC3 may interfere with the protein dimerization process, a human cDNA library was screened by the yeast two-hybrid system by using the hinge region of SMC3 as bait. This has lead to the identification of Hinderin, a novel five domains protein including two coiled-coil motifs and sharing a strikingly structural similarity to the SMC family of proteins. Hinderin is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. Orthologue forms of the protein are present in other vertebrates but not in lower organisms. A mapping of the interaction sites revealed that the N- and C-terminal globular domains mediate the binding of Hinderin to SMC3. Hinderin/SMC3 complexes could be recovered by immunoprecipitation from cell lysates using an anti-SMC3 antibody, thus demonstrating that the two proteins interact in vivo. On the contrary, Hinderin did not interact with SMC1. In vivo the rate of SMC1/SMC3 interaction was decreased by the ectopic expression of Hinderin. Conclusions Hinderin is a novel binding partner of SMC3. Based on its ability to modulate SMC1/SMC3 interaction we postulate that Hinderin affects the availability of SMC3 to engage in the formation of multimeric protein complexes.

  6. SURF'S UP! – Protein classification by surface comparisons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Surf's Up – Protein Classification by Surface Comparisons. 97. J. Biosci. 32(1), January 2007. 1. Introduction. With an increasing number of experimentally uncharacterized protein sequences and structures produced by genome sequencing or structural genomic initiatives, we often encounter large protein families with only ...

  7. Directed Supramolecular Surface Assembly of SNAP-tag Fusion Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlenheuer, D.A.; Wasserberg, D.; Haase, C.; Nguyen, Hoang D.; Schenkel, J.H.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Ravoo, B.J.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Brunsveld, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular assembly of proteins on surfaces and vesicles was investigated by site-selective incorporation of a supramolecular guest element on proteins. Fluorescent proteins were site-selectively labeled with bisadamantane by SNAP-tag technology. The assembly of the bisadamantane functionalized

  8. Full-dimensional diabatic potential energy surfaces including dissociation: the ²E″ state of NO₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisfeld, Wolfgang; Vieuxmaire, Olivier; Viel, Alexandra

    2014-06-14

    A scheme to produce accurate full-dimensional coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces including dissociative regions and suitable for dynamical calculations is proposed. The scheme is successfully applied to model the two-sheeted surface of the (2)E″ state of the NO3 radical. An accurate potential energy surface for the NO₃⁻ anion ground state is developed as well. Both surfaces are based on high-level ab initio calculations. The model consists of a diabatic potential matrix, which is expanded to higher order in terms of symmetry polynomials of symmetry coordinates. The choice of coordinates is key for the accuracy of the obtained potential energy surfaces and is discussed in detail. A second central aspect is the generation of reference data to fit the expansion coefficients of the model for which a stochastic approach is proposed. A third ingredient is a new and simple scheme to handle problematic regions of the potential energy surfaces, resulting from the massive undersampling by the reference data unavoidable for high-dimensional problems. The final analytical diabatic surfaces are used to compute the lowest vibrational levels of NO₃⁻ and the photo-electron detachment spectrum of NO₃⁻ leading to the neutral radical in the (2)E″ state by full dimensional multi-surface wave-packet propagation for NO3 performed using the Multi-Configuration Time Dependent Hartree method. The achieved agreement of the simulations with available experimental data demonstrates the power of the proposed scheme and the high quality of the obtained potential energy surfaces.

  9. Producing high-accuracy lattice models from protein atomic coordinates including side chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Martin; Saunders, Rhodri; Smith, Cameron; Backofen, Rolf; Deane, Charlotte M

    2012-01-01

    Lattice models are a common abstraction used in the study of protein structure, folding, and refinement. They are advantageous because the discretisation of space can make extensive protein evaluations computationally feasible. Various approaches to the protein chain lattice fitting problem have been suggested but only a single backbone-only tool is available currently. We introduce LatFit, a new tool to produce high-accuracy lattice protein models. It generates both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models in any user defined lattice. LatFit implements a new distance RMSD-optimisation fitting procedure in addition to the known coordinate RMSD method. We tested LatFit's accuracy and speed using a large nonredundant set of high resolution proteins (SCOP database) on three commonly used lattices: 3D cubic, face-centred cubic, and knight's walk. Fitting speed compared favourably to other methods and both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models show low deviation from the original data (~1.5 Å RMSD in the FCC lattice). To our knowledge this represents the first comprehensive study of lattice quality for on-lattice protein models including side chains while LatFit is the only available tool for such models.

  10. Improving weather predictability by including land-surface model parameter uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Rene; Dutra, Emanuel; Pappenberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    The land surface forms an important component of Earth system models and interacts nonlinearly with other parts such as ocean and atmosphere. To capture the complex and heterogenous hydrology of the land surface, land surface models include a large number of parameters impacting the coupling to other components of the Earth system model. Focusing on ECMWF's land-surface model HTESSEL we present in this study a comprehensive parameter sensitivity evaluation using multiple observational datasets in Europe. We select 6 poorly constrained effective parameters (surface runoff effective depth, skin conductivity, minimum stomatal resistance, maximum interception, soil moisture stress function shape, total soil depth) and explore their sensitivity to model outputs such as soil moisture, evapotranspiration and runoff using uncoupled simulations and coupled seasonal forecasts. Additionally we investigate the possibility to construct ensembles from the multiple land surface parameters. In the uncoupled runs we find that minimum stomatal resistance and total soil depth have the most influence on model performance. Forecast skill scores are moreover sensitive to the same parameters as HTESSEL performance in the uncoupled analysis. We demonstrate the robustness of our findings by comparing multiple best performing parameter sets and multiple randomly chosen parameter sets. We find better temperature and precipitation forecast skill with the best-performing parameter perturbations demonstrating representativeness of model performance across uncoupled (and hence less computationally demanding) and coupled settings. Finally, we construct ensemble forecasts from ensemble members derived with different best-performing parameterizations of HTESSEL. This incorporation of parameter uncertainty in the ensemble generation yields an increase in forecast skill, even beyond the skill of the default system. Orth, R., E. Dutra, and F. Pappenberger, 2016: Improving weather predictability by

  11. Systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Anyin; Luo, Qingjie

    2017-08-01

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions. In certain aspects, the invention provides methods that involve providing a metal and a solvent. The methods additionally involve applying voltage to the solvated metal to thereby produce solvent droplets including ions of the metal containing compound, and directing the solvent droplets including the metal ions to a target. In certain embodiments, once at the target, the metal ions can react directly or catalyze reactions.

  12. Nephrin regulates lamellipodia formation by assembling a protein complex that includes Ship2, filamin and lamellipodin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudan Venkatareddy

    Full Text Available Actin dynamics has emerged at the forefront of podocyte biology. Slit diaphragm junctional adhesion protein Nephrin is necessary for development of the podocyte morphology and transduces phosphorylation-dependent signals that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. The present study extends our understanding of Nephrin function by showing in cultured podocytes that Nephrin activation induced actin dynamics is necessary for lamellipodia formation. Upon activation Nephrin recruits and regulates a protein complex that includes Ship2 (SH2 domain containing 5' inositol phosphatase, Filamin and Lamellipodin, proteins important in regulation of actin and focal adhesion dynamics, as well as lamellipodia formation. Using the previously described CD16-Nephrin clustering system, Nephrin ligation or activation resulted in phosphorylation of the actin crosslinking protein Filamin in a p21 activated kinase dependent manner. Nephrin activation in cell culture results in formation of lamellipodia, a process that requires specialized actin dynamics at the leading edge of the cell along with focal adhesion turnover. In the CD16-Nephrin clustering model, Nephrin ligation resulted in abnormal morphology of actin tails in human podocytes when Ship2, Filamin or Lamellipodin were individually knocked down. We also observed decreased lamellipodia formation and cell migration in these knock down cells. These data provide evidence that Nephrin not only initiates actin polymerization but also assembles a protein complex that is necessary to regulate the architecture of the generated actin filament network and focal adhesion dynamics.

  13. Trichomonas vaginalis surface proteins: a view from the genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirt, R. P.; Noel, C. J.; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Surface proteins of mucosal microbial pathogens play multiple and essential roles in initiating and sustaining the colonization of the heavily defended mucosa. The protist Trichomonas vaginalis is one of the most common human sexually transmitted pathogens that colonize the urogenital mucosa....... However, little is known about its surface proteins. The recently completed draft genome sequence of T. vaginalis provides an invaluable resource to guide molecular and cellular characterization of surface proteins and to investigate their role in pathogenicity. Here, we review the existing data on T...

  14. Pre-absorbed immunoproteomics: a novel method for the detection of Streptococcus suis surface proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2 is a zoonotic pathogen that can cause infections in pigs and humans. Bacterial surface proteins are often investigated as potential vaccine candidates and biomarkers of virulence. In this study, a novel method for identifying bacterial surface proteins is presented, which combines immunoproteomic and immunoserologic techniques. Critical to the success of this new method is an improved procedure for generating two-dimensional electrophoresis gel profiles of S. suis proteins. The S. suis surface proteins identified in this study include muramidase-released protein precursor (MRP and an ABC transporter protein, while MRP is thought to be one of the main virulence factors in SS2 located on the bacterial surface. Herein, we demonstrate that the ABC transporter protein can bind to HEp-2 cells, which strongly suggests that this protein is located on the bacterial cell surface and may be involved in pathogenesis. An immunofluorescence assay confirmed that the ABC transporter is localized to the bacterial outer surface. This new method may prove to be a useful tool for identifying surface proteins, and aid in the development of new vaccine subunits and disease diagnostics.

  15. Cleaning of biomaterial surfaces: protein removal by different solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Fabian; Grass, Simone; Umanskaya, Natalia; Scheibe, Christian; Müller-Renno, Christine; Davoudi, Neda; Hannig, Matthias; Ziegler, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    The removal of biofilms or protein films from biomaterials is still a challenging task. In particular, for research investigations on real (applied) surfaces the reuse of samples is of high importance, because reuse allows the comparison of the same sample in different experiments. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cleaning efficiency of different solvents (SDS, water, acetone, isopropanol, RIPA-buffer and Tween-20) on five different biomaterials (titanium, gold, PMMA (no acetone used), ceramic, and PTFE) with different wettability which were covered by layers of two different adsorbed proteins (BSA and lysozyme). The presence of a protein film after adsorption was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After treatment of the surfaces with the different solvents, the residual proteins on the surface were determined by BCA-assay (bicinchoninic acid assay). Data of the present study indicate that SDS is an effective solvent, but for several protein-substrate combinations it does not show the cleaning efficiency often mentioned in literature. RIPA-buffer and Tween-20 were more effective. They showed very low residual protein amounts after cleaning on all examined material surfaces and for both proteins, however, with small differences for the respective substrate-protein combinations. RIPA-buffer in combination with ultrasonication completely removed the protein layer as confirmed by TEM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Protein sequences bound to mineral surfaces persist into deep time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demarchi, Beatrice; Hall, Shaun; Roncal-Herrero, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Proteins persist longer in the fossil record than DNA, but the longevity, survival mechanisms and substrates remain contested. Here, we demonstrate the role of mineral binding in preserving the protein sequence in ostrich (Struthionidae) eggshell, including from the palaeontological sites...

  17. Evaluation of the susceptibility to pitting corrosion of structural steels, including steels with modified surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunarska, E.; Nikiforow, K.

    2001-01-01

    Although the low alloy ferrite-perlite and bainite-martensite steels mostly undergo the general corrosion, pitting corrosion occurring under certain conditions jeopardizes the safety of installations, causing perforation of walls or initiation of crack. On the basis of electrochemical, corrosion and microscopic examinations, the conditions simulating typical industrial corrosion environments, containing Cl - ions have been selected, to which the parts of machines, devices and installation are subjected. The test parameters provide the preferential pitting corrosion without prevailing general corrosion, and provide the similar type of corrosion of different kinds of ferrite-perlite and bainite-martensite steels, including steels with modified surface layer. The proposed express method allows to evaluate the susceptibility to pitting corrosion and to evaluate the effect of surface modification on susceptibility to pitting corrosion in environments containing Cl - ions. The method may be applied for the proper selection of materials exploited under pitting corrosion conditions and for preparation of precorroded samples for mechanical testing. (author)

  18. SHARC: ab Initio Molecular Dynamics with Surface Hopping in the Adiabatic Representation Including Arbitrary Couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Martin; Marquetand, Philipp; González-Vázquez, Jesús; Sola, Ignacio; González, Leticia

    2011-05-10

    We present a semiclassical surface-hopping method which is able to treat arbitrary couplings in molecular systems including all degrees of freedom. A reformulation of the standard surface-hopping scheme in terms of a unitary transformation matrix allows for the description of interactions like spin-orbit coupling or transitions induced by laser fields. The accuracy of our method is demonstrated in two systems. The first one, consisting of two model electronic states, validates the semiclassical approach in the presence of an electric field. In the second one, the dynamics in the IBr molecule in the presence of spin-orbit coupling after laser excitation is investigated. Due to an avoided crossing that originates from spin-orbit coupling, IBr dissociates into two channels: I + Br((2)P3/2) and I + Br*((2)P1/2). In both systems, the obtained results are in very good agreement with those calculated from exact quantum dynamical simulations.

  19. A novel technique for including surface tension in PLIC-VOF methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, M.; Yadigaroglu, G. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Nuclear Engineering Lab. ETH-Zentrum, CLT, Zurich (Switzerland); Smith, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Thermal-Hydraulics

    2002-02-01

    Various versions of Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) methods have been used successfully for the numerical simulation of gas-liquid flows with an explicit tracking of the phase interface. Of these, Piecewise-Linear Interface Construction (PLIC-VOF) appears as a fairly accurate, although somewhat more involved variant. Including effects due to surface tension remains a problem, however. The most prominent methods, Continuum Surface Force (CSF) of Brackbill et al. and the method of Zaleski and co-workers (both referenced later), both induce spurious or 'parasitic' currents, and only moderate accuracy in regards to determining the curvature. We present here a new method to determine curvature accurately using an estimator function, which is tuned with a least-squares-fit against reference data. Furthermore, we show how spurious currents may be drastically reduced using the reconstructed interfaces from the PLIC-VOF method. (authors)

  20. Dynamics of hydration water and coupled protein sidechains around a polymerase protein surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yangzhong; Yang, Yi; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2017-09-01

    Water-protein coupled interactions are essential to the protein structural stability, flexibility and dynamic functions. The ultimate effects of the hydration dynamics on the protein fluctuations remain substantially unexplored. Here, we investigated the dynamics of both hydration water and protein sidechains at 13 different sites around the polymerase β protein surface using a tryptophan scan with femtosecond spectroscopy. Three types of hydration-water relaxations and two types of protein sidechain motions were determined, reflecting a highly dynamic water-protein interactions fluctuating on the picosecond time scales. The hydration-water dynamics dominate the coupled interactions with higher flexibility.

  1. Role of sperm surface proteins in reproduction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonáková, Věra; Maňásková, Pavla; Davidová, Nina; Tichá, M.; Pěknicová, Jana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, Supplement (2009), s. 63-64 ISSN 0196-3635. [9th International Congress of Andrology. 07.03.2009-10.03.2009, Barcelona] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06011; GA ČR(CZ) GA523/08/H064; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/06/0895 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : boar seminal plasma proteins * spermadhesins * proteinase inhibitor * DQH * boar spermatozoa Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  2. ANTIFREEZE PROTEINS IN PLANTS: AN OVERVIEW WITH AN INSIGHT INTO THE DETECTION TECHNIQUES INCLUDING NANOBIOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Sharma

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Antifreeze proteins (AFPs are a class of polypeptides which enables various organisms to survive subzero temperatures and have been found in vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, fungi and lichens. AFPs possess the characteristic thermal hysteresis (TH and ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI properties which allow them to adsorb the surface of ice crystals and inhibit their growth and recrystallization. AFPs are also known as ice restructuring proteins due to their ability to modify ice crystal morphology which leads to formation of hexagonal shape ice crystals in the presence of AFPs and disc shape AFPs in its absence. AFPs have various applications in medical, agricultural, industrial and biotechnological field. This review provides an overview of the AFPs, their TH and IRI properties and potential biotechnological applications of AFPs. Various conventional detection methods like Capillary assay and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed in detail along with the commonly used Splat assay and Nanoliter osmometer. Moreover, a novel, high-throughput and efficient nanobiotechnological method for AFP detection is also discussed. The method is based on colorimetric detection of freeze-labile gold nanoparticles and can provide an alternative to overcome the limitations of conventional methods by providing quick and easy way to screen AFPs in multiple systems simultaneously

  3. Surface proteins of bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Dylus

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Beneficial effects due to the presence of probiotic bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium in the human intestinal tract are still an interesting object of study. So far activities have been confirmed of bifidobacteria in stimulation of the host immune system, stimulation of tumor cell apoptosis, improvement of bowel motility, alleviation of symptoms of lactose intolerance, cholesterol lowering capacity, prevention and treatment of diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome, alleviation of allergy or atopic dermatitis, maintenance of homeostasis of the intestine, and stimulation of the development of normal intestinal microflora in infants. A multitude of therapeutic properties encourages researchers to investigate the possibility of using the potential of Bifidobacterium in the prevention and treatment of other conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and depression. Although it is known that the beneficial effects are due to intestinal mucosal colonization by these bacteria, the cell components responsible for the colonization are still not determined. In addition to the beneficial effects of probiotic administration, there were also negative effects including sepsis. Therefore research has been directed to identify specific components of Bifidobacterium responsible for probiotic effects. Currently researchers are focused on identifying, isolating and evaluating the properties of surface proteins that are probably involved in the adhesion of bacterial cells to the intestinal epithelium, improving colonization. This paper is an overview of current knowledge on Bifidobacterium surface proteins. The ways of transport and anchoring proteins in Gram-positive bacterial cells, the assembly of cell wall, and a description of the genus Bifidobacterium are presented.

  4. Molecular Characteristics and Biological Functions of Surface-Active and Surfactant Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, Margaret; Pham, Chi L L; Kwan, Ann H

    2017-06-20

    Many critical biological processes take place at hydrophobic:hydrophilic interfaces, and a wide range of organisms produce surface-active proteins and peptides that reduce surface and interfacial tension and mediate growth and development at these boundaries. Microorganisms produce both small lipid-associated peptides and amphipathic proteins that allow growth across water:air boundaries, attachment to surfaces, predation, and improved bioavailability of hydrophobic substrates. Higher-order organisms produce surface-active proteins with a wide variety of functions, including the provision of protective foam environments for vulnerable reproductive stages, evaporative cooling, and gas exchange across airway membranes. In general, the biological functions supported by these diverse polypeptides require them to have an amphipathic nature, and this is achieved by a diverse range of molecular structures, with some proteins undergoing significant conformational change or intermolecular association to generate the structures that are surface active.

  5. The Role of Borrelia burgdorferi Outer Surface Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenedy, Melisha R.; Lenhart, Tiffany R.; Akins, Darrin R.

    2012-01-01

    Human pathogenic spirochetes causing Lyme disease belong to the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. B. burgdorferi organisms are extracellular pathogens transmitted to humans through the bite of Ixodes spp. ticks. These spirochetes are unique in that they can cause chronic infection and persist in the infected human, even though a robust humoral and cellular immune response is produced by the infected host. How this extracellular pathogen is able to evade the host immune response for such long periods of time is currently unclear. To gain a better understanding of how this organism persists in the infected human, many laboratories have focused on identifying and characterizing outer surface proteins of B. burgdorferi. Since the interface between B. burgdorferi and its human host is its outer surface, proteins localized to the outer membrane must play an important role in dissemination, virulence, tissue tropism, and, immune evasion. Over the last two decades numerous outer surface proteins from B. burgdorferi have been identified and more recent studies have begun to elucidate the functional role(s) of many borrelial outer surface proteins. This review summarizes the outer surface proteins identified in B. burgdorferi to date and provides detailed insight into the functions of many of these proteins as they relate to the unique parasitic strategy of this spirochetal pathogen. PMID:22540535

  6. Identification and characterization of Vibrio cholerae surface proteins by radioiodination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, K.; Parker, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    Whole cells and isolated outer membrane from Vibrio cholerae (Classical, Inaba) were radiolabeled with Iodogen or Iodo-beads as catalyst. Radiolabeling of whole cells was shown to be surface specific by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of whole cells and cell fractions. Surface-labeled whole cells regularly showed 16 distinguishable protein species, of which nine were found in radiolabeled outer membrane preparations obtained by a lithium chloride- lithium acetate procedure. Eight of these proteins were found in outer membranes prepared by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and Triton X-100 extraction of radiolabeled whole cells. The mobility of several proteins was shown to be affected by temperature, and the major protein species exposed on the cell surface was shown to consist of at least two different peptides

  7. Consistent retrieval of land surface radiation products from EO, including traceable uncertainty estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Thomas; Pinty, Bernard; Voßbeck, Michael; Lopatka, Maciej; Gobron, Nadine; Robustelli, Monica

    2017-05-01

    Earth observation (EO) land surface products have been demonstrated to provide a constraint on the terrestrial carbon cycle that is complementary to the record of atmospheric carbon dioxide. We present the Joint Research Centre Two-stream Inversion Package (JRC-TIP) for retrieval of variables characterising the state of the vegetation-soil system. The system provides a set of land surface variables that satisfy all requirements for assimilation into the land component of climate and numerical weather prediction models. Being based on a 1-D representation of the radiative transfer within the canopy-soil system, such as those used in the land surface components of advanced global models, the JRC-TIP products are not only physically consistent internally, but they also achieve a high degree of consistency with these global models. Furthermore, the products are provided with full uncertainty information. We describe how these uncertainties are derived in a fully traceable manner without any hidden assumptions from the input observations, which are typically broadband white sky albedo products. Our discussion of the product uncertainty ranges, including the uncertainty reduction, highlights the central role of the leaf area index, which describes the density of the canopy. We explain the generation of products aggregated to coarser spatial resolution than that of the native albedo input and describe various approaches to the validation of JRC-TIP products, including the comparison against in situ observations. We present a JRC-TIP processing system that satisfies all operational requirements and explain how it delivers stable climate data records. Since many aspects of JRC-TIP are generic, the package can serve as an example of a state-of-the-art system for retrieval of EO products, and this contribution can help the user to understand advantages and limitations of such products.

  8. Enhanced bone morphogenetic protein-2 performance on hydroxyapatite ceramic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuessele, A; Mayr, H; Tessmar, J; Goepferich, A

    2009-09-15

    The immobilization of biomolecules on biomaterial surfaces allows for the control of their localization and retention. In numerous studies, proteins have been simply adsorbed to enhance the biological performance of various materials in vivo. We investigated the potential of surface modification techniques on hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic discs in an in vitro approach. A novel method for protein immobilization was evaluated using the aminobisphosphonates pamidronate and alendronate, which are strong Ca chelating agents, and was compared with the established silanization technique. Lysozyme and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were used to assess the suitability of the two surface modification methods with regard to the enzymatic activity of lysozyme and to the capacity of BMP-2 to stimulate the osteoblastic differentiation of C2C12 mouse myoblasts. After immobilization, a 2.5-fold increase in enzymatic activity of lysozyme was observed compared with the control. The alkaline phosphatase activity per cell stimulated by immobilized BMP-2 was 2.5-fold higher [9 x 10(-6) I.U.] than the growth factor on unmodified surfaces [2-4 x 10(-6) I.U.]. With regard to the increase in protein activity, both procedures lead to equivalent results. Thus, the bisphosphonate-based surface modification represents a safe and easy alternative for the attachment of proteins to HA surfaces. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. New developments for the site-specific attachment of protein to surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A

    2005-05-12

    Protein immobilization on surfaces is of great importance in numerous applications in biology and biophysics. The key for the success of all these applications relies on the immobilization technique employed to attach the protein to the corresponding surface. Protein immobilization can be based on covalent or noncovalent interaction of the molecule with the surface. Noncovalent interactions include hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals forces, electrostatic forces, or physical adsorption. However, since these interactions are weak, the molecules can get denatured or dislodged, thus causing loss of signal. They also result in random attachment of the protein to the surface. Site-specific covalent attachment of proteins onto surfaces, on the other hand, leads to molecules being arranged in a definite, orderly fashion and uses spacers and linkers to help minimize steric hindrances between the protein surface. This work reviews in detail some of the methods most commonly used as well as the latest developments for the site-specific covalent attachment of protein to solid surfaces.

  10. Protein-Protein Interaction Site Predictions with Three-Dimensional Probability Distributions of Interacting Atoms on Protein Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Tai; Peng, Hung-Pin; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Yang, Ei-Wen; Chen, Jun-Bo; Ho, Shinn-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to many biological processes. Computational methodologies devised to predict protein-protein interaction (PPI) sites on protein surfaces are important tools in providing insights into the biological functions of proteins and in developing therapeutics targeting the protein-protein interaction sites. One of the general features of PPI sites is that the core regions from the two interacting protein surfaces are complementary to each other, similar to the interior of proteins in packing density and in the physicochemical nature of the amino acid composition. In this work, we simulated the physicochemical complementarities by constructing three-dimensional probability density maps of non-covalent interacting atoms on the protein surfaces. The interacting probabilities were derived from the interior of known structures. Machine learning algorithms were applied to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the PPI sites. The trained predictors for PPI sites were cross-validated with the training cases (consisting of 432 proteins) and were tested on an independent dataset (consisting of 142 proteins). The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient for the independent test set was 0.423; the accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity were 0.753, 0.519, 0.677, and 0.779 respectively. The benchmark results indicate that the optimized machine learning models are among the best predictors in identifying PPI sites on protein surfaces. In particular, the PPI site prediction accuracy increases with increasing size of the PPI site and with increasing hydrophobicity in amino acid composition of the PPI interface; the core interface regions are more likely to be recognized with high prediction confidence. The results indicate that the physicochemical complementarity patterns on protein surfaces are important determinants in PPIs, and a substantial portion of the PPI sites can be predicted correctly with

  11. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng (Texas-HSC); (OKLU)

    2010-06-15

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 {angstrom}, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface.

  12. Adhesion, invasion and evasion: the many functions of the surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K.; Höök, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important opportunistic pathogen and persistently colonizes about 20% of the human population. Its surface is ‘decorated’ with proteins that are covalently anchored to the cell wall peptidoglycan. Structural and functional analysis has identified four distinct classes of surface proteins, of which microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) are the largest class. These surface proteins have numerous functions, including adhesion to and invasion of host cells and tissues, evasion of immune responses and biofilm formation. Thus, cell wall-anchored proteins are essential virulence factors for the survival of S. aureus in the commensal state and during invasive infections, and targeting them with vaccines could combat S. aureus infections. PMID:24336184

  13. Revealing Surface Waters on an Antifreeze Protein by Fusion Protein Crystallography Combined with Molecular Dynamic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianjun; Gauthier, Sherry Y; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2015-10-08

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) adsorb to ice through an extensive, flat, relatively hydrophobic surface. It has been suggested that this ice-binding site (IBS) organizes surface waters into an ice-like clathrate arrangement that matches and fuses to the quasi-liquid layer on the ice surface. On cooling, these waters join the ice lattice and freeze the AFP to its ligand. Evidence for the generality of this binding mechanism is limited because AFPs tend to crystallize with their IBS as a preferred protein-protein contact surface, which displaces some bound waters. Type III AFP is a 7 kDa globular protein with an IBS made up two adjacent surfaces. In the crystal structure of the most active isoform (QAE1), the part of the IBS that docks to the primary prism plane of ice is partially exposed to solvent and has clathrate waters present that match this plane of ice. The adjacent IBS, which matches the pyramidal plane of ice, is involved in protein-protein crystal contacts with few surface waters. Here we have changed the protein-protein contacts in the ice-binding region by crystallizing a fusion of QAE1 to maltose-binding protein. In this 1.9 Å structure, the IBS that fits the pyramidal plane of ice is exposed to solvent. By combining crystallography data with MD simulations, the surface waters on both sides of the IBS were revealed and match well with the target ice planes. The waters on the pyramidal plane IBS were loosely constrained, which might explain why other isoforms of type III AFP that lack the prism plane IBS are less active than QAE1. The AFP fusion crystallization method can potentially be used to force the exposure to solvent of the IBS on other AFPs to reveal the locations of key surface waters.

  14. Surface charge effects in protein adsorption on nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, M; Shimoni, O; Ostrikov, K; Prawer, S; Cervenka, J

    2015-03-19

    Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) of different properties (charge, molecular weight and rigidity), the main driving mechanism responsible for the protein binding to the charged nanoparticles was identified. Electrostatic interactions were found to dominate the protein adsorption dynamics, attachment and conformation. We developed a simple electrostatic model that can qualitatively explain the observed adsorption behaviour based on charge-induced pH modifications near the charged nanoparticle surfaces. Under neutral conditions, the local pH around the positively and negatively charged nanodiamonds becomes very high (11-12) and low (1-3) respectively, which has a profound impact on the protein charge, hydration and affinity to the nanodiamonds. Small proteins (lysozyme) were found to form multilayers with significant conformational changes to screen the surface charge, while larger proteins (albumin) formed monolayers with minor conformational changes. The findings of this study provide a step forward toward understanding and eventually predicting nanoparticle interactions with biofluids.

  15. Prediction of Protein Structure Using Surface Accessibility Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlmüller, Christoph; Göbl, Christoph; Madl, Tobias

    2016-09-19

    An approach to the de novo structure prediction of proteins is described that relies on surface accessibility data from NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancements by a soluble paramagnetic compound (sPRE). This method exploits the distance-to-surface information encoded in the sPRE data in the chemical shift-based CS-Rosetta de novo structure prediction framework to generate reliable structural models. For several proteins, it is demonstrated that surface accessibility data is an excellent measure of the correct protein fold in the early stages of the computational folding algorithm and significantly improves accuracy and convergence of the standard Rosetta structure prediction approach. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  16. Hydrophilic crosslinked-polymeric surface capable of effective suppression of protein adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamon, Yuri; Inoue, Naoko; Mihara, Erika; Kitayama, Yukiya; Ooya, Tooru; Takeuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: takeuchi@gold.kobe-u.ac.jp

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Three hydrophilic crosslinked polymers were examined for protein adsorption. • All polymers showed low nonspecific adsorption of negatively charged proteins. • Poly(MMPC) showed the lowest adsorption for positively charged proteins. • Poly(MMPC) is able to reduce nonspecific adsorption of a wide range of proteins. - Abstract: We investigated the nonspecific adsorption of proteins towards three hydrophilic crosslinked-polymeric thin layers prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization using N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide, 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl-[N-(2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]phosphorylcholine (MMPC), or 6,6′-diacryloyl-trehalose crosslinkers. Protein binding experiments were performed by surface plasmon resonance with six proteins of different pI values including α-lactalbumin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), myoglobin, ribonuclease A, cytochrome C, and lysozyme in buffer solution at pH 7.4. All of the obtained crosslinked-polymeric thin layers showed low nonspecific adsorption of negatively charged proteins at pH 7.4 such as α-lactalbumin, BSA, and myoglobin. Nonspecific adsorption of positively charged proteins including ribonuclease A, cytochrome C, and lysozyme was the lowest for poly(MMPC). These results suggest poly(MMPC) can effectively reduce nonspecific adsorption of a wide range of proteins that are negatively or positively charged at pH 7.4. MMPC is a promising crosslinker for a wide range of polymeric materials requiring low nonspecific protein binding.

  17. Altering protein surface charge with chemical modification modulates protein–gold nanoparticle aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamison, Jennifer A.; Bryant, Erika L.; Kadali, Shyam B.; Wong, Michael S.; Colvin, Vicki L.; Matthews, Kathleen S.; Calabretta, Michelle K.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) can interact with a wide range of molecules including proteins. Whereas significant attention has focused on modifying the nanoparticle surface to regulate protein–AuNP assembly or influence the formation of the protein “corona,” modification of the protein surface as a mechanism to modulate protein–AuNP interaction has been less explored. Here, we examine this possibility utilizing three small globular proteins—lysozyme with high isoelectric point (pI) and established interactions with AuNP; α-lactalbumin with similar tertiary fold to lysozyme but low pI; and myoglobin with a different globular fold and an intermediate pI. We first chemically modified these proteins to alter their charged surface functionalities, and thereby shift protein pI, and then applied multiple methods to assess protein–AuNP assembly. At pH values lower than the anticipated pI of the modified protein, AuNP exposure elicits changes in the optical absorbance of the protein–NP solutions and other properties due to aggregate formation. Above the expected pI, however, protein–AuNP interaction is minimal, and both components remain isolated, presumably because both species are negatively charged. These data demonstrate that protein modification provides a powerful tool for modulating whether nanoparticle–protein interactions result in material aggregation. The results also underscore that naturally occurring protein modifications found in vivo may be critical in defining nanoparticle–protein corona compositions.

  18. Surface charge effects in protein adsorption on nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, M.; Shimoni, O.; Ostrikov, K.; Prawer, S.; Cervenka, J.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) of different properties (charge, molecular weight and rigidity), the main driving mechanism responsible for the protein binding to the charged nanoparticles was identified. Electrostatic interactions were found to dominate the protein adsorption dynamics, attachment and conformation. We developed a simple electrostatic model that can qualitatively explain the observed adsorption behaviour based on charge-induced pH modifications near the charged nanoparticle surfaces. Under neutral conditions, the local pH around the positively and negatively charged nanodiamonds becomes very high (11-12) and low (1-3) respectively, which has a profound impact on the protein charge, hydration and affinity to the nanodiamonds. Small proteins (lysozyme) were found to form multilayers with significant conformational changes to screen the surface charge, while larger proteins (albumin) formed monolayers with minor conformational changes. The findings of this study provide a step forward toward understanding and eventually predicting nanoparticle interactions with biofluids.Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins

  19. Grafting hyaluronic acid onto gold surface to achieve low protein fouling in surface plasmon resonance biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Huang, Renliang; Su, Rongxin; Qi, Wei; Wang, Libing; He, Zhimin

    2014-08-13

    Antifouling surfaces capable of reducing nonspecific protein adsorption from natural complex media are highly desirable in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors. A new protein-resistant surface made through the chemical grafting of easily available hyaluronic acid (HA) onto gold (Au) substrate demonstrates excellent antifouling performance against protein adsorption. AFM images showed the uniform HA layer with a thickness of ∼10.5 nm on the Au surface. The water contact angles of Au surfaces decreased from 103° to 12° with the covalent attachment of a carboxylated HA matrix, indicating its high hydrophilicity mainly resulted from carboxyl and amide groups in the HA chains. Using SPR spectroscopy to investigate nonspecific adsorption from single protein solutions (bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme) and complex media (soybean milk, cow milk, orange juice) to an HA matrix, it was found that ultralow or low protein adsorptions of 0.6-16.1 ng/cm(2) (e.g., soybean milk: 0.6 ng/cm(2)) were achieved on HA-Au surfaces. Moreover, anti-BSA was chosen as a model recognition molecule to characterize the immobilization capacity and the antifouling performance of anti-BSA/HA surfaces. The results showed that anti-BSA/HA sensor surfaces have a high anti-BSA loading of 780 ng/cm(2), together with achieving the ultralow (<3 ng/cm(2) for lysozyme and soybean milk) or low (<17 ng/cm(2) for cow milk and 10% blood serum) protein adsorptions. Additionally, the sensor chips also exhibited a high sensitivity to BSA over a wide range of concentrations from 15 to 700 nM. Our results demonstrate a promising antifouling surface using extremely hydrophilic HA as matrix to resist nonspecific adsorption from complex media in SPR biosensors.

  20. Predicting protein-protein interface residues using local surface structural similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Rafael A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of the residues in protein-protein interaction sites has a significant impact in problems such as drug discovery. Motivated by the observation that the set of interface residues of a protein tend to be conserved even among remote structural homologs, we introduce PrISE, a family of local structural similarity-based computational methods for predicting protein-protein interface residues. Results We present a novel representation of the surface residues of a protein in the form of structural elements. Each structural element consists of a central residue and its surface neighbors. The PrISE family of interface prediction methods uses a representation of structural elements that captures the atomic composition and accessible surface area of the residues that make up each structural element. Each of the members of the PrISE methods identifies for each structural element in the query protein, a collection of similar structural elements in its repository of structural elements and weights them according to their similarity with the structural element of the query protein. PrISEL relies on the similarity between structural elements (i.e. local structural similarity. PrISEG relies on the similarity between protein surfaces (i.e. general structural similarity. PrISEC, combines local structural similarity and general structural similarity to predict interface residues. These predictors label the central residue of a structural element in a query protein as an interface residue if a weighted majority of the structural elements that are similar to it are interface residues, and as a non-interface residue otherwise. The results of our experiments using three representative benchmark datasets show that the PrISEC outperforms PrISEL and PrISEG; and that PrISEC is highly competitive with state-of-the-art structure-based methods for predicting protein-protein interface residues. Our comparison of PrISEC with PredUs, a recently

  1. Technology of surface wastewater purification, including high-rise construction areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyba, Anna; Skolubovich, Yury

    2018-03-01

    Despite on the improvements in the quality of high-rise construction areas and industrial wastewater treatment, the pollution of water bodies continues to increase. This is due to the organized and unorganized surface untreated sewage entry into the reservoirs. The qualitative analysis of some cities' surface sewage composition is carried out in the work. Based on the published literature review, the characteristic contamination present in surface wastewater was identified. The paper proposes a new technology for the treatment of surface sewage and presents the results of preliminary studies.

  2. Competitive protein adsorption to polymer surface from human serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Jensen, Karin Bagger Stibius; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2008-01-01

    Surface modification by "soft" plasma polymerisation to obtain a hydrophilic and non-fouling polymer surface has been validated using radioactive labelling. Adsorption to unmodified and modified polymer surfaces, from both single protein and human serum solutions, has been investigated. By using...... different radioisotopes, albumin and Immunoglobulin G (IgG) adsorption has been monitored simultaneously during competitive adsorption processes, which to our knowledge has not been reported in the literature before. Results show that albumin and IgG adsorption is dependent on adsorption time...

  3. Electron density in reasonably real metallic surfaces, including interchange and correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraga, L.A.; Martinez, G.

    1981-01-01

    By means of a new method, the electron density in a jellium surface is calculated taking in account interchange and correlation effects; reproducing, in this way, the Lang and Kohn results. The new method is self-consistent but not iterative and hence is possible extend it to the solution of the same problem in more reasonably real metallic surfaces. (L.C.) [pt

  4. Identification and characterization of the surface-layer protein of Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Omar; Brailsford, Alan; Wright, Anne; Faraar, Jeremy; Campbell, Jim; Fairweather, Neil

    2007-09-01

    Many bacterial species produce a paracrystalline layer, the surface layer, which completely surrounds the exterior of the cell. In some bacteria, the surface layer is implicated in pathogenesis. Two proteins present in cell wall extracts from Clostridium tetani have been investigated and identified one of these has been unambiguously as the surface-layer protein (SLP). The gene, slpA, has been located in the genome of C. tetani E88 that encodes the SLP. The molecular mass of the protein as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is considerably larger than that predicted from the gene; however the protein does not appear to be glycosylated. Furthermore, analysis of five C. tetani strains, including three recent clinical isolates, shows considerable variation in the sizes of the SLP.

  5. An approach to including protein quality when assessing the net contribution of livestock to human food supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, P; Knaus, W; Zollitsch, W

    2016-11-01

    The production of protein from animal sources is often criticized because of the low efficiency of converting plant protein from feeds into protein in the animal products. However, this critique does not consider the fact that large portions of the plant-based proteins fed to animals may be human-inedible and that the quality of animal proteins is usually superior as compared with plant proteins. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess changes in protein quality in the course of the transformation of potentially human-edible plant proteins into animal products via livestock production; data from 30 Austrian dairy farms were used as a case study. A second aim was to develop an approach for combining these changes with quantitative aspects (e.g. with the human-edible feed conversion efficiency (heFCE), defined as kilogram protein in the animal product divided by kilogram potentially human-edible protein in the feeds). Protein quality of potentially human-edible inputs and outputs was assessed using the protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score and the digestible indispensable amino acid score, two methods proposed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to describe the nutritional value of proteins for humans. Depending on the method used, protein scores were between 1.40 and 1.87 times higher for the animal products than for the potentially human-edible plant protein input on a barn-gate level (=protein quality ratio (PQR)). Combining the PQR of 1.87 with the heFCE for the same farms resulted in heFCE×PQR of 2.15. Thus, considering both quantity and quality, the value of the proteins in the animal products for human consumption (in this case in milk and beef) is 2.15 times higher than that of proteins in the potentially human-edible plant protein inputs. The results of this study emphasize the necessity of including protein quality changes resulting from the transformation of plant proteins to animal proteins when

  6. Proteomic inventory of "anchorless" proteins on the colon adenocarcinoma cell surface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjalsma, H.; Pluk, W.J.G.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Peters, W.H.M.; Roelofs, R.H.W.M.; Swinkels, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    Surface proteins play important pathophysiological roles in health and disease, and accumulating proteomics-based studies suggest that several "non-membrane" proteins are sorted to the cell surface by unconventional mechanisms. Importantly, these proteins may comprise attractive therapeutic targets

  7. Microwave effective surface impedance of structures including a high-Tc superconducting film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartemann, P.

    1992-01-01

    The microwave effective surface impedances of different stacks made of high-temperature superconducting films, dielectric materials and bulk normal metals were computed. The calculations were based on the two-fluid model of superconductors and the conventional transmission line theory. These effective impedances are compared to the calculated intrinsic surface impedances of the stacked superconducting films. The considered superconducting material has been the oxide YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 epitaxially grown on crystalline substrates (MgO, LaAlO 3 , SrTiO 3 ), the film thickness ranging from a few nm to 1μm. Discrepancies between the effective surface resistances or reactances and the corresponding intrinsic values were determined at 10 GHz for non resonant or resonant structures. At resonance the surface resistance discrepancy exhibits a sharp peak which reaches 10 4 or more in relative value according to the geometry and the used materials. Obviously the effective surface reactance shows also huge variations about the resonance and may be negative. Moreover geometries allowing to obtain an effective resistance smaller than the film intrinsic value have been found. The effects of the resonance phenomenon on the electromagnetic wave reflectivity and reflection phase shift are investigated. Therefore the reported theoretical results demonstrate that the effective surface impedance of YBCO films with a thickness smaller than 500 nm can be very different from the intrinsic film impedance according to the structures. (Author). 3 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Role of protein surface charge in monellin sweetness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei-Feng; Szczepankiewicz, Olga; Thulin, Eva; Linse, Sara; Carey, Jannette

    2009-03-01

    A small number of proteins have the unusual property of tasting intensely sweet. Despite many studies aimed at identifying their sweet taste determinants, the molecular basis of protein sweetness is not fully understood. Recent mutational studies of monellin have implicated positively charged residues in sweetness. In the present work, the effect of overall net charge was investigated using the complementary approach of negative charge alterations. Multiple substitutions of Asp/Asn and Glu/Gln residues radically altered the surface charge of single-chain monellin by removing six negative charges or adding four negative charges. Biophysical characterization using circular dichroism, fluorescence, and two-dimensional NMR demonstrates that the native fold of monellin is preserved in the variant proteins under physiological solution conditions although their stability toward chemical denaturation is altered. A human taste test was employed to determine the sweetness detection threshold of the variants. Removal of negative charges preserves monellin sweetness, whereas added negative charge has a large negative impact on sweetness. Meta-analysis of published charge variants of monellin and other sweet proteins reveals a general trend toward increasing sweetness with increasing positive net charge. Structural mapping of monellin variants identifies a hydrophobic surface predicted to face the receptor where introduced positive or negative charge reduces sweetness, and a polar surface where charges modulate long-range electrostatic complementarity.

  9. Cdon, a cell surface protein, mediates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chun; Almazan, Guillermina

    2016-06-01

    During central nervous system development, oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) establish multiple branched processes and axonal contacts to initiate myelination. A complete understanding of the molecular signals implicated in cell surface interaction to initiate myelination/remyelination is currently lacking. The objective of our study was to assess whether Cdon, a cell surface protein that was shown to participate in muscle and neuron cell development, is involved in oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and myelination. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous Cdon protein is expressed in OLPs, increasing in the early differentiation stages and decreasing in mature OLGs. Immunocytochemistry of endogenous Cdon showed localization on both OLG cell membranes and cellular processes exhibiting puncta- or varicosity-like structures. Cdon knockdown with siRNA decreased protein levels by 62% as well as two myelin-specific proteins, MBP and MAG. Conversely, overexpression of full-length rat Cdon increased myelin proteins in OLGs. The complexity of OLGs branching and contact point numbers with axons were also increased in Cdon overexpressing cells growing alone or in coculture with dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs). Furthermore, myelination of DRGNs was decreased when OLPs were transfected with Cdon siRNA. Altogether, our results suggest that Cdon participates in OLG differentiation and myelination, most likely in the initial stages of development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Simultaneous measurements of work function and H‒ density including caesiation of a converter surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofaro, S.; Friedl, R.; Fantz, U.

    2017-08-01

    Negative hydrogen ion sources rely on the surface conversion of neutral atomic hydrogen and positive hydrogen ions to H-. The efficiency of this process depends on the actual work function of the converter surface. By introducing caesium into the source the work function decreases, enhancing the negative ion yield. In order to study the impact of the work function on the H- surface production at similar conditions to the ones in ion sources for fusion devices like ITER and DEMO, fundamental investigations are performed in a flexible laboratory experiment. The work function of the converter surface can be absolutely measured by photoelectric effect, while a newly installed cavity ring-down spectroscopy system (CRDS) measures the H- density. The CRDS is firstly tested and characterized by investigations on H- volume production. Caesiation of a stainless steel sample is then performed in vacuum and the plasma effect on the Cs layer is investigated also for long plasma-on times. A minimum work function of (1.9±0.1) eV is reached after some minutes of plasma treatment, resulting in a reduction by a value of 0.8 eV compared to vacuum measurements. The H- density above the surface is (2.1±0.5)×1015 m-3. With further plasma exposure of the caesiated surface, the work function increases up to 3.75 eV, due to the impinging plasma particles which gradually remove the Cs layer. As a result, the H- density decreases by a factor of at least 2.

  11. Health effects of an increased protein intake on kidney function and colorectal cancer risk factors, including the role of animal and plant protein sources – the PREVIEW project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Grith

    data from three European population studies; NQplus, Lifelines and the Young Finns Study (paper I) as well as the large international RCT (paper II and paper III). In paper I, the aim of the study was to develop a protein diet score, based on both dietary protein quantity and source i.e. plant...... intake, including the role of animal and plant protein in pre-diabetic, overweight or obese individuals on health outcomes: markers of kidney function and putative risk factors for colorectal cancer as well as insulin sensitivity and kidney function in healthy individuals. The thesis is based on PREVIEW...... or animal protein. The score was used to investigate the relation to T2D-related adverse metabolic health events. A total of 76,777 healthy individuals were included in the analysis. We found that a higher total protein diet score (higher intake of total protein and plant to animal protein ratio...

  12. NMR identification of the binding surfaces involved in the Salmonella and Shigella Type III secretion tip-translocon protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShan, Andrew C; Kaur, Kawaljit; Chatterjee, Srirupa; Knight, Kevin M; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2016-08-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential for the pathogenesis of many bacteria including Salmonella and Shigella, which together are responsible for millions of deaths worldwide each year. The structural component of the T3SS consists of the needle apparatus, which is assembled in part by the protein-protein interaction between the tip and the translocon. The atomic detail of the interaction between the tip and the translocon proteins is currently unknown. Here, we used NMR methods to identify that the N-terminal domain of the Salmonella SipB translocon protein interacts with the SipD tip protein at a surface at the distal region of the tip formed by the mixed α/β domain and a portion of its coiled-coil domain. Likewise, the Shigella IpaB translocon protein and the IpaD tip protein interact with each other using similar surfaces identified for the Salmonella homologs. Furthermore, removal of the extreme N-terminal residues of the translocon protein, previously thought to be important for the interaction, had little change on the binding surface. Finally, mutations at the binding surface of SipD reduced invasion of Salmonella into human intestinal epithelial cells. Together, these results reveal the binding surfaces involved in the tip-translocon protein-protein interaction and advance our understanding of the assembly of the T3SS needle apparatus. Proteins 2016; 84:1097-1107. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Surface wave site characterization at 27 locations near Boston, Massachusetts, including 2 strong-motion stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Eric M.; Carkin, Bradley A.; Baise, Laurie G.; Kayen, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    The geotechnical properties of the soils in and around Boston, Massachusetts, have been extensively studied. This is partly due to the importance of the Boston Blue Clay and the extent of landfill in the Boston area. Although New England is not a region that is typically associated with seismic hazards, there have been several historical earthquakes that have caused significant ground shaking (for example, see Street and Lacroix, 1979; Ebel, 1996; Ebel, 2006). The possibility of strong ground shaking, along with heightened vulnerability from unreinforced masonry buildings, motivates further investigation of seismic hazards throughout New England. Important studies that are pertinent to seismic hazards in New England include source-parameter studies (Somerville and others, 1987; Boore and others, 2010), wave-propagation studies (Frankel, 1991; Viegas and others, 2010), empirical ground-motion prediction equations (GMPE) for computing ground-motion intensity (Tavakoli and Pezeshk, 2005; Atkinson and Boore, 2006), site-response studies (Hayles and others, 2001; Ebel and Kim, 2006), and liquefaction studies (Brankman and Baise, 2008). The shear-wave velocity (VS) profiles collected for this report are pertinent to the GMPE, site response, and liquefaction aspects of seismic hazards in the greater Boston area. Besides the application of these data for the Boston region, the data may be applicable throughout New England, through correlations with geologic units (similar to Ebel and Kim, 2006) or correlations with topographic slope (Wald and Allen, 2007), because few VS measurements are available in stable tectonic regions.Ebel and Hart (2001) used felt earthquake reports to infer amplification patterns throughout the greater Boston region and noted spatial correspondence with the dominant period and amplification factors obtained from ambient noise (horizontal-to-vertical ratios) by Kummer (1998). Britton (2003) compiled geotechnical borings in the area and produced a

  14. Plasma immersion ion implantation of polyurethane shape memory polymer: Surface properties and protein immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xinying; Kondyurin, Alexey; Bao, Shisan; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Ye, Lin

    2017-09-01

    Polyurethane-type shape memory polymers (SMPU) are promising biomedical implant materials due to their ability to recover to a predetermined shape from a temporary shape induced by thermal activation close to human body temperature and their advantageous mechanical properties including large recovery strains and low recovery stresses. Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is a surface modification process using energetic ions that generates radicals in polymer surfaces leading to carbonisation and oxidation and the ability to covalently immobilise proteins without the need for wet chemistry. Here we show that PIII treatment of SMPU significantly enhances its bioactivity making SMPU suitable for applications in permanent implantable biomedical devices. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), contact angle measurements, surface energy measurements, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterise the PIII modified surface, including its after treatment aging kinetics and its capability to covalently immobilise protein directly from solution. The results show a substantial improvement in wettability and dramatic changes of surface chemical composition dependent on treatment duration, due to the generation of radicals and subsequent oxidation. The SMPU surface, PIII treated for 200s, achieved a saturated level of covalently immobilized protein indicating that a full monolayer coverage was achieved. We conclude that PIII is a promising and efficient surface modification method to enhance the biocompatibility of SMPU for use in medical applications that demand bioactivity for tissue integration and stability in vivo.

  15. Air filter devices including nonwoven meshes of electrospun recombinant spider silk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Gregor; Jokisch, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2013-05-08

    Based on the natural sequence of Araneus diadematus Fibroin 4 (ADF4), the recombinant spider silk protein eADF4(C16) has been engineered. This highly repetitive protein has a molecular weight of 48kDa and is soluble in different solvents (hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP), formic acid and aqueous buffers). eADF4(C16) provides a high potential for various technical applications when processed into morphologies such as films, capsules, particles, hydrogels, coatings, fibers and nonwoven meshes. Due to their chemical stability and controlled morphology, the latter can be used to improve filter materials. In this protocol, we present a procedure to enhance the efficiency of different air filter devices, by deposition of nonwoven meshes of electrospun recombinant spider silk proteins. Electrospinning of eADF4(C16) dissolved in HFIP results in smooth fibers. Variation of the protein concentration (5-25% w/v) results in different fiber diameters (80-1,100 nm) and thus pore sizes of the nonwoven mesh. Post-treatment of eADF4(C16) electrospun from HFIP is necessary since the protein displays a predominantly α-helical secondary structure in freshly spun fibers, and therefore the fibers are water soluble. Subsequent treatment with ethanol vapor induces formation of water resistant, stable β-sheet structures, preserving the morphology of the silk fibers and meshes. Secondary structure analysis was performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and subsequent Fourier self-deconvolution (FSD). The primary goal was to improve the filter efficiency of existing filter substrates by adding silk nonwoven layers on top. To evaluate the influence of electrospinning duration and thus nonwoven layer thickness on the filter efficiency, we performed air permeability tests in combination with particle deposition measurements. The experiments were carried out according to standard protocols.

  16. Air Filter Devices Including Nonwoven Meshes of Electrospun Recombinant Spider Silk Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Gregor; Jokisch, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Based on the natural sequence of Araneus diadematus Fibroin 4 (ADF4), the recombinant spider silk protein eADF4(C16) has been engineered. This highly repetitive protein has a molecular weight of 48kDa and is soluble in different solvents (hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP), formic acid and aqueous buffers). eADF4(C16) provides a high potential for various technical applications when processed into morphologies such as films, capsules, particles, hydrogels, coatings, fibers and nonwoven meshes. Due to their chemical stability and controlled morphology, the latter can be used to improve filter materials. In this protocol, we present a procedure to enhance the efficiency of different air filter devices, by deposition of nonwoven meshes of electrospun recombinant spider silk proteins. Electrospinning of eADF4(C16) dissolved in HFIP results in smooth fibers. Variation of the protein concentration (5-25% w/v) results in different fiber diameters (80-1,100 nm) and thus pore sizes of the nonwoven mesh. Post-treatment of eADF4(C16) electrospun from HFIP is necessary since the protein displays a predominantly α-helical secondary structure in freshly spun fibers, and therefore the fibers are water soluble. Subsequent treatment with ethanol vapor induces formation of water resistant, stable β-sheet structures, preserving the morphology of the silk fibers and meshes. Secondary structure analysis was performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and subsequent Fourier self-deconvolution (FSD). The primary goal was to improve the filter efficiency of existing filter substrates by adding silk nonwoven layers on top. To evaluate the influence of electrospinning duration and thus nonwoven layer thickness on the filter efficiency, we performed air permeability tests in combination with particle deposition measurements. The experiments were carried out according to standard protocols. PMID:23685883

  17. On the modelling of semi-insulating GaAs including surface tension and bulk stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, W.; Duderstadt, F.

    2004-07-01

    Necessary heat treatment of single crystal semi-insulating Gallium Arsenide (GaAs), which is deployed in micro- and opto- electronic devices, generate undesirable liquid precipitates in the solid phase. The appearance of precipitates is influenced by surface tension at the liquid/solid interface and deviatoric stresses in the solid. The central quantity for the description of the various aspects of phase transitions is the chemical potential, which can be additively decomposed into a chemical and a mechanical part. In particular the calculation of the mechanical part of the chemical potential is of crucial importance. We determine the chemical potential in the framework of the St. Venant-Kirchhoff law which gives an appropriate stress/strain relation for many solids in the small strain regime. We establish criteria, which allow the correct replacement of the St. Venant-Kirchhoff law by the simpler Hooke law. The main objectives of this study are: (i) We develop a thermo-mechanical model that describes diffusion and interface motion, which both are strongly influenced by surface tension effects and deviatoric stresses. (ii) We give an overview and outlook on problems that can be posed and solved within the framework of the model. (iii) We calculate non-standard phase diagrams, i.e. those that take into account surface tension and non-deviatoric stresses, for GaAs above 786 C, and we compare the results with classical phase diagrams without these phenomena. (orig.)

  18. Overexpression and surface localization of the Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koehler, JF; Birkelund, Svend; Stephens, RS

    1992-01-01

    The Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP) is the quantitatively predominant surface protein which has important functional, structural and antigenic properties. We have cloned and overexpressed the MOMP in Escherichia coli. The MOMP is surface exposed in C. trachomatis....... The induction of MOMP expression had a rapidly lethal effect on the L2rMOMP E. coli clone. Although no genetic system exists for Chlamydia, development of a stable, inducible E. coli clone which overexpresses the chlamydial MOMP permits a study of the biological properties of the MOMP, including...

  19. Protein immobilization on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane and polymethyl methacrylate microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khnouf, Ruba; Karasneh, Dina; Albiss, Borhan Aldeen

    2016-02-01

    PDMS and PMMA are two of the most used polymers in the fabrication of lab-on-chip or microfluidic devices. In order to use these polymers in biological applications, it is sometimes essential to be able to bind biomolecules such as proteins and DNA to the surface of these materials. In this work, we have evaluated a number of processes that have been developed to bind protein to PDMS surfaces which include passive adsorption, passive adsorption with glutaraldehyde cross-linking, (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane functionalization followed by glutaraldehyde or 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride cross-linkers. It has been shown that the latter technique--using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride--results in more than twice the bonding of protein to the surface of PDMS microchannels than proteins binding passively. We have also evaluated a few techniques that have been tested for the functionalization of PMMA microchannels where we have found that the use of polyethyleneimine (PEI) has led to the strongest protein-PMMA microchannel bond. We finally demonstrated the effect of PDMS curing methodology on protein adsorption to its surface, and showed that increased curing time is the factor that reduces passive adsorption the most. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A protein diet score, including plant and animal protein, investigating the association with HbA1c and eGFR - the PREVIEW project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Grith; Sluik, Diewertje; Ritz, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Higher-protein diets have been advocated for body-weight regulation for the past few decades. However, the potential health risks of these diets are still uncertain. We aimed to develop a protein score based on the quantity and source of protein, and to examine the association of the score...... with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Analyses were based on three population studies included in the PREVIEW project (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World): NQplus, Lifelines, and the Young Finns...... Study. Cross-sectional data from food-frequency questionnaires (n = 76,777 subjects) were used to develop a protein score consisting of two components: 1) percentage of energy from total protein, and 2) plant to animal protein ratio. An inverse association between protein score and HbA1c (slope -0...

  1. Exploring the Leishmania Hydrophilic Acylated Surface Protein B (HASPB) Export Pathway by Live Cell Imaging Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Lorna; Price, Helen; O'Toole, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania major is a human-infective protozoan parasite transmitted by the bite of the female phlebotomine sand fly. The L. major hydrophilic acylated surface protein B (HASPB) is only expressed in infective parasite stages suggesting a role in parasite virulence. HASPB is a "nonclassically" secreted protein that lacks a conventional signal peptide, reaching the cell surface by an alternative route to the classical ER-Golgi pathway. Instead HASPB trafficking to and exposure on the parasite plasma membrane requires dual N-terminal acylation. Here, we use live cell imaging methods to further explore this pathway allowing visualization of key events in real time at the individual cell level. These methods include live cell imaging using fluorescent reporters to determine the subcellular localization of wild type and acylation site mutation HASPB18-GFP fusion proteins, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to analyze the dynamics of HASPB in live cells, and live antibody staining to detect surface exposure of HASPB by confocal microscopy.

  2. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  3. Sputter deposited bioceramic coatings: surface characterisation and initial protein adsorption studies using surface-MALDI-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, A. R.; Burke, G. A.; Duffy, H.

    2011-01-01

    Protein adsorption onto calcium phosphate (Ca–P) bioceramics utilised in hard tissue implant applications has been highlighted as one of the key events that influences the subsequent biological response, in vivo. This work reports on the use of surface-matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation ...

  4. Novel drugs and vaccines based on the structure and function of HIV pathogenic proteins including Nef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Ahmed A

    2005-11-01

    Evidence is presented to suggest that HIV-1 accessory protein Nef could be involved in AIDS pathogenesis. When present in extracellular medium, Nef causes the death of a wide variety of cells in vitro and may therefore be responsible for the depletion of bystander cells in lymphoid tissues during HIV infection. When present inside the cell, Nef could prevent the death of infected cells and thereby contribute to increased viral load. Intracellular Nef does this by preventing apoptosis of infected cells by either inhibiting proteins involved in apoptosis or preventing the infected cells from being recognized by CTLs. Neutralization of extracellular Nef could prevent the death of uninfected immune cells and thereby the destruction of the immune system. Neutralization of intracellular Nef could hasten the death of infected cells and help reduce the viral load. Nef is therefore a very important molecular target for developing therapeutics that slow progression to AIDS. The N-terminal region of Nef and the naturally occurring bee venom mellitin have very similar primary and tertiary structures, and they both act by destroying membranes. Chemical analogs of a mellitin inhibitor prevent Nef-mediated cell death and inhibit the interaction of Nef with cellular proteins involved in apoptosis. Naturally occurring bee propolis also contains substances that prevent Nef-mediated cell lysis and increases proliferation of CD4 cells in HIV-infected cultures. These chemical compounds and natural products are water soluble and nontoxic and are therefore potentially very useful candidate drugs.

  5. Determining surface wave attenuation by modeling surface wave amplitudes including finite-frequency focusing and defocusing effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z.; Masters, G.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a technique that uses cluster analysis method to efficiently measure Rayleigh wave phase and amplitude anomalies. Amplitude anomaly measurements have been made on the vertical components of all permanent stations recording LHZ data from IRIS. We currently consider earthquakes with Ms>5.5 between 1990 and 2004 and correct for source phase and magnitude according to the CMT. This technique leads to a large set of amplitude measurements at 7mHz, 10mHz, 15mHz and 20mHz. We discard data with erroneously large amplitude anomalies (|dlnA|>1) and inconsistent instrument responses and we only use earthquakes recorded by more than 30 stations. Out of about 250000 raw measurements for each frequency, about 140000 measurements are retained for inverting for attenuation structure. Similar to Dalton and Ekstrom (2006), phase and amplitude data are inverted together for phase velocity maps, attenuation maps, and source and receiver terms. However, we use the 2D finite frequency amplitude kernel of Zhou et al, (2004) to model the focusing-defocusing effects. Ray theory, which has been used to date, gives amplitude anomaly predictions which depend strongly on short wavelength structure and so are very sensitive to how phase velocity maps are smoothed. Our resulting attenuation maps show structures correlating well with surface tectonics, with high attenuation in regions of ridges, back-arc basins and western North America, and low attenuation in stable continental shields. The success of getting reasonable attenuation structures demonstrates the feasibility of applying 2D finite frequency amplitude kernel to real data.

  6. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles as Optical Labels for Imaging Cell Surface Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.

    Assaying the expression of cell surface proteins has widespread application for characterizing cell type, developmental stage, and monitoring disease transformation. Immunophenotyping is conducted by treating cells with labelled targeting moieties that have high affinity for relevant surface protein(s). The sensitivity and specificity of immunophenotyping is defined by the choice of contrast agent and therefore, the number of resolvable signals that can be used to simultaneously label cells. Narrow band width surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles are proposed as optical labels for multiplexed immunophenotying. Two types of surface coatings were investigated to passivate the gold nanoparticles, incorporate SERS functionality, and to facilitate attachment of targeting antibodies. Thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) forms dative bonds with the gold surface and is compatible with multiple physisorbed Raman-active reporter molecules. Ternary lipid bilayers are used to encapsulate the gold nanoparticles particles, and incorporate three different classes of Raman reporters. TEM, UV-Visible absorbance spectroscopy, DLS, and electrophoretic light scattering were used characterize the particle coating. Colourimetric protein assay, and secondary antibody labelling were used to quantify the antibody conjugation. Three different in vitromodels were used to investigate the binding efficacy and specificity of SERS labels for their biomarker targets. Primary human CLL cells, LY10 B lymphoma, and A549 adenocarcinoma lines were targeted. Dark field imaging was used to visualize the colocalization of SERS labels with cells, and evidence of receptor clustering was obtained based on colour shifts of the particles' Rayleigh scattering. Widefield, and spatially-resolved Raman spectra were used to detect labels singly, and in combination from labelled cells. Fluorescence flow cytometry was used to test the particles' binding specificity, and SERS from labelled cells was also

  7. Characterization of serum proteins attached to distinct sol-gel hybrid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo-Gomes, Nuno; Romero-Gavilán, Francisco; Sánchez-Pérez, Ana M; Gurruchaga, Marilo; Azkargorta, Mikel; Elortza, Felix; Martinez-Ibañez, María; Iloro, Ibon; Suay, Julio; Goñi, Isabel

    2017-07-04

    The success of a dental implant depends on its osseointegration, an important feature of the implant biocompatibility. In this study, two distinct sol-gel hybrid coating formulations [50% methyltrimethoxysilane: 50% 3-glycidoxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (50M50G) and 70% methyltrimethoxysilane with 30% tetraethyl orthosilicate (70M30T)] were applied onto titanium implants. To evaluate their osseointegration, in vitro and in vivo assays were performed. Cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro did not show any differences between the coatings. However, four and eight weeks after in vivo implantation, the fibrous capsule area surrounding 50M50G-implant was 10 and 4 times, respectively, bigger than the area of connective tissue surrounding the 70M30T treated implant. Thus, the in vitro results gave no prediction or explanation for the 50M50G-implant failure in vivo. We hypothesized that the first protein layer adhered to the surface may have direct implication in implant osseointegration, and perhaps correlate with the in vivo outcome. Human serum was used for adsorption analysis on the biomaterials, the first layer of serum proteins adhered to the implant surface was analyzed by proteomic analysis, using mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). From the 171 proteins identified; 30 proteins were significantly enriched on the 50M50G implant surface. This group comprised numerous proteins of the immune complement system, including several subcomponents of the C1 complement, complement factor H, C4b-binding protein alpha chain, complement C5 and C-reactive protein. This result suggests that these proteins enriched in 50M50G surface might trigger the cascade leading to the formation of the fibrous capsule observed. The implications of these results could open up future possibilities to predict the biocompatibility problems in vivo. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Surface peptide mapping of protein I and protein III of four strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Whole cells and isolated outer membranes (OMs) of four strains of gonococci were surface radioiodinated with either lactoperoxidase or Iodogen (Pierce Chemical Co., Rockford, Ill.). These preparations were solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Surface-radioiodinated protein I (PI) and PIII bands were excised from the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels and digested with alpha-chymotrypsin, and the resultant 125 I-peptide fragments were resolved by high-voltage electrophoresis and thin-layer chromatography (i.e., surface peptide mapping). Radioemitting peptidic fragments were visualized by autoradiography. Results demonstrated that the PI molecule of each gonococcal strain studied had unique iodinatable peptides exposed on the surface of whole cells and OMs, whereas PIIIs appeared to have the same portion of the molecule exposed on the surface of bacteria or OMs, regardless of the gonococcal strain from which they were isolated. Many more radiolabeled peptides were seen in surface peptide maps of PIs from radiolabeled OMs than in those from radioiodinated whole cells, whereas different peptidic fragments were seen in the surface peptide maps of PIIIs from radiolabeled OMs than were seen in those from radiolabeled whole cells. These data suggest that PI may contribute strain-specific antigenic determinants and PIII may contribute cross-reactive determinants and that the surface exposure of PI and PIII is different in isolated OMs than in the OM of intact gonococci

  9. Native SDS-PAGE: high resolution electrophoretic separation of proteins with retention of native properties including bound metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Andrew B; Wobig, William J; Petering, David H

    2014-05-01

    Sodium dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) is commonly used to obtain high resolution separation of complex mixtures of proteins. The method initially denatures the proteins that will undergo electrophoresis. Although covalent structural features of resolved proteins can be determined with SDS-PAGE, functional properties are destroyed, including the presence of non-covalently bound metal ions. To address this shortcoming, blue-native (BN)-PAGE has been introduced. This method retains functional properties but at the cost of protein resolving power. To address the need for a high resolution PAGE method that results in the separation of native proteins, experiments tested the impact of changing the conditions of SDS-PAGE on the quality of protein separation and retention of functional properties. Removal of SDS and EDTA from the sample buffer together with omission of a heating step had no effect on the results of PAGE. Reduction of SDS in the running buffer from 0.1% to 0.0375% together with deletion of EDTA also made little impact on the quality of the electrophoretograms of fractions of pig kidney (LLC-PK1) cell proteome in comparison with that achieved with the SDS-PAGE method. The modified conditions were called native (N)SDS-PAGE. Retention of Zn(2+) bound in proteomic samples increased from 26 to 98% upon shifting from standard to modified conditions. Moreover, seven of nine model enzymes, including four Zn(2+) proteins that were subjected to NSDS-PAGE retained activity. All nine were active in BN-PAGE, whereas all underwent denaturation during SDS-PAGE. Metal retention after electrophoresis was additionally confirmed using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and in-gel Zn-protein staining using the fluorophore TSQ.

  10. Mapping Protein Binding Sites and Conformational Epitopes Using Cysteine Labeling and Yeast Surface Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najar, Tariq Ahmad; Khare, Shruti; Pandey, Rajesh; Gupta, Satish K; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2017-03-07

    We describe a facile method for mapping protein:ligand binding sites and conformational epitopes. The method uses a combination of Cys scanning mutagenesis, chemical labeling, and yeast surface display. While Ala scanning is widely used for similar purposes, often mutation to Ala (or other amino acids) has little effect on binding, except at hotspot residues. Many residues in physical contact with a binding partner are insensitive to substitution with Ala. In contrast, we show that labeling of Cys residues in a binding site consistently abrogates binding. We couple this methodology to yeast surface display and deep sequencing to map conformational epitopes targeted by both monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal sera as well as a protein:ligand binding site. The method does not require purified protein, can distinguish buried and exposed residues, and can be extended to other display formats, including mammalian cells and viruses, emphasizing its wide applicability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Expansion Hamiltonian model for a diatomic molecule adsorbed on a surface: Vibrational states of the CO/Cu(100) system including surface vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Qingyong, E-mail: mengqingyong@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongshan Road 457, 116023 Dalian (China); Meyer, Hans-Dieter, E-mail: hans-dieter.meyer@pci.uni-heidelberg.de [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-10-28

    Molecular-surface studies are often done by assuming a corrugated, static (i.e., rigid) surface. To be able to investigate the effects that vibrations of surface atoms may have on spectra and cross sections, an expansion Hamiltonian model is proposed on the basis of the recently reported [R. Marquardt et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074108 (2010)] SAP potential energy surface (PES), which was built for the CO/Cu(100) system with a rigid surface. In contrast to other molecule-surface coupling models, such as the modified surface oscillator model, the coupling between the adsorbed molecule and the surface atoms is already included in the present expansion SAP-PES model, in which a Taylor expansion around the equilibrium positions of the surface atoms is performed. To test the quality of the Taylor expansion, a direct model, that is avoiding the expansion, is also studied. The latter, however, requests that there is only one movable surface atom included. On the basis of the present expansion and direct models, the effects of a moving top copper atom (the one to which CO is bound) on the energy levels of a bound CO/Cu(100) system are studied. For this purpose, the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree calculations are carried out to obtain the vibrational fundamentals and overtones of the CO/Cu(100) system including a movable top copper atom. In order to interpret the results, a simple model consisting of two coupled harmonic oscillators is introduced. From these calculations, the vibrational levels of the CO/Cu(100) system as function of the frequency of the top copper atom are discussed.

  12. Overview of systems and techniques for surface display of recombinant proteins in yeast S. cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Teparic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade much effort has been devoted to the development of new expression systems and novel techniques for the surface display of heterologous proteins in yeast in order to improve their applications in biotechnology, food technology, pharmacology and medicine. Heterologous protein-encoding genes are generally fused with genes coding for yeast cell wall proteins or their fragments required for anchoring. The variety of reactions by which a protein can be displayed at the cell surface enables finding the appropriate one for each individual protein. However, it is still challenging how to improve the efficiency of display of protein complexes and increase the quantity of protein displayed on the yeast surface. Recently, synthetic protein chimeras that self-assemble into the scaffolds on the yeast surface displaying different proteins have been constructed. This review focuses on systems and techniques for display of recombinant proteins on the yeast cell surfaces and applications afforded by this technology.

  13. Chemotherapy modulates intestinal immune gene expression including surfactant Protein-D and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Thomassen, Mads; Shen, René L.

    2016-01-01

    the BUCY and DOX piglets. Selected genes of potential biological significance with a similar change in expression across the treatments were controlled by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Key innate defense molecules, including surfactant protein-D and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1, were among...

  14. Fluorescent proteins as efficient tools for evaluating the surface PEGylation of silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ma, Minyan; Zhang, Xiao-ai; Zhang, Ze-yu; Saleh, Sayed M.; Wang, Xu-dong

    2017-06-01

    Surface PEGylation is essential for preventing non-specific binding of biomolecules when silica nanoparticles are utilized for in vivo applications. Methods for installing poly(ethylene glycol) on a silica surface have been widely explored but varies from study to study. Because there is a lack of a satisfactory method for evaluating the properties of silica surface after PEGylation, the prepared nanoparticles are not fully characterized before use. In some cases, even non-PEGylated silica nanoparticles were produced, which is unfortunately not recognized by the end-user. In this work, a fluorescent protein was employed, which acts as a sensitive material for evaluating the surface protein adsorption properties of silica nanoparticles. Eleven different methods were systematically investigated for their reaction efficiency towards surface PEGylation. Results showed that both reaction conditions (including pH, catalyst) and surface functional groups of parent silica nanoparticles play critical roles in producing fully PEGylated silica nanoparticles. Great care needs to be taken in choosing the proper coupling chemistry for surface PEGylation. The data and method shown here will guarantee high-quality PEGylated silica nanoparticles to be produced and guide their applications in biology, chemistry, industry and medicine.

  15. Toward a Molecular Understanding of Protein Solubility: Increased Negative Surface Charge Correlates with Increased Solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Ryan M.; Shende, Varad R.; Motl, Nicole; Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Protein solubility is a problem for many protein chemists, including structural biologists and developers of protein pharmaceuticals. Knowledge about how intrinsic factors influence solubility is limited due to the difficulty of obtaining quantitative solubility measurements. Solubility measurements in buffer alone are difficult to reproduce, because gels or supersaturated solutions often form, making it impossible to determine solubility values for many proteins. Protein precipitants can be used to obtain comparative solubility measurements and, in some cases, estimations of solubility in buffer alone. Protein precipitants fall into three broad classes: salts, long-chain polymers, and organic solvents. Here, we compare the use of representatives from two classes of precipitants, ammonium sulfate and polyethylene glycol 8000, by measuring the solubility of seven proteins. We find that increased negative surface charge correlates strongly with increased protein solubility and may be due to strong binding of water by the acidic amino acids. We also find that the solubility results obtained for the two different precipitants agree closely with each other, suggesting that the two precipitants probe similar properties that are relevant to solubility in buffer alone. PMID:22768947

  16. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Computation of binding energies including their enthalpy and entropy components for protein-ligand complexes using support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppisetty, Chaitanya A K; Frank, Martin; Kemp, Graham J L; Nyholm, Per-Georg

    2013-10-28

    Computing binding energies of protein-ligand complexes including their enthalpy and entropy terms by means of computational methods is an appealing approach for selecting initial hits and for further optimization in early stages of drug discovery. Despite the importance, computational predictions of thermodynamic components have evaded attention and reasonable solutions. In this study, support vector machines are used for developing scoring functions to compute binding energies and their enthalpy and entropy components of protein-ligand complexes. The binding energies computed from our newly derived scoring functions have better Pearson's correlation coefficients with experimental data than previously reported scoring functions in benchmarks for protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database. The protein-ligand complexes with binding energies dominated by enthalpy or entropy term could be qualitatively classified by the newly derived scoring functions with high accuracy. Furthermore, it is found that the inclusion of comprehensive descriptors based on ligand properties in the scoring functions improved the accuracy of classification as well as the prediction of binding energies including their thermodynamic components. The prediction of binding energies including the enthalpy and entropy components using the support vector machine based scoring functions should be of value in the drug discovery process.

  18. Relevant uses of surface proteins – display on self‐organized biological structures

    OpenAIRE

    Jahns, Anika C.; Rehm, Bernd H. A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Proteins are often found attached to surfaces of self‐assembling biological units such as whole microbial cells or subcellular structures, e.g. intracellular inclusions. In the last two decades surface proteins were identified that could serve as anchors for the display of foreign protein functions. Extensive protein engineering based on structure–function data enabled efficient display of technically and/or medically relevant protein functions. Small size, diversity of the anchor pro...

  19. Features of protein-protein interactions that translate into potent inhibitors: topology, surface area and affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew C; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2012-07-26

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) control the assembly of multi-protein complexes and, thus, these contacts have enormous potential as drug targets. However, the field has produced a mix of both exciting success stories and frustrating challenges. Here, we review known examples and explore how the physical features of a PPI, such as its affinity, hotspots, off-rates, buried surface area and topology, might influence the chances of success in finding inhibitors. This analysis suggests that concise, tight binding PPIs are most amenable to inhibition. However, it is also clear that emerging technical methods are expanding the repertoire of 'druggable' protein contacts and increasing the odds against difficult targets. In particular, natural product-like compound libraries, high throughput screens specifically designed for PPIs and approaches that favour discovery of allosteric inhibitors appear to be attractive routes. The first group of PPI inhibitors has entered clinical trials, further motivating the need to understand the challenges and opportunities in pursuing these types of targets.

  20. Characterization of the surface of protein-adsorbed dental materials by wetting and streaming potential measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsumura, H.; Kawasaki, K.; Okumura, N.; Kambara, M.; Norde, W.

    2003-01-01

    In this study we have elucidated the water-wettability and the electrokinetic surface potential of protein-covered dental materials. The proteins used here as typical proteins were human serum albumin and lysozyme from hen*s egg. The wettability (hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) and the surface

  1. Characterization of the surface of protein-adsorbed dental materials by wetting and streaming potential measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsumura, H; Kawasaki, K; Okumura, N; Kambara, M; Norde, W

    2003-01-01

    In this study we have elucidated the water-wettability and the electrokinetic surface potential of protein-covered dental materials. The proteins used here as typical proteins were human serum albumin and lysozyme from hen's egg. The wettability (hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) and the surface

  2. Protein-Nanoparticle Interactions: Improving Immobilized Lytic Enzyme Activity and Surface Energy Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Emily Elizabeth

    Protein-nanostructure conjugates, particularly particles, are a subject of significant interest due to changes in their fundamental behavior compared to bulk surfaces. As the size scale of nano-structured materials and proteins are on the same order of magnitude, nanomaterial properties can heavily influence how proteins adsorb and conform to the surface. Previous work has demonstrated the ability of nanoscale surfaces to modulate protein activity, conformation, and retention by modifying the particle surface curvature, morphology, and surface charge. This work has improved our understanding of the protein material interactions, but a complete understanding is still lacking. The goal of this thesis is to investigate two missing areas of understanding using two distinct systems. The first system utilizes a particle with controlled surface energy to observe the impact of surface energy on protein-particle interactions, while the second system uses a modified Listeria-specific protein to determine how protein structure and flexibility affects protein adsorption and activity on particles. Spherical, amorphous, and uniformly doped Zn-silica particles with tailored surface energies were synthesized to understand the impact of surface energy on protein adsorption behavior. Particle surface energy increased with a decrease in particle size and greater dopant concentrations. Protein adsorption and structural loss increased with both particle size and particle surface energy. Higher surface energies promoted protein-particle association and increased protein unfolding. Particle curvature and protein steric hindrance effects limited adsorption and structural loss on smaller particles. Protein surface charge heterogeneity was also found to be linked to both protein adsorption and unfolding behavior on larger particles. Greater surface charge heterogeneity led to higher adsorption concentrations and multilayer formation. These multilayers transitioned from protein

  3. Enterococcus faecalis surface proteins determine its adhesion mechanism to bile drain materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waar, K; van der Mei, HC; Harmsen, HJM; Degener, JE; Busscher, HJ

    An important step in infections associated with biliary drains is adhesion of micro-organisms to the surface. In this study the role of three surface proteins of Enterococcus faecalis (enterococcal surface protein, aggregation substances 1 and 373) in the adhesion to silicone rubber,

  4. Hydrophobicity-driven self-assembly of protein and silver nanoparticles for protein detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Mehmet; Balz, Ben N; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2013-05-21

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a promising analytical technique for the detection and characterization of biological molecules and structures. The role of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces in the self-assembly of protein-metallic nanoparticle structures for label-free protein detection is demonstrated. Aggregation is driven by both the hydrophobicity of the surface as well as the charge of the proteins. The best conditions for obtaining a reproducible SERS signal that allows for sensitive, label-free protein detection are provided by the use of hydrophobic surfaces and 16 × 10(11) NPs per mL. A detection limit of approximately 0.5 μg mL(-1) is achieved regardless of the proteins' charge properties and size. The developed method is simple and can be used for reproducible and sensitive detection and characterization of a wide variety of biological molecules and various structures with different sizes and charge status.

  5. Simultaneous characterization of protein-material and cell-protein interactions using dynamic QCM-D analysis on SAM surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushiro, Keiichiro; Lee, Chih-Hao; Takai, Madoka

    2016-05-24

    Understanding the interactions among materials, proteins and cells is critical for the development of novel biomaterials, and establishing a highly sensitive and quantitative method to standardize these interactions is desired. In this study, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) combined with microscopy was utilized to quantitatively monitor the entirety of the cell adhesion processes, starting from the protein adsorption, on various self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces. Although the resulting cell adhesion morphologies were similar on most of the surfaces, the dynamic QCM-D signal patterns were unique on each surface, suggesting different forms of material-protein-cell interactions. The viscoelasticity and the density of the surface-adsorbed fibronectin (FN), as well as the relative exposure of the cell adhesive arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motifs, were correlated to the different cell adhesion dynamics and mechanics. Some surfaces exhibited complicated behaviors alluding to the detachment/rearrangement of surface proteins or highly sparse but bioactive proteins that promote a slow adhesion process. This study underscores the potential use of the QCM-D signal pattern as a rule of thumb for delineating different protein-material and cell-protein interactions, and offers a rapid in vitro platform for the dynamic evaluation of protein and cell behaviors on novel biomaterials.

  6. Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein is expressed on the surface of hematopoietic cells upon activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullido, M J; Muñoz-Fernandez, M A; Recuero, M; Fresno, M; Valdivieso, F

    1996-08-21

    A4-amyloid is the major component of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles found in the brain of patients suffering Alzheimer's disease. This 39-42 amino acid peptide is derived from a larger precursor protein (APP). Since APP gene encodes for a putative membrane protein, the study of APP expression at the cell surface may provide useful data for understanding its physiological function. In this report, we present data on APP expression, that was detected by APP specific mAbs in cells of the hematopoietic system. APP was weakly expressed on the cell surface of resting human lymphocytes and monocytes, but it could be induced to the surface of those cells upon stimulation. The cell activators capable of inducing APP membrane expression comprehended mitogenic lectins, calcium ionophores, phosphatase inhibitors, and anti mu-chain or anti-CD3 antibodies in B and T cells, respectively. Interestingly, phorbol esters were able to induce APP membrane expression in monocytic, but not in lymphoid cells. In contrast to lymphocytes and monocytes, granulocytes never expressed cell surface or cytoplasmic APP, even after the activation. The induction of membrane APP in response to lymphocyte activation signals, including antibodies to the antigen receptor of B and T cells, raises the possibility that APP might play the role of a cell surface receptor in the immune system.

  7. AFM study of adsorption of protein A on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Ling; Lu Zhisong; Gan Ye; Liu Yingshuai; Li, C M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the morphology and kinetics of adsorption of protein A on a PDMS surface is studied by AFM. The results of effects of pH, protein concentration and contact time of the adsorption reveal that the morphology of adsorbed protein A is significantly affected by pH and adsorbed surface concentration, in which the pH away from the isoelectric point (IEP) of protein A could produce electrical repulsion to change the protein conformation, while the high adsorbed surface protein volume results in molecular networks. Protein A can form an adsorbed protein film on PDMS with a maximum volume of 2.45 x 10 -3 μm 3 . This work enhances our fundamental understanding of protein A adsorption on PDMS, a frequently used substrate component in miniaturized immunoassay devices.

  8. Competitive Adsorption of Plasma Proteins on Polysaccharide-Modified Silicon Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ombelli, Michela; Costello, Lauren B; Meng, Qing C; Composto, Russell J; Eckmann, David M

    2005-01-01

    .... Competitive protein adsorption plays a key role in the hemocompatibility of the surface. The synthesis of nonfouling surfaces is therefore one of the major prerequisites for devices for biomedical applications...

  9. Bone Morphogenetic Protein Coating on Titanium Implant Surface: a Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haim Haimov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the study is to systematically review the osseointegration process improvement by bone morphogenetic protein coating on titanium implant surface. Material and Methods: An electronic literature search was conducted through the MEDLINE (PubMed and EMBASE databases. The search was restricted for articles published during the last 10 years from October 2006 to September 2016 and articles were limited to English language. Results: A total of 41 articles were reviewed, and 8 of the most relevant articles that are suitable to the criteria were selected. Articles were analysed regarding concentration of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP, delivery systems, adverse reactions and the influence of the BMP on the bone and peri-implant surface in vivo. Finally, the present data included 340 implants and 236 models. Conclusions: It’s clearly shown from most of the examined studies that bone morphogenetic protein increases bone regeneration. Further studies should be done in order to induce and sustain bone formation activity. Osteogenic agent should be gradually liberated and not rapidly released with priority to three-dimension reservoir (incorporated titanium implant surface in order to avoid following severe side effects: inflammation, bleeding, haematoma, oedema, erythema, and graft failure.

  10. Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi surface proteins as determinants in establishing host cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia L Schmit

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi infection causes Lyme borreliosis in humans, a condition which can involve a systemic spread of the organism to colonize various tissues and organs. If the infection is left untreated by antimicrobials, it can lead to manifestations including, arthritis, carditis, and/or neurological problems. Identification and characterization of B. burgdorferi outer membrane proteins that facilitate cellular attachment and invasion to establish infection continue to be investigated. In this study, we sought to further define putative cell binding properties of surface-exposed B. burgdorferi proteins by observing whether cellular adherence could be blocked by antibodies. B. burgdorferi mixed separately with monoclonal antibodies against outer surface protein (Osp A, OspC, decorin-binding protein (Dbp A, BBA64, and RevA antigens were incubated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and human neuroglial cells (H4. B. burgdorferi treated with anti-OspA, -DbpA, and –BBA64 monoclonal antibodies showed a significant decrease in cellular association compared to controls, whereas B. burgdorferi treated with anti-OspC and anti-RevA showed no reduction in cellular attachment. Additionally, temporal transcriptional analyses revealed upregulated expression of bba64, ospA, and dbpA during coincubation with cells. Together, the data provide evidence that OspA, DbpA, and BBA64 function in host cell adherence and infection mechanisms.

  11. Modulating surface rheology by electrostatic protein/polysaccharide interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzevles, R.A.; Zinoviadou, K.; Vliet, T. van; Stuart, M.A.C.; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2006-01-01

    There is a large interest in mixed protein/polysaccharide layers at air-water and oil-water interfaces because of their ability to stabilize foams and emulsions. Mixed protein/polysaccharide adsorbed layers at air-water interfaces can be prepared either by adsorption of soluble protein/

  12. Photoswitchable method for the ordered attachment of proteins to surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero, Julio A.; De Yoreo, James J.; Kwon, Youngeun

    2010-04-20

    Described herein is a method for the attachment of proteins to any solid support with control over the orientation of the attachment. The method is extremely efficient, not requiring the previous purification of the protein to be attached, and can be activated by UV-light. Spatially addressable arrays of multiple protein components can be generated by using standard photolithographic techniques.

  13. Scanning electron microscopy study of protein immobilized on SIO2 Sol-gel surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assis O.B.G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniform attachment of enzymes to solid surfaces is essential in the development of bio and optical sensor devices. Immobilization by adsorption according to hydrophilic or hydrophobic nature is dependent on the charges and defects of the support surfaces. Sol-gel SiO2 densified glass surfaces, frequently used as supports for protein immobilization, are evaluated via scanning electron microscopy. The model protein is globular enzyme lysozyme, deposited by adsorption on functionalized surfaces. Formation of a protein layer is confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy, and the SEM images suggest discontinuous adsorption in areas where cracks predominate on the glass surface.

  14. Combining Surface Analytical and Computational Techniques to Investigate Orientation Effects of Immobilized Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Elisa Turla

    Controlling how proteins are immobilized (e.g. controlling their orientation and conformation) is essential for developing and optimizing the performance of in vitro protein-binding devices, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The objective of this work is to develop new methodologies to study proteins and complex mixtures of proteins immobilized onto surfaces. The focus of this study was to control and characterize the orientation of protein G B1, an IgG antibody-binding domain of protein G, on well-defined surfaces as well as measure the effect of protein G B1 orientation on IgG antibody binding using a variety of surface analytical and computational techniques. The surface sensitivity of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to distinguish between different proteins and their orientation by monitoring the changes in intensity of characteristic amino acid mass fragments. Amino acids distributed asymmetrically were used to calculate peak intensity ratios from ToF-SIMS data to determine the orientation of five different cysteine mutants of protein G B1 covalently attached to a maleimide surface. To study the effect of protein orientation on antibody binding, we formed multilayer protein films by binding IgG to protein G B1 films. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) detected protein coverages of 69-130 ng/cm2 (theoretical mass of a monolayer of protein G B1 is 110-160 ng/cm2). QCM-D and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that packing density along with orientation affected the antibody binding process. Spectra from ToF-SIMS using large Ar gas cluster ion sources distinguished between different proteins in multilayer protein systems. A Monte Carlo algorithm was developed to predict protein orientation on surfaces. Two distinct orientations of protein G B1 adsorbed onto a hydrophobic surface were found and characterized as two mutually exclusive sets of amino acids on the outermost

  15. Identification of Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus surface associated proteins by enzymatic shaving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zigong; Fu, Qiang; Liu, Xiaohong; Xiao, Pingping; Lu, Zhaohui; Chen, Yaosheng

    2012-10-12

    Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (Streptococcus zooepidemicus, SEZ) is responsible for a wide variety of infections in many species. Attempts to control the infection caused by this agent are hampered by a lack of effective vaccines and useful diagnostic kits. Surface proteins of bacterial species are usually involved in interaction with host and hopefully act as biomarkers for serodiagnosis and subunit vaccine components. In this study, the surface proteins of SEZ C55138 strain were systematically identified by surface shaving with trypsin and a total of 20 surface associated proteins were found. Further analysis of five selected novel proteins (SzM, FBP, SAP, CSP and 5'-Nu) revealed that they all expressed in vivo and their recombinant derived proteins could be reactive with convalescent sera. These identified immunogenic surface proteins have potential as SEZ vaccine candidates and diagnostic markers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Measurements of long-range interactions between protein-functionalized surfaces by total internal reflection microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Gong, Xiangjun; Ngai, To

    2015-03-17

    Understanding the interaction between protein-functionalized surfaces is an important subject in a variety of protein-related processes, ranging from coatings for biomedical implants to targeted drug carriers and biosensors. In this work, utilizing a total internal reflection microscope (TIRM), we have directly measured the interactions between micron-sized particles decorated with three types of common proteins concanavalin A (ConA), bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYZ), and glass surface coated with soy proteins (SP). Our results show that the protein adsorption greatly affects the charge property of the surfaces, and the interactions between those protein-functionalized surfaces depend on solution pH values. At pH 7.5-10.0, all these three protein-functionalized particles are highly negatively charged, and they move freely above the negatively charged SP-functionalized surface. The net interaction between protein-functionalized surfaces captured by TIRM was found as a long-range, nonspecific double-layer repulsion. When pH was decreased to 5.0, both protein-functionalized surfaces became neutral and double-layer repulsion was greatly reduced, resulting in adhesion of all three protein-functionalized particles to the SP-functionalized surface due to the hydrophobic attraction. The situation is very different at pH = 4.0: BSA-decorated particles, which are highly charged, can move freely above the SP-functionalized surfaces, while ConA- and LYZ-decorated particles can only move restrictively in a limited range. Our results quantify these nonspecific kT-scale interactions between protein-functionalized surfaces, which will enable the design of surfaces for use in biomedical applications and study of biomolecular interactions.

  17. Enhanced protein retention on poly(caprolactone) via surface initiated polymerization of acrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yuhao; Cai, Mengtan; He, Liu [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Luo, Xianglin, E-mail: luoxl@scu.edu.cn [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); State Key Laboratory of Polymer Material and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Dense package of poly(acrylamide) on poly(caprolactone) surface was achieved by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. • Poly(acrylamide) grafted surface exhibited high protein retention ability. • Loaded protein was resistant to detachment and maintained its structure without denaturation. - Abstract: To enhance the biocompatibility or extend the biomedical application of poly(caprolactone) (PCL), protein retention on PCL surface is often required. In this study, poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) brushes were grown from PCL surface via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) and served as a protein-capturing platform. Grafted PAAm was densely packed on surface and exhibited superior protein retention ability. Captured protein was found to be resistant to washing under detergent environment. Furthermore, protein structure after being captured was investigated by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and the CD spectra verified that secondary structure of captured proteins was maintained, indicating no denaturation of protein happened for retention process.

  18. Effect of mechanical denaturation on surface free energy of protein powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Mohammad Amin; Grimsey, Ian M; Forbes, Robert T; Blagbrough, Ian S; Conway, Barbara R

    2016-10-01

    Globular proteins are important both as therapeutic agents and excipients. However, their fragile native conformations can be denatured during pharmaceutical processing, which leads to modification of the surface energy of their powders and hence their performance. Lyophilized powders of hen egg-white lysozyme and β-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae were used as models to study the effects of mechanical denaturation on the surface energies of basic and acidic protein powders, respectively. Their mechanical denaturation upon milling was confirmed by the absence of their thermal unfolding transition phases and by the changes in their secondary and tertiary structures. Inverse gas chromatography detected differences between both unprocessed protein powders and the changes induced by their mechanical denaturation. The surfaces of the acidic and basic protein powders were relatively basic, however the surface acidity of β-galactosidase was higher than that of lysozyme. Also, the surface of β-galactosidase powder had a higher dispersive energy compared to lysozyme. The mechanical denaturation decreased the dispersive energy and the basicity of the surfaces of both protein powders. The amino acid composition and molecular conformation of the proteins explained the surface energy data measured by inverse gas chromatography. The biological activity of mechanically denatured protein powders can either be reversible (lysozyme) or irreversible (β-galactosidase) upon hydration. Our surface data can be exploited to understand and predict the performance of protein powders within pharmaceutical dosage forms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Surface-associated proteins of Staphylococcus aureus: their possible roles in virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Foster (Timothy); D. McDevitt

    1994-01-01

    textabstractA class of proteins that are associated with the cell surface of Gram-positive bacteria has been recognised. Common structural features which are implicated in the proper secretion and attachment of these proteins to the cell surface occur in the C-termini. N-terminal domains interact

  20. How surface composition of high milk proteins powders is influenced by spray-drying temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiani, C; Morand, M; Sanchez, C; Tehrany, E Arab; Jacquot, M; Schuck, P; Jeantet, R; Scher, J

    2010-01-01

    High milk proteins powders are common ingredients in many food products. The surface composition of these powders is expected to play an essential role during their storage, handling and/or final application. Therefore, an eventual control of the surface composition by modifying the spray-drying temperature could be very useful in the improvement of powder quality and the development of new applications. For this purpose, the influence of five spray-drying temperatures upon the surface composition of the powders was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The major milk proteins were studied: native micellar casein and native whey, both more or less enriched in lactose. The results show a surface enrichment in lipids for all the powders and in proteins for many powders. Whatever the drying temperature, lipids and proteins are preferentially located near the surface whereas lactose is found in the core. This surface enrichment is also highly affected by the spray-drying temperature. More lipids, more proteins and less lactose are systematically observed at the surface of powders spray-dried at lower outlet air temperatures. The nature of proteins is also found essential; surface enrichment in lipids being much stronger for whey proteins containing powders than for casein containing powders. Additionally, we found a direct correlation between the lipids surface concentration and the wetting ability for the 25 powders studied.

  1. Surface potential based modeling of charge, current, and capacitances in DGTFET including mobile channel charge and ambipolar behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Prateek; Yadav, Chandan; Agarwal, Amit; Chauhan, Yogesh Singh

    2017-08-01

    We present a surface potential based analytical model for double gate tunnel field effect transistor (DGTFET) for the current, terminal charges, and terminal capacitances. The model accounts for the effect of the mobile charge in the channel and captures the device physics in depletion as well as in the strong inversion regime. The narrowing of the tunnel barrier in the presence of mobile charges in the channel is incorporated via modeling of the inverse decay length, which is constant under channel depletion condition and bias dependent under inversion condition. To capture the ambipolar current behavior in the model, tunneling at the drain junction is also included. The proposed model is validated against TCAD simulation data and it shows close match with the simulation data.

  2. Protein Compatible Polymer Brushes on Polymeric Substrates Prepared by Surface-Initiated Transfer Radica Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Eskimergen, Rüya; Burkrinsky, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    have been made with model systems of poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) films as they can easily be functionalized [1]. Moreover, the inert material polypropylene has successfully beel! activated using a photochemical method [2]. Different polymers including PEG-like matenals have been investigated...... when the PEEK films were modified. The surface roughness should either be unchanged or decreased as it 'will affect the protein adsorption [3]. 1. O. Noiset, C. Henneuse, Y.-J. Schneider, J. Marchand-Brynaert Macromolecules 30 (1997) 540-548 2. J. Huang, H. Murata, R.R. Koepsel, A.J. Russell, K...

  3. Protein consensus-based surface engineering (ProCoS): a computer-assisted method for directed protein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivange, Amol V; Hoeffken, Hans Wolfgang; Haefner, Stefan; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    Protein consensus-based surface engineering (ProCoS) is a simple and efficient method for directed protein evolution combining computational analysis and molecular biology tools to engineer protein surfaces. ProCoS is based on the hypothesis that conserved residues originated from a common ancestor and that these residues are crucial for the function of a protein, whereas highly variable regions (situated on the surface of a protein) can be targeted for surface engineering to maximize performance. ProCoS comprises four main steps: ( i ) identification of conserved and highly variable regions; ( ii ) protein sequence design by substituting residues in the highly variable regions, and gene synthesis; ( iii ) in vitro DNA recombination of synthetic genes; and ( iv ) screening for active variants. ProCoS is a simple method for surface mutagenesis in which multiple sequence alignment is used for selection of surface residues based on a structural model. To demonstrate the technique's utility for directed evolution, the surface of a phytase enzyme from Yersinia mollaretii (Ymphytase) was subjected to ProCoS. Screening just 1050 clones from ProCoS engineering-guided mutant libraries yielded an enzyme with 34 amino acid substitutions. The surface-engineered Ymphytase exhibited 3.8-fold higher pH stability (at pH 2.8 for 3 h) and retained 40% of the enzyme's specific activity (400 U/mg) compared with the wild-type Ymphytase. The pH stability might be attributed to a significantly increased (20 percentage points; from 9% to 29%) number of negatively charged amino acids on the surface of the engineered phytase.

  4. Adsorption of DNA binding proteins to functionalized carbon nanotube surfaces with and without DNA wrapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yu; Oura, Shusuke; Umemura, Kazuo

    2017-09-01

    We examined the adsorption of DNA binding proteins on functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). When SWNTs were functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG-SWNT), moderate adsorption of protein molecules was observed. In contrast, nanotubes functionalized with CONH 2 groups (CONH 2 -SWNT) exhibited very strong interactions between the CONH 2 -SWNT and DNA binding proteins. Instead, when these SWNT surfaces were wrapped with DNA molecules (thymine 30-mers), protein binding was a little decreased. Our results revealed that DNA wrapped PEG-SWNT was one of the most promising candidates to realize DNA nanodevices involving protein reactions on DNA-SWNT surfaces. In addition, the DNA binding protein RecA was more adhesive than single-stranded DNA binding proteins to the functionalized SWNT surfaces.

  5. Data on the role of accessible surface area on osmolytes-induced protein stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safikur Rahman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes data related to the research article “Testing the dependence of stabilizing effect of osmolytes on the fractional increase in the accessible surface area on thermal and chemical denaturations of proteins” [1]. Heat- and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl-induced denaturation of three disulfide free proteins (bovine cytochrome c (b-cyt-c, myoglobin (Mb and barstar in the presence of different concentrations of methylamines (sarcosine, glycine-betaine (GB and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO was monitored by [ϴ]222, the mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm at pH 7.0. Methylamines belong to a class of osmolytes known to protect proteins from deleterious effect of urea. This paper includes comprehensive thermodynamic data obtained from the heat- and GdmCl-induced denaturations of barstar, b-cyt-c and Mb.

  6. A Bacterial Surface Display System Expressing Cleavable Capsid Proteins of Human Norovirus: A Novel System to Discover Candidate Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Human noroviruses (HuNoVs are the dominant cause of food-borne outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis. However, fundamental researches on HuNoVs, such as identification of viral receptors have been limited by the currently immature system to culture HuNoVs and the lack of efficient small animal models. Previously, we demonstrated that the recombinant protruding domain (P domain of HuNoVs capsid proteins were successfully anchored on the surface of Escherichia coli BL21 cells after the bacteria were transformed with a plasmid expressing HuNoVs P protein fused with bacterial transmembrane anchor protein. The cell-surface-displayed P proteins could specifically recognize and bind to histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs, receptors of HuNoVs. In this study, an upgraded bacterial surface displayed system was developed as a new platform to discover candidate receptors of HuNoVs. A thrombin-susceptible “linker” sequence was added between the sequences of bacterial transmembrane anchor protein and P domain of HuNoV (GII.4 capsid protein in a plasmid that displays the functional P proteins on the surface of bacteria. In this new system, the surface-displayed HuNoV P proteins could be released by thrombin treatment. The released P proteins self-assembled into small particles, which were visualized by electron microscopy. The bacteria with the surface-displayed P proteins were incubated with pig stomach mucin which contained HBGAs. The bacteria-HuNoV P proteins-HBGAs complex could be collected by low speed centrifugation. The HuNoV P proteins-HBGAs complex was then separated from the recombinant bacterial surface by thrombin treatment. The released viral receptor was confirmed by using the monoclonal antibody against type A HBGA. It demonstrated that the new system was able to capture and easily isolate receptors of HuNoVs. This new strategy provides an alternative, easier approach for isolating unknown receptors/ligands of HuNoVs from different samples

  7. Identification of surface proteins of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae using immunoproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R D; Cui, J; Wang, L; Long, S R; Zhang, X; Liu, M Y; Wang, Z Q

    2014-12-01

    Trichinella spiralis surface proteins are directly exposed to the host's immune system, making them the main target antigens which induce the immune responses and may play an important role in the larval invasion and development process. The analysis and characterization of T. spiralis surface proteins could provide useful information to elucidate the host-parasite interaction, identify the early diagnostic antigens and the targets for vaccine. The purpose of this study was to identify the surface proteins of T. spiralis muscle larvae by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) Western-blot analysis and mass spectrometry. The 2-DE results showed that a total of approximately 33 proteins spots were detected with molecular weights varying from 10 to 66 kDa and isoelectric point (pI) from 4 to 7. Fourteen protein spots were recognized by sera of mice infected with T. spiralis at 42 dpi or at 18 dpi, and 12 spots were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS, which represented 8 different proteins of T. spiralis. Out of the 8 T. spiralis proteins, 5 proteins (partial P49 antigen, deoxyribonuclease II family protein, two serine proteases, and serine proteinase) had catalytic and hydrolase activity, which might be the invasion-related proteins and the targets for vaccine. The 4 proteins (deoxyribonuclease II family protein, serine protease, 53 kDa ES antigen and hypothetical protein Tsp_08444) recognized by infection sera at 18 dpi might be the early diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis.

  8. In-cell thermodynamics and a new role for protein surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Austin E; Zhou, Larry Z; Gorensek, Annelise H; Senske, Michael; Pielak, Gary J

    2016-02-16

    There is abundant, physiologically relevant knowledge about protein cores; they are hydrophobic, exquisitely well packed, and nearly all hydrogen bonds are satisfied. An equivalent understanding of protein surfaces has remained elusive because proteins are almost exclusively studied in vitro in simple aqueous solutions. Here, we establish the essential physiological roles played by protein surfaces by measuring the equilibrium thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding in the complex environment of living Escherichia coli cells, and under physiologically relevant in vitro conditions. Fluorine NMR data on the 7-kDa globular N-terminal SH3 domain of Drosophila signal transduction protein drk (SH3) show that charge-charge interactions are fundamental to protein stability and folding kinetics in cells. Our results contradict predictions from accepted theories of macromolecular crowding and show that cosolutes commonly used to mimic the cellular interior do not yield physiologically relevant information. As such, we provide the foundation for a complete picture of protein chemistry in cells.

  9. Major membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae selectively modified by covalently bound lipid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise K.S.; Kim, M.F.

    1987-12-01

    Surface protein antigens of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were identified by direct antibody-surface binding or by radioimmunoprecipitation of surface /sup 125/I-labeled proteins with a series of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Radioimmunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from cells labeled with (/sup 35/S) methionine, /sup 14/C-amino acids, or (/sup 3/H) palmitic acid showed that proteins p65, p50, and p44 were abundant and (with one other hydrophobic protein, p60) were selectively labeled with lipid. Alkaline hydroxylamine treatment of labeled proteins indicated linkage of lipids by amide or stable O-linked ester bonds. Proteins p65, p50, and p44 were highly immunogenic in the natural host as measured by immunoblots of TX-114-phase proteins with antisera from swine inoculated with whole organisms. These proteins were antigenically and structurally unrelated, since hyperimmune mouse antibodies to individual gel-purified proteins were monospecific and gave distinct proteolytic epitope maps. Intraspecies size variants of one surface antigen of M. hyopneumoniae were revealed by a MAb to p70 (defined in strain J, ATCC 25934), which recognized a large p73 component on strain VPP11 (ATCC 25617). In addition, MAb to internal, aqueous-phase protein p82 of strain J failed to bind an analogous antigen in strain VPP11.

  10. Major membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae selectively modified by covalently bound lipid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, K.S.; Kim, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    Surface protein antigens of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were identified by direct antibody-surface binding or by radioimmunoprecipitation of surface 125 I-labeled proteins with a series of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Radioimmunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from cells labeled with [ 35 S] methionine, 14 C-amino acids, or [ 3 H] palmitic acid showed that proteins p65, p50, and p44 were abundant and (with one other hydrophobic protein, p60) were selectively labeled with lipid. Alkaline hydroxylamine treatment of labeled proteins indicated linkage of lipids by amide or stable O-linked ester bonds. Proteins p65, p50, and p44 were highly immunogenic in the natural host as measured by immunoblots of TX-114-phase proteins with antisera from swine inoculated with whole organisms. These proteins were antigenically and structurally unrelated, since hyperimmune mouse antibodies to individual gel-purified proteins were monospecific and gave distinct proteolytic epitope maps. Intraspecies size variants of one surface antigen of M. hyopneumoniae were revealed by a MAb to p70 (defined in strain J, ATCC 25934), which recognized a large p73 component on strain VPP11 (ATCC 25617). In addition, MAb to internal, aqueous-phase protein p82 of strain J failed to bind an analogous antigen in strain VPP11

  11. Selective labelling of cell-surface proteins using CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagner-McWhirter, Asa; Winkvist, Maria; Bourin, Stephanie; Marouga, Rita

    2008-11-26

    Surface proteins are central to the cell's ability to react to its environment and to interact with neighboring cells. They are known to be inducers of almost all intracellular signaling. Moreover, they play an important role in environmental adaptation and drug treatment, and are often involved in disease pathogenesis and pathology (1). Protein-protein interactions are intrinsic to signaling pathways, and to gain more insight in these complex biological processes, sensitive and reliable methods are needed for studying cell surface proteins. Two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis is used extensively for detection of biomarkers and other targets in complex protein samples to study differential changes. Cell surface proteins, partly due to their low abundance (1 2% of cellular proteins), are difficult to detect in a 2-D gel without fractionation or some other type of enrichment. They are also often poorly represented in 2-D gels due to their hydrophobic nature and high molecular weight (2). In this study, we present a new protocol for intact cells using CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes for specific labeling and detection of this important group of proteins. The results showed specific labeling of a large number of cell surface proteins with minimal labeling of intracellular proteins. This protocol is rapid, simple to use, and all three CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes (Cy 2, Cy 3 and Cy 5) can be used to label cell-surface proteins. These features allow for multiplexing using the 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with Ettan DIGE technology and analysis of protein expression changes using DeCyder 2-D Differential Analysis Software. The level of cell-surface proteins was followed during serum starvation of CHO cells for various lengths of time (see Table 1). Small changes in abundance were detected with high accuracy, and results are supported by defined statistical methods.

  12. Nitrate as a probe of cytochrome c surface: crystallographic identification of crucial "hot spots" for protein-protein recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De March, Matteo; Demitri, Nicola; De Zorzi, Rita; Casini, Angela; Gabbiani, Chiara; Guerri, Annalisa; Messori, Luigi; Geremia, Silvano

    2014-06-01

    The electrostatic surface of cytochrome c and its changes with the iron oxidation state are involved in the docking and undocking processes of this protein to its biological partners in the mitochondrial respiratory pathway. To investigate the subtle mechanisms of formation of productive macromolecular complexes and of their breakage following the electron transfer process, the X-ray structures of horse heart ferri-cytochrome c (trigonal form) and ferro-cytochrome c (monoclinic form) were obtained using nitrate ions both as a crystallizing agent and an anionic probe for mapping the electrostatic surface changes. Both crystal forms contain three protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. In addition, a total of 21.5 and 18 crystallographically independent nitrate ions were identified for the trigonal and monoclinic forms, respectively. By matching all the six crystallographically independent protein molecules, 26 different anion-protein interaction sites were identified on the surfaces of cytochrome c, 10 of which were found in both forms, 8 present only in the oxidized and 8 only in the reduced form. The structural analysis of the electron transfer complexes, based on this new information, suggests a specific exit strategy for cytochrome c after formation of productive protein-protein complexes: a directional sliding mechanism for the electron shuttle on the surface of the redox partner is proposed to take place after the electron transfer process has occurred. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. PL-PatchSurfer: A Novel Molecular Local Surface-Based Method for Exploring Protein-Ligand Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingjie Hu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Structure-based computational methods have been widely used in exploring protein-ligand interactions, including predicting the binding ligands of a given protein based on their structural complementarity. Compared to other protein and ligand representations, the advantages of a surface representation include reduced sensitivity to subtle changes in the pocket and ligand conformation and fast search speed. Here we developed a novel method named PL-PatchSurfer (Protein-Ligand PatchSurfer. PL-PatchSurfer represents the protein binding pocket and the ligand molecular surface as a combination of segmented surface patches. Each patch is characterized by its geometrical shape and the electrostatic potential, which are represented using the 3D Zernike descriptor (3DZD. We first tested PL-PatchSurfer on binding ligand prediction and found it outperformed the pocket-similarity based ligand prediction program. We then optimized the search algorithm of PL-PatchSurfer using the PDBbind dataset. Finally, we explored the utility of applying PL-PatchSurfer to a larger and more diverse dataset and showed that PL-PatchSurfer was able to provide a high early enrichment for most of the targets. To the best of our knowledge, PL-PatchSurfer is the first surface patch-based method that treats ligand complementarity at protein binding sites. We believe that using a surface patch approach to better understand protein-ligand interactions has the potential to significantly enhance the design of new ligands for a wide array of drug-targets.

  14. Determining Cell-surface Expression and Endocytic Rate of Proteins in Primary Astrocyte Cultures Using Biotinylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Daniel Kai Long; Moukhles, Hakima

    2017-07-03

    Cell-surface proteins mediate a wide array of functions. In many cases, their activity is regulated by endocytic processes that modulate their levels at the plasma membrane. Here, we present detailed protocols for 2 methods that facilitate the study of such processes, both of which are based on the principle of the biotinylation of cell-surface proteins. The first is designed to allow for the semi-quantitative determination of the relative levels of a particular protein at the cell-surface. In it, the lysine residues of the plasma membrane proteins of cells are first labeled with a biotin moiety. Once the cells are lysed, these proteins may then be specifically precipitated via the use of agarose-immobilized streptavidin by exploiting the natural affinity of the latter for biotin. The proteins isolated in such a manner may then be analyzed via a standard western blotting approach. The second method provides a means of determining the endocytic rate of a particular cell-surface target over a period of time. Cell-surface proteins are first modified with a biotin derivative containing a cleavable disulfide bond. The cells are then shifted back to normal culture conditions, which causes the endocytic uptake of a proportion of biotinylated proteins. Next, the disulfide bonds of non-internalized biotin groups are reduced using the membrane-impermeable reducing agent glutathione. Via this approach, endocytosed proteins may thus be isolated and quantified with a high degree of specificity.

  15. Structure of the surface layer protein of the outer membrane of Spirillum serpens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaeser, R.M.; Chiu, W.; Grano, D.

    1979-01-01

    The outer membrane of the Gram negative bacterium, Spirillum serpens VHA, possesses an ordered surface-layer protein. A morphological model of this protein is proposed on the basis of electron micrographs that have been obtained of unstained, hydrated specimens as well as of negatively stained specimens. The molecular weight of the protein monomer in this model is consistent with the surface-layer protein molecular weight obtained by gel electrophoresis and estimated to be 140,000. In addition, gel electrophoresis reveals the presence of proteins of MW approx. = 35,000 and MW approx. = 78,000, which remain associated with the outer membrane under conditions where the ordered surface-layer protein is released in soluble form.

  16. Multidimensional profiling of cell surface proteins and nuclear markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Andarawewa, Kumari; Yaswen, Paul; Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Mary; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-01-30

    Cell membrane proteins play an important role in tissue architecture and cell-cell communication. We hypothesize that segmentation and multidimensional characterization of the distribution of cell membrane proteins, on a cell-by-cell basis, enable improved classification of treatment groups and identify important characteristics that can otherwise be hidden. We have developed a series of computational steps to (i) delineate cell membrane protein signals and associate them with a specific nucleus; (ii) compute a coupled representation of the multiplexed DNA content with membrane proteins; (iii) rank computed features associated with such a multidimensional representation; (iv) visualize selected features for comparative evaluation through heatmaps; and (v) discriminate between treatment groups in an optimal fashion. The novelty of our method is in the segmentation of the membrane signal and the multidimensional representation of phenotypic signature on a cell-by-cell basis. To test the utility of this method, the proposed computational steps were applied to images of cells that have been irradiated with different radiation qualities in the presence and absence of other small molecules. These samples are labeled for their DNA content and E-cadherin membrane proteins. We demonstrate that multidimensional representations of cell-by-cell phenotypes improve predictive and visualization capabilities among different treatment groups, and identify hidden variables.

  17. Surface sieving coordinated IMAC material for purification of His-tagged proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Senwu; Yang, Kaiguang; Liu, Lukuan; Zhao, Baofeng; Chen, Yuanbo; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2018-01-02

    Tailor-made materials for the purification of proteins with His-tag was designed through synergizing the selectivity of surface sieving and metal ion affinity. By excluding impurity proteins out of the surface polymer network, such materials could purify His-tagged proteins from the crude cell lysis with purity up to 90%, improved by 14% compared to that obtained by the commercial metal chelating affinity materials. This study might promote the His-tagged protein purification to a new level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Interfacial layers from the protein HFBII hydrophobin: dynamic surface tension, dilatational elasticity and relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Nikola A; Marinova, Krastanka G; Gurkov, Theodor D; Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B J; Arnaudov, Luben N; Pelan, Eddie G; Lips, Alex

    2012-06-15

    The pendant-drop method (with drop-shape analysis) and Langmuir trough are applied to investigate the characteristic relaxation times and elasticity of interfacial layers from the protein HFBII hydrophobin. Such layers undergo a transition from fluid to elastic solid films. The transition is detected as an increase in the error of the fit of the pendant-drop profile by means of the Laplace equation of capillarity. The relaxation of surface tension after interfacial expansion follows an exponential-decay law, which indicates adsorption kinetics under barrier control. The experimental data for the relaxation time suggest that the adsorption rate is determined by the balance of two opposing factors: (i) the barrier to detachment of protein molecules from bulk aggregates and (ii) the attraction of the detached molecules by the adsorption layer due to the hydrophobic surface force. The hydrophobic attraction can explain why a greater surface coverage leads to a faster adsorption. The relaxation of surface tension after interfacial compression follows a different, square-root law. Such behavior can be attributed to surface diffusion of adsorbed protein molecules that are condensing at the periphery of interfacial protein aggregates. The surface dilatational elasticity, E, is determined in experiments on quick expansion or compression of the interfacial protein layers. At lower surface pressures (<11 mN/m) the experiments on expansion, compression and oscillations give close values of E that are increasing with the rise of surface pressure. At higher surface pressures, E exhibits the opposite tendency and the data are scattered. The latter behavior can be explained with a two-dimensional condensation of adsorbed protein molecules at the higher surface pressures. The results could be important for the understanding and control of dynamic processes in foams and emulsions stabilized by hydrophobins, as well as for the modification of solid surfaces by adsorption of such

  19. A study on the effect of surface lysine to arginine mutagenesis on protein stability and structure using green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Two positively charged basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, are mostly exposed to protein surface, and play important roles in protein stability by forming electrostatic interactions. In particular, the guanidinium group of arginine allows interactions in three possible directions, which enables arginine to form a larger number of electrostatic interactions compared to lysine. The higher pKa of the basic residue in arginine may also generate more stable ionic interactions than lysine. This paper reports an investigation whether the advantageous properties of arginine over lysine can be utilized to enhance protein stability. A variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created by mutating the maximum possible number of lysine residues on the surface to arginines while retaining the activity. When the stability of the variant was examined under a range of denaturing conditions, the variant was relatively more stable compared to control GFP in the presence of chemical denaturants such as urea, alkaline pH and ionic detergents, but the thermal stability of the protein was not changed. The modeled structure of the variant indicated putative new salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions that help improve the rigidity of the protein against different chemical denaturants. Structural analyses of the electrostatic interactions also confirmed that the geometric properties of the guanidinium group in arginine had such effects. On the other hand, the altered electrostatic interactions induced by the mutagenesis of surface lysines to arginines adversely affected protein folding, which decreased the productivity of the functional form of the variant. These results suggest that the surface lysine mutagenesis to arginines can be considered one of the parameters in protein stability engineering.

  20. A Study of Surface Proteins, Other Adhesins and Iron Acquiring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By the use guinea pig blood cells this was found to be 15% MRHA and 25% MSHA strains. When tested for their iron-binding protein (IBP) production, the MRHAs were positive for IBPs while the MSHA were positive for this property in 10%. Finally, based on the results obtained conclusions and recommendations are given ...

  1. SURF'S UP! – Protein classification by surface comparisons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Large-scale genome sequencing and structural genomics projects generate numerous sequences and structures for. 'hypothetical' proteins ... SURF'S UP! facilitates the comparative analysis of physicochemical features of the ... features, SURF'S UP! can work with models obtained from comparative modelling. Although it is ...

  2. Ion specific protein assembly and hydrophobic surface forces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lund, Mikael; Jungwirth, Pavel; Woodward, C. E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 25 (2008), 258105/1-258105/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/07/1006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : lysozyme * water * protein association Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.180, year: 2008

  3. Protein conformational transitions at the liquid-gas interface as studied by dilational surface rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, Boris A

    2014-04-01

    Experimental results on the dynamic dilational surface elasticity of protein solutions are analyzed and compared. Short reviews of the protein behavior at the liquid-gas interface and the dilational surface rheology precede the main sections of this work. The kinetic dependencies of the surface elasticity differ strongly for the solutions of globular and non-globular proteins. In the latter case these dependencies are similar to those for solutions of non-ionic amphiphilic polymers and have local maxima corresponding to the formation of the distal region of the surface layer (type I). In the former case the dynamic surface elasticity is much higher (>60 mN/m) and the kinetic dependencies are monotonical and similar to the data for aqueous dispersions of solid nanoparticles (type II). The addition of strong denaturants to solutions of bovine serum albumin and β-lactoglobulin results in an abrupt transition from the type II to type I dependencies if the denaturant concentration exceeds a certain critical value. These results give a strong argument in favor of the preservation of the protein globular structure in the course of adsorption without any denaturants. The addition of cationic surfactants also can lead to the non-monotonical kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity indicating destruction of the protein tertiary and secondary structures. The addition of anionic surfactants gives similar results only for the protein solutions of high ionic strength. The influence of cationic surfactants on the local maxima of the kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity for solutions of a non-globular protein (β-casein) differs from the influence of anionic surfactants due to the heterogeneity of the charge distribution along the protein chain. In this case one can use small admixtures of ionic surfactants as probes of the adsorption mechanism. The effect of polyelectrolytes on the kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity of protein

  4. Shotgun proteomic analytical approach for studying proteins adsorbed onto liposome surface

    KAUST Repository

    Capriotti, Anna Laura

    2011-07-02

    The knowledge about the interaction between plasma proteins and nanocarriers employed for in vivo delivery is fundamental to understand their biodistribution. Protein adsorption onto nanoparticle surface (protein corona) is strongly affected by vector surface characteristics. In general, the primary interaction is thought to be electrostatic, thus surface charge of carrier is supposed to play a central role in protein adsorption. Because protein corona composition can be critical in modifying the interactive surface that is recognized by cells, characterizing its formation onto lipid particles may serve as a fundamental predictive model for the in vivo efficiency of a lipidic vector. In the present work, protein coronas adsorbed onto three differently charged cationic liposome formulations were compared by a shotgun proteomic approach based on nano-liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. About 130 proteins were identified in each corona, with only small differences between the different cationic liposome formulations. However, this study could be useful for the future controlled design of colloidal drug carriers and possibly in the controlled creation of biocompatible surfaces of other devices that come into contact with proteins into body fluids. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Cheese matrix protects the immunomodulatory surface protein SlpB of Propionibacterium freudenreichii during in vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabah, Houem; Ménard, Olivia; Gaucher, Floriane; do Carmo, Fillipe Luiz Rosa; Dupont, Didier; Jan, Gwénaël

    2018-04-01

    Propionibacterium freudenreichii is a traditional Swiss-type cheeses starter and constitutes an emergent probiotic, exerting several beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory modulation of gut inflammation. This feature relies on several metabolites and on surface proteins, with a prominent role of the surface protein SlpB. In this study, we firstly investigated the relevance to avoid SlpB digestive proteolysis, by comparing the effect of i) P. freudenreichii CIRM-BIA 129, ii) its native Slps, or iii) peptides resulting from Slps digestive proteolysis, with respect to modulation of HT-29 cells response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. The anti-inflammatory effect exerted by P. freudenreichii CIRM-BIA 129 and by its native surface proteins (Slps) on HT-29 cells was abolished by digestive proteolysis. This result confirmed the importance to protect immunomodulatory surface proteins from digestive proteolysis in order to allow gut immune system modulation. Thus, we examined the effect of dairy matrices on P. freudenreichii viability and on SlpB integrity during digestion. In comparison with liquid matrices, the cheese matrix provided an enhanced tolerance towards digestive stresses and protection of SlpB towards proteolysis, during two in vitro digestion models: static and dynamic. Taken together, these results show that cheese is an adequate delivery vehicle for P. freudenreichii immunomodulatory proteins. This opens perspectives for the development of fermented dairy functional foods aimed at target populations at high risk for diet-related diseases with an inflammatory component. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enterococcus faecalis surface proteins determine its adhesion mechanism to bile drain materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waar, Karola; van der Mei, Henny C; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Degener, John E; Busscher, Henk J

    2002-06-01

    An important step in infections associated with biliary drains is adhesion of micro-organisms to the surface. In this study the role of three surface proteins of Enterococcus faecalis (enterococcal surface protein, aggregation substances 1 and 373) in the adhesion to silicone rubber, fluoro-ethylene-propylene and polyethylene was examined. Four isogenic E. faecalis strains with and without aggregation substances and one strain expressing enterococcal surface protein were used. The kinetics of enterococcal adhesion to the materials was measured in situ in a parallel plate flow chamber. Initial deposition rates were similar for all strains, whereas the presence of surface proteins increased the total number of adhering bacteria. Nearest neighbour analysis demonstrated that enterococci expressing the whole sex-pheromone plasmid encoding aggregation substances 1 or 373 adhered in higher numbers through mechanisms of positive cooperativity, which means that adhesion of bacteria enhances the probability of adhesion of other bacteria near these bacteria. Enterococci with the enterococcal surface protein did not adhere through this mechanism. These findings indicate that the surface proteins of E. faecalis play a key role in the adhesion to bile drains and bile drain associated infections.

  7. Grafting zwitterionic polymer onto cryogel surface enhances protein retention in steric exclusion chromatography on cryogel monolith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shi-Peng; Zheng, Jie; Sun, Yan

    2015-04-10

    Cryogel monoliths with interconnected macropores (10-100μm) and hydrophilic surfaces can be employed as chromatography media for protein retention in steric exclusion chromatography (SXC). SXC is based on the principle that the exclusion of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on both a hydrophilic chromatography surface and a protein favors their association, leading to the protein retention on the chromatography surface. Elution of the retained protein can be achieved by reducing PEG concentration. In this work, the surface of polyacrylamide-based cryogel monolith was modified by grafting zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) (pCBMA), leading the increase in the surface hydrophilicity. Observation by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of the grafted pCBMA chain clusters on the cryogel surface, but pCBMA grafting did not result in the changes of the physical properties of the monolith column, and the columns maintained good recyclability in SXC. The effect of the surface grafting on the SXC behavior of γ-globulin was investigated in a wide flow rate range (0.6-12cm/min). It was found that the dynamic retention capacity increased 1.4-1.8 times by the zwitterionic polymer grafting in the flow rate range of 1.5-12cm/min. The mechanism of enhanced protein retention on the zwitterionic polymer-grafted surface was proposed. The research proved that zwitterionic polymer modification was promising for the development of new materials for SXC applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Insights into cellulase-lignin non-specific binding revealed by computational redesign of the surface of green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarmeyer, Carolyn N; Smith, Matthew D; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Sammond, Deanne; Whitehead, Timothy A

    2017-04-01

    Biological-mediated conversion of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and biochemicals is a promising avenue toward energy sustainability. However, a critical impediment to the commercialization of cellulosic biofuel production is the high cost of cellulase enzymes needed to deconstruct biomass into fermentable sugars. One major factor driving cost is cellulase adsorption and inactivation in the presence of lignin, yet we currently have a poor understanding of the protein structure-function relationships driving this adsorption. In this work, we have systematically investigated the role of protein surface potential on lignin adsorption using a model monomeric fluorescent protein. We have designed and experimentally characterized 16 model protein variants spanning the physiological range of net charge (-24 to +16 total charges) and total charge density (0.28-0.40 charges per sequence length) typical for natural proteins. Protein designs were expressed, purified, and subjected to in silico and in vitro biophysical measurements to evaluate the relationship between protein surface potential and lignin adsorption properties. The designs were comparable to model fluorescent protein in terms of thermostability and heterologous expression yield, although the majority of the designs unexpectedly formed homodimers. Protein adsorption to lignin was studied at two different temperatures using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring and a subtractive mass balance assay. We found a weak correlation between protein net charge and protein-binding capacity to lignin. No other single characteristic, including apparent melting temperature and 2nd virial coefficient, showed correlation with lignin binding. Analysis of an unrelated cellulase dataset with mutations localized to a family I carbohydrate-binding module showed a similar correlation between net charge and lignin binding capacity. Overall, our study provides strategies to identify highly active, low

  9. Functionalization of SU-8 Photoresist Surfaces with IgG Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blagoi, Gabriela; Keller, Stephan Urs; Johansson, Alicia

    2008-01-01

    The negative epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 has a variety of applications within microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and lab-on-a-chip systems. Here, several methods to functionalize SU-8 surfaces with IgG proteins were investigated. Fluorescent labeled proteins and fluorescent sandwich...... immunoassays were employed to characterize the binding efficiency of model proteins to bare SU-8 surface, SU-8 treated with cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN) etchant and CAN treated surfaces modified by aminosilanization. The highest binding capacity of antibodies was observed on bare SU-8. This explains why bare...... SU-8 in a functional fluorescent sandwich immunoassay detecting C-reactive protein (CRP) gave twice as high signal as compared with the other two surfaces. Immunoassays performed on bare SU-8 and CAN treated SU-8 resulted in detection limits of CRP of 30 and 80 ng/ml respectively which is sufficient...

  10. Purification and characterization of a protein cryoprotective for Vibrio cholerae extracted from the prawn shell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faming, D; Shimodori, S; Moriya, T; Iwanaga, S; Amako, K

    1993-01-01

    A substance cryoprotective for Vibrio cholerae on the prawn shell surface was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration. It was a protein of 81 kDa and called cryoprotective protein (CPP). The cryoprotective activity of this protein for V. cholerae was sensitive to heat at 100 C and trypsin treatment. In the presence of Mg ion the protein can bind to the bacterial cell surface. V. cholerae can adhere to the shell surface of the prawn. The number of adhered bacteria was reduced by treating the shell with anti-CPP serum, heat or by trypsin. The presence of Mg ion promoted the adherence. These results suggest that the CPP could serve as an adherence site for V. cholerae on the shell surface.

  11. Regulation of ADAM12 cell-surface expression by protein kinase C epsilon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundberg, Christina; Thodeti, Charles Kumar; Kveiborg, Marie

    2004-01-01

    The ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family consists of multidomain cell-surface proteins that have a major impact on cell behavior. These transmembrane-anchored proteins are synthesized as proforms that have (from the N terminus): a prodomain; a metalloprotease-, disintegrin......-like-, cysteine-rich, epidermal growth factor-like, and transmembrane domain; and a cytoplasmic tail. The 90-kDa mature form of human ADAM12 is generated in the trans-Golgi through cleavage of the prodomain by a furin-peptidase and is stored intracellularly until translocation to the cell surface...... as a constitutively active protein. However, little is known about the regulation of ADAM12 cell-surface translocation. Here, we used human RD rhabdomyosarcoma cells, which express ADAM12 at the cell surface, in a temporal pattern. We report that protein kinase C (PKC) epsilon induces ADAM12 translocation to the cell...

  12. Identification of polymer surface adsorbed proteins implicated in pluripotent human embryonic stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Moamen; Rao, Wei; Smith, James G W; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Young, Lorraine E; Barrett, David A; Davies, Martyn C; Denning, Chris; Alexander, Morgan R

    2016-08-16

    Improved biomaterials are required for application in regenerative medicine, biosensing, and as medical devices. The response of cells to the chemistry of polymers cultured in media is generally regarded as being dominated by proteins adsorbed to the surface. Here we use mass spectrometry to identify proteins adsorbed from a complex mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) conditioned medium found to support pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) expansion on a plasma etched tissue culture polystyrene surface. A total of 71 proteins were identified, of which 14 uniquely correlated with the surface on which pluripotent stem cell expansion was achieved. We have developed a microarray combinatorial protein spotting approach to test the potential of these 14 proteins to support expansion of a hESC cell line (HUES-7) and a human induced pluripotent stem cell line (ReBl-PAT) on a novel polymer (N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl) methacrylamide). These proteins were spotted to form a primary array yielding several protein mixture 'hits' that enhanced cell attachment to the polymer. A second array was generated to test the function of a refined set of protein mixtures. We found that a combination of heat shock protein 90 and heat shock protein-1 encourage elevated adherence of pluripotent stem cells at a level comparable to fibronectin pre-treatment.

  13. Proximity Hybridization-Regulated Immunoassay for Cell Surface Protein and Protein-Overexpressing Cancer Cells via Electrochemiluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Gao, Hongfang; Qi, Honglan; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2018-03-06

    A simple electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassay based on a proximity hybridization-regulated strategy was developed for highly sensitive and specific detection of cell surface protein and protein-overexpressing cancer cells. A biosensor was fabricated by self-assembling a thiolated capture ss-DNA3 (partially hybridize with ss-DNA1 and ss-DNA2) and blocking with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol on a gold electrode surface. Target protein was simultaneously bound by two ss-DNA-tagged antibody probes (DNA1-Ab1 and DNA2-Ab2), while DNA1 and DNA2 were brought in sufficient proximity and hybridized with capture DNA3 on the surface of the biosensor. After ECL signal reagent Ru(phen) 3 2+ was intercalated into the hybridized ds-DNAs, ECL measurement was performed in the coreactant solution. A "signal on" proximity hybridization-regulated ECL immunoassay for alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) was developed. The ECL intensity increased with the increase of AFP concentration in the range of 0.05-20.0 ng/mL with a detection limit of 6.2 pg/mL. Moreover, the developed ECL method was successfully used to detect AFP-overexpressing cancer cells (MCF-7 cancer cells as model) with a detection limit of 620 cells/mL (∼60 MCF-7 cells in 100 μL of cell suspension) and discriminate AFP expression on different types of the living cell surface. This work for the first time reports a proximity hybridization-regulated ECL immunoassay for the detection of the cell surface protein on a living cell surface with good specificity and sensitivity. This simple, specific, and sensitive strategy is greatly promising for the detection of proteins and specific cells.

  14. Hybrid surface platform for the simultaneous detection of proteins and DNA using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homola, Jiří; Piliarik, Marek; Ladd, J.; Taylor, A.; Shaoyi, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 11 (2008), s. 4231-4236 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance imaging * DNA -directed immobilization * protein array Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 5.712, year: 2008

  15. Do we see what we should see? Describing non-covalent interactions in protein structures including precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manickam Gurusaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The power of X-ray crystal structure analysis as a technique is to `see where the atoms are'. The results are extensively used by a wide variety of research communities. However, this `seeing where the atoms are' can give a false sense of security unless the precision of the placement of the atoms has been taken into account. Indeed, the presentation of bond distances and angles to a false precision (i.e. to too many decimal places is commonplace. This article has three themes. Firstly, a basis for a proper representation of protein crystal structure results is detailed and demonstrated with respect to analyses of Protein Data Bank entries. The basis for establishing the precision of placement of each atom in a protein crystal structure is non-trivial. Secondly, a knowledge base harnessing such a descriptor of precision is presented. It is applied here to the case of salt bridges, i.e. ion pairs, in protein structures; this is the most fundamental place to start with such structure-precision representations since salt bridges are one of the tenets of protein structure stability. Ion pairs also play a central role in protein oligomerization, molecular recognition of ligands and substrates, allosteric regulation, domain motion and α-helix capping. A new knowledge base, SBPS (Salt Bridges in Protein Structures, takes these structural precisions into account and is the first of its kind. The third theme of the article is to indicate natural extensions of the need for such a description of precision, such as those involving metalloproteins and the determination of the protonation states of ionizable amino acids. Overall, it is also noted that this work and these examples are also relevant to protein three-dimensional structure molecular graphics software.

  16. Proteomic analysis of cell surface-associated proteins from probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Madsen, Søren M; Glenting, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we used a proteomic approach to identify surface-associated proteins from the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum 299v. Proteins were extracted from the cell surface using a mild wash in phosphate buffer and analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel...... of probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The results provide the basis for future studies on the molecular mechanisms of probiotics....

  17. Adsorption mechanism of ribosomal protein L2 onto a silica surface: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosaka, Ryo; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Ohdomari, Iwao; Watanabe, Takanobu

    2010-06-15

    A large-scale molecular dynamics simulation was carried out in order to investigate the adsorption mechanism of ribosomal protein L2 (RPL2) onto a silica surface at various pH values. RPL2 is a constituent protein of the 50S large ribosomal subunit, and a recent experimental report showed that it adsorbs strongly to silica surfaces and that it can be used to immobilize proteins on silica surfaces. The simulation results show that RPL2, especially domains 1 (residues 1-60) and 3 (residues 203-273), adsorbed more tightly to the silica surface above pH 7. We found that a major driving force for the adsorption of RPL2 onto the silica surface is the electrostatic interaction and that the structural flexibility of domains 1 and 3 may further contribute to the high affinity.

  18. Antibody-protein A conjugated quantum dots for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Takashi; Tiwari, Dhermendra K; Tanaka, Shin-Ichi; Inouye, Yasushi; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Tomonobu M

    2010-11-01

    To use quantum dots (QDs) as fluorescent probes for receptor imaging, QD surface should be modified with biomolecules such as antibodies, peptides, carbohydrates, and small-molecule ligands for receptors. Among these QDs, antibody conjugated QDs are the most promising fluorescent probes. There are many kinds of coupling reactions that can be used for preparing antibody conjugated QDs. Most of the antibody coupling reactions, however, are non-selective and time-consuming. In this paper, we report a facile method for preparing antibody conjugated QDs for surface receptor imaging. We used ProteinA as an adaptor protein for binding of antibody to QDs. By using ProteinA conjugated QDs, various types of antibodies are easily attached to the surface of the QDs via non-covalent binding between the F(c) (fragment crystallization) region of antibody and ProteinA. To show the utility of ProteinA conjugated QDs, HER2 (anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) in KPL-4 human breast cancer cells were stained by using anti-HER2 antibody conjugated ProteinA-QDs. In addition, multiplexed imaging of HER2 and CXCR4 (chemokine receptor) in the KPL-4 cells was performed. The result showed that CXCR4 receptors coexist with HER2 receptors in the membrane surface of KPL-4 cells. ProteinA mediated antibody conjugation to QDs is very useful to prepare fluorescent probes for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

  19. Regulation of Macrophage Recognition through the Interplay of Nanoparticle Surface Functionality and Protein Corona

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saha, Krishnendu; Rahimi, Mehran; Yazdani, Mandieh; Kim, Sung Tae; Moyano, Daniel F.; Hou, Singyuk; Das, Ridhha; Mout, Rubul; Rezaee, Farhad; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Rotello, Vincent M.

    Using a family of cationic gold nanoparticles (NPs) with similar size and charge, we demonstrate that proper surface engineering can control the nature and identity of protein corona in physiological serum conditions. The protein coronas were highly dependent on the hydrophobicity and arrangement of

  20. Identification of phagocytosis-associated surface proteins of macrophages by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, F D; Petty, H R; McConnell, H M

    1982-02-01

    Two-dimensional PAGE (P. Z. O'Farrell, H. M. Goodman, and P. H. O'Farrell. 1977. Cell. 12:1133-1142) has been employed to assess the effects of antibody-dependent phagocytosis on the cell surface protein composition of RAW264 macrophages. Unilamellar phospholipid vesicles containing 1% dinitrophenyl-aminocaproyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (DNP-cap-PE) were used as the target particle. Macrophages were exposed to anti-DNP antibody alone, vesicles alone, or vesicles in the presence of antibody for 1 h at 37 degrees C. Cell surface proteins were then labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination at 4 degrees C. After detergent solubilization, membrane proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The resulting pattern of spots was compared to that of standard proteins. We have identified several surface proteins, not apparently associated with the phagocytic process, which are present either in a multichain structure or in several discretely charged forms. After phagocytosis, we have observed the appearance of two proteins of 45 and 50 kdaltons in nonreducing gels. In addition, we have noted the disappearance of a 140-kdalton protein in gels run under reducing conditions. These alterations would not be detected in the conventional one-dimensional gel electrophoresis. This evidence shows that phagocytosis leads to a modification of cell surface protein composition. Our results support the concept of specific enrichment and depletion of membrane components during antibody-dependent phagocytosis.

  1. Surface-tethered polymers to influence protein adsorption and microbial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norde, Willem

    2007-01-01

    In various applications it is desired that biological cells or protein molecules are immobilized at surfaces. Examples are enzymes or cells in bioreactors and biosensors, immuno-proteins in solid-state diagnostics and proteinaceous farmacons in drug delivery systems. In order to retain biological

  2. Adsorption of plasma proteins : adsorption behaviour on apolar surfaces and effect on colloid stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, Albert

    1978-01-01

    In this thesis the adsorption of some plasma proteins (human albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen (HFb)) on non polar surfaces is studied, together with the influence of these proteins on the stability of polystyrene latices. The aim of these investigations is a better understanding of the processes

  3. Nitrate as a probe of cytochrome c surface : crystallographic identification of crucial "hot spots" for protein-protein recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De March, Matteo; Demitri, Nicola; De Zorzi, Rita; Casini, Angela; Gabbiani, Chiara; Guerri, Annalisa; Messori, Luigi; Geremia, Silvano

    The electrostatic surface of cytochrome c and its changes with the iron oxidation state are involved in the docking and undocking processes of this protein to its biological partners in the mitochondrial respiratory pathway. To investigate the subtle mechanisms of formation of productive

  4. A novel Pfs38 protein complex on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum blood-stage merozoites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Gourab; Deshmukh, Arunaditya; Kaur, Inderjeet

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Plasmodium genome encodes for a number of 6-Cys proteins that contain a module of six cysteine residues forming three intramolecular disulphide bonds. These proteins have been well characterized at transmission as well as hepatic stages of the parasite life cycle. In the present...... the development of a multi-sub-unit malaria vaccine based on some of these protein complexes on merozoite surface....

  5. Surface selective binding of nanoclay particles to polyampholyte protein chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Nisha; Bohidar, H B

    2009-07-28

    Binding of nanoclay (Laponite) to gelatin-A and gelatin-B (both polyampholytes) molecules was investigated at room temperature (25 degrees C) both experimentally and theoretically. The stoichiometric binding ratio between gelatin and Laponite was found to be strongly dependent on the solution ionic strength. Large soluble complexes were formed at higher ionic strengths of the solution, a result supported by data obtained from light scattering, viscosity, and zeta potential measurements. The binding problem was theoretically modeled by choosing a suitable two-body screened Coulomb potential, U(R(+)) = (q(-)/2epsilon)[(Q(-)/R(-))e(-kR(-))-(Q(+)/R(+))e(-kR(+))], where the protein dipole has charges Q(+) and Q(-) that are located at distances R(+) and R(-) from the point Laponite charge q(-) and the dispersion liquid has dielectric constant (epsilon). U(R(+)) accounted for electrostatic interactions between a dipole (protein molecule) and an effective charge (Laponite particle) located at an angular position theta. Gelatin-A and Laponite association was facilitated by a strong attractive interaction potential that led to preferential binding of the biopolymer chains to negatively charged face of Laponite particles. In the case of gelatin-B selective surf ace patch binding dominated the process where the positively charged rim and negatively charged face of the particles were selectively bound to the oppositely charged segments of the biopolymer. The equilibrium separation (R(e)) between the protein and nanoclay particle revealed monovalent salt concentration dependence given by R(e) approximately [NaCl](alpha) where alpha = 0.6+/-0.2 for gelatin-A and alpha = 0.4+/-0.2 for gelatin-B systems. The equilibrium separations were approximately 30% less compared to the gelatin-A system implying preferential short-range ordering of the gelatin-B-nanoclay pair in the solvent.

  6. Protein immobilization on epoxy-activated thin polymer films: effect of surface wettability and enzyme loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Pernodet, Nadine; Rafailovich, Miriam H; Bakhtina, Asya; Gross, Richard A

    2008-12-02

    A series of epoxy-activated polymer films composed of poly(glycidyl methacrylate/butyl methacrylate/hydroxyethyl methacrylate) were prepared. Variation in comonomer composition allowed exploration of relationships between surface wettability and Candida antartica lipase B (CALB) binding to surfaces. By changing solvents and polymer concentrations, suitable conditions were developed for preparation by spin-coating of uniform thin films. Film roughness determined by AFM after incubation in PBS buffer for 2 days was less than 1 nm. The occurrence of single CALB molecules and CALB aggregates at surfaces was determined by AFM imaging and measurements of volume. Absolute numbers of protein monomers and multimers at surfaces were used to determine values of CALB specific activity. Increased film wettability, as the water contact angle of films increased from 420 to 550, resulted in a decreased total number of immobilized CALB molecules. With further increases in the water contact angle of films from 55 degrees to 63 degrees, there was an increased tendency of CALB molecules to form aggregates on surfaces. On all flat surfaces, two height populations, differing by more than 30%, were observed from height distribution curves. They are attributed to changes in protein conformation and/or orientation caused by protein-surface and protein-protein interactions. The fraction of molecules in these populations changed as a function of film water contact angle. The enzyme activity of immobilized films was determined by measuring CALB-catalyzed hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate. Total enzyme specific activity decreased by decreasing film hydrophobicity.

  7. Cell-Surface Receptors Transactivation Mediated by G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Guerra, Germano; Parisi, Melania; De Marinis, Marta; Tafuri, Domenico; Cinelli, Mariapia; Ammendola, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to a large family of cell-surface receptors involved in many intracellular signaling cascades. Despite GPCRs lack intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, tyrosine phosphorylation of a tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK) occurs in response to binding of specific agonists of several such receptors, triggering intracellular mitogenic cascades. This suggests that the notion that GPCRs are associated with the regulation of post-mitotic cell functions is no longer believable. Crosstalk between GPCR and RTK may occur by different molecular mechanism such as the activation of metalloproteases, which can induce the metalloprotease-dependent release of RTK ligands, or in a ligand-independent manner involving membrane associated non-receptor tyrosine kinases, such as c-Src. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also implicated as signaling intermediates in RTKs transactivation. Intracellular concentration of ROS increases transiently in cells stimulated with GPCR agonists and their deliberated and regulated generation is mainly catalyzed by enzymes that belong to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase family. Oxidation and/or reduction of cysteine sulfhydryl groups of phosphatases tightly controls the activity of RTKs and ROS-mediated inhibition of cellular phosphatases results in an equilibrium shift from the non-phosphorylated to the phosphorylated state of RTKs. Many GPCR agonists activate phospholipase C, which catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate to produce inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and diacylglicerol. The consequent mobilization of Ca2+ from endoplasmic reticulum leads to the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms. PKCα mediates feedback inhibition of RTK transactivation during GPCR stimulation. Recent data have expanded the coverage of transactivation to include Serine/Threonine kinase receptors and Toll-like receptors. Herein, we

  8. Immunity of Surface Layer Protein of Aeromonas ‎hydrophila in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobna Adil Al-Noori

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study the Surface layer (S-layer protein was extracted from Aeromonas hydrophila bacteria ,the humoral immune response that induced by S-layer protein only or as adjuvant was investigated  by using 16 males New Zealand rabbits and divided into four groups, each group contained four rabbits, the first group was immunized with  S-layer protein only, the second group was immunized with heated killed antigen(HKAof Sallmonella typhi only, the third group was immunized with mixed antigens (S-layer+ HKA,while the fourth group considered as control group and immunized with normal saline. The HKA of S. typhi  was used to evaluate the efficiency of S-layer protein as adjuvant. After the immunization period, the humoral immune response was investigated by several tests include, tube agglutination test and passive agglutination test that used to detect the antibody titer. Biuret method was used to determine the total protein concentration in serum  samples and total protein concentration of secretory immunoglobulin that extracted form appendix samples. In addition the Radical Immunodiffution (RID  method was used to detect the concentration level of the IgG in serum samples. Moreover the concentration level of the CD4 in the serum samples was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method .In all these tests the result revealed, both of S-layer protein only , HKA of only and mixed antigens(S-layer+ HKA were given significantly increased in comparison with control group at P<0.05. The result showed that the  concentration level of IgG with mean values (2365.5 , 3505 and 2916 mg/dl respectively  while the control group with mean value (1662mg/dl. In addition the concentration  level of CD4 molecule with mean values (9.37, 11.77 and 17.36 ng/ml respectively while the control group with mean value (6.91 ng/ml .The results showed that these three types of antigens induced the humoral immune response

  9. Nonlinear Surface Dilatational Rheology and Foaming Behavior of Protein and Protein Fibrillar Aggregates in the Presence of Natural Surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhili; Yang, Xiaoquan; Sagis, Leonard M C

    2016-04-19

    The surface and foaming properties of native soy glycinin (11S) and its heat-induced fibrillar aggregates, in the presence of natural surfactant steviol glycoside (STE), were investigated and compared at pH 7.0 to determine the impact of protein structure modification on protein-surfactant interfacial interactions. The adsorption at, and nonlinear dilatational rheological behavior of, the air-water interface were studied by combining drop shape analysis tensiometry, ellipsometry, and large-amplitude oscillatory dilatational rheology. Lissajous plots of surface pressure versus deformation were used to analyze the surface rheological response in terms of interfacial microstructure. The heat treatment generates a mixture of long fibrils and unconverted peptides. The presence of small peptides in 11S fibril samples resulted in a faster adsorption kinetics than that of native 11S. The addition of STE affected the adsorption of 11S significantly, whereas no apparent effect on the adsorption of the 11S fibril-peptide system was observed. The rheological response of interfaces stabilized by 11S-STE mixtures also differed significantly from the response for 11S fibril-peptide-STE mixtures. For 11S, the STE reduces the degree of strain hardening in extension and increases strain hardening in compression, suggesting the interfacial structure may change from a surface gel to a mixed phase of protein patches and STE domains. The foams generated from the mixtures displayed comparable foam stability to that of pure 11S. For 11S fibril-peptide mixtures STE only significantly affects the response in extension, where the degree of strain softening is decreased compared to the pure fibril-peptide system. The foam stability of the fibril-peptide system was significantly reduced by STE. These findings indicate that fibrillization of globular proteins could be a potential strategy to modify the complex surface and foaming behaviors of protein-surfactant mixtures.

  10. Accumulation of small heat shock proteins, including mitochondrial HSP22, induced by oxidative stress and adaptive response in tomato cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzet, N.; Richaud, C.; Deveaux, Y.; Kazmaier, M.; Gagnon, J.; Triantaphylides, C.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in gene expression, by application of H2O2, O2.- generating agents (methyl viologen, digitonin) and gamma irradiation to tomato suspension cultures, were investigated and compared to the well-described heat shock response. Two-dimensional gel protein mapping analyses gave the first indication that at least small heat shock proteins (smHSP) accumulated in response to application of H2O2 and gamma irradiation, but not to O2.- generating agents. While some proteins seemed to be induced specifically by each treatment, only part of the heat shock response was observed. On the basis of Northern hybridization experiments performed with four heterologous cDNA, corresponding to classes I-IV of pea smHSP, it could be concluded that significant amounts of class I and II smHSP mRNA are induced by H2O2 and by irradiation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in plants some HSP genes are inducible by oxidative stresses, as in micro-organisms and other eukaryotic cells. HSP22, the main stress protein that accumulates following H2O2 action or gamma irradiation, was also purified. Sequence homology of amino terminal and internal sequences, and immunoreactivity with Chenopodium rubrum mitochondrial smHSP antibody, indicated that the protein belongs to the recently discovered class of plant mitochondrial smHSP. Heat shock or a mild H2O2 pretreatment was also shown to lead to plant cell protection against oxidative injury. Therefore, the synthesis of these stress proteins can be considered as an adaptive mechanism in which mitochondrial protection could be essential

  11. Microscopic Investigation of Reversible Nanoscale Surface Size Dependent Protein Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Carpenter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Aβ1-40 coated 20 nm gold colloidal nanoparticles exhibit a reversible color change as pH is externally altered between pH 4 and 10. This reversible process may contain important information on the initial reversible step reported for the fibrillogenesis of Aβ (a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. We examined this reversible color change by microscopic investigations. AFM images on graphite surfaces revealed the morphology of Aβ aggregates with gold colloids. TEM images clearly demonstrate the correspondence between spectroscopic features and conformational changes of the gold colloid.

  12. Characterizing and modeling protein-surface interactions in lab-on-chip devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katira, Parag

    Protein adsorption on surfaces determines the response of other biological species present in the surrounding solution. This phenomenon plays a major role in the design of biomedical and biotechnological devices. While specific protein adsorption is essential for device function, non-specific protein adsorption leads to the loss of device function. For example, non-specific protein adsorption on bioimplants triggers foreign body response, in biosensors it leads to reduced signal to noise ratios, and in hybrid bionanodevices it results in the loss of confinement and directionality of molecular shuttles. Novel surface coatings are being developed to reduce or completely prevent the non-specific adsorption of proteins to surfaces. A novel quantification technique for extremely low protein coverage on surfaces has been developed. This technique utilizes measurement of the landing rate of microtubule filaments on kinesin proteins adsorbed on a surface to determine the kinesin density. Ultra-low limits of detection, dynamic range, ease of detection and availability of a ready-made kinesin-microtubule kit makes this technique highly suitable for detecting protein adsorption below the detection limits of standard techniques. Secondly, a random sequential adsorption model is presented for protein adsorption to PEO-coated surfaces. The derived analytical expressions accurately predict the observed experimental results from various research groups, suggesting that PEO chains act as almost perfect steric barriers to protein adsorption. These expressions can be used to predict the performance of a variety of systems towards resisting protein adsorption and can help in the design of better non-fouling surface coatings. Finally, in biosensing systems, target analytes are captured and concentrated on specifically adsorbed proteins for detection. Non-specific adsorption of proteins results in the loss of signal, and an increase in the background. The use of nanoscale transducers as

  13. Optimization of solvation models for predicting the structure of surface loops in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, B; Meirovitch, H

    2001-05-15

    A novel procedure for optimizing the atomic solvation parameters (ASPs) sigma(i) developed recently for cyclic peptides is extended to surface loops in proteins. The loop is free to move, whereas the protein template is held fixed in its X-ray structure. The energy is E(tot) = E(FF)(epsilon = nr) + summation operator sigma(i)A(i), where E(FF)(epsilon = nr) is the force-field energy of the loop-loop and loop-template interactions, epsilon = nr is a distance-dependent dielectric constant, and n is an additional parameter to be optimized. A(i) is the solvent-accessible surface area of atom i. The optimal sigma(i) and n are those for which the loop structure with the global minimum of E(tot)(n, sigma(i)) becomes the experimental X-ray structure. Thus, the ASPs depend on the force field and are optimized in the protein environment, unlike commonly used ASPs such as those of Wesson and Eisenberg (Protein Sci 1992;1:227-235). The latter are based on the free energy of transfer of small molecules from the gas phase to water and have been traditionally combined with various force fields without further calibration. We found that for loops the all-atom AMBER force field performed better than OPLS and CHARMM22. Two sets of ASPs [based on AMBER (n = 2)], optimized independently for loops 64-71 and 89-97 of ribonuclease A, were similar and thus enabled the definition of a best-fit set. All these ASPs were negative (hydrophilic), including those for carbon. Very good (i.e., small) root-mean-square-deviation values from the X-ray loop structure were obtained with the three sets of ASPs, suggesting that the best-fit set would be transferable to loops in other proteins as well. The structure of loop 13-24 is relatively stretched and was insensitive to the effect of the ASPs. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Heterologous protein display on the cell surface of lactic acid bacteria mediated by the s-layer protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Lanlan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have revealed that the C-terminal region of the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus is responsible for the cell wall anchoring, which provide an approach for targeting heterologous proteins to the cell wall of lactic acid bacteria (LAB. In this study, we developed a new surface display system in lactic acid bacteria with the C-terminal region of S-layer protein SlpB of Lactobacillus crispatus K2-4-3 isolated from chicken intestine. Results Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the C-terminal region (LcsB of Lb. crispatus K2-4-3 SlpB had a high similarity with the cell wall binding domains SA and CbsA of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lb. crispatus. To evaluate the potential application as an anchoring protein, the green fluorescent protein (GFP or beta-galactosidase (Gal was fused to the N-terminus of the LcsB region, and the fused proteins were successfully produced in Escherichia coli, respectively. After mixing them with the non-genetically modified lactic acid bacteria cells, the fused GFP-LcsB and Gal-LcsB were functionally associated with the cell surface of various lactic acid bacteria tested. In addition, the binding capacity could be improved by SDS pretreatment. Moreover, both of the fused proteins could simultaneously bind to the surface of a single cell. Furthermore, when the fused DNA fragment of gfp:lcsB was inserted into the Lactococcus lactis expression vector pSec:Leiss:Nuc, the GFP could not be secreted into the medium under the control of the nisA promoter. Western blot, in-gel fluorescence assay, immunofluorescence microscopy and SDS sensitivity analysis confirmed that the GFP was successfully expressed onto the cell surface of L. lactis with the aid of the LcsB anchor. Conclusion The LcsB region can be used as a functional scaffold to target the heterologous proteins to the cell surfaces of lactic acid bacteria in vitro and in vivo, and has also the potential for biotechnological

  15. Molecular biology of Chlamydia pneumoniae surface proteins and their role in immunopathogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Boesen, Thomas; Hjernø, Karin

    1999-01-01

    present on the surface of the bacteria, we analyzed what components are present on the C pneumoniae surface. We identified a family of proteins, the GGAI or Omp4-15 proteins, of which at least 3 are present on the surface of C pneumoniae. We immunized rabbits with recombinant GGAI proteins and used......BACKGROUND: The association of Chlamydia pneumoniae with the development of atherosclerosis is based on serology and on detection of C pneumoniae-specific DNA by polymerase chain reaction in the atheromas. METHODS AND RESULTS: Because the humoral immune response frequently recognizes epitopes...... these antibodies in immunofluorescence microscopy of experimentally infected mice. In lung sections, a massive infiltration with polymorph nuclear neutrophil cells was observed. In the bronchial epithelial cells, C pneumoniae inclusions were seen. Evidence was found of differential expression of the GGAI proteins...

  16. Analyses of Interactions Between Heparin and the Apical Surface Proteins of Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Takano, Ryo; Takemae, Hitoshi; Sugi, Tatsuki; Ishiwa, Akiko; Gong, Haiyan; Recuenco, Frances C.; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Horimoto, Taisuke; Akashi, Hiroomi; Kato, Kentaro

    2013-11-01

    Heparin, a sulfated glycoconjugate, reportedly inhibits the blood-stage growth of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Elucidation of the inhibitory mechanism is valuable for developing novel invasion-blocking treatments based on heparin. Merozoite surface protein 1 has been reported as a candidate target of heparin; however, to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved, we characterized the molecules that bind to heparin during merozoite invasion. Here, we show that heparin binds only at the apical tip of the merozoite surface and that multiple heparin-binding proteins localize preferentially in the apical organelles. To identify heparin-binding proteins, parasite proteins were fractionated by means of heparin affinity chromatography and subjected to immunoblot analysis with ligand-specific antibodies. All tested members of the Duffy and reticulocyte binding-like families bound to heparin with diverse affinities. These findings suggest that heparin masks the apical surface of merozoites and blocks interaction with the erythrocyte membrane after initial attachment.

  17. Competitive Protein Adsorption of Albumin and Immunoglobulin G from Human Serum onto Polymer Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2010-01-01

    Competitive protein adsorption from human serum onto unmodified polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surfaces and plasma-polymerized PET surfaces, using the monomer diethylene glycol vinyl ether (DEGVE), has been investigated using radioactive labeling. Albumin and immunoglobulin G (IgG) labeled...... with two different iodine isotopes have been added to human serum solutions of different concentrations, and adsorption has been performed using adsorption times from approximately 5 s to 24 h. DEGVE surfaces showed indications of being nonfouling regarding albumin and IgG adsorption during competitive...... protein adsorption from diluted human serum solutions with relatively low protein concentrations, but the nonfouling character was weakened when less diluted human serum solutions with higher protein concentrations were used. The observed adsorption trend is independent of adsorption time, indicating...

  18. Surface functionalization of superparamagnetic nanoparticles encapsulated by chitosan for protein immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Jose Silva de

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscience and nanotechnology have opened up numerous developments of devices and systems on the nanometer scale, with new molecular organization, properties and functions. In this context, the polymeric magnetic nanoparticles are composites formed by magnetic materials with a particle size between 1 and 100 nm combined with functional polymers. They are well-known and have been widely studied because of its applications in various technology areas. Applications on the biological and medical areas include separation and immobilization of enzymes and proteins, improved techniques of magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostic systems for controlled drug delivery. In this work, proteins were immobilized on the surface of a biopolymer combined with superparamagnetic particles of magnetite. The biopolymer chitosan was used, cross-linked and functionalized with glutaraldehyde, applicable to the biological assays. Three types of magnetic composites were obtained, which were called QM1Glu, QM2NaGlu and QM3Glu. They were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry and infrared spectroscopy. They were evaluated concerning the immobilization of the proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA), collagen and trypsin. The study showed that the immobilization of proteins on the biopolymer occurred in 30 min of incubation. The magnetic composite of non functionalized chitosan (QM3) was also evaluated. For trypsin, it was found that the immobilization potential of QM3 was higher than that observed for QM3Glu. After 30 days, the trypsin of the QM3-Trip and QM3Glu-Trip was still with activity. The activity and the enzyme kinetics of the QM3Glu-Trip with the substrate BApNA were demonstrated. (author)

  19. Cell Surface Properties of Lactococcus lactis Reveal Milk Protein Binding Specifically Evolved in Dairy Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazanova, Mariya; Huppertz, Thom; Beerthuyzen, Marke; van Schalkwijk, Saskia; Janssen, Patrick; Wels, Michiel; Kok, Jan; Bachmann, Herwig

    2017-01-01

    Surface properties of bacteria are determined by the molecular composition of the cell wall and they are important for interactions of cells with their environment. Well-known examples of bacterial interactions with surfaces are biofilm formation and the fermentation of solid materials like food and feed. Lactococcus lactis is broadly used for the fermentation of cheese and buttermilk and it is primarily isolated from either plant material or the dairy environment. In this study, we characterized surface hydrophobicity, charge, emulsification properties, and the attachment to milk proteins of 55 L. lactis strains in stationary and exponential growth phases. The attachment to milk protein was assessed through a newly developed flow cytometry-based protocol. Besides finding a high degree of biodiversity, phenotype-genotype matching allowed the identification of candidate genes involved in the modification of the cell surface. Overexpression and gene deletion analysis allowed to verify the predictions for three identified proteins that altered surface hydrophobicity and attachment of milk proteins. The data also showed that lactococci isolated from a dairy environment bind higher amounts of milk proteins when compared to plant isolates. It remains to be determined whether the alteration of surface properties also has potential to alter starter culture functionalities. PMID:28936202

  20. Cell Surface Properties of Lactococcus lactis Reveal Milk Protein Binding Specifically Evolved in Dairy Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Tarazanova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface properties of bacteria are determined by the molecular composition of the cell wall and they are important for interactions of cells with their environment. Well-known examples of bacterial interactions with surfaces are biofilm formation and the fermentation of solid materials like food and feed. Lactococcus lactis is broadly used for the fermentation of cheese and buttermilk and it is primarily isolated from either plant material or the dairy environment. In this study, we characterized surface hydrophobicity, charge, emulsification properties, and the attachment to milk proteins of 55 L. lactis strains in stationary and exponential growth phases. The attachment to milk protein was assessed through a newly developed flow cytometry-based protocol. Besides finding a high degree of biodiversity, phenotype-genotype matching allowed the identification of candidate genes involved in the modification of the cell surface. Overexpression and gene deletion analysis allowed to verify the predictions for three identified proteins that altered surface hydrophobicity and attachment of milk proteins. The data also showed that lactococci isolated from a dairy environment bind higher amounts of milk proteins when compared to plant isolates. It remains to be determined whether the alteration of surface properties also has potential to alter starter culture functionalities.

  1. Protein arrangement on modified diamond-like carbon surfaces – An ARXPS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosterbeek, Reece N.; Seal, Christopher K.; Hyland, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • DLC coatings were modified by Ar + ion sputtering and laser graphitisation. • The surface properties of the coatings were measured, and it was found that the above methods increased sp 2 content and altered surface energy. • ARXPS was used to observe protein arrangement on the surface. • Polar CO/CN groups were seen to be segregated towards the interface, indicating they play an important role in bonding. • This segregation increased with increasing polar surface energy, indicating an increased net attraction between polar groups. - Abstract: Understanding the nature of the interface between a biomaterial implant and the biological fluid is an essential step towards creating improved implant materials. This study examined a diamond-like carbon coating biomaterial, the surface energy of which was modified by Ar + ion sputtering and laser graphitisation. The arrangement of proteins was analysed by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the effects of the polar component of surface energy on this arrangement were observed. It was seen that polar groups (such as CN, CO) are more attracted to the coating surface due to the stronger polar interactions. This results in a segregation of these groups to the DLC–protein interface; at increasing takeoff angle (further from to DLC–protein interface) fewer of these polar groups are seen. Correspondingly, groups that interact mainly by dispersive forces (CC, CH) were found to increase in intensity as takeoff angle increased, indicating they are segregated away from the DLC–protein interface. The magnitude of the segregation was seen to increase with increasing polar surface energy, this was attributed to an increased net attraction between the solid surface and polar groups at higher polar surface energy (γ S p )

  2. Protein arrangement on modified diamond-like carbon surfaces – An ARXPS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oosterbeek, Reece N., E-mail: reece.oosterbeek@auckland.ac.nz [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019 (New Zealand); Seal, Christopher K. [Light Metals Research Centre, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019 (New Zealand); Hyland, Margaret M. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019 (New Zealand)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • DLC coatings were modified by Ar{sup +} ion sputtering and laser graphitisation. • The surface properties of the coatings were measured, and it was found that the above methods increased sp{sup 2} content and altered surface energy. • ARXPS was used to observe protein arrangement on the surface. • Polar CO/CN groups were seen to be segregated towards the interface, indicating they play an important role in bonding. • This segregation increased with increasing polar surface energy, indicating an increased net attraction between polar groups. - Abstract: Understanding the nature of the interface between a biomaterial implant and the biological fluid is an essential step towards creating improved implant materials. This study examined a diamond-like carbon coating biomaterial, the surface energy of which was modified by Ar{sup +} ion sputtering and laser graphitisation. The arrangement of proteins was analysed by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the effects of the polar component of surface energy on this arrangement were observed. It was seen that polar groups (such as CN, CO) are more attracted to the coating surface due to the stronger polar interactions. This results in a segregation of these groups to the DLC–protein interface; at increasing takeoff angle (further from to DLC–protein interface) fewer of these polar groups are seen. Correspondingly, groups that interact mainly by dispersive forces (CC, CH) were found to increase in intensity as takeoff angle increased, indicating they are segregated away from the DLC–protein interface. The magnitude of the segregation was seen to increase with increasing polar surface energy, this was attributed to an increased net attraction between the solid surface and polar groups at higher polar surface energy (γ{sub S}{sup p})

  3. Statistical investigation of surface bound ions and further development of BION server to include pH and salt dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukh, Marharyta; Zhang, Min; Alexov, Emil

    2015-12-15

    Ions are engaged in multiple biological processes in cells. By binding to the macromolecules or being mobile in the solvent, they maintain the integrity of the structure of macromolecules; participate in their enzymatic activity; or screen electrostatic interactions. While experimental methods are not always able to assign the exact location of ions, computational methods are in demand. Although the majority of computational methods are successful in predicting the position of ions buried inside macromolecules, they are less effective in deciphering positions of surface bound ions. Here, we propose the new BION algorithm (http://compbio.clemson.edu/bion_server_ph/) that predicts the location of the surface bound ions. It is more efficient and accurate compared to the previous version since it uses more advanced clustering algorithm in combination with pairing rules. In addition, the BION webserver allows specifying the pH and the salt concentration in predicting ions positions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Isolation of two biologically active cell surface proteins from Brucella abortus by chromatofocusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabatabai, L.B.; Deyoe, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Brucella abortus contains a group of immunogenic cell surface proteins which have potential value as a vaccine or as a diagnostic reagent for the prevention and diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. Under nondenaturing conditions, these proteins range in molecular weight from 10,000-124,000, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on TSK 3000sw. By analytical isoelectrofocusing, 6 major protein bands could be distinguished with pI's ranging from 4.0 to 6.0 and 3 additional major proteins with pI's of 7.5, 9.5, and 10. By chromatofocusing on Polybuffer Exchanger 94 with a pH gradient from 6-4, two of the six proteins from pI 4-6 were separated, a pI 4.9 and a pI 4.7 protein; a third fraction contained the high pI proteins. The former two proteins were homogeneous by analytical isoelectrofocusing, and a molecular weight of 54,000 daltons was found for both protein species by HPLC on TSK 3000sw. The pI 4-6 and not the pI 9.5 and 10 proteins, could be radiolabeled when intact cells were radioiodinated with diazotized ( 125 I)-iodosulfanilic acid. Biological activity of the proteins as assessed in lemmings indicated that immunization with the pI 4.7 and 4.9 proteins afforded better protection against experimental brucellosis than immunization with the high pI proteins. These results support our view that a single surface protein may be sufficient for the prevention of experimental brucellosis

  5. Isolation of two biologically active cell surface proteins from Brucella abortus by chromatofocusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabatabai, L.B.; Deyoe, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Brucella abortus contains a group of immunogenic cell surface proteins which have potential value as a vaccine or as a diagnostic reagent for the prevention and diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. Under nondenaturing conditions, these proteins range in molecular weight from 10,000-124,000, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on TSK 3000sw. By analytical isoelectrofocusing, 6 major protein bands could be distinguished with pI's ranging from 4.0 to 6.0 and 3 additional major proteins with pI's of 7.5, 9.5, and 10. By chromatofocusing on Polybuffer Exchanger 94 with a pH gradient from 6-4, two of the six proteins from pI 4-6 were separated, a pI 4.9 and a pI 4.7 protein; a third fraction contained the high pI proteins. The former two proteins were homogeneous by analytical isoelectrofocusing, and a molecular weight of 54,000 daltons was found for both protein species by HPLC on TSK 3000sw. The pI 4-6 and not the pI 9.5 and 10 proteins, could be radiolabeled when intact cells were radioiodinated with diazotized (/sup 125/I)-iodosulfanilic acid. Biological activity of the proteins as assessed in lemmings indicated that immunization with the pI 4.7 and 4.9 proteins afforded better protection against experimental brucellosis than immunization with the high pI proteins. These results support our view that a single surface protein may be sufficient for the prevention of experimental brucellosis.

  6. Evaluation of protein adsorption onto a polyurethane nanofiber surface having different segment distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Yuko; Koizumi, Gaku [Frontier Fiber Technology and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan); Sakamoto, Hiroaki, E-mail: hi-saka@u-fukui.ac.jp [Tenure-Track Program for Innovative Research, University of Fukui (Japan); Suye, Shin-ichiro [Frontier Fiber Technology and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan)

    2017-02-01

    Electrospinning is well known to be an effective method for fabricating polymeric nanofibers with a diameter of several hundred nanometers. Recently, the molecular-level orientation within nanofibers has attracted particular attention. Previously, we used atomic force microscopy to visualize the phase separation between soft and hard segments of a polyurethane (PU) nanofiber surface prepared by electrospinning. The unstretched PU nanofibers exhibited irregularly distributed hard segments, whereas hard segments of stretched nanofibers prepared with a high-speed collector exhibited periodic structures along the long-axis direction. PU was originally used to inhibit protein adsorption, but because the surface segment distribution was changed in the stretched nanofiber, here, we hypothesized that the protein adsorption property on the stretched nanofiber might be affected. We investigated protein adsorption onto PU nanofibers to elucidate the effects of segment distribution on the surface properties of PU nanofibers. The amount of adsorbed protein on stretched PU nanofibers was increased compared with that of unstretched nanofibers. These results indicate that the hard segment alignment on stretched PU nanofibers mediated protein adsorption. It is therefore expected that the amount of protein adsorption can be controlled by rotation of the collector. - Highlights: • The hard segments of stretched PU nanofibers exhibit periodic structures. • The adsorbed protein on stretched PU nanofibers was increased compared with PU film. • The hard segment alignment on stretched PU nanofibers mediated protein adsorption.

  7. Phagocytosis escape by a Staphylococcus aureus protein that connects complement and coagulation proteins at the bacterial surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ping Ko

    Full Text Available Upon contact with human plasma, bacteria are rapidly recognized by the complement system that labels their surface for uptake and clearance by phagocytic cells. Staphylococcus aureus secretes the 16 kD Extracellular fibrinogen binding protein (Efb that binds two different plasma proteins using separate domains: the Efb N-terminus binds to fibrinogen, while the C-terminus binds complement C3. In this study, we show that Efb blocks phagocytosis of S. aureus by human neutrophils. In vitro, we demonstrate that Efb blocks phagocytosis in plasma and in human whole blood. Using a mouse peritonitis model we show that Efb effectively blocks phagocytosis in vivo, either as a purified protein or when produced endogenously by S. aureus. Mutational analysis revealed that Efb requires both its fibrinogen and complement binding residues for phagocytic escape. Using confocal and transmission electron microscopy we show that Efb attracts fibrinogen to the surface of complement-labeled S. aureus generating a 'capsule'-like shield. This thick layer of fibrinogen shields both surface-bound C3b and antibodies from recognition by phagocytic receptors. This information is critical for future vaccination attempts, since opsonizing antibodies may not function in the presence of Efb. Altogether we discover that Efb from S. aureus uniquely escapes phagocytosis by forming a bridge between a complement and coagulation protein.

  8. Functional display of proteins, mutant proteins, fragments of proteins and peptides on the surface of filamentous (bacterio) phages: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pannekoek, H.; van Meijer, M.; Gaardsvoll, H.; van Zonneveld, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    Cytoplasmic expression of complex eukaryotic proteins inEscherichia coli usually yields inactive protein preparations. In some cases, (part) of the biological activity can be recovered by rather inefficient denaturation-renaturation procedures. Recently, novel concepts have been developed for the

  9. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets. Copyright © 2014

  10. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of a novel surface-adhesin protein: protein E from Haemophilus influenzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Birendra; Al Jubair, Tamim; Förnvik, Karolina; Thunnissen, Marjolein M.; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Protein E of the respiratory pathogen H. influenzae is a multifunctional adhesin that is involved in bacterial attachment to host epithelium and direct interactions with vitronectin, laminin and plasminogen. The method of crystallization and X-ray data collection for protein E at 1.8 Å is presented. Protein E (PE) is a ubiquitous multifunctional surface protein of Haemophilus spp. and other bacterial pathogens of the Pasteurellaceae family. H. influenzae utilizes PE for attachment to respiratory epithelial cells. In addition, PE interacts directly with plasminogen and the extracellular matrix (ECM) components vitronectin and laminin. Vitronectin is a complement regulator that inhibits the formation of the membrane-attack complex (MAC). PE-mediated vitronectin recruitment at the H. influenzae surface thus inhibits MAC and protects against serum bactericidal activity. Laminin is an abundant ECM protein and is present in the basement membrane that helps in adherence of H. influenzae during colonization. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of and the collection of high-resolution data for this important H. influenzae adhesin are reported. To solve the phase problem for PE, Met residues were introduced and an SeMet variant was expressed and crystallized. Both native and SeMet-containing PE gave plate-like crystals in space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 44, b = 57, c = 61 Å, β = 96°. Diffraction data collected from native and SeMet-derivative crystals extended to resolutions of 1.8 and 2.6 Å, respectively

  11. Hepatic ALT isoenzymes are elevated in gluconeogenic conditions including diabetes and suppressed by insulin at the protein level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kun; Zhong, Shao; Xie, Keming; Yu, Daozhan; Yang, Rongze; Gong, Da-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Alanine transaminase (ALT) plays an important role in gluconeogenesis by converting alanine into pyruvate for glucose production. Early studies have shown that ALT activities are upregulated in gluconeogenic conditions and may be implicated in the development of diabetes. ALT consists of two isoforms, ALT1 and ALT2, with distinctive subcellular and tissue distributions. Whether and how they are regulated are largely unknown. By using Western blotting analysis, we measured hepatic ALT isoforms at the protein level in obese and diabetic animals and in Fao hepatoma cells treated with dexamethasone and insulin. In addition, we measured glucose output in Fao cells over-expressing ALT1 and ALT2. Both ALT isoforms in the liver were increased in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats and during fasting. However, in ob/ob mice, only ALT2, but not ALT1, protein levels were elevated, and the increase of ALT2 was correlated with that of ALT activity. We further demonstrated that, in vitro, both ALT1 and ALT2 were induced by glucocorticoid dexamethasone, but suppressed by insulin in Fao cells. Finally, we showed that the over-expression of ALT1 and ALT2 in Fao cells directly increased glucose output. We have shown the similarity and difference in the regulation of ALT isoforms in gluconeogenic conditions at the protein level, supporting that ALT isoenzymes play an important role in glucose metabolism and may be implicated the development of insulin resistance and diabetes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Measuring evapotranspiration: comparison of in situ micrometeorological methods including eddy covariance, scintillometer, Bowen ratio, and surface renewal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznikova, G.; Fischer, M.; Orsag, M.; Trnka, M.

    2016-12-01

    Quantifying evapotranspiration (ET) is a challenging task as different methods can induce large discrepancies. Comparisons of various techniques are not rare, however it is demanding to maintain several in situ measurements for longer time. In our study, we aimed to compare four micrometeorological methods measuring ET at relatively large homogeneous area. The study took place on a winter wheat field in Polkovice, the Czech Republic (49°23'42.8"N 17°14'47.3"E) from Jul 1st 2015 until Sep 15th 2015. In the centre of 26-ha experimental field we deployed the eddy covariance (EC) system, the Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) system, thermocouples for surface renewal technique, and the surface layer scintillometer with 106 m path length. Additionally, we installed the large aperture scintillometer with 617 m path length across the field. Our results showed good agreement of compared methods during the wetter periods of the measurements with slight overestimation of the scintillometry. The BREB method agreed the best with EC. Both scintillometers gave very consistent results throughout the whole measurement period. The EC tended to underestimate other methods. One of potential reasons is energy balance disclosure which reached 27.4 % for the measured period. The surface renewal method showed good potential however, need to be further tested in our conditions. Our experimental locality is one of several we are running as a part of ground based measurement network for ET estimation. Gained results helped us to enhance and optimise our network to ensure effective and reliable data acquisition for future validation of airborne images (satellite based drought monitoring).

  13. Handheld Chem/Biosensor Using Extreme Conformational Changes in Designed Binding Proteins to Enhance Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFCEC-CX-TY-TR-2016-0007 HANDHELD CHEM/ BIOSENSOR USING EXTREME CONFORMATIONAL CHANGES IN DESIGNED BINDING PROTEINS TO ENHANCE SURFACE PLASMON...Include area code) 03/24/2016 Abstract 08/14/2015--03/31/2016 Handheld chem/ biosensor using extreme conformational changes in designed binding...Baltimore, Maryland on 17-21 April 2016. We propose the development of a highly sensitive handheld chem/ biosensor device using a novel class of engineered

  14. Development, Characterization, and Optimization of Protein Level in Date Bars Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nadeem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This project was designed to produce a nourishing date bar with commercial value especially for school going children to meet their body development requirements. Protein level of date bars was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM. Economical and underutilized sources, that is, whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates, were explored for protein supplementation. Fourteen date bar treatments were produced using a central composite design (CCD with 2 variables and 3 levels for each variable. Date bars were then analyzed for nutritional profile. Proximate composition revealed that addition of whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates improved the nutritional profile of date bars. Protein level, texture, and taste were considerably improved by incorporating 6.05% whey protein concentrate and 4.35% vetch protein isolates in date bar without affecting any sensory characteristics during storage. Response surface methodology was observed as an economical and effective tool to optimize the ingredient level and to discriminate the interactive effects of independent variables.

  15. Characterization of the antigenicity of Cpl1, a surface protein of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jian-Piao; Liu, Ling-Li; To, Kelvin K W; Lau, Candy C Y; Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Guo, Yong-Hui; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Che, Xiao-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans is an important fungal pathogen. The capsule is a well established virulence factor and a target site for diagnostic tests. The CPL1 gene is required for capsular formation and virulence. The protein product Cpl1 has been proposed to be a secreted protein, but the characteristics of this protein have not been reported. Here we sought to characterize Cpl1. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Cpl1 of C. neoformans var. neoformans and the Cpl1 orthologs identified in C. neoformans var. grubii and C. gattii formed a distinct cluster among related fungi; while the putative ortholog found in Trichosporon asahii was distantly related to the Cryptococcus cluster. We expressed Cpl1 abundantly as a secreted His-tagged protein in Pichia pastoris. The protein was used to immunize guinea pigs and rabbits for high titer mono-specific polyclonal antibody that was shown to be highly specific against the cell wall of C. neoformans var. neoformans and did not cross react with C. gattii, T. asahii, Aspergillus spp., Candida spp. and Penicillium spp. Using the anti-Cpl1 antibody, we detected Cpl1 protein in the fresh culture supernatant of C. neoformans var. neoformans and we showed by immunostaining that the Cpl1 protein was located on the surface. The Cpl1 protein is a specific surface protein of C. neoformans var. neoformans. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  16. Surface Density of the Hendra G Protein Modulates Hendra F Protein-Promoted Membrane Fusion: Role for Hendra G Protein Trafficking and Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Whitman, Shannon D.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2007-01-01

    Hendra virus, like most paramyxoviruses, requires both a fusion (F) and attachment (G) protein for promotion of cell-cell fusion. Recent studies determined that Hendra F is proteolytically processed by the cellular protease cathepsin L after endocytosis. This unique cathepsin L processing results in a small percentage of Hendra F on the cell surface. To determine how the surface densities of the two Hendra glycoproteins affect fusion promotion, we performed experiments that varied the levels ...

  17. Cell surface protein disulfide isomerase regulates natriuretic peptide generation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuchong Pan

    Full Text Available The family of natriuretic peptides (NPs, including atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP, and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP, exert important and diverse actions for cardiovascular and renal homeostasis. The autocrine and paracrine functions of the NPs are primarily mediated through the cellular membrane bound guanylyl cyclase-linked receptors GC-A (NPR-A and GC-B (NPR-B. As the ligands and receptors each contain disulfide bonds, a regulatory role for the cell surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI was investigated.We utilized complementary in vitro and in vivo models to determine the potential role of PDI in regulating the ability of the NPs to generate its second messenger, cyclic guanosine monophosphate.Inhibition of PDI attenuated the ability of ANP, BNP and CNP to generate cGMP in human mesangial cells (HMCs, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, and human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs, each of which were shown to express PDI. In LLC-PK1 cells, where PDI expression was undetectable by immunoblotting, PDI inhibition had a minimal effect on cGMP generation. Addition of PDI to cultured LLC-PK1 cells increased intracellular cGMP generation mediated by ANP. Inhibition of PDI in vivo attenuated NP-mediated generation of cGMP by ANP. Surface Plasmon Resonance demonstrated modest and differential binding of the natriuretic peptides with immobilized PDI in a cell free system. However, PDI was shown to co-localize on the surface of cells with GC-A and GC-B by co-immunoprecpitation and immunohistochemistry.These data demonstrate for the first time that cell surface PDI expression and function regulate the capacity of natriuretic peptides to generate cGMP through interaction with their receptors.

  18. Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase, a Novel Immunogenic Surface Protein on Listeria Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Marcelo; Moreira, Gustavo Marçal Schmidt Garcia; Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo; Hust, Michael; Mendonça, Karla Sequeira; Moreira, Ângela Nunes; França, Rodrigo Correa; da Silva, Wladimir Padilha; Bhunia, Arun K; Aleixo, José Antonio G

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous food-borne pathogen, and its presence in food or production facilities highlights the importance of surveillance. Increased understanding of the surface exposed antigens on Listeria would provide potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets. In the present work, using mass spectrometry and genetic cloning, we show that fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) class II in Listeria species is the antigen target of the previously described mAb-3F8. Western and dot blot assays confirmed that the mAb-3F8 could distinguish all tested Listeria species from close-related bacteria. Localization studies indicated that FBA is present in every fraction of Listeria cells, including supernatant and the cell wall, setting Listeria spp. as one of the few bacteria described to have this protein on their cell surface. Epitope mapping using ORFeome display and a peptide membrane revealed a 14-amino acid peptide as the potential mAb-3F8 epitope. The target epitope in FBA allowed distinguishing Listeria spp. from closely-related bacteria, and was identified as part of the active site in the dimeric enzyme. However, its function in cell surface seems not to be host cell adhesion-related. Western and dot blot assays further demonstrated that mAb-3F8 together with anti-InlA mAb-2D12 could differentiate pathogenic from non-pathogenic Listeria isolated from artificially contaminated cheese. In summary, we report FBA as a novel immunogenic surface target useful for the detection of Listeria genus.

  19. Radiation-curing of acrylate composites including carbon fibres: A customized surface modification for improving mechanical performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Arnaud; Pietras-Ozga, Dorota; Ponsaud, Philippe; Kowandy, Christelle; Barczak, Mariusz; Defoort, Brigitte; Coqueret, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The lower transverse mechanical properties of radiation-cured acrylate-based composites reinforced with carbon-fibre with respect to the thermosettable analogues was investigated from the viewpoint of chemical interactions at the interface between the matrix and the carbon material. XPS analysis of representative commercial carbon fibres revealed the presence of a significant amount of chemical functions potentially exerting an adverse effect on the initiation and propagation of the free radical polymerization initiated under high energy radiation. The EB-induced polymerization of n-butyl acrylate as a simple model monomer was conducted in the presence of various aromatic additives exhibiting a strong inhibiting effect, whereas thiols efficiently sensitize the initiation mechanism and undergo transfer reactions. A method based on the surface modification of sized fibres by thiomalic acid is proposed for overcoming the localized inhibition phenomenon and for improving the mechanical properties of the resulting acrylate-based composites. - Highlights: • Surface functions of C-fibres are analyzed for their effect on radical reaction. • Irradiation of nBu-acrylate in presence of aromatic additives reveals inhibition. • Thiol groups sensitize the radiation-initiated polymerization of nBu-acrylate. • Modification of C-fibres with thiomalic acid enhances composite properties

  20. The ability of IgY to recognize surface proteins of Streptococcus mutans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri A. Gani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptococcus mutans are gram positive bacteria classified into viridians group, and have a role in pathogenesis of dental caries. It’s adhesion to the tooth surface is mediated by cell surface proteins, which interact with specific receptor located in tooth pellicle. Glucan binding protein, Glukosyltransferase, and antigen I/II are basic proteins of S. mutans, which have a role in initiating the interaction. A previous study showed that chicken’s IgY can interfere the interaction. Purpose: The objective of this study was to assess the ability of IgY in recognizing the surface molecule of Streptococcus mutans expressed by various serotypes (c, d, e, f and a strain derived from IPB, Bogor. Method: Western blot was used as a method to determine such capability. Result: The result showed that IgY has a potency to recognize antigen I/II, but not the other proteins on the cell surface of all bacteria tested. Conclusion: The ability of IgY to bind the surface protein, antigen I/II, indicates that this avian antibody could be used as a candidate for anti-adhesion in preventing dental caries.

  1. Synthesis of an endothelial cell mimicking surface containing thrombomodulin and endothelial protein C receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kador, Karl Erich

    Synthetic materials for use in blood contacting applications have been studied for many years with limited success. One of the main areas of need for these materials is the design of synthetic vascular grafts for use in the hundreds of thousands of patients who have coronary artery bypass grafting, many without suitable veins for autologous grafts. The design of these grafts is constrained by two common modes of failure, the formation of intimal hyperplasia (IH) and thrombosis. IH formation has been previously linked to a mismatching of the mechanical properties of the graft and has been overcome by creating grafts using materials whose compliance mimics that of the native artery. Several techniques and surface modification have been designed to limit thrombosis on the surface of synthetic materials. One which has shown the greatest promise is the immobilization of Thrombomodulin (TM), a protein found on the endothelial cell membrane lining native blood vessels involved in the activation of the anticoagulant Protein C (PC). While TM immobilization has been shown to arrest thrombin formation and limit fibrous formations in in-vitro and in-vivo experiments, it has shown to be transport limiting under arterial flow. On the endothelial cell surface, TM is co-localized with Endothelial Protein C Receptor (EPCR), which increases PC transport onto the cell surface and increases PC activation via TM between 20-100 fold. This dissertation will describe the chemical modification of medical grade polyurethane (PU), whose compliance has been shown to match that of native arteries. This modification will enable the immobilization of two proteins on an enzymatically relevant scale estimated at less than 10 nm. This dissertation will further describe the immobilization of the proteins TM and EPCR, and analyze the ability of a surface co-immobilized with these proteins to activate the anticoagulant PC. Finally, it will compare the ability of this co-immobilized surface to delay

  2. Analysis of direct immobilized recombinant protein G on a gold surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunhee [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Applied Science and Technology, Sogang University , Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Da-Yeon [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Goh, Hyun-Jeong [Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Byung-Keun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Singh, Ravindra P. [Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Soo-Min [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Applied Science and Technology, Sogang University , Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeong-Woo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jwchoi@sogang.ac.kr

    2008-09-15

    Abstact: For the immobilization of IgG, various techniques such as chemical linker, thiolated protein G methods, and fragmentation of antibodies have been reported [Y.M. Bae, B.K. Oh, W. Lee, W.H. Lee, J.W. Choi, Biosensors Bioelectron. 21 (2005) 103; W. Lee, B.K. Oh, W.H. Lee, J.W. Choi, Colloids Surf. B-Biointerfaces, 40 (2005) 143; A.A. Karyakin, G.V. Presnova, M.Y. Rubtsova, A.M. Egorov, Anal. Chem. 72 (2000) 3805]. Here, we modified the immunoglobulin Fc-binding B-domain of protein G to contain two cysteine residues at its C-terminus by a genetic engineering technique. The resulting recombinant protein, RPGcys, retained IgG-binding activity in the same manner as native protein G. RPGcys was immobilized on a gold surface by strong affinity between thiol of cysteine and gold. The orientations of both IgG layers immobilized on the base recombinant protein Gs were analyzed by fluorescence microscope, atomic force microscope (AFM), and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Our data revealed that IgG-binding activity of RPGcys on gold surface significantly increased in comparison to wild type of protein G (RPGwild), which was physically adsorbed due to absence of cysteine residue. Immobilization of highly oriented antibodies based on cysteine-modified protein G could be useful for the fabrication of immunosensor systems.

  3. In various protein complexes, disordered protomers have large per-residue surface areas and area of protein-, DNA- and RNA-binding interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhonghua; Hu, Gang; Yang, Jianyi; Peng, Zhenling; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2015-09-14

    We provide first large scale analysis of the peculiarities of surface areas of 5658 dissimilar (below 50% sequence similarity) proteins with known 3D-structures that bind to proteins, DNA or RNAs. We show here that area of the protein surface is highly correlated with the protein length. The size of the interface surface is only modestly correlated with the protein size, except for RNA-binding proteins where larger proteins are characterized by larger interfaces. Disordered proteins with disordered interfaces are characterized by significantly larger per-residue areas of their surfaces and interfaces when compared to the structured proteins. These result are applicable for proteins involved in interaction with DNA, RNA, and proteins and suggest that disordered proteins and binding regions are less compact and more likely to assume extended shape. We demonstrate that disordered protein binding residues in the interfaces of disordered proteins drive the increase in the per residue area of these interfaces. Our results can be used to predict in silico whether a given protomer from the DNA, RNA or protein complex is likely to be disordered in its unbound form. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Protein arrangement on modified diamond-like carbon surfaces - An ARXPS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterbeek, Reece N.; Seal, Christopher K.; Hyland, Margaret M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the nature of the interface between a biomaterial implant and the biological fluid is an essential step towards creating improved implant materials. This study examined a diamond-like carbon coating biomaterial, the surface energy of which was modified by Ar+ ion sputtering and laser graphitisation. The arrangement of proteins was analysed by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the effects of the polar component of surface energy on this arrangement were observed. It was seen that polar groups (such as CN, CO) are more attracted to the coating surface due to the stronger polar interactions. This results in a segregation of these groups to the DLC-protein interface; at increasing takeoff angle (further from to DLC-protein interface) fewer of these polar groups are seen. Correspondingly, groups that interact mainly by dispersive forces (CC, CH) were found to increase in intensity as takeoff angle increased, indicating they are segregated away from the DLC-protein interface. The magnitude of the segregation was seen to increase with increasing polar surface energy, this was attributed to an increased net attraction between the solid surface and polar groups at higher polar surface energy (γSp).

  5. A neural network potential energy surface for the F + CH4reaction including multiple channels based on coupled cluster theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Xin; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H

    2018-03-22

    We report here a new global and full dimensional potential energy surface (PES) for the F + CH4 reaction. This PES was constructed by using neural networks (NN) fitting to about 99 000 ab initio energies computed at the UCCSD(T)-F12a/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory, and the correction terms considering the influence of a larger basis set as well as spin-orbit couplings were further implemented with a hierarchial scheme. This PES, covering both the abstraction and substitution channels, has an overall fitting error of 8.24 meV in total, and 4.87 meV for energies within 2.5 eV using a segmented NN fitting method, and is more accurate than the previous PESs.

  6. Controlled surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films for preferential protein adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Handschuh-Wang, Stephan; Yang, Yang; Zhuang, Hao; Schlemper, Christoph; Wesner, Daniel; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Wenjun; Jiang, Xin

    2014-02-04

    Diamond and SiC both process extraordinary biocompatible, electronic, and chemical properties. A combination of diamond and SiC may lead to highly stable materials, e.g., for implants or biosensors with excellent sensing properties. Here we report on the controllable surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films and its effect on protein adsorption. For systematic and high-throughput investigations, novel diamond/β-SiC composite films with gradient composition have been synthesized using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the diamond/β-SiC ratio of the composite films shows a continuous change from pure diamond to β-SiC over a length of ∼ 10 mm on the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was employed to unveil the surface termination of chemically oxidized and hydrogen treated surfaces. The surface chemistry of the composite films was found to depend on diamond/β-SiC ratio and the surface treatment. As observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy, albumin and fibrinogen were preferentially adsorbed from buffer: after surface oxidation, the proteins preferred to adsorb on diamond rather than on β-SiC, resulting in an increasing amount of proteins adsorbed to the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. By contrast, for hydrogen-treated surfaces, the proteins preferentially adsorbed on β-SiC, leading to a decreasing amount of albumin adsorbed on the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. The mechanism of preferential protein adsorption is discussed by considering the hydrogen bonding of the water self-association network to OH-terminated surfaces and the change of the polar surface energy component, which was determined according to the van Oss method. These results suggest that the diamond/β-SiC gradient film can be a promising material for biomedical applications which

  7. Taking Orders from Light: Photo-Switchable Working/Inactive Smart Surfaces for Protein and Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junji; Ma, Wenjing; He, Xiao-Peng; Tian, He

    2017-03-15

    Photoresponsive smart surfaces are promising candidates for a variety of applications in optoelectronics and sensing devices. The use of light as an order signal provides advantages of remote and noninvasive control with high temporal and spatial resolutions. Modification of the photoswitches with target biomacromolecules, such as peptides, DNA, and small molecules including folic acid derivatives and sugars, has recently become a popular strategy to empower the smart surfaces with an improved detection efficiency and specificity. Herein, we report the construction of photoswitchable self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) based on sugar (galactose/mannose)-decorated azobenzene derivatives and determine their photoswitchable, selective protein/cell adhesion performances via electrochemistry. Under alternate UV/vis irradiation, interconvertible high/low recognition and binding affinity toward selective lectins (proteins that recognize sugars) and cells that highly express sugar receptors are achieved. Furthermore, the cis-SAMs with a low binding affinity toward selective proteins and cells also exhibit minimal response toward unselective protein and cell samples, which offers the possibility in avoiding unwanted contamination and consumption of probes prior to functioning for practical applications. Besides, the electrochemical technique used facilitates the development of portable devices based on the smart surfaces for on-demand disease diagnosis.

  8. The influence of the surface properties of silicon-fluorine hydrogel on protein adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haijiao; Zhao, Zhengbai; An, Shuangshuang; Jiang, Yong

    2015-12-01

    A range of fluorinated hydrogels were synthesized using the copolymerization of 1, 1, 1, 3, 3, 3-hexafluoroisopropyl methacrylate (HFMA) or 1H, 1H, 7H-dodecafluoroheptyl methacrylate (DFMA) with hydrophilic monomers. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and Lysozyme (LZM) were chosen as model proteins to investigate the performance of protein adsorption on the surface of these fluorinated hydrogels. It was found that the performance of the fluorinated hydrogels toward protein adsorption was different for different proteins; simultaneously, the amount of protein adsorption was related to but not linear with the fluorine content on the hydrogel surface. With increasing HFMA content, the mass of BSA adsorption increased in the first stage and then decreased, meanwhile the mass of LZM adsorption exhibited an upward trend in general. In addition, the amount of protein adsorption was also related to the type and length of the fluorinated groups. The hydrogels made from DFMA behaved better than HFMA hydrogels in terms of reducing protein adsorption. This study might provide further reference in choosing fluorine monomer to prepare protein-repelling hydrogels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Spatially-resolved protein surface microsampling from tissue sections using liquid extraction surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisztorski, Maxence; Desmons, Annie; Quanico, Jusal; Fatou, Benoit; Gimeno, Jean-Pascal; Franck, Julien; Salzet, Michel; Fournier, Isabelle

    2016-06-01

    Tissue microenvironment characterization presents a challenge for a better understanding of the full complexity of a pathology. Unfortunately, making a precise "picture" of the disease needs an efficient microsampling method coupled to an accurate localization for performing region-dependent proteomics. Here, we present a method that enables rapid and reproducible extraction of proteins from a tissue section to analyze a specific region at a millimeter scale. The method used a liquid-microjunction extraction with conventional detergent solution for proteomics analysis. We successfully performed immunoblotting experiments and showed the possibility to retrieve and identify more than 1400 proteins from a 1-mm diameter spot size on tissue sections with a high degree of reproducibility both qualitatively and quantitatively. Moreover, the small size of the extracted region achieved by this sampling method allows the possibility to perform multiple extractions on different tissue section points. Ten points on a sagittal rat brain tissue section were analyzed and the measured proteins clearly distinguished the different parts of the brain, thus permitting precise functional mapping. We thus demonstrate that with this technology, it is possible to map the tissue microenvironment and gain an understanding of the molecular mechanisms at millimeter resolution. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The Effect of Nano-ZnO Surface Wettability on Modulating Protein Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qian; Ding, Yadan; Shao, Hong; Cong, Tie; Yang, Xiaoguang; Hong, Xia

    2017-07-01

    Although surface wettability plays a major role in regulating protein adsorption and nanostructured ZnO has shown great potential in various biomedical fields, few reports have examined the influence of nano-ZnO surface wettability on protein adsorption. Herein, we explored the adsorption behavior of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the superhydrophilic, hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic nano-ZnO surfaces. The adsorption amount of BSA increased with increase of hydrophilicity because of increased adsorption sites on the hydrophilic surface. The protein adsorption was proved to occur along with the desorption and conformational changes by well-fitted kinetic adsorption curves with the Spreading Particle Model and Fourier transformation infrared spectral analysis. The rates of BSA adsorption and desorption increased with hydrophobicity of the ZnO surfaces, which was considered to be related with the energy barrier created by water bound to the ZnO surfaces via hydrogen bonding. The rate of conformational change varied in a complex way, which might be influenced by the surface wettability of ZnO and some other factors. The present work may open up a new avenue to design nano-bio interfacial materials for advanced biological study and clinical applications.

  11. Microparticles released from Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected human macrophages contain increased levels of the type I interferon inducible proteins including ISG15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Nathan J; Chan, Brian; Chan, Edwina; Kaufman, Kimberley L; Britton, Warwick J; Saunders, Bernadette M

    2015-09-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are small membranous particles (100-1000 nm) released under normal steady-state conditions and are thought to provide a communication network between host cells. Previous studies demonstrated that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection of macrophages increased the release of MPs, and these MPs induced a proinflammatory response from uninfected macrophages in vitro and in vivo following their transfer into uninfected mice. To determine how M. tb infection modulates the protein composition of the MPs, and if this contributes to their proinflammatory properties, we compared the proteomes of MPs derived from M. tb-infected (TBinf-MP) and uninfected human THP-1 monocytic cells. MP proteins were analyzed by GeLC-MS/MS with spectral counting revealing 68 proteins with statistically significant differential abundances. The 42 proteins increased in abundance in TBinf-MPs included proteins associated with immune function (7), lysosomal/endosomal maturation (4), vesicular formation (12), nucleosome proteins (4), and antigen processing (9). Prominent among these were the type I interferon inducible proteins, ISG15, IFIT1, IFIT2, and IFIT3. Exposure of uninfected THP-1 cells to TBinf-MPs induced increased gene expression of isg15, ifit1, ifit2, and ifit3 and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. These proteins may regulate the proinflammatory potential of the MPs and provide candidate biomarkers for M. tb infection. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Nanoscale protein arrays of rich morphologies via self-assembly on chemically treated diblock copolymer surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Sheng; Milchak, Marissa; Zhou Hebing; Lee, Thomas; Hanscom, Mark; Hahm, Jong-in

    2013-01-01

    Well-controlled assembly of proteins on supramolecular templates of block copolymers can be extremely useful for high-throughput biodetection. We report the adsorption and assembly characteristics of a model antibody protein to various polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) templates whose distinctive nanoscale structures are obtained through time-regulated exposure to chloroform vapor. The strong adsorption preference of the protein to the polystyrene segment in the diblock copolymer templates leads to an easily predictable, controllable, rich set of nanoscale protein morphologies through self-assembly. We also demonstrate that the chemical identities of various subareas within individual nanostructures can be readily elucidated by investigating the corresponding protein adsorption behavior on each chemically distinct area of the template. In our approach, a rich set of intricate nanoscale morphologies of protein arrays that cannot be easily attained through other means can be generated straightforwardly via self-assembly of proteins on chemically treated diblock copolymer surfaces, without the use of clean-room-based fabrication tools. Our approach provides much-needed flexibility and versatility for the use of block copolymer-based protein arrays in biodetection. The ease of fabrication in producing well-defined and self-assembled templates can contribute to a high degree of versatility and simplicity in acquiring an intricate nanoscale geometry and spatial distribution of proteins in arrays. These advantages can be extremely beneficial both for fundamental research and biomedical detection, especially in the areas of solid-state-based, high-throughput protein sensing. (paper)

  13. Refrigerated storage of platelets initiates changes in platelet surface marker expression and localization of intracellular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ben; Padula, Matthew P; Marks, Denese C; Johnson, Lacey

    2016-10-01

    Platelets (PLTs) are currently stored at room temperature (22°C), which limits their shelf life, primarily due to the risk of bacterial growth. Alternatives to room temperature storage include PLT refrigeration (2-6°C), which inhibits bacterial growth, thus potentially allowing an extension of shelf life. Additionally, refrigerated PLTs appear more hemostatically active than conventional PLTs, which may be beneficial in certain clinical situations. However, the mechanisms responsible for this hemostatic function are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to assess the protein profile of refrigerated PLTs in an effort to understand these functional consequences. Buffy coat PLTs were pooled, split, and stored either at room temperature (20-24°C) or under refrigerated (2-6°C) conditions (n = 8 in each group). PLTs were assessed for changes in external receptor expression and actin filamentation using flow cytometry. Intracellular proteomic changes were assessed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. PLT refrigeration significantly reduced the abundance of glycoproteins (GPIb, GPIX, GPIIb, and GPIV) on the external membrane. However, refrigeration resulted in the increased expression of high-affinity integrins (αIIbβ3 and β1) and activation and apoptosis markers (CD62P, CD63, and phosphatidylserine). PLT refrigeration substantially altered the abundance and localization of several cytoskeletal proteins and resulted in an increase in actin filamentation, as measured by phalloidin staining. Refrigerated storage of PLTs induces significant changes in the expression and localization of both surface-expressed and intracellular proteins. Understanding these proteomic changes may help to identify the mechanisms resulting in the refrigeration-associated alterations in PLT function and clearance. © 2016 AABB.

  14. Locating critical points on multi-dimensional surfaces by genetic algorithm: test cases including normal and perturbed argon clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Pinaki; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    1999-03-01

    It is demonstrated that Genetic Algorithm in a floating point realisation can be a viable tool for locating critical points on a multi-dimensional potential energy surface (PES). For small clusters, the standard algorithm works well. For bigger ones, the search for global minimum becomes more efficient when used in conjunction with coordinate stretching, and partitioning of the strings into a core part and an outer part which are alternately optimized The method works with equal facility for locating minima, local as well as global, and saddle points (SP) of arbitrary orders. The search for minima requires computation of the gradient vector, but not the Hessian, while that for SP's requires the information of the gradient vector and the Hessian, the latter only at some specific points on the path. The method proposed is tested on (i) a model 2-d PES (ii) argon clusters (Ar 4-Ar 30) in which argon atoms interact via Lennard-Jones potential, (iii) Ar mX, m=12 clusters where X may be a neutral atom or a cation. We also explore if the method could also be used to construct what may be called a stochastic representation of the reaction path on a given PES with reference to conformational changes in Ar n clusters.

  15. SWRT: A package for semi-analytical solutions of surface wave propagation, including mode conversion, across transversely aligned vertical discontinuities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Datta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a suite of programs that implement decades-old algorithms for computation of seismic surface wave reflection and transmission coefficients at a welded contact between two laterally homogeneous quarter-spaces. For Love as well as Rayleigh waves, the algorithms are shown to be capable of modelling multiple mode conversions at a lateral discontinuity, which was not shown in the original publications or in the subsequent literature. Only normal incidence at a lateral boundary is considered so there is no Love–Rayleigh coupling, but incidence of any mode and coupling to any (other mode can be handled. The code is written in Python and makes use of SciPy's Simpson's rule integrator and NumPy's linear algebra solver for its core functionality. Transmission-side results from this code are found to be in good agreement with those from finite-difference simulations. In today's research environment of extensive computing power, the coded algorithms are arguably redundant but SWRT can be used as a valuable testing tool for the ever evolving numerical solvers of seismic wave propagation. SWRT is available via GitHub (https://github.com/arjundatta23/SWRT.git.

  16. SWRT: A package for semi-analytical solutions of surface wave propagation, including mode conversion, across transversely aligned vertical discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Arjun

    2018-03-01

    We present a suite of programs that implement decades-old algorithms for computation of seismic surface wave reflection and transmission coefficients at a welded contact between two laterally homogeneous quarter-spaces. For Love as well as Rayleigh waves, the algorithms are shown to be capable of modelling multiple mode conversions at a lateral discontinuity, which was not shown in the original publications or in the subsequent literature. Only normal incidence at a lateral boundary is considered so there is no Love-Rayleigh coupling, but incidence of any mode and coupling to any (other) mode can be handled. The code is written in Python and makes use of SciPy's Simpson's rule integrator and NumPy's linear algebra solver for its core functionality. Transmission-side results from this code are found to be in good agreement with those from finite-difference simulations. In today's research environment of extensive computing power, the coded algorithms are arguably redundant but SWRT can be used as a valuable testing tool for the ever evolving numerical solvers of seismic wave propagation. SWRT is available via GitHub (https://github.com/arjundatta23/SWRT.git).

  17. Exhaustive comparison and classification of ligand-binding surfaces in proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Yoichi; Kinoshita, Kengo; Kinjo, Akira R; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    Many proteins function by interacting with other small molecules (ligands). Identification of ligand-binding sites (LBS) in proteins can therefore help to infer their molecular functions. A comprehensive comparison among local structures of LBSs was previously performed, in order to understand their relationships and to classify their structural motifs. However, similar exhaustive comparison among local surfaces of LBSs (patches) has never been performed, due to computational complexity. To e...

  18. Protein structural transition at negatively charged electrode surfaces. Effects of temperature and current density

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černocká, Hana; Ostatná, Veronika; Paleček, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 174, AUG 2015 (2015), s. 356-360 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-15479S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00956S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Bovine serum albumin * sensing of surface-attached protein stability * protein structural transition at Hg Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.803, year: 2015

  19. Measured Properties of Turbulent Premixed Flames for Model Assessment, Including Burning Velocities, Stretch Rates, and Surface Densities (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    conditions was stabilized on a large two-dimensional slot Bunsen burner . It was found that the turbulent burning velocity of Bunsen flames depends...burning velocity of Bunsen flames are inadequate because they should include two additional parameters: mean velocity Ū and burner width W. These...corru- gated) flame with well-defined boundary conditions was stabilized on a large two-dimensional slot Bunsen burner . It was found that the turbulent

  20. Hot spot mapping of protein surfaces with TEMPOL: Bovine pancreatic RNase A as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccolai, Neri; Morandi, Edoardo; Gardini, Simone; Costabile, Valentino; Spadaccini, Roberta; Crescenzi, Orlando; Picone, Delia; Spiga, Ottavia; Bernini, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    TEMPOL spin-label has been used to identify surface exposure of protein nuclei from NMR analysis of the induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PRE). The absence of linear dependence between atom depths and observed PRE reveals that specific mechanisms drive the approach of the paramagnet to the protein surface. RNase A represents a unique protein system to explore the fine details of the information offered by TEMPOL induced PRE, due to the abundance of previous results, obtained in solution and in the crystal, dealing with surface dynamics behavior of this protein. MD simulations in explicit solvent have been performed, also in the presence of TEMPOL, in order to delineate the role of intermolecular hydrogen bonds (HB) on PRE extents. Comparison of our results with the ones obtained from multiple solvent crystal structure (MSCS) studies yields information on the specificities that these two techniques have for characterizing protein-ligand interactions, a fundamental step in the development of reliable surface druggability predictors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bacterial adhesion to protein-coated surfaces: An AFM and QCM-D study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Joshua; Liu, Yatao; Camesano, Terri A.

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials, mineral surfaces, or other industrial surfaces is strongly controlled by the way bacteria interact with protein layers or organic matter and other biomolecules that coat the materials. Despite this knowledge, many studies of bacterial adhesion are performed under clean conditions, instead of in the presence of proteins or organic molecules. We chose fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a model protein, and prepared FBS films on quartz crystals. The thickness of the FBS layer was characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging under liquid and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Next, we characterized how the model biomaterial surface would interact with the nocosomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis. An AFM probe was coated with S. epidermidis cells and used to probe a gold slide that had been coated with FBS or another protein, fibronectin (FN). These experiments show that AFM and QCM-D can be used in complementary ways to study the complex interactions between bacteria, proteins, and surfaces.

  2. Kinetic Control of Histidine-Tagged Protein Surface Density on Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, Jeffrey A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Groves, Jay T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-02-28

    Nickel-chelating lipids are general tools for anchoring polyhistidine-tagged proteins to supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), but controversy exists over the stability of the protein-lipid attachment. In this study, we show that chelator lipids are suitable anchors for building stable, biologically active surfaces but that a simple Langmuirian model is insufficient to describe their behavior. Desorption kinetics from chelator lipids are governed by the valency of surface binding: monovalently bound proteins desorb within minutes (t1/2 ≈ 6 min), whereas polyvalently bound species remain bound for hours (t1/2 ≈ 12 h). Evolution between surface states is slow, so equilibrium is unlikely to be reached on experimental timescales. However, by tuning incubation conditions, the populations of each species can be kinetically controlled, providing a wide range of protein densities on SLBs with a single concentration of chelator lipid. In conclusion, we propose guidelines for the assembly of SLB surfaces functionalized with specific protein densities and demonstrate their utility in the formation of hybrid immunological synapses.

  3. Structure of the Streptococcus pneumoniae Surface Protein and Adhesin PfbA

    OpenAIRE

    Suits, Michael D.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2013-01-01

    PfbA (plasmin- and fibronectin-binding protein A) is an extracellular Streptococcus pneumoniae cell-wall attached surface protein that binds to fibronectin, plasmin, and plasminogen. Here we present a structural analysis of the surface exposed domains of PfbA using a combined approach of X-ray crystallography and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The crystal structure of the PfbA core domain, here called PfbAβ, determined to 2.28 Å resolution revealed an elongated 12-stranded parallel β-he...

  4. Analysis of the free-energy surface of proteins from reversible folding simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy R Allen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Computer generated trajectories can, in principle, reveal the folding pathways of a protein at atomic resolution and possibly suggest general and simple rules for predicting the folded structure of a given sequence. While such reversible folding trajectories can only be determined ab initio using all-atom transferable force-fields for a few small proteins, they can be determined for a large number of proteins using coarse-grained and structure-based force-fields, in which a known folded structure is by construction the absolute energy and free-energy minimum. Here we use a model of the fast folding helical lambda-repressor protein to generate trajectories in which native and non-native states are in equilibrium and transitions are accurately sampled. Yet, representation of the free-energy surface, which underlies the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the protein model, from such a trajectory remains a challenge. Projections over one or a small number of arbitrarily chosen progress variables often hide the most important features of such surfaces. The results unequivocally show that an unprojected representation of the free-energy surface provides important and unbiased information and allows a simple and meaningful description of many-dimensional, heterogeneous trajectories, providing new insight into the possible mechanisms of fast-folding proteins.

  5. Human and pneumococcal cell surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) proteins are both ligands of human C1q protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-12-14

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (K(D) = 0.34-2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response.

  6. Human and Pneumococcal Cell Surface Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) Proteins Are Both Ligands of Human C1q Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M.; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (KD = 0.34–2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response. PMID:23086952

  7. Simultaneous analysis of multiple serum proteins adhering to the surface of medical grade polydimethylsiloxane elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backovic, Aleksandar; Wolfram, Dolores; Del-Frari, Barbara; Piza, Hildegunde; Huber, Lukas A; Wick, Georg

    2007-12-01

    Although polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, silicone) elastomers are presumed to be chemically inert and of negligible toxicity, they induce a prompt acute inflammatory response with subsequent fibrotic reactions. Since local inflammatory and fibrotic side effects are associated with the proteinaceous film on the surface of silicone implants, the process of protein adherence to silicone is of practical medical relevance, and interesting from theoretical, clinical and biotechnological perspectives. It is hypothesized that the systemic side effects resembling rheumatoid and other connective tissue diseases may be triggered by local immunological changes, but this functional relationship has yet to be defined. Because the proteinaceous film on the surface of silicone has been identified as a key player in the activation of host defense mechanisms, we propose a test system based on a proteomics screen to simultaneously identify proteins adsorbed from serum to the surface of silicone. Herein, we describe protein adsorption kinetics on the surface of silicone implants, correlate the adhesion properties of serum proteins with the occurrence of adverse reactions to silicone, and successfully discriminate their signature on the silicone surface in a blinded study of patients suffering from fibrotic reactions (as determined by Baker scale) to silicone implants.

  8. Identification of novel surface-exposed proteins of Rickettsia rickettsii by affinity purification and proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Gong

    Full Text Available Rickettsia rickettsii, the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, is the most pathogenic member among Rickettsia spp. Surface-exposed proteins (SEPs of R. rickettsii may play important roles in its pathogenesis or immunity. In this study, R. rickettsii organisms were surface-labeled with sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin and the labeled proteins were affinity-purified with streptavidin. The isolated proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and 10 proteins were identified among 23 protein spots by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Five (OmpA, OmpB, GroEL, GroES, and a DNA-binding protein of the 10 proteins were previously characterized as surface proteins of R. rickettsii. Another 5 proteins (Adr1, Adr2, OmpW, Porin_4, and TolC were first recognized as SEPs of R. rickettsii herein. The genes encoding the 5 novel SEPs were expressed in Escherichia coli cells, resulting in 5 recombinant SEPs (rSEPs, which were used to immunize mice. After challenge with viable R. rickettsii cells, the rickettsial load in the spleen, liver, or lung of mice immunized with rAdr2 and in the lungs of mice immunized with other rSEPs excluding rTolC was significantly lower than in mice that were mock-immunized with PBS. The in vitro neutralization test revealed that sera from mice immunized with rAdr1, rAdr2, or rOmpW reduced R. rickettsii adherence to and invasion of vascular endothelial cells. The immuno-electron microscopic assay clearly showed that the novel SEPs were located in the outer and/or inner membrane of R. rickettsii. Altogether, the 5 novel SEPs identified herein might be involved in the interaction of R. rickettsii with vascular endothelial cells, and all of them except TolC were protective antigens.

  9. Comparing autotransporter β-domain configurations for their capacity to secrete heterologous proteins to the cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter S P Jong

    Full Text Available Monomeric autotransporters have been extensively used for export of recombinant proteins to the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria. A bottleneck in the biosynthesis of such constructs is the passage of the outer membrane, which is facilitated by the β-domain at the C terminus of an autotransporter in conjunction with the Bam complex in the outer membrane. We have evaluated eight β-domain constructs for their capacity to secrete fused proteins to the cell surface. These constructs derive from the monomeric autotransporters Hbp, IgA protease, Ag43 and EstA and the trimeric autotransporter Hia, which all were selected because they have been previously used for secretion of recombinant proteins. We fused three different protein domains to the eight β-domain constructs, being a Myc-tag, the Hbp passenger and a nanobody or VHH domain, and assessed expression, membrane insertion and surface exposure. Our results show that expression levels differed considerably between the constructs tested. The constructs that included the β-domains of Hbp and IgA protease appeared the most efficient and resulted in expression levels that were detectable on Coomassie-stained SDS-PAGE gels. The VHH domain appeared the most difficult fusion partner to export, probably due to its complex immunoglobulin-like structure with a tertiary structure stabilized by an intramolecular disulfide bond. Overall, the Hbp β-domain compared favorably in exporting the fused recombinant proteins, because it showed in every instance tested a good level of expression, stable membrane insertion and clear surface exposure.

  10. Californium-252 plasma desorption mass analysis of proteins adsorbed on polymer and modified-polymer surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    A new Cf-252 plasma desorption mass spectrometer has been built specifically for the analysis of large biomolecules. This mass spectrometer was used to investigate the interactions between proteins adsorbed onto polymer surfaces and how the chemical nature of the polymer surface influences the production of stable, gas-phase molecule ions. Chemical modification of the polymer surfaces was achieved by means of ultra-violet irradiation, resulting in the production of a more hydrophilic surface. Analysis of a series of model compounds adsorbed onto modified and non-modified polymer surfaces indicates that the wettability of the surface is an important influence in the production of stable molecular ions. This information was then utilized to aid in the analysis of lysozyme, myoglobin, and porcine trypsin

  11. Analysis of the key elements of FFAT-like motifs identifies new proteins that potentially bind VAP on the ER, including two AKAPs and FAPP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Mikitova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two phenylalanines (FF in an acidic tract (FFAT-motifs were originally described as having seven elements: an acidic flanking region followed by 6 residues (EFFDA-E. Such motifs are found in several lipid transfer protein (LTP families, and they interact with a protein on the cytosolic face of the ER called vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP. Mutation of which causes ER stress and motor neuron disease, making it important to determine which proteins bind VAP. Among other proteins that bind VAP, some contain FFAT-like motifs that are missing one or more of the seven elements. Defining how much variation is tolerated in FFAT-like motifs is a preliminary step prior to the identification of the full range of VAP interactors. RESULTS: We used a quantifiable in vivo system that measured ER targeting in a reporter yeast strain that over-expressed VAP to study the effect of substituting different elements of FFAT-like motifs in turn. By defining FFAT-like motifs more widely than before, we found them in novel proteins the functions of which had not previously been directly linked to the ER, including: two PKA anchoring proteins, AKAP220 and AKAP110; a family of plant LTPs; and the glycolipid LTP phosphatidylinositol-four-phosphate adaptor-protein-2 (FAPP-2. CONCLUSION: All of the seven essential elements of a FFAT motif tolerate variation, and weak targeting to the ER via VAP is still detected if two elements are substituted. In addition to the strong FFAT motifs already known, there are additional proteins with weaker FFAT-like motifs, which might be functionally important VAP interactors.

  12. Optimising the Use of TRIzol-extracted Proteins in Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/ Ionization (SELDI Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perlaky Laszlo

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research with clinical specimens is always hampered by the limited availability of relevant samples, necessitating the use of a single sample for multiple assays. TRIzol is a common reagent for RNA extraction, but DNA and protein fractions can also be used for other studies. However, little is known about using TRIzol-extracted proteins in proteomic research, partly because proteins extracted from TRIzol are very resistant to solubilization. Results To facilitate the use of TRIzol-extracted proteins, we first compared the ability of four different common solubilizing reagents to solubilize the TRIzol-extracted proteins from an osteosarcoma cell line, U2-OS. Then we analyzed the solubilized proteins by Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/ Ionization technique (SELDI. The results showed that solubilization of TRIzol-extracted proteins with 9.5 M Urea and 2% CHAPS ([3-[(3-cholamidopropyl-dimethylammonio]propanesulfonate] (UREA-CHAPS was significantly better than the standard 1% SDS in terms of solubilization efficiency and the number of detectable ion peaks. Using three different types of SELDI arrays (CM10, H50, and IMAC-Cu, we demonstrated that peak detection with proteins solubilized by UREA-CHAPS was reproducible (r > 0.9. Further SELDI analysis indicated that the number of ion peaks detected in TRIzol-extracted proteins was comparable to a direct extraction method, suggesting many proteins still remain in the TRIzol protein fraction. Conclusion Our results suggest that UREA-CHAPS performed very well in solubilizing TRIzol-extracted proteins for SELDI applications. Protein fractions left over after TRIzol RNA extraction could be a valuable but neglected source for proteomic or biochemical analysis when additional samples are not available.

  13. TGP, an extremely stable, non-aggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Close, Devin W.; Don Paul, Craig; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Traore, Daouda A.K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP....

  14. Protein Adsorption Tailors the Surface Energies and Compatibility between Polylactide and Cellulose Nanofibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakalo, Alexey; Filpponen, Ilari; Rojas, Orlando J

    2017-04-10

    The state of dispersion and the interactions between a polymer and a filler in a nanocomposite crucially define its properties and performance. The affinity of polylactide (PLA) with vegetable and animal proteins (casein, gelatin, soy protein isolate, and hydrolysate) is investigated and their role as eco-friendly dispersants and compatibilizers of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) is elucidated. The affinity of the proteins with PLA is determined by using sensograms acquired by electroacoustic (quartz crystal microgravimetry) and optical (surface plasmon resonance) techniques. The surface energy of PLA increases upon protein adsorption while the opposite effect is observed for CNF, under identical experimental conditions. A significant improvement in the thermodynamic work of adhesion for PLA/CNF systems is predicted by application of the denatured proteins at low concentrations (∼20% and ∼15% enhancement with soy protein and casein at pH 3 and pH 8, respectively). We offer a robust method to screen denatured proteins and to tailor the wettability and material compatibility in the synthesis of bionanocomposites based on CNF and PLA.

  15. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  16. Using extremely halophilic bacteria to understand the role of surface charge and surface hydration in protein evolution, folding, and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Wouter; Deole, Ratnakar; Osu Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Halophilic Archaea accumulate molar concentrations of KCl in their cytoplasm as an osmoprotectant, and have evolved highly acidic proteomes that only function at high salinity. We examine osmoprotection in the photosynthetic Proteobacteria Halorhodospira halophila. We find that H. halophila has an acidic proteome and accumulates molar concentrations of KCl when grown in high salt media. Upon growth of H. halophila in low salt media, its cytoplasmic K + content matches that of Escherichia coli, revealing an acidic proteome that can function in the absence of high cytoplasmic salt concentrations. These findings necessitate a reassessment of two central aspects of theories for understanding extreme halophiles. We conclude that proteome acidity is not driven by stabilizing interactions between K + ions and acidic side chains, but by the need for maintaining sufficient solvation and hydration of the protein surface at high salinity through strongly hydrated carboxylates. We propose that obligate protein halophilicity is a non-adaptive property resulting from genetic drift in which constructive neutral evolution progressively incorporates weakly stabilizing K + binding sites on an increasingly acidic protein surface.

  17. The Listeria monocytogenes LPXTG surface protein Lmo1413 is an invasin with capacity to bind mucin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscotti, Javier F; Quereda, Juan J; García-Del Portillo, Francisco; Pucciarelli, M Graciela

    2014-05-01

    Many Gram-positive bacterial pathogens use surface proteins covalently anchored to the peptidoglycan to cause disease. Bacteria of the genus Listeria have the largest number of surface proteins of this family. Every Listeria genome sequenced to date contains more than forty genes encoding surface proteins bearing anchoring-domains with an LPXTG motif that is recognized for covalent linkage to the peptidoglycan. About one-third of these proteins are present exclusively in pathogenic Listeria species, with some of them acting as adhesins or invasins that promote bacterial entry into eukaryotic cells. Here, we investigated two LPXTG surface proteins of the pathogen L. monocytogenes, Lmo1413 and Lmo2085, of unknown function and absent in non-pathogenic Listeria species. Lack of these two proteins does not affect bacterial adhesion or invasion of host cells using in vitro infection models. However, expression of Lmo1413 promotes entry of the non-invasive species L. innocua into non-phagocytic host cells, an effect not observed with Lmo2085. Moreover, overproduction of Lmo1413, but not Lmo2085, increases the invasion rate in non-phagocytic eukaryotic cells of an L. monocytogenes mutant deficient in the acting-binding protein ActA. Unexpectedly, production of full-length Lmo1413 and InlA exhibited opposite trends in a high percentage of L. monocytogenes isolates obtained from different sources. The idea of Lmo1413 playing a role as a new auxiliary invasin was also sustained by assays revealing that purified Lmo1413 binds to mucin via its MucBP domains. Taken together, these data indicate that Lmo1413, which we rename LmiA, for Listeria-mucin-binding invasin-A, may promote interaction of bacteria with adhesive host protective components and, in this manner, facilitate bacterial entry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Detection of vitamin D binding protein on the surface of cytotrophoblasts isolated from human placentae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestler, J.E.; McLeod, J.F.; Kowalski, M.A.; Strauss, J.F. III; Haddad, J.G. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Vitamin D binding protein (DBP), a Mr 56,000-58,000 alpha 2-glycoprotein, is the major serum protein involved in the transport of vitamin D sterols. Recently it has been suggested that DBP may also be involved in immunoglobulin G binding to cells. Because the trophoblast is involved in the transport of molecules such as vitamin D and immunoglobulin G to the fetus, we asked whether DBP could be detected on the surface of human placental trophoblast cells. Cytotrophoblasts purified from human term placentae were fixed and made permeant with Triton X-100 and examined by indirect immunofluorescence after incubation with a monoclonal antibody to DBP. Greater than 90% of these cells stained positively, whereas no staining was observed with nonimmune antiserum. The presence of DBP on/in the surface of cytotrophoblasts could also be demonstrated by fluorescent cytometry. When cell surface-associated proteins of cytotrophoblasts were radioiodinated, a Mr 57,000 radiolabeled protein could be immunoisolated from the cell lysate with a purified monospecific polyclonal antibody to DBP. Immunoisolation of this radiolabeled protein was prevented by the addition of excess unlabeled human DBP to the cell lysate before incubation with antibody. This Mr 57,000 radiolabeled protein could also be isolated by affinity chromatography selecting for proteins that bind to globular actin. When cytotrophoblasts were incubated with [ 35 S]methionine for 3 or 18 h, active synthesis of DBP could not be demonstrated by immunoisolation techniques. These studies demonstrate the presence of DBP on the surface of well washed, human cytotrophoblasts. This DBP may be maternally derived, since active synthesis of DBP could not be demonstrated

  19. The nuclear basket proteins Mlp1p and Mlp2p are part of a dynamic interactome including Esc1p and the proteasome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepel, Mario; Molloy, Kelly R.; Williams, Rosemary; Farr, Julia C.; Meinema, Anne C.; Vecchietti, Nicholas; Cristea, Ileana M.; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Strambio-De-Castillia, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    The basket of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is generally depicted as a discrete structure of eight protein filaments that protrude into the nucleoplasm and converge in a ring distal to the NPC. We show that the yeast proteins Mlp1p and Mlp2p are necessary components of the nuclear basket and that they also embed the NPC within a dynamic protein network, whose extended interactome includes the spindle organizer, silencing factors, the proteasome, and key components of messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs). Ultrastructural observations indicate that the basket reduces chromatin crowding around the central transporter of the NPC and might function as a docking site for mRNP during nuclear export. In addition, we show that the Mlps contribute to NPC positioning, nuclear stability, and nuclear envelope morphology. Our results suggest that the Mlps are multifunctional proteins linking the nuclear transport channel to multiple macromolecular complexes involved in the regulation of gene expression and chromatin maintenance. PMID:24152732

  20. Mapping Hydrophobicity on the Protein Molecular Surface at Atom-Level Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau Jr., Dan V.; Paszek, Ewa; Fulga, Florin; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2014-01-01

    A precise representation of the spatial distribution of hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity and charges on the molecular surface of proteins is critical for the understanding of the interaction with small molecules and larger systems. The representation of hydrophobicity is rarely done at atom-level, as this property is generally assigned to residues. A new methodology for the derivation of atomic hydrophobicity from any amino acid-based hydrophobicity scale was used to derive 8 sets of atomic hydrophobicities, one of which was used to generate the molecular surfaces for 35 proteins with convex structures, 5 of which, i.e., lysozyme, ribonuclease, hemoglobin, albumin and IgG, have been analyzed in more detail. Sets of the molecular surfaces of the model proteins have been constructed using spherical probes with increasingly large radii, from 1.4 to 20 Å, followed by the quantification of (i) the surface hydrophobicity; (ii) their respective molecular surface areas, i.e., total, hydrophilic and hydrophobic area; and (iii) their relative densities, i.e., divided by the total molecular area; or specific densities, i.e., divided by property-specific area. Compared with the amino acid-based formalism, the atom-level description reveals molecular surfaces which (i) present an approximately two times more hydrophilic areas; with (ii) less extended, but between 2 to 5 times more intense hydrophilic patches; and (iii) 3 to 20 times more extended hydrophobic areas. The hydrophobic areas are also approximately 2 times more hydrophobicity-intense. This, more pronounced “leopard skin”-like, design of the protein molecular surface has been confirmed by comparing the results for a restricted set of homologous proteins, i.e., hemoglobins diverging by only one residue (Trp37). These results suggest that the representation of hydrophobicity on the protein molecular surfaces at atom-level resolution, coupled with the probing of the molecular surface at different geometric resolutions

  1. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies promote apoptosis of mature human Saos-2 osteoblasts via cell-surface binding to citrullinated heat shock protein 60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Chi; Yu, Chia-Li; Yu, Hui-Chun; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Koo, Malcolm; Lai, Ning-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) react with osteoblast surface citrullinated proteins and affect cell function, leading to joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). First, we purified ACPAs by cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP)-conjugated affinity column chromatography. The cognate antigens of ACPAs on Saos-2 cells, a sarcoma osteogenic cell line generated from human osteoblasts, were probed by ACPAs, and the reactive bands were analyzed using proteomic analyses. We found that ACPAs bind to Saos-2 cell membrane, and several protein candidates, including HSP60, were identified. We then cloned and purified recombinant heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) and citrullinated HSP60 (citHSP60) and investigated the effect of ACPAs on Saos-2 cell. We confirmed that HSP60 obtained from Saos-2 cell membrane were citrullinated and reacted with ACPAs, which induces Saos-2 cells apoptosis via binding to surface-expressed citHSP60 through Toll-like receptor 4 signaling. ACPAs promoted interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 expression in Saos-2 cells. Finally, sera from patients with RA and healthy controls were examined for their titers of anti-HSP60 and anti-citHSP60 antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The radiographic change in patients with RA was evaluated using the Genant-modified Sharp scoring system. Patients with RA showed higher sera titers of anti-citHSP60, but not anti-HSP60, antibodies when compared with controls. In addition, the anti-citHSP60 level was positively associated with increased joint damage in patients with RA. In conclusion, Saos-2 cell apoptosis was mediated by ACPAs via binding to cell surface-expressed citHSP60 and the titer of anti-citHSP60 in patients with RA positively associated with joint damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Proteome of conidial surface associated proteins of Aspergillus fumigatus reflecting potential vaccine candidates and allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Abdul R; Oellerich, Michael; Amstrong, Victor W; Riemenschneider, Birgit; Monod, Michel; Reichard, Utz

    2006-04-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a mold causing most of the invasive fungal lung infections in the immunocompromised host. In addition, the species is the causative agent of certain allergic diseases. Both in invasive and in allergic diseases, the conidial surface mediates the first contact with the human immune system. Thus, conidial surface proteins may be reasonable vaccine candidates as well as important allergens. To broaden the list of those antigens, intact viable Aspergillus conidia were extracted with mild alkaline buffer at pH 8.5 in the presence of a 1,3-beta-glucanase. The proteome of this fraction was separated by two- dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Altogether 26 different A. fumigatus proteins were identified, twelve of which contain a signal for secretion. Among these were the known major conidial surface protein rodlet A, one acid protease PEP2, one lipase, a putative disulfide isomerase and a putative fructose-1,6-biphosphatase. The known allergen Aspf 3 was identified among the proteins without a signal for secretion. On the basis of the recently annotated A. fumigatus genome (Nature 2005, 438, 1151-1156), proteome analysis is now a powerful tool to confirm expression of hypothetical proteins and, thereby to identify additional vaccine candidates and possible new allergens of this important fungal pathogen.

  3. Balance between hydration enthalpy and entropy is important for ice binding surfaces in Antifreeze Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauperl, Michael; Podewitz, Maren; Ortner, Teresa S; Waibl, Franz; Thoeny, Alexander; Loerting, Thomas; Liedl, Klaus R

    2017-09-19

    Antifreeze Proteins (AFPs) inhibit the growth of an ice crystal by binding to it. The detailed binding mechanism is, however, still not fully understood. We investigated three AFPs using Molecular Dynamics simulations in combination with Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory, exploring their hydration thermodynamics. The observed enthalpic and entropic differences between the ice-binding sites and the inactive surface reveal key properties essential for proteins in order to bind ice: While entropic contributions are similar for all sites, the enthalpic gain for all ice-binding sites is lower than for the rest of the protein surface. In contrast to most of the recently published studies, our analyses show that enthalpic interactions are as important as an ice-like pre-ordering. Based on these observations, we propose a new, thermodynamically more refined mechanism of the ice recognition process showing that the appropriate balance between entropy and enthalpy facilitates ice-binding of proteins. Especially, high enthalpic interactions between the protein surface and water can hinder the ice-binding activity.

  4. Probing protein: DNA interactions using a uniform monolayer of DNA and surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumaker-Parry, Jennifer S.; Campbell, Charles T.; Stormo, Gary D.; Silbaq, Fauzi S.; Aebersold, Rudolf H.

    2000-04-01

    A method is described for immobilizing double-stranded DNAs to a planar gold surface with high density and uniform spacing. This is accomplished by adsorbing biotinylated DNAs onto a nearly close-packed monolayer of the protein streptavidin. This streptavidin monolayer, which offers approximately 5 X 1012 biotin sites per cm2, is prepared first by adsorbing it onto a mixed self-assembled monolayer on gold which contains biotin-terminated and oligo-terminated alkylthiolates in a 3/7 ratio. This DNA- functionalized surface resists non-specific protein adsorption and is useful for probing the kinetics and equilibrium binding of proteins to DNA with surface plasmon resonance. This is demonstrated with the Mnt protein, which is found to bind in 3.8:1 ratio to its immobilized DNA operator sequence. This is consistent with its behavior in homogeneous solution, where it binds as a tetramer to its DNA. A sequence with a single base-pair mutation shows nearly as much Mnt binding, but a completely random DNA sequence shows only 5 percent of this binding. This proves that DNA-binding proteins bind sequence-specifically to double-stranded DNAs which are immobilized to gold with this streptavidin linker layer.

  5. Dynamics of Agglutinin-Like Sequence (ALS) Protein Localization on the Surface of Candida Albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, David Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The ALS gene family encodes large cell-surface glycoproteins associated with "C. albicans" pathogenesis. Als proteins are thought to act as adhesin molecules binding to host tissues. Wide variation in expression levels among the ALS genes exists and is related to cell morphology and environmental conditions. "ALS1," "ALS3," and "ALS4" are three of…

  6. Non-invasive high throughput approach for protein hydrophobicity determination based on surface tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrhein, Sven; Bauer, Katharina Christin; Galm, Lara; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    The surface hydrophobicity of a protein is an important factor for its interactions in solution and thus the outcome of its production process. Yet most of the methods are not able to evaluate the influence of these hydrophobic interactions under natural conditions. In the present work we have established a high resolution stalagmometric method for surface tension determination on a liquid handling station, which can cope with accuracy as well as high throughput requirements. Surface tensions could be derived with a low sample consumption (800 μL) and a high reproducibility (content. The protein influence on the solutions' surface tension was correlated to the hydrophobicity of lysozyme, human lysozyme, BSA, and α-lactalbumin. Differences in proteins' hydrophobic character depending on pH and species could be resolved. Within this work we have developed a pH dependent hydrophobicity ranking, which was found to be in good agreement with literature. For the studied pH range of 3-9 lysozyme from chicken egg white was identified to be the most hydrophilic. α-lactalbumin at pH 3 exhibited the most pronounced hydrophobic character. The stalagmometric method occurred to outclass the widely used spectrophotometric method with bromophenol blue sodium salt as it gave reasonable results without restrictions on pH and protein species. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor for parallelized detection of protein biomarkers in diluted blood plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Piliarik, Marek; Bocková, Markéta; Homola, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2010), s. 1656-1661 ISSN 0956-5663 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance * Protein array * Cancer marker Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 5.361, year: 2010

  8. Surface N-glycoproteome patterns reveal key proteins of neuronal differentiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tylečková, Jiřina; Valeková, Ivona; Žižková, Martina; Rákocyová, Michaela; Maršala, S.; Maršala, M.; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 1 (2016), s. 13-20 ISSN 1874-3919 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : cell adhesion proteins * cell surface capture * neuronal differentiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.914, year: 2016

  9. Functionalization of SU-8 photoresist surfaces with IgG proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blagoi, Gabriela; Keller, Stephan; Johansson, Alicia; Boisen, Anja; Dufva, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The negative epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 has a variety of applications within microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and lab-on-a-chip systems. Here, several methods to functionalize SU-8 surfaces with IgG proteins were investigated. Fluorescent labeled proteins and fluorescent sandwich immunoassays were employed to characterize the binding efficiency of model proteins to bare SU-8 surface, SU-8 treated with cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN) etchant and CAN treated surfaces modified by aminosilanization. The highest binding capacity of antibodies was observed on bare SU-8. This explains why bare SU-8 in a functional fluorescent sandwich immunoassay detecting C-reactive protein (CRP) gave twice as high signal as compared with the other two surfaces. Immunoassays performed on bare SU-8 and CAN treated SU-8 resulted in detection limits of CRP of 30 and 80 ng/ml respectively which is sufficient for detecting CRP in clinical samples, where concentrations of 3-10 μg/ml are normal for healthy individuals. In conclusion, bare SU-8 and etched SU-8 can be modified with antibodies by a simple adsorption procedure which simplifies building lab-on-a-chip systems in SU-8. Additionally, we report the fabrication process and use of microwells created in a SU-8 layer with the same dimensions as a standard microscope glass slide that could fit into fluorescent scanners. The SU-8 microwells minimize the reagent consumption and are straightforward to handle compared to SU-8 coated microscope slides

  10. Novel surface display system for proteins on non-genetically modified gram-positive bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, T; Kanninga, R; Neef, J; Audouy, SAL; van Roosmalen, ML; Steen, A; Buist, G; Kok, J; Kuipers, OP; Robillard, G; Leenhouts, K

    A novel display system is described that allows highly efficient immobilization of heterologous proteins on bacterial surfaces in applications for which the use of genetically modified bacteria is less desirable. This system is based on nonliving and non-genetically modified gram-positive bacterial

  11. Microarray analysis of genes associated with cell surface NIS protein levels in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Sasha J; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jimenez, Rafael E; Lee, Mei-Ling T; Richardson, Andrea L; Huang, Kun; Jhiang, Sissy M

    2011-10-11

    Na+/I- symporter (NIS)-mediated iodide uptake allows radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer. NIS is also expressed in breast tumors, raising potential for radionuclide therapy of breast cancer. However, NIS expression in most breast cancers is low and may not be sufficient for radionuclide therapy. We aimed to identify biomarkers associated with NIS expression such that mechanisms underlying NIS modulation in human breast tumors may be elucidated. Published oligonucleotide microarray data within the National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene Expression Omnibus database were analyzed to identify gene expression tightly correlated with NIS mRNA level among human breast tumors. NIS immunostaining was performed in a tissue microarray composed of 28 human breast tumors which had corresponding oligonucleotide microarray data available for each tumor such that gene expression associated with cell surface NIS protein level could be identified. NIS mRNA levels do not vary among breast tumors or when compared to normal breast tissues when detected by Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platforms. Cell surface NIS protein levels are much more variable than their corresponding NIS mRNA levels. Despite a limited number of breast tumors examined, our analysis identified cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase as a biomarker that is highly associated with cell surface NIS protein levels in the ER-positive breast cancer subtype. Further investigation on genes associated with cell surface NIS protein levels within each breast cancer molecular subtype may lead to novel targets for selectively increasing NIS expression/function in a subset of breast cancers patients.

  12. Enterococcal surface protein transiently aggravates Enterococcus faecium-induced urinary tract infection in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leendertse, Masja; Heikens, Esther; Wijnands, Lucas M.; van Luit-Asbroek, Miranda; Teske, Gwendoline J. D.; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; van der Poll, Tom; Willems, Rob J. L.

    2009-01-01

    The role that the enterococcal surface protein Esp plays in the capacity of Enterococcus faecium to adhere to uroepithelial cells and the role that it plays in urinary tract infection and peritonitis was investigated in vitro and in vivo, respectively, using Esp-expressing E. faecium (E1162) and its

  13. Analysis of the lipidated recombinant outer surface protein A from Borrelia burgdorferi by mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouchon, B.; Klein, Michele; Bischoff, Rainer; Van Dorsselaer, A.; Roitsch, C.

    1997-01-01

    The outer surface protein A, OspA, from the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is a lipoprotein of 25 kDa. The recombinant OspA (rOspA) expressed in Escherichia coli has been purified and analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESMS). A heterogenous spectrum gave a measured mass of 28,462 +/- 9 Da

  14. Cell Wall-anchored Proteins of Enterococcus faecium: Exploring a Novel Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, A.P.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304820741

    2009-01-01

    The past 4 years my research focussed on the identification, expression and function of surface-exposed LPXTG proteins and filamentous structures (also called pili or fimbriae) at the Enterococcus faecium cell wall. E. faecium is a commensal organism of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, but the

  15. Surface reengineering of RPA70N enables cocrystallization with an inhibitor of the replication protein A interaction motif of ATR interacting protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldkamp, Michael D; Frank, Andreas O; Kennedy, J Phillip; Patrone, James D; Vangamudi, Bhavatarini; Waterson, Alex G; Fesik, Stephen W; Chazin, Walter J

    2013-09-17

    Replication protein A (RPA) is the primary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein in eukaryotes. The N-terminal domain of the RPA70 subunit (RPA70N) interacts via a basic cleft with a wide range of DNA processing proteins, including several that regulate DNA damage response and repair. Small molecule inhibitors that disrupt these protein-protein interactions are therefore of interest as chemical probes of these critical DNA processing pathways and as inhibitors to counter the upregulation of DNA damage response and repair associated with treatment of cancer patients with radiation or DNA-damaging agents. Determination of three-dimensional structures of protein-ligand complexes is an important step for elaboration of small molecule inhibitors. However, although crystal structures of free RPA70N and an RPA70N-peptide fusion construct have been reported, RPA70N-inhibitor complexes have been recalcitrant to crystallization. Analysis of the P61 lattice of RPA70N crystals led us to hypothesize that the ligand-binding surface was occluded. Surface reengineering to alter key crystal lattice contacts led to the design of RPA70N E7R, E100R, and E7R/E100R mutants. These mutants crystallized in a P212121 lattice that clearly had significant solvent channels open to the critical basic cleft. Analysis of X-ray crystal structures, target peptide binding affinities, and (15)N-(1)H heteronuclear single-quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance spectra showed that the mutations do not result in perturbations of the RPA70N ligand-binding surface. The success of the design was demonstrated by determining the structure of RPA70N E7R soaked with a ligand discovered in a previously reported molecular fragment screen. A fluorescence anisotropy competition binding assay revealed this compound can inhibit the interaction of RPA70N with the peptide binding motif from the DNA damage response protein ATRIP. The implications of the results are discussed in the context of ongoing efforts

  16. A dual tag system for facilitated detection of surface expressed proteins in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmander Johan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of the autotransporter family has provided a mechanism for surface expression of proteins in laboratory strains of Escherichia coli. We have previously reported the use of the AIDA-I autotransport system to express the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis proteins SefA and H:gm. The SefA protein was successfully exposed to the medium, but the orientation of H:gm in the outer membrane could not be determined due to proteolytic cleavage of the N-terminal detection-tag. The goal of the present work was therefore to construct a vector containing elements that facilitates analysis of surface expression, especially for proteins that are sensitive to proteolysis or otherwise difficult to express. Results The surface expression system pAIDA1 was created with two detection tags flanking the passenger protein. Successful expression of SefA and H:gm on the surface of E. coli was confirmed with fluorescently labeled antibodies specific for the N-terminal His6-tag and the C-terminal Myc-tag. While both tags were detected during SefA expression, only the Myc-tag could be detected for H:gm. The negative signal indicates a proteolytic cleavage of this protein that removes the His6-tag facing the medium. Conclusions Expression levels from pAIDA1 were comparable to or higher than those achieved with the formerly used vector. The presence of the Myc- but not of the His6-tag on the cell surface during H:gm expression allowed us to confirm the hypothesis that this fusion protein was present on the surface and oriented towards the cell exterior. Western blot analysis revealed degradation products of the same molecular weight for SefA and H:gm. The size of these fragments suggests that both fusion proteins have been cleaved at a specific site close to the C-terminal end of the passenger. This proteolysis was concluded to take place either in the outer membrane or in the periplasm. Since H:gm was cleaved to a much greater extent

  17. Ultrasensitive probing of the protein resistance of PEG surfaces by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kingshott, P.; McArthur, S.; Thissen, H.

    2002-01-01

    The highly sensitive surface analytical techniques X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight static secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used to test the resistance of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings towards adsorption of lysozyme (LYS) and fibronectin (FN). PEG...... temperature to maximise the graft density of the PEG chains. XPS showed that the grafted density of PEG chains was slightly higher on the allylamine surface. XPS detected no adsorption of either protein on either PEG coating. ToF-SIMS analysis, on the other hand, found, in the positive ion spectra, minute...... but statistically significant signals assignable to amino acid fragment ions from both proteins adsorbed to the lower density PEG coating and from LYS but not FN on the higher density PEG coating. Negative ion spectra contained relatively more intense protein fragment ion signals for the lower density PEG coating...

  18. THE EFFECTS OF SURFACE CHEMISTRY ON THE PROPERTIES OF PROTEINS CONFINED IN NANO-POROUS MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, L. M.; O' Neill, H.

    2007-01-01

    The entrapment of proteins using the sol-gel route provides a means to retain its native properties and artifi cially reproduce the molecular crowding and confi nement experienced by proteins in the cell allowing investigation of the physico-chemical and structural properties of biomolecules at the biotic/abiotic interface. The biomolecules are spatially separated and ‘caged’ in the gel structure but solutes can freely permeate the matrix. Thus, properties such as the folding of ensembles of individual molecules can be examined in the absence of aggregation effects that can occur in solution studies. Green fl uorescent protein from Aequorea coerulescens was used as a model protein to examine the unfolding/re-folding properties of protein in silica gels. The recombinant protein was isolated and purifi ed from Escherichia coli extracts by cell lysis, three-phase partitioning, dialysis, and anion exchange chromatography. The purity of the protein was greater than 90% as judged by SDS PAGE gel analysis. Sol-gels were synthesized using tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) in combination with, methyltrimethoxyorthosilane (MTMOS), ethyltrimethoxyorthosilane (ETMOS), 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The acid induced denaturation and renaturation of GFP was analyzed by UV-visible, fl uorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. No renaturation was observed in gels that were made with TMOS only, and in the presence of APTES, MTMOS, and ETMOS. However, in gels that were made with GPTMS, the CD and UV-visible spectra indicated that the protein had refolded. The fl uorescence emission spectrum indicated that approximately 20% of fl uorescence had returned. This study highlights the importance of the surface chemistry of the silica gels for the refolding properties of the entrapped GFP. Future studies will investigate the effect of surface chemistry on the thermal and solvent stability of the entrapped protein.

  19. Surface (glyco-)proteins: primary structure and crystallization under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, H.; Akca, E.; Schultz, N.; Karbach, G.; Schlott, B.; Debaerdemaeker, T.; De Clercq, J.-P.; König, H.

    2001-08-01

    The Archaea comprise microorganisms that live under environmental extremes, like high temperature, low pH value or high salt concentration. Their cells are often covered by a single layer of (glyco)protein subunits (S-layer) in hexagonal arrangement. In order to get further hints about the molecular mechanisms of protein stabilization we compared the primary and secondary structures of archaeal S-layer (glyco)proteins. We found an increase of charged amino acids in the S-layer proteins of the extreme thermophilic species compared to their mesophilic counterparts. Our data and those of other authors suggest that ionic interactions, e.g., salt bridges seem to be played a major role in protein stabilization at high temperatures. Despite the differences in the growth optima and the predominance of some amino acids the primary structures of S-layers revealed also a significant degree of identity between phylogenetically related archaea. These obervations indicate that protein sequences of S-layers have been conserved during the evolution from extremely thermophilic to mesophilic life. To support these findings the three-dimensional structure of the S-layer proteins has to be elucidated. Recently, we described the first successful crystallization of an extreme thermophilic surface(glyco)protein under microgravity conditions.

  20. Interaction of arginine, lysine, and guanidine with surface residues of lysozyme: implication to protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhawal; Shaikh, Abdul Rajjak

    2016-01-01

    Additives are widely used to suppress aggregation of therapeutic proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms of effect of additives to stabilize proteins are still unclear. To understand this, we herein perform molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in the presence of three commonly used additives: arginine, lysine, and guanidine. These additives have different effects on stability of proteins and have different structures with some similarities; arginine and lysine have aliphatic side chain, while arginine has a guanidinium group. We analyze atomic contact frequencies to study the interactions of the additives with individual residues of lysozyme. Contact coefficient, quantified from contact frequencies, is helpful in analyzing the interactions with the guanidine groups as well as aliphatic side chains of arginine and lysine. Strong preference for contacts to the additives (over water) is seen for the acidic followed by polar and the aromatic residues. Further analysis suggests that the hydration layer around the protein surface is depleted more in the presence of arginine, followed by lysine and guanidine. Molecular dynamics simulations also reveal that the internal dynamics of protein, as indicated by the lifetimes of the hydrogen bonds within the protein, changes depending on the additives. Particularly, we note that the side-chain hydrogen-bonding patterns within the protein differ with the additives, with several side-chain hydrogen bonds missing in the presence of guanidine. These results collectively indicate that the aliphatic chain of arginine and lysine plays a critical role in the stabilization of the protein.

  1. Plasma graft of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) on RGP lens surface for reducing protein adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shiheng; Ren, Li; Wang, Yingjun

    2017-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) was grafted on fluorosilicone acrylate rigid gas permissible contact lens surface by means of argon plasma induced polymerization to improve surface hydrophilicity and reduce protein adsorption. The surface properties were characterized by contact angle measurement, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy respectively. The surface protein adsorption was evaluated by lysozyme solution immersion and XPS analysis. The results indicated that a thin layer of PEGMA was successfully grafted. The surface hydrophilicity was bettered and surface free energy increased. The lysozyme adsorption on the lens surface was reduced greatly. The study was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51273072).

  2. VASP: a volumetric analysis of surface properties yields insights into protein-ligand binding specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Y Chen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Many algorithms that compare protein structures can reveal similarities that suggest related biological functions, even at great evolutionary distances. Proteins with related function often exhibit differences in binding specificity, but few algorithms identify structural variations that effect specificity. To address this problem, we describe the Volumetric Analysis of Surface Properties (VASP, a novel volumetric analysis tool for the comparison of binding sites in aligned protein structures. VASP uses solid volumes to represent protein shape and the shape of surface cavities, clefts and tunnels that are defined with other methods. Our approach, inspired by techniques from constructive solid geometry, enables the isolation of volumetrically conserved and variable regions within three dimensionally superposed volumes. We applied VASP to compute a comparative volumetric analysis of the ligand binding sites formed by members of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR-related lipid transfer (START domains and the serine proteases. Within both families, VASP isolated individual amino acids that create structural differences between ligand binding cavities that are known to influence differences in binding specificity. Also, VASP isolated cavity subregions that differ between ligand binding cavities which are essential for differences in binding specificity. As such, VASP should prove a valuable tool in the study of protein-ligand binding specificity.

  3. THE SURFACE-MEDIATED UNFOLDING KINETICS OF GLOBULAR PROTEINS IS DEPENDENT ON MOLECULAR WEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patananan, A.N.; Goheen, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and unfolding pathways of proteins on rigid surfaces are essential in numerous complex processes associated with biomedical engineering, nanotechnology, and chromatography. It is now well accepted that the kinetics of unfolding are characterized by chemical and physical interactions dependent on protein deformability and structure, as well as environmental pH, temperature, and surface chemistry. Although this fundamental process has broad implications in medicine and industry, little is known about the mechanism because of the atomic lengths and rapid time scales involved. Therefore, the unfolding kinetics of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin were investigated by adsorbing the globular proteins to non-porous cationic polymer beads. The protein fractions were adsorbed at different residence times (0, 9, 10, 20, and 30 min) at near-physiological conditions using a gradient elution system similar to that in high-performance liquid chromatography. The elution profi les and retention times were obtained by ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometry. A decrease in recovery was observed with time for almost all proteins and was attributed to irreversible protein unfolding on the non-porous surfaces. These data, and those of previous studies, fi t a positively increasing linear trend between percent unfolding after a fi xed (9 min) residence time (71.8%, 31.1%, and 32.1% of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin, respectively) and molecular weight. Of all the proteins examined so far, only myoglobin deviated from this trend with higher than predicted unfolding rates. Myoglobin also exhibited an increase in retention time over a wide temperature range (0°C and 55°C, 4.39 min and 5.74 min, respectively) whereas ovalbumin and β-glucosidase did not. Further studies using a larger set of proteins are required to better understand the physiological and physiochemical implications of protein unfolding kinetics. This study confi rms that surface

  4. A Brief View of the Surface Membrane Proteins from Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech-Canul, Ángel de la Cruz

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causal agent of Chagas' disease which affects millions of people around the world mostly in Central and South America. T. cruzi expresses a wide variety of proteins on its surface membrane which has an important role in the biology of these parasites. Surface molecules of the parasites are the result of the environment to which the parasites are exposed during their life cycle. Hence, T. cruzi displays several modifications when they move from one host to another. Due to the complexity of this parasite's cell surface, this review presents some membrane proteins organized as large families, as they are the most abundant and/or relevant throughout the T. cruzi membrane. PMID:28656101

  5. A Brief View of the Surface Membrane Proteins from Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel de la Cruz Pech-Canul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the causal agent of Chagas’ disease which affects millions of people around the world mostly in Central and South America. T. cruzi expresses a wide variety of proteins on its surface membrane which has an important role in the biology of these parasites. Surface molecules of the parasites are the result of the environment to which the parasites are exposed during their life cycle. Hence, T. cruzi displays several modifications when they move from one host to another. Due to the complexity of this parasite’s cell surface, this review presents some membrane proteins organized as large families, as they are the most abundant and/or relevant throughout the T. cruzi membrane.

  6. Templating Biomineralization: Surface Directed Protein Self-assembly and External Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Xiaolan

    biomineralization is investigated by SEM, GIXRD and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). Gene expression during the exposure of SMF is also studies by RT-PCR. The results indicated that exposure to SMF induces osteoblasts to produce larger quantities of HA, with higher degree of crystalline order. The controlling and understanding of protein on the surface is of great interest in biomedical application such as implant medicine, biosensor design, food processing, and chromatographic separations. The adsorbed protein onto the surface significantly determines the performance of biomaterials in a biological environment. Recent studies have suggested that the preservation of the native secondary structure of protein adsorbed is essential for biological application. In order to manipulate protein adsorption and design biocompatible materials, the mechanisms underlying protein-surface interactions, especially how surface properties of materials induce conformational changes of adsorbed proteins, needs to be well understood. Here we demonstrated that even though SPS is a necessary condition, it is not sufficient. We show that low substrate conductivity as well as proper salt concentration are also critical in sustained protein adsorption continuously. These factors allow one to pattern regions of different conducting properties and for the first time patterns physiologically relevant protein structures. Here we show that we can achieve patterned biomineralized regimes, both with plasma proteins in a simple and robust manner without additional functionalization or application of electrochemical gradients. Since the data indicate that the patterns just need to differ in electrical conductivity, rather than surface chemistry, we propose that the creation of transient image charges, due to incomplete charge screening, may be responsible for sustain the driving force for continual protein absorption.

  7. Bacterial surface layer proteins as a novel capillary coating material for capillary electrophoretic separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Gordaliza, Estefanía, E-mail: emorenog@ucm.es [Division of Analytical Biosciences, Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research, Universiteit Leiden, Einsteinweg 55, 2300, RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Stigter, Edwin C.A. [Division of Analytical Biosciences, Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research, Universiteit Leiden, Einsteinweg 55, 2300, RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Department of Molecular Cancer Research, Universitair Medisch Centrum Utrecht, Wilhelmina Kinder Ziekenhuis, Lundlaan 6, 3584, EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Lindenburg, Petrus W.; Hankemeier, Thomas [Division of Analytical Biosciences, Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research, Universiteit Leiden, Einsteinweg 55, 2300, RA, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-06-07

    A novel concept for stable coating in capillary electrophoresis, based on recrystallization of surface layer proteins on hydrophobized fused silica capillaries, was demonstrated. Surface layer protein A (SlpA) from Lactobacillus acidophilus bacteria was extracted, purified and used for coating pre-silanized glass substrates presenting different surface wettabilities (either hydrophobic or hydrophilic). Contact angle determination on SlpA-coated hydrophobic silica slides showed that the surfaces turned to hydrophilic after coating (53 ± 5°), due to a protein monolayer formation by protein-surface hydrophobic interactions. Visualization by atomic force microscopy demonstrated the presence of a SlpA layer on methylated silica slides displaying a surface roughness of 0.44 ± 0.02 nm. Additionally, a protein layer was visualized by fluorescence microscopy in methylated silica capillaries coated with SlpA and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled. The SlpA-coating showed an outstanding stability, even after treatment with 20 mM NaOH (pH 12.3). The electroosmotic flow in coated capillaries showed a partial suppression at pH 7.50 (3.8 ± 0.5 10{sup −9} m{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}) when compared with unmodified fused silica (5.9 ± 0.1 10{sup −8} m{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}). To demonstrate the potential of this novel coating, the SlpA-coated capillaries were applied for the first time for electrophoretic separation, and proved to be very suitable for the isotachophoretic separation of lipoproteins in human serum. The separations showed a high degree of repeatability (absolute migration times with 1.1–1.8% coefficient-of-variation (CV) within a day) and 2–3% CV inter-capillary reproducibility. The capillaries were stable for more than 100 runs at pH 9.40, and showed to be an exceptional alternative for challenging electrophoretic separations at long-term use. - Highlights: • New coating using recrystallized surface-layer proteins on

  8. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 modulates the roughness of cell surface: combined AFM and SEM study

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    Mamgain Hitesh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imaging tools such as scanning electron microscope (SEM and atomic force microscope (AFM can be used to produce high-resolution topographic images of biomedical specimens and hence are well suited for imaging alterations in cell morphology. We have studied the correlation of SMAR1 expression with cell surface smoothness in cell lines as well as in different grades of human breast cancer and mouse tumor sections. Methods We validated knockdown and overexpression of SMAR1 using RT-PCR as well as Western blotting in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293, human breast cancer (MCF-7 and mouse melanoma (B16F1 cell lines. The samples were then processed for cell surface roughness studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The same samples were used for microarray analysis as well. Tumors sections from control and SMAR1 treated mice as well as tissues sections from different grades of human breast cancer on poly L-lysine coated slides were used for AFM and SEM studies. Results Tumor sections from mice injected with melanoma cells showed pronounced surface roughness. In contrast, tumor sections obtained from nude mice that were first injected with melanoma cells followed by repeated injections of SMAR1-P44 peptide, exhibited relatively smoother surface profile. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue sections that showed reduced SMAR1 expression exhibited increased surface roughness compared to the adjacent normal breast tissue. Our AFM data establishes that treatment of cells with SMAR1-P44 results into increase in cytoskeletal volume that is supported by comparative gene expression data showing an increase in the expression of specific cytoskeletal proteins compared to the control cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that tumor suppressor function of SMAR1 might be exhibited through smoothening of cell surface by regulating expression of cell surface proteins. Conclusion Tumor suppressor

  9. Characterization of protective immune responses induced by pneumococcal surface protein A in fusion with pneumolysin derivatives.

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    Cibelly Goulart

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA and Pneumolysin derivatives (Pds are important vaccine candidates, which can confer protection in different models of pneumococcal infection. Furthermore, the combination of these two proteins was able to increase protection against pneumococcal sepsis in mice. The present study investigated the potential of hybrid proteins generated by genetic fusion of PspA fragments to Pds to increase cross-protection against fatal pneumococcal infection. Pneumolisoids were fused to the N-terminus of clade 1 or clade 2 pspA gene fragments. Mouse immunization with the fusion proteins induced high levels of antibodies against PspA and Pds, able to bind to intact pneumococci expressing a homologous PspA with the same intensity as antibodies to rPspA alone or the co-administered proteins. However, when antibody binding to pneumococci with heterologous PspAs was examined, antisera to the PspA-Pds fusion molecules showed stronger antibody binding and C3 deposition than antisera to co-administered proteins. In agreement with these results, antisera against the hybrid proteins were more effective in promoting the phagocytosis of bacteria bearing heterologous PspAs in vitro, leading to a significant reduction in the number of bacteria when compared to co-administered proteins. The respective antisera were also capable of neutralizing the lytic activity of Pneumolysin on sheep red blood cells. Finally, mice immunized with fusion proteins were protected against fatal challenge with pneumococcal strains expressing heterologous PspAs. Taken together, the results suggest that PspA-Pd fusion proteins comprise a promising vaccine strategy, able to increase the immune response mediated by cross-reactive antibodies and complement deposition to heterologous strains, and to confer protection against fatal challenge.

  10. Transglutaminase-mediated protein immobilization to casein nanolayers created on a plastic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Noriho; Doi, Satoshi; Tominaga, Jo; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Goto, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    An enzymatic method for covalent and site-specific immobilization of recombinant proteins on a plastic surface was explored. Using Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) with a specific peptide tag (MKHKGS) genetically incorporated at the N-terminus as a model (NK-AP), microbial transglutaminase (MTG)-mediated protein immobilization was demonstrated. To generate a reactive surface for MTG, a 96-well polystyrene microtiter plate was physically coated with casein, a good MTG substrate. Successful immobilization of recombinant AP to the nanolayer of casein on the surface of the microtiter plate was verified by the detection of enzymatic activity. Since little activity was observed when wild-type AP was used, immobilization of NK-AP was likely directed by the specific peptide tag. When polymeric casein prepared by MTG was used as a matrix on the plate, the loading capacity of AP was increased about 2-fold compared to when casein was used as the matrix. Transglutaminase-mediated site-specific posttranslational modification of proteins offers one way of generating a variety of protein-based solid formulations for biotechnological applications.

  11. ECTO-NOX (ENOX) proteins of the cell surface lack thioredoxin reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosneaga, Elena; Kim, Chinpal; Shen, Bernard; Watanabe, Takahiro; Morre, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2008-01-01

    This study was to determine if ENOX proteins of the cell surface act as cell surface thioredoxin reductases. To measure formation of thiols a turbimetric insulin assay was used. No turbidity was observed with insulin alone or with insulin plus DTT. However, the combination of insulin +DTT + recombinant his-tagged ENOX2 (tNOX) did result in increased turbidity. An ENOX1 (CNOX) preparation also resulted in turbidity changes. In contrast, we were unable to demonstrate ENOX2-dependent insulin reduction by high density SDS-PAGE. Inclusion of reduced serum albumin as a source of free thiols for the protein disulfide interchange activity catalyzed by ENOX2 failed to result in insulin reduction in the presence of ENOX2. A direct effect of ENOX2 on thioredoxin reduction in the presence of NADPH also was not observed. The DTNB assay for thioredoxin reductase activity also failed to reveal activity. Thus, ENOX proteins appear not to function as thioredoxin reductases at the cell surface nor do they appear to recognize reduced insulin as a substrate for protein disulfide-thiol interchange. The enhanced turbidity of insulin solutions resulting from ENOX presence was traced to ENOX-catalyzed insulin fibrillation either through nucleation enhancement or some other mechanism. Fibrillation was determined using Thioflavin T fluorescence which paralleled the turbimetric results and the formation of multimers (polymerization) observed on SDS-PAGE.

  12. Biological protein-resistance layer construction of recombinant hirudin on polymethyl methacrylate IOL surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhiwen; Jiao, Yan; Ren, Li; Wang, Yingjun

    2015-03-01

    In this article, the surface of intraocular len material PMMA was first aminated for activation on which some polar groups generated such as C-N, COO(-), -OH, NH3(+), etc. Then the anticoagulant drugs recombinant hirudin (rH) was grafted with amido bonds to look forward to resist the adsorption of nonspecific protein or cells in tear, even the cataract. The detailed analysis and discussion about the grafting quantity, molography, wettability, electric charges, chemical structure, and the dynamic adsorption of protein Fn on the material surface were carried on by the technology of ultraviolet photometric, contact angle, solid Zeta potential, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and quartz crystal microbalance. The surface with a certain amount of rH modification existed more hydrophilic due to the amphiphilic structure than before, on which the protein adsorption was the most unstable. The results indicated that the rH modification improved the resistance of PMMA to nonspecific adsorption of protein Fn to achieve the expectative effect. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Enhanced protein loading on a planar Si(111)-H surface with second generation NTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Han, Huan-Mei; Liu, Hong-Bo; Xiao, Shou-jun

    2010-08-01

    A Si(111)-H surface was modified via a direct reaction between Si-H and 1-undecylenic acid (UA) under microwave irradiation to form molecular monolayers with terminal carboxyl groups. After esterifying carboxylic acid being esterified with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS), aminobutyl nitrilotriacetic acid (ANTA) was bound to the silicon surface through amidation (pH = 8.0) between its primary amino group and NHS-ester, producing nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) anions. Then hexa-histidine tagged thioredoxin-urodilatin (his-tagged protein) and FITC-labeled hexa-histidine tagged thioredoxin-urodilatin (FITC-his-tagged protein) can be anchored after NTA was coordinated with Ni 2+. Furthermore, the NTA-terminated chip was acidified with 0.1 M HCl and subsequently esterified with NHS and then amidated with ANTA again to produce a second generation NTA. Thus the surface density of nitrilotriacetic acid anions was improved and resultantly that of anchored proteins was also enhanced through the iterative reactions. Both multiple transmission-reflection infrared spectroscopy (MTR-IR) and fluorescence scanning measurements demonstrated a proximate 1.63 times of anchored proteins on the second generation NTA/Ni 2+ as that on the first generation NTA/Ni 2+ monolayer.

  14. Surface Proteins of Lactococcus lactis: Bacterial Resources for Muco-adhesion in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Mercier-Bonin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Food and probiotic bacteria, in particular lactic acid bacteria, are ingested in large amounts by humans and are part of the transient microbiota which is increasingly considered to be able to impact the resident microbiota and thus possibly the host health. The lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is extensively used in starter cultures to produce dairy fermented food. Also because of a generally recognized as safe status, L. lactis has been considered as a possible vehicle to deliver in vivo therapeutic molecules with anti-inflammatory properties in the gastrointestinal tract. One of the key factors that may favor health effects of beneficial bacteria to the host is their capacity to colonize transiently the gut, notably through close interactions with mucus, which covers and protects the intestinal epithelium. Several L. lactis strains have been shown to exhibit mucus-binding properties and bacterial surface proteins have been identified as key determinants of such capacity. In this review, we describe the different types of surface proteins found in L. lactis, with a special focus on mucus-binding proteins and pili. We also review the different approaches used to investigate the adhesion of L. lactis to mucus, and particularly to mucins, one of its major components, and we present how these approaches allowed revealing the role of surface proteins in muco-adhesion.

  15. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; Liu, Corey W.; Nygaard, Rie; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Fung, Juan José; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Weis, William I.; Pardo, Leonardo; Prosser, R. Scott; Mueller, Luciano; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford-MED); (Toronto); (BMS); (UAB, Spain)

    2010-01-14

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. They are the largest group of therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. Recent crystal structures of GPCRs have revealed structural conservation extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive-state crystal structures.

  16. Facile synthesis of biphasic calcium phosphate microspheres with engineered surface topography for controlled delivery of drugs and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkesh, Ibrahim; Ghanian, Mohammad Hossein; Azami, Mahmoud; Bagheri, Fatemeh; Baharvand, Hossein; Mohammadi, Javad; Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza Baghaban

    2017-09-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) microspheres are of great interest due to their high stability and osteoinductive properties at specific compositions. However, the need for optimal performance at a unique composition limits their flexibility for tuning drug release by modulation of bulk properties and presents the question of engineering surface topography as an alternative. It is necessary to have a facile method to control surface topography at a defined bulk composition. Here, we have produced BCP microspheres with different surface topographies that have the capability to be used as tunable drug release systems. We synthesized calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) microparticles by precipitating calcium and phosphate ions onto ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) templates. The morphology and surface topography of CDHA microparticles were controlled using process parameters, which governed nucleation and growth. These parameters included template concentration, heat rate, and stirring speed. Under low heat rate and static conditions, we could obtain spherical microparticles with long and short nanosheets on their surfaces at low and high EDTA concentrations, respectively. These nanostructured microspheres were subsequently crystallized by thermal treatment to produce EDTA-free BCP microspheres with intact morphology. These biocompatible BCP microspheres were highly effective in loading and prolonged release of both small molecule [dexamethasone (Dex)] and protein [bovine serum albumin (BSA)] models. This strategy has enabled us to control the surface topography of BCP microspheres at defined compositions and holds tremendous promise for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of surface protein expression reveals the growth pattern of the gram-negative outer membrane.

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    Tristan S Ursell

    Full Text Available The outer membrane (OM of Gram-negative bacteria is a complex bilayer composed of proteins, phospholipids, lipoproteins, and lipopolysaccharides. Despite recent advances revealing the molecular pathways underlying protein and lipopolysaccharide incorporation into the OM, the spatial distribution and dynamic regulation of these processes remain poorly understood. Here, we used sequence-specific fluorescent labeling to map the incorporation patterns of an OM-porin protein, LamB, by labeling proteins only after epitope exposure on the cell surface. Newly synthesized LamB appeared in discrete puncta, rather than evenly distributed over the cell surface. Further growth of bacteria after labeling resulted in divergence of labeled LamB puncta, consistent with a spatial pattern of OM growth in which new, unlabeled material was also inserted in patches. At the poles, puncta remained relatively stationary through several rounds of division, a salient characteristic of the OM protein population as a whole. We propose a biophysical model of growth in which patches of new OM material are added in discrete bursts that evolve in time according to Stokes flow and are randomly distributed over the cell surface. Simulations based on this model demonstrate that our experimental observations are consistent with a bursty insertion pattern without spatial bias across the cylindrical cell surface, with approximately one burst of ≈ 10(-2 µm(2 of OM material per two minutes per µm(2. Growth by insertion of discrete patches suggests that stochasticity plays a major role in patterning and material organization in the OM.

  18. Interactions between protein coated particles and polymer surfaces studied with the rotating particles probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, M; Spridon, D; van IJzendoorn, L J; Prins, M W J

    2012-05-29

    Nonspecific interactions between proteins and polymer surfaces have to be minimized in order to control the performance of biosensors based on immunoassays with particle labels. In this paper we investigate these nonspecific interactions by analyzing the response of protein coated magnetic particles to a rotating magnetic field while the particles are in nanometer vicinity to a polymer surface. We use the fraction of nonrotating (bound) particles as a probe for the interaction between the particles and the surface. As a model system, we study the interaction of myoglobin coated particles with oxidized polystyrene surfaces. We measure the interaction as a function of the ionic strength of the solution, varying the oxidation time of the polystyrene and the pH of the solution. To describe the data we propose a model in which particles bind to the polymer by crossing an energy barrier. The height of this barrier depends on the ionic strength of the solution and two interaction parameters. The fraction of nonrotating particles as a function of ionic strength shows a characteristic shape that can be explained with a normal distribution of energy barrier heights. This method to determine interaction parameters paves the way for further studies to quantify the roles of protein coated particles and polymers in their mutual nonspecific interactions in different matrixes.

  19. Impact of surface coating and food-mimicking media on nanosilver-protein interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burcza, Anna, E-mail: anna.burcza@mri.bund.de; Gräf, Volker; Walz, Elke; Greiner, Ralf [Max Rubner-Institute, Department of Food Technology and Bioprocess Engineering (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The application of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in food contact materials has recently become a subject of dispute due to the possible migration of silver in nanoform into foods and beverages. Therefore, the analysis of the interaction of AgNPs with food components, especially proteins, is of high importance in order to increase our knowledge of the behavior of nanoparticles in food matrices. AgPURE™ W10 (20 nm), an industrially applied nanomaterial, was compared with AgNPs of similar size frequently investigated for scientific purposes differing in the surface capping agent (spherical AgNP coated with either PVP or citrate). The interactions of the AgNPs with whey proteins (BSA, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin) at different pH values (4.2, 7 or 7.4) were investigated using surface plasmon resonance, SDS-PAGE, and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation. The data obtained by the three different methods correlated well. Besides the nature of the protein and the nanoparticle coating, the environment was shown to affect the interaction significantly. The strongest interaction was obtained with BSA and AgNPs in an acidic environment. Neutral and slightly alkaline conditions however, seemed to prevent the AgNP-protein interaction almost completely. Furthermore, the interaction of whey proteins with AgPURE™ W10 was found to be weaker compared to the interaction with the other two AgNPs under all conditions investigated.

  20. Interaction of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Specific Proteins of the Corona Studied by Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio E. Di Ianni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The applications of pharmaceutical and medical nanosystems are among the most intensively investigated fields in nanotechnology. A relevant point to be considered in the design and development of nanovehicles intended for medical use is the formation of the “protein corona” around the nanoparticle, that is, a complex biomolecular layer formed when the nanovehicle is exposed to biological fluids. The chemical nature of the protein corona determines the biological identity of the nanoparticle and influences, among others, the recognition of the nanocarrier by the mononuclear phagocytic system and, thus, its clearance from the blood. Recent works suggest that Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR, extensively employed for the analysis of biomolecular interactions, can shed light on the formation of the protein corona and its interaction with the surroundings. The synthesis and characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN coated with polymers of different chemical nature (e.g., polyvinyl alcohol, chitosans are reported. The proof-of-concept for the use of SPR technique in characterizing protein-nanoparticle interactions of surface-immobilized proteins (immunoglobulin G and bovine serum albumin, both involved in the formation of the corona subjected to flowing SLN is demonstrated for non-chitosan-coated nanoparticles. All assayed nanosystems show more preference for IgG than for BSA, such preference being more pronounced in the case of polyvinyl-alcohol-coated SLN.

  1. Impact of surface coating and food-mimicking media on nanosilver-protein interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burcza, Anna; Gräf, Volker; Walz, Elke; Greiner, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The application of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in food contact materials has recently become a subject of dispute due to the possible migration of silver in nanoform into foods and beverages. Therefore, the analysis of the interaction of AgNPs with food components, especially proteins, is of high importance in order to increase our knowledge of the behavior of nanoparticles in food matrices. AgPURE™ W10 (20 nm), an industrially applied nanomaterial, was compared with AgNPs of similar size frequently investigated for scientific purposes differing in the surface capping agent (spherical AgNP coated with either PVP or citrate). The interactions of the AgNPs with whey proteins (BSA, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin) at different pH values (4.2, 7 or 7.4) were investigated using surface plasmon resonance, SDS-PAGE, and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation. The data obtained by the three different methods correlated well. Besides the nature of the protein and the nanoparticle coating, the environment was shown to affect the interaction significantly. The strongest interaction was obtained with BSA and AgNPs in an acidic environment. Neutral and slightly alkaline conditions however, seemed to prevent the AgNP-protein interaction almost completely. Furthermore, the interaction of whey proteins with AgPURE™ W10 was found to be weaker compared to the interaction with the other two AgNPs under all conditions investigated

  2. Comparing Multiple Evapotranspiration-calculating Methods, Including Eddy Covariance and Surface Renewal, Using Empirical Measurements from Alfalfa Fields in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, J.; Kent, E. R.; Leinfelder-Miles, M.; Lambert, J. J.; Little, C.; Paw U, K. T.; Snyder, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Eddy covariance and surface renewal measurements were used to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) over a variety of crop fields in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta during the 2016 growing season. However, comparing and evaluating multiple measurement systems and methods for determining ET was focused upon at a single alfalfa site. The eddy covariance systems included two systems for direct measurement of latent heat flux: one using a separate sonic anemometer and an open path infrared gas analyzer and another using a combined system (Campbell Scientific IRGASON). For these methods, eddy covariance was used with measurements from the Campbell Scientific CSAT3, the LI-COR 7500a, the Campbell Scientific IRGASON, and an additional R.M. Young sonic anemometer. In addition to those direct measures, the surface renewal approach included several energy balance residual methods in which net radiation, ground heat flux, and sensible heat flux (H) were measured. H was measured using several systems and different methods, including using multiple fast-response thermocouple measurements and using the temperatures measured by the sonic anemometers. The energy available for ET was then calculated as the residual of the surface energy balance equation. Differences in ET values were analyzed between the eddy covariance and surface renewal methods, using the IRGASON-derived values of ET as the standard for accuracy.

  3. Unfolding of a model protein on ion exchange and mixed mode chromatography surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gospodarek, Adrian M; Hiser, Diana E; O'Connell, John P; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-08-15

    Recent studies with proteins indicate that conformational changes and aggregation can occur during ion exchange chromatography (IEC). Such behavior is not usually expected, but could lead to decreased yield and product degradation from both IEC and multi mode chromatography (MMC) that has ligands of both hydrophobic and charged functionalities. In this study, we used hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry to investigate unfolding of the model protein BSA on IEC and MMC surfaces under different solution conditions at 25°C. Increased solvent exposure, indicating greater unfolding relative to that in solution, was found for protein adsorbed on cationic IEC and MMC surfaces in the pH range of 3.0 to 4.5, where BSA has decreased stability in solution. There was no effect of anionic surfaces at pH values in the range from 6.0 to 9.0. Differences of solvent exposure of whole molecules when adsorbed and in solution suggest that adsorbed BSA unfolds at lower pH values and may show aggregation, depending upon pH and the surface type. Measurements on digested peptides showed that classifications of stability can be made for various regions; these are generally retained as pH is changed. When salt was added to MMC systems, where electrostatic interactions would be minimized, less solvent exposure was seen, implying that it is the cationic moieties, rather than the hydrophobic ligands, which cause greater surface unfolding at low salt concentrations. These results suggest that proteins of lower stability may exhibit unfolding and aggregation during IEC and MMC separations, as they can with hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the immunodiagnostic potential of a recombinant surface protein domain from Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Alemao G Carpinteyro; Virginio, Veridiana Gomes; Maschio, Vinicius José; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2016-10-01

    Acanthamoeba spp. are free-living protists widely distributed in environment, able to cause keratitis, encephalitis and skin lesions in humans and animals. Acanthamoeba spp. exist in two forms: an infective trophozoite and a dormant cyst. Several factors contribute to the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba spp. The parasite adhesion to the host cell is the primary step for infection and is mediated by a mannose binding-protein, expressed in the surface and considered the main pathogenicity factor in Acanthamoeba spp. So far, there was no evidence of another surface protein of Acanthamoeba spp. relevant for host invasion or infection by these organisms. The aims of this study were to identify and characterize an Acanthamoeba castellanii surface protein and to evaluate its diagnostic potential. In silico predictions of surface proteins allowed to identify the A. castellanii calreticulin as a possible surface antigen. The coding sequence of a predicted extracellular domain of A. castellanii calreticulin was cloned by in vivo homologous recombination and the recombinant polypeptide (AcCRT29-130) was produced. Its immunodiagnostic potential was assessed in a recombinant antigen-based ELISA with sera from experimentally infected rats that developed keratitis and encephalitis, and sera from patients with encephalitis. The AcCRT29-130 was significantly more recognized by sera from encephalitis infected rats in comparison with the non-infected controls. Human sera from encephalitis patients, however presented no significant response. These results showed the AcCRT29-130 potential for A. castellanii infection immunodiagnosis in animals, with further studies being required for assessment of its use for human infections.

  5. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus encodes two proteins that block cell surface display of MHC class I chains by enhancing their endocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Coscoy, Laurent; Ganem, Don

    2000-01-01

    Down-regulation of the cell surface display of class I MHC proteins is an important mechanism of immune evasion by human and animal viruses. Herpesviruses in particular encode a variety of proteins that function to lower MHC I display by several mechanisms. These include binding and retention of MHC I chains in the endoplasmic reticulum, dislocation of class I chains from the ER, inhibition of the peptide transporter (TAP) involved in antigen presentation, and shunting of newly assembled chai...

  6. Identification and characterization of novel ERC-55 interacting proteins: evidence for the existence of several ERC-55 splicing variants; including the cytosolic ERC-55-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigsen, Maja; Jacobsen, Christian; Maunsbach, Arvid B; Honoré, Bent

    2009-12-01

    ERC-55, encoded from RCN2, is localized in the ER and belongs to the CREC protein family. ERC-55 is involved in various diseases and abnormal cell behavior, however, the function is not well defined and it has controversially been reported to interact with a cytosolic protein, the vitamin D receptor. We have used a number of proteomic techniques to further our functional understanding of ERC-55. By affinity purification, we observed interaction with a large variety of proteins, including those secreted and localized outside of the secretory pathway, in the cytosol and also in various organelles. We confirm the existence of several ERC-55 splicing variants including ERC-55-C localized in the cytosol in association with the cytoskeleton. Localization was verified by immunoelectron microscopy and sub-cellular fractionation. Interaction of lactoferrin, S100P, calcyclin (S100A6), peroxiredoxin-6, kininogen and lysozyme with ERC-55 was further studied in vitro by SPR experiments. Interaction of S100P requires [Ca(2+)] of approximately 10(-7) M or greater, while calcyclin interaction requires [Ca(2+)] of >10(-5) M. Interaction with peroxiredoxin-6 is independent of Ca(2+). Co-localization of lactoferrin, S100P and calcyclin with ERC-55 in the perinuclear area was analyzed by fluorescence confocal microscopy. The functional variety of the interacting proteins indicates a broad spectrum of ERC-55 activities such as immunity, redox homeostasis, cell cycle regulation and coagulation.

  7. Zeta-potential data reliability of gold nanoparticle biomolecular conjugates and its application in sensitive quantification of surface absorbed protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Ding, Xiaofan; Xu, Qing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Lei; Lou, Xinhui

    2016-12-01

    Zeta potentials (ZP) of gold nanoparticle bioconjugates (AuNP-bios) provide important information on surface charge that is critical for many applications including drug delivery, biosensing, and cell imaging. The ZP measurements (ZPMs) are conducted under an alternative electrical field at a high frequency under laser irradiation, which may strongly affect the status of surface coating of AuNP-bios and generate unreliable data. In this study, we systemically evaluated the ZP data reliability (ZPDR) of citrate-, thiolated single stranded DNA-, and protein-coated AuNPs mainly according to the consistence of ZPs in the repeated ZPMs and the changes of the hydrodynamic size before and after the ZPMs. We found that the ZPDR was highly dependent on both buffer conditions and surface modifications. Overall, the higher ionic strength of the buffer and the lower affinity of surface bounders were related with the worse ZPDR. The ZPDR of citrate-coated AuNP was good in water, but bad in 10mM phosphate buffer (PB), showing substantially decrease of the absolute ZP values after each measurement, probably due to the electrical field facilitated adsorption of negatively charged phosphate ions on AuNPs. The significant desorption of DNAs from AuNP was observed in the PB containing medium concentration of NaCl, but not in PB. The excellent ZPDR of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-coated AuNP was observed at high salt concentrations and low surface coverage, enabling ZPM as an ultra-sensitive tool for protein quantification on the surface of AuNPs with a single molecule resolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 3D-SURFER 2.0: web platform for real-time search and characterization of protein surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi; Esquivel-Rodriguez, Juan; Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of uncharacterized protein structures necessitates the development of computational approaches for function annotation using the protein tertiary structures. Protein structure database search is the basis of any structure-based functional elucidation of proteins. 3D-SURFER is a web platform for real-time protein surface comparison of a given protein structure against the entire PDB using 3D Zernike descriptors. It can smoothly navigate the protein structure space in real-time from one query structure to another. A major new feature of Release 2.0 is the ability to compare the protein surface of a single chain, a single domain, or a single complex against databases of protein chains, domains, complexes, or a combination of all three in the latest PDB. Additionally, two types of protein structures can now be compared: all-atom-surface and backbone-atom-surface. The server can also accept a batch job for a large number of database searches. Pockets in protein surfaces can be identified by VisGrid and LIGSITE (csc) . The server is available at http://kiharalab.org/3d-surfer/.

  9. Surface field of forces and protein adsorption behavior of poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate) films deposited from plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, M; Cassinelli, C

    1995-01-01

    Polymeric films were deposited from hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) plasma on non-woven poly(butyleneterephtalate) (PBT) filter materials. To test the effect of deposition conditions on surface properties, film were deposited using a constant monomer flow rate and a discharge power ranging from 40-100 W. Surface composition and surface energetics were evaluated by Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) and contact angle measurement, respectively. Albumin (Alb) and fibrinogen (Fg) adsorption from single protein solutions to the plasma-coated filters was measured. Results illustrate the marked effects of the deposition condition on the surface composition, the surface field of forces, and the protein adsorption behavior. The latter is modeled by the application of the Good-van Oss-Chaudhury theory of Lewis acid-base contribution to interfacial energetics. Materials endowed with widely different properties are obtained from the same monomer and different deposition conditions, a result that must be taken into account both in the production step, to assure constant quality, and in the development of specifically tailored materials.

  10. Impact of hydrophilic and hydrophobic functionalization of flat TiO2/Ti surfaces on proteins adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Héloïse; Mercier, Dimitri; Galtayries, Anouk; Portet, David; Delorme, Nicolas; Bardeau, Jean-François

    2018-02-01

    Controlling adsorption of proteins onto medical devices is a key issue for implant-related infections. As self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on titanium oxide represent a good model to study the surface-protein interactions, TiO2 surface properties were modified by grafting bisphosphonate molecules terminated with hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) groups and hydrophobic perfluoropolyether ones, respectively. Characterisation of the surface chemistry and surface topography of the modified surfaces was performed using XPS and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to determine the mass of adsorbed proteins as well as its kinetics. Poly(ethylene glycol)-terminated SAMs were the most effective surfaces to limit the adsorption of both BSA and fibrinogen in comparison to perfluorinated-terminated SAMs and non-modified TiO2 surfaces, as expected. The adsorption was not reversible in the case of BSA, while a partial reversibility was observed with Fg, most probably due to multilayers of proteins. The grafted surfaces adsorbed about the same quantity of proteins in terms of molecules per surface area, most probably in monolayer or island-like groups of adsorbed proteins. The adsorption on pristine TiO2 reveals a more important, non-specific adsorption of proteins.

  11. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bokoch, Michael P; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup

    2010-01-01

    extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known...... about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the beta(2) adrenergic...

  12. Pathogenic genotype of major piroplasm surface protein associated with anemia in Theileria orientalis infection in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhee; Yu, Do-Hyeon; Chae, Jeong-Byoung; Choi, Kyoung-Seong; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Park, Bae-Keun; Chae, Joon-Seok; Park, Jinho

    2017-07-27

    Serious disease outbreaks in cattle caused by Theileria orientalis have emerged in the Asia-Pacific region. Genetic variables of the major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) expressed on the surface of the piroplasm inside T. orientalis-infected erythrocytes are considered to be associated with variation in the pathogenicity of T. orientalis. Our study describes the clinically relevant MPSP types associated with anemia in Theileria-infected cattle. These results revealed that MPSP expression plays an important role in hematological alterations in Theileria-infected cattle, and that MPSP type 1 is strongly associated with bovine anemia, which can be a potential target for the prevention of bovine theileriosis.

  13. The Staphylococcus aureus Global Regulator MgrA Modulates Clumping and Virulence by Controlling Surface Protein Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi A Crosby

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen that causes devastating infections in a wide range of locations within the body. One of the defining characteristics of S. aureus is its ability to form clumps in the presence of soluble fibrinogen, which likely has a protective benefit and facilitates adhesion to host tissue. We have previously shown that the ArlRS two-component regulatory system controls clumping, in part by repressing production of the large surface protein Ebh. In this work we show that ArlRS does not directly regulate Ebh, but instead ArlRS activates expression of the global regulator MgrA. Strains lacking mgrA fail to clump in the presence of fibrinogen, and clumping can be restored to an arlRS mutant by overexpressing either arlRS or mgrA, indicating that ArlRS and MgrA constitute a regulatory pathway. We used RNA-seq to show that MgrA represses ebh, as well as seven cell wall-associated proteins (SraP, Spa, FnbB, SasG, SasC, FmtB, and SdrD. EMSA analysis showed that MgrA directly represses expression of ebh and sraP. Clumping can be restored to an mgrA mutant by deleting the genes for Ebh, SraP and SasG, suggesting that increased expression of these proteins blocks clumping by steric hindrance. We show that mgrA mutants are less virulent in a rabbit model of endocarditis, and virulence can be partially restored by deleting the genes for the surface proteins ebh, sraP, and sasG. While mgrA mutants are unable to clump, they are known to have enhanced biofilm capacity. We demonstrate that this increase in biofilm formation is partially due to up-regulation of SasG, a surface protein known to promote intercellular interactions. These results confirm that ArlRS and MgrA constitute a regulatory cascade, and that they control expression of a number of genes important for virulence, including those for eight large surface proteins.

  14. Lack of Detection of Bt Sugarcane Cry1Ab and NptII DNA and Proteins in Sugarcane Processing Products Including Raw Sugar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cheavegatti-Gianotto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is the largest sugarcane producer and the main sugar exporter in the world. The industrial processes applied by Brazilian mills are very efficient in producing highly purified sugar and ethanol. Literature presents evidence of lack of DNA/protein in these products, regardless of the nature of sugarcane used as raw material. Recently CTNBio, the Brazilian biosafety authority, has approved the first biotechnology-derived sugarcane variety for cultivation, event CTC175-A, which expresses the Cry1Ab protein to control the sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis. The event also expresses neomycin-phosphotransferase type II (NptII protein used as selectable marker during the transformation process. Because of the high purity of sugar and ethanol produced from genetically modified sugarcane, these end-products should potentially be classified as “pure substances, chemically defined,” by Brazilian Biosafety Law No. 11.105. If this classification is to be adopted, these substances are not considered as “GMO derivatives” and fall out of the scope of Law No. 11.105. In order to assess sugar composition and quality, we evaluate Cry1Ab and NptII expression in several sugarcane tissues and in several fractions from laboratory-scale processing of event CTC175-A for the presence of these heterologous proteins as well as for the presence of traces of recombinant DNA. The results of these studies show that CTC175-A presents high expression of Cry1Ab in leaves and barely detectable expression of heterologous proteins in stalks. We also evaluated the presence of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase protein and DNA in the fractions of the industrial processing of conventional Brazilian sugarcane cultivars. Results from both laboratory and industrial processing were concordant, demonstrating that DNA and protein are not detected in the clarified juice and downstream processed fractions, including ethanol and raw sugar, indicating that protein

  15. Surface-associated proteins of wheat starch granules: suitability of wheat starch for celiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasarda, Donald D; Dupont, Frances M; Vensel, William H; Altenbach, Susan B; Lopez, Rocio; Tanaka, Charlene K; Hurkman, William J

    2008-11-12

    Wheat starch is used to make baked products for celiac patients in several European countries but is avoided in the United States because of uncertainty about the amounts of associated grain storage (gluten) proteins. People with celiac disease (CD) must avoid wheat, rye, and barley proteins and products that contain them. These proteins are capable of initiating damage to the absorptive lining of the small intestine in CD patients, apparently as a consequence of undesirable interactions with the innate and adaptive immune systems. In this study, starch surface-associated proteins were extracted from four commercial wheat starches, fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography and gel electrophoresis, and identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. More than 150 proteins were identified, many of which (for example, histones, purothionins, and glutenins) had not been recognized previously as starch-associated. The commercial starches were analyzed by the R-5 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method to estimate the amount of harmful gluten protein present. One of these starches had a low gluten content of 7 ppm and actually fell within the range proposed as a new Codex Alimentarius Standard for naturally gluten-free foods (maximum 20 ppm). This low level of gluten indicates that the starch should be especially suitable for use by celiac patients, although wheat starches with levels up to 100 ppm are deemed safe in the proposed Codex standards.

  16. Functional mapping of cell surface proteins with localized stimulation of single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bingyun; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes the development of using individual micro and nano meter-sized vesicles as delivery vessels to functionally map the distribution of cell surface proteins at the level of single cells. The formation of different sizes of vesicles from tens of nanometers to a few micrometers in diameter that contain the desired molecules is addressed. An optical trap is used to manipulate the loaded vesicle to specific cell morphology of interest, and a pulsed UV laser is used to photo-release the stimuli onto the cell membrane. Carbachol activated cellular calcium flux, upon binding to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, is studied by this method, and the potential of using this method for the functional mapping of localized proteins on the cell surface membrane is discussed.

  17. Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell envelope proteome by capture of surface-exposed proteins on activated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Vecchietti

    Full Text Available We report on specific magneto-capturing followed by Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT for the analysis of surface-exposed proteins of intact cells of the bacterial opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The magneto-separation of cell envelope fragments from the soluble cytoplasmic fraction allowed the MudPIT identification of the captured and neighboring proteins. Remarkably, we identified 63 proteins captured directly by nanoparticles and 67 proteins embedded in the cell envelope fragments. For a high number of proteins, our analysis strongly indicates either surface exposure or localization in an envelope district. The localization of most identified proteins was only predicted or totally unknown. This novel approach greatly improves the sensitivity and specificity of the previous methods, such as surface shaving with proteases that was also tested on P. aeruginosa. The magneto-capture procedure is simple, safe, and rapid, and appears to be well-suited for envelope studies in highly pathogenic bacteria.

  18. Protein-protein networks construction and their relevance measurement based on multi-epitope-ligand-kartographie and gene ontology data of T-cell surface proteins for polymyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang-Zhen; Gao, Feng

    2012-08-01

    Polymyositis is an inflammatory myopathy characterized by muscle invasion of T-cells penetrating the basal lamina and displacing the plasma membrane of normal muscle fibers. In order to understand the different adhesive mechanisms at the T-cell surface, Schubert randomly selected 19 proteins expressed at the T-cell surface and studied them using MELK technique [4], among which 15 proteins are picked up for further study by us. Two types of functional similarity networks are constructed for these proteins. The first type is MELK similarity network, which is constructed based on their MELK data by using the McNemar's test [24]. The second type is GO similarity network, which is constructed based on their GO annotation data by using the RSS method to measuring functional similarity. Then the subset surprisology theory is employed to measure the degree of similarity between two networks. Our computing results show that these two types of networks are high related. This conclusion added new values on MELK technique and expanded its applications greatly.

  19. Microarray analysis of genes associated with cell surface NIS protein levels in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Andrea L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Na+/I- symporter (NIS-mediated iodide uptake allows radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer. NIS is also expressed in breast tumors, raising potential for radionuclide therapy of breast cancer. However, NIS expression in most breast cancers is low and may not be sufficient for radionuclide therapy. We aimed to identify biomarkers associated with NIS expression such that mechanisms underlying NIS modulation in human breast tumors may be elucidated. Methods Published oligonucleotide microarray data within the National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene Expression Omnibus database were analyzed to identify gene expression tightly correlated with NIS mRNA level among human breast tumors. NIS immunostaining was performed in a tissue microarray composed of 28 human breast tumors which had corresponding oligonucleotide microarray data available for each tumor such that gene expression associated with cell surface NIS protein level could be identified. Results and Discussion NIS mRNA levels do not vary among breast tumors or when compared to normal breast tissues when detected by Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platforms. Cell surface NIS protein levels are much more variable than their corresponding NIS mRNA levels. Despite a limited number of breast tumors examined, our analysis identified cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase as a biomarker that is highly associated with cell surface NIS protein levels in the ER-positive breast cancer subtype. Conclusions Further investigation on genes associated with cell surface NIS protein levels within each breast cancer molecular subtype may lead to novel targets for selectively increasing NIS expression/function in a subset of breast cancers patients.

  20. Protein surface topology-probing by selective chemical modification and mass spectrometric peptide mapping.

    OpenAIRE

    Suckau, D; Mak, M; Przybylski, M

    1992-01-01

    Aminoacetylation of lysine residues and the modification of arginine by 1,2-cyclohexanedione to N7,N8-(dihydroxy-1,2-cyclohexylidene)arginine were used for probing the surface topology of hen-eggwhite lysozyme as a model protein. The molecular identification of lysine and arginine modification sites was provided by molecular weight determinations of modified and unmodified tryptic peptide mixtures (peptide mapping) using 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry. At conditions of limited chem...

  1. Skin Layer at the Actin-Gel Surface: Quenched Protein Membranes with Flat, Crumpled and Tubular Morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, L. S.

    2004-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a major component of eukaryotic cells involved in key functions including cell shape and mechanical stability. We report on the discovery of a novel hierarchically structured skin-layer formed at the surface of an isotropic gel of filamentous actin bundles at high molar ratios of alpha-actinin, an actin cross-linking protein, to globular actin. Laser scanning confocal microscopy has elucidated the full 3D structure on the micron scale. The protein skin-layer, composed of a directed network of bundles, exhibits flat, crumpled and remarkable, tube-like and pleated multi-tubular morphologies, resulting from stresses due to the underlying gel. These biologically based geometric structures, which may freely detach from the gel, demonstrate potential for the generation of scaffolds with defined shapes for applications in tissue engineering and templating. Supported by NSF DMR-0203755 and CTS 0103516 and NIH GM59288.

  2. Trafficking of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchored proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz, Manuel; Riezman, Howard

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, many cell surface proteins are attached to the plasma membrane via a glycolipid glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) receive the GPI anchor as a conserved posttranslational modification in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). After anchor attachment, the GPI anchor is structurally remodeled to function as a transport signal that actively triggers the delivery of GPI-APs from the ER to the plasma membrane, via the Golgi apparatus. The structure and composition of the GPI anchor confer a special mode of interaction with membranes of GPI-APs within the lumen of secretory organelles that lead them to be differentially trafficked from other secretory membrane proteins. In this review, we examine the mechanisms by which GPI-APs are selectively transported through the secretory pathway, with special focus on the recent progress made in their actively regulated export from the ER and the trans-Golgi network. PMID:26450970

  3. Cooperative Binding and Activation of Fibronectin by a Bacterial Surface Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjenberg, Zoe R.; Ellis, Ian R.; Hagan, Robert M.; Prabhakaran, Sabitha; Höök, Magnus; Talay, Susanne R.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Staunton, David; Schwarz-Linek, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Integrin-dependent cell invasion of some pathogenic bacteria is mediated by surface proteins targeting the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (FN). Although the structural basis for bacterial FN recognition is well understood, it has been unclear why proteins such as streptococcal SfbI contain several FN-binding sites. We used microcalorimetry to reveal cooperative binding of FN fragments to arrays of binding sites in SfbI. In combination with thermodynamic analyses, functional cell-based assays show that SfbI induces conformational changes in the N-terminal 100-kDa region of FN (FN100kDa), most likely by competition with intramolecular interactions defining an inactive state of FN100kDa. This study provides insights into how long range conformational changes resulting in FN activation may be triggered by bacterial pathogens. PMID:21059652

  4. Surface Plasmon Resonance Investigations of Bioselective Element Based on the Recombinant Protein A for Immunoglobulin Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmachuk, A.; Gorbatiuk, O.; Rachkov, A.; Dons'koi, B.; Khristosenko, R.; Ushenin, I.; Peshkova, V.; Soldatkin, A.

    2017-02-01

    The developed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on the recombinant Staphylococcal protein A with an additional cysteine residue (SPA-Cys) used as a biorecognition component showed a good selectivity and sensitivity for the immunoglobulin detection. The developed biosensor with SPA-Cys-based bioselective element can also be used as a first step of immunosensor creation. The successful immobilization of SPA-Cys on the nanolayer gold sensor surface of the SPR spectrometer was performed. The efficiency of blocking nonspecific sorption sites on the sensor surface with milk proteins, gelatin, BSA, and HSA was studied, and a rather high efficiency of using gelatin was confirmed. The SPR biosensor selectively interacted with IgG and did not interact with the control proteins. The linear dependence of the sensor response on the IgG concentration in the range from 2 to 10 μg/ml was shown. Using the calibration curve, the IgG concentration was measured in the model samples. The determined concentrations are in good agreement ( r 2 = 0.97) with the given concentration of IgG.

  5. Real-time protein aggregation monitoring with a Bloch surface wave-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Sara; Barakat, Elsie; Descrovi, Emiliano; Neier, Reinhard; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2014-05-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of amyloid proteins has been associated with incurable diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. In the specific case of Alzheimer's disease, recent studies have shown that cell toxicity is caused by soluble oligomeric forms of aggregates appearing in the early stages of aggregation, rather than by insoluble fibrils. Research on new strategies of diagnosis is imperative to detect the disease prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. Here, we propose the use of an optical method for protein aggregation dynamic studies using a Bloch surface wave based approach. A one dimension photonic crystal made of a periodic stack of silicon oxide and silicon nitride layers is used to excite a Bloch surface wave, which is sensitive to variation of the refractive index of an aqueous solution. The aim is to detect the early dynamic events of protein aggregation and fibrillogenesis of the amyloid-beta peptide Aβ42, which plays a central role in the onset of the Alzheimer's disease. The detection principle relies on the refractive index changes caused by the depletion of the Aβ42 monomer concentration during oligomerization and fibrillization. We demonstrate the efficacy of the Bloch surface wave approach by monitoring in real-time the first crucial steps of Aβ42 oligomerization.

  6. Immunogenicity studies of proteins forming the T4 phage head surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Owczarek, Barbara; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Letarov, Andrey; Górski, Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    Advances in phage therapy and novel applications of phages in biotechnology encourage interest in phage impact on human and animal immunity. Here we present comparative studies of immunogenic properties of T4 phage head surface proteins gp23*, gp24*, Hoc, and Soc, both as elements of the phage capsid and as isolated agents. Studies comprise evaluation of specific antibodies in the human population, analysis of the proteins' impact on the primary and secondary responses in mice, and the effect of specific antibodies on phage antibacterial activity in vitro and in vivo in mice. In humans, natural antibodies specific to T4-like phages were abundant (81% of investigated sera). Among those, significantly elevated levels of IgG antibodies only against major head protein (gp23*) were found, which probably reflected cross-reactions of T4 with antibodies induced by other T4-like phages. Both IgM and IgG antibodies were induced mostly by gp23* and Hoc, while weak (gp24*) and very weak (Soc) reactivities of other head proteins were noticed. Thus, T4 head proteins that markedly contribute to immunological memory to the phage are highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc) and major capsid protein (gp23*). Specific anti-gp23* and anti-Hoc antibodies substantially decreased T4 phage activity in vitro and to some extent in vivo. Cooperating with antibodies, the immune complement system also contributed to annihilating phages. Current descriptions of phage immunogenicity and its biological consequences are still vague and incomplete; thus, the central problem of this work is timely and may have strong practical implications. Here is presented the very first description of the contribution of bacteriophage proteins to immunological memory of the phage. Understanding of interactions between phages and mammalian immunology may help in biotechnological adaptations of phages for therapeutic requirements as well as for better appreciation of phage ecology and their role in the biosphere

  7. Protein analysis in dissolved organic matter: What proteins from organic debris, soil leachate and surface water can tell us - a perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. X. Schulze

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry based analysis of proteins is widely used to study cellular processes in model organisms. However, it has not yet routinely been applied in environmental research. Based on observations that protein can readily be detected as a component of dissolved organic matter (DOM, this article gives an example about the possible use of protein analysis in ecology and environmental sciences focusing on different terrestrial ecosystems. At this stage, there are two areas of interest: (1 the identification of phylogenetic groups contributing to the environmental protein pool, and (2 identification of the organismic origin of specific enzymes that are important for ecosystem processes. In this paper, mass spectrometric protein analysis was applied to identify proteins from decomposing plant material and DOM of soil leachates and surface water samples derived from different environments. It is concluded, that mass spectrometric protein analysis is capable of distinguishing phylogenetic origin of proteins from litter protein extracts, leachates of different soil horizons, and from various sources of terrestrial surface water. Current limitation is imposed by the limited knowledge of complete genomes of soil organisms. The protein analysis allows to relate protein presence to biogeochemical processes, and to identify the source organisms for specific active enzymes. Further applications, such as in pollution research are conceivable. In summary, the analysis of proteins opens a new area of research between the fields of microbiology and biogeochemistry.

  8. The neuroplastin adhesion molecules are accessory proteins that chaperone the monocarboxylate transporter MCT2 to the neuronal cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieangela C Wilson

    Full Text Available The neuroplastins np65 and np55 are two synapse-enriched immunoglobulin (Ig superfamily adhesion molecules that contain 3 and 2 Ig domains respectively. Np65 is implicated in long term, activity dependent synaptic plasticity, including LTP. Np65 regulates the surface expression of GluR1 receptor subunits and the localisation of GABA(A receptor subtypes in hippocampal neurones. The brain is dependent not only on glucose but on monocarboxylates as sources of energy. The. monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs 1-4 are responsible for the rapid proton-linked translocation of monocarboxylates including pyruvate and lactate across the plasma membrane and require association with either embigin or basigin, proteins closely related to neuroplastin, for plasma membrane expression and activity. MCT2 plays a key role in providing lactate as an energy source to neurons.Here we use co-transfection of neuroplastins and monocarboxylate transporters into COS-7 cells to demonstrate that neuroplastins can act as ancillary proteins for MCT2. We also show that Xenopus laevis oocytes contain endogenous neuroplastin and its knockdown with antisense RNA reduces the surface expression of MCT2 and associated lactate transport. Immunocytochemical studies show that MCT2 and the neuroplastins are co-localised in rat cerebellum. Strikingly neuroplastin and MCT2 are enriched in the same parasagittal zebrin II-negative stripes.These data strongly suggest that neuroplastins act as key ancillary proteins for MCT2 cell surface localisation and activity in some neuronal populations, thus playing an important role in facilitating the uptake of lactate for use as a respiratory fuel.

  9. A surface plasmon resonance interferometer based on spatial phase modulation for protein array detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinglong; Ding, Xiang; Liu, Fangfang; Wei, Xing; Wang, Dingxin

    2008-01-01

    Thousands of kinds of proteins exist in a single cell. Proteomics research aims to characterize these proteins and simultaneously analyse modifications and interactions on a large scale. Here we present a label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging interferometer based on spatial phase modulation, which can be useful in this field. It consists of a light source, a SPR sensing unit, a special phase modulator, a photoelectric conversion unit and a computer. Collimated light is projected into a prism and reflected at the gold-glass interface. The p- and s-polarized components of the reflected light pass through a one-dimensional beam expander and a Wollaston prism, and form an interference pattern on a CCD. Interference images are acquired and transferred to the computer for data processing. Protein interaction on the gold surface leads to a local refractive index change and results in interference fringe phase shift. By calculating the phase shift, interaction information can be obtained. It is demonstrated that this technique can detect different concentrations of NaCl solutions, and the phase change generated by a 0.9% NaCl solution is about 10°. In protein-protein interaction experiments, a model system of rabbit IgG and goat-anti-rabbit IgG is tested. The maximum phase change is up to 12°. The phase resolution of the system is 0.2°, equivalent to the refractive index resolution of 3 × 10-5 RIU, and this value can be improved to 2 × 10-6 RIU just by increasing the gold thickness of the sensing chip. It is concluded that the sensitivity of the interferometer is enough to achieve larger capacity than that detected by the present protein micro-array products. These results suggest that the SPR interferometer based on spatial phase modulation provides a potential facility to meet the requirements in proteomics research.

  10. Degradation of Redox-Sensitive Proteins including Peroxiredoxins and DJ-1 is Promoted by Oxidation-induced Conformational Changes and Ubiquitination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In-Kang; Lee, Jae-Jin; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Jeong, Jihye; Shin, Dong-Hae; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2016-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key molecules regulating various cellular processes. However, what the cellular targets of ROS are and how their functions are regulated is unclear. This study explored the cellular proteomic changes in response to oxidative stress using H2O2 in dose- and recovery time-dependent ways. We found discernible changes in 76 proteins appearing as 103 spots on 2D-PAGE. Of these, Prxs, DJ-1, UCH-L3 and Rla0 are readily oxidized in response to mild H2O2 stress, and then degraded and active proteins are newly synthesized during recovery. In studies designed to understand the degradation process, multiple cellular modifications of redox-sensitive proteins were identified by peptide sequencing with nanoUPLC-ESI-q-TOF tandem mass spectrometry and the oxidative structural changes of Prx2 explored employing hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). We found that hydrogen/deuterium exchange rate increased in C-terminal region of oxidized Prx2, suggesting the exposure of this region to solvent under oxidation. We also found that Lys191 residue in this exposed C-terminal region of oxidized Prx2 is polyubiquitinated and the ubiquitinated Prx2 is readily degraded in proteasome and autophagy. These findings suggest that oxidation-induced ubiquitination and degradation can be a quality control mechanism of oxidized redox-sensitive proteins including Prxs and DJ-1.

  11. batman Interacts with polycomb and trithorax group genes and encodes a BTB/POZ protein that is included in a complex containing GAGA factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucheux, M; Roignant, J-Y; Netter, S; Charollais, J; Antoniewski, C; Théodore, L

    2003-02-01

    Polycomb and trithorax group genes maintain the appropriate repressed or activated state of homeotic gene expression throughout Drosophila melanogaster development. We have previously identified the batman gene as a Polycomb group candidate since its function is necessary for the repression of Sex combs reduced. However, our present genetic analysis indicates functions of batman in both activation and repression of homeotic genes. The 127-amino-acid Batman protein is almost reduced to a BTB/POZ domain, an evolutionary conserved protein-protein interaction domain found in a large protein family. We show that this domain is involved in the interaction between Batman and the DNA binding GAGA factor encoded by the Trithorax-like gene. The GAGA factor and Batman codistribute on polytene chromosomes, coimmunoprecipitate from nuclear embryonic and larval extracts, and interact in the yeast two-hybrid assay. Batman, together with the GAGA factor, binds to MHS-70, a 70-bp fragment of the bithoraxoid Polycomb response element. This binding, like that of the GAGA factor, requires the presence of d(GA)n sequences. Together, our results suggest that batman belongs to a subset of the Polycomb/trithorax group of genes that includes Trithorax-like, whose products are involved in both activation and repression of homeotic genes.

  12. Bacterial surface-displayed GII.4 human norovirus capsid proteins bound to surface of Romaine lettuce through HBGA-like molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the main cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Contaminated produce is a main vehicle for dissemination of HuNoVs. In this study, we used an ice nucleation protein (INP) mediated surface display system to present the protruding domain of GII.4 HuNoV capsid protein (G...

  13. Importance of including small-scale tile drain discharge in the calibration of a coupled groundwater-surface water catchment model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Lausten; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Christensen, Britt Stenhøj Baun

    2013-01-01

    the catchment. In this study, a coupled groundwater-surface water model based on the MIKE SHE code was developed for the 4.7 km2 Lillebæk catchment in Denmark, where tile drain flow is a major contributor to the stream discharge. The catchment model was calibrated in several steps by incrementally including...... the observation data into the calibration to see the effect on model performance of including diverse data types, especially tile drain discharge. For the Lillebæk catchment, measurements of hydraulic head, daily stream discharge, and daily tile drain discharge from five small (1–4 ha) drainage areas exist....... The results showed that including tile drain data in the calibration of the catchment model improved its general performance for hydraulic heads and stream discharges. However, the model failed to correctly describe the local-scale dynamics of the tile drain discharges, and, furthermore, including the drain...

  14. Ice-surface adsorption enhanced colligative effect of antifreeze proteins in ice growth inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yougang; Ba, Yong

    2006-09-01

    This Communication describes a mechanism to explain antifreeze protein's function to inhibit the growth of ice crystals. We propose that the adsorption of antifreeze protein (AFP) molecules on an ice surface induces a dense AFP-water layer, which can significantly decrease the mole fraction of the interfacial water and, thus, lower the temperature for a seed ice crystal to grow in a super-cooled AFP solution. This mechanism can also explain the nearly unchanged melting point for the ice crystal due to the AFP's ice-surface adsorption. A mathematical model combining the Langmuir theory of adsorption and the colligative effect of thermodynamics has been proposed to find the equilibrium constants of the ice-surface adsorptions, and the interfacial concentrations of AFPs through fitting the theoretical curves to the experimental thermal hysteresis data. This model has been demonstrated by using the experimental data of serial size-mutated beetle Tenebrio molitor (Tm) AFPs. It was found that the AFP's ice-surface adsorptions could increase the interfacial AFP's concentrations by 3 to 4 orders compared with those in the bulk AFP solutions.

  15. The Plasmodium falciparum transcriptome in severe malaria reveals altered expression of genes involved in important processes including surface antigen–encoding var genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin-Hill, Gerry Q.; Trianty, Leily; Noviyanti, Rintis; Nguyen, Hanh H. T.; Sebayang, Boni F.; Lampah, Daniel A.; Marfurt, Jutta; Cobbold, Simon A.; Rambhatla, Janavi S.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Rogerson, Stephen J.; Brown, Graham V.; Day, Karen P.; Price, Ric N.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2018-01-01

    Within the human host, the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is exposed to multiple selection pressures. The host environment changes dramatically in severe malaria, but the extent to which the parasite responds to—or is selected by—this environment remains unclear. From previous studies, the parasites that cause severe malaria appear to increase expression of a restricted but poorly defined subset of the PfEMP1 variant, surface antigens. PfEMP1s are major targets of protective immunity. Here, we used RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to analyse gene expression in 44 parasite isolates that caused severe and uncomplicated malaria in Papuan patients. The transcriptomes of 19 parasite isolates associated with severe malaria indicated that these parasites had decreased glycolysis without activation of compensatory pathways; altered chromatin structure and probably transcriptional regulation through decreased histone methylation; reduced surface expression of PfEMP1; and down-regulated expression of multiple chaperone proteins. Our RNAseq also identified novel associations between disease severity and PfEMP1 transcripts, domains, and smaller sequence segments and also confirmed all previously reported associations between expressed PfEMP1 sequences and severe disease. These findings will inform efforts to identify vaccine targets for severe malaria and also indicate how parasites adapt to—or are selected by—the host environment in severe malaria. PMID:29529020

  16. Characterization of grafting density and binding efficiency of DNA and proteins on gold surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelino, Kenneth; Kannan, Balaji; Majumdar, Arun

    2005-03-01

    The surface grafting density of biomolecules is an important factor for quantitative assays using a wide range of biological sensors. We use a fluorescent measurement technique to characterize the immobilization density of thiolated probe DNA on gold and hybridization efficiency of target DNA as a function of oligonucleotide length and salt concentration. The results indicate the dominance of osmotic and hydration forces in different regimes of salt concentration, which was used to validate previous simulations and to optimize the performance of surface-stress based microcantilever biosensors. The difference in hybridization density between complementary and mismatched target sequences was also measured to understand the response of these sensors in base-pair mismatch detection experiments. Finally, two different techniques for immobilizing proteins on gold were considered and the surface densities obtained in both cases were compared.

  17. Characterization of rat basophilic leukemia cell surface proteins using monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonocore-Buzzelli, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells express both immunoglobulin E (IgE) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) receptors. In this study, mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced against the RBL cell and screened for their ability to precipitate specific bands from 125 I surface labeled cells. Fourteen hybridomas were selected and divided into five groups since many of the hybridomas precipitated bands of identical molecular weight. One or more of the hybridomas from each group, and the cell surface antigens they identified, were further characterized. Binding of all the monoclonal antibodies to the RBL-2H3 cell surface was saturable and of high affinity. In cross inhibition studies, two of the antibodies were found to bind to identical or neighboring epitopes, presumably on the same cell surface molecule. Binding studies using other cell populations demonstrated that the monoclonal antibodies react not only with commonly expressed rat cell surface molecules but also with molecules specifically expressed on rat mast cells and basophils. None of the antibodies were found to induce or inhibit serotonin release from the RBL cells. Western blotting showed most of the antibodies to react with bands whose molecular weights resembled those seen by immuno-precipitation. Antibodies number sign 8 and number sign 12, although from the same group, were found to react with different subunits of the same cell surface protein. Sequential immunoprecipitation and peptide mapping confirmed that the antigens defined by these antibodies were structurally related

  18. Regulation of human mononuclear phagocyte migration by cell surface-binding proteins for advanced glycation end products.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, A M; Yan, S D; Brett, J; Mora, R; Nowygrod, R; Stern, D

    1993-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of proteins occurs at an accelerated rate in diabetes and can lead to the formation of advanced glycation end products of proteins (AGEs), which bind to mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) and induce chemotaxis. We have isolated two cell surface-associated binding proteins that mediate the interaction of AGEs with bovine endothelial cells. One of these proteins is a new member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of receptors (termed receptor for AGEs or RAGE); and the second is ...

  19. Application of Response Surface Methodology to Study the Effects of Brisket Fat, Soy Protein Isolate, and Cornstarch on Nutritional and Textural Properties of Rabbit Sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambui, Joseph M; Karuri, Edward G; Wanyoike, Margaret M M

    2017-01-01

    The effects of brisket fat, soy protein isolate, and cornstarch on chemical and textural properties of rabbit sausages were studied using surface response methodology. Sausage samples were prepared using a five-level three-variable Central Composite Rotatable Design with 16 combinations, including two replicates of the center point, carried out in random order. The level of brisket fat (BF), soy protein isolate (SPI), and cornstarch (CS) in the sausage formulation ranged within 8.3-16.7%, 0.7-2.3%, and 1.3-4.7%, respectively. Increasing BF decreased moisture and ash contents but increased protein and fat contents of the sausages ( p sausages ( p sausages than CS.

  20. TGP, an extremely stable, non-aggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W.; Don Paul, Craig; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Traore, Daouda A.K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. PMID:25287913

  1. Response Surface Optimisation for the Production of Antioxidant Hydrolysates from Stone Fish Protein Using Bromelain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehu Muhammad Auwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein hydrolysates produced from different food sources exhibit therapeutic potential and can be used in the management of chronic diseases. This study was targeted to optimise the conditions for the hydrolysis of stone fish protein to produce antioxidant hydrolysates using central composite design (CCD by response surface methodology (RSM. The stone fish protein was hydrolysed under the optimum predicted conditions defined by pH (6.5, temperature (54°C, E/S ratio (1.5%, and hydrolysis time (360 min. The hydrolysates were then evaluated for 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH• scavenging activity and ferrous ion- (Fe2+- chelating activity. Results validation showed no significant difference between the experimental values of DPPH• scavenging activity (48.94% and Fe2+-chelating activity (25.12% obtained at 54.62% degree of hydrolysis (DH compared to their corresponding predicted values of 49.79% and 24.08% at 53.08% DH, respectively. The hydrolysates demonstrated non-Newtonian behavior (n<1 with stronger shear-thinning effect and higher viscosities at increasing concentration. Thus, RSM can be considered as a promising strategy to optimise the production of stone fish protein hydrolysates containing antioxidant peptides. It is hoped that this finding will enhance the potential of stone fish protein hydrolysates (SHs as therapeutic bioactive ingredient in functional foods development.

  2. Accessible surface area of proteins from purely sequence information and the importance of global features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraggi, Eshel; Zhou, Yaoqi; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    We present a new approach for predicting the accessible surface area of proteins. The novelty of this approach lies in not using residue mutation profiles generated by multiple sequence alignments as descriptive inputs. Rather, sequential window information and the global monomer and dimer compositions of the chain are used. We find that much of the lost accuracy due to the elimination of evolutionary information is recouped by the use of global features. Furthermore, this new predictor produces similar results for proteins with or without sequence homologs deposited in the Protein Data Bank, and hence shows generalizability. Finally, these predictions are obtained in a small fraction (1/1000) of the time required to run mutation profile based prediction. All these factors indicate the possible usability of this work in de-novo protein structure prediction and in de-novo protein design using iterative searches. Funded in part by the financial support of the National Institutes of Health through Grants R01GM072014 and R01GM073095, and the National Science Foundation through Grant NSF MCB 1071785.

  3. Incidence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in human and animal fecal sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, R.L.; Przybyla-Kelly, K.; Shively, D.A.; Byappanahalli, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in the opportunistic pathogens Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium is well-documented in clinical research. Recently, the esp gene has been proposed as a marker of human pollution in environmental waters; however, information on its relative incidence in various human and animal fecal sources is limited. We have determined the occurrence of the esp gene in enterococci from human (n = 64) and animal (n = 233) fecal samples by polymerase chain reaction using two primer sets: one presumably specific for E. faecium (espfm) and the other for both E. faecalis and E. faecium (espfs/fm). We believe that this research is the first to explore the use of espfs/fm for the detection of human waste in natural environmental settings. The incidence in human sources was 93.1% espfm and 100% espfs/fm in raw sewage influent; 30% for both espfm and espfs/fm in septic waste; and 0% espfm and 80% espfs/fm in active pit toilets. The overall occurrence of the gene in animal feces was 7.7% (espfs/fm) and 4.7% (espfm); animal types with positive results included dogs (9/43, all espfm), gulls (10/34, espfs/fm; 2/34, espfm), mice (3/22, all espfs/fm), and songbirds (5/55, all espfs/fm). The esp gene was not detected in cat (0/34), deer (0/4), goose (0/18), or raccoon (0/23) feces. The inconsistent occurrence, especially in septic and pit toilet sewage, suggests a low statistical power of discrimination between animal and human sources, which means a large number of replicates should be collected. Both espfm and espfs/fm were common in raw sewage, but neither one efficiently differentiated between animal and other human sources.

  4. Self-Immobilization of Car9 Fusion Proteins within High Surface Area Silica Sol-Gels and Dynamic Control of Protein Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenlan; Hellner, Brittney; Baneyx, François

    2016-10-19

    Protein entrapment within silica matrices during sol-gel formation is an effective way of producing biocatalysts with high load, activity retention, and minimal leaching. On the other hand, mesoporous silica materials have been favored for diffusional control of protein delivery because of their regular pore size and morphology and in spite of the drawback of requiring post-synthesis loading with cargo proteins. Here, we describe a hybrid technology in which fusion of the silica-binding Car9 dodecapeptide to model fluorescent proteins allows for their simultaneous entrapment and surface immobilization within sol-gel monoliths that can be fabricated in air and oil phases. Spherical particles produced by injecting a mixture of silicic acid and Car9-tagged proteins in silicone oil exhibit high surface area (>400 m 2 /g), 15-nm-diameter mean pore size and homogeneous protein loading. Incubation in arginine-containing buffer disrupts the interaction between Car9 extensions and silica surfaces and triggers the continuous or discontinuous (on/off) release of cargo proteins with pH-tunable kinetics. This simple approach for producing hybrid silica materials that stably encapsulate and release one or more Car9-tagged proteins in a single step may prove useful for applications requiring dynamic control of protein concentration.

  5. ErpC, a member of the complement regulator-acquiring family of surface proteins from Borrelia burgdorferi, possesses an architecture previously unseen in this protein family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caesar, Joseph J. E.; Johnson, Steven; Kraiczy, Peter; Lea, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of ErpC, a member of the complement regulator-acquiring surface protein family from B. burgdorferi, has been solved, providing insights into the strategies of complement evasion by this zoonotic bacterium and suggesting a common architecture for other members of this protein family. Borrelia burgdorferi is a spirochete responsible for Lyme disease, the most commonly occurring vector-borne disease in Europe and North America. The bacterium utilizes a set of proteins, termed complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs), to aid evasion of the human complement system by recruiting and presenting complement regulator factor H on its surface in a manner that mimics host cells. Presented here is the atomic resolution structure of a member of this protein family, ErpC. The structure provides new insights into the mechanism of recruitment of factor H and other factor H-related proteins by acting as a molecular mimic of host glycosaminoglycans. It also describes the architecture of other CRASP proteins belonging to the OspE/F-related paralogous protein family and suggests that they have evolved to bind specific complement proteins, aiding survival of the bacterium in different hosts

  6. Surface expression of protein A on magnetosomes and capture of pathogenic bacteria by magnetosome/ antibody complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eXu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetosomes are membrane-enclosed magnetite nanocrystals synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria (MTB. They display chemical purity, narrow size ranges, and species-specific crystal morphologies. Specific transmembrane proteins are sorted to the magnetosome membrane (MM. MamC is the most abundant MM protein of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1. MamF is the second most abundant MM protein of MSR-1 and forms stable oligomers. We expressed staphylococcal protein A (SPA, an immunoglobulin-binding protein from the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus, on MSR-1 magnetosomes by fusion with MamC or MamF. The resulting recombinant magnetosomes were capable of self-assembly with the Fc region of mammalian antibodies (Abs and were therefore useful for functionalization of magnetosomes. Recombinant plasmids pBBR-mamC-spa and pBBR-mamF-spa were constructed by fusing spa (the gene that encodes SPA with mamC and mamF, respectively. Recombinant magnetosomes with surface expression of SPA were generated by introduction of these fusion genes into wild-type MSR-1 or a mamF mutant strain. Studies with a Zeta Potential Analyzer showed that the recombinant magnetosomes had hydrated radii significantly smaller than those of WT magnetosomes and zeta potentials less than -30 mV, indicating that the magnetosome colloids were relatively stable. Observed conjugation efficiencies were as high as 71.24 µg Ab per mg recombinant magnetosomes, and the conjugated Abs retained most of their activity. Numbers of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (a common pathogenic bacterium in seafood captured by recombinant magnetosome/ Ab complexes were measured by real-time fluorescence-based quantitative PCR. One mg of complex was capable of capturing as many as 1.74×107 Vibrio cells. The surface expression system described here will be useful for design of functionalized magnetosomes from MSR-1 and other MTB.

  7. PPE Surface Proteins Are Required for Heme Utilization by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avishek Mitra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but iron is efficiently sequestered in the human host during infection. Heme constitutes the largest iron reservoir in the human body and is utilized by many bacterial pathogens as an iron source. While heme acquisition is well studied in other bacterial pathogens, little is known in M. tuberculosis. To identify proteins involved in heme utilization by M. tuberculosis, a transposon mutant library was screened for resistance to the toxic heme analog gallium(III-porphyrin (Ga-PIX. Inactivation of the ppe36, ppe62, and rv0265c genes resulted in resistance to Ga-PIX. Growth experiments using isogenic M. tuberculosis deletion mutants showed that PPE36 is essential for heme utilization by M. tuberculosis, while the functions of PPE62 and Rv0265c are partially redundant. None of the genes restored growth of the heterologous M. tuberculosis mutants, indicating that the proteins encoded by the genes have separate functions. PPE36, PPE62, and Rv0265c bind heme as shown by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and are associated with membranes. Both PPE36 and PPE62 proteins are cell surface accessible, while the Rv0265c protein is probably located in the periplasm. PPE36 and PPE62 are, to our knowledge, the first proline-proline-glutamate (PPE proteins of M. tuberculosis that bind small molecules and are involved in nutrient acquisition. The absence of a virulence defect of the ppe36 deletion mutant indicates that the different iron acquisition pathways of M. tuberculosis may substitute for each other during growth and persistence in mice. The emerging model of heme utilization by M. tuberculosis as derived from this study is substantially different from those of other bacteria.

  8. Prevalence of epistasis in the evolution of influenza A surface proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Kryazhimskiy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface proteins of human influenza A viruses experience positive selection to escape both human immunity and, more recently, antiviral drug treatments. In bacteria and viruses, immune-escape and drug-resistant phenotypes often appear through a combination of several mutations that have epistatic effects on pathogen fitness. However, the extent and structure of epistasis in influenza viral proteins have not been systematically investigated. Here, we develop a novel statistical method to detect positive epistasis between pairs of sites in a protein, based on the observed temporal patterns of sequence evolution. The method rests on the simple idea that a substitution at one site should rapidly follow a substitution at another site if the sites are positively epistatic. We apply this method to the surface proteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of influenza A virus subtypes H3N2 and H1N1. Compared to a non-epistatic null distribution, we detect substantial amounts of epistasis and determine the identities of putatively epistatic pairs of sites. In particular, using sequence data alone, our method identifies epistatic interactions between specific sites in neuraminidase that have recently been demonstrated, in vitro, to confer resistance to the drug oseltamivir; these epistatic interactions are responsible for widespread drug resistance among H1N1 viruses circulating today. This experimental validation demonstrates the predictive power of our method to identify epistatic sites of importance for viral adaptation and public health. We conclude that epistasis plays a large role in shaping the molecular evolution of influenza viruses. In particular, sites with , which would normally not be identified as positively selected, can facilitate viral adaptation through epistatic interactions with their partner sites. The knowledge of specific interactions among sites in influenza proteins may help us to predict the course of antigenic evolution and

  9. Automatic construction of subject-specific human airway geometry including trifurcations based on a CT-segmented airway skeleton and surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Wenzel, Sally E.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method to construct three-dimensional airway geometric models based on airway skeletons, or centerlines (CLs). Given a CT-segmented airway skeleton and surface, the proposed CL-based method automatically constructs subject-specific models that contain anatomical information regarding branches, include bifurcations and trifurcations, and extend from the trachea to terminal bronchioles. The resulting model can be anatomically realistic with the assistance of an image-based surface; alternatively a model with an idealized skeleton and/or branch diameters is also possible. This method systematically identifies and classifies trifurcations to successfully construct the models, which also provides the number and type of trifurcations for the analysis of the airways from an anatomical point of view. We applied this method to 16 normal and 16 severe asthmatic subjects using their computed tomography images. The average distance between the surface of the model and the image-based surface was 11% of the average voxel size of the image. The four most frequent locations of trifurcations were the left upper division bronchus, left lower lobar bronchus, right upper lobar bronchus, and right intermediate bronchus. The proposed method automatically constructed accurate subject-specific three-dimensional airway geometric models that contain anatomical information regarding branches using airway skeleton, diameters, and image-based surface geometry. The proposed method can construct (i) geometry automatically for population-based studies, (ii) trifurcations to retain the original airway topology, (iii) geometry that can be used for automatic generation of computational fluid dynamics meshes, and (iv) geometry based only on a skeleton and diameters for idealized branches. PMID:27704229

  10. Spontaneous surface self-assembly in protein-surfactant mixtures: interactions between hydrophobin and ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun; Cox, Andrew R; Hedges, Nick; Webster, John R P

    2014-05-08

    The synergistic interactions between certain ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants and the protein hydrophobin result in spontaneous self-assembly at the air-water interface to form layered surface structures. The surface structures are characterized using neutron reflectivity. The formation of the layered surface structures is promoted by the hydrophobic interaction between the polysorbate alkyl chain and the hydrophobic patch on the surface of the globular hydrophobin and the interaction between the ethoxylated sorbitan headgroup and hydrophilic regions of the protein. The range of the ethoxylated polysorbate concentrations over which the surface ordering occurs is a maximum for the more hydrophobic surfactant polyoxyethylene(8) sorbitan monostearate. The structures at the air-water interface are accompanied by a profound change in the wetting properties of the solution on hydrophobic substrates. In the absence of the polysorbate surfactant, hydrophobin wets a hydrophobic surface, whereas the hydrophobin/ethoxylated polysorbate mixtures where multilayer formation occurs result in a significant dewetting of hydrophobic surfaces. The spontaneous surface self-assembly for hydrophobin/ethoxylated polysorbate surfactant mixtures and the changes in surface wetting properties provide a different insight into protein-surfactant interactions and potential for manipulating surface and interfacial properties and protein surface behavior.

  11. Multiple Legionella pneumophila Type II secretion substrates, including a novel protein, contribute to differential infection of the amoebae Acanthamoeba castellanii, Hartmannella vermiformis, and Naegleria lovaniensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Jessica Y; Pearce, Meghan M; Vargas, Paloma; Bagchi, Sreya; Mulhern, Brendan J; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2013-05-01

    Type II protein secretion (T2S) by Legionella pneumophila is required for intracellular infection of host cells, including macrophages and the amoebae Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis. Previous proteomic analysis revealed that T2S by L. pneumophila 130b mediates the export of >25 proteins, including several that appeared to be novel. Following confirmation that they are unlike known proteins, T2S substrates NttA, NttB, and LegP were targeted for mutation. nttA mutants were impaired for intracellular multiplication in A. castellanii but not H. vermiformis or macrophages, suggesting that novel exoproteins which are specific to Legionella are especially important for infection. Because the importance of NttA was host cell dependent, we examined a panel of T2S substrate mutants that had not been tested before in more than one amoeba. As a result, RNase SrnA, acyltransferase PlaC, and metalloprotease ProA all proved to be required for optimal intracellular multiplication in H. vermiformis but not A. castellanii. Further examination of an lspF mutant lacking the T2S apparatus documented that T2S is also critical for infection of the amoeba Naegleria lovaniensis. Mutants lacking SrnA, PlaC, or ProA, but not those deficient for NttA, were defective in N. lovaniensis. Based upon analysis of a double mutant lacking PlaC and ProA, the role of ProA in H. vermiformis was connected to its ability to activate PlaC, whereas in N. lovaniensis, ProA appeared to have multiple functions. Together, these data document that the T2S system exports multiple effectors, including a novel one, which contribute in different ways to the broad host range of L. pneumophila.

  12. Well-known surface and extracellular antigens of pathogenic microorganisms among the immunodominant proteins of the infectious microalgae Prototheca zopfii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrgang, Alexandra; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Weise, Christoph; Azab, Walid; Roesler, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae of the genus Prototheca (P.) are associated with rare but severe infections (protothecosis) and represent a potential zoonotic risk. Genotype (GT) 2 of P. zopfii has been established as pathogenic agent for humans, dogs, and cattle, whereas GT1 is considered to be non-pathogenic. Since pathogenesis is poorly understood, the aim of this study was to determine immunogenic proteins and potential virulence factors of P. zopfii GT2. Therefore, 2D western blot analyses with sera and isolates of two dogs naturally infected with P. zopfii GT2 have been performed. Cross-reactivity was determined by including the type strains of P. zopfii GT2, P. zopfii GT1, and P. blaschkeae, a close relative of P. zopfii, which is known to cause subclinical forms of bovine mastitis. The sera showed a high strain-, genotype-, and species-cross-reactivity. A total of 198 immunogenic proteins have been analyzed via MALDI-TOF MS. The majority of the 86 identified proteins are intracellularly located (e.g., malate dehydrogenase, oxidoreductase, 3-dehydroquinate synthase) but some antigens and potential virulence factors, known from other pathogens, have been found (e.g., phosphomannomutase, triosephosphate isomerase). One genotype-specific antigen could be identified as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), a well-known antigen of eukaryotic pathogens with immunological importance when located extracellularly. Both sera were reactive to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase of all investigated strains. This house-keeping enzyme is found to be located on the surface of several pathogens as virulence factor. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed its presence on the surface of P. blaschkeae.

  13. Well-known surface and extracellular antigens of pathogenic microorganisms among the immunodominant proteins of the infectious microalgae Prototheca zopfii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eIrrgang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae of the genus Prototheca (P. are associated with rare but severe infections (protothecosis and represent a potential zoonotic risk. Genotype (GT 2 of P. zopfii has been established as pathogenic agent for humans, dogs and cattle, whereas GT1 is considered to be non-pathogenic. Since pathogenesis is poorly understood, the aim of this study was to determine immunogenic proteins and potential virulence factors of P. zopfii GT2. Therefore, 2D western blot analyses with sera and isolates of two dogs naturally infected with P. zopfii GT2 have been performed. Cross-reactivity was determined by including the type strains of P. zopfii GT2, P. zopfii GT1 and P. blaschkeae, a close relative of P. zopfii, which is known to cause subclinical forms of bovine mastitis. The sera showed a high strain-, genotype-, and species-cross-reactivity. A total of 198 immunogenic proteins have been analysed via MALDI- TOF MS. The majority of the 86 identified proteins are intracellularly located (e.g. malate dehydrogenase, oxidoreductase, 3-dehydroquinate synthase but some antigens and potential virulence factors, known from other pathogens, have been found (e.g. phosphomannomutase, triosephosphate isomerase. One genotype-specific antigen could be identified as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70, a well-known antigen of eukaryotic pathogens with immunological importance when located extracellularly. Both sera were reactive to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase of all investigated strains. This house-keeping enzyme is found to be located on the surface of several pathogens as virulence factor. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed its presence on the surface of P. blaschkeae.

  14. Characterization of genotoxic response to 15 multiwalled carbon nanotubes with variable physicochemical properties including surface functionalizations in the FE1-Muta(TM) mouse lung epithelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Petra; Kling, Kirsten; Jensen, Keld Alstrup; Clausen, Per Axel; Madsen, Anne Mette; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes vary greatly in physicochemical properties. We compared cytotoxic and genotoxic response to 15 multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with varying physicochemical properties to identify drivers of toxic responses. The studied MWCNT included OECD Working Party on Manufactured Nanomaterials (WPMN) (NM-401, NM-402, and NM-403), materials (NRCWE-026 and MWCNT-XNRI-7), and three sets of surface-modified MWCNT grouped by physical characteristics (thin, thick, and short I-III, respectively). Each Groups I-III included pristine, hydroxylated and carboxylated MWCNT. Group III also included an amino-functionalized MWCNT. The level of surface functionalization of the MWCNT was low. The level and type of elemental impurities of the MWCNT varied by <2% of the weight, with exceptions. Based on dynamic light scattering data, the MWCNT were well-dispersed in stock dispersion of nanopure water with 2% serum, but agglomerated and sedimented during exposure. FE1-Muta(TM) Mouse lung epithelial cells were exposed for 24 hr. The levels of DNA strand breaks (SB) were evaluated using the comet assay, a screening assay suitable for genotoxicity testing of nanomaterials. Exposure to MWCNT (12.5-200 µg/ml) did not induce significant cytotoxicity (viability above 92%). Cell proliferation was reduced in highest doses of some MWCNT after 24 hr, and was associated with generation of reactive oxygen species and high surface area. Increased levels of DNA SB were only observed for Group II consisting of MWCNT with large diameters and high Fe2 O3 and Ni content. Significantly, increased levels of SB were only observed at 200 µg/ml of MWCNT-042. Overall, the MWCNT were not cytotoxic and weakly genotoxic after 24 hr exposure to doses up to 200 µg/ml. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Identification and dynamics of proteins adhering to the surface of medical silicones in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backovic, Aleksandar; Huang, Hong-Lei; Del Frari, Barbara; Piza, Hildegunde; Huber, Lukas A; Wick, Georg

    2007-01-01

    Silicone has been used in medical practice as a paradigmatic implant material for decades despite significant detrimental side effects. Our targeted proteomics approach was aimed at identification of the proteins adsorbed to the surface of silicone because they have been characterized as key components in the onset and perpetuation of local immune reactions to silicone. The composition of the proteinacious film, the dynamics of protein deposition, and protein modifications after adsorption were analyzed both in vivo and in vitro. Differential analysis of protein deposition was performed, followed by protein identification with mass spectrometry, database matching, and Western blots. Thus far, we have identified the 30 most abundant proteins deposited on the surface of silicone, the largest known inventory of such proteins so far. Structural and extracellular matrix proteins predominated, followed by mediators of host defense, metabolism, transport, and stress related proteins. In addition, several biochemical modifications of fibronectin, vitronectin, and heat shock protein 60 were detected. Our analyses also revealed previously undetected proteins deposited on the surface of silicone. As tentative initiators and/or modulators of the response to silicone, they are therefore valuable candidates for prognosis and therapy.

  16. Antibodies to a cell surface histone-like protein protect against Histoplasma capsulatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Steenbergen, Judith N; Shi, Li; Deepe, George S; Casadevall, Arturo

    2003-10-01

    A protective role for antibodies has not previously been described for host defense against the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc). Mouse mAb's were generated from mice immunized with Hc yeast that binds the cell surface of Hc. Administration of mAb's before Hc infection reduced fungal burden, decreased pulmonary inflammation, and prolonged survival in a murine infection model. Protection mediated by mAb's was associated with enhanced levels of IL-4, IL-6, and IFN-gamma in the lungs of infected mice. The mAb's increased phagocytosis of yeast by J774.16 cells through a CR3-dependent process. Ingestion of mAb-opsonized Hc by J774.16 macrophage-like cells was associated with yeast cell growth inhibition and killing. The mAb's bound to a 17-kDa antigen expressed on the surface of Hc. The antigen was identified as a histone H2B-like protein. This study establishes that mAb's to a cell surface protein of Hc alter the intracellular fate of the fungus and mediate protection in a murine model of lethal histoplasmosis, and it suggests a new candidate antigen for vaccine development.

  17. Hydration behavior at the ice-binding surface of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midya, Uday Sankar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2014-05-08

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out at two different temperatures (300 and 220 K) to study the conformational rigidity of the hyperactive Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) in aqueous medium and the structural arrangements of water molecules hydrating its surface. It is found that irrespective of the temperature the ice-binding surface (IBS) of the protein is relatively more rigid than its nonice-binding surface (NIBS). The presence of a set of regularly arranged internally bound water molecules is found to play an important role in maintaining the flat rigid nature of the IBS. Importantly, the calculations reveal that the strategically located hydroxyl oxygens of the threonine (Thr) residues in the IBS influence the arrangements of five sets of ordered waters around it on two parallel planes that closely resemble the basal plane of ice. As a result, these waters can register well with the ice basal plane, thereby allowing the IBS to preferentially bind at the ice interface and inhibit its growth. This provides a possible molecular reason behind the ice-binding activity of TmAFP at the basal plane of ice.

  18. Disposal project for LLW and VLLW generated from research facilities in Japan: A feasibility study for the near surface disposal of VLLW that includes uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Akihiro; Hasegawa, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakatani, T.

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion and future work: • JAEA plans trench disposal of U-bearing waste with less than 100 Bq/g. • Two safety measures of trench disposal of U-bearing waste have been discussed taking into account increasing radioactivity over a long period of time. 1. First is to carry out dose assessment of site use scenario by using a conservatively stylized condition. 2. Second is to control the average concentration of U in the trench facilities based on the concept of the existing exposure situation. • We are continuously developing the method for safety measures of near surface disposal of VLLW including U-bearing waste.

  19. Multi-faceted proteomic characterization of host protein complement of Rift Valley fever virus virions and identification of specific heat shock proteins, including HSP90, as important viral host factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Jonathan E; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Benedict, Ashwini; Costantino, Julie; Ward, Michael; Peyser, Brian D; Retterer, Cary J; Tressler, Lyal E; Wanner, Laura M; McGovern, Hugh F; Zaidi, Anum; Anthony, Scott M; Kota, Krishna P; Bavari, Sina; Hakami, Ramin M

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley fever is a potentially fatal disease of humans and domestic animals caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Infection with RVFV in ruminants can cause near 100% abortion rates and recent outbreaks in naïve human populations have suggested case fatality rates of greater than thirty percent. To elucidate the roles that host proteins play during RVFV infection, proteomic analysis of RVFV virions was conducted using complementary analytical approaches, followed by functional validation studies of select identified host factors. Coupling the more traditional Gel LC/MS/MS approach (SDS PAGE followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry) with an alternative technique that preserves protein complexes allowed the protein complement of these viral particles to be thoroughly examined. In addition to viral proteins present within the virions and virion-associated host proteins, multiple macromolecular complexes were identified. Bioinformatic analysis showed that host chaperones were among over-represented protein families associated with virions, and functional experiments using siRNA gene silencing and small molecule inhibitors identified several of these heat shock proteins, including heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), as important viral host factors. Further analysis indicated that HSP inhibition effects occur during the replication/transcription phase of the virus life cycle, leading to significant lowering of viral titers without compromising the functional capacity of released virions. Overall, these studies provide much needed further insight into interactions between RVFV and host cells, increasing our understanding of the infection process and suggesting novel strategies for anti-viral development. In particular, considering that several HSP90 inhibitors have been advancing through clinical trials for cancer treatment, these results also highlight the exciting potential of repurposing HSP90 inhibitors to treat RVF.

  20. Multi-faceted proteomic characterization of host protein complement of Rift Valley fever virus virions and identification of specific heat shock proteins, including HSP90, as important viral host factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Nuss

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever is a potentially fatal disease of humans and domestic animals caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV. Infection with RVFV in ruminants can cause near 100% abortion rates and recent outbreaks in naïve human populations have suggested case fatality rates of greater than thirty percent. To elucidate the roles that host proteins play during RVFV infection, proteomic analysis of RVFV virions was conducted using complementary analytical approaches, followed by functional validation studies of select identified host factors. Coupling the more traditional Gel LC/MS/MS approach (SDS PAGE followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with an alternative technique that preserves protein complexes allowed the protein complement of these viral particles to be thoroughly examined. In addition to viral proteins present within the virions and virion-associated host proteins, multiple macromolecular complexes were identified. Bioinformatic analysis showed that host chaperones were among over-represented protein families associated with virions, and functional experiments using siRNA gene silencing and small molecule inhibitors identified several of these heat shock proteins, including heat shock protein 90 (HSP90, as important viral host factors. Further analysis indicated that HSP inhibition effects occur during the replication/transcription phase of the virus life cycle, leading to significant lowering of viral titers without compromising the functional capacity of released virions. Overall, these studies provide much needed further insight into interactions between RVFV and host cells, increasing our understanding of the infection process and suggesting novel strategies for anti-viral development. In particular, considering that several HSP90 inhibitors have been advancing through clinical trials for cancer treatment, these results also highlight the exciting potential of repurposing HSP90 inhibitors to treat RVF.

  1. Surface properties of nanocrystalline TiO2 coatings in relation to the in vitro plasma protein adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzetti, M; Kobe, S; Novak, S; Bernardini, G; Santucci, A; Luxbacher, T

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on the selective adsorption of whole plasma proteins on hydrothermally (HT) grown TiO 2 -anatase coatings and its dependence on the three main surface properties: surface charge, wettability and roughness. The influence of the photo-activation of TiO 2 by UV irradiation was also evaluated. Even though the protein adhesion onto Ti-based substrates was only moderate, better adsorption of any protein (at pH = 7.4) occurred for the most negatively charged and hydrophobic substrate (Ti non-treated) and for the most nanorough and hydrophilic surface (HT Ti3), indicating that the mutual action of the surface characteristics is responsible for the attraction and adhesion of the proteins. The HT coatings showed a higher adsorption of certain proteins (albumin ‘passivation’ layer, apolipoproteins, vitamin D-binding protein, ceruloplasmin, α-2-HS-glycoprotein) and higher ratios of albumin to fibrinogen and albumin to immunoglobulin γ-chains. The UV pre-irradiation affected the surface properties and strongly reduced the adsorption of the proteins. These results provide in-depth knowledge about the characterization of nanocrystalline TiO 2 coatings for body implants and provide a basis for future studies on the hemocompatibility and biocompatibility of such surfaces. (paper)

  2. Ligand-Modified Aminobisphosphonate for Linking Proteins to Hydroxyapatite and Bone Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrick, Robin S.; Capaccio, Marcello; Puleo, David A.; Bachas, Leonidas G.

    2011-01-01

    An increase in bone resorption is one of the main symptoms of osteoporosis, a disease that affects more and more individuals every day. Bisphosphonates are known to inhibit bone resorption, and thus are being used as a treatment for osteoporosis. Aminobisphosphonates present a functionality that can be easily used for conjugation to other molecules, such as peptides, proteins, and ligands for protein recognition. In this study, an aminobisphosphonate conjugated with biotin was used as a model linker for protein attachment to bone. With this system, the interaction of biotinylated aminobisphosphonate with hydroxyapatite, a major mineral component of bone, was investigated. Quantification of the binding of aminobisphosphonate to hydroxyapatite was performed using a fluorescently labeled antibody for biotin. Additionally, the interaction of the biotinylated aminobisphosphonate with multiple treatments of cortical bone from the mid-shaft of a cow femur was studied. It was demonstrated that modified aminobisphosphonate reagents can bind hydroxyapatite and bone at high levels, while the biotin functionality is free to be recognized by the fluorescently labeled anti-biotin antibody, suggesting that modified aminobisphosphonates could be used to link other peptides or proteins to the bone surface. PMID:18001076

  3. Rapid outer-surface protein C DNA tattoo vaccination protects against Borrelia afzelii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemakers, A; Mason, L M K; Oei, A; de Wever, B; van der Poll, T; Bins, A D; Hovius, J W R

    2014-12-01

    Borrelia afzelii is the predominant Borrelia species causing Lyme borreliosis in Europe. Currently there is no human vaccine against Lyme borreliosis, and most research focuses on recombinant protein vaccines against Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. DNA tattooing is a novel vaccination method that can be applied in a rapid vaccination schedule. We vaccinated C3H/HeN mice with B. afzelii strain PKo OspC (outer-surface protein C) using a codon-optimized DNA vaccine tattoo and compared this with recombinant protein vaccination in a 0-2-4 week vaccination schedule. We also assessed protection by DNA tattoo in a 0-3-6 day schedule. DNA tattoo and recombinant OspC vaccination induced comparable total IgG responses, with a lower IgG1/IgG2a ratio after DNA tattoo. Two weeks after syringe-challenge with 5 × 10(5) B. afzelii spirochetes most vaccinated mice had negative B. afzelii tissue DNA loads and all were culture negative. Furthermore, DNA tattoo vaccination in a 0-3-6 day regimen also resulted in negative Borrelia loads and cultures after challenge. To conclude, DNA vaccination by tattoo was fully protective against B. afzelii challenge in mice in a rapid vaccination protocol, and induces a favorable humoral immunity compared to recombinant protein vaccination. Rapid DNA tattoo is a promising vaccination strategy against spirochetes.

  4. A Gravity-Responsive Time-Keeping Protein of the Plant and Animal Cell Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. James

    2003-01-01

    The hypothesis under investigation was that a ubiquinol (NADH) oxidase protein of the cell surface with protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity (= NOX protein) is a plant and animal time-keeping ultradian (period of less than 24 h) driver of both cell enlargement and the biological clock that responds to gravity. Despite considerable work in a large number of laboratories spanning several decades, this is, to my knowledge, our work is the first demonstration of a time-keeping biochemical reaction that is both gravity-responsive and growth-related and that has been shown to determine circadian periodicity. As such, the NOX protein may represent both the long-sought biological gravity receptor and the core oscillator of the cellular biological clock. Completed studies have resulted in 12 publications and two issued NASA-owned patents of the clock activity. The gravity response and autoentrainment were characterized in cultured mammalian cells and in two plant systems together with entrainment by light and small molecules (melatonin). The molecular basis of the oscillatory behavior was investigated using spectroscopic methods (Fourier transform infrared and circular dichroism) and high resolution electron microscopy. We have also applied these findings to an understanding of the response to hypergravity. Statistical methods for analysis of time series phenomena were developed (Foster et al., 2003).

  5. Engineering nanoparticles surface for biosensing: "Chemical noses" to detect and identify proteins, bacteria and cancerous cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Sanchez, Oscar Ramon

    Rapid and sensitive detection of biomolecules is an important issue in nanomedicine. Many disorders are manifested by changes in protein levels of serum and other biofluids. Rapid and effective differentiation between normal and cancerous cells is an important challenge for the diagnosis and treatment of tumor. Likewise, rapid and effective identification of pathogens is a key target in both biomedical and environmental monitoring. Most biological recognition processes occur via specific interactions. Gold nanoparticles (AuNP s) feature sizes commensurate with biomacromolecules, coupled with useful physical and optical properties. A key issue in the use of nanomaterials is controlling the interfacial interactions of these complex systems. Modulation of these physicochemical properties can be readily achieved by engineering nanoparticles surface. Inspired by the idea of mimicking nature, a convenient, precise and rapid method for sensing proteins, cancerous cells and bacteria has been developed by overtaking the superb performance of biological olfactory systems in odor detection, identification, tracking, and location. On the fundamental side, an array-based/'chemical nose' sensor composed of cationic functionalized AuNPs as receptors and anionic fluorescent conjugated polymers or green fluorescent proteins or enzyme/substrates as transducers that can properly detect and identify proteins, bacteria, and cancerous cells has been successfully fabricated.

  6. Characterization of surface layer proteins and its role in probiotic properties of three Lactobacillus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jun; Zhu, Xiao; Gao, Shu-Ming; Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Sun, Zhen; Lu, Rong-Rong

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was the characterization of the surface layer proteins (SLPs) and their functional role in the probiotic activity of Lactobacillus helveticus fb213, L. acidophilus fb116 and L. acidophilus fb214. SLPs were extracted and identified by SDS-PAGE, circular dichroism spectra and LC-MS analysis. The results revealed that the molecular masses of the three proteins were 49.7 kDa, 46.0 kDa and 44.6 kDa, respectively. The secondary structures and amino acid compositions of the three proteins were found to be similar. After removing SLPs, the survival of the three lactobacilli in simulated gastric and intestinal juices was reduced by 2-3log as compared with survival of the intact cells. And the adhesion ability of the three strains to HT-29 cells decreased by 61%, 65% and 92%, respectively. SLPs also inhibited the adhesion and invasion of Escherichia coli ATCC 43893 to HT-29 cells. These results suggest that SLPs are advantageous barriers for lactobacilli in the gastrointestinal tract, and these proteins help make it possible for lactobacilli to serve their probiotic functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pathogenic Leptospira species acquire factor H and vitronectin via the surface protein LcpA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ludmila Bezerra; Miragaia, Lidia Dos Santos; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Abe, Cecilia Mari; Schmidt, Mariana Costa Braga; Moro, Ana Maria; Monaris, Denize; Conde, Jonas Nascimento; Józsi, Mihály; Isaac, Lourdes; Abreu, Patrícia Antônia Estima; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2015-03-01

    Upon infection, pathogenic Leptospira species bind several complement regulators in order to overcome host innate immunity. We previously characterized a 20-kDa leptospiral surface protein which interacts with C4b binding protein (C4BP): leptospiral complement regulator-acquiring protein A (LcpA). Here we show that LcpA also interacts with human factor H (FH), which remains functionally active once bound to the protein. Antibodies directed against short consensus repeat 20 (SCR20) inhibited binding of FH to LcpA by approximately 90%, thus confirming that this particular domain is involved in the interaction. We have also shown for the first time that leptospires bind human vitronectin and that the interaction is mediated by LcpA. Coincubation with heparin blocked LcpA-vitronectin interaction in a dose-dependent manner, strongly suggesting that binding may occur through the heparin binding domains of vitronectin. LcpA also bound to the terminal pathway component C9 and inhibited Zn(2+)-induced polymerization and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. Competitive binding assays indicated that LcpA interacts with C4BP, FH, and vitronectin through distinct sites. Taken together, our findings indicate that LcpA may play a role in leptospiral immune evasion. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Antifouling coatings: recent developments in the design of surfaces that prevent fouling by proteins, bacteria, and marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Indrani; Pangule, Ravindra C; Kane, Ravi S

    2011-02-08

    The major strategies for designing surfaces that prevent fouling due to proteins, bacteria, and marine organisms are reviewed. Biofouling is of great concern in numerous applications ranging from biosensors to biomedical implants and devices, and from food packaging to industrial and marine equipment. The two major approaches to combat surface fouling are based on either preventing biofoulants from attaching or degrading them. One of the key strategies for imparting adhesion resistance involves the functionalization of surfaces with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) or oligo(ethylene glycol). Several alternatives to PEG-based coatings have also been designed over the past decade. While protein-resistant coatings may also resist bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation, in order to overcome the fouling-mediated risk of bacterial infection it is highly desirable to design coatings that are bactericidal. Traditional techniques involve the design of coatings that release biocidal agents, including antibiotics, quaternary ammonium salts (QAS), and silver, into the surrounding aqueous environment. However, the emergence of antibiotic- and silver-resistant pathogenic strains has necessitated the development of alternative strategies. Therefore, other techniques based on the use of polycations, enzymes, nanomaterials, and photoactive agents are being investigated. With regard to marine antifouling coatings, restrictions on the use of biocide-releasing coatings have made the generation of nontoxic antifouling surfaces more important. While considerable progress has been made in the design of antifouling coatings, ongoing research in this area should result in the development of even better antifouling materials in the future. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Low level chemiluminescence measurement of the binding of 8-methoxypsoralen to proteins and lymphocytic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, B.

    1980-01-01

    Photochemotherapy with 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and longwave ultraviolet light is beneficial in such different disorders like psoriasis, lichen planus, and mykosis fungoides. In contrast to a widely accepted hypothesis 8-MOP does not solely bind to nucleic acid, but also to certain proteins. The mechanism of this binding as well as the precise binding area are unknown. Therefore the UV-provoked reactions of 8-MOP with a lipid mixture, a glucosaminoglycan solution, a protein solution, and lymphocyte suspensions, respectively were investigated using low level chemiluminescence (LLCL). It was found an 8-MOP concentration-dependent decrease of LLCL intensity in the lymphocyte suspensions (10 3 to 10 4 cells/μl). This effect is result of the diminution of the photoactive 8-MOP content of the solution. 8-MOP binds quickly and in the course of a free radical reaction to lymphocytic surfaces and coincidentally loses its potency to start LLCL-detectable free radical chain responses. (author)

  10. Targeting cell surface HIV-1 Env protein to suppress infectious virus formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Arangassery Rosemary; Ang, Charles G; Kamanna, Kantharaju; Shaheen, Farida; Huang, Yu-Hung; McFadden, Karyn; Duffy, Caitlin; Bailey, Lauren D; Sundaram, Ramalingam Venkat Kalyana; Chaiken, Irwin

    2017-05-02

    HIV-1 Env protein is essential for host cell entry, and targeting Env remains an important antiretroviral strategy. We previously found that a peptide triazole thiol KR13 and its gold nanoparticle conjugate AuNP-KR13 directly and irreversibly inactivate the virus by targeting the Env protein, leading to virus gp120 shedding, membrane disruption and p24 capsid protein release. Here, we examined the consequences of targeting cell-surface Env with the virus inactivators. We found that both agents led to formation of non-infectious virus from transiently transfected HEK293T cells. The budded non-infectious viruses lacked Env gp120 but contained gp41. Importantly, budded virions also retained the capsid protein p24, in stark contrast to p24 leakage from viruses directly treated by these agents and arguing that the agents led to deformed viruses by transforming the cells at a stage before virus budding. We found that the Env inactivators caused gp120 shedding from the transiently transfected HEK293T cells as well as non-producer CHO-K1-gp160 cells. Additionally, AuNP-KR13 was cytotoxic against the virus-producing HEK293T and CHO-K1-gp160 cells, but not untransfected HEK293T or unmodified CHO-K1 cells. The results obtained reinforce the argument that cell-surface HIV-1 Env is metastable, as on virus particles, and provides a conformationally vulnerable target for virus suppression and infectious cell inactivation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase downregulates Kv7.1 cell surface expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin N; Krzystanek, Katarzyna; Jespersen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The potassium channel Kv7.1 is expressed in the heart, where it contributes to the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. Additionally, Kv7.1 is expressed in epithelial tissues playing a role in salt and water transport. We recently demonstrated that surface-expressed Kv7.1 is internalized...... in response to polarization of the epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line and that this was mediated by activation of protein kinase C (PKC). In this study, the pathway downstream of PKC, which leads to internalization of Kv7.1 upon cell polarization, is elucidated. We show by confocal...

  12. Iodo-gen-catalysed iodination for identification of surface-exposed outer membrane proteins of Escherichia coli K12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, L.C.S.; Almeida, D.F. de

    1987-01-01

    Surface proteins of Escherichia coli K12 were identified by radiolabelling using 1,3,4,6 - tatrachloro, 3-alpha, 6-alpha - diphenylgycoluryl (Iodo-Gen) and 131 I. Labelled proteins were localized in the outer membrane of the cells. Using this technique it has been possible to observe technique it has been possible to observe that the eletrophoretic pattern of surface proteins changes according to the growth phases in culture. Radiolabelling of E.coli cells inculbated at 42 0 C showed that the syntheses of two surface proteins were temperature-inducible. At least one such protein may be involved in the process of cell division in E.coli K12. (author) [pt

  13. Atomistic simulation of the coupled adsorption and unfolding of protein GB1 on the polystyrenes nanoparticle surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, HuiFang; Huang, Bin; Yao, Ge; Kang, WenBin; Gong, Sheng; Pan, Hai; Cao, Yi; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the processes of protein adsorption/desorption on nanoparticles' surfaces is important for the development of new nanotechnology involving biomaterials; however, an atomistic resolution picture for these processes and for the simultaneous protein conformational change is missing. Here, we report the adsorption of protein GB1 on a polystyrene nanoparticle surface using atomistic molecular dynamic simulations. Enabled by metadynamics, we explored the relevant phase space and identified three protein states, each involving both the adsorbed and desorbed modes. We also studied the change of the secondary and tertiary structures of GB1 during adsorption and the dominant interactions between the protein and surface in different adsorption stages. The results we obtained from simulation were found to be more adequate and complete than the previous one. We believe the model presented in this paper, in comparison with the previous ones, is a better theoretical model to understand and explain the experimental results.

  14. Bee venom phospholipase A2 as a membrane-binding vector for cell surface display or internalization of soluble proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babon, Aurélie; Wurceldorf, Thibault; Almunia, Christine; Pichard, Sylvain; Chenal, Alexandre; Buhot, Cécile; Beaumelle, Bruno; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-06-15

    We showed that bee venom phospholipase A2 can be used as a membrane-binding vector to anchor to the surface of cells a soluble protein fused to its C-terminus. ZZ, a two-domain derivative of staphylococcal protein A capable of binding constant regions of antibodies was fused to the C-terminus of the phospholipase or to a mutant devoid of enzymatic activity. The fusion proteins bound to the surface of cells and could themselves bind IgGs. Their fate depended on the cell type to which they bound. On the A431 carcinoma cell line the proteins remained exposed on the cell surface. In contrast, on human dendritic cells the proteins were internalized into early endosomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Prediction of protein retention times in hydrophobic interaction chromatography by robust statistical characterization of their atomic-level surface properties.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanke, A.T.; Klijn, M.E.; Verhaert, P.D.; Wielen, van der L.; Ottens, M.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Sandt, van de E.J.A.X.

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between the dimensionless retention times (DRT) of proteins in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and their surface properties were investigated. A ternary atomic-level hydrophobicity scale was used to calculate the distribution of local average hydrophobicity across the

  16. Effects of surface proteins and lipids on molecular structure, thermal properties, and enzymatic hydrolysis of rice starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan HU

    Full Text Available Abstract Rice starches with different amylose contents were treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS to deplete surface proteins and lipids, and the changes in molecular structure, thermal properties, and enzymatic hydrolysis were evaluated. SDS treatment did not significantly change the molecular weight distribution, crystalline structure, short-range ordered degree, and gelatinization properties of starch, but significantly altered the pasting properties and increased the swelling power of starch. The removal of surface proteins and lipids increased the enzymatic hydrolysis and in vitro digestion of starch. The influences of removing surface proteins and lipids from starch on swelling power, pasting properties, and enzymatic hydrolysis were different among the various starches because of the differences in molecular structures of different starch styles. The aforementioned results indicated that removing the surface proteins and lipids from starch did not change the molecular structure but had significant effects on some functional properties.

  17. The effect of amorphous silicon surface hydrogenation on morphology, wettability and its implication on the adsorption of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filali, Larbi; Brahmi, Yamina; Sib, Jamal Dine; Bouhekka, Ahmed; Benlakehal, Djamel; Bouizem, Yahya; Kebab, Aissa; Chahed, Larbi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogenation of the surfaces had the effect of reducing the roughness by way of shadow etching. • Roughness was the driving factor affecting the wettability of the hydrogenated surfaces. • Bovine Serum Albumin proteins favored the surfaces with highest hydrogen content. • Surface modification induced secondary structure change of adsorbed proteins. - Abstract: We study the effect of amorphous silicon (a-Si) surface hydrogenation on Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) adsorption. A set of (a-Si) films was prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS) and after deposition; they were treated in molecular hydrogen ambient at different pressures (1–3 Pa). Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) were used to study the hydrogenation effect and BSA adsorption. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate morphological changes caused by hydrogenation. The wettability of the films was measured using contact angle measurement, and in the case of the hydrogenated surfaces, it was found to be driven by surface roughness. FTIR-ATR spectroscopy and SE measurements show that proteins had the strongest affinity toward the surfaces with the highest hydrogen content and their secondary structure was affected by a significant decrease of the α-helix component (-27%) compared with the proteins adsorbed on the un-treated surface, which had a predominantly α-helix (45%) structure. The adsorbed protein layer was found to be densely packed with a large thickness (30.9 nm) on the hydrogen-rich surfaces. The most important result is that the surface hydrogen content was the dominant factor, compared to wettability and morphology, for protein adsorption.

  18. The effect of amorphous silicon surface hydrogenation on morphology, wettability and its implication on the adsorption of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filali, Larbi, E-mail: larbifilali5@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria); Brahmi, Yamina; Sib, Jamal Dine [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria); Bouhekka, Ahmed [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria); Département de Physique, Université Hassiba Ben Bouali, 02000 Chlef (Algeria); Benlakehal, Djamel; Bouizem, Yahya; Kebab, Aissa; Chahed, Larbi [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Hydrogenation of the surfaces had the effect of reducing the roughness by way of shadow etching. • Roughness was the driving factor affecting the wettability of the hydrogenated surfaces. • Bovine Serum Albumin proteins favored the surfaces with highest hydrogen content. • Surface modification induced secondary structure change of adsorbed proteins. - Abstract: We study the effect of amorphous silicon (a-Si) surface hydrogenation on Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) adsorption. A set of (a-Si) films was prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS) and after deposition; they were treated in molecular hydrogen ambient at different pressures (1–3 Pa). Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) were used to study the hydrogenation effect and BSA adsorption. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate morphological changes caused by hydrogenation. The wettability of the films was measured using contact angle measurement, and in the case of the hydrogenated surfaces, it was found to be driven by surface roughness. FTIR-ATR spectroscopy and SE measurements show that proteins had the strongest affinity toward the surfaces with the highest hydrogen content and their secondary structure was affected by a significant decrease of the α-helix component (-27%) compared with the proteins adsorbed on the un-treated surface, which had a predominantly α-helix (45%) structure. The adsorbed protein layer was found to be densely packed with a large thickness (30.9 nm) on the hydrogen-rich surfaces. The most important result is that the surface hydrogen content was the dominant factor, compared to wettability and morphology, for protein adsorption.

  19. Detecting circulating antibodies by controlled surface modification with specific target proteins: Application to malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Ana R; Cabral-Miranda, Gustavo; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo; Bachmann, Martin F; Sales, M Goreti F

    2017-05-15

    Sensitive detection of specific antibodies by biosensors has become of major importance for monitoring and controlling epidemics. Here we report a development of a biosensor able to specifically measure antibodies in a drop of unmodified blood serum. Within minutes, the detection system measures presence of antibodies against Plasmodium vivax, a causing agent for malaria. The biosensor consists of a layer of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which were casted on a carbon working electrode area of a three-electrode system and oxidized. An amine layer was produced next by modifying the surface with EDAC/NHS followed by reaction with a diamine compound. Finally, the protein fragments derived from P. vivax containing well-known antigen sequences were casted on this layer and bound through electrostatic interactions, involving hydrogen and ionic bonding. All these chemical changes occurring at the carbon surface along the biosensor assembly were followed and confirmed by Fourier Transformed Infrared s pectrometry (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. The presence of antibodies in serum was detected by monitoring the electrical properties of the layer, making use of cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and square wave voltammetry (SWV), against a standard iron probe. Overall, the charge-transfer resistance decreased after antibody binding, because there was an additional amount of protein bound to the surface. This hindered the access of the iron redox probe to the conductive support at the electrode surface. Electrical changes could be measured at antibody concentration as low as ~6-50pg/L (concentrations in the range of 10-15M) and as high as ~70μg/L. Specific measurement with low background was even possible in undiluted serum. Hence, this novel biosensor allows assessing serum antibody levels in real time and in un-manipulated serum samples on-site where needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural analysis of the surface-layer protein of spirillum serpens by high-resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, W.H.; Glaeser, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In order to understand the detailed association of the macro-molecules of the structure of the protein, a high resolution structural analysis was performed. Large, single layered arrays of the surface layer protein have been obtained for this purpose by means of extensive heating in high CaCl/sub 2/. The computer processed image reveals a pore of about 10 Angstrom diameter at the 6-fold symmetry center; the handedness of the images is quite evident. The individual molecular envelope of the protein monomers are apparent and details of the protein-protein contact at the three-fold lattice positions emerge.

  1. Surface proteins from Lactobacillus kefir antagonize in vitro cytotoxic effect of Clostridium difficile toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasi, Paula; Trejo, Fernando M; Pérez, Pablo F; De Antoni, Graciela L; Serradell, María de los Angeles

    2012-02-01

    In this work, the ability of S-layer proteins from kefir-isolated Lactobacillus kefir strains to antagonize the cytophatic effects of toxins from Clostridium difficile (TcdA and TcdB) on eukaryotic cells in vitro was tested by cell detachment assay. S-layer proteins from eight different L. kefir strains were able to inhibit the damage induced by C. difficile spent culture supernatant to Vero cells. Besides, same protective effect was observed by F-actin network staining. S-layer proteins from aggregating L. kefir strains (CIDCA 83115, 8321, 8345 and 8348) showed a higher inhibitory ability than those belonging to non-aggregating ones (CIDCA 83111, 83113, JCM 5818 and ATCC 8007), suggesting that differences in the structure could be related to the ability to antagonize the effect of clostridial toxins. Similar results were obtained using purified TcdA and TcdB. Protective effect was not affected by proteases inhibitors or heat treatment, thus indicating that proteolytic activity is not involved. Only preincubation with specific anti-S-layer antibodies significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of S-layer proteins, suggesting that this could be attributed to a direct interaction between clostridial toxins and L. kefir S-layer protein. Interestingly, the interaction of toxins with S-layer carrying bacteria was observed by dot blot and fluorescence microscopy with specific anti-TcdA or anti-TcdB antibodies, although L. kefir cells did not show protective effects. We hypothesize that the interaction between clostridial toxins and soluble S-layer molecules is different from the interaction with S-layer on the surface of the bacteria thus leading a different ability to antagonize cytotoxic effect. This is the first report showing the ability of S-layer proteins from kefir lactobacilli to antagonize biological effects of bacterial toxins. These results encourage further research on the role of bacterial surface molecules to the probiotic properties of L. kefir and could

  2. Crystal Structure of Neurotropism-Associated Variable Surface Protein 1 (VSP1) of Borrelia Turicatae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson,C.; Yung, B.; Barbour, A.; Zuckert, W.

    2006-01-01

    Vsp surface lipoproteins are serotype-defining antigens of relapsing fever spirochetes that undergo multiphasic antigenic variation to allow bacterial persistence in spite of an immune response. Two isogenic serotypes of Borrelia turicatae strain Oz1 differ in their Vsp sequences and in disease manifestations in infected mice: Vsp1 is associated with the selection of a neurological niche, while Vsp2 is associated with blood and skin infection. We report here crystal structures of the Vsp1 dimer at 2.7 and 2.2 Angstroms. The structures confirm that relapsing fever Vsp proteins share a common helical fold with OspCs of Lyme disease-causing Borrelia. The fold features an inner stem formed by highly conserved N and C termini and an outer 'dome' formed by the variable central residues. Both Vsp1 and OspC structures possess small water-filled cavities, or pockets, that are lined largely by variable residues and are thus highly variable in shape. These features appear to signify tolerance of the Vsp-OspC fold for imperfect packing of residues at its antigenic surface. Structural comparison of Vsp1 with a homology model for Vsp2 suggests that observed differences in disease manifestation may arise in part from distinct differences in electrostatic surface properties; additional predicted positively charged surface patches on Vsp2 compared to Vsp1 may be sufficient to explain the relative propensity of Vsp2 to bind to acidic glycosaminoglycans.

  3. The promotion of osseointegration of titanium surfaces by coating with silk protein sericin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Sunita; Dey, Tuli; Naskar, Deboki; Kundu, Subhas C

    2013-04-01

    A promising strategy to influence the osseointegration process around orthopaedic titanium implants is the immobilization of bioactive molecules. This recruits appropriate interaction between the surface and the tissue by directing cells adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and active matrix remodelling. In this study, we aimed to investigate the functionalization of metallic implant titanium with silk protein sericin. Titanium surface was immobilized with non-mulberry Antheraea mylitta sericin using glutaraldehyde as crosslinker. To analyse combinatorial effects the sericin immobilized titanium was further conjugated with integrin binding peptide sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) using ethyl (dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide as coupling agents. The surface of sericin immobilized titanium was characterized biophysically. Osteoblast-like cells were cultured on sericin and sericin/RGD functionalized titanium and found to be more viable than those on pristine titanium. The enhanced adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of osteoblast cells were observed. RT-PCR analysis showed that mRNA expressions of bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase were upregulated in osteoblast cells cultured on sericin and sericin/RGD immobilized titanium substrates. Additionally, no significant amount of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and nitric oxide production were recorded when macrophages cells and osteoblast-macrophages co culture cells were grown on sericin immobilized titanium. The findings demonstrate that the sericin immobilized titanium surfaces are potentially useful bioactive coated materials for titanium-based medical implants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dual fluorescence labeling of surface-exposed and internal proteins in erythrocytes infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Dominique C; Sowa, Kordai M P; Arnot, David E

    2008-01-01

    There is a need for improved methods for in situ localization of surface proteins on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to help understand how these antigens are trafficked to, and positioned within, the host cell membrane. This protocol for confocal immunofluorescence microscopy combines...... is discussed here in the context of malaria parasite-infected cells, it can also be modified to visualize the membrane and intracellular distribution of surface and internal proteins in other eukaryotic cells....

  5. Investigation of protein FTT1103 electroactivity using carbon and mercury electrodes. Surface-inhibition approach for disulfide oxidoreductases using silver amalgam powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Večerková, Renata; Hernychová, Lenka; Dobeš, Petr; Vrba, Jiří; Josypčuk, Bohdan; Bartošík, Martin; Vacek, Jan

    2014-06-09

    Recently, it was shown that electrochemical methods can be used for analysis of poorly water-soluble proteins and for study of their structural changes and intermolecular (protein-ligand) interactions. In this study, we focused on complex electrochemical investigation of recombinant protein FTT1103, a disulfide oxidoreductase with structural similarity to well described DsbA proteins. This thioredoxin-like periplasmic lipoprotein plays an important role in virulence of bacteria Francisella tularensis. For electrochemical analyses, adsorptive transfer (ex situ) square-wave voltammetry with pyrolytic graphite electrode, and alternating-current voltammetry and constant-current chronopotentiometric stripping analysis with mercury electrodes, including silver solid amalgam electrode (AgSAE) were used. AgSAE was used in poorly water-soluble protein analysis for the first time. In addition to basic redox, electrocatalytic and adsorption/desorption characterization of FTT1103, electrochemical methods were also used for sensitive determination of the protein at nanomolar level and study of its interaction with surface of AgSA microparticles. Proposed electrochemical protocol and AgSA surface-inhibition approach presented here could be used in future for biochemical studies focused on proteins associated with membranes as well as on those with disulfide oxidoreductase activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcript expression analysis of putative Trypanosoma brucei GPI-anchored surface proteins during development in the tsetse and mammalian hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy F Savage

    Full Text Available Human African Trypanosomiasis is a devastating disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Trypanosomes live extracellularly in both the tsetse fly and the mammal. Trypanosome surface proteins can directly interact with the host environment, allowing parasites to effectively establish and maintain infections. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchoring is a common posttranslational modification associated with eukaryotic surface proteins. In T. brucei, three GPI-anchored major surface proteins have been identified: variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs, procyclic acidic repetitive protein (PARP or procyclins, and brucei alanine rich proteins (BARP. The objective of this study was to select genes encoding predicted GPI-anchored proteins with unknown function(s from the T. brucei genome and characterize the expression profile of a subset during cyclical development in the tsetse and mammalian hosts. An initial in silico screen of putative T. brucei proteins by Big PI algorithm identified 163 predicted GPI-anchored proteins, 106 of which had no known functions. Application of a second GPI-anchor prediction algorithm (FragAnchor, signal peptide and trans-membrane domain prediction software resulted in the identification of 25 putative hypothetical proteins. Eighty-one gene products with hypothetical functions were analyzed for stage-regulated expression using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of most of these genes were found to be upregulated in trypanosomes infecting tsetse salivary gland and proventriculus tissues, and 38% were specifically expressed only by parasites infecting salivary gland tissues. Transcripts for all of the genes specifically expressed in salivary glands were also detected in mammalian infective metacyclic trypomastigotes, suggesting a possible role for these putative proteins in invasion and/or establishment processes in the mammalian host. These results represent the first large-scale report of the differential

  7. Modulation of Protein Fouling and Interfacial Properties at Carbon Surfaces via Immobilization of Glycans Using Aryldiazonium Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Federico; Angione, M. Daniela; Behan, James A.; Cullen, Ronan J.; Duff, Thomas; Vasconcelos, Joana M.; Scanlan, Eoin M.; Colavita, Paula E.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon materials and nanomaterials are of great interest for biological applications such as implantable devices and nanoparticle vectors, however, to realize their potential it is critical to control formation and composition of the protein corona in biological media. In this work, protein adsorption studies were carried out at carbon surfaces functionalized with aryldiazonium layers bearing mono- and di-saccharide glycosides. Surface IR reflectance absorption spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance were used to study adsorption of albumin, lysozyme and fibrinogen. Protein adsorption was found to decrease by 30–90% with respect to bare carbon surfaces; notably, enhanced rejection was observed in the case of the tested di-saccharide vs. simple mono-saccharides for near-physiological protein concentration values. ζ-potential measurements revealed that aryldiazonium chemistry results in the immobilization of phenylglycosides without a change in surface charge density, which is known to be important for protein adsorption. Multisolvent contact angle measurements were used to calculate surface free energy and acid-base polar components of bare and modified surfaces based on the van Oss-Chaudhury-Good model: results indicate that protein resistance in these phenylglycoside layers correlates positively with wetting behavior and Lewis basicity. PMID:27108562

  8. One-step polymer surface modification for minimizing drug, protein, and DNA adsorption in microanalytical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2013-01-01

    The non-specific adsorption of dissolved analytes strongly reduces the sensitivity and reliability in polymer microanalytical systems. Here, a one-step aqueous phase procedure modifies polymer material surfaces to strongly reduce their non-specific adsorption of a broad range of organic analytes ...... systems, including polystyrene (PS), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), liquid crystalline polymer (LCP), and polyimide (PI)....

  9. Characterization of sperm surface protein patterns of ejaculated and capacitated boar sperm, with the detection of ZP binding candidates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zigo, Michal; Jonáková, Věra; Šulc, Miroslav; Maňásková-Postlerová, Pavla

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61, oct (2013), s. 322-328 ISSN 0141-8130 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP503/12/1834 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Sperm surface protein * Zona pellucida-binding receptors * PKDREJ protein Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.096, year: 2013

  10. Voltammetry and In Situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy of De Novo Designed Heme Protein Monolayers on Au(111)-Electrode Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, Tim; Li, Wu; Haehnel, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we report the electrochemical characterization and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) studies of monolayers of an artificial de novo designed heme protein MOP-C, covalently immobilized on modified Au(111) surfaces. The protein forms closely packed monolayers, which ...

  11. Hydration water dynamics around a protein surface: a first passage time approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shivangi; Biswas, Parbati

    2018-01-01

    A stochastic noise-driven dynamic model is proposed to study the diffusion of water molecules around a protein surface, under the effect of thermal fluctuations that arise due to the collision of water molecules with the surrounding environment. The underlying dynamics of such a system may be described in the framework of the generalized Langevin equation, where the thermal fluctuations are assumed to be algebraically correlated in time, which governs the non-Markovian behavior of the system. Results of the calculations of mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function reveal that the hydration water around the protein surface follows subdiffusive dynamics at long times. Analytical expressions for the first passage time distribution, survival probability, mean residence time and mean first passage time of water molecules are derived for different boundary conditions, to analyze hydration water dynamics under the effect of thermally correlated noise. The results depict a unimodal distribution of the first passage time unlike Brownian motion. The survival probability of hydration water follows a stretched exponential decay for both boundary conditions. The mean residence time of the hydration water molecule for different initial positions increases with increase in the complexity/heterogeneity of the surrounding environment for both boundary conditions. The mean first passage time of the water molecule to reach the absorbing/reflecting boundary follows an asymptotic power law with respect to the thickness of the hydration layer, and increases with increase in the complexity/heterogeneity of the environment.

  12. N-Terminal Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein-1, a Potential Subunit for Malaria Vivax Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda G. Versiani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The human malaria is widely distributed in the Middle East, Asia, the western Pacific, and Central and South America. Plasmodium vivax started to have the attention of many researchers since it is causing diseases to millions of people and several reports of severe malaria cases have been noticed in the last few years. The lack of in vitro cultures for P. vivax represents a major delay in developing a functional malaria vaccine. One of the major candidates to antimalarial vaccine is the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP1, which is expressed abundantly on the merozoite surface and capable of activating the host protective immunity. Studies have shown that MSP-1 possesses highly immunogenic fragments, capable of generating immune response and protection in natural infection in endemic regions. This paper shows humoral immune response to different proteins of PvMSP1 and the statement of N-terminal to be added to the list of potential candidates for malaria vivax vaccine.

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Hepatitis C NS5A Viral Protein Dynamics on the ER Surface

    KAUST Repository

    Knodel, Markus

    2018-01-08

    Exploring biophysical properties of virus-encoded components and their requirement for virus replication is an exciting new area of interdisciplinary virological research. To date, spatial resolution has only rarely been analyzed in computational/biophysical descriptions of virus replication dynamics. However, it is widely acknowledged that intracellular spatial dependence is a crucial component of virus life cycles. The hepatitis C virus-encoded NS5A protein is an endoplasmatic reticulum (ER)-anchored viral protein and an essential component of the virus replication machinery. Therefore, we simulate NS5A dynamics on realistic reconstructed, curved ER surfaces by means of surface partial differential equations (sPDE) upon unstructured grids. We match the in silico NS5A diffusion constant such that the NS5A sPDE simulation data reproduce experimental NS5A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) time series data. This parameter estimation yields the NS5A diffusion constant. Such parameters are needed for spatial models of HCV dynamics, which we are developing in parallel but remain qualitative at this stage. Thus, our present study likely provides the first quantitative biophysical description of the movement of a viral component. Our spatio-temporal resolved ansatz paves new ways for understanding intricate spatial-defined processes central to specfic aspects of virus life cycles.

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Hepatitis C NS5A Viral Protein Dynamics on the ER Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus M. Knodel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Exploring biophysical properties of virus-encoded components and their requirement for virus replication is an exciting new area of interdisciplinary virological research. To date, spatial resolution has only rarely been analyzed in computational/biophysical descriptions of virus replication dynamics. However, it is widely acknowledged that intracellular spatial dependence is a crucial component of virus life cycles. The hepatitis C virus-encoded NS5A protein is an endoplasmatic reticulum (ER-anchored viral protein and an essential component of the virus replication machinery. Therefore, we simulate NS5A dynamics on realistic reconstructed, curved ER surfaces by means of surface partial differential equations (sPDE upon unstructured grids. We match the in silico NS5A diffusion constant such that the NS5A sPDE simulation data reproduce experimental NS5A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP time series data. This parameter estimation yields the NS5A diffusion constant. Such parameters are needed for spatial models of HCV dynamics, which we are developing in parallel but remain qualitative at this stage. Thus, our present study likely provides the first quantitative biophysical description of the movement of a viral component. Our spatio-temporal resolved ansatz paves new ways for understanding intricate spatial-defined processes central to specfic aspects of virus life cycles.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Hepatitis C NS5A Viral Protein Dynamics on the ER Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knodel, Markus M; Nägel, Arne; Reiter, Sebastian; Vogel, Andreas; Targett-Adams, Paul; McLauchlan, John; Herrmann, Eva; Wittum, Gabriel

    2018-01-08

    Exploring biophysical properties of virus-encoded components and their requirement for virus replication is an exciting new area of interdisciplinary virological research. To date, spatial resolution has only rarely been analyzed in computational/biophysical descriptions of virus replication dynamics. However, it is widely acknowledged that intracellular spatial dependence is a crucial component of virus life cycles. The hepatitis C virus-encoded NS5A protein is an endoplasmatic reticulum (ER)-anchored viral protein and an essential component of the virus replication machinery. Therefore, we simulate NS5A dynamics on realistic reconstructed, curved ER surfaces by means of surface partial differential equations (sPDE) upon unstructured grids. We match the in silico NS5A diffusion constant such that the NS5A sPDE simulation data reproduce experimental NS5A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) time series data. This parameter estimation yields the NS5A diffusion constant. Such parameters are needed for spatial models of HCV dynamics, which we are developing in parallel but remain qualitative at this stage. Thus, our present study likely provides the first quantitative biophysical description of the movement of a viral component. Our spatio-temporal resolved ansatz paves new ways for understanding intricate spatial-defined processes central to specfic aspects of virus life cycles.

  16. Conformational study of protein interactions with hydrogen-passivated amorphous silicon surfaces: Effect of pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Yamina; Filali, Larbi; Sib, Jamal Dine; Bouhekka, Ahmed; Benlakehal, Djamel; Bouizem, Yahya; Kebab, Aissa; Chahed, Larbi

    2017-11-01

    The adsorption of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) proteins on amorphous silicon (a-Si) surfaces was studied with respect to solution pH. Thin films of a-Si were deposited using radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at room temperature and then treated in a hydrogen ambient to form a hydrogenated a-Si surface layer (a-Si:H). The interactions of the as-deposited and hydrogenated surfaces with the proteins at neutral, acidic, and basic environments was probed by means of Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy, Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE), and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), to study the influence of the charge of proteins on their adsorption and conformation on the a-Si:H surface, compared with the a-Si surface. The results show that the charge of the proteins has a significant effect on their interactions with these two substrates but in dissimilar ways. For the as-deposited substrate, these interactions are predictably coulombic since the surface is charged. For the hydrogenated substrate, the adsorption of the proteins depends on their conformation which is heavily affected by pH, and the size of their footprint (adsorption mode) on the surface.

  17. Improved long-term expression from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors packaged using combinations of mutated HSV-1 proteins that include the UL13 protein kinase and specific components of the VP16 transcriptional complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geller Alfred I

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1 gene expression is thought to shut off recombinant gene expression from HSV-1 vectors; however, in a helper virus-free HSV-1 vector system, a number of promoters support only short-term expression. These results raise the paradox that recombinant gene expression remains short-term even in the absence of almost all (~99% of the HSV-1 genome, HSV-1 genes, and HSV-1 gene expression. To resolve this paradox, we hypothesized that specific proteins in the HSV-1 virus particle shut off recombinant gene expression. In two earlier studies, we examined the effects on recombinant gene expression of packaging vectors using specific mutated HSV-1 proteins. We found that vectors packaged using mutated UL13 (a protein kinase, or VP16, or UL46 and/or UL47 (components of the VP16 transcriptional complex supported improved long-term expression, and vectors packaged using mutated UL46 and/or UL47 also supported improved gene transfer (numbers of cells at 4 days. These results suggested the hypothesis that specific proteins in the HSV-1 particle act by multiple pathways to reduce recombinant gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we examined combinations of mutated proteins that included both UL13 and specific components of the VP16 transcriptional complex. Results A HSV-1 vector containing a neuronal-specific promoter was packaged using specific combinations of mutated proteins, and the resulting vector stocks were tested in the rat striatum. For supporting long-term expression, the preferred combination of mutated HSV-1 proteins was mutated UL13, UL46, and UL47. Vectors packaged using this combination of mutated proteins supported a higher efficiency of gene transfer and high levels expression for 3 months, the longest time examined. Conclusion Vector particles containing this combination of mutated HSV-1 proteins improve recombinant gene expression. Implications of these results for strategies to further improve

  18. Improved long-term expression from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors packaged using combinations of mutated HSV-1 proteins that include the UL13 protein kinase and specific components of the VP16 transcriptional complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Wang, Xiaodan; Geller, Alfred I

    2009-06-16

    Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) gene expression is thought to shut off recombinant gene expression from HSV-1 vectors; however, in a helper virus-free HSV-1 vector system, a number of promoters support only short-term expression. These results raise the paradox that recombinant gene expression remains short-term even in the absence of almost all (approximately 99%) of the HSV-1 genome, HSV-1 genes, and HSV-1 gene expression. To resolve this paradox, we hypothesized that specific proteins in the HSV-1 virus particle shut off recombinant gene expression. In two earlier studies, we examined the effects on recombinant gene expression of packaging vectors using specific mutated HSV-1 proteins. We found that vectors packaged using mutated UL13 (a protein kinase), or VP16, or UL46 and/or UL47 (components of the VP16 transcriptional complex) supported improved long-term expression, and vectors packaged using mutated UL46 and/or UL47 also supported improved gene transfer (numbers of cells at 4 days). These results suggested the hypothesis that specific proteins in the HSV-1 particle act by multiple pathways to reduce recombinant gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we examined combinations of mutated proteins that included both UL13 and specific components of the VP16 transcriptional complex. A HSV-1 vector containing a neuronal-specific promoter was packaged using specific combinations of mutated proteins, and the resulting vector stocks were tested in the rat striatum. For supporting long-term expression, the preferred combination of mutated HSV-1 proteins was mutated UL13, UL46, and UL47. Vectors packaged using this combination of mutated proteins supported a higher efficiency of gene transfer and high levels expression for 3 months, the longest time examined. Vector particles containing this combination of mutated HSV-1 proteins improve recombinant gene expression. Implications of these results for strategies to further improve long-term expression are discussed

  19. Bioinformatic prediction of G protein-coupled receptor encoding sequences from the transcriptome of the foreleg, including the Haller's organ, of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus australis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Munoz

    Full Text Available The cattle tick of Australia, Rhipicephalus australis, is a vector for microbial parasites that cause serious bovine diseases. The Haller's organ, located in the tick's forelegs, is crucial for host detection and mating. To facilitate the development of new technologies for better control of this agricultural pest, we aimed to sequence and annotate the transcriptome of the R. australis forelegs and associated tissues, including the Haller's organ. As G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are an important family of eukaryotic proteins studied as pharmaceutical targets in humans, we prioritized the identification and classification of the GPCRs expressed in the foreleg tissues. The two forelegs from adult R. australis were excised, RNA extracted, and pyrosequenced with 454 technology. Reads were assembled into unigenes and annotated by sequence similarity. Python scripts were written to find open reading frames (ORFs from each unigene. These ORFs were analyzed by different GPCR prediction approaches based on sequence alignments, support vector machines, hidden Markov models, and principal component analysis. GPCRs consistently predicted by multiple methods were further studied by phylogenetic analysis and 3D homology modeling. From 4,782 assembled unigenes, 40,907 possible ORFs were predicted. Using Blastp, Pfam, GPCRpred, TMHMM, and PCA-GPCR, a basic set of 46 GPCR candidates were compiled and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. With further screening of tertiary structures predicted by RaptorX, 6 likely GPCRs emerged and the strongest candidate was classified by PCA-GPCR to be a GABAB receptor.

  20. Epigenetics targeted protein-vorinostat nanomedicine inducing apoptosis in heterogeneous population of primary acute myeloid leukemia cells including refractory and relapsed cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Kavalakatt, Anu; Malarvizhi, Giridharan Loghanathan; Vasanthakumari, Divya Rani Vikraman Nair; Retnakumari, Archana Payickattu; Sidharthan, Neeraj; Pavithran, Keechilat; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2014-05-01

    Aberrant epigenetics play a key role in the onset and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Herein we report in silico modelling based development of a novel, protein-vorinostat nanomedicine exhibiting selective and superior anti-leukemic activity against heterogeneous population of AML patient samples (n=9), including refractory and relapsed cases, and three representative cell lines expressing CD34(+)/CD38(-) stem cell phenotype (KG-1a), promyelocytic phenotype (HL-60) and FLT3-ITD mutation (MV4-11). Nano-vorinostat having ~100nm size exhibited enhanced cellular uptake rendering significantly lower IC50 in AML cell lines and patient samples, and induced enhanced HDAC inhibition, oxidative injury, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis compared to free vorinostat. Most importantly, nanomedicine showed exceptional single-agent activity against the clonogenic proliferative capability of bone marrow derived leukemic progenitors, while remaining non-toxic to healthy bone marrow cells. Collectively, this epigenetics targeted nanomedicine appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy against various French-American-British (FAB) classes of AML. Through the use of a protein-vorinostat agent, exceptional single-agent activity was demonstrated against the clonogenic proliferative capability of bone marrow derived leukemic progenitors, while remaining non-toxic to healthy bone marrow cells. The studied epigenetics targeted nanomedicine approach is a promising therapeutic strategy against various French-American-British classes of acute myeloid leukemia. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Experimental approach to controllably vary protein oxidation while minimizing electrode adsorption for boron-doped diamond electrochemical surface mapping applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Carlee S; Hettich, Robert L

    2013-01-02

    Oxidative protein surface mapping has become a powerful approach for measuring the solvent accessibility of folded protein structures. A variety of techniques exist for generating the key reagent (i.e., hydroxyl radicals) for these measurements; however, these approaches range significantly in their complexity and expense of operation. This research expands upon earlier work to enhance the controllability of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrochemistry as an easily accessible tool for producing hydroxyl radicals in order to oxidize a range of intact proteins. Efforts to modulate the oxidation level while minimizing the adsorption of protein to the electrode involved the use of relatively high flow rates to reduce protein residence time inside the electrochemical flow chamber. Additionally, a different cell activation approach using variable voltage to supply a controlled current allowed us to precisely tune the extent of oxidation in a protein-dependent manner. In order to gain perspective on the level of protein adsorption onto the electrode surface, studies were conducted to monitor protein concentration during electrolysis and gauge changes in the electrode surface between cell activation events. This report demonstrates the successful use of BDD electrochemistry for greater precision in generating a target number of oxidation events upon intact proteins.

  2. Second-sphere complexation of thorium(IV) by cucurbit[6]uril with included perrhenate counterions. Crystal structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuery, Pierre [CEA, IRAMIS, UMR 3685 NIMBE, Laboratoire de Chimie Moleculaire et Catalyse pour l' Energie (LCMCE), Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-04-15

    The reaction of thorium(IV) nitrate with cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) in the presence of perrhenic acid in water gives the complex [Th(NO{sub 3})(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}][(ReO{sub 4})(CB6)](ReO{sub 4}){sub 2}.3H{sub 2}O (1). Aquated cations are held at both CB6 portals by ion-dipole and hydrogen-bonding interactions, and one of the ReO{sub 4}{sup -} anions is included in the CB6 cavity. The packing displays columns of alternate cations and encapsulated anions. Hirshfeld surfaces are used to visualize short contacts between the species present. (Copyright copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Transfer of Fas (CD95 protein from the cell surface to the surface of polystyrene beads coated with anti-Fas antibody clone CH-11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sawai

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Mouse monoclonal anti-Fas (CD95 antibody clone CH-11 has been widely used in research on apoptosis. CH-11 has the ability to bind to Fas protein on cell surface and induce apoptosis. Here, we used polystyrene beads coated with CH-11 to investigate the role of lipid rafts in Fas-mediated apoptosis in SKW6.4 cells. Unexpectedly, by treatment of the cells with CH-11-coated beads Fas protein was detached from cell surface and transferred to the surface of CH-11-coated beads. Western blot analysis showed that Fas protein containing both extracellular and intracellular domains was attached to the beads. Fas protein was not transferred from the cells to the surface of the beads coated with other anti-Fas antibodies or Fas ligand. Similar phenomenon was observed in Jurkat T cells. Furthermore, CH-11-induced apoptosis was suppressed by pretreatment with CH-11-coated beads in Jurkat cells. These results suggest that CH-11 might possess distinct properties on Fas protein compared with other anti-Fas antibodies or Fas ligand, and also suggest that caution should be needed to use polystyrene beads coated with antibodies such as CH-11.

  4. Binding characteristics of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor to streptococcal surface collagen-like proteins A and B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seron, Mercedes Valls; Plug, Tom; Marquart, J. Arnoud; Marx, Pauline F.; Herwald, Heiko; de Groot, Philip G.; Meijers, Joost C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is the causative agent in a wide range of diseases in humans. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) binds to collagen-like proteins ScIA and ScIB at the surface of S. pyogenes. Activation of TAFI at this surface redirects inflammation from a transient to chronic

  5. Bacteroidales Secreted Antimicrobial Proteins Target Surface Molecules Necessary for Gut Colonization and Mediate Competition In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin G. Roelofs

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that human gut Bacteroidales species secrete antimicrobial proteins (BSAPs, and we characterized in vitro the first such BSAP produced by Bacteroides fragilis. In this study, we identified a second potent BSAP produced by the ubiquitous and abundant human gut species Bacteroides uniformis. The two BSAPs contain a membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF domain but share very little sequence similarity. We identified the target molecules of BSAP-sensitive cells and showed that each BSAP targets a different class of surface molecule: BSAP-1 targets an outer membrane protein of sensitive B. fragilis strains, and BSAP-2 targets the O-antigen glycan of lipopolysaccharide (LPS of sensitive B. uniformis strains. Species-wide genomic and phenotypic analyses of B. fragilis and B. uniformis showed that BSAP-producing strains circumvent killing by synthesizing an orthologous nontargeted surface molecule. The BSAP genes are adjacent to the gene(s encoding their target replacements, suggesting coacquisition. Using a gnotobiotic mouse competitive-colonization model, we found that the BSAP surface targets are important for colonization of the mammalian gut, thereby explaining why they are maintained in sensitive strains and why they were replaced rather than deleted in BSAP-producing strains. Using isogenic BSAP-producing, -sensitive, and -resistant strains, we show that a BSAP-producing strain outcompetes a sensitive strain but not a resistant strain in the mammalian gut. Human gut metagenomic datasets reveal that BSAP-1-sensitive strains do not cooccur with BSAP-1-producing strains in human gut microbiotas, further supporting the idea that BSAPs are important competitive factors with relevance to the strain-level composition of the human gut microbiota.

  6. Substance P Increases Cell-Surface Expression of CD74 (Receptor for Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor: In Vivo Biotinylation of Urothelial Cell-Surface Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine L. Meyer-Siegler

    2009-01-01

    N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide biotin ester-labeled surface urothelial proteins in rats treated either with saline or substance P (SP, 40 μg/kg. The bladder was examined by histology and confocal microscopy. Biotinylated proteins were purified by avidin agarose, immunoprecipitated with anti-MIF or anti-CD74 antibodies, and detected with strepavidin-HRP. Only superficial urothelial cells were biotinylated. These cells contained a biotinylated MIF/CD74 cell-surface complex that was increased in SP-treated animals. SP treatment increased MIF and CD74 mRNA in urothelial cells. Our data indicate that intraluminal MIF, released from urothelial cells as a consequence of SP treatment, interacts with urothelial cell-surface CD74. These results document that our previously described MIF-CD74 interaction occurs at the urothelial cell surface.

  7. A comparison of the adsorption of saliva proteins and some typical proteins onto the surface of hydroxyapatite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawasaki, K; Kambara, M; Matsumura, H; Norde, W

    2003-01-01

    Adsorption of protein from saliva on hydroxyapatite was compared with adsorption of several typical proteins with different electric charges, i.e. lysozyme, human serum albumin, beta-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin. Adsorbed amounts of these proteins were determined and electrophoretic mobilities of

  8. Measuring the force of single protein molecule detachment from surfaces with AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapikouni, Theodora S; Missirlis, Yannis F

    2010-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to measure the non-specific detachment force of single fibrinogen molecules from glass surfaces. The identification of single unbinding events was based on the characteristics of the parabolic curves, recorded during the stretching of protein molecules. Fibrinogen molecules were covalently bound to Si(3)N(4) AFM tips, previously modified with 3-aminopropyl-dimethyl-ethoxysilane, through a homobifunctional poly(ethylene glycol) linker bearing two hydroxysulfosuccinimide esters. The most probable detachment force was found to be 210 pN, when the tip was retracting with a velocity of 1400 nm/s, while the distribution of the detachment distances indicated that the fibrinogen chain can be elongated beyond the length of the physical conformation before detachment. The dependence of the most probable detachment force on the loading rate was examined and the dynamics of fibrinogen binding to the surface were found amenable to the simple expression of the Bell-Evans theory. The theory's expansion, however, by incorporating the concept of the rupture of parallel residue-surface bonds could only describe the detachment of fibrinogen for a small number of such bonds. Finally, the mathematical expression of the Worm-Like Chain model was used to fit the stretching curves before rupture and two interpretations are suggested for the description of the AFM curves with multiple detachment events.

  9. Surface film formation in vitro by infant and therapeutic surfactants: role of surfactant protein B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhaive, Olivier; Chapin, Cheryl; Horneman, Hart; Cogo, Paola E; Ballard, Philip L

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary surfactant provides an alveolar surface-active film that is critical for normal lung function. Our objective was to determine in vitro film formation properties of therapeutic and infant surfactants and the influence of surfactant protein (SP)-B content. We used a multiwell fluorescent assay measuring maximum phospholipid surface accumulation (Max), phospholipid concentration required for half-maximal film formation (½Max), and time for maximal accumulation (tMax). Among five therapeutic surfactants, calfactant (highest SP-B content) had film formation values similar to natural surfactant, and addition of SP-B to beractant (lowest SP-B) normalized its Max value. Addition of budesonide to calfactant did not adversely affect film formation. In tracheal aspirates of preterm infants with evolving chronic lung disease, SP-B content correlated with ½Max and tMax values, and SP-B supplementation of SP-B-deficient infant surfactant restored normal film formation. Reconstitution of normal surfactant indicated a role for both SP-B and SP-C in film formation. Film formation in vitro differs among therapeutic surfactants and is highly dependent on SP-B content in infant surfactant. The results support a critical role of SP-B for promoting surface film formation.

  10. Prediction of protein retention times in hydrophobic interaction chromatography by robust statistical characterization of their atomic-level surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Alexander T; Klijn, Marieke E; Verhaert, Peter D E M; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Ottens, Marcel; Eppink, Michel H M; van de Sandt, Emile J A X

    2016-03-01

    The correlation between the dimensionless retention times (DRT) of proteins in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and their surface properties were investigated. A ternary atomic-level hydrophobicity scale was used to calculate the distribution of local average hydrophobicity across the proteins surfaces. These distributions were characterized by robust descriptive statistics to reduce their sensitivity to small changes in the three-dimensional structure. The applicability of these statistics for the prediction of protein retention behaviour was looked into. A linear combination of robust statistics describing the central tendency, heterogeneity and frequency of highly hydrophobic clusters was found to have a good predictive capability (R2  = 0.78), when combined a factor to account for protein size differences. The achieved error of prediction was 35% lower than for a similar model based on a description of the protein surface on an amino acid level. This indicates that a robust and mathematically simple model based on an atomic description of the protein surface can be used for the prediction of the retention behaviour of conformationally stable globular proteins with a well determined 3D structure in HIC. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:372-381, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  11. Protein adsorption resistance of PVP-modified polyurethane film prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Huihui; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Wei [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry and Research Center of Analysis and Test, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Lan, Minbo, E-mail: minbolan@ecust.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry and Research Center of Analysis and Test, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Antifouling PVP brushes were successfully grafted on PU films by SI-ATRP. • The effect of polymerization time on surface property and topography was studied. • Hydrophilicity and protein fouling resistance of PVP–PU films were greatly promoted. • Competitive adsorption of three proteins on PVP–PU films was evaluated. - Abstract: An anti-fouling surface of polyurethane (PU) film grafted with Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was prepared through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). And the polymerization time was investigated to obtain PU films with PVP brushes of different lengths. The surface properties and protein adsorption of modified PU films were evaluated. The results showed that the hydrophilicity of PU–PVP films were improved with the increase of polymerization time, which was not positive correlation with the surface roughness due to the brush structure. Additionally, the protein resistance performance was promoted when prolonging the polymerization time. The best antifouling PU–PVP (6.0 h) film reduced the adsoption level of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and brovin serum fibrinogen (BFG) by 93.4%, 68.3%, 85.6%, respectively, compared to the unmodified PU film. The competitive adsorption of three proteins indicated that LYS preferentially adsorbed on the modified PU film, while BFG had the lowest adsorption selectivity. And the amount of BFG on PU–PVP (6.0 h) film reduced greatly to 0.08 μg/cm{sup 2}, which was almost one-tenth of its adsorption from the single-protein system. Presented results suggested that both hydrophilicity and surface roughness might be the important factors in all cases of protein adsorption, and the competitive or selective adsorption might be related to the size of the proteins, especially on the non-charged films.

  12. The effect of physiological conditions on the surface structure of proteins: Setting the scene for human digestion of emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Valderrama, J.; Gunning, A. P.; Ridout, M. J.; Wilde, P. J.; Morris, V. J.

    2009-10-01

    Understanding and manipulating the interfacial mechanisms that control human digestion of food emulsions is a crucial step towards improved control of dietary intake. This article reports initial studies on the effects of the physiological conditions within the stomach on the properties of the film formed by the milk protein ( β -lactoglobulin) at the air-water interface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface tension and surface rheology techniques were used to visualize and examine the effect of gastric conditions on the network structure. The effects of changes in temperature, pH and ionic strength on a pre-formed interfacial structure were characterized in order to simulate the actual digestion process. Changes in ionic strength had little effect on the surface properties. In isolation, acidification reduced both the dilatational and the surface shear modulus, mainly due to strong repulsive electrostatic interactions within the surface layer and raising the temperature to body temperature accelerated the rearrangements within the surface layer, resulting in a decrease of the dilatational response and an increase of surface pressure. Together pH and temperature display an unexpected synergism, independent of the ionic strength. Thus, exposure of a pre-formed interfacial β -lactoglobulin film to simulated gastric conditions reduced the surface dilatational modulus and surface shear moduli. This is attributed to a weakening of the surface network in which the surface rearrangements of the protein prior to exposure to gastric conditions might play a crucial role.

  13. High-sensitivity detection of newly induced LamB protein on the Escherichia coli cell surface.

    OpenAIRE

    Vos-Scheperkeuter, G H; Hofnung, M; Witholt, B

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of the appearance at the cell surface of the outer membrane LamB protein after induction were determined by using specific antibodies and radioiodinated protein A as a probe. This was done in two different induction systems. First, LamB protein was induced in a wild-type strain by the simultaneous addition of cyclic AMP and maltose. Second, an operon fusion strain in which the lamB gene is expressed under lac promoter control was used; in this system, LamB protein can be induced ...

  14. A member of the CPW-WPC protein family is expressed in and localized to the surface of developing ookinetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangwanrangsan, Niwat; Tachibana, Mayumi; Jenwithisuk, Rachaneeporn; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Riengrojpitak, Suda; Torii, Motomi; Ishino, Tomoko

    2013-04-15

    Despite the development of malaria control programs, billions of people are still at risk for this infectious disease. Recently, the idea of the transmission-blocking vaccine, which works by interrupting the infection of mosquitoes by parasites, has gained attention as a promising strategy for malaria control and eradication. To date, a limited number of surface proteins have been identified in mosquito-stage parasites and investigated as potential targets for transmission-blocking vaccines. Therefore, for the development of effective transmission-blocking strategies in epidemic areas, it is necessary to identify novel zygote/ookinete surface proteins as candidate antigens. Since the expression of many zygote/ookinete proteins is regulated post-transcriptionally, proteins that are regulated by well-known translational mediators were focused. Through in silico screening, CPW-WPC family proteins were selected as potential zygote/ookinete surface proteins. All experiments were performed in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium yoelii XNL. mRNA and protein expression profiles were examined by RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively, over the course of the life cycle of the malaria parasite. Protein function was also investigated by the generation of gene-disrupted transgenic parasites. The CPW-WPC protein family, named after the unique WxC repeat domains, is highly conserved among Plasmodium species. It is revealed that CPW-WPC mRNA transcripts are transcribed in gametocytes, while CPW-WPC proteins are expressed in zygote/ookinete-stage parasites. Localization analysis reveals that one of the CPW-WPC family members, designated as PyCPW-WPC-1, is a novel zygote/ookinete stage-specific surface protein. Targeted disruption of the pycpw-wpc-1 gene caused no obvious defects during ookinete and oocyst formation, suggesting that PyCPW-WPC-1 is not essential for mosquito-stage parasite development. It is demonstrated that PyCPW-WPC-1 can be classified as a novel, post

  15. Gene expression profiling in the stress control brain region hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus reveals a novel gene network including Amyloid beta Precursor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deussing Jan M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pivotal role of stress in the precipitation of psychiatric diseases such as depression is generally accepted. This study aims at the identification of genes that are directly or indirectly responding to stress. Inbred mouse strains that had been evidenced to differ in their stress response as well as in their response to antidepressant treatment were chosen for RNA profiling after stress exposure. Gene expression and regulation was determined by microarray analyses and further evaluated by bioinformatics tools including pathway and cluster analyses. Results Forced swimming as acute stressor was applied to C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice and resulted in sets of regulated genes in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN, 4 h or 8 h after stress. Although the expression changes between the mouse strains were quite different, they unfolded in phases over time in both strains. Our search for connections between the regulated genes resulted in potential novel signalling pathways in stress. In particular, Guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha inhibiting 2 (GNAi2 and Amyloid β (A4 precursor protein (APP were detected as stress-regulated genes, and together with other genes, seem to be integrated into stress-responsive pathways and gene networks in the PVN. Conclusions This search for stress-regulated genes in the PVN revealed its impact on interesting genes (GNAi2 and APP and a novel gene network. In particular the expression of APP in the PVN that is governing stress hormone balance, is of great interest. The reported neuroprotective role of this molecule in the CNS supports the idea that a short acute stress can elicit positive adaptational effects in the brain.

  16. Surface Immobilization of Human Arginase-1 with an Engineered Ice Nucleation Protein Display System in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation protein (INP is frequently used as a surface anchor for protein display in gram-negative bacteria. Here, MalE and TorA signal peptides, and three charged polypeptides, 6×Lys, 6×Glu and 6×Asp, were anchored to the N-terminus of truncated INP (InaK-N to improve its surface display efficiency for human Arginase1 (ARG1. Our results indicated that the TorA signal peptide increased the surface translocation of non-protein fused InaK-N and human ARG1 fused InaK-N (InaK-N/ARG1 by 80.7% and 122.4%, respectively. Comparably, the MalE signal peptide decreased the display efficiencies of both the non-protein fused InaK-N and InaK-N/ARG1. Our results also suggested that the 6×Lys polypeptide significantly increased the surface display efficiency of K6-InaK-N/ARG1 by almost 2-fold, while also practically abolishing the surface translocation of non-protein fused InaK-N, indicating the interesting roles of charged polypeptides in bacteria surface display systems. Cell surface-immobilized K6-InaK-N/ARG1 presented an arginase activity of 10.7 U/OD600 under the optimized conditions of 40°C, pH 10.0 and 1 mM Mn2+, which could convert more than 95% of L-Arginine (L-Arg to L-Ornithine (L-Orn in 16 hours. The engineered InaK-Ns expanded the INP surface display system, which aided in the surface immobilization of human ARG1 in E. coli cells.

  17. The PPE domain of PPE17 is responsible for its surface localization and can be used to express heterologous proteins on the mycobacterial surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Donà

    Full Text Available PPE represent a peculiar family of mycobacterial proteins characterized by a 180 aminoacids conserved N-terminal domain. Several PPE genes are co-transcribed with a gene encoding for a protein belonging to another family of mycobacterial specific proteins named PE. Only one PE-PPE couple has been extensively characterized so far (PE25-PPE41 and it was shown that these two proteins form a heterodimer and that this interaction is essential for PPE41 stability and translocation through the mycobacterial cell wall. In this study we characterize the PE11-PPE17 couple. In contrast with what was found for PE25-PPE41, we show that PPE17 is not secreted but surface exposed. Moreover, we demonstrate that the presence of PE11 is not necessary for PPE17 stability or for its localization on the mycobacterial surface. Finally, we show that the PPE domain of PPE17 targets the mycobacterial cell wall and that this domain can be used as a fusion partner to expose heterologous proteins on the mycobacterial surface.

  18. Radioimmunoassay for platelet activation specific protein GMP-140 on the platelet surface and in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Guoxin; Li Jianyong; Ruan Changgeng

    1991-08-01

    Using monoclonal antibody (McAb) SZ-51 which is specific for an alpha-granule membrane protein (GMP-140) on the surface of human activated platelets, the platelet GMP-140 expression in fixed whole blood was measured by direct radioimmunoassay and GMP-140 microparticles in plasma was measured by sandwich method. The GMP-140 molecules per platelet or milliliter (mL) were calculated for the following subjects; acute myocardial infarction; cerebro thrombosis; diabetic mellitus; asthma attack; epidemic hemorrhagic fever etc.. By comparing with the concentration of thromboxane B 2 (TXB 2 ) and von Willebrand factor (vWF) in plasma, it is confirmed that the measurement of GMP-140 molecules is better than that of TXB 2 and vWF. It is a sensitive and specific method for evaluating the platelet activation degree in vivo. The establishment of this method will be useful to diagnosing the thrombotic disorders and studying the pathogenesis of some other diseases

  19. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polydopamine nanolayer on multiwalled carbon nanotubes surface for protein capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yuli; Yan, Liang; Zhang, Zhaohui; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-01

    A novel, facile and low cost process for imprinting protein on the surface of magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MMWNTs) was developed using human serum albumin (HSA) as the template and dopamine as the functional monomer. The magnetic imprinted polymers were characterized with transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in detail. The maximum adsorption capacity of the magnetic imprinted polymers toward HSA was 66.23 mg g(-1) and it took 20 min to achieve the adsorption equilibrium. The magnetic imprinted polymers exhibited the specific selective adsorption toward HSA. Coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, the magnetic imprinted polymers were used to solid-phase extract and detect HSA in urine samples successfully with the recoveries of 91.95-97.8%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Analytical technique for label-free multi-protein detection based on Western blot and surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao X; Jia, Hui Y; Wang, Yan F; Lu, Zhi C; Wang, Chun X; Xu, Wei Q; Zhao, Bing; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2008-04-15

    We have developed a new analytical procedure for label-free protein detection designated "Western SERS", consisting of protein electrophoresis, Western blot, colloidal silver staining, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection. A novel method of silver staining for Western blot that uses a silver colloid, an excellent SERS-active substrate, is first proposed in the present study. During the process of silver staining, interactions between proteins and silver nanoparticles result in the emergence of SERS of proteins. In the present study, we use myoglobin (Mb) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as model proteins. From different protein bands on a nitrocellulose (NC) membrane, we have observed surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra of Mb and SERS spectra of BSA. The proposed technique offers dual advantages of simplicity and high sensitivity. On one hand, after the colloidal silver staining, we can detect label-free multi-proteins directly on a NC membrane without digestion, extraction, and other pretreatments. On the other hand, the detection limit of the Western SERS is almost consistent with the detection limit of colloidal silver staining, and the SERRS detection limit of Mb is found to be 4 ng/band. This analytical method, which combines the technique of protein separation with SERS, may be a powerful protocol for label-free protein detection in proteomic research.

  1. Adhesion of MRC-5 and A549 cells on poly(dimethylsiloxane) surface modified by proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchowska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowski, Piotr; Jastrzebska, Elzbieta; Chudy, Michal; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew

    2016-02-01

    PDMS is a very popular material used for fabrication of Lab-on-a-Chip systems for biological applications. Although PDMS has numerous advantages, it is a highly hydrophobic material, which inhibits adhesion and proliferation of the cells. PDMS surface modifications are used to enrich growth of the cells. However, due to the fact that each cell type has specific adhesion, it is necessary to optimize the parameters of these modifications. In this paper, we present an investigation of normal (MRC-5) and carcinoma (A549) human lung cell adhesion and proliferation on modified PDMS surfaces. We have chosen these cell types because often they are used as models for basic cancer research. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first presentation of this type of investigation. The combination of a gas-phase processing (oxygen plasma or ultraviolet irradiation) and wet chemical methods based on proteins' adsorption was used in our experiments. Different proteins such as poly-l-lysine, fibronectin, laminin, gelatin, and collagen were incubated with the activated PDMS samples. To compare with other works, here, we also examined how ratio of prepolymer to curing agent (5:1, 10:1, and 20:1) influences PDMS hydrophilicity during further modifications. The highest adhesion of the tested cells was observed for the usage of collagen, regardless of PDMS ratio. However, the MRC-5 cell line demonstrated better adhesion than A549 cells. This is probably due to the difference in their morphology and type (normal/cancer). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Prediction of Carbohydrate Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces with 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Keng-Chang; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Yang, Ei-Wen; Hsu, Po-Chiang; Peng, Hung-Pin; Chen, Ching-Tai; Chen, Jun-Bo; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Non-covalent protein-carbohydrate interactions mediate molecular targeting in many biological processes. Prediction of non-covalent carbohydrate binding sites on protein surfaces not only provides insights into the functions of the query proteins; information on key carbohydrate-binding residues could suggest site-directed mutagenesis experiments, design therapeutics targeting carbohydrate-binding proteins, and provide guidance in engineering protein-carbohydrate interactions. In this work, we show that non-covalent carbohydrate binding sites on protein surfaces can be predicted with relatively high accuracy when the query protein structures are known. The prediction capabilities were based on a novel encoding scheme of the three-dimensional probability density maps describing the distributions of 36 non-covalent interacting atom types around protein surfaces. One machine learning model was trained for each of the 30 protein atom types. The machine learning algorithms predicted tentative carbohydrate binding sites on query proteins by recognizing the characteristic interacting atom distribution patterns specific for carbohydrate binding sites from known protein structures. The prediction results for all protein atom types were integrated into surface patches as tentative carbohydrate binding sites based on normalized prediction confidence level. The prediction capabilities of the predictors were benchmarked by a 10-fold cross validation on 497 non-redundant proteins with known carbohydrate binding sites. The predictors were further tested on an independent test set with 108 proteins. The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) for the independent test was 0.45, with prediction precision and sensitivity (or recall) of 0.45 and 0.49 respectively. In addition, 111 unbound carbohydrate-binding protein structures for which the structures were determined in the absence of the carbohydrate ligands were predicted with the trained predictors. The overall

  3. Staphylococcus aureus surface protein SdrE binds complement regulator factor H as an immune evasion tactic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A Sharp

    Full Text Available Similar to other highly successful invasive bacterial pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus recruits the complement regulatory protein factor H (fH to its surface to inhibit the alternative pathway of complement. Here, we report the identification of the surface-associated protein SdrE as a fH-binding protein using purified fH overlay of S. aureus fractionated cell wall proteins and fH cross-linking to S. aureus followed by mass spectrometry. Studies using recombinant SdrE revealed that rSdrE bound significant fH whether from serum or as a purified form, in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, rSdrE-bound fH exhibited cofactor functionality for factor I (fI-mediated cleavage of C3b to iC3b which correlated positively with increasing amounts of fH. Expression of SdrE on the surface of the surrogate bacterium Lactococcus lactis enhanced recruitment of fH which resulted in increased iC3b generation. Moreover, surface expression of SdrE led to a reduction in C3-fragment deposition, less C5a generation, and reduced killing by polymorphonuclear cells. Thus, we report the first identification of a S. aureus protein associated with the staphylococcal surface that binds factor H as an immune evasion mechanism.

  4. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy studies of the ice surface - antifreeze protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertaya, N.; Thomson, E.; Davies, P. L.; Braslavsky, I.

    2005-03-01

    Biomineralization is a phenomenon in which biological material influences mineral growth on the molecular level. A compelling example involves antifreeze proteins (AFPs) known to prevent fish and insects from freezing. AFPs have many potential applications in agriculture, biomedical science, and can be used as a model platform to understand biomineralization processes for future nanotechnology applications. Here we describe a new approach to study the interaction between AFPs and ice using fluorescence and confocal microscopy combined with a unique ice growth cell. After conjugating green fluorescent protein (GFP) to Type III AFP, we imaged the fluorescence signal around and inside of the ice crystals that emerged from the cooled AFP-GFP solution, and have observed an enhanced fluorescence signal at the edge of the ice crystal. In a second cell we observed a dramatic change in the ice growth morphology when AFPs were introduced into an initially pure system. Further developments of these methods will permit the direct imaging of the location and concentration of the AFPs on ice surfaces and enable a better understanding of their operation. Supported by CIHR, the Bosack and Kruger Foundation, Ohio and Yale Universities.

  5. Direct protein quantification in complex sample solutions by surface-engineered nanorod probes

    KAUST Repository

    Schrittwieser, Stefan

    2017-06-30

    Detecting biomarkers from complex sample solutions is the key objective of molecular diagnostics. Being able to do so in a simple approach that does not require laborious sample preparation, sophisticated equipment and trained staff is vital for point-of-care applications. Here, we report on the specific detection of the breast cancer biomarker sHER2 directly from serum and saliva samples by a nanorod-based homogeneous biosensing approach, which is easy to operate as it only requires mixing of the samples with the nanorod probes. By careful nanorod surface engineering and homogeneous assay design, we demonstrate that the formation of a protein corona around the nanoparticles does not limit the applicability of our detection method, but on the contrary enables us to conduct in-situ reference measurements, thus further strengthening the point-of-care applicability of our method. Making use of sandwich assays on top of the nanorods, we obtain a limit of detection of 110 pM and 470 pM in 10-fold diluted spiked saliva and serum samples, respectively. In conclusion, our results open up numerous applications in direct protein biomarker quantification, specifically in point-of-care settings where resources are limited and ease-of-use is of essence.

  6. Platelet adhesion and plasma protein adsorption control of collagen surfaces by He+ ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurotobi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Suzuki, H.; Iwaki, M.

    2003-01-01

    He + ion implanted collagen-coated tubes with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 were exhibited antithrombogenicity. To investigate the mechanisms of antithrombogenicity of these samples, plasma protein adsorption assay and platelet adhesion experiments were performed. The adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg) and von Willebrand factor (vWf) was minimum on the He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 . Platelet adhesion (using platelet rich plasma) was inhibited on the He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 and was accelerated on the untreated collagen and ion implanted collagen with fluences of 1 x 10 13 , 1 x 10 15 and 1 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 . Platelet activation with washed platelets was observed on untreated collagen and He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 and was inhibited with fluences of 1 x 10 13 , 1 x 10 15 and 1 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 . Generally, platelets can react with a specific ligand inside the collagen (GFOGER sequence). The results of platelets adhesion experiments using washed platelets indicated that there were no ligands such as GFOGER on the He + ion implanted collagen over a fluence of 1 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . On the 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 implanted collagen, no platelet activation was observed due to the influence of plasma proteins. >From the above, it is concluded that the decrease of adsorbed Fg and vWf caused the antithrombogenicity of He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 and that plasma protein adsorption took an important role repairing the graft surface

  7. Protein surface softness is the origin of enzyme cold-adaptation of trypsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir Villy Isaksen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Life has effectively colonized most of our planet and extremophilic organisms require specialized enzymes to survive under harsh conditions. Cold-loving organisms (psychrophiles express heat-labile enzymes that possess a high specific activity and catalytic efficiency at low temperatures. A remarkable universal characteristic of cold-active enzymes is that they show a reduction both in activation enthalpy and entropy, compared to mesophilic orthologs, which makes their reaction rates less sensitive to falling temperature. Despite significant efforts since the early 1970s, the important question of the origin of this effect still largely remains unanswered. Here we use cold- and warm-active trypsins as model systems to investigate the temperature dependence of the reaction rates with extensive molecular dynamics free energy simulations. The calculations quantitatively reproduce the catalytic rates of the two enzymes and further yield high-precision Arrhenius plots, which show the characteristic trends in activation enthalpy and entropy. Detailed structural analysis indicates that the relationship between these parameters and the 3D structure is reflected by significantly different internal protein energy changes during the reaction. The origin of this effect is not localized to the active site, but is found in the outer regions of the protein, where the cold-active enzyme has a higher degree of softness. Several structural mechanisms for softening the protein surface are identified, together with key mutations responsible for this effect. Our simulations further show that single point-mutations can significantly affect the thermodynamic activation parameters, indicating how these can be optimized by evolution.

  8. Do malaria ookinete surface proteins P25 and P28 mediate parasite entry into mosquito midgut epithelial cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranford-Cartwright Lisa C

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P25 and P28 are related ookinete surface proteins highly conserved throughout the Plasmodium genus that are under consideration as candidates for inclusion in transmission-blocking vaccines. Previous research using transgenic rodent malaria parasites lacking P25 and P28 has demonstrated that these proteins have multiple partially redundant functions during parasite infection of the mosquito vector, including an undefined role in ookinete traversal of the mosquito midgut epithelium, and it has been suggested that, unlike wild-type parasites, Dko P25/P28 parasites migrate across the midgut epithelium via an intercellular, rather than intracellular, route. Presentation of the hypothesis This paper presents an alternative interpretation for the previous observations of Dko P25/P28 parasites, based upon a recently published model of the route of ookinete invasion across the midgut epithelium. This model claims ookinete invasion is intracellular, with entry occurring through the lateral apical plasma membrane of midgut epithelial cells, and is associated with significant invagination of the midgut epithelium localised at the site of parasite penetration. Following this model, it is hypothesized that: (1 a sub-population of Dko P25/P28 ookinetes invaginate, but do not penetrate, the apical surface of the midgut epithelium and thus remain within the midgut lumen; and (2 another sub-population of Dko P25/P28 parasites successfully enters and migrates across the midgut epithelium via an intracellular route similar to wild-type parasites and subsequently develops into oocysts. Testing the hypothesis These hypotheses are tested by showing how they can account for previously published observations and incorporate them into a coherent and consistent explanatory framework. Based upon these hypotheses, several quantitative predictions are made, which can be experimentally tested, about the relationship between the densities of invading Dko P

  9. The importance of the shape of the protein-water interface of a kinesin motor domain for dynamics of the surface atoms of the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffel, Anna; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2012-04-28

    A single kinesin motor domain immersed in water has been investigated using molecular dynamics. It has been found that local properties of water in the solvation shell change along with the nature of the neighboring protein surface. However, a detailed analysis leads to the conclusion that the geometrical features of hydrogen bonds and overall structure of kinesin hydration water are not very different from bulk water. The local values of diffusion coefficients (translational and rotational) of water adjacent to specific patches on the protein surface seem not to be correlated to the orientational ordering of hydration water, but instead they depend on spatial roughness and degree of exposure of the patch to the solvent. Finally, a relationship between the mobility of various surface atoms of the protein and the mean values of the diffusion coefficient of the adjacent water molecules has been observed. The latter finding suggests a close relationship between the dynamics of the inner kinesin movements and the behavior of solvation water which is in turn determined by the topography of the contact surface between the protein and the surrounding water molecules. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  10. Multi-parametric surface plasmon resonance platform for studying liposome-serum interactions and protein corona formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Otto K; Rojalin, Tatu; Salmaso, Stefano; Barattin, Michela; Jarva, Hanna; Meri, Seppo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Viitala, Tapani; Urtti, Arto

    2017-04-01

    When nanocarriers are administered into the blood circulation, a complex biomolecular layer known as the "protein corona" associates with their surface. Although the drivers of corona formation are not known, it is widely accepted that this layer mediates biological interactions of the nanocarrier with its surroundings. Label-free optical methods can be used to study protein corona formation without interfering with its dynamics. We demonstrate the proof-of-concept for a multi-parametric surface plasmon resonance (MP-SPR) technique in monitoring the formation of a protein corona on surface-immobilized liposomes subjected to flowing 100 % human serum. We observed the formation of formulation-dependent "hard" and "soft" coronas with distinct refractive indices, layer thicknesses, and surface mass densities. MP-SPR was also employed to determine the affinity (K D ) of a complement system molecule (C3b) with cationic liposomes with and without polyethylene glycol. Tendency to create a thick corona correlated with a higher affinity of opsonin C3b for the surface. The label-free platform provides a fast and robust preclinical tool for tuning nanocarrier surface architecture and composition to control protein corona formation.

  11. Expression, immunogenicity and variation of iron-regulated surface protein A from bovine isolates of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Neha; Wines, Tyler F; Knopp, Colton L; McGuire, Mark A; Tinker, Juliette K

    2017-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus iron-regulated surface protein A (IsdA) is a fibrinogen and fibronectin adhesin that also contributes to iron sequestration and resistance to innate immunity. IsdA is conserved in human isolates and has been investigated as a human vaccine candidate. Here we report the expression of isdA, the efficacy of anti-IsdA responses and the existence of IsdA sequence variants from bovine Staphylococcus. Clinical staphylococci were obtained from US dairy farms and assayed by PCR for the presence and expression of isdA. isdA-positive species from bovines included S. aureus, S. haemolyticus and S. chromogenes. Immunoassays on bovine milk and serum confirmed the induction and opsonophagocytic activity of anti-IsdA humoral responses. The variable region of isdA was sequenced and protein alignments predicted the presence of two main variants consistent with those from human S. aureus. Mouse antibodies against one IsdA variant reduced staphylococcal binding to fibronectin in vitro in an isotype-dependent manner. Purified IsdA variants bound distinctly to fibronectin and fibrinogen. Our findings demonstrate that variability within the C-terminus of this adhesin affects immune reactivity and binding specificity, but are consistent with the significance of IsdA in bovine disease and relevant for vaccine development. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Expression, immunogenicity and variation of iron-regulated surface protein A from bovine isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Neha; Wines, Tyler F.; Knopp, Colton L.; McGuire, Mark A.; Tinker, Juliette K.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Staphylococcus aureus iron-regulated surface protein A (IsdA) is a fibrinogen and fibronectin adhesin that also contributes to iron sequestration and resistance to innate immunity. IsdA is conserved in human isolates and has been investigated as a human vaccine candidate. Here we report the expression of isdA, the efficacy of anti-IsdA responses and the existence of IsdA sequence variants from bovine Staphylococcus. Clinical staphylococci were obtained from US dairy farms and assayed by PCR for the presence and expression of isdA. isdA-positive species from bovines included S. aureus, S. haemolyticus and S. chromogenes. Immunoassays on bovine milk and serum confirmed the induction and opsonophagocytic activity of anti-IsdA humoral responses. The variable region of isdA was sequenced and protein alignments predicted the presence of two main variants consistent with those from human S. aureus. Mouse antibodies against one IsdA variant reduced staphylococcal binding to fibronectin in vitro in an isotype-dependent manner. Purified IsdA variants bound distinctly to fibronectin and fibrinogen. Our findings demonstrate that variability within the C-terminus of this adhesin affects immune reactivity and binding specificity, but are consistent with the significance of IsdA in bovine disease and relevant for vaccine development. PMID:28430959

  13. Naturally-acquired cellular immune response against Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1 paralog antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changrob, Siriruk; Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Cheng, Yang; Lim, Chae Seung; Chootong, Patchanee; Han, Eun-Taek

    2015-04-15

    Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1 paralog (PvMSP1P) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein expressed on the merozoite surface. This molecule is a target of natural immunity, as high anti-MSP1P-19 antibody levels were detected during P. vivax infection and the antibody inhibited PvMSP1P-erythrocyte binding. Recombinant PvMSP1P antigen results in production of a significant Th1 cytokine response in immunized mice. The present study was performed to characterize natural cellular immunity against PvMSP1P-19 and PvDBP region II in acute and recovery P. vivax infection. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from acute and recovery P. vivax infection were obtained for lymphocyte proliferation assay upon PvMSP1P-19 and PvDBP region II antigen stimulation. The culture supernatant was examined for the presence of the cytokines IL-2, TNF, IFN-γ and IL-10 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To determine whether Th1 or Th2 have a memory response against PvMSP1P-19 and PvDBPII protein antigen, PBMCs from subjects who had recovered from P. vivax infection 8-10 weeks prior to the study were obtained for lymphocyte proliferation assay. Cytokine-producing cells were analysed by flow cytometry. IL-2 was detected at high levels in lymphocyte cultures from acutely infected P. vivax patients upon PvMSP1P-19 stimulation. Analysis of the Th1 or Th2 memory response in PBMC cultures from subjects who had recovered from P. vivax infection showed significantly elevated levels of PvMSP1P-19 and PvDBPII-specific IFN-γ-producing cells (P  response of IFN-γ-producing cells in PvMSP1P stimulation was fourfold greater in recovered subjects than that in acute-infection patients. CD4(+) T cells were the major cell phenotype involved in the response to PvMSP1P-19 and PvDBPII antigen. PvMSP1P-19 strongly induces a specific cellular immune response for protection against P. vivax compared with PvDBPII as the antigen induces activation of IFN

  14. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus encodes two proteins that block cell surface display of MHC class I chains by enhancing their endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscoy, L; Ganem, D

    2000-07-05

    Down-regulation of the cell surface display of class I MHC proteins is an important mechanism of immune evasion by human and animal viruses. Herpesviruses in particular encode a variety of proteins that function to lower MHC I display by several mechanisms. These include binding and retention of MHC I chains in the endoplasmic reticulum, dislocation of class I chains from the ER, inhibition of the peptide transporter (TAP) involved in antigen presentation, and shunting of newly assembled chains to lysosomes. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a human herpesvirus strongly linked to the development of KS and to certain AIDS-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. Here we show that KSHV encodes two distinctive gene products that function to dramatically reduce cell surface MHC I expression. These viral proteins are localized predominantly to the ER. However, unlike previously described MHC I inhibitors, they do not interfere with the synthesis, translocation, or assembly of class I chains, nor do they retain them in the ER. Rather, they act to enhance endocytosis of MHC I from the cell surface; internalized class I chains are delivered to endolysosomal vesicles, where they undergo degradation. These KSHV proteins define a mechanism of class I down-regulation distinct from the mechanisms of other herpesviruses and are likely to contribute importantly to immune evasion during viral infection.

  15. Influence of surface chemistry on the structural organization of monomolecular protein layers adsorbed to functionalized aqueous interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Piepenstock, M.; Diederich, A.

    1993-01-01

    The molecular organization of streptavidin (SA) bound to aqueous surface monolayers of biotin-functionalized lipids and binary lipid mixtures has been investigated with neutron reflectivity and electron and fluorescence microscopy. The substitution of deuterons (2H) for protons (1H), both...... in subphase water molecules and in the alkyl chains of the lipid surface monolayer, was utilized to determine the interface structure on the molecular length scale. In all cases studied, the protein forms monomolecular layers underneath the interface with thickness values of apprx 40 ANG . A systematic...... dependence of the structural properties of such self-assembled SA monolayers on the surface chemistry was observed: the lateral protein density depends on the length of the spacer connecting the biotin moiety and its hydrophobic anchor. The hydration of the lipid head groups in the protein-bound state...

  16. The Optimisation of the Expression of Recombinant Surface Immunogenic Protein of Group B Streptococcus in Escherichia coli by Response Surface Methodology Improves Humoral Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Dinamarca, Diego A; Jerias, José I; Soto, Daniel A; Soto, Jorge A; Díaz, Natalia V; Leyton, Yessica Y; Villegas, Rodrigo A; Kalergis, Alexis M; Vásquez, Abel E

    2018-03-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of neonatal meningitis and a common pathogen in livestock and aquaculture industries around the world. Conjugate polysaccharide and protein-based vaccines are under development. The surface immunogenic protein (SIP) is a conserved protein in all GBS serotypes and has been shown to be a good target for vaccine development. The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli cells has been shown to be useful in the development of vaccines, and the protein purification is a factor affecting their immunogenicity. The response surface methodology (RSM) and Box-Behnken design can optimise the performance in the expression of recombinant proteins. However, the biological effect in mice immunised with an immunogenic protein that is optimised by RSM and purified by low-affinity chromatography is unknown. In this study, we used RSM for the optimisation of the expression of the rSIP, and we evaluated the SIP-specific humoral response and the property to decrease the GBS colonisation in the vaginal tract in female mice. It was observed by NI-NTA chromatography that the RSM increases the yield in the expression of rSIP, generating a better purification process. This improvement in rSIP purification suggests a better induction of IgG anti-SIP immune response and a positive effect in the decreased GBS intravaginal colonisation. The RSM applied to optimise the expression of recombinant proteins with immunogenic capacity is an interesting alternative in the evaluation of vaccines in preclinical phase, which could improve their immune response.

  17. Mucosal Immunogenicity of Genetically Modified Lactobacillus acidophilus Expressing an HIV-1 Epitope within the Surface Layer Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinobu Kajikawa

    Full Text Available Surface layer proteins of probiotic lactobacilli are theoretically efficient epitope-displaying scaffolds for oral vaccine delivery due to their high expression levels and surface localization. In this study, we constructed genetically modified Lactobacillus acidophilus strains expressing the membrane proximal external region (MPER from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 within the context of the major S-layer protein, SlpA. Intragastric immunization of mice with the recombinants induced MPER-specific and S-layer protein-specific antibodies in serum and mucosal secretions. Moreover, analysis of systemic SlpA-specific cytokines revealed that the responses appeared to be Th1 and Th17 dominant. These findings demonstrated the potential use of the Lactobacillus S-layer protein for development of oral vaccines targeting specific peptides.

  18. Mucosal Immunogenicity of Genetically Modified Lactobacillus acidophilus Expressing an HIV-1 Epitope within the Surface Layer Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Akinobu; Zhang, Lin; LaVoy, Alora; Bumgardner, Sara; Klaenhammer, Todd R.; Dean, Gregg A.

    2015-01-01

    Surface layer proteins of probiotic lactobacilli are theoretically efficient epitope-displaying scaffolds for oral vaccine delivery due to their high expression levels and surface localization. In this study, we constructed genetically modified Lactobacillus acidophilus strains expressing the membrane proximal external region (MPER) from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) within the context of the major S-layer protein, SlpA. Intragastric immunization of mice with the recombinants induced MPER-specific and S-layer protein-specific antibodies in serum and mucosal secretions. Moreover, analysis of systemic SlpA-specific cytokines revealed that the responses appeared to be Th1 and Th17 dominant. These findings demonstrated the potential use of the Lactobacillus S-layer protein for development of oral vaccines targeting specific peptides. PMID:26509697

  19. Estimates of effective elastic thickness of oceanic lithosphere using model including surface and subsurface loads and effective elastic thickness of subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, A.; Yongtao, F.

    2016-12-01

    The effective elastic thickness (Te) is an important parameter that characterizes the long term strength of the lithosphere, which has great significance on understanding the mechanical properties and evolution of the lithosphere. In contrast with many controversies regarding elastic thickness of continent lithosphere, the Te of oceanic lithosphere is thought to be in a simple way that is dependent on the age of the plate. However, rescent studies show that there is no simple relationship between Te and age at time of loading for both seamounts and subduction zones. As subsurface loading is very importand and has large influence in the estimate of Te for continent lithosphere, and many oceanic features such as subduction zones also have considerable subsurface loading. We introduce the method to estimate the effective elastic thickness of oceanic lithosphere using model including surface and subsurface loads by using free-air gravity anomaly and bathymetric data, together with a moving window admittance technique (MWAT). We use the multitaper spectral estimation method to calculate the power spectral density. Through tests with synthetic subduction zone like bathymetry and gravity data show that the Te can be recovered in an accurance similar to that in the continent and there is also a trade-off between spatial resolution and variance for different window sizes. We estimate Te of many subduction zones (Peru-Chile trench, Middle America trench, Caribbean trench, Kuril-Japan trench, Mariana trench, Tonga trench, Java trench, Ryukyu-Philippine trench) with an age range of 0-160 Myr to reassess the relationship between elastic thickness and the age of the lithosphere at the time of loading. The results do not show a simple relationship between Te and age.

  20. Exploring the diameter and surface dependent conformational changes in carbon nanotube-protein corona and the related cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xingchen; Lu, Dawei; Hao, Fang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Liu, Rutao, E-mail: rutaoliu@sdu.edu.cn [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China–America CRC for Environment & Health, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • CNT diameter and surface area govern the stability of adsorbed proteins. • More BSA was loaded and destabilized on smaller CNTs. • Protein corona reduces the cytotoxicity of CNTs - Abstract: In this work, we investigated and compared carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of different diameters regarding their interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and their ability to alter protein structure. BSA was exposed to CNT solutions, and the effects were assessed by utilizing fluorescence spectroscopy, UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), bichinchoninic acid (BCA) and zeta-potential measurement assays. We demonstrate that CNT diameter and surface area play key roles in influencing the stability of adsorbed proteins. Results showed that the secondary and tertiary structural stability of BSA decreased upon adsorption onto CNTs, with greater decrease on smaller-diametered nanotubes. Besides, more protein was loaded onto CNTs with small diameter, reducing the cytotoxicity. This study, therefore, provides fundamental information for the influence of CNT diameter and surface on protein behavior, which may be helpful to understand toxic effects of CNTs and prove beneficial for developing novel biomedical devices and safe use of nanomaterials.

  1. Another turn of the screw in shaving Gram-positive bacteria: Optimization of proteomics surface protein identification in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaya-Abril, Alfonso; Gómez-Gascón, Lidia; Jiménez-Munguía, Irene; Obando, Ignacio; Rodríguez-Ortega, Manuel J

    2012-06-27

    Bacterial surface proteins are of outmost importance as they play critical roles in the interaction between cells and their environment. In addition, they can be targets of either vaccines or antibodies. Proteomic analysis through "shaving" live cells with proteases has become a successful approach for a fast and reliable identification of surface proteins. However, this protocol has not been able to reach the goal of excluding cytoplasmic contamination, as cell lysis is an inherent process during culture and experimental manipulation. In this work, we carried out the optimization of the "shaving" strategy for the Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae, a bacterium highly susceptible to autolysis, and set up the conditions for maximizing the identification of surface proteins containing sorting or exporting signals, and for minimizing cytoplasmic contamination. We also demonstrate that cell lysis is an inherent process during culture and experimental manipulation, and that a low level of lysis is enough to contaminate a "surfome" preparation with peptides derived from cytoplasmic proteins. When the optimized conditions were applied to several clinical isolates, we found the majority of the proteins described to induce protection against pneumococcal infection. In addition, we found other proteins whose protection capacity has not been yet tested. In addition, we show the utility of this approach for providing antigens that can be used in serological tests for the diagnosis of pneumococcal disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The interaction of protein S with the phospholipid surface is essential for the activated protein C-independent activity of protein S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnen, M.; Stam, J. G.; van't Veer, C.; Meijers, J. C.; Reitsma, P. H.; Bertina, R. M.; Bouma, B. N.

    1996-01-01

    Protein S is a vitamin-K dependent glycoprotein involved in the regulation of the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C (APC). Recent data showed a direct anticoagulant role of protein S independent of APC, as demonstrated by the inhibition of prothrombinase and tenase activity both in

  3. Application of atomic mutations included in nuclear reactions, 40Ar(γ, p)39Cl(β decay)39Ar, to surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkuma, Juzo

    1987-01-01

    It has been found that the nuclear transformation processes which are initiated by photonuclear reactions can be used for studying the adsorption and chemical reactions taking place on solid surfaces. Chemically reactive 39 Cl was produced by irradiating 40 Ar with high-energy bremsstrahlung, and its blow was directed onto several material surfaces. The amount of chlorine adsorption was ascertained by detecting its radioactivity. Desorption without heating the adsorber samples inevitably occurred owing to the nuclear decay of 39 Cl. The adsorption and desorption rates were compared for several elements. A fast growth of oxide islands on sample surfaces was observed during the adsorption-desorption process. (author)

  4. Multi-subunit proteins on the surface of filamentous phage: methodologies for displaying antibody (Fab) heavy and light chains.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogenboom, H R; Griffiths, A D; Johnson, K S; Chiswell, D J; Hudson, P; Winter, G

    1991-01-01

    The display of proteins on the surface of phage offers a powerful means of selecting for rare genes encoding proteins with binding activities. Recently we found that antibody heavy and light chain variable (V) domains fused as a single polypeptide chain to a minor coat protein of filamentous phage fd, could be enriched by successive rounds of phage growth and panning with antigen. This allows the selection of antigen-binding domains directly from diverse libraries of V-genes. Now we show that...

  5. Glioblastoma Inhibition by Cell Surface Immunoglobulin Protein EWI-2, In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Kolesnikova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available EWI-2, a cell surface IgSF protein, is highly expressed in normal human brain but is considerably diminished in glioblastoma tumors and cell lines. Moreover, loss of EWI-2 expression correlated with a shorter survival time in human glioma patients, suggesting that EWI-2 might be a natural inhibitor of glioblastoma. In support of this idea, EWI-2 expression significantly impaired both ectopic and orthotopic tumor growth in nude mice in vivo. In vitro assays provided clues regarding EWI-2 functions. Expression of EWI-2 in T98G and/or U87-MG malignant glioblastoma cell lines failed to alter two-dimensional cell proliferation but inhibited glioblastoma colony formation in soft agar and caused diminished cell motility and invasion. At the biochemical level, EWI-2 markedly affects the organization of four molecules (tetraspanin proteins CD9 and CD81 and matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MT1-MMP, which play key roles in the biology of astrocytes and gliomas. EWI-2 causes CD9 and CD81 to become more associated with each other, whereas CD81 and other tetraspanins become less associated with MMP-2 and MT1-MMP. We propose that EWI-2 inhibition of glioblastoma growth in vivo is at least partly explained by the capability of EWI-2 to inhibit growth and/or invasion in vitro. Underlying these functional effects, EWI-2 causes a substantial molecular reorganization of multiple molecules (CD81, CD9, MMP-2, and MT1-MMP known to affect proliferation and/or invasion of astrocytes and/or glioblastomas.

  6. Polymorphic patterns of the merozoite surface protein-3β in Korean isolates of Plasmodium vivax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Mi; Ju, Hye-Lim; Cho, Pyo Yun; Moon, Sung-Ung; Ahn, Seong Kyu; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Lee, Hyeong-Woo; Kim, Tong-Soo; Na, Byoung-Kuk

    2014-03-17

    The merozoite surface protein-3β of Plasmodium vivax (PvMSP-3β) is one of the candidate antigens for blood stage malaria vaccine development. The polymorphisms in PvMSP-3β have been reported in certain P. vivax isolates. However, the diversity of PvMSP-3β throughout its global distribution has not been well understood. In this study, the genetic diversity and the effects of natural selection in PvMSP-3β among P. vivax Korean isolates were analysed. Blood samples were collected from 95 patients with vivax malaria in Korea. The region flanking full-length PvMSP-3β was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a TA cloning vector. The PvMSP-3β sequence of each isolate was determined and the polymorphic characteristics and effects of natural selection were analysed using the DNASTAR, MEGA4, and DnaSP programs. Five different subtypes of PvMSP-3β were identified based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions, and deletions. Although a high level of sequence diversity was observed in the PvMSP-3β gene, the coiled-coil tertiary structure of the PvMSP-3β protein was well conserved in all of the sequences. The PvMSP-3β of Korean isolates is under natural selection. DNA polymerase slippage and intragenic recombination likely contributed to PvMSP-3β diversity in Korean P. vivax isolates. The PvMSP-3β of Korean P. vivax isolates displayed polymorphisms, with SNPs, insertions and deletions scattered throughout of the gene. These results of parasite heterogeneity are relevant to the development of a PvMSP-3β based vaccine against P. vivax and the implementation of malaria control programmes in Korea.

  7. Experimental validation of multi-epitope peptides including promising MHC class I- and class II-restricted epitopes of four known Leishmania infantum proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eAgallou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a significant worldwide health problem for which no vaccine exists. Activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells is crucial for the generation of protective immunity against parasite. Recent trend in vaccine design has been shifted to epitope-based vaccines that are more specific, safe, and easy to produce. In the present study, four known antigenic Leishmania (L. infantum proteins, CPA, histone H1, KMP-11 and LeIF were analysed for the prediction of binding epitopes to H2d MHC class I and class II molecules, using online available algorithms. Based on in silico analysis, eight peptides including highly scored MHC class I- and class II-restricted epitopes were synthesized. Peptide immunogenicity was validated in MHC compatible BALB/c mice immunized with each synthetic peptide emulsified in CFA/IFA. CPA_p2, CPA_p3, H1_p1 and LeIF_p6 induced strong spleen cell proliferation upon in vitro peptide re-stimulation. In addition, the majority of the peptides, except of LeIF_p1 and KMP-11_p1, induced IFN-γ secretion, while KMP-11_p1 indicated a suppressive effect on IL-10 production. CPA_p2, CPA_p3, LeIF_p3 and LeIF_p6 induced IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells indicating a TH1 type response. In addition, CPA_p2, CPA_p3 and H1_p1 induced also the induction of CD8+ T cells. The induction of peptide-specific IgG in immunized mice designated also the existence of B cell epitopes in peptide sequences. Combining immunoinformatic tools and experimental validation, we demonstrated that CPA_p2, CPA_p3, H1_p1, H1_p3, CPA_p2, LeIF_p3 and LeIF_p6 are likely to include potential epitopes for the induction of protective cytotoxic and/or TH1-type immune responses supporting the feasibility of peptide-based vaccine development for leishmaniasis.

  8. Protein immobilization on the surface of liposomes via carbodiimide activation in the presence of N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, A A; Klibanov, A L; Torchilin, V P

    1988-04-25

    A method of the covalent immobilization of proteins on the surface of liposomes, containing 10% (by mol) of N-glutaryl phosphatidylethanolamine, is described. Carboxylic groups of liposomal N-glutaryl phosphatidylethanolamine were activated in the presence of water-soluble carbodiimide and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide and reacted subsequently with protein amino groups. The liposome-protein conjugates formed contained up to 5 x 10(-4) mol protein/mol lipid. Lectins (RCA1 and WGA) upon immobilization on liposomes retained saccharide specificity and the ability to agglutinate red blood cells. The immobilization of mouse monoclonal IgG in a ratio of 3.5 x 10(-4) mol IgG/mol lipid was achieved. The liposome activation in the absence of N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide resulted in a 2-fold decrease of protein coupling yields.

  9. Cost-effective and rapid lysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells for quantitative western blot analysis of proteins, including phosphorylated eIF2α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Jung; Ramesh, Rashmi; de Boor, Valerie; Gebler, Jan M; Silva, Richard C; Sattlegger, Evelyn

    2017-09-01

    The common method for liberating proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells involves mechanical cell disruption using glass beads and buffer containing inhibitors (protease, phosphatase and/or kinase inhibitors), followed by centrifugation to remove cell debris. This procedure requires the use of costly inhibitors and is laborious, in particular when many samples need to be processed. Also, enzymatic reactions can still occur during harvesting and cell breakage. As a result low-abundance and labile proteins may be degraded, and enzymes such as kinases and phosphatases may still modify proteins during and after cell lysis. We believe that our rapid sample preparation method helps overcome the above issues and offers the following advantages: (a) it is cost-effective, as no inhibitors and breaking buffer are needed; (b) cell breakage is fast (about 15 min) since it only involves a few steps; (c) the use of formaldehyde inactivates endogenous proteases prior to cell lysis, dramatically reducing the risk of protein degradation; (d) centrifugation steps only occur prior to cell lysis, circumventing the problem of losing protein complexes, in particular if cells were treated with formaldehyde intended to stabilize and capture large protein complexes; and (e) since formaldehyde has the potential to instantly terminate protein activity, this method also allows the study of enzymes in live cells, i.e. in their true physiological environment, such as the short-term effect of a drug on enzyme activity. Taken together, the rapid sample preparation procedure provides a more accurate snapshot of the cell's protein content at the time of harvesting. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Surface Characterization and in situ Protein Adsorption Studies on Carbene-Modified Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Geoffrey W; Parker, Emily M; Singh, Kulveer; Blanford, Christopher F; Moloney, Mark G; Foord, John S

    2015-10-13

    Polystyrene thin films were functionalized using a facile two-step chemical protocol involving carbene insertion followed by azo-coupling, permitting the introduction of a range of chemical functional groups, including aniline, hexyl, amine, carboxyl, phenyl, phosphonate diester, and ethylene glycol. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the success of the two-step chemical modification with a grafting density of at least 1/10th of the typical loading density (10(14)-10(15)) of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). In situ, real-time quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) studies show that the dynamics of binding of bovine serum albumin (BSA) are different at each modified surface. Mass, viscoelastic, and kinetic data were analyzed, and compared to cheminformatic descriptors (i.e., c log P, polar surface area) typically used for drug discovery. Results show that functionalities may either resist or adsorb BSA, and uniquely influence its adsorption dynamics. It is concluded that carbene-based surface modification can usefully influence BSA binding dynamics in a manner consistent with, and more robust than, traditional systems based on SAM chemistry.

  11. A GPR-protein interaction surface of Gi(alpha): implications for the mechanism of GDP-release inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Michael; Gasimov, Karim G; Artemyev, Nikolai O

    2002-01-08

    Proteins containing G-protein regulatory (GPR) motifs represent a novel family of guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors (GDIs) for G(alpha) subunits from the Gi family. They selectively interact with the GDP-bound conformation of Gi(alpha) and transducin-alpha (Gt(alpha)), but not with Gs(alpha). A series of chimeric proteins between Gi(alpha)(1) and Gs(alpha) has been constructed to investigate GPR-contact sites on G(alpha) subunits and the mechanism of GPR-protein GDI activity. Analysis of the interaction of two GPR-proteins-AGS3GPR and Pcp2-with the chimeric G(alpha) subunits demonstrated that the GPR-Gi(alpha)(1) interface involves the Gi(alpha)(1) switch regions and Gi(alpha)(1)-144-151, a site within the helical domain. Residues within Gi(alpha)(1)-144-151 form conformation-sensitive contacts with switch III, and may directly interact with a GPR-protein or form a GPR-binding surface jointly with switch III. The helical domain site is critical to the ability of GPR-proteins to act as GDIs. Our data suggest that a mechanism of the GDI activity of GPR-proteins is different from that of GDIs for monomeric GTPases and from the GDI-like activity of G(betagamma) subunits. The GPR-proteins are likely to block a GDP-escape route on G(alpha) subunits.

  12. A study on poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone covalently bonded NiTi surface for inhibiting protein adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Near equiatomic NiTi alloys have been extensively applied as biomaterials owing to its unique shape memory effect, superelasticity and biocompatibility. It has been demonstrated that surfaces capable of preventing plasma protein adsorption could reduce the reactivity of biomaterials with human blood. This motivated a lot of researches on the surface modification of NiTi alloy. In the present work, following heat and alkaline treatment and silanization by trichlorovinylsilane (TCVS, coating of poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP was produced on the NiTi alloy by gamma ray induced chemical bonding. The structures and properties of modified NiTi were characterized and in vitro biocompatibility of plasma protein adsorption was investigated. The results indicated that heat treatment at 823 K for 1 h could result in the formation of a protective TiO2 layer with “Ni-free” zone on NiTi surface. It was found that PVP was covalently bonded on NiTi surface to create a hydrophilic layer for inhibiting protein adsorption on the surface. The present work offers a green approach to introduce a bioorganic surface on metal and other polymeric or inorganic substrates by gamma irradiation.

  13. Molecular Characterizations of Surface Proteins Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase from Recent H5Nx Avian Influenza Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hua; Carney, Paul J.; Mishin, Vasiliy P.; Guo, Zhu; Chang, Jessie C.; Wentworth, David E.; Gubareva, Larisa V.; Stevens, James; Schultz-Cherry, S.

    2016-04-06

    ABSTRACT

    During 2014, a subclade 2.3.4.4 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N8) virus caused poultry outbreaks around the world. In late 2014/early 2015, the virus was detected in wild birds in Canada and the United States, and these viruses also gave rise to reassortant progeny, composed of viral RNA segments (vRNAs) from both Eurasian and North American lineages. In particular, viruses were found with N1, N2, and N8 neuraminidase vRNAs, and these are collectively referred to as H5Nx viruses. In the United States, more than 48 million domestic birds have been affected. Here we present a detailed structural and biochemical analysis of the surface antigens of H5N1, H5N2, and H5N8 viruses in addition to those of a recent human H5N6 virus. Our results with recombinant hemagglutinin reveal that these viruses have a strict avian receptor binding preference, while recombinantly expressed neuraminidases are sensitive to FDA-approved and investigational antivirals. Although H5Nx viruses currently pose a low risk to humans, it is important to maintain surveillance of these circulating viruses and to continually assess future changes that may increase their pandemic potential.

    IMPORTANCEThe H5Nx viruses emerging in North America, Europe, and Asia pose a great public health concern. Here we report a molecular and structural study of the major surface proteins of several H5Nx infl