WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface projection images

  1. Adaptive fringe-pattern projection for image saturation avoidance in 3D surface-shape measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Kofman, Jonathan

    2014-04-21

    In fringe-projection 3D surface-shape measurement, image saturation results in incorrect intensities in captured images of fringe patterns, leading to phase and measurement errors. An adaptive fringe-pattern projection (AFPP) method was developed to adapt the maximum input gray level in projected fringe patterns to the local reflectivity of an object surface being measured. The AFPP method demonstrated improved 3D measurement accuracy by avoiding image saturation in highly-reflective surface regions while maintaining high intensity modulation across the entire surface. The AFPP method can avoid image saturation and handle varying surface reflectivity, using only two prior rounds of fringe-pattern projection and image capture to generate the adapted fringe patterns.

  2. Usefulness of 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projection FDG PET images for the diagnosis of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jahae; Cho, Sang-Geon; Song, Minchul; Kang, Sae-Ryung; Kwon, Seong Young; Choi, Kang-Ho; Choi, Seong-Min; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Song, Ho-Chun

    2016-12-01

    To compare diagnostic performance and confidence of a standard visual reading and combined 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP) results to discriminate between Alzheimer disease (AD)/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD).[F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET brain images were obtained from 120 patients (64 AD/MCI, 38 DLB, and 18 FTD) who were clinically confirmed over 2 years follow-up. Three nuclear medicine physicians performed the diagnosis and rated diagnostic confidence twice; once by standard visual methods, and once by adding of 3D-SSP. Diagnostic performance and confidence were compared between the 2 methods.3D-SSP showed higher sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive, and negative predictive values to discriminate different types of dementia compared with the visual method alone, except for AD/MCI specificity and FTD sensitivity. Correction of misdiagnosis after adding 3D-SSP images was greatest for AD/MCI (56%), followed by DLB (13%) and FTD (11%). Diagnostic confidence also increased in DLB (visual: 3.2; 3D-SSP: 4.1; P visual: 3.1; 3D-SSP: 3.8; P = 0.002) and FTD (visual: 3.5; 3D-SSP: 4.2; P = 0.022). Overall, 154/360 (43%) cases had a corrected misdiagnosis or improved diagnostic confidence for the correct diagnosis.The addition of 3D-SSP images to visual analysis helped to discriminate different types of dementia in FDG PET scans, by correcting misdiagnoses and enhancing diagnostic confidence in the correct diagnosis. Improvement of diagnostic accuracy and confidence by 3D-SSP images might help to determine the cause of dementia and appropriate treatment.

  3. Projecting Images on a Sphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A system for projecting images on an object with a reflective surface. A plurality of image projectors are spaced around the object and synchronized such that each...

  4. System and technique for retrieving depth information about a surface by projecting a composite image of modulated light patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassebrook, Laurence G. (Inventor); Lau, Daniel L. (Inventor); Guan, Chun (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A technique, associated system and program code, for retrieving depth information about at least one surface of an object, such as an anatomical feature. Core features include: projecting a composite image comprising a plurality of modulated structured light patterns, at the anatomical feature; capturing an image reflected from the surface; and recovering pattern information from the reflected image, for each of the modulated structured light patterns. Pattern information is preferably recovered for each modulated structured light pattern used to create the composite, by performing a demodulation of the reflected image. Reconstruction of the surface can be accomplished by using depth information from the recovered patterns to produce a depth map/mapping thereof. Each signal waveform used for the modulation of a respective structured light pattern, is distinct from each of the other signal waveforms used for the modulation of other structured light patterns of a composite image; these signal waveforms may be selected from suitable types in any combination of distinct signal waveforms, provided the waveforms used are uncorrelated with respect to each other. The depth map/mapping to be utilized in a host of applications, for example: displaying a 3-D view of the object; virtual reality user-interaction interface with a computerized device; face--or other animal feature or inanimate object--recognition and comparison techniques for security or identification purposes; and 3-D video teleconferencing/telecollaboration.

  5. Nonlaser-based 3D surface imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shin-yee; Johnson, R.K.; Sherwood, R.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    3D surface imaging refers to methods that generate a 3D surface representation of objects of a scene under viewing. Laser-based 3D surface imaging systems are commonly used in manufacturing, robotics and biomedical research. Although laser-based systems provide satisfactory solutions for most applications, there are situations where non laser-based approaches are preferred. The issues that make alternative methods sometimes more attractive are: (1) real-time data capturing, (2) eye-safety, (3) portability, and (4) work distance. The focus of this presentation is on generating a 3D surface from multiple 2D projected images using CCD cameras, without a laser light source. Two methods are presented: stereo vision and depth-from-focus. Their applications are described.

  6. Kernel based subspace projection of hyperspectral images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Arngren, Morten

    In hyperspectral image analysis an exploratory approach to analyse the image data is to conduct subspace projections. As linear projections often fail to capture the underlying structure of the data, we present kernel based subspace projections of PCA and Maximum Autocorrelation Factors (MAF......). The MAF projection exploits the fact that interesting phenomena in images typically exhibit spatial autocorrelation. The analysis is based on nearinfrared hyperspectral images of maize grains demonstrating the superiority of the kernelbased MAF method....

  7. Interferometry to Image Surface Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Guy

    2016-04-01

    I present in this lecture the technique of interferometric imaging at optical/infrared wavelengths. The technique has matured since the pioneering work of Michelson at the end of the XIXth—beginning of the XXth when he first resolved the surface of a star, Betelgeuse, with his colleague Pease. Images were obtained for the first time 20 years ago with the COAST instrument and interferometers have made constant progress to reach the minimum level where blind image reconstruction can be achieved. I briefly introduce the topic to recall why studying the surface and close environment of stars is important in some fields of stellar physics. I introduce the theory of imaging with telescopes and interferometers. I discuss the nature of interferometric data in this wavelength domain and give a few insights on the importance of getting access to visibility phases to obtain information on asymmetries of stellar surfaces. I then present the issue of aperture synthesis with a small number of telescopes, a signature of optical/infrared interferometers compared to the radio domain. Despite the impossibility to measure the phase of visibilities because of turbulence I show that useful information can be recovered from the closure phase. I eventually introduce the principles of image reconstruction and I discuss some recent results on several types of stars.

  8. Projections of Veronese surface and morphisms from projective ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Projective plane; vector bundles; morphisms; Grassmannian; Veronese ... A general projection has this property. It is well known that the Veronese surface is the unique closed orbit for the natural action of the algebraic group P GL(3, .... Globally generated vector bundle on projective spaces with special Chern classes are.

  9. Multispectral Panoramic Imaging System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — International Electronic Machines Corporation, a leader in the design of precision imaging systems, will develop an innovative multispectral, panoramic imaging...

  10. The Assessment of Distortion in Neurosurgical Image Overlay Projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakharia, Nilesh N; Paraskevopoulos, Dimitris; Lang, Jozsef; Vakharia, Vejay N

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the superiority of neuronavigation during neurosurgical procedures compared to non-neuronavigation-based procedures. Limitations to neuronavigation systems include the need for the surgeons to avert their gaze from the surgical field and the cost of the systems, especially for hospitals in developing countries. Overlay projection of imaging directly onto the patient allows localization of intracranial structures. A previous study using overlay projection demonstrated the accuracy of image coregistration for a lesion in the temporal region but did not assess image distortion when projecting onto other anatomical locations. Our aim is to quantify this distortion and establish which regions of the skull would be most suitable for overlay projection. Using the difference in size of a square grid when projected onto an anatomically accurate model skull and a flat surface, from the same distance, we were able to calculate the degree of image distortion when projecting onto the skull from the anterior, posterior, superior, and lateral aspects. Measuring the size of a square when projected onto a flat surface from different distances allowed us to model change in lesion size when projecting a deep structure onto the skull surface. Using 2 mm as the upper limit for distortion, our results show that images can be accurately projected onto the majority (81.4%) of the surface of the skull. Our results support the use of image overlay projection in regions with ≤2 mm distortion to assist with localization of intracranial lesions at a fraction of the cost of existing methods. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Surface Estimation for Microwave Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Kurrant

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical imaging and sensing applications in many scenarios demand accurate surface estimation from a sparse set of noisy measurements. These measurements may arise from a variety of sensing modalities, including laser or electromagnetic samples of an object’s surface. We describe a state-of-the-art microwave imaging prototype that has sensors to acquire both microwave and laser measurements. The approach developed to translate sparse samples of the breast surface into an accurate estimate of the region of interest is detailed. To evaluate the efficacy of the method, laser and electromagnetic samples are acquired by sensors from three realistic breast models with varying sizes and shapes. A set of metrics is developed to assist with the investigation and demonstrate that the algorithm is able to accurately estimate the shape of a realistic breast phantom when only a sparse set of data are available. Moreover, the algorithm is robust to the presence of measurement noise, and is effective when applied to measurement scans of patients acquired with the prototype.

  12. Surface Estimation for Microwave Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurrant, Douglas; Bourqui, Jeremie; Fear, Elise

    2017-07-19

    Biomedical imaging and sensing applications in many scenarios demand accurate surface estimation from a sparse set of noisy measurements. These measurements may arise from a variety of sensing modalities, including laser or electromagnetic samples of an object's surface. We describe a state-of-the-art microwave imaging prototype that has sensors to acquire both microwave and laser measurements. The approach developed to translate sparse samples of the breast surface into an accurate estimate of the region of interest is detailed. To evaluate the efficacy of the method, laser and electromagnetic samples are acquired by sensors from three realistic breast models with varying sizes and shapes. A set of metrics is developed to assist with the investigation and demonstrate that the algorithm is able to accurately estimate the shape of a realistic breast phantom when only a sparse set of data are available. Moreover, the algorithm is robust to the presence of measurement noise, and is effective when applied to measurement scans of patients acquired with the prototype.

  13. Surface Imaging Skin Friction Instrument and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James L. (Inventor); Naughton, Jonathan W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A surface imaging skin friction instrument allowing 2D resolution of spatial image by a 2D Hilbert transform and 2D inverse thin-oil film solver, providing an innovation over prior art single point approaches. Incoherent, monochromatic light source can be used. The invention provides accurate, easy to use, economical measurement of larger regions of surface shear stress in a single test.

  14. Water surface capturing by image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    An alternative means of measuring the water surface interface during laboratory experiments is processing a series of sequentially captured images. Image processing can provide a continuous, non-intrusive record of the water surface profile whose accuracy is not dependent on water depth. More trad...

  15. Egypt satellite images for land surface characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    Satellite images provide information on the land surface properties. From optical remote sensing images in the blue, green, red and near-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum it is possible to identify a large number of surface features. The report briefly describes different satellite...

  16. An inflatable surface coil for rectal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.F.; Hajek, P.C.; Baker, L.L.; Gylys-Morin, V.; Mattrey, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Surface coils have become ubiquitous in MR imaging of the body because of substantial gains in signal-to-noise ratio. Unfortunately, there are some anatomic regions, such as the prostate, for which surface coils have insufficient depth sensitivity. The authors have developed an inflatable, distributed capacitance, passively decoupled surface coil which is collapsed for insertion and reinflated for imaging. Images of the prostate are dramatically improved due to proximity of the coil. Lesions in cadaver specimens were observed which were not seen with body coil imaging. Clinical trials are expected to begin in September

  17. A novel augmented reality system of image projection for image-guided neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahvash, Mehran; Besharati Tabrizi, Leila

    2013-05-01

    Augmented reality systems combine virtual images with a real environment. To design and develop an augmented reality system for image-guided surgery of brain tumors using image projection. A virtual image was created in two ways: (1) MRI-based 3D model of the head matched with the segmented lesion of a patient using MRIcro software (version 1.4, freeware, Chris Rorden) and (2) Digital photograph based model in which the tumor region was drawn using image-editing software. The real environment was simulated with a head phantom. For direct projection of the virtual image to the head phantom, a commercially available video projector (PicoPix 1020, Philips) was used. The position and size of the virtual image was adjusted manually for registration, which was performed using anatomical landmarks and fiducial markers position. An augmented reality system for image-guided neurosurgery using direct image projection has been designed successfully and implemented in first evaluation with promising results. The virtual image could be projected to the head phantom and was registered manually. Accurate registration (mean projection error: 0.3 mm) was performed using anatomical landmarks and fiducial markers position. The direct projection of a virtual image to the patients head, skull, or brain surface in real time is an augmented reality system that can be used for image-guided neurosurgery. In this paper, the first evaluation of the system is presented. The encouraging first visualization results indicate that the presented augmented reality system might be an important enhancement of image-guided neurosurgery.

  18. Medical imaging projects meet at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    ENTERVISION, the Research Training Network in 3D Digital Imaging for Cancer Radiation Therapy, successfully passed its mid-term review held at CERN on 11 January. This multidisciplinary project aims at qualifying experts in medical imaging techniques for improved hadron therapy.   ENTERVISION provides training in physics, medicine, electronics, informatics, radiobiology and engineering, as well as a wide range of soft skills, to 16 researchers of different backgrounds and nationalities. The network is funded by the European Commission within the Marie Curie Initial Training Network, and relies on the EU-funded research project ENVISION to provide a training platform for the Marie Curie researchers. The two projects hold their annual meetings jointly, allowing the young researchers to meet senior scientists and to have a full picture of the latest developments in the field beyond their individual research project. ENVISION and ENTERVISION are both co-ordinated by CERN, and the Laboratory hosts t...

  19. AMMA Land surface Model Intercomparison Project (ALMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, A. A.; Derosnay, P.

    2007-05-01

    Extreme climatic variability has afflicted West Africa over the last half century, which has resulted in significant socio-economic consequences for the people of this region. There is therefore a need to improve seasonal to inter-annual prediction of the West-African monsoon (WAM), however, difficulties modeling the WAM arise from both the paucity of observations at sufficient space-time resolutions, and due to the complex interactions between the biosphere, atmosphere and hydrosphere over this region. In particular, there is evidence that the land surface influences the variability of the WAM over a wide range of spatio-temporal scales. A critical aspect of this coupling is the feedback between the regional atmospheric circulation and the strong meridional surface flux gradients of mass and energy. One of the main goals of the African Monsoon Multi-disciplinary Analysis (AMMA) Project is to obtain a better understanding of the physical processes influencing the West-African Monsoon (WAM) on daily to inter-annual timescales. An improved comprehension of the relevant land surface processes is being addressed through the construction of a multi-scale atmospheric and land surface parameter forcing database using a variety of sources; numerical weather prediction forecast data, remote sensing products and local scale observations. The goal of this database is to drive land surface, vegetation and hydrological models over a range of spatial scales (local to regional) in order to gain better insights into the attendant processes. This goal is being met under the auspices of the AMMA Land surface Model Intercomparison Project (ALMIP). In the recently completed Phase 1 of this project, an ensemble of state-of-the-art land surface schemes have been run in "off-line" mode (i.e. decoupled from an atmospheric model) at a regional scale over western Africa for four annual cycles (2002-5). In this talk, intercomparison results will be presented. In addition, results from a

  20. Projective and superconformal structures on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Much attention has recently been given to the study of super Riemann surfaces. Detailed accounts of these objects and their infinitesimal deformation theory are referenced where they are fitted into the framework of complex supermanifolds, superconformal structures and graded sheaves. One difficulty, which seems even more of a barrier than in the case of classical deformations of Riemann surface structure, is the lack of a good global description of super-moduli spaces. In this note, we outline an approach which places the theory in the classical setting of projective structures on variable Riemann surfaces. We explain how to construct a distribution (family of vector subspaces) inside the holomorphic cotangent space to the moduli space M g of Riemann surfaces with genus g and furnished with a level-4 homology structure, such that the corresponding rank-(2g-2) complex vector bundle models the soul deformations of a family of super-Riemann surfaces. The keystone in this construction is the existence of holomorphic sections for the space of non-singular odd theta characteristics on C g the universal curve over M g . (author)

  1. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2016-02-01

    We present a migration method that does not require a velocity model to migrate backscattered surface waves to their projected locations on the surface. This migration method, denoted as natural migration, uses recorded Green\\'s functions along the surface instead of simulated Green\\'s functions. The key assumptions are that the scattering bodies are within the depth interrogated by the surface waves, and the Green\\'s functions are recorded with dense receiver sampling along the free surface. This natural migration takes into account all orders of multiples, mode conversions and non-linear effects of surface waves in the data. The natural imaging formulae are derived for both active source and ambient-noise data, and computer simulations show that natural migration can effectively image near-surface heterogeneities with typical ambient-noise sources and geophone distributions.

  2. Tablet surface characterisation by various imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitavuopio, Paulus; Rantanen, Jukka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise tablet surfaces using different imaging and roughness analytical techniques including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The test materials compressed were potassium chloride (KCl......) and sodium chloride (NaCl). It was found that all methods used suggested that the KCl tablets were smoother than the NaCl tablets and higher compression pressure made the tablets smoother. Imaging methods like optical microscopy and SEM can give useful information about the roughness of the sample surface......, but they do not provide quantitative information about surface roughness. Laser profilometry and AFM on the other hand provide quantitative roughness data from two different scales, laser profilometer from 1 mm and atomic force microscope from 90 microm scale. AFM is a powerful technique but other imaging...

  3. Tablet surface characterisation by various imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitavuopio, Paulus; Rantanen, Jukka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise tablet surfaces using different imaging and roughness analytical techniques including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The test materials compressed were potassium chloride (KCl......) and sodium chloride (NaCl). It was found that all methods used suggested that the KCl tablets were smoother than the NaCl tablets and higher compression pressure made the tablets smoother. Imaging methods like optical microscopy and SEM can give useful information about the roughness of the sample surface...

  4. Lunar Surface Reconstruction from Apollo MC Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaksher, Ahmed F.; Al-Jarrah, Ahmad; Walker, Kyle

    2015-07-01

    The last three Apollo lunar missions (15, 16, and 17) carried an integrated photogrammetric mapping system of a metric camera (MC), a high-resolution panoramic camera, a star camera, and a laser altimeter. Recently images taken by the MC were scanned by Arizona State University (ASU); these images contain valuable information for scientific exploration, engineering analysis, and visualization of the Moon's surface. In this article, we took advantage of the large overlaps, the multi viewing, and the high ground resolution of the images taken by the Apollo MC in generating an accurate and reliable surface of the Moon. We started by computing the relative positions and orientations of the exposure stations through a rigorous photogrammetric bundle adjustment process. We then generated a surface model using a hierarchical correlation-based matching algorithm. The matching algorithm was implemented in a multi-photo scheme and permits the exclusion of obscured pixels. The generated surface model was registered with LOLA topographic data and the comparison between the two surfaces yielded an average absolute difference of 36 m. These results look very promising and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in accounting for depth discontinuities, occlusions, and image-signal noise.

  5. Divergent surface and total soil moisture projections under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Alexis; Sheffield, Justin; Milly, Paul C.D.

    2017-01-01

    Land aridity has been projected to increase with global warming. Such projections are mostly based on off-line aridity and drought metrics applied to climate model outputs but also are supported by climate-model projections of decreased surface soil moisture. Here we comprehensively analyze soil moisture projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5, including surface, total, and layer-by-layer soil moisture. We identify a robust vertical gradient of projected mean soil moisture changes, with more negative changes near the surface. Some regions of the northern middle to high latitudes exhibit negative annual surface changes but positive total changes. We interpret this behavior in the context of seasonal changes in the surface water budget. This vertical pattern implies that the extensive drying predicted by off-line drought metrics, while consistent with the projected decline in surface soil moisture, will tend to overestimate (negatively) changes in total soil water availability.

  6. Image-projection ion-beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Image-projection ion-beam lithography is an attractive alternative for submicron patterning because it may provide high throughput; it uses demagnification to gain advantages in reticle fabrication, inspection, and lifetime; and it enjoys the precise deposition characteristics of ions which cause essentially no collateral damage. This lithographic option involves extracting low-mass ions (e.g., He + ) from a plasma source, transmitting the ions at low voltage through a stencil reticle, and then accelerating and focusing the ions electrostatically onto a resist-coated wafer. While the advantages of this technology have been demonstrated experimentally by the work of IMS (Austria), many difficulties still impede extension of the technology to the high-volume production of microelectronic devices. We report a computational study of a lithography system designed to address problem areas in field size, telecentricity, and chromatic and geometric aberration. We present a novel ion-column-design approach and conceptual ion-source and column designs which address these issues. We find that image-projection ion-beam technology should in principle meet high-volume-production requirements. The technical success of our present relatively compact-column design requires that a glow-discharge-based ion source (or equivalent cold source) be developed and that moderate further improvement in geometric aberration levels be obtained. Our system requires that image predistortion be employed during reticle fabrication to overcome distortion due to residual image nonlinearity and space-charge forces. This constitutes a software data preparation step, as do correcting for distortions in electron lithography columns and performing proximity-effect corrections. Areas needing further fundamental work are identified

  7. Plenoptic Imager for Automated Surface Navigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Autonomous and semi-autonomous robotic systems require information about their surroundings in order to navigate properly. A video camera machine vision system can...

  8. Final Project Report: Imaging Fault Zones Using a Novel Elastic Reverse-Time Migration Imaging Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chen, Ting [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tan, Sirui [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lin, Youzuo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gao, Kai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-10

    Imaging fault zones and fractures is crucial for geothermal operators, providing important information for reservoir evaluation and management strategies. However, there are no existing techniques available for directly and clearly imaging fault zones, particularly for steeply dipping faults and fracture zones. In this project, we developed novel acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion methods for high-resolution velocity model building. In addition, we developed acoustic and elastic reverse-time migration methods for high-resolution subsurface imaging of complex subsurface structures and steeply-dipping fault/fracture zones. We first evaluated and verified the improved capabilities of our newly developed seismic inversion and migration imaging methods using synthetic seismic data. Our numerical tests verified that our new methods directly image subsurface fracture/fault zones using surface seismic reflection data. We then applied our novel seismic inversion and migration imaging methods to a field 3D surface seismic dataset acquired at the Soda Lake geothermal field using Vibroseis sources. Our migration images of the Soda Lake geothermal field obtained using our seismic inversion and migration imaging algorithms revealed several possible fault/fracture zones. AltaRock Energy, Inc. is working with Cyrq Energy, Inc. to refine the geologic interpretation at the Soda Lake geothermal field. Trenton Cladouhos, Senior Vice President R&D of AltaRock, was very interested in our imaging results of 3D surface seismic data from the Soda Lake geothermal field. He planed to perform detailed interpretation of our images in collaboration with James Faulds and Holly McLachlan of University of Nevada at Reno. Using our high-resolution seismic inversion and migration imaging results can help determine the optimal locations to drill wells for geothermal energy production and reduce the risk of geothermal exploration.

  9. Functional imaging of cortical feedback projections to the olfactory bulb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eRothermel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Processing of sensory information is substantially shaped by centrifugal, or feedback, projections from higher cortical areas, yet the functional properties of these projections are poorly characterized. Here, we used genetically-encoded calcium sensors (GCaMPs to functionally image activation of centrifugal projections targeting the olfactory bulb (OB. The OB receives massive centrifugal input from cortical areas but there has been as yet no characterization of their activity in vivo. We focused on projections to the OB from the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON, a major source of cortical feedback to the OB. We expressed GCaMP selectively in AON projection neurons using a mouse line expressing Cre recombinase (Cre in these neurons and Cre-dependent viral vectors injected into AON, allowing us to image GCaMP fluorescence signals from their axon terminals in the OB. Electrical stimulation of AON evoked large fluorescence signals that could be imaged from the dorsal OB surface in vivo. Surprisingly, odorants also evoked large signals that were transient and coupled to odorant inhalation both in the anesthetized and awake mouse, suggesting that feedback from AON to the OB is rapid and robust across different brain states. The strength of AON feedback signals increased during wakefulness, suggesting a state-dependent modulation of cortical feedback to the OB. Two-photon GCaMP imaging revealed that different odorants activated different subsets of centrifugal AON axons and could elicit both excitation and suppression in different axons, indicating a surprising richness in the representation of odor information by cortical feedback to the OB. Finally, we found that activating neuromodulatory centers such as basal forebrain drove AON inputs to the OB independent of odorant stimulation. Our results point to the AON as a multifunctional cortical area that provides ongoing feedback to the OB and also serves as a descending relay for other neuromodulatory

  10. Surface Spectroscopy Center Of Excellence Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane

    2014-01-01

    We propose to develop a national center of excellence in Regolith Radiative Transfer (RRT), i.e., in modeling spectral reflectivity and emissivity of grainy or structured surfaces. The focus is the regime where the structural elements of grainy surfaces have grain sizes and separations of tens of microns, comparable to the wavelengths carrying diagnostic compositional information. This regime is of fundamental interest to remote sensing of planetary and terrestrial surfaces.

  11. Figuring and Polishing Precision Optical Surfaces Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The requirements for cost effective manufacturing and metrology of large optical surfaces is instrumental for the success of future NASA programs such as LISA,...

  12. V-Band Wireless Surface Networks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA GLENN RESEARCH CENTER in Topic O1.10 has identified the need to provide surface communications networks for human and robotic missions to explore the Moon and...

  13. Nuclear Fuel Assembly Assessment Project and Image Categorization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Lindblad, T.; Waldemark, K.; Hildingsson, Lars

    1998-07-01

    A project has been underway to add digital imaging and processing to the inspection of nuclear fuel by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The ultimate goals are to provide the inspector not only with the advantages of Ccd imaging, such as high sensitivity and digital image enhancements, but also with an intelligent agent that can analyze the images and provide useful information about the fuel assemblies in real time. The project is still in the early stages and several interesting sub-projects have been inspired. Here we give first a review of the work on the fuel assembly image analysis and then give a brief status report on one of these sub-projects that concerns automatic categorization of fuel assembly images. The technique could be of benefit to the general challenge of image categorization

  14. A portable image overlay projection device for computer-aided open liver surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaghan, Kate A; Peterhans, Matthias; Oliveira-Santos, Thiago; Weber, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    Image overlay projection is a form of augmented reality that allows surgeons to view underlying anatomical structures directly on the patient surface. It improves intuitiveness of computer-aided surgery by removing the need for sight diversion between the patient and a display screen and has been reported to assist in 3-D understanding of anatomical structures and the identification of target and critical structures. Challenges in the development of image overlay technologies for surgery remain in the projection setup. Calibration, patient registration, view direction, and projection obstruction remain unsolved limitations to image overlay techniques. In this paper, we propose a novel, portable, and handheld-navigated image overlay device based on miniature laser projection technology that allows images of 3-D patient-specific models to be projected directly onto the organ surface intraoperatively without the need for intrusive hardware around the surgical site. The device can be integrated into a navigation system, thereby exploiting existing patient registration and model generation solutions. The position of the device is tracked by the navigation system's position sensor and used to project geometrically correct images from any position within the workspace of the navigation system. The projector was calibrated using modified camera calibration techniques and images for projection are rendered using a virtual camera defined by the projectors extrinsic parameters. Verification of the device's projection accuracy concluded a mean projection error of 1.3 mm. Visibility testing of the projection performed on pig liver tissue found the device suitable for the display of anatomical structures on the organ surface. The feasibility of use within the surgical workflow was assessed during open liver surgery. We show that the device could be quickly and unobtrusively deployed within the sterile environment.

  15. Method for Surface Scanning in Medical Imaging and Related Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for surface scanning in medical imaging is provided. The surface scanning apparatus comprises an image source, a first optical fiber bundle comprising first optical fibers having proximal ends and distal ends, and a first optical coupler for coupling an image from the image...

  16. Space-Ready Advanced Imaging System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II effort Toyon will increase the state-of-the-art for video/image systems. This will include digital image compression algorithms as well as system...

  17. Low-cost rural surface alternatives : demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The goals of this project were to implement several stabilization methods for preventing or mitigating freeze-thaw damage to : granular surfaced roads and identify the most effective and economical methods for the soil and climate conditions of Iowa....

  18. Variance in parametric images: direct estimation from parametric projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, R.P.; Leenders, K.L.; Spyrou, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    Recent work has shown that it is possible to apply linear kinetic models to dynamic projection data in PET in order to calculate parameter projections. These can subsequently be back-projected to form parametric images - maps of parameters of physiological interest. Critical to the application of these maps, to test for significant changes between normal and pathophysiology, is an assessment of the statistical uncertainty. In this context, parametric images also include simple integral images from, e.g., [O-15]-water used to calculate statistical parametric maps (SPMs). This paper revisits the concept of parameter projections and presents a more general formulation of the parameter projection derivation as well as a method to estimate parameter variance in projection space, showing which analysis methods (models) can be used. Using simulated pharmacokinetic image data we show that a method based on an analysis in projection space inherently calculates the mathematically rigorous pixel variance. This results in an estimation which is as accurate as either estimating variance in image space during model fitting, or estimation by comparison across sets of parametric images - as might be done between individuals in a group pharmacokinetic PET study. The method based on projections has, however, a higher computational efficiency, and is also shown to be more precise, as reflected in smooth variance distribution images when compared to the other methods. (author)

  19. Novel spirometry based on optical surface imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guang, E-mail: lig2@mskcc.org; Huang, Hailiang; Li, Diana G.; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P.; Mechalakos, James [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Wei, Jie [Department of Computer Science, City College of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Sullivan, James [Pulmonary Laboratories, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Zatcky, Joan; Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using optical surface imaging (OSI) to measure the dynamic tidal volume (TV) of the human torso during free breathing. Methods: We performed experiments to measure volume or volume change in geometric and deformable phantoms as well as human subjects using OSI. To assess the accuracy of OSI in volume determination, we performed experiments using five geometric phantoms and two deformable body phantoms and compared the values with those derived from geometric calculations and computed tomography (CT) measurements, respectively. To apply this technique to human subjects, an institutional review board protocol was established and three healthy volunteers were studied. In the human experiment, a high-speed image capture mode of OSI was applied to acquire torso images at 4–5 frames per second, which was synchronized with conventional spirometric measurements at 5 Hz. An in-house MATLAB program was developed to interactively define the volume of interest (VOI), separate the thorax and abdomen, and automatically calculate the thoracic and abdominal volumes within the VOIs. The torso volume change (TV C = ΔV{sub torso} = ΔV{sub thorax} + ΔV{sub abdomen}) was automatically calculated using full-exhalation phase as the reference. The volumetric breathing pattern (BP{sub v} = ΔV{sub thorax}/ΔV{sub torso}) quantifying thoracic and abdominal volume variations was also calculated. Under quiet breathing, TVC should equal the tidal volume measured concurrently by a spirometer with a conversion factor (1.08) accounting for internal and external differences of temperature and moisture. Another MATLAB program was implemented to control the conventional spirometer that was used as the standard. Results: The volumes measured from the OSI imaging of geometric phantoms agreed with the calculated volumes with a discrepancy of 0.0% ± 1.6% (range −1.9% to 2.5%). In measurements from the deformable torso/thorax phantoms, the volume

  20. Novel spirometry based on optical surface imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guang; Huang, Hailiang; Li, Diana G.; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P.; Mechalakos, James; Wei, Jie; Sullivan, James; Zatcky, Joan; Rimner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using optical surface imaging (OSI) to measure the dynamic tidal volume (TV) of the human torso during free breathing. Methods: We performed experiments to measure volume or volume change in geometric and deformable phantoms as well as human subjects using OSI. To assess the accuracy of OSI in volume determination, we performed experiments using five geometric phantoms and two deformable body phantoms and compared the values with those derived from geometric calculations and computed tomography (CT) measurements, respectively. To apply this technique to human subjects, an institutional review board protocol was established and three healthy volunteers were studied. In the human experiment, a high-speed image capture mode of OSI was applied to acquire torso images at 4–5 frames per second, which was synchronized with conventional spirometric measurements at 5 Hz. An in-house MATLAB program was developed to interactively define the volume of interest (VOI), separate the thorax and abdomen, and automatically calculate the thoracic and abdominal volumes within the VOIs. The torso volume change (TV C = ΔV torso = ΔV thorax + ΔV abdomen ) was automatically calculated using full-exhalation phase as the reference. The volumetric breathing pattern (BP v = ΔV thorax /ΔV torso ) quantifying thoracic and abdominal volume variations was also calculated. Under quiet breathing, TVC should equal the tidal volume measured concurrently by a spirometer with a conversion factor (1.08) accounting for internal and external differences of temperature and moisture. Another MATLAB program was implemented to control the conventional spirometer that was used as the standard. Results: The volumes measured from the OSI imaging of geometric phantoms agreed with the calculated volumes with a discrepancy of 0.0% ± 1.6% (range −1.9% to 2.5%). In measurements from the deformable torso/thorax phantoms, the volume differences measured using OSI

  1. Adaptive Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The present proposal describes the development of an adaptive Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), or "Snapshot" spectrometer which can "instantaneously"...

  2. Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization (SIMO) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space-based interferometry missions have the potential to revolutionize imaging and astrometry, providing observations of unprecedented accuracy. Realizing the full...

  3. [Managing digital medical imaging projects in healthcare services: lessons learned].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas de la Escalera, D

    2013-01-01

    Medical imaging is one of the most important diagnostic instruments in clinical practice. The technological development of digital medical imaging has enabled healthcare services to undertake large scale projects that require the participation and collaboration of many professionals of varied backgrounds and interests as well as substantial investments in infrastructures. Rather than focusing on systems for dealing with digital medical images, this article deals with the management of projects for implementing these systems, reviewing various organizational, technological, and human factors that are critical to ensure the success of these projects and to guarantee the compatibility and integration of digital medical imaging systems with other health information systems. To this end, the author relates several lessons learned from a review of the literature and the author's own experience in the technical coordination of digital medical imaging projects. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Tomographic image reconstruction from continuous projections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Cant (Jeroen); W.J. Palenstijn (Willem Jan); G. Behiels; J. Sijbers (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractAn important design aspect in tomographic image reconstruction is the choice between a step-and-shoot protocol versus continuous X-ray tube movement for image acquisition. A step-and-shoot protocol implies a perfectly still tube during X-ray exposure, and hence involves moving the tube

  5. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science; Altman, Eric I. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3DAFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  6. Projections onto the Pareto surface in multicriteria radiation therapy optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokrantz, Rasmus; Miettinen, Kaisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate or reduce the error to Pareto optimality that arises in Pareto surface navigation when the Pareto surface is approximated by a small number of plans. Methods: The authors propose to project the navigated plan onto the Pareto surface as a postprocessing step to the navigation. The projection attempts to find a Pareto optimal plan that is at least as good as or better than the initial navigated plan with respect to all objective functions. An augmented form of projection is also suggested where dose–volume histogram constraints are used to prevent that the projection causes a violation of some clinical goal. The projections were evaluated with respect to planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered by step-and-shoot and sliding window and spot-scanned intensity modulated proton therapy. Retrospective plans were generated for a prostate and a head and neck case. Results: The projections led to improved dose conformity and better sparing of organs at risk (OARs) for all three delivery techniques and both patient cases. The mean dose to OARs decreased by 3.1 Gy on average for the unconstrained form of the projection and by 2.0 Gy on average when dose–volume histogram constraints were used. No consistent improvements in target homogeneity were observed. Conclusions: There are situations when Pareto navigation leaves room for improvement in OAR sparing and dose conformity, for example, if the approximation of the Pareto surface is coarse or the problem formulation has too permissive constraints. A projection onto the Pareto surface can identify an inaccurate Pareto surface representation and, if necessary, improve the quality of the navigated plan

  7. Projections onto the Pareto surface in multicriteria radiation therapy optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokrantz, Rasmus; Miettinen, Kaisa

    2015-10-01

    To eliminate or reduce the error to Pareto optimality that arises in Pareto surface navigation when the Pareto surface is approximated by a small number of plans. The authors propose to project the navigated plan onto the Pareto surface as a postprocessing step to the navigation. The projection attempts to find a Pareto optimal plan that is at least as good as or better than the initial navigated plan with respect to all objective functions. An augmented form of projection is also suggested where dose-volume histogram constraints are used to prevent that the projection causes a violation of some clinical goal. The projections were evaluated with respect to planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered by step-and-shoot and sliding window and spot-scanned intensity modulated proton therapy. Retrospective plans were generated for a prostate and a head and neck case. The projections led to improved dose conformity and better sparing of organs at risk (OARs) for all three delivery techniques and both patient cases. The mean dose to OARs decreased by 3.1 Gy on average for the unconstrained form of the projection and by 2.0 Gy on average when dose-volume histogram constraints were used. No consistent improvements in target homogeneity were observed. There are situations when Pareto navigation leaves room for improvement in OAR sparing and dose conformity, for example, if the approximation of the Pareto surface is coarse or the problem formulation has too permissive constraints. A projection onto the Pareto surface can identify an inaccurate Pareto surface representation and, if necessary, improve the quality of the navigated plan.

  8. Hybrid surface platform for the simultaneous detection of proteins and DNA using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homola, Jiří; Piliarik, Marek; Ladd, J.; Taylor, A.; Shaoyi, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 11 (2008), s. 4231-4236 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance imaging * DNA -directed immobilization * protein array Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 5.712, year: 2008

  9. Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization (SIMO) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences (AFS), in collaboration with the MIT Space Systems Laboratory (MIT-SSL), proposed the Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization (SIMO) program...

  10. Miniaturized Airborne Imaging Central Server System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is a miniaturized airborne imaging central server system (MAICSS). MAICSS is designed as a high-performance-computer-based electronic backend that...

  11. Miniaturized Airborne Imaging Central Server System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is a miniaturized airborne imaging central server system (MAICSS). MAICSS is designed as a high-performance computer-based electronic backend that...

  12. Ge Quantum Dot Infrared Imaging Camera Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated proposes to develop a high performance Ge quantum dots-based infrared (IR) imaging camera on Si substrate. The high sensitivity, large...

  13. Airborne Wide Area Imager for Wildfire Mapping and Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An advanced airborne imaging system for fire detection/mapping is proposed. The goal of the project is to improve control and management of wildfires in order to...

  14. Descriptive and Computer Aided Drawing Perspective on an Unfolded Polyhedral Projection Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwierzynska, Jolanta

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the herby study is to develop a method of direct and practical mapping of perspective on an unfolded prism polyhedral projection surface. The considered perspective representation is a rectilinear central projection onto a surface composed of several flat elements. In the paper two descriptive methods of drawing perspective are presented: direct and indirect. The graphical mapping of the effects of the representation is realized directly on the unfolded flat projection surface. That is due to the projective and graphical connection between points displayed on the polyhedral background and their counterparts received on the unfolded flat surface. For a significant improvement of the construction of line, analytical algorithms are formulated. They draw a perspective image of a segment of line passing through two different points determined by their coordinates in a spatial coordinate system of axis x, y, z. Compared to other perspective construction methods that use information about points, for computer vision and the computer aided design, our algorithms utilize data about lines, which are applied very often in architectural forms. Possibility of drawing lines in the considered perspective enables drawing an edge perspective image of an architectural object. The application of the changeable base elements of perspective as a horizon height and a station point location enable drawing perspective image from different viewing positions. The analytical algorithms for drawing perspective images are formulated in Mathcad software, however, they can be implemented in the majority of computer graphical packages, which can make drawing perspective more efficient and easier. The representation presented in the paper and the way of its direct mapping on the flat unfolded projection surface can find application in presentation of architectural space in advertisement and art.

  15. Image reconstruction technique using projection data from neutron tomography system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Abd el Bar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutron tomography is a very powerful technique for nondestructive evaluation of heavy industrial components as well as for soft hydrogenous materials enclosed in heavy metals which are usually difficult to image using X-rays. Due to the properties of the image acquisition system, the projection images are distorted by several artifacts, and these reduce the quality of the reconstruction. In order to eliminate these harmful effects the projection images should be corrected before reconstruction. This paper gives a description of a filter back projection (FBP technique, which is used for reconstruction of projected data obtained from transmission measurements by neutron tomography system We demonstrated the use of spatial Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT and the 2D Inverse DFT in the formulation of the method, and outlined the theory of reconstruction of a 2D neutron image from a sequence of 1D projections taken at different angles between 0 and π in MATLAB environment. Projections are generated by applying the Radon transform to the original image at different angles.

  16. Total Variation and Tomographic Imaging from Projections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide

    2011-01-01

    or 3D reconstruction from noisy projections. We demonstrate that for a small signal-to-noise ratio, this new approach allows us to compute better (i.e., more reliable) reconstructions than those obtained by classical methods. This is possible due to the use of the TV reconstruction model, which...

  17. Speckle averaging system for laser raster-scan image projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiszauer, Detlev H.; Hackel, Lloyd A.

    1998-03-17

    The viewers' perception of laser speckle in a laser-scanned image projection system is modified or eliminated by the addition of an optical deflection system that effectively presents a new speckle realization at each point on the viewing screen to each viewer for every scan across the field. The speckle averaging is accomplished without introduction of spurious imaging artifacts.

  18. Quantitative imaging studies with PET VI. Project II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper, M.; Chen, C.T.; Yasillo, N.; Gatley, J.; Ortega, C.; DeJesus, O.; Friedman, A.

    1985-01-01

    This project is focused upon the development of hardware and software to improve PET image analysis and upon clinical applications of PET. In this report the laboratory's progress in various attenuation correction methods for brain imaging are described. The use of time-of-flight information for image reconstruction is evaluated. The location of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in brain was found to be largely in the basal ganghia. 1 tab. (DT)

  19. Augmented reality-guided neurosurgery: accuracy and intraoperative application of an image projection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besharati Tabrizi, Leila; Mahvash, Mehran

    2015-07-01

    An augmented reality system has been developed for image-guided neurosurgery to project images with regions of interest onto the patient's head, skull, or brain surface in real time. The aim of this study was to evaluate system accuracy and to perform the first intraoperative application. Images of segmented brain tumors in different localizations and sizes were created in 10 cases and were projected to a head phantom using a video projector. Registration was performed using 5 fiducial markers. After each registration, the distance of the 5 fiducial markers from the visualized tumor borders was measured on the virtual image and on the phantom. The difference was considered a projection error. Moreover, the image projection technique was intraoperatively applied in 5 patients and was compared with a standard navigation system. Augmented reality visualization of the tumors succeeded in all cases. The mean time for registration was 3.8 minutes (range 2-7 minutes). The mean projection error was 0.8 ± 0.25 mm. There were no significant differences in accuracy according to the localization and size of the tumor. Clinical feasibility and reliability of the augmented reality system could be proved intraoperatively in 5 patients (projection error 1.2 ± 0.54 mm). The augmented reality system is accurate and reliable for the intraoperative projection of images to the head, skull, and brain surface. The ergonomic advantage of this technique improves the planning of neurosurgical procedures and enables the surgeon to use direct visualization for image-guided neurosurgery.

  20. Learning linear discriminant projections for dimensionality reduction of image descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hongping; Mikolajczyk, Krystian; Matas, Jiri

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we present Linear Discriminant Projections (LDP) for reducing dimensionality and improving discriminability of local image descriptors. We place LDP into the context of state-of-the-art discriminant projections and analyze its properties. LDP requires a large set of training data with point-to-point correspondence ground truth. We demonstrate that training data produced by a simulation of image transformations leads to nearly the same results as the real data with correspondence ground truth. This makes it possible to apply LDP as well as other discriminant projection approaches to the problems where the correspondence ground truth is not available, such as image categorization. We perform an extensive experimental evaluation on standard data sets in the context of image matching and categorization. We demonstrate that LDP enables significant dimensionality reduction of local descriptors and performance increases in different applications. The results improve upon the state-of-the-art recognition performance with simultaneous dimensionality reduction from 128 to 30.

  1. Compressed Sensing Inspired Image Reconstruction from Overlapped Projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The key idea discussed in this paper is to reconstruct an image from overlapped projections so that the data acquisition process can be shortened while the image quality remains essentially uncompromised. To perform image reconstruction from overlapped projections, the conventional reconstruction approach (e.g., filtered backprojection (FBP algorithms cannot be directly used because of two problems. First, overlapped projections represent an imaging system in terms of summed exponentials, which cannot be transformed into a linear form. Second, the overlapped measurement carries less information than the traditional line integrals. To meet these challenges, we propose a compressive sensing-(CS- based iterative algorithm for reconstruction from overlapped data. This algorithm starts with a good initial guess, relies on adaptive linearization, and minimizes the total variation (TV. Then, we demonstrated the feasibility of this algorithm in numerical tests.

  2. Compressed Sensing Inspired Image Reconstruction from Overlapped Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Lu, Yang; Wang, Ge

    2010-01-01

    The key idea discussed in this paper is to reconstruct an image from overlapped projections so that the data acquisition process can be shortened while the image quality remains essentially uncompromised. To perform image reconstruction from overlapped projections, the conventional reconstruction approach (e.g., filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms) cannot be directly used because of two problems. First, overlapped projections represent an imaging system in terms of summed exponentials, which cannot be transformed into a linear form. Second, the overlapped measurement carries less information than the traditional line integrals. To meet these challenges, we propose a compressive sensing-(CS-) based iterative algorithm for reconstruction from overlapped data. This algorithm starts with a good initial guess, relies on adaptive linearization, and minimizes the total variation (TV). Then, we demonstrated the feasibility of this algorithm in numerical tests. PMID:20689701

  3. Analysis of cell surface antigens by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, Ivan; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie

    2013-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is most commonly used to measure bio-molecular interactions. SPR is used significantly less frequent for measuring whole cell interactions. Here we introduce a method to measure whole cells label free using the specific binding of cell surface antigens expressed on

  4. Micro Aerial Projector Stabilizing Projected Images Of An Airborne Robotics Projection Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-09

    Micro Aerial Projector - Stabilizing Projected Images Of An Airborne Robotics Projection Platform Werner Alexander Isop1, Jesus Pestana1, Gabriele...combining augmented reality and mobile robotics into a new form of human-machine interaction. Specifically, we introduce a small semi-autonomous micro aerial...it as a robotic companion, which follows the user and is able to project supportive information in the 3D environment. Fig. 1 shows an example where

  5. An accelerated threshold-based back-projection algorithm for Compton camera image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundy, Daniel W.; Herman, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Compton camera imaging (CCI) systems are currently under investigation for radiotherapy dose reconstruction and verification. The ability of such a system to provide real-time images during dose delivery will be limited by the computational speed of the image reconstruction algorithm. In this work, the authors present a fast and simple method by which to generate an initial back-projected image from acquired CCI data, suitable for use in a filtered back-projection algorithm or as a starting point for iterative reconstruction algorithms, and compare its performance to the current state of the art. Methods: Each detector event in a CCI system describes a conical surface that includes the true point of origin of the detected photon. Numerical image reconstruction algorithms require, as a first step, the back-projection of each of these conical surfaces into an image space. The algorithm presented here first generates a solution matrix for each slice of the image space by solving the intersection of the conical surface with the image plane. Each element of the solution matrix is proportional to the distance of the corresponding voxel from the true intersection curve. A threshold function was developed to extract those pixels sufficiently close to the true intersection to generate a binary intersection curve. This process is repeated for each image plane for each CCI detector event, resulting in a three-dimensional back-projection image. The performance of this algorithm was tested against a marching algorithm known for speed and accuracy. Results: The threshold-based algorithm was found to be approximately four times faster than the current state of the art with minimal deficit to image quality, arising from the fact that a generically applicable threshold function cannot provide perfect results in all situations. The algorithm fails to extract a complete intersection curve in image slices near the detector surface for detector event cones having axes nearly

  6. Nonabelian Jacobian of projective surfaces geometry and representation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Reider, Igor

    2013-01-01

    The Jacobian of a smooth projective curve is undoubtedly one of the most remarkable and beautiful objects in algebraic geometry. This work is an attempt to develop an analogous theory for smooth projective surfaces - a theory of the nonabelian Jacobian of smooth projective surfaces. Just like its classical counterpart, our nonabelian Jacobian relates to vector bundles (of rank 2) on a surface as well as its Hilbert scheme of points. But it also comes equipped with the variation of Hodge-like structures, which produces a sheaf of reductive Lie algebras naturally attached to our Jacobian. This constitutes a nonabelian analogue of the (abelian) Lie algebra structure of the classical Jacobian. This feature naturally relates geometry of surfaces with the representation theory of reductive Lie algebras/groups. This work’s main focus is on providing an in-depth study of various aspects of this relation. It presents a substantial body of evidence that the sheaf of Lie algebras on the nonabelian Jacobian is an effic...

  7. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites

  8. Image enlargement using biharmonic Said-Ball surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaban, A.; Kherd, A.; Jameel, A. F.; Akhadkulov, H.; Alipiah, F. M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper discusses the use of biharmonic cubic Said-Ball surfaces in image enlargement area. Resizing an image through up sampling or down sampling is generally common for making smaller image fit a bigger screen in full screen mode or reducing a higher resolution image to a smaller resolution. However due to some limitation, this paper will focus on image enlargement based on scaling factor of two. We use biharmonic cubic Said-Ball subject to a given four boundary curves condition respectively. We implement and evaluate the performance of the proposed method based on peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) indicator using well-known gray-scale test images.

  9. Imaging Catalytic Surfaces by Multiplexed Capillary Electrophoresis With Absorption Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christodoulou, Michael [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A new technique for in situ imaging and screening heterogeneous catalysts by using multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with absorption detection was developed. By bundling the inlets of a large number of capillaries, an imaging probe can be created that can be used to sample products formed directly from a catalytic surface with high spatial resolution. In this work, they used surfaces made of platinum, iron or gold wires as model catalytic surfaces for imaging. Various shapes were recorded including squares and triangles. Model catalytic surfaces consisting of both iron and platinum wires in the shape of a cross were also imaged successfully. Each of the two wires produced a different electrochemical product that was separated by capillary electrophoresis. Based on the collected data they were able to distinguish the products from each wire in the reconstructed image.

  10. Projection Operators and Moment Invariants to Image Blurring

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flusser, Jan; Suk, Tomáš; Boldyš, Jiří; Zitová, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 4 (2015), s. 786-802 ISSN 0162-8828 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29225S; GA ČR GAP103/11/1552 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Blurred image * N-fold rotation symmetry * projection operators * image moments * moment invariants * blur invariants * object recognition Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 6.077, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/ZOI/flusser-0434521.pdf

  11. Moduli spaces of convex projective structures on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fock, V. V.; Goncharov, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    We introduce explicit parametrisations of the moduli space of convex projective structures on surfaces, and show that the latter moduli space is identified with the higher Teichmüller space for defined in [V.V. Fock, A.B. Goncharov, Moduli spaces of local systems and higher Teichmüller theory, ma.......AG/0311149]. We investigate the cluster structure of this moduli space, and define its quantum version....

  12. Fundamental remote sensing science research program. Part 1: Status report of the mathematical pattern recognition and image analysis project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydorn, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The Mathematical Pattern Recognition and Image Analysis (MPRIA) Project is concerned with basic research problems related to the study of the Earth from remotely sensed measurement of its surface characteristics. The program goal is to better understand how to analyze the digital image that represents the spatial, spectral, and temporal arrangement of these measurements for purposing of making selected inference about the Earth.

  13. Collaborative Tracking of Image Features Based on Projective Invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinwei

    -mode sensors for improving the flexibility and robustness of the system. From the experimental results during three field tests for the LASOIS system, we observed that most of the errors in the image processing algorithm are caused by the incorrect feature tracking. This dissertation addresses the feature tracking problem in image sequences acquired from cameras. Despite many alternatives to feature tracking problem, iterative least squares solution solving the optical flow equation has been the most popular approach used by many in the field. This dissertation attempts to leverage the former efforts to enhance feature tracking methods by introducing a view geometric constraint to the tracking problem, which provides collaboration among features. In contrast to alternative geometry based methods, the proposed approach provides an online solution to optical flow estimation in a collaborative fashion by exploiting Horn and Schunck flow estimation regularized by view geometric constraints. Proposed collaborative tracker estimates the motion of a feature based on the geometry of the scene and how the other features are moving. Alternative to this approach, a new closed form solution to tracking that combines the image appearance with the view geometry is also introduced. We particularly use invariants in the projective coordinates and conjecture that the traditional appearance solution can be significantly improved using view geometry. The geometric constraint is introduced by defining a new optical flow equation which exploits the scene geometry from a set drawn from tracked features. At the end of each tracking loop the quality of the tracked features is judged using both appearance similarity and geometric consistency. Our experiments demonstrate robust tracking performance even when the features are occluded or they undergo appearance changes due to projective deformation of the template. The proposed collaborative tracking method is also tested in the visual navigation

  14. Atmospheres – Through Projections on a Living Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steijn, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    of space, liveness and atmosphere. With the development of this model I wish to contribute to the on-going development of the use of video projections and motion graphics as important visual, spatial and narrative elements within the field of spatial experience design, e.g. in performance, exhibition...... design and events. The model is being designed with two purposes in mind. One is a tool for analyzing empirical examples or cases where video projections are used in spatial experience design. The second is to create a tool that can be useful in actual design processes. In this paper I describe a case...... where video projection on a living surface was part of an experimental dance performance. Based on this case I incorporate descriptions derived from the field of aesthetics, specifically atmospheres understood as a concept of new aesthetics as described by philosopher Gernot Böhme.2 Finally I look...

  15. Discriminating Projections for Estimating Face Age in Wild Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokola, Ryan A [ORNL; Bolme, David S [ORNL; Ricanek, Karl [ORNL; Barstow, Del R [ORNL; Boehnen, Chris Bensing [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach to estimating the age of a human from a single uncontrolled image. Current face age estimation algorithms work well in highly controlled images, and some are robust to changes in illumination, but it is usually assumed that images are close to frontal. This bias is clearly seen in the datasets that are commonly used to evaluate age estimation, which either entirely or mostly consist of frontal images. Using pose-specific projections, our algorithm maps image features into a pose-insensitive latent space that is discriminative with respect to age. Age estimation is then performed using a multi-class SVM. We show that our approach outperforms other published results on the Images of Groups dataset, which is the only age-related dataset with a non-trivial number of off-axis face images, and that we are competitive with recent age estimation algorithms on the mostly-frontal FG-NET dataset. We also experimentally demonstrate that our feature projections introduce insensitivity to pose.

  16. Integrated variable projection approach (IVAPA) for parallel magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiao; Sheng, Jinhua

    2012-10-01

    Parallel magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) is a fast method which requires algorithms for the reconstructing image from a small number of measured k-space lines. The accurate estimation of the coil sensitivity functions is still a challenging problem in parallel imaging. The joint estimation of the coil sensitivity functions and the desired image has recently been proposed to improve the situation by iteratively optimizing both the coil sensitivity functions and the image reconstruction. It regards both the coil sensitivities and the desired images as unknowns to be solved for jointly. In this paper, we propose an integrated variable projection approach (IVAPA) for pMRI, which integrates two individual processing steps (coil sensitivity estimation and image reconstruction) into a single processing step to improve the accuracy of the coil sensitivity estimation using the variable projection approach. The method is demonstrated to be able to give an optimal solution with considerably reduced artifacts for high reduction factors and a low number of auto-calibration signal (ACS) lines, and our implementation has a fast convergence rate. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated using a set of in vivo experiment data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Object-Image Correspondence for Algebraic Curves under Projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Burdis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel algorithm for deciding whether a given planar curve is an image of a given spatial curve, obtained by a central or a parallel projection with unknown parameters. The motivation comes from the problem of establishing a correspondence between an object and an image, taken by a camera with unknown position and parameters. A straightforward approach to this problem consists of setting up a system of conditions on the projection parameters and then checking whether or not this system has a solution. The computational advantage of the algorithm presented here, in comparison to algorithms based on the straightforward approach, lies in a significant reduction of a number of real parameters that need to be eliminated in order to establish existence or non-existence of a projection that maps a given spatial curve to a given planar curve. Our algorithm is based on projection criteria that reduce the projection problem to a certain modification of the equivalence problem of planar curves under affine and projective transformations. To solve the latter problem we make an algebraic adaptation of signature construction that has been used to solve the equivalence problems for smooth curves. We introduce a notion of a classifying set of rational differential invariants and produce explicit formulas for such invariants for the actions of the projective and the affine groups on the plane.

  18. Smooth embeddings with Stein surface images

    OpenAIRE

    Gompf, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    A simple characterization is given of open subsets of a complex surface that smoothly perturb to Stein open subsets. As applications, complex 2-space C^2 contains domains of holomorphy (Stein open subsets) that are exotic R^4's, and others homotopy equivalent to the 2-sphere but cut out by smooth, compact 3-manifolds. Pseudoconvex embeddings of Brieskorn spheres and other 3-manifolds into complex surfaces are constructed, as are pseudoconcave holomorphic fillings (with disagreeing contact and...

  19. Images as embedding maps and minimal surfaces: Movies, color, and volumetric medical images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmel, R.; Malladi, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Sochen, N. [Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel)

    1997-02-01

    A general geometrical framework for image processing is presented. The authors consider intensity images as surfaces in the (x,I) space. The image is thereby a two dimensional surface in three dimensional space for gray level images. The new formulation unifies many classical schemes, algorithms, and measures via choices of parameters in a {open_quote}master{close_quotes} geometrical measure. More important, it is a simple and efficient tool for the design of natural schemes for image enhancement, segmentation, and scale space. Here the authors give the basic motivation and apply the scheme to enhance images. They present the concept of an image as a surface in dimensions higher than the three dimensional intuitive space. This will help them handle movies, color, and volumetric medical images.

  20. Measurement of surface crack length using image processing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahm, Seung Hoon; Kim, Si Cheon; Kim, Yong Il; Ryu, Dae Hyun

    2001-01-01

    The development of a new experimental method is required to easily observe the growth behavior of fatigue cracks. To satisfy the requirement, an image processing technique was introduced to fatigue testing. The length of surface fatigue crack could be successfully measured by the image processing system. At first, the image data of cracks were stored into the computer while the cyclic loading was interrupted. After testing, crack length was determined using image processing software which was developed by ourselves. Block matching method was applied to the detection of surface fatigue cracks. By comparing the data measured by image processing system with the data measured by manual measurement with a microscope, the effectiveness of the image processing system was established. If the proposed method is used to monitor and observe the crack growth behavior automatically, the time and efforts for fatigue test could be dramatically reduced

  1. Computer-Aided Panoramic Images Enriched by Shadow Construction on a Prism and Pyramid Polyhedral Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Dzwierzynska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to develop an efficient and practical method of a direct mapping of a panoramic projection on an unfolded prism and pyramid polyhedral projection surface with the aid of a computer. Due to the fact that straight lines very often appear in any architectural form we formulate algorithms which utilize data about lines and draw panoramas as plots of functions in Mathcad software. The ability to draw panoramic images of lines enables drawing a wireframe image of an architectural object. The application of the multicenter projection, as well as the idea of shadow construction in the panoramic representation, aims at achieving a panoramic image close to human perception. The algorithms are universal as the application of changeable base elements of panoramic projection—horizon height, station point location, number of polyhedral walls—enables drawing panoramic images from various viewing positions. However, for more efficient and easier drawing, the algorithms should be implemented in some graphical package. The representation presented in the paper and the method of its direct mapping on a flat unfolded projection surface can find application in the presentation of architectural spaces in advertising and art when drawings are displayed on polyhedral surfaces and can be observed from multiple viewing positions.

  2. A cohomological stability result for projective schemes over surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Brodmann, M

    2007-01-01

    Let π : X → X 0 be a projective morphism of schemes such that X 0 is noetherian and essentially of finite type over a field K. Let i ∈ ℕ0, let ℱ be a coherent sheaf of -modules and let ℒ be an ample invertible sheaf over X. We show that the set of associated points of the higher direct image sheaf ultimately becomes constant if n tends to −∞, provided X 0 has dimensione ≦ 2. If , this stability result need not hold any more. To prove this, we show that the set of associated primes of the n-th...

  3. A study of images of Projective Angles of pulmonary veins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jue [Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Beijing (China); Zhaoqi, Zhang [Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Beijing (China)], E-mail: zhaoqi5000@vip.sohu.com; Yu Wei; Miao Cuilian; Yan Zixu; Zhao Yike [Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2009-09-15

    Aims: In images of magnetic resonance and computed tomography (CT) there are visible angles between pulmonary veins and the coronary, transversal or sagittal section of body. In this study these angles are measured and defined as Projective Angles of pulmonary veins. Several possible influential factors and characters of distribution are studied and analyzed for a better understanding of this imaging anatomic character of pulmonary veins. And it could be the anatomic base of adjusting correctly the angle of the central X-ray of the angiography of pulmonary veins undergoing the catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). Method: Images of contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) and contrast enhanced computer tomography (CECT) of the left atrium and pulmonary veins of 137 health objects and patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are processed with the technique of post-processing, and Projective Angles to the coronary and transversal sections are measured and analyzed statistically. Result: Project Angles of pulmonary veins are one of real and steady imaging anatomic characteristics of pulmonary veins. The statistical distribution of variables is relatively concentrated, with a fairly good representation of average value. It is possible to improve the angle of the central X-ray according to the average value in the selective angiography of pulmonary veins undergoing the catheter ablation of AF.

  4. Parametric image reconstruction using spectral analysis of PET projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meikle, Steven R.; Matthews, Julian C.; Cunningham, Vincent J.; Bailey, Dale L.; Livieratos, Lefteris; Jones, Terry; Price, Pat

    1998-01-01

    Spectral analysis is a general modelling approach that enables calculation of parametric images from reconstructed tracer kinetic data independent of an assumed compartmental structure. We investigated the validity of applying spectral analysis directly to projection data motivated by the advantages that: (i) the number of reconstructions is reduced by an order of magnitude and (ii) iterative reconstruction becomes practical which may improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A dynamic software phantom with typical 2-[ 11 C]thymidine kinetics was used to compare projection-based and image-based methods and to assess bias-variance trade-offs using iterative expectation maximization (EM) reconstruction. We found that the two approaches are not exactly equivalent due to properties of the non-negative least-squares algorithm. However, the differences are small ( 1 and, to a lesser extent, VD). The optimal number of EM iterations was 15-30 with up to a two-fold improvement in SNR over filtered back projection. We conclude that projection-based spectral analysis with EM reconstruction yields accurate parametric images with high SNR and has potential application to a wide range of positron emission tomography ligands. (author)

  5. Modeling the land surface heat exchange process with the aid of moderate resolution imaging spectroradiomer images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Wenjiang; Gao, Wei; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2009-12-01

    Most ecosystems and crops experience water stress in arid and semiarid areas of the Inner Mongolia grassland, Northern China. Yet the lack of long-term in situ monitoring data hinders the managerial capacity of changing water vapor environment, which is tied with sustaining the grassland in the Inner Mongolia. Environmental remote sensing monitoring and modeling may provide synergistic means of observing changes in thermodynamic balance during drought onset at the grassland surface, providing reliable projections accounting for variations and correlations of water vapor and heat fluxes. It is the aim of this paper to present a series of estimates of latent heat, sensible heat, and net radiation using an innovative first-principle, physics-based model (GEOMOD: GEO-model estimated the land surface heat with MODis data) with the aid of integrated satellite remote sensing and in situ eddy covariance data. Based on the energy balance principle and aerodynamics diffusion theory, the GEOMOD model is featured with MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data with 250 m spatial resolution to collectively reflect the spatial heterogeneity of surface properties, supplement missing data with the neighborhood values across both spatial and temporal domains, estimate the surface roughness height and zero-plane displacement with dynamic look-up table, and implement a fast iterative algorithm to calculate sensible heat. Its analytical framework is designed against overreliance on local micro-meteorological parameters. Practical implementation was assessed in the study area, the Xilin Gol River Basin, a typical grassland environment, Northern China. With 179 days of MODIS data in support of modeling, coincident ground-based observations between 2000 and 2006 were selected for model calibration. The findings indicate that GEOMOD performs reasonably well in modeling the land surface heat exchange process, as demonstrated by a case study of Inner Mongolia.

  6. Surface chemistry and morphology in single particle optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiz-Kanik, Fulya; Sevenler, Derin Deniz; Ünlü, Neşe Lortlar; Chiari, Marcella; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2017-05-01

    Biological nanoparticles such as viruses and exosomes are important biomarkers for a range of medical conditions, from infectious diseases to cancer. Biological sensors that detect whole viruses and exosomes with high specificity, yet without additional labeling, are promising because they reduce the complexity of sample preparation and may improve measurement quality by retaining information about nanoscale physical structure of the bio-nanoparticle (BNP). Towards this end, a variety of BNP biosensor technologies have been developed, several of which are capable of enumerating the precise number of detected viruses or exosomes and analyzing physical properties of each individual particle. Optical imaging techniques are promising candidates among broad range of label-free nanoparticle detectors. These imaging BNP sensors detect the binding of single nanoparticles on a flat surface functionalized with a specific capture molecule or an array of multiplexed capture probes. The functionalization step confers all molecular specificity for the sensor's target but can introduce an unforeseen problem; a rough and inhomogeneous surface coating can be a source of noise, as these sensors detect small local changes in optical refractive index. In this paper, we review several optical technologies for label-free BNP detectors with a focus on imaging systems. We compare the surface-imaging methods including dark-field, surface plasmon resonance imaging and interference reflectance imaging. We discuss the importance of ensuring consistently uniform and smooth surface coatings of capture molecules for these types of biosensors and finally summarize several methods that have been developed towards addressing this challenge.

  7. Mars Surface Change Detection from Multi-temporal Orbital Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di, Kaichang; Liu, Yiliang; Hu, Wenmin; Yue, Zongyu; Liu, Zhaoqin

    2014-01-01

    A vast amount of Mars images have been acquired by orbital missions in recent years. With the increase of spatial resolution to metre and decimetre levels, fine-scale geological features can be identified, and surface change detection is possible because of multi-temporal images. This study briefly reviews detectable changes on the Mars surface, including new impact craters, gullies, dark slope streaks, dust devil tracks and ice caps. To facilitate fast and efficient change detection for subsequent scientific investigations, a featured-based change detection method is developed based on automatic image registration, surface feature extraction and difference information statistics. Experimental results which use multi-temporal images demonstrate the promising potential of the proposed method

  8. Visual tritium imaging of In-Vessel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C. A.; Zweben, S. J.; Skinner, C. H.; Young, K. M.; Langish, S. W.; Nishi, M. F.; Shu, W. M.; Parker, J.; Isobe, K.

    2000-01-01

    A imaging detector has been developed for the purpose of providing a non-destructive, real time method of determining tritium concentrations on the surface of internal TFTR vacuum vessel components. The detector employs a green phosphor screen (P31, zinc sulfide: copper) with a wave length peak of 530 nm, a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera linked to a computer, and a detection chamber for inserting components recovered from the vacuum vessel. This detector is capable of determining tritium concentrations on the surfaces. The detector provides a method of imaging tritium deposition on the surfaces in a fairly rapid fashion

  9. Visual tritium imaging of in-vessel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Zweben, S.J.; Skinner, C.H.; Young, K.M.; Langish, S.W.; Nishi, M.F.; Shu, W.M.; Parker, J.; Isobe, K.

    2000-01-01

    An imaging detector has been developed for the purpose of providing a non-destructive, real time method of determining tritium concentrations on the surface of internal TFTR vacuum vessel components. The detector employs a green phosphor screen (P31, zinc sulfide: copper) with a wave length peak of 530 nm, a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera linked to a computer, and a detection chamber for inserting components recovered from the vacuum vessel. This detector is capable of determining tritium concentrations on the surfaces. The detector provides a method of imaging tritium deposition on the surfaces in a fairly rapid fashion

  10. Detecting image edge from projections using Discrete Radon Transform properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jing; Li Zheng

    2004-01-01

    The authors studied the distributed 2-D convolution of Discrete Radon Transform, and developed a method of image processing used directly on the projection data in Computerized Tomography. The special case of edge detection and its computer simulated results are demonstrated. The paper also compared the traditional image edge detection method with the new method, analyzed the effecting factors of calculating time. It is proved that the new method is superior to the traditional method in calculating time. The advantage and application potential of the new method are also discussed. (authors)

  11. M2DART: a real image rear-projection display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Leonard G.; Wight, Don R.; Peppler, Philipp W.

    1999-08-01

    The Mobile Modular Display for Advanced Research and Training (M2DART) was designed and fabricated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Warfighter Training Research Facility. The M2DART is part of a long term development goal of AFRL to produce a display and imaging system combination with significantly improved visual acuity in a full field-of- view/field-of-regard environment. The M2DART is an eight- channel, state-of-the-art, real image, rear-projection visual display system. It is a full color, high resolution, wraparound display designed for use with single-seat cockpit simulators. Depending on the number of available image generator channels, the system allows for a wide instantaneous field-of-view, when used in conjunction with a magnetic head tracker and video router combination to provide a full field- of-regard. The display is designed to accommodate a variety of visual image generators and cockpit simulators. The system uses commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) BARCO CRT projectors to display the out-the-window (OTW) visual imagery to the pilot. The M2DART concept demonstrates that a rear-projected, real image approach is a viable means of providing full color imagery to flight simulators with improved brightness and resolution characteristics. The final design of the M2DART represents a balance between such considerations as training requirements, the number of available image generator channels, system resolution, field of view, brightness, image stability and maintainability. This paper will provide a system description, which includes design trade-off considerations, hardware configuration, screen geometry, field of view, and performance specifications.

  12. Measuring Brand Image Effects of Flagship Projects for Place Brands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zenker, Sebastian; Beckmann, Suzanne C.

    2013-01-01

    , which was originally developed for product brands. An experimental design was used to first measure the Hamburg brand as such and then the changes in the brand perceptions after priming the participants (N=209) for one of the three different flagship projects. The findings reveal several important......Cities invest large sums of money in ‘flagship projects’, with the aim of not only developing the city as such, but also changing the perceptions of the city brand towards a desired image. The city of Hamburg, Germany, is currently investing euro575 million in order to build a new symphony hall...... (Elbphilharmonie), euro400 million to develop the ‘International Architectural Fair’ and it is also considering candidature again for the ‘Olympic Games’ in 2024/2028. As assessing the image effects of such projects is rather difficult, this article introduces an improved version of the Brand Concept Map approach...

  13. IDENTIFYING SURFACE CHANGES ON HRSC IMAGES OF THE MARS SOUTH POLAR RESIDUAL CAP (SPRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. D. Putri

    2016-06-01

    Orthorectified Images (ORIs and projected into polar stereographic projection using DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; German Aerospace Center’s VICAR and GIS software with modifications developed by Kim & Muller (2009. Surface changes are identified in the Mars SPRC region and analysed based on their appearance in the HRSC images.

  14. Information Pattern in Imaging of a Rough Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abul’khanov, S. R.; Kazanskiy, N. L.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a method of parametrization of a rough surface image based on its information pattern. We have determined that the image information pattern makes it possible to keep track of any variations in the number of pixels in the image of the controlled rough surface of at least 0.192 per cent of the total number of image pixels. The offered method permits to compensate a non-linear perception of the controlled surface by a human eye. We have determined a ratio of the number of these pixels to the total number of image pixels. Such ratios, was treated as a certain square area. We packed this squares without intercrossings in the square of 2. This type of squares packing was designated as an information pattern. Using the information pattern, the parameter value was obtained. We have determined that the parameter value can keep track of any variations of the number of pixels in the image of the rough surface from at least 0.192 percent.

  15. Determining Surface Material Properties Using Satellite Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloudeman, C.; Gerace, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge of soil moisture content is necessary for drought monitoring, crop irrigation, and water runoff. Remote sensing techniques provide a more efficient alternative to traditional field measurements for determining soil moisture content. Thermal infrared sensors from Landsat, MODIS Aqua & Terra, and AVHRR MetOp A & B satellites were used to find thermal inertia, which is highly correlated with soil moisture. A diurnal cycle is converted from band effective radiance to Land Surface Temperature (LST) using Planck's Law for blackbody radiation and a modified split-window algorithm. The THERM model for finding expected LST is then used to determine the material properties. A second approach was used to calculate apparent thermal inertia and soil moisture content from day/ night pairs of LST. For this method, only the MODIS Aqua LST product was used.To this end, we have observed clear differences in moisture between areas of vegetation and sand and between different crop fields. Our results indicate that matching the observed data with the THERM model could be improved with increased satellite measurements.

  16. Surfaced-based investigations plan, Volume 4: Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This document represents a detailed summary of design plans for surface-based investigations to be conducted for site characterization of the Yucca Mountain site. These plans are current as of December 1988. The description of surface-based site characterization activities contained in this document is intended to give all interested parties an understanding of the current plans for site characterization of Yucca Mountain. The maps presented in Volume 4 are products of the Geographic Information System (GIS) being used by the Yucca Mountain Project. The ARC/INFO GIS software, developed by Environmental Systems Research Institute, was used to digitize and process these SBIP maps. The maps were prepared using existing US Geological Survey (USGS) maps as a planimetric base. Roads and other surface features were interpreted from a variety of sources and entered into the GIS. Sources include the USGS maps, 1976 USGS orthophotoquads and aerial photography, 1986 and 1987 aerial photography, surveyed coordinates of field sites, and a combination of various maps, figures, descriptions and approximate coordinates of proposed locations for future activities

  17. Feature extraction and classifcation in surface grading application using multivariate statistical projection models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats-Montalbán, José M.; López, Fernando; Valiente, José M.; Ferrer, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present an innovative way to simultaneously perform feature extraction and classification for the quality control issue of surface grading by applying two well known multivariate statistical projection tools (SIMCA and PLS-DA). These tools have been applied to compress the color texture data describing the visual appearance of surfaces (soft color texture descriptors) and to directly perform classification using statistics and predictions computed from the extracted projection models. Experiments have been carried out using an extensive image database of ceramic tiles (VxC TSG). This image database is comprised of 14 different models, 42 surface classes and 960 pieces. A factorial experimental design has been carried out to evaluate all the combinations of several factors affecting the accuracy rate. Factors include tile model, color representation scheme (CIE Lab, CIE Luv and RGB) and compression/classification approach (SIMCA and PLS-DA). In addition, a logistic regression model is fitted from the experiments to compute accuracy estimates and study the factors effect. The results show that PLS-DA performs better than SIMCA, achieving a mean accuracy rate of 98.95%. These results outperform those obtained in a previous work where the soft color texture descriptors in combination with the CIE Lab color space and the k-NN classi.er achieved a 97.36% of accuracy.

  18. Digital image processing: Cylindrical surface plane development of CAREM fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caccavelli, J; Cativa Tolosa, S; Gommes, C

    2012-01-01

    As part of the development of fuel pellets (FPs) for nuclear reactor CAREM-25, is necessary to systematize the analysis of the mechanical integrity of the FPs that is now done manually by a human operator. Following specifications and standards of reference for this purpose, the FPs should be inspected visually for detecting material discontinuities in the FPs surfaces to minimize any deterioration, loss of material and excessive breakage during operation and load of fuel bars. The material discontinuities are classified into two defects: surface cracks and chips. For each of these surface defects exist acceptance criteria that determine if the fuel pellet (FP) as a whole is accepted or rejected. One criteria for surface cracks is that they do not exceed one third (1/3) of the circumferential surface of the FP. The FP has cylindrical shape, so some of these acceptance criteria make difficult to analyze the FP in a single photographic image. Depending on the axial rotation of the FP, the crack could not be entirely visualized on the picture frame. Even a single crack that appears in different parts of the FP rotated images may appear to be different cracks in the FP when it is actually one. For this reason it is necessary, for the automatic detection and measurement of surface defects, obtain the circumferential surface of the FP into a single image in order to decide the acceptance or reject of the FP. As the FP shape is cylindrical, it is possible to obtain the flat development of the cylindrical surface (surface unrolling) of the FPs into a single image combining the image set of the axial rotation of the FP. In this work, we expose the procedure to implement the flat development of the cylindrical surface (surface unrolling). Starting from a photographic image of the FP surface, which represents the projection of a cylinder in the plane, we obtain three-dimensional information of each point on the cylindrical surface of the FP (3D-mapping). Then, we can

  19. Superresolution near-field imaging with surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lei; Liu, Zhaolun; Schuster, Gerard

    2018-02-01

    We present the theory for near-field superresolution imaging with surface waves and time reverse mirrors (TRMs). Theoretical formulae and numerical results show that applying the TRM operation to surface waves in an elastic half-space can achieve superresolution imaging of subwavelength scatterers if they are located less than about 1/2 of the shear wavelength from the source line. We also show that the TRM operation for a single frequency is equivalent to natural migration, which uses the recorded data to approximate the Green's functions for migration, and only costs O(N4) algebraic operations for post-stack migration compared to O(N6) operations for natural pre-stack migration. Here, we assume the sources and receivers are on an N × N grid and there are N2 trial image points on the free surface. Our theoretical predictions of superresolution are validated with tests on synthetic data. The field-data tests suggest that hidden faults at the near surface can be detected with subwavelength imaging of surface waves by using the TRM operation if they are no deeper than about 1/2 the dominant shear wavelength.

  20. Superresolution Near-field Imaging with Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Lei

    2017-10-21

    We present the theory for near-field superresolution imaging with surface waves and time reverse mirrors (TRMs). Theoretical formulas and numerical results show that applying the TRM operation to surface waves in an elastic half-space can achieve superresolution imaging of subwavelength scatterers if they are located less than about 1/2 of the shear wavelength from the source line. We also show that the TRM operation for a single frequency is equivalent to natural migration, which uses the recorded data to approximate the Green’s functions for migration, and only costs O(N4) algebraic operations for poststack migration compared to O(N6) operations for natural prestack migration. Here, we assume the sources and receivers are on an N × N grid and there are N2 trial image points on the free surface. Our theoretical predictions of superresolution are validated with tests on synthetic data. The field-data tests suggest that hidden faults at the near surface can be detected with subwavelength imaging of surface waves by using the TRM operation if they are no deeper than about 1/2 the dominant shear wavelength.

  1. Simulation of Langmuir-Blodgett film surface STM images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agabekov, V.E.; Zhavnerko, G.K.; Bar, G.; Cantov, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    The simulation of the STM image of a hydrocarbon tail of the fatty acid was carried out and compared to the experimental results. The simulation procedure includes calculations of the distribution of an isolated molecule electronic density by the extended Huckel-Hoffman method. An agreement between the calculated and experimental STM images of closely packed Langmuir-Blodgett film of cobalt behenate on the graphite surface and the adsorbed molecules constituting bi- and multilayer Langmuir-Blodgett films can be neglected in simulations of STM images. (author)

  2. STM Imaging of Localized Surface Plasmons on Individual Gold Nanoislands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy A; Banerjee, Progna; Nguyen, Duc; Lyding, Joseph W; Gruebele, Martin; Jain, Prashant K

    2018-04-19

    An optically modulated scanning tunneling microscopy technique developed for measurement of single-molecule optical absorption is used here to image the light absorption by individual Au nanoislands and Au nanostructures. The technique is shown to spatially map, with nanometer resolution, localized surface plasmons (LSPs) excited within the nanoislands. Electrodynamic simulations demonstrate the correspondence of the measured images to plasmonic near-field intensity maps. The optical STM imaging technique captures the wavelength, polarization, and geometry dependence of the LSP resonances and their corresponding near-fields. Thus, we introduce a tool for real-space, nanometer-scale visualization of optical energy absorption, transport, and dissipation in complex plasmonic nanostructures.

  3. An adaptive filtered back-projection for photoacoustic image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, He; Bustamante, Gilbert; Peterson, Ralph; Ye, Jing Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an improved filtered-back-projection (FBP) algorithm for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), which allows image reconstruction with higher quality compared to images reconstructed through traditional algorithms. Methods: A rigorous expression of a weighting function has been derived directly from a photoacoustic wave equation and used as a ramp filter in Fourier domain. The authors’ new algorithm utilizes this weighting function to precisely calculate each photoacoustic signal’s contribution and then reconstructs the image based on the retarded potential generated from the photoacoustic sources. In addition, an adaptive criterion has been derived for selecting the cutoff frequency of a low pass filter. Two computational phantoms were created to test the algorithm. The first phantom contained five spheres with each sphere having different absorbances. The phantom was used to test the capability for correctly representing both the geometry and the relative absorbed energy in a planar measurement system. The authors also used another phantom containing absorbers of different sizes with overlapping geometry to evaluate the performance of the new method for complicated geometry. In addition, random noise background was added to the simulated data, which were obtained by using an arc-shaped array of 50 evenly distributed transducers that spanned 160° over a circle with a radius of 65 mm. A normalized factor between the neighbored transducers was applied for correcting measurement signals in PAT simulations. The authors assumed that the scanned object was mounted on a holder that rotated over the full 360° and the scans were set to a sampling rate of 20.48 MHz. Results: The authors have obtained reconstructed images of the computerized phantoms by utilizing the new FBP algorithm. From the reconstructed image of the first phantom, one can see that this new approach allows not only obtaining a sharp image but also showing

  4. RGB color coded images in scanning electron microscopy of biological surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kofroňová, Olga; Benada, Oldřich

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2017), s. 349-352 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20229S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Biological surfaces * Color image s * Scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 0.673, year: 2016

  5. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of reconstructed images using projections with noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, R.T.; Assis, J.T. de

    1988-01-01

    The reconstruction of a two-dimencional image from one-dimensional projections in an analytic algorithm ''convolution method'' is simulated on a microcomputer. In this work it was analysed the effects caused in the reconstructed image in function of the number of projections and noise level added to the projection data. Qualitative and quantitative (distortion and image noise) comparison were done with the original image and the reconstructed images. (author) [pt

  6. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA

  7. Remote microscopy and volumetric imaging on the surface of icy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Alejandro; Nowicki, Keith; Howett, Carly; Feldkhun, Daniel; Retherford, Kurt D.

    2017-10-01

    With NASA PIDDP support we have applied recent advancements in Fourier-domain microscopy to develop an instrument capable of microscopic imaging from meter-scale distances for use on a planetary lander on the surface of an icy satellite or other planetary bodies. Without moving parts, our instrument projects dynamic patterns of laser light onto a distant target using a lightweight large-aperture reflector, which then collects the light scattered or fluoresced by the target on a fast photon-bucket detector. Using Fourier Transform based techniques, we reconstruct an image from the detected light. The remote microscope has been demonstrated to produce 2D images with better than 15 micron lateral resolution for targets at a distance of 5 meters and is capable of linearly proportionally higher resolution at shorter distances. The remote microscope is also capable of providing three-dimensional (3D) microscopic imaging capabilities, allowing future surface scientists to explore the morphology of microscopic features in surface ices, for example. The instrument enables microscopic in-situ imaging during day or night without the use of a robotic arm, greatly facilitating the surface operations for a lander or rover while expanding the area of investigation near a landing site for improved science targeting. We are developing this remote microscope for in-situ planetary exploration as a collaboration between the Southwest Research Institute, LambdaMetrics, and the University of Colorado.

  8. Surface and borehole electromagnetic imaging of conducting contaminant plumes. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    'Electromagnetic induction tomography is a promising new tool for imaging electrical conductivity variations in the earth. The EM source field is produced by induction coil (magnetic dipole) transmitters deployed at the surface or in boreholes. Vertical and horizontal component magnetic field detectors are deployed in other boreholes or on the surface. Sources and receivers are typically deployed in a configuration surrounding the region of interest. The goal of this procedure is to image electrical conductivity variations in the earth, much as x-ray tomography is used to image density variations through cross-sections of the body. Although such EM field techniques have been developed and applied, the algorithms for inverting the magnetic data to produce the desired images of electrical conductivity have not kept pace. One of the main reasons for the lag in the algorithm development has been the fact that the magnetic induction problem is inherently three dimensional: other imaging methods such as x-ray and seismic can make use of two-dimensional approximations that are not too far from reality, but the author does not have this luxury in EM induction tomography. In addition, previous field experiments were conducted at controlled test sites that typically do not have much external noise or extensive surface clutter problems often associated with environmental sites. To use the same field techniques in environments more typical of cleanup sites requires a new set of data processing tools to remove the effects of both noise and clutter. The goal of this project is to join theory and experiment to produce enhanced images of electrically conducting fluids underground, allowing better localization of contaminants and improved planning strategies for the subsequent remediation efforts. After explaining the physical context in more detail, this report will summarize the progress made in the first year of this project: (1) on code development and (2) on field tests of

  9. SIMS imaging in the analysis of chemically altered coal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.R. (Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada)); Maephee, J.A. (Canmet Energy Research Lab., 555 Booth St., Ottawa, Ontario (CA))

    1989-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been used to study the low temperature oxidation of coal. Specifically, SIMS imaging has been used to study the surface distribution of /sup 16/O/sup -/ and /sup 18/O/sup -/ after mild oxidation in /sup 18/O/sub 2/ and to correlate the results with the organic and inorganic regions on the coal. In addition, coal surfaces have been treated with Tollens' reagent and the resulting silver deposition has been used as a probe for specific reactive oxygen functional groups. The results suggest the presence of surface peroxides, as well as an intimate association of reactive oxygen with the mineral apatite.

  10. Sparse Nonlinear Electromagnetic Imaging Accelerated With Projected Steepest Descent Algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Desmal, Abdulla

    2017-04-03

    An efficient electromagnetic inversion scheme for imaging sparse 3-D domains is proposed. The scheme achieves its efficiency and accuracy by integrating two concepts. First, the nonlinear optimization problem is constrained using L₀ or L₁-norm of the solution as the penalty term to alleviate the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. The resulting Tikhonov minimization problem is solved using nonlinear Landweber iterations (NLW). Second, the efficiency of the NLW is significantly increased using a steepest descent algorithm. The algorithm uses a projection operator to enforce the sparsity constraint by thresholding the solution at every iteration. Thresholding level and iteration step are selected carefully to increase the efficiency without sacrificing the convergence of the algorithm. Numerical results demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed imaging scheme in reconstructing sparse 3-D dielectric profiles.

  11. Ultrasonic phased array with surface acoustic wave for imaging cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Ohara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To accurately measure crack lengths, we developed a real-time surface imaging method (SAW PA combining an ultrasonic phased array (PA with a surface acoustic wave (SAW. SAW PA using a Rayleigh wave with a high sensitivity to surface defects was implemented for contact testing using a wedge with the third critical angle that allows the Rayleigh wave to be generated. Here, to realize high sensitivity imaging, SAW PA was optimized in terms of the wedge and the imaging area. The improved SAW PA was experimentally demonstrated using a fatigue crack specimen made of an aluminum alloy. For further verification in more realistic specimens, SAW PA was applied to stainless-steel specimens with a fatigue crack and stress corrosion cracks (SCCs. The fatigue crack was visualized with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and its length was measured with a high accuracy of better than 1 mm. The SCCs generated in the heat-affected zones (HAZs of a weld were successfully visualized with a satisfactory SNR, although responses at coarse grains appeared throughout the imaging area. The SCC lengths were accurately measured. The imaging results also precisely showed complicated distributions of SCCs, which were in excellent agreement with the optically observed distributions.

  12. Surface wave multipath signals in near-field microwave imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Paul M; Shubitidze, Fridon; Fanning, Margaret W; Kmiec, Maciej; Epstein, Neil R; Paulsen, Keith D

    2012-01-01

    Microwave imaging techniques are prone to signal corruption from unwanted multipath signals. Near-field systems are especially vulnerable because signals can scatter and reflect from structural objects within or on the boundary of the imaging zone. These issues are further exacerbated when surface waves are generated with the potential of propagating along the transmitting and receiving antenna feed lines and other low-loss paths. In this paper, we analyze the contributions of multi-path signals arising from surface wave effects. Specifically, experiments were conducted with a near-field microwave imaging array positioned at variable heights from the floor of a coupling fluid tank. Antenna arrays with different feed line lengths in the fluid were also evaluated. The results show that surface waves corrupt the received signals over the longest transmission distances across the measurement array. However, the surface wave effects can be eliminated provided the feed line lengths are sufficiently long independently of the distance of the transmitting/receiving antenna tips from the imaging tank floor. Theoretical predictions confirm the experimental observations.

  13. Surface Wave Multipath Signals in Near-Field Microwave Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Meaney

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave imaging techniques are prone to signal corruption from unwanted multipath signals. Near-field systems are especially vulnerable because signals can scatter and reflect from structural objects within or on the boundary of the imaging zone. These issues are further exacerbated when surface waves are generated with the potential of propagating along the transmitting and receiving antenna feed lines and other low-loss paths. In this paper, we analyze the contributions of multi-path signals arising from surface wave effects. Specifically, experiments were conducted with a near-field microwave imaging array positioned at variable heights from the floor of a coupling fluid tank. Antenna arrays with different feed line lengths in the fluid were also evaluated. The results show that surface waves corrupt the received signals over the longest transmission distances across the measurement array. However, the surface wave effects can be eliminated provided the feed line lengths are sufficiently long independently of the distance of the transmitting/receiving antenna tips from the imaging tank floor. Theoretical predictions confirm the experimental observations.

  14. Surface Reconstruction and Image Enhancement via $L^1$-Minimization

    KAUST Repository

    Dobrev, Veselin

    2010-01-01

    A surface reconstruction technique based on minimization of the total variation of the gradient is introduced. Convergence of the method is established, and an interior-point algorithm solving the associated linear programming problem is introduced. The reconstruction algorithm is illustrated on various test cases including natural and urban terrain data, and enhancement oflow-resolution or aliased images. Copyright © by SIAM.

  15. A Novel Algorithm of Surface Eliminating in Undersurface Optoacoustic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhulina Yulia V

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the task of optoacoustic imaging of the objects located under the surface covering them. In this paper, we suggest the algorithm of the surface eliminating based on the fact that the intensity of the image as a function of the spatial point should change slowly inside the local objects, and will suffer a discontinuity of the spatial gradients on their boundaries. The algorithm forms the 2-dimensional curves along which the discontinuity of the signal derivatives is detected. Then, the algorithm divides the signal space into the areas along these curves. The signals inside the areas with the maximum level of the signal amplitudes and the maximal gradient absolute values on their edges are put equal to zero. The rest of the signals are used for the image restoration. This method permits to reconstruct the picture of the surface boundaries with a higher contrast than that of the surface detection technique based on the maximums of the received signals. This algorithm does not require any prior knowledge of the signals' statistics inside and outside the local objects. It may be used for reconstructing any images with the help of the signals representing the integral over the object's volume. Simulation and real data are also provided to validate the proposed method.

  16. Representing images using curvilinear feature driven subdivision surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hailing; Zheng, Jianmin; Wei, Lei

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a subdivision-based vector graphics for image representation and creation. The graphics representation is a subdivision surface defined by a triangular mesh augmented with color attribute at vertices and feature attribute at edges. Special cubic B-splines are proposed to describe curvilinear features of an image. New subdivision rules are then designed accordingly, which are applied to the mesh and the color attribute to define the spatial distribution and piecewise-smoothly varying colors of the image. A sharpness factor is introduced to control the color transition across the curvilinear edges. In addition, an automatic algorithm is developed to convert a raster image into such a vector graphics representation. The algorithm first detects the curvilinear features of the image, then constructs a triangulation based on the curvilinear edges and feature attributes, and finally iteratively optimizes the vertex color attributes and updates the triangulation. Compared with existing vector-based image representations, the proposed representation and algorithm have the following advantages in addition to the common merits (such as editability and scalability): 1) they allow flexible mesh topology and handle images or objects with complicated boundaries or features effectively; 2) they are able to faithfully reconstruct curvilinear features, especially in modeling subtle shading effects around feature curves; and 3) they offer a simple way for the user to create images in a freehand style. The effectiveness of the proposed method has been demonstrated in experiments.

  17. Whole-surface round object imaging method using line-scan hyperspectral imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    To achieve comprehensive online quality and safety inspection of fruits, whole-surface sample presentation and imaging regimes must be considered. Specifically, a round object sample presentation method is under development to achieve effective whole-surface sample evaluation based on the use of a s...

  18. Detection of cracks on concrete surfaces by hyperspectral image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruno O.; Valença, Jonatas; Júlio, Eduardo

    2017-06-01

    All large infrastructures worldwide must have a suitable monitoring and maintenance plan, aiming to evaluate their behaviour and predict timely interventions. In the particular case of concrete infrastructures, the detection and characterization of crack patterns is a major indicator of their structural response. In this scope, methods based on image processing have been applied and presented. Usually, methods focus on image binarization followed by applications of mathematical morphology to identify cracks on concrete surface. In most cases, publications are focused on restricted areas of concrete surfaces and in a single crack. On-site, the methods and algorithms have to deal with several factors that interfere with the results, namely dirt and biological colonization. Thus, the automation of a procedure for on-site characterization of crack patterns is of great interest. This advance may result in an effective tool to support maintenance strategies and interventions planning. This paper presents a research based on the analysis and processing of hyper-spectral images for detection and classification of cracks on concrete structures. The objective of the study is to evaluate the applicability of several wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum for classification of cracks in concrete surfaces. An image survey considering highly discretized wavelengths between 425 nm and 950 nm was performed on concrete specimens, with bandwidths of 25 nm. The concrete specimens were produced with a crack pattern induced by applying a load with displacement control. The tests were conducted to simulate usual on-site drawbacks. In this context, the surface of the specimen was subjected to biological colonization (leaves and moss). To evaluate the results and enhance crack patterns a clustering method, namely k-means algorithm, is being applied. The research conducted allows to define the suitability of using clustering k-means algorithm combined with hyper-spectral images highly

  19. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun

    2016-09-06

    We demonstrate that near-surface heterogeneities can be imaged by natural migration of backscattered surface waves in common shot gathers. No velocity model is required because the data are migrated onto surface points with the virtual Green\\'s functions computed from the shot gathers. Migrating shot gathers recorded by 2D and 3D land surveys validates the effectiveness of detecting nearsurface heterogeneities by natural migration. The implication is that more accurate hazard maps can be created by migrating surface waves in land surveys.

  20. MR imaging of the knee with high-field-strength surface coil imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laster, R.; Halford, H.H.; Brooks, T.; Geldmeier, R.

    1987-01-01

    A prospective study of high-resolution surface coil imaging of the knee in a high-field-strength (1.5-T) MR imaging system will be performed to assess the ability of MR to detect bony, ligamentous and cartilaginous abnormalities of the knee. Coronal spin-echo images (echo time [TE], 25 msec; repetition time [TR] 1,000 msec) and sagittal multiecho images (TE, 25, 70 msec; TR, 1,000, 2,000 msec) are displayed demonstrating normal anatomy, meniscal and ligamentous injuries, and miscellaneous lesions such as osteomyelitis. A minimum of 100 patients are examined, and arthroscopic correlation will be available in at least 60% of the patients

  1. A new framework of image reconstruction from fan beam projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.-H.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present a unified framework to reconstruct images for both fan beam and cone beam projections. The important feature of our theoretical framework is that it does not depend on the classical concept of the Radon transform at all. This property allows us to directly generalize the ideas and techniques developed in this paper to the cone beam reconstruction problem. In this paper, we extract such a framework from developing a new image reconstruction scheme from fan beam projections. Our new scheme also provides us new understanding of fan beam reconstruction problem. Our main results for the fan beam reconstruction are the following: First, we derive a general reconstruction scheme, in which the data sufficiency condition is transparently revealed by the reconstruction formula. Specifically, the data sufficiency condition for an accurate reconstruction of a region of interest (ROI) is that all the lines passing through the ROI must intersect the source trajectory at least once. Second, we further simplify the general reconstruction scheme by following three major steps of our new framework: (i) using symmetries of intermediate function; (ii) handling the data redundancy; (iii) changing discrete summation over the possible focal points into an integral along the source trajectory. After these steps, we obtain a new filtered backprojection algorithm. The key characteristic of this new algorithm is to take derivative of measured data with respect to the trajectory parameter. In practice, we can trade this derivative to some other continuous functions. In the configuration of a circular source trajectory with a third generation arc/collinear detector, we demonstrate how to remove the undesirable derivative of measured projection data. It results in a new algorithm for the sequential reconstruction of a ROI with a general normalized weighting function

  2. Spectrally enhanced image resolution of tooth enamel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Short-wavelength 405 nm laser illumination of surface dental enamel using an ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) produced enhanced detail of dental topography. The surfaces of human extracted teeth and artificial erosions were imaged with 405 nm, 444 nm, 532 nm, or 635 nm illumination lasers. The obtained images were then processed offline to compensate for any differences in the illumination beam diameters between the different lasers. Scattering and absorption coefficients for a Monte Carlo model of light propagation in dental enamel for 405 nm were scaled from published data at 532 nm and 633 nm. The value of the scattering coefficient used in the model was scaled from the coefficients at 532 nm and 633 nm by the inverse third power of wavelength. Simulations showed that the penetration depth of short-wavelength illumination is localized close to the enamel surface, while long-wavelength illumination travels much further and is backscattered from greater depths. Therefore, images obtained using short wavelength laser are not contaminated by the superposition of light reflected from enamel tissue at greater depths. Hence, the SFE with short-wavelength illumination may make it possible to visualize surface manifestations of phenomena such as demineralization, thus better aiding the clinician in the detection of early caries.

  3. Image applications for coastal resource planning: Elkhorn Slough Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitek, Rikk G.; Sharp, Gary D.; VanCoops, Jonathan; Fitzgerald, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project has been to evaluate the utility of digital spectral imagery at two levels of resolution for large scale, accurate, auto-classification of land cover along the Central California Coast. Although remote sensing technology offers obvious advantages over on-the-ground mapping, there are substantial trade-offs that must be made between resolving power and costs. Higher resolution images can theoretically be used to identify smaller habitat patches, but they usually require more scenes to cover a given area and processing these images is computationally intense requiring much more computer time and memory. Lower resolution images can cover much larger areas, are less costly to store, process, and manipulate, but due to their larger pixel size can lack the resolving power of the denser images. This lack of resolving power can be critical in regions such as the Central California Coast where important habitat change often occurs on a scale of 10 meters. Our approach has been to compare vegetation and habitat classification results from two aircraft-based spectral scenes covering the same study area but at different levels of resolution with a previously produced ground-truthed land cover base map of the area. Both of the spectral images used for this project were of significantly higher resolution than the satellite-based LandSat scenes used in the C-CAP program. The lower reaches of the Elkhorn Slough watershed was chosen as an ideal study site because it encompasses a suite of important vegetation types and habitat loss processes characteristic of the central coast region. Dramatic habitat alterations have and are occurring within the Elkhorn Slough drainage area, including erosion and sedimentation, land use conversion, wetland loss, and incremental loss due to development and encroachnnent by agriculture. Additonally, much attention has already been focused on the Elkhorn Slough due to its status as a National Marine Education and Research

  4. Implementation of GPU-accelerated back projection for EPR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zhiwei; Redler, Gage; Epel, Boris; Qian, Yuhua; Halpern, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) Imaging (EPRI) is a robust method for measuring in vivo oxygen concentration (pO2). For 3D pulse EPRI, a commonly used reconstruction algorithm is the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm, in which the backprojection process is computationally intensive and may be time consuming when implemented on a CPU. A multistage implementation of the backprojection can be used for acceleration, however it is not flexible (requires equal linear angle projection distribution) and may still be time consuming. In this work, single-stage backprojection is implemented on a GPU (Graphics Processing Units) having 1152 cores to accelerate the process. The GPU implementation results in acceleration by over a factor of 200 overall and by over a factor of 3500 if only the computing time is considered. Some important experiences regarding the implementation of GPU-accelerated backprojection for EPRI are summarized. The resulting accelerated image reconstruction is useful for real-time image reconstruction monitoring and other time sensitive applications.

  5. Multiview Discriminative Geometry Preserving Projection for Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziqiang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In many image classification applications, it is common to extract multiple visual features from different views to describe an image. Since different visual features have their own specific statistical properties and discriminative powers for image classification, the conventional solution for multiple view data is to concatenate these feature vectors as a new feature vector. However, this simple concatenation strategy not only ignores the complementary nature of different views, but also ends up with “curse of dimensionality.” To address this problem, we propose a novel multiview subspace learning algorithm in this paper, named multiview discriminative geometry preserving projection (MDGPP for feature extraction and classification. MDGPP can not only preserve the intraclass geometry and interclass discrimination information under a single view, but also explore the complementary property of different views to obtain a low-dimensional optimal consensus embedding by using an alternating-optimization-based iterative algorithm. Experimental results on face recognition and facial expression recognition demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  6. Project proposal for surface-mined land enhancement (SMILE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, A.M.

    1975-01-29

    Reclaiming strip-mined land is a program ideally suited to meet the requirements of the Job Opportunities Program. It will provide healthy and vigorous outdoor activity involving surveying, earth-moving, revegetation, tree planting, construction of roads, paths, lakes, and park facilities. It is work which states and communities are anxious to have started. It can be done with relatively small capital expenditure. Technical expertise is available in the various states concerned. FEA is the ideal agency to initiate such a project. It has regional offices throughout the country with close contacts with states and local communities. It is a temporary emergency agency with considerable experience in initiating and carrying out crash programs. It is not tied down to the procedures and bureaucratic problems which burden an old-line agency attempting to take on new work. Finally, FEA has a vital interest in energy and surface mining in particular. It played a major role in drafting the new legislation. The initial program development is described, including the technical aspects, economic aspects and administration, cost, budget, cooperation with state agencies, etc.

  7. Surface Projection of Interosseous Foramen of the Leg: Cadaver Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Arguello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study was conducted to identify the surface projection of the interosseous foramen and associated structures of the proximal leg using the average clinician’s thumb width as a quick measurement to assist in differential diagnosis and treatment. Methods. Twelve cadavers (5 males and 7 females, age range = 51–91 years, and mean age = 76.9 were dissected for analysis. Location and size of interosseous foramen, location of anterior tibial artery, location of deep fibular nerve, and corresponding arterial branches were measured and converted into thumb widths. Results. Mean thumb width measured among the cadavers was 17.94±3.9 mm. The interosseous foramen measured was approximately 1 thumb width vertically (18.47±3.0 mm and 1/2 thumb width horizontally (7.32±2.1 mm and was located approximately 1 thumb width distally to the tibial tuberosity (20.81±6.8 mm and 2 thumb widths (37.47±4.7 mm lateral to the tibial ridge. The anterior tibial artery and deep fibular nerve converged approximately 4 thumb widths (74.31±14.8 mm inferior to the tibial tuberosity and 2 thumb widths (33.46±4.9 mm lateral to the tibial ridge. Conclusion. Clinicians may identify anatomical structures of the proximal leg with palpation using the thumb width for measurement.

  8. A monthly quality assurance procedure for 3D surface imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, H Omar; Klein, Eric E; Gokhroo, Garima; Santanam, Lakshmi

    2010-12-21

    A procedure for periodic quality assurance of a video surface imaging system is introduced. AlignRT is a video camera-based patient localization system that captures and compares images of a patient's topography to a DICOM-formatted external contour, then calculates shifts required to accurately reposition the patient. This technical note describes the tools and methods implemented in our department to verify correct and accurate operation of the AlignRT hardware and software components. The procedure described is performed monthly and complements a daily calibration of the system.

  9. Localized surface plasmon enhanced cellular imaging using random metallic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Taehwang; Lee, Wonju; Kim, Donghyun

    2017-02-01

    We have studied fluorescence cellular imaging with randomly distributed localized near-field induced by silver nano-islands. For the fabrication of nano-islands, a 10-nm silver thin film evaporated on a BK7 glass substrate with an adhesion layer of 2-nm thick chromium. Micrometer sized silver square pattern was defined using e-beam lithography and then the film was annealed at 200°C. Raw images were restored using electric field distribution produced on the surface of random nano-islands. Nano-islands were modeled from SEM images. 488-nm p-polarized light source was set to be incident at 60°. Simulation results show that localized electric fields were created among nano-islands and that their average size was found to be 135 nm. The feasibility was tested using conventional total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy while the angle of incidence was adjusted to maximize field enhancement. Mouse microphage cells were cultured on nano-islands, and actin filaments were selectively stained with FITC-conjugated phalloidin. Acquired images were deconvolved based on linear imaging theory, in which molecular distribution was sampled by randomly distributed localized near-field and blurred by point spread function of far-field optics. The optimum fluorophore distribution was probabilistically estimated by repetitively matching a raw image. The deconvolved images are estimated to have a resolution in the range of 100-150 nm largely determined by the size of localized near-fields. We also discuss and compare the results with images acquired with periodic nano-aperture arrays in various optical configurations to excite localized plasmonic fields and to produce super-resolved molecular images.

  10. Surface image of herniated disc on three-dimensional CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kyung Il; Jeon, Chang Hoon; Kim, Sun Yong; Kim, Ok Hwa; Suh, Jung Ho [Ajou Univ. College of Medicine, Suwon(Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-01

    To evaluate surface configuration of herniated disc on three-dimensional CT. Three dimensional surface images reconstructed from CT scans(1 mm thick) of 24 surgically confirmed herniated discs in 23 patients were reviewed. Disc surface was classified into peripheral and central zones in contact with consecutive peripheral ring and central endplate. Surface irregularity was categorized into two types(local and general). The incidence, size, and extent of local irregularity were observed. General irregularity incidence and severity ranges in 4 grades, and peripheral width were evaluated. The findings were correlated with discography. Local irregularity compatible with anulus tear in discography was shown in all. It was large(13/24) and mainly peripheral tract extending to disc margin in protrusion(3/5) and sequestration(5/7), and cleft encompassing central zone to disc margin in extrusion(9/12). General irregularity was predominantly grade 3(15/22) and was shown in all except in 2 protrusions. Peripheral width was 0.56 of central radius. Extrusion in herniated disc shows characteristic cleft encompassing central zone to disc margin whereas sequestration or protrusion displays tract extending from peripheral zone to disc margin. Thus, three dimensional surface imaging may aid the diagnosis, follow-up, prediction, and treatment of herniated disc.

  11. DETECTING GLASS SURFACE CORROSION WITH IMAGE PROCESSING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafet AKDENİZ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Glass is a kind of amorphous materials that exhibits a transition from rigid to viscous state and finally liquid state when heated. For daily usage, it is desirable to have different forms and differenttransparencies for different purposes. Most widely used one is the one with high transparency and flat surface.One of the detrimental effects that glass is undergone during the storage or usage periods is corrosion. In this work, a way for detecting corrosion on the glass surface by image processing methodis presented.

  12. Imaging of Stellar Surfaces with the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-18

    Imaging stellar surfaces requires aperture diameters of sometimes hundreds of meters. In general, the diffraction limited angular resolution of an aper ...many practical complications of large aper - tures, ranging from the mechanical problems of building and supporting large mirrors to the computational...appropriate observatory layout and a data ac- quisition system tailored to the types of observations, as well as specific data processing techniques

  13. Calibration of Surface Plasmon Resonance Imager for Biochemical Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ktari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new Surface Plasmon Resonance imager (SPRi based on immobilized T4-phage for bacteria detection. First, we present the sensitivity of the SPR imager towards refractive index variation for biosensor application. The SPR imager can be calibrated versus different percentage of triethylene glycol mixture in ultrapure water. The system can be used as a refractometer with sensitivity below 5×10−5 in the range of 1.33300–1.34360. Second, bacteriophage (T4-phage can be physisorbed on gold microarray spots for bacteria detection. The kinetic physisorption of different concentrations of T4-phages can be observed in real time. Finally, two types of bacteria such as E. coli (gram negative and Lactobacillus (gram positive were used for positive and negative tests. The results show a selectivity of T4-phage toward E. coli with a detection limit below 104 CFU/mL and with good reproducibility.

  14. High-Resolution Seismic Imaging of Near-Surface Voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritto, R.; Korneev, V. A.; Elobaid, E. A.; Mohamed, F.; Sadooni, F.

    2017-12-01

    A major hazard in Qatar is the presence of karst, which is ubiquitous throughout the country including depressions, sinkholes, and caves. Causes for the development of karst include faulting and fracturing where fluids find pathways through limestone and dissolve the host rock to form caverns. Of particular concern in rapidly growing metropolitan areas that expand in heretofore unexplored regions are the collapse of such caverns. Because Qatar has seen a recent boom in construction, including the planning and development of complete new sub-sections of metropolitan areas, the development areas need to be investigated for the presence of karst to determine their suitability for the planned project. We present a suite of seismic techniques applied to a controlled experiment to detect, locate and estimate the size of a karst analog in form of a man-made water shaft on the campus of Qatar University, Doha, Qatar. Seismic waves are well suited for karst detection and characterization. Voids represent high-contrast seismic objects that exhibit strong responses due to incident seismic waves. However, the complex geometry of karst, including shape and size, makes their imaging nontrivial. While karst detection can be reduced to the simple problem of detecting an anomaly, karst characterization can be complicated by the 3D nature of the problem of unknown scale, where irregular surfaces can generate diffracted waves of different kind. In our presentation, we employ a variety of seismic techniques to demonstrate the detection and characterization of a vertical water collection shaft analyzing the phase, amplitude and spectral information of seismic waves that have been scattered by the object. We use the reduction in seismic wave amplitudes and the delay in phase arrival times in the geometrical shadow of the vertical shaft to independently detect and locate the object in space. Additionally, we use narrow band-pass filtered data combining two orthogonal transmission surveys

  15. Using IR Imaging of Water Surfaces for Estimating Piston Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gålfalk, M.; Bastviken, D.; Arneborg, L.

    2013-12-01

    The transport of gasses dissolved in surface waters across the water-atmosphere interface is controlled by the piston velocity (k). This coefficient has large implications for, e.g., greenhouse gas fluxes but is challenging to quantify in situ. At present, empirical k-wind speed relationships from a small number of studies and systems are often extrapolated without knowledge of model performance. It is therefore of interest to search for new methods for estimating k, and to compare the pros and cons of existing and new methods. Wind speeds in such models are often measured at a height of 10 meters. In smaller bodies of water such as lakes, wind speeds can vary dramatically across the surface through varying degrees of wind shadow from e.g. trees at the shoreline. More local measurements of the water surface, through wave heights or surface motion mapping, could give improved k-estimates over a surface, also taking into account wind fetch. At thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths water has very low reflectivity (depending on viewing angle) than can go below 1%, meaning that more than 99% is heat radiation giving a direct measurement of surface temperature variations. Using an IR camera at about 100 frames/s one could map surface temperature structures at a fraction of a mm depth even with waves present. In this presentation I will focus on IR imaging as a possible tool for estimating piston velocities. Results will be presented from IR field measurements, relating the motions of surface temperature structures to k calculated from other simultaneous measurements (flux chamber and ADV-Based Dissipation Rate), but also attempting to calculate k directly from the IR surface divergence. A relation between wave height and k will also be presented.

  16. Label-Free Biosensor Imaging on Photonic Crystal Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yue; Cunningham, Brian T

    2015-08-28

    We review the development and application of nanostructured photonic crystal surfaces and a hyperspectral reflectance imaging detection instrument which, when used together, represent a new form of optical microscopy that enables label-free, quantitative, and kinetic monitoring of biomaterial interaction with substrate surfaces. Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscopy (PCEM) has been used to detect broad classes of materials which include dielectric nanoparticles, metal plasmonic nanoparticles, biomolecular layers, and live cells. Because PCEM does not require cytotoxic stains or photobleachable fluorescent dyes, it is especially useful for monitoring the long-term interactions of cells with extracellular matrix surfaces. PCEM is only sensitive to the attachment of cell components within ~200 nm of the photonic crystal surface, which may correspond to the region of most interest for adhesion processes that involve stem cell differentiation, chemotaxis, and metastasis. PCEM has also demonstrated sufficient sensitivity for sensing nanoparticle contrast agents that are roughly the same size as protein molecules, which may enable applications in "digital" diagnostics with single molecule sensing resolution. We will review PCEM's development history, operating principles, nanostructure design, and imaging modalities that enable tracking of optical scatterers, emitters, absorbers, and centers of dielectric permittivity.

  17. Maximum intensity projection MR angiography using shifted image data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Yoshio; Ichinose, Nobuyasu; Hatanaka, Masahiko; Goro, Takehiko; Kitake, Shinichi; Hatta, Junicchi.

    1992-01-01

    The quality of MR angiograms has been significantly improved in past several years. Spatial resolution, however, is not sufficient for clinical use. On the other hand, MR image data can be filled at anywhere using Fourier shift theorem, and the quality of multi-planar reformed image has been reported to be improved remarkably using 'shifted data'. In this paper, we have clarified the efficiency of 'shifted data' for maximum intensity projection MR angiography. Our experimental studies and theoretical consideration showd that the quality of MR angiograms has been significantly improved using 'shifted data' as follows; 1) remarkable reduction of mosaic artifact, 2) improvement of spatial continuity for the blood vessels, and 3) reduction of variance for the signal intensity along the blood vessels. In other words, the angiograms looks much 'finer' than conventional ones, although the spatial resolution is not improved theoretically. Furthermore, we found the quality of MR angiograms dose not improve significantly with the 'shifted data' more than twice as dense as ordinal ones. (author)

  18. Chemical imaging and solid state analysis at compact surfaces using UV imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jian X.; Rehder, Sönke; van den Berg, Frans

    2014-01-01

    , and microcrystalline cellulose together with magnesium stearate as excipients were used as model materials in the compacts. The UV imaging based drug and excipient distribution was in good agreement with hyperspectral NIR imaging. The UV wavelength region can be utilized in distinguishing between glibenclamide......Fast non-destructive multi-wavelength UV imaging together with multivariate image analysis was utilized to visualize distribution of chemical components and their solid state form at compact surfaces. Amorphous and crystalline solid forms of the antidiabetic compound glibenclamide...... and excipients in a non-invasive way, as well as mapping the glibenclamide solid state form. An exploratory data analysis supported the critical evaluation of the mapping results and the selection of model parameters for the chemical mapping. The present study demonstrated that the multi-wavelength UV imaging...

  19. Robustness of an artificially tailored fisheye imaging system with a curvilinear image surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gil Ju; Nam, Won Il; Song, Young Min

    2017-11-01

    Curved image sensors inspired by animal and insect eyes have provided a new development direction in next-generation digital cameras. It is known that natural fish eyes afford an extremely wide field of view (FOV) imaging due to the geometrical properties of the spherical lens and hemispherical retina. However, its inherent drawbacks, such as the low off-axis illumination and the fabrication difficulty of a 'dome-like' hemispherical imager, limit the development of bio-inspired wide FOV cameras. Here, a new type of fisheye imaging system is introduced that has simple lens configurations with a curvilinear image surface, while maintaining high off-axis illumination and a wide FOV. Moreover, through comparisons with commercial conventional fisheye designs, it is determined that the volume and required number of optical elements of the proposed design is practical while capturing the fundamental optical performances. Detailed design guidelines for tailoring the proposed optic system are also discussed.

  20. Near Surface Seismic Reflection Imaging: Great Potential Under Critical Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. D.; Peterie, S.; Judy, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic-reflection imaging has long been a mainstay in the oil and gas exploration community with mind boggling advancements in just the last decade, but its application to engineering, environmental, and groundwater problems has not seen the same level of utilization. A great deal of the problem lies in the many assumptions that are valid for deep exploration that are violated in the very complex near surface. Large channel systems with acquisition geometries conducive for both deep and shallow targets are many times assumed to be capable of extending the imaging depth window. In reality, constraints of the source and sensor/recording systems must be considered, where large powerful sources are needed to image exploration depths while low-energy, high-frequency sources are required for the shallow and thin targets in the near surface. Attempts to make one size fit all will result in artifacts that result in bogus images and characterizations in the shallow subsurface.Narrow optimum offsets, highly attenuative materials, extreme velocity variability, wavefield interference, and low signal-to-noise ratios provide an ideal breeding ground for the generation of artifacts on near-surface seismic-reflection data. With the cost of shallow reflection data being so high relative to other geophysical methods and invasive sampling, sometimes a single failure can hinder the growth in the use of the method. The method is extremely powerful and has the potential to provide vast quantities of information critical to understand the distributed hydrogeological and biogeochemical processes that elude borehole investigations. It is imperative that data be acquired in its rawest possible form and be processed with an eye to each operation. Cost savings sometimes result in one-size-fits-all acquisition and automated processing flows. Attention to detail and following signal from origination to characterization is essential.

  1. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves: Field data test

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun

    2017-03-06

    We have developed a methodology for detecting the presence of near-surface heterogeneities by naturally migrating backscattered surface waves in controlled-source data. The near-surface heterogeneities must be located within a depth of approximately one-third the dominant wavelength λ of the strong surface-wave arrivals. This natural migration method does not require knowledge of the near-surface phase-velocity distribution because it uses the recorded data to approximate the Green’s functions for migration. Prior to migration, the backscattered data are separated from the original records, and the band-passed filtered data are migrated to give an estimate of the migration image at a depth of approximately one-third λ. Each band-passed data set gives a migration image at a different depth. Results with synthetic data and field data recorded over known faults validate the effectiveness of this method. Migrating the surface waves in recorded 2D and 3D data sets accurately reveals the locations of known faults. The limitation of this method is that it requires a dense array of receivers with a geophone interval less than approximately one-half λ.

  2. No-Tack Inlay on Milled Surface: Project Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    This report documents observation of a construction project west of Nashville, Tennessee that did not use a tack coat during the placement of the hot mix asphalt (HMA). This observation took place on June 23, 1998. For this project, the existing pave...

  3. A New Sensor for Surface Process Quantification in the Geosciences - Image-Assisted Tacheometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicovac, Tanja; Reiterer, Alexander; Rieke-Zapp, Dirk

    2010-05-01

    The quantification of earth surface processes in the geosciences requires precise measurement tools. Typical applications for precise measurement systems involve deformation monitoring for geo-risk management, detection of erosion rates, etc. Often employed for such applications are laser scanners, photogrammetric sensors and image-assisted tacheometers. Image-assisted tacheometers offer the user (metrology expert) an image capturing system (CCD/CMOS camera) in addition to 3D point measurements. The images of the telescope's visual field are projected onto the camera's chip. The camera is capable of capturing panoramic image mosaics through camera rotation if the axes of the measurement system are driven by computer controlled motors. With appropriate calibration, these images are accurately geo-referenced and oriented since the horizontal and vertical angles of rotation are continuously measured and fed into the computer. The oriented images can then directly be used for direction measurements with no need for control points in object space or further photogrammetric orientation processes. In such a system, viewing angles must be addressed to chip pixels inside the optical field of view. Hence dedicated calibration methods have to be applied, an autofocus unit has to be added to the optical path, and special digital image processing procedures have to be used to detect the points of interest on the objects to be measured. We present such a new optical measurement system for measuring and describing 3D surfaces for geosciences. Besides the technique and methods some practical examples will be shown. The system was developed at the Vienna University of Technology (Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics) - two interdisciplinary research project, i-MeaS and SedyMONT, have been launched with the purpose of measuring and interpreting 3D surfaces and surface processes. For the in situ measurement of bed rock erosion the level of surveying accuracy required for recurring sub

  4. The projected and perceived image of the United Republic of Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Koerte, Tammy Reiko

    2009-01-01

    While Tanzania has enjoyed increasing popularity as a tourism destination, there is a lack of research on Tanzania's tourism image. Tanzania 's tourism growth, however, depends upon the congruency of its projected and perceived images. This research examines the government's projected image of Tanzania and measures its congruency with the image perceived by past visitors to Tanzania. The study utilized the Tanzania Tourist Board and Tanzania Travel and Tourism Online websites as well as 36...

  5. A Gimbal-Stabilized Compact Hyperspectral Imaging System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Gimbal-stabilized Compact Hyperspectral Imaging System (GCHIS) fully integrates multi-sensor spectral imaging, stereovision, GPS and inertial measurement,...

  6. Brain surface motion imaging to predict adhesions between meningiomas and the brain surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taoka, Toshiaki; Yamatani, Yuya; Akashi, Toshiaki; Miyasaka, Toshiteru; Emura, Tomoko; Kichikawa, Kimihiko [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology, Nara (Japan); Yamada, Syuichi; Nakase, Hiroyuki [Nara Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Nara (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    ''Brain surface motion imaging'' (BSMI) is the subtraction of pulse-gated, 3D, heavily T2-weighted image of two different phases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsation, which enables the assessment of the dynamics of brain surface pulsatile motion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of this imaging method for providing presurgical information about adhesions between meningiomas and the brain surface. Eighteen cases with surgically resected meningioma in whom BSMI was presurgically obtained were studied. BSMI consisted of two sets of pulse-gated, 3D, heavily T2-weighted, fast spin echo scans. Images of the systolic phase and the diastolic phase were obtained, and subtraction was performed with 3D motion correction. We analyzed the presence of band-like texture surrounding the tumor and judged the degree of motion discrepancy as ''total,'' ''partial,'' or ''none.'' The correlation between BSMI and surgical findings was evaluated. For cases with partial adhesions, agreements in the locations of the adhesions were also evaluated. On presurgical BSMI, no motion discrepancy was seen in eight cases, partial in six cases, and total in four cases. These presurgical predictions about adhesions and surgical findings agreed in 13 cases (72.2%). The locations of adhesions agreed in five of six cases with partial adhesions. In the current study, BSMI could predict brain and meningioma adhesions correctly in 72.2% of cases, and adhesion location could also be predicted. This imaging method appears to provide presurgical information about brain/meningioma adhesions. (orig.)

  7. People cannot Locate the Projection of an Object on the Surface of a Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    People cannot veridically perceive reflections of objects as projections on the surface of mirrors. People tried to locate an object's projection on a flat mirror. The observer stood at the opposite end of a long mirror to the experimenter. They were told to remember the location of the projection of the experimenter's face. The experimenter then…

  8. Quantifying Uncertainty in Near Surface Electromagnetic Imaging Using Bayesian Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatter, D. B.; Ray, A.; Key, K.

    2017-12-01

    Geoscientists commonly use electromagnetic methods to image the Earth's near surface. Field measurements of EM fields are made (often with the aid an artificial EM source) and then used to infer near surface electrical conductivity via a process known as inversion. In geophysics, the standard inversion tool kit is robust and can provide an estimate of the Earth's near surface conductivity that is both geologically reasonable and compatible with the measured field data. However, standard inverse methods struggle to provide a sense of the uncertainty in the estimate they provide. This is because the task of finding an Earth model that explains the data to within measurement error is non-unique - that is, there are many, many such models; but the standard methods provide only one "answer." An alternative method, known as Bayesian inversion, seeks to explore the full range of Earth model parameters that can adequately explain the measured data, rather than attempting to find a single, "ideal" model. Bayesian inverse methods can therefore provide a quantitative assessment of the uncertainty inherent in trying to infer near surface conductivity from noisy, measured field data. This study applies a Bayesian inverse method (called trans-dimensional Markov chain Monte Carlo) to transient airborne EM data previously collected over Taylor Valley - one of the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica. Our results confirm the reasonableness of previous estimates (made using standard methods) of near surface conductivity beneath Taylor Valley. In addition, we demonstrate quantitatively the uncertainty associated with those estimates. We demonstrate that Bayesian inverse methods can provide quantitative uncertainty to estimates of near surface conductivity.

  9. Image/patient registration from (partial) projection data by the Fourier phase matching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiguo Lu; You, J.

    1999-01-01

    A technique for 2D or 3D image/patient registration, PFPM (projection based Fourier phase matching method), is proposed. This technique provides image/patient registration directly from sequential tomographic projection data. The method can also deal with image files by generating 2D Radon transforms slice by slice. The registration in projection space is done by calculating a Fourier invariant (FI) descriptor for each one-dimensional projection datum, and then registering the FI descriptor by the Fourier phase matching (FPM) method. The algorithm has been tested on both synthetic and experimental data. When dealing with translated, rotated and uniformly scaled 2D image registration, the performance of the PFPM method is comparable to that of the IFPM (image based Fourier phase matching) method in robustness, efficiency, insensitivity to the offset between images, and registration time. The advantages of the former are that subpixel resolution is feasible, and it is more insensitive to image noise due to the averaging effect of the projection acquisition. Furthermore, the PFPM method offers the ability to generalize to 3D image/patient registration and to register partial projection data. By applying patient registration directly from tomographic projection data, image reconstruction is not needed in the therapy set-up verification, thus reducing computational time and artefacts. In addition, real time registration is feasible. Registration from partial projection data meets the geometry and dose requirements in many application cases and makes dynamic set-up verification possible in tomotherapy. (author)

  10. BUILDING DETECTION USING AERIAL IMAGES AND DIGITAL SURFACE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a method for building detection in aerial images based on variational inference of logistic regression is proposed. It consists of three steps. In order to characterize the appearances of buildings in aerial images, an effective bag-of-Words (BoW method is applied for feature extraction in the first step. In the second step, a classifier of logistic regression is learned using these local features. The logistic regression can be trained using different methods. In this paper we adopt a fully Bayesian treatment for learning the classifier, which has a number of obvious advantages over other learning methods. Due to the presence of hyper prior in the probabilistic model of logistic regression, approximate inference methods have to be applied for prediction. In order to speed up the inference, a variational inference method based on mean field instead of stochastic approximation such as Markov Chain Monte Carlo is applied. After the prediction, a probabilistic map is obtained. In the third step, a fully connected conditional random field model is formulated and the probabilistic map is used as the data term in the model. A mean field inference is utilized in order to obtain a binary building mask. A benchmark data set consisting of aerial images and digital surfaced model (DSM released by ISPRS for 2D semantic labeling is used for performance evaluation. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Localization precision of the superconducting imaging-surface MEG system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Robert H., Jr.; Matlachov, A. N. (Andrei N.); Espy, M. A. (Michelle A.); Maharajh, K. (Keeran); Volegov, P. (Petr)

    2001-01-01

    A unique whole-head Magnetoencephalography (MEG) system incorporating a superconducting imaging surface (SIS) has been designed and built at Los Alamos with the goal of dramatically improving source localization accuracy while mitigating limitations of current systems (e.g. low signal-to-noise, cost, bulk). Magnetoencephalography (MEG) measures the weak magnetic fields emanating from the brain as a direct consequence of the neuronal currents resulting from brain function[1]. The extraordinarily weak magnetic fields are measured by an array of SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) sensors. The position and vector characteristics of these neuronal sources can be estimated from the inverse solution of the field distribution at the surface of the head. In addition, MEG temporal resolution is unsurpassed by any other method currently used for brain imaging. Although MEG source reconstruction is limited by solutions of the electromagnetic inverse problem, constraints used for source localization produce reliable results. The Los Alamos SIS-MEG system[2] is based on the principal that fields from nearby sources measured by a SQUID sensor array while the SIS shields the sensor array from distant noise fields. In general, Meissner currents flow in the surface of superconductors, preventing any significant penetration of magnetic fields. A hemispherical SIS with a brim, or helmet, surrounds the SQUID sensor array largely sheilding the SQUIDs from sources outside the helmet while measuring fields from nearby sources within the helmet. We have implemented a finite element model (FEM) description of the SIS using the exact as-built geometry to accurately describe how the SIS impacts the forward physics of source models. The FEM is used to calculate the distribution of Meissner currents in the complicated surface geometry of the SIS such that B{perpendicular} = 0 at the surface. This model of the forward physics is described elsewhere in these proceedings [3]. In

  12. Topography improvements in MEMS DMs for high-contrast, high-resolution imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop and demonstrate an innovative microfabrication process to substantially improve the surface quality achievable in high-resolution...

  13. Nanostructure-enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špašková, Barbora; Lynn, Nicholas S.; Slabý, Jiří Bocková, Markéta; Homola, Jiří

    2017-06-01

    There remains a need for the multiplexed detection of biomolecules at extremely low concentrations in fields of medical diagnostics, food safety, and security. Surface plasmon resonance imaging is an established biosensing approach in which the measurement of the intensity of light across a sensor chip is correlated with the amount of target biomolecules captured by the respective areas on the chip. In this work, we present a new approach for this method allowing for enhanced bioanalytical performance via the introduction of nanostructured sensing chip and polarization contrast measurement, which enable the exploitation of both amplitude and phase properties of plasmonic resonances on the nanostructures. Here we will discuss a complex theoretical analysis of the sensor performance, whereby we investigate aspects related to both the optical performance as well as the transport of the analyte molecules to the functionalized surfaces. This analysis accounts for the geometrical parameters of the nanostructured sensing surface, the properties of functional coatings, and parameters related to the detection assay. Based on the results of the theoretical analysis, we fabricated sensing chips comprised of arrays of gold nanoparticles (by electron-beam lithography), which were modified by a biofunctional coating to allow for the selective capturing of the target biomolecules in the regions with high sensitivity. In addition, we developed a compact optical reader with an integrated microfluidic cell, allowing for the measurement from 50 independent sensing channels. The performance of this biosensor is demonstrated through the sensitive detection of short oligonucleotides down to the low picomolar level.

  14. Delta-projection imaging on contrast-enhanced ultrasound to quantify tumor microvasculature and perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Chandra M; Cary, Theodore W; Arger, Peter H; Wood, Andrew K W

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Delta-projection image processing technique for visualizing tumor microvessels and for quantifying the area of tissue perfused by them on contrast-enhanced ultrasound images. The Delta-projection algorithm was implemented to quantify perfusion by tracking the running maximum of the difference (Delta) between the contrast-enhanced ultrasound image sequence and a baseline image. Twenty-five mice with subcutaneous K1735 melanomas were first imaged with contrast-enhanced grayscale and then with minimum-exposure contrast-enhanced power Doppler (minexCPD) ultrasound. Delta-projection images were reconstructed from the grayscale images and then used to evaluate the evolution of tumor vascularity during the course of contrast enhancement. The extent of vascularity (ratio of the perfused area to the tumor area) for each tumor was determined quantitatively from Delta-projection images and compared to the extent of vascularity determined from contrast-enhanced power Doppler images. Delta-projection and minexCPD measurements were compared using linear regression analysis. Delta-projection was successfully performed in all 25 cases. The technique allowed the dynamic visualization of individual blood vessels as they filled in real time. Individual tumor blood vessels were distinctly visible during early image enhancement. Later, as an increasing number of blood vessels were filled with the contrast agent, clusters of vessels appeared as regions of perfusion, and the identification of individual vessels became difficult. Comparisons were made between the perfused area of tumors in Delta-projections and in minexCPD images. The Delta-projection perfusion measurements were correlated linearly with minexCPD. Delta-projection visualized tumor vessels and enabled the quantitative assessment of the tumor area perfused by the contrast agent.

  15. UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QAIP is subordinate to the latest issue of the UMTRA Project TAC Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The QAIP addresses technical aspects of the TAC UMTRA Project surface and ground water programs. The QAIP is authorized and approved by the TAC Project Manager and QA manager. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance functions as management tools to ensure that all Project organization activities are carried out in a manner that will protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project and meet or exceed contract requirements

  16. From whole-body counting to imaging: The computer aided collimation gamma camera project (CACAO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanguillaume, C.; Begot, S.; Quartuccio, M.; Douiri, A.; Ballongue, P.

    2000-01-01

    Whole-body counting is the method of choice for in vivo detection of contamination. To extend this well established method, the possible advantages of imaging radiocontaminants are examined. The use of the CACAO project is then studied. A comparison of simulated reconstructed images obtained by the CACAO project and by a conventional gamma camera used in nuclear medicine follows. Imaging a radionuclide contaminant with a geometrical sensitivity of 10 -2 seems possible in the near future. (author)

  17. Projecting Benevolent Power: Transforming America’s Image from Superpower to Superhero

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    St ra te gy R es ea rc h Pr oj ec t PROJECTING BENEVOLENT POWER: TRANSFORMING AMERICA’S IMAGE FROM SUPERPOWER TO SUPERHERO BY COLONEL...AND SUBTITLE Projecting Benevolent Power: Transforming America’s Image from Superpower to Superhero 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM... SUPERHERO by Colonel Kenneth D’Alfonso United States Air Force Dr. Craig Nation Project Adviser This SRP is

  18. Fundamental remote science research program. Part 2: Status report of the mathematical pattern recognition and image analysis project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydorn, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    The Mathematical Pattern Recognition and Image Analysis (MPRIA) Project is concerned with basic research problems related to the study of he Earth from remotely sensed measurements of its surface characteristics. The program goal is to better understand how to analyze the digital image that represents the spatial, spectral, and temporal arrangement of these measurements for purposing of making selected inferences about the Earth. This report summarizes the progress that has been made toward this program goal by each of the principal investigators in the MPRIA Program.

  19. Ultrasonic Flaw Detection and Imaging through Reverberant Layers via Subspace Analysis and Projection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Demirli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic flaw detection and imaging through reverberant layers are challenging problems owing to the layer-induced reverberations and front surface reflections. These undesired signals present a strong clutter and mask the flaw echoes. In this paper, a subspace-based approach is developed for removing, or significantly reducing, the unwanted reverberations, enabling proper flaw detection and imaging. The technique utilizes a set of independent clutter-only reference measurements of the material through the layer. If these measurements are not available, array measurements of the material with flaws are used instead. The clutter, due to its high strength relative to the flaw reflections, forms a subspace spanned by the eigenvectors corresponding to the dominant eigenvalues of the data covariance matrix. The clutter subspace is estimated and removed using orthogonal subspace projection. The clutter usually occupies multidimension subspace that is dependent on the level of coupling, material inhomogeneity, surface roughness, and the sampling rate of the measurements. When the clutter-only reference is not available, information theoretic techniques are used to estimate the dimension of the clutter subspace so that clutter signals are sufficiently suppressed without distorting the flaw signals. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated using simulations and real measurement results.

  20. Landsat Image Analysis of the Rebea Agricultural Project, Mosul Dam and Lake, Northern Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, W.; Alassadi, F.

    2014-12-01

    An archive of 70 good-to-excellent quality Landsat TM and ETM+ images acquired between 1984 and 2011 were identified through visual examination of the GLOVIS web portal. After careful consideration of factors relevant to agriculture in the region (e.g., crop calendar) and associated image processing needs (e.g., preference for anniversary dates), the images deemed most appropriate were downloaded. Standard preprocessing, including visual quality and statistical inspection, sub-setting to the study area, was performed, and the results combined in a database with available GIS data. The resolution merge spatial enhancement technique was applied to any ETM+ imagery to improve visual clarity and interpretability. The NDVI was calculated for all images in the time series. Unsupervised classification of images was performed for dates ranging from 1987 just before the inception of the Rebea project in 1989 through 2011. In order to reduce uncertainty related to lack of detailed ancillary and/or ground reference data, simple land cover classes were mapped, specifically: surface water, agriculture, and other. Results were able to quantify and track areas of each class over time, and showed a marked decrease in agriculture between the Iraq invasion in 2003 to the end of the study period in 2011, despite massive efforts and capital by the United States and Iraqi governments to improve agriculture in the area. Complications to understanding the role of warfare and conflict on the environment in the Mosul region include severe drought and water shortages, including effects of the Turkish GAP water resource development project in the headwaters of the Tigris-Euphrates, as well as Mosul Dam structural problems associated with geologically-unsuitable conditions upon which the dam is constructed. Now, the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) likely captured the Mosul Dam on the day this abstract was submitted. Our Landsat-based monitoring and analysis of the Rebea Project and

  1. Projection of curves on B-spline surfaces using quadratic reparameterization

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yijun

    2010-09-01

    Curves on surfaces play an important role in computer aided geometric design. In this paper, we present a hyperbola approximation method based on the quadratic reparameterization of Bézier surfaces, which generates reasonable low degree curves lying completely on the surfaces by using iso-parameter curves of the reparameterized surfaces. The Hausdorff distance between the projected curve and the original curve is controlled under the user-specified distance tolerance. The projected curve is T-G 1 continuous, where T is the user-specified angle tolerance. Examples are given to show the performance of our algorithm. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sub-surface terahertz imaging through uneven surfaces: visualizing Neolithic wall paintings in Çatalhöyük.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gillian C; Bowen, John W; Matthews, Wendy; Roychowdhury, Soumali; Labaune, Julien; Mourou, Gerard; Menu, Michel; Hodder, Ian; Jackson, J Bianca

    2013-04-08

    Pulsed terahertz imaging is being developed as a technique to image obscured mural paintings. Due to significant advances in terahertz technology, portable systems are now capable of operating in unregulated environments and this has prompted their use on archaeological excavations. August 2011 saw the first use of pulsed terahertz imaging at the archaeological site of Çatalhöyük, Turkey, where mural paintings dating from the Neolithic period are continuously being uncovered by archaeologists. In these particular paintings the paint is applied onto an uneven surface, and then covered by an equally uneven surface. Traditional terahertz data analysis has proven unsuccessful at sub-surface imaging of these paintings due to the effect of these uneven surfaces. For the first time, an image processing technique is presented, based around Gaussian beam-mode coupling, which enables the visualization of the obscured painting.

  3. EUV Doppler Imaging for CubeSat Platforms Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mature the design and fabricate the Flare Initiation Doppler Imager (FIDI) instrument to demonstrate low-spacecraft-resource EUV technology (most notably,...

  4. Waterway-View Imaging with a Small Unmanned Surface System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S. N.; Peschel, J.

    2015-12-01

    This research investigated the use of a small unmanned surface system (USS) for waterway-view imaging in an intensively managed agricultural landscape. Tile drains commonly dewater landscapes into drainage tributaries so that land uses such as agricultural production can occur. The outlets of tile drain networks, which contribute to the water balance in a river network, are often located on private property and in most instances cannot be readily cataloged. Remote sensing presents one option for identifying tile drain networks but vegetation and other topographic occlusions may obstruct identification. This work presents a case study in the Upper Sangamon River Basin in East-Central Illinois for the use of a small USS utilizing visual sensing with a 360-degree camera as an alternative method of mapping agricultural tile drain outlets for improved hydrologic and hydraulic modeling. The results are expected to serve as groundwork for future design and refinement of small unmanned surface vehicles, as well as improved human interfaces for USS, and a foundation for better understanding human-machine interaction in USS applied to agricultural, riparian, and similar domains.

  5. Using the Mars Student Imaging Project to Integrate Science and English into Middle School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, C. F.; Troy, M. T.; Valderrama, P.

    2005-12-01

    Bringing science to life in a middle school classroom, and getting students excited about writing an English research paper can be a challenge. We met the challenge by using the exploration of Mars with Arizona State University`s (ASU) Mars Student Imaging Project (MSIP). We replaced individuals writing their own research papers with teams writing scientific proposals for use of the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The 126 students on our academic team divided themselves into 26 teams. Each team selected a Leader, Archivist, Publicist, and Bibliographer. I was the Principal Investigator for each team. For twelve weeks the teams formally met once a week to discuss their progress and plan strategies for the following week. We created a website to communicate our progress. During the twelve weeks, the major task was to narrow each general topic such as ``Volcanoes on Mars," to a specific topic that could be answered by an 18km by 60km visible light image such as ``Is it Possible to Find the Relative Age of Volcanic Depressions in a Lava Flow Using a Mars Odyssey Image?" In addition to traditional research methods, we also participated in four teleconferences with ASU scientists chaired by Paige Valderrama, Assistant Director of the Mars Education Program. As the project evolved, I guided the teams with content, while the English teacher provided strategies for writing a meaningful persuasive essay, using citations, and recording bibliographical entries. When the proposals were completed, each team created a PowerPoint presentation to introduce their proposal to everyone for peer review. The students were hard, but fair with their evaluations. In several cases, they did not cast one of their three votes for their own! They decided that ten proposals met the criteria established by ASU. Those teams selected one member to use the JMARS software to target locations on Mars. The imagers spent two intensive days learning the software and targeting the surface. When we received

  6. Intelligent and interactive computer image of a nuclear power plant: The ImagIn project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubensack, D.; Malvache, P.; Valleix, P.

    1998-01-01

    The ImagIn project consists in a method and a set of computer tools apt to bring perceptible and assessable improvements in the operational safety of a nuclear plant. Its aim is to design an information system that would maintain a highly detailed computerized representation of a nuclear plant in its initial state and throughout its in-service life. It is not a tool to drive or help driving the nuclear plant, but a tool that manages concurrent operations that modify the plant configuration in a very general was (maintenance for example). The configuration of the plant, as well as rules and constraints about it, are described in a object-oriented knowledge database, which is built using a generic ImagIn meta-model based on the semantical network theory. An inference engine works on this database and is connected to reality through interfaces to operators and captors on the installation; it verifies constantly in real-time the consistency of the database according to its inner rules, and reports eventual problems to concerned operators. A special effort is made on interfaces to provide natural and intuitive tools (using virtual reality, natural language, voice recognition and synthesis). A laboratory application on a fictive but realistic installation already exists and is used to simulate various tests and scenarii. A real application is being constructed on Siloe, an experimental reactor of the CEA. (author)

  7. A New Physical Model to Estimate Solar Irradiance Componets on the Earth's Surface from Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cony, Marco, ,, Dr.; Wiesenberg, Ralf, ,, Dr.; Fernandéz, Irene; Jimenez, Marta

    2017-04-01

    The present study describes a new model designed to estimate the incident solar radiation at the Earth's surface from geostationary satellites images (AFASat). In this new physical model proposed, the effect of Rayleigh scattering, aerosols and Earth's surface topography are taken into account. Water vapor absorption is also introduced by means of its climatological effects on shortwave radiation. Cloud albedo, ground albedo and absorption are derived from brightness measurements on the assumption that they both are linearly related to the brightness. However, this simple consideration applied to individual images elements represents quite accurately the bulk effect of clouds and reflectance. AFASat model uses the Heliosat-3 method and add others environmental factors to estimate with relative precision the solar radiation that arrives at the Earth's surface. Comparisons with daily radiation measurements from ground data station located in Europe, Africa and India (BSRN) showed that the satellite estimates were, on the average, within 2% of the ground measurements for global horizontal irradiance and less than 7% for direct normal irradiance. The hourly variations monitored by the satellite also followed very closely the variations measured on the ground. This study has shown that model is sufficient for the determination of the incident solar radiation when the high spatial and temporal coverage of a geostationary satellite is used. The AFASat is highly appropriate for such those projects that required an analysis of the solar resource assessment as such as TMY report (Typical Meteorological Year).

  8. Multi-image matching for lunar surface reconstruction from orbital images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaksher, Ahmed F.; Al-Jarrah, Ahmad; Walker, Kyle

    2015-09-01

    The last three Apollo lunar missions (15, 16, and 17) carried an integrated photogrammetric mapping system of a Metric Camera (MC), a high-resolution Panoramic Camera, a Star Camera, and a Laser Altimeter. Recently images taken by the MC were scanned by Arizona State University (ASU); these images contain valuable information for scientific exploration, engineering analysis, and visualization of the moon's surface. Through this article, we took advantage of the large overlaps, the multi viewing, and the high ground resolution of the images taken by the Apollo MC in generating an accurate and trustful surface of the Moon. After computing the positions and orientations of the exposure stations, through rigorous a photogrammetric bundle adjustment techniques, we carried out a two-step matching process that contains hierarchical matching and least squares matching; both steps are implemented in a multi-photo scheme. Our results look very promising and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in accounting for depth discontinuities, occlusions, and noises.

  9. Acousto-Optic Imaging Spectrometers for Mars Surface Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenar, D. A.; Blaney, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    ). AIMS is capable of tunable spectroscopic imaging of surface mineralogy, ices and dust between 0.5 and 2.4 microns, at a resolving power (lambda/delta lambda) which is typically several hundred. The design spatial resolution, similar to IMP and SSI, will allow mapping at scales down to about 1 cm.

  10. Imaging of surface wave phase velocities from array phase observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valerie

    2010-05-01

    While temporary deployments some 10 years ago were largely based on short-period seismometers, the availability of broadband instruments in instrument pools increased strongly in recent years and as such modern temporary deployments for passive seismological recordings often consist to a large extent, if not exclusively, of broadband instruments. This opens for new analysis approaches as the broadband seismic wavefield is obtained at a relatively high spatial sampling relative to the wavelength. In an attempt to infer surface wave phase velocity anomalies beneath Southern Norway based on data from a temporary network of 41 broadband instruments, we present a new approach to overcome the limitations of two-station phase measurements (on the great circle with the source) and instead exploit the two-dimensional nature of the wavefield by taking into account phase measurements at all stations of the array from a single event. This is based on the assumption that the wavefield is at least piecewise linear within the study region. By triangulation of the network region and linear estimation of the phase gradient in each triangle we get without further a priori assumptions a coarse image of the phase velocity variations within our network. The image can be significantly refined for a single event recording by stacking multiple images based on arbitrary subsets of the available data. Phase velocity anomalies measured from single event recordings can be biased and blurred by non-plane arriving wavefield, reflections and diffractions of heterogeneities. Therefore, by averaging over velocity fields from different events with varying backazimuths, artefacts are reduced and the recovered image significantly improved. Another way to improve the recovered structures is to take into account the spatial variation of the amplitude field. However, while the phase between two neighboring stations may be (at least close to) linear, the amplitude may not, hence estimation of the second

  11. Research interface for experimental ultrasound imaging - the CFU grabber project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    PC aquires pre processed data from the scanner in real time. Further post processing is required to create the final images. In house software (CFU Grabber tool) was developed to review and store the pre processed data. Using MatLab image processing with a new post post processing method the final...

  12. 77 FR 10599 - Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... information gathering. Limited scope of Pilot Program project development activity. Caltrans has not operated... Program areas within the scope and the limitations of the audit, with the exceptions noted in the... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit...

  13. Fluorescence guided lymph node biopsy in large animals using direct image projection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringhausen, Elizabeth; Wang, Tylon; Pitts, Jonathan; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    The use of fluorescence imaging for aiding oncologic surgery is a fast growing field in biomedical imaging, revolutionizing open and minimally invasive surgery practices. We have designed, constructed, and tested a system for fluorescence image acquisition and direct display on the surgical field for fluorescence guided surgery. The system uses a near-infrared sensitive CMOS camera for image acquisition, a near-infra LED light source for excitation, and DLP digital projector for projection of fluorescence image data onto the operating field in real time. Instrument control was implemented in Matlab for image capture, processing of acquired data and alignment of image parameters with the projected pattern. Accuracy of alignment was evaluated statistically to demonstrate sensitivity to small objects and alignment throughout the imaging field. After verification of accurate alignment, feasibility for clinical application was demonstrated in large animal models of sentinel lymph node biopsy. Indocyanine green was injected subcutaneously in Yorkshire pigs at various locations to model sentinel lymph node biopsy in gynecologic cancers, head and neck cancer, and melanoma. Fluorescence was detected by the camera system during operations and projected onto the imaging field, accurately identifying tissues containing the fluorescent tracer at up to 15 frames per second. Fluorescence information was projected as binary green regions after thresholding and denoising raw intensity data. Promising results with this initial clinical scale prototype provided encouraging results for the feasibility of optical projection of acquired luminescence during open oncologic surgeries.

  14. Kernel based subspace projection of near infrared hyperspectral images of maize kernels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Arngren, Morten; Hansen, Per Waaben

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an exploratory analysis of hyper- spectral 900-1700 nm images of maize kernels. The imaging device is a line scanning hyper spectral camera using a broadband NIR illumi- nation. In order to explore the hyperspectral data we compare a series of subspace projection methods...... including principal component analysis and maximum autocorrelation factor analysis. The latter utilizes the fact that interesting phenomena in images exhibit spatial autocorrelation. However, linear projections often fail to grasp the underlying variability on the data. Therefore we propose to use so......- tor transform outperform the linear methods as well as kernel principal components in producing interesting projections of the data....

  15. CT Image Reconstruction from Sparse Projections Using Adaptive TpV Regularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Qi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation dose reduction without losing CT image quality has been an increasing concern. Reducing the number of X-ray projections to reconstruct CT images, which is also called sparse-projection reconstruction, can potentially avoid excessive dose delivered to patients in CT examination. To overcome the disadvantages of total variation (TV minimization method, in this work we introduce a novel adaptive TpV regularization into sparse-projection image reconstruction and use FISTA technique to accelerate iterative convergence. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the proposed method suppresses noise and artifacts more efficiently, and preserves structure information better than other existing reconstruction methods.

  16. Optimized image acquisition for breast tomosynthesis in projection and reconstruction space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Baker, Jay A.; Samei, Ehsan

    2009-01-01

    Breast tomosynthesis has been an exciting new development in the field of breast imaging. While the diagnostic improvement via tomosynthesis is notable, the full potential of tomosynthesis has not yet been realized. This may be attributed to the dependency of the diagnostic quality of tomosynthesis on multiple variables, each of which needs to be optimized. Those include dose, number of angular projections, and the total angular span of those projections. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of these acquisition parameters on the overall diagnostic image quality of breast tomosynthesis in both the projection and reconstruction space. Five mastectomy specimens were imaged using a prototype tomosynthesis system. 25 angular projections of each specimen were acquired at 6.2 times typical single-view clinical dose level. Images at lower dose levels were then simulated using a noise modification routine. Each projection image was supplemented with 84 simulated 3 mm 3D lesions embedded at the center of 84 nonoverlapping ROIs. The projection images were then reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm at different combinations of acquisition parameters to investigate which of the many possible combinations maximizes the performance. Performance was evaluated in terms of a Laguerre-Gauss channelized Hotelling observer model-based measure of lesion detectability. The analysis was also performed without reconstruction by combining the model results from projection images using Bayesian decision fusion algorithm. The effect of acquisition parameters on projection images and reconstructed slices were then compared to derive an optimization rule for tomosynthesis. The results indicated that projection images yield comparable but higher performance than reconstructed images. Both modes, however, offered similar trends: Performance improved with an increase in the total acquisition dose level and the angular span. Using a constant dose level and angular

  17. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles as Optical Labels for Imaging Cell Surface Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.

    Assaying the expression of cell surface proteins has widespread application for characterizing cell type, developmental stage, and monitoring disease transformation. Immunophenotyping is conducted by treating cells with labelled targeting moieties that have high affinity for relevant surface protein(s). The sensitivity and specificity of immunophenotyping is defined by the choice of contrast agent and therefore, the number of resolvable signals that can be used to simultaneously label cells. Narrow band width surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles are proposed as optical labels for multiplexed immunophenotying. Two types of surface coatings were investigated to passivate the gold nanoparticles, incorporate SERS functionality, and to facilitate attachment of targeting antibodies. Thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) forms dative bonds with the gold surface and is compatible with multiple physisorbed Raman-active reporter molecules. Ternary lipid bilayers are used to encapsulate the gold nanoparticles particles, and incorporate three different classes of Raman reporters. TEM, UV-Visible absorbance spectroscopy, DLS, and electrophoretic light scattering were used characterize the particle coating. Colourimetric protein assay, and secondary antibody labelling were used to quantify the antibody conjugation. Three different in vitromodels were used to investigate the binding efficacy and specificity of SERS labels for their biomarker targets. Primary human CLL cells, LY10 B lymphoma, and A549 adenocarcinoma lines were targeted. Dark field imaging was used to visualize the colocalization of SERS labels with cells, and evidence of receptor clustering was obtained based on colour shifts of the particles' Rayleigh scattering. Widefield, and spatially-resolved Raman spectra were used to detect labels singly, and in combination from labelled cells. Fluorescence flow cytometry was used to test the particles' binding specificity, and SERS from labelled cells was also

  18. Generating Three-Dimensional Surface Models of Solid Objects from Multiple Projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    oretain afe lgmnafsrae norma vetr in top mnode II 08 and B’ respectively, to planes perpendicular to N and N’ respectively. G is then rotated around N...from multiple images of the surface illuminated by iso - parametric lines; JSUD~ - converts 3D surface descriptions into hier- archical

  19. Recent advances and future projections in clinical radionuclide imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    This outline review of recent advances in radionuclide imaging draws attention to developments in nuclear medicine of the urinary tract such as Captopril renography and the introduction of MAG-3, the technetium-99m labelled mimic of hippuran, the use of radionuclides for infection diagnosis, advances in lung perfusion scanning, new radiopharmaceuticals for cardiac imaging, and developments in radiopharmaceuticals for imaging tumours, including gallium-67, thallium-201, and the development of radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies. Attention is drawn to the wider use of nuclear medicine in child care. (author)

  20. Recent advances and future projections in clinical radionuclide imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, A.M. (Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (UK))

    1990-06-01

    This outline review of recent advances in radionuclide imaging draws attention to developments in nuclear medicine of the urinary tract such as Captopril renography and the introduction of MAG-3, the technetium-99m labelled mimic of hippuran, the use of radionuclides for infection diagnosis, advances in lung perfusion scanning, new radiopharmaceuticals for cardiac imaging, and developments in radiopharmaceuticals for imaging tumours, including gallium-67, thallium-201, and the development of radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies. Attention is drawn to the wider use of nuclear medicine in child care. (author).

  1. Pre-analytic process control: projecting a quality image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Mark D

    2006-09-26

    Within the health-care system, the term "ancillary department" often describes the laboratory. Thus, laboratories may find it difficult to define their image and with it, customer perception of department quality. Regulatory requirements give laboratories who so desire an elegant way to address image and perception issues--a comprehensive pre-analytic system solution. Since large laboratories use such systems--laboratory service manuals--I describe and illustrate the process for the benefit of smaller facilities. There exist resources to help even small laboratories produce a professional service manual--an elegant solution to image and customer perception of quality.

  2. PHOENIX MARS SURFACE STEREO IMAGER 5 INCID OVER FLX SCI V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) experiment on the Mars Phoenix Lander consists of one instrument component plus command electronics. This SSI Imaging Science RDR...

  3. PHOENIX MARS SURFACE STEREO IMAGER 5 NORMAL OPS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) experiment on the Mars Phoenix Lander consists of one instrument component plus command electronics. This SSI Imaging Operations RDR...

  4. PHOENIX MARS SURFACE STEREO IMAGER 3 RADIOMETRIC SCI V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) experiment on the Mars Phoenix Lander consists of one instrument component plus command electronics. This SSI Imaging Science RDR...

  5. PHOENIX MARS SURFACE STEREO IMAGER 4 LINEARIZED OPS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) experiment on the Mars Phoenix Lander consists of one instrument component plus command electronics. This SSI Imaging Operations RDR...

  6. PHOENIX MARS SURFACE STEREO IMAGER 5 DISPARITY OPS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) experiment on the Mars Phoenix Lander consists of one instrument component plus command electronics. This SSI Imaging Operations RDR...

  7. PHOENIX MARS SURFACE STEREO IMAGER 5 XYZ OPS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) experiment on the Mars Phoenix Lander consists of one instrument component plus command electronics. This SSI Imaging Operations RDR...

  8. PHOENIX MARS SURFACE STEREO IMAGER 5 ROUGHNESS OPS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) experiment on the Mars Phoenix Lander consists of one instrument component plus command electronics. This SSI Imaging Operations RDR...

  9. PHOENIX MARS SURFACE STEREO IMAGER 2 EDR VERSION 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) experiment on the Mars Phoenix Lander consists of one instrument component plus command electronics. This SSI Imaging Operations EDR...

  10. PHOENIX MARS SURFACE STEREO IMAGER 5 REACHABILITY OPS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) experiment on the Mars Phoenix Lander consists of one instrument component plus command electronics. This SSI Imaging Operations RDR...

  11. Applied noncentral Chi-squared distribution in CFAR detection of hyperspectral projected images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyong; Chen, Dong; Shi, Gongtao; Yang, Guopeng; Wang, Gang

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the noncentral chi-squared distribution is applied in the Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detection of hyperspectral projected images to distinguish the anomaly points from background. Usually, the process of the hyperspectral anomaly detectors can be considered as a linear projection. These operators are linear transforms and their results are quadratic form which comes from the transform of spectral vector. In general, chi-squared distribution could be the proper choice to describe the statistical characteristic of this projected image. However, because of the strong correlation among the bands, the standard central chi-squared distribution often cannot fit the stochastic characteristic of the projected images precisely. In this paper, we use a noncentral chi-squared distribution to approximate the projected image of subspace based anomaly detectors. Firstly, the statistical modal of the projected multivariate data is analysed, and a noncentral chi-squared distribution is deduced. Then, the approach of the parameters calculation is introduced. At last, the aerial hyperspectral images are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method in tightly modeling the projected image statistic distribution.

  12. High Resolution, Range/Range-Rate Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne proposes to develop a design for a small, lightweight, high resolution, in x, y, and z Doppler imager to assist in the guidance, navigation and control...

  13. Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph (RAISE) Renewal Proposal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The optical design of RAISE is based on a new class of UV/EUV imaging spectrometers that use  only two reflections to provide quasi-stigmatic performance...

  14. Low-Mass Planar Photonic Imaging Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a revolutionary electro-optical (EO) imaging sensor concept that provides a low-mass, low-volume alternative to the traditional bulky optical telescope...

  15. Gamma-Ray Imager Polarimeter for Solar Flares Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose here to develop the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS), the next-generation instrument for high-energy solar observations. GRIPS will...

  16. Using Heliospheric Imager Data to Improve Space Weather Forecasting Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to test a new approach for selecting the optimal solar wind model from an ensemble of model runs.Because of the paucity of...

  17. Enhanced Reliability MEMS Deformable Mirrors for Space Imaging Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a reliable, fault-tolerant wavefront control system that will fill a critical technology gap in NASA's vision...

  18. Virtual autopsy using imaging: bridging radiologic and forensic sciences. A review of the Virtopsy and similar projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolliger, Stephan A.; Thali, Michael J.; Ross, Steffen; Buck, Ursula; Naether, Silvio; Vock, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The transdisciplinary research project Virtopsy is dedicated to implementing modern imaging techniques into forensic medicine and pathology in order to augment current examination techniques or even to offer alternative methods. Our project relies on three pillars: three-dimensional (3D) surface scanning for the documentation of body surfaces, and both multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualise the internal body. Three-dimensional surface scanning has delivered remarkable results in the past in the 3D documentation of patterned injuries and of objects of forensic interest as well as whole crime scenes. Imaging of the interior of corpses is performed using MSCT and/or MRI. MRI, in addition, is also well suited to the examination of surviving victims of assault, especially choking, and helps visualise internal injuries not seen at external examination of the victim. Apart from the accuracy and three-dimensionality that conventional documentations lack, these techniques allow for the re-examination of the corpse and the crime scene even decades later, after burial of the corpse and liberation of the crime scene. We believe that this virtual, non-invasive or minimally invasive approach will improve forensic medicine in the near future. (orig.)

  19. Virtual autopsy using imaging: bridging radiologic and forensic sciences. A review of the Virtopsy and similar projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolliger, Stephan A; Thali, Michael J; Ross, Steffen; Buck, Ursula; Naether, Silvio; Vock, Peter

    2008-02-01

    The transdisciplinary research project Virtopsy is dedicated to implementing modern imaging techniques into forensic medicine and pathology in order to augment current examination techniques or even to offer alternative methods. Our project relies on three pillars: three-dimensional (3D) surface scanning for the documentation of body surfaces, and both multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualise the internal body. Three-dimensional surface scanning has delivered remarkable results in the past in the 3D documentation of patterned injuries and of objects of forensic interest as well as whole crime scenes. Imaging of the interior of corpses is performed using MSCT and/or MRI. MRI, in addition, is also well suited to the examination of surviving victims of assault, especially choking, and helps visualise internal injuries not seen at external examination of the victim. Apart from the accuracy and three-dimensionality that conventional documentations lack, these techniques allow for the re-examination of the corpse and the crime scene even decades later, after burial of the corpse and liberation of the crime scene. We believe that this virtual, non-invasive or minimally invasive approach will improve forensic medicine in the near future.

  20. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction imaging for evaluation of congenital heart disease from ECG-triggered MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannier, M.W.; Laschinger, J.; Knapp, R.H.; Gutierrez, F.R.; Gronnemeyer, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Three-dimensional surface reconstruction images of the heart and great vessels were produced from contiguous sequences of electrocardiographically triggered MR images in 25 patients with congenital heart disease and in three healthy subjects. The imaging data were semiautomatically processed to separate the epicardial and endocardial surfaces and to define the outline of the enclosed blood volumes on a section by section basis. Images were obtained at 5-mm intervals in patients aged 3 months to 30 years with anomalies of the great vessels, tetralogy of Fallot, septal defects, pulmonary atresia, and other congenital heart malformations. The results were used to facilitate the surgical treatment of these patients and were compared with echocardiographic and cineradiographic studies, and with surgical findings or pathologic specimens. These surface reconstruction images were useful for communicating the results of diagnostic examinations to cardiac surgeons, for sizing and location of intracardiac defects, for imaging the pulmonary venous drainage, and for assessing regional and global function

  1. THE IMAGE REGISTRATION OF FOURIER-MELLIN BASED ON THE COMBINATION OF PROJECTION AND GRADIENT PREPROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Image registration is one of the most important applications in the field of image processing. The method of Fourier Merlin transform, which has the advantages of high precision and good robustness to change in light and shade, partial blocking, noise influence and so on, is widely used. However, not only this method can’t obtain the unique mutual power pulse function for non-parallel image pairs, even part of image pairs also can’t get the mutual power function pulse. In this paper, an image registration method based on Fourier-Mellin transformation in the view of projection-gradient preprocessing is proposed. According to the projection conformational equation, the method calculates the matrix of image projection transformation to correct the tilt image; then, gradient preprocessing and Fourier-Mellin transformation are performed on the corrected image to obtain the registration parameters. Eventually, the experiment results show that the method makes the image registration of Fourier-Mellin transformation not only applicable to the registration of the parallel image pairs, but also to the registration of non-parallel image pairs. What’s more, the better registration effect can be obtained

  2. The Image Registration of Fourier-Mellin Based on the Combination of Projection and Gradient Preprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, D.; Zhao, X.; Pan, X.

    2017-09-01

    Image registration is one of the most important applications in the field of image processing. The method of Fourier Merlin transform, which has the advantages of high precision and good robustness to change in light and shade, partial blocking, noise influence and so on, is widely used. However, not only this method can't obtain the unique mutual power pulse function for non-parallel image pairs, even part of image pairs also can't get the mutual power function pulse. In this paper, an image registration method based on Fourier-Mellin transformation in the view of projection-gradient preprocessing is proposed. According to the projection conformational equation, the method calculates the matrix of image projection transformation to correct the tilt image; then, gradient preprocessing and Fourier-Mellin transformation are performed on the corrected image to obtain the registration parameters. Eventually, the experiment results show that the method makes the image registration of Fourier-Mellin transformation not only applicable to the registration of the parallel image pairs, but also to the registration of non-parallel image pairs. What's more, the better registration effect can be obtained

  3. Method of surface error visualization using laser 3D projection technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lili; Li, Lijuan; Lin, Xuezhu

    2017-10-01

    In the process of manufacturing large components, such as aerospace, automobile and shipping industry, some important mold or stamped metal plate requires precise forming on the surface, which usually needs to be verified, if necessary, the surface needs to be corrected and reprocessed. In order to make the correction of the machined surface more convenient, this paper proposes a method based on Laser 3D projection system, this method uses the contour form of terrain contour, directly showing the deviation between the actually measured data and the theoretical mathematical model (CAD) on the measured surface. First, measure the machined surface to get the point cloud data and the formation of triangular mesh; secondly, through coordinate transformation, unify the point cloud data to the theoretical model and calculate the three-dimensional deviation, according to the sign (positive or negative) and size of the deviation, use the color deviation band to denote the deviation of three-dimensional; then, use three-dimensional contour lines to draw and represent every coordinates deviation band, creating the projection files; finally, import the projection files into the laser projector, and make the contour line projected to the processed file with 1:1 in the form of a laser beam, compare the Full-color 3D deviation map with the projection graph, then, locate and make quantitative correction to meet the processing precision requirements. It can display the trend of the machined surface deviation clearly.

  4. "Intelligent Ensemble" Projections of Precipitation and Surface Radiation in Support of Agricultural Climate Change Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patrick C.; Baker, Noel C.

    2015-01-01

    Earth's climate is changing and will continue to change into the foreseeable future. Expected changes in the climatological distribution of precipitation, surface temperature, and surface solar radiation will significantly impact agriculture. Adaptation strategies are, therefore, required to reduce the agricultural impacts of climate change. Climate change projections of precipitation, surface temperature, and surface solar radiation distributions are necessary input for adaption planning studies. These projections are conventionally constructed from an ensemble of climate model simulations (e.g., the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5)) as an equal weighted average, one model one vote. Each climate model, however, represents the array of climate-relevant physical processes with varying degrees of fidelity influencing the projection of individual climate variables differently. Presented here is a new approach, termed the "Intelligent Ensemble, that constructs climate variable projections by weighting each model according to its ability to represent key physical processes, e.g., precipitation probability distribution. This approach provides added value over the equal weighted average method. Physical process metrics applied in the "Intelligent Ensemble" method are created using a combination of NASA and NOAA satellite and surface-based cloud, radiation, temperature, and precipitation data sets. The "Intelligent Ensemble" method is applied to the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 anthropogenic climate forcing simulations within the CMIP5 archive to develop a set of climate change scenarios for precipitation, temperature, and surface solar radiation in each USDA Farm Resource Region for use in climate change adaptation studies.

  5. Multispectral UV imaging for surface analysis of MUPS tablets with special focus on the pellet distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikova, Anna; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Rades, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In the present study the applicability of multispectral UV imaging in combination with multivariate image analysis for surface evaluation of MUPS tablets was investigated with respect to the differentiation of the API pellets from the excipients matrix, estimation of the drug content as well...... on the tablet surface allowed an estimation of the true drug content in the respective MUPS tablet. In addition, the pellet distribution in the MUPS formulations could be estimated by UV image analysis of the tablet surface. In conclusion, this study revealed that UV imaging in combination with multivariate...... image analysis is a promising approach for the automatic quality control of MUPS tablets during the manufacturing process....

  6. Molecular Tension Probes for Imaging Forces at the Cell Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Galior, Kornelia; Ma, Victor Pui-Yan; Salaita, Khalid

    2017-12-19

    Mechanical forces are essential for a variety of biological processes ranging from transcription and translation to cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation. Through the activation of mechanosensitive signaling pathways, cells sense and respond to physical stimuli from the surrounding environment, a process widely known as mechanotransduction. At the cell membrane, many signaling receptors, such as integrins, cadherins and T- or B-cell receptors, bind to their ligands on the surface of adjacent cells or the extracellular matrix (ECM) to mediate mechanotransduction. Upon ligation, these receptor-ligand bonds transmit piconewton (pN) mechanical forces that are generated, in part, by the cytoskeleton. Importantly, these forces expose cryptic sites within mechanosensitive proteins and modulate the binding kinetics (on/off rate) of receptor-ligand complexes to further fine-tune mechanotransduction and the corresponding cell behavior. Over the past three decades, two categories of methods have been developed to measure cell receptor forces. The first class is traction force microscopy (TFM) and micropost array detectors (mPADs). In these methods, cells are cultured on elastic polymers or microstructures that deform under mechanical forces. The second category of techniques is single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) including atomic force microscopy (AFM), optical or magnetic tweezers, and biomembrane force probe (BFP). In SMFS, the experimenter applies external forces to probe the mechanics of individual cells or single receptor-ligand complexes, serially, one bond at a time. Although these techniques are powerful, the limited throughput of SMFS and the nN force sensitivity of TFM have hindered further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction. In this Account, we introduce the recent advent of molecular tension fluorescence microscopy (MTFM) as an emerging tool for molecular imaging of receptor mechanics in living cells. MTFM probes are

  7. TanDEM-X the Earth surface observation project from space level - basis and mission status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Wiśniowski

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available TanDEM-X is DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt the Earth surface observation project using high-resolution SAR interferometry. It opens a new era in space borne radar remote sensing. The system is based on two satellites: TerraSAR-X (TSX and TanDEM-X (TDX flying on the very close, strictly controlled orbits. This paper gives an overview of the radar technology and overview of the TanDEM-X mission concept which is based on several innovative technologies. The primary objective of the mission is to deliver a global digital elevation model (DEM with an unprecedented accuracy, which is equal to or surpass the HRTI-3 specifications (12 m posting, relative height accuracy ±2 m for slope < 20% and ±4 m for slope > 20% [8]. Beyond that, TanDEM-X provides a highly reconfigurable platform for the demonstration of new radar imaging techniques and applications.[b]Keywords[/b]: remote sensing, Bistatic SAR, digital elevation model (DEM, Helix formation, SAR interferomery, HRTI-3, synchronization

  8. UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water, Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The QAIP outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance activities as management tools to ensure that UMTRA Project activities are carried out in amanner to protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project, and meet or exceed contract requirements

  9. Clenbuterol Assay by Spectral Imaging Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yichuan; Yao, Manwen; Fang, Xiangyi; Yang, Yucong; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2015-11-01

    To prevent illegal use of clenbuterol and for quality control in the food industry, more efficient and reliable methods for clenbuterol detection are needed. In this study, clenbuterol was detected using a spectral imaging surface plasmon resonance sensor system via two inhibition methods: (1) the target site compensation method, in which anti-clenbuterol antibody was immobilized on the sensor chip as a bioprobe and (2) the solution competition method in which a clenbuterol-BSA conjugate was immobilized on the sensor chip as the bioprobe. The detectable clenbuterol concentration ranged between 6.25 and 100 μg/mL for both methods. The clenbuterol limit of detection for the target site compensation method and solution competition method are estimated to be 6.7 and 4.5 μg/mL, respectively. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the detection of clenbuterol molecules and were found to have high specificity and high-throughput and were label free and operationally convenient.

  10. Radon transform based automatic metal artefacts generation for 3D threat image projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megherbi, Najla; Breckon, Toby P.; Flitton, Greg T.; Mouton, Andre

    2013-10-01

    Threat Image Projection (TIP) plays an important role in aviation security. In order to evaluate human security screeners in determining threats, TIP systems project images of realistic threat items into the images of the passenger baggage being scanned. In this proof of concept paper, we propose a 3D TIP method which can be integrated within new 3D Computed Tomography (CT) screening systems. In order to make the threat items appear as if they were genuinely located in the scanned bag, appropriate CT metal artefacts are generated in the resulting TIP images according to the scan orientation, the passenger bag content and the material of the inserted threat items. This process is performed in the projection domain using a novel methodology based on the Radon Transform. The obtained results using challenging 3D CT baggage images are very promising in terms of plausibility and realism.

  11. Z-Contrast STEM Imaging and EELS of CdSe Nanocrystals: Towards the Analysis of Individual Nanocrystal Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erwin, M.; Kadavanich, A.V.; Kippeny, T.; Pennycook, S.J.; Rosenthal, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    We have applied Atomic Number Contract Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Z-Contrast STEM) and STEM/EELS (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) towards the study of colloidal CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals embedded in MEH-PPV polymer films. Unlike the case of conventional phase-contrast High Resolution TEM, Z-Contrast images are direct projections of the atomic structure. Hence they can be interpreted without the need for sophisticated image simulation and the image intensity is a direct measure of the thickness of a nanocrystal. Our thickness measurements are in agreement with the predicted faceted shape of these nanocrystals. Our unique 1.3A resolution STEM has successfully resolve3d the sublattice structure of these CdSe nanocrystals. In [010] projection (the polar axis in the image plane) we can distinguish Se atom columns from Cd columns. Consequently we can study the effects of lattice polarity on the nanocrystal morphology. Furthermore, since the STEM technique does not rely on diffraction, it is superbly suited to the study of non-periodic detail, such as the surface structure of the nanocrystals. EELS measurements on individual nanocrystals indicate a significant amount (equivalet to 0.5-1 surface monolayers) of oxygen on the nanocrystals, despite processing in an inert atmosphere. Spatially resolved measurements at 7A resolution suggest a surface oxide layer. However, the uncertainty in the measurement precludes definitive assignment at this time. The source of the oxygen is under investigation as well

  12. Organoselenium Surface Modification of Stainless Steel Surfaces To Prevent Biofouling in Treatment of Space Wastestreams Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this work is to quantify the reduction of biofilm formation in a water distribution system resulting from an organoselenium surface coating on...

  13. Visualization of brain surface structures by weighted summation technique using multislice MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Yoshio; Hatanaka, Masahiko; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Tadatoki; Katada, Kazuhiro.

    1991-01-01

    Surface anatomy scanning (SAS) technique which visualizes brain surface structures has been developed since 1987. In this paper, we propose a modified method called 'multislice SAS', which also generates such surface structure images, and has several advantages compared with conventional SAS technique. The conventional SAS technique uses a very long echo time sequence (e.g. SE(3000, 250)) with a thick slice and a surface coil to enhance CSF on the brain surface. Our modified technique also uses a long echo time sequence. But, added multislice images, each appropriately weighted, are used in stead of a thick slice and a surface coil. Our basic studies have shown that this modified method has the following advantage: Several surface images with slightly different summation directions are obtained, and they are used for stereographic display and cine display. This is very useful for visualizing the spatial relationship of brain surface structures. By choosing appropriate weighting, we can obtain clinically legible surface images. This technique dose not require a surface coil. It means that flexibility of selecting imaging direction is high. We can make a lot of modifications, because the original multislice images of weighted summation are arbitrary. And we also clarify some limitation or disadvantage of this modified method. In conclusion, we think that this technique is one of the practical approaches for surface anatomy imaging. (author)

  14. Using Sentinel-1 and Landsat 8 satellite images to estimate surface soil moisture content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexis, Philippos-Dimitrios; Alexakis, Dimitrios D.; Daliakopoulos, Ioannis N.; Tsanis, Ioannis K.

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, the potential for more accurate assessment of Soil Moisture (SM) content exploiting Earth Observation (EO) technology, by exploring the use of synergistic approaches among a variety of EO instruments has emerged. This study is the first to investigate the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) (Sentinel-1) and optical (Landsat 8) images in combination with ground measurements to estimate volumetric SM content in support of water management and agricultural practices. SAR and optical data are downloaded and corrected in terms of atmospheric, geometric and radiometric corrections. SAR images are also corrected in terms of roughness and vegetation with the synergistic use of Oh and Topp models using a dataset consisting of backscattering coefficients and corresponding direct measurements of ground parameters (moisture, roughness). Following, various vegetation indices (NDVI, SAVI, MSAVI, EVI, etc.) are estimated to record diachronically the vegetation regime within the study area and as auxiliary data in the final modeling. Furthermore, thermal images from optical data are corrected and incorporated to the overall approach. The basic principle of Thermal InfraRed (TIR) method is that Land Surface Temperature (LST) is sensitive to surface SM content due to its impact on surface heating process (heat capacity and thermal conductivity) under bare soil or sparse vegetation cover conditions. Ground truth data are collected from a Time-domain reflectometer (TRD) gauge network established in western Crete, Greece, during 2015. Sophisticated algorithms based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) approaches are used to explore the statistical relationship between backscattering measurements and SM content. Results highlight the potential of SAR and optical satellite images to contribute to effective SM content detection in support of water resources management and precision agriculture. Keywords: Sentinel-1, Landsat 8, Soil

  15. The Multidimensional Integrated Intelligent Imaging project (MI-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allinson, N.; Anaxagoras, T.; Aveyard, J.; Arvanitis, C.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Bohndiek, S.; Cabello, J.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Clark, A.; Clayton, C.; Cook, E.; Cossins, A.; Crooks, J.; El-Gomati, M.; Evans, P.M.; Faruqi, W.; French, M.; Gow, J.

    2009-01-01

    MI-3 is a consortium of 11 universities and research laboratories whose mission is to develop complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APS) and to apply these sensors to a range of imaging challenges. A range of sensors has been developed: On-Pixel Intelligent CMOS (OPIC)-designed for in-pixel intelligence; FPN-designed to develop novel techniques for reducing fixed pattern noise; HDR-designed to develop novel techniques for increasing dynamic range; Vanilla/PEAPS-with digital and analogue modes and regions of interest, which has also been back-thinned; Large Area Sensor (LAS)-a novel, stitched LAS; and eLeNA-which develops a range of low noise pixels. Applications being developed include autoradiography, a gamma camera system, radiotherapy verification, tissue diffraction imaging, X-ray phase-contrast imaging, DNA sequencing and electron microscopy.

  16. The Multidimensional Integrated Intelligent Imaging project (MI-3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allinson, N.; Anaxagoras, T. [Vision and Information Engineering, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Aveyard, J. [Laboratory for Environmental Gene Regulation, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Arvanitis, C. [Radiation Physics, University College, London (United Kingdom); Bates, R.; Blue, A. [Experimental Particle Physics, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Bohndiek, S. [Radiation Physics, University College, London (United Kingdom); Cabello, J. [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Chen, L. [Electron Optics, Applied Electromagnetics and Electron Optics, University of York (United Kingdom); Chen, S. [MRC Laboratory for Molecular Biology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Clark, A. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratories (United Kingdom); Clayton, C. [Vision and Information Engineering, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Cook, E. [Radiation Physics, University College, London (United Kingdom); Cossins, A. [Laboratory for Environmental Gene Regulation, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Crooks, J. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratories (United Kingdom); El-Gomati, M. [Electron Optics, Applied Electromagnetics and Electron Optics, University of York (United Kingdom); Evans, P.M. [Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: phil.evans@icr.ac.uk; Faruqi, W. [MRC Laboratory for Molecular Biology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); French, M. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratories (United Kingdom); Gow, J. [Imaging for Space and Terrestrial Applications, Brunel University, London (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    2009-06-01

    MI-3 is a consortium of 11 universities and research laboratories whose mission is to develop complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APS) and to apply these sensors to a range of imaging challenges. A range of sensors has been developed: On-Pixel Intelligent CMOS (OPIC)-designed for in-pixel intelligence; FPN-designed to develop novel techniques for reducing fixed pattern noise; HDR-designed to develop novel techniques for increasing dynamic range; Vanilla/PEAPS-with digital and analogue modes and regions of interest, which has also been back-thinned; Large Area Sensor (LAS)-a novel, stitched LAS; and eLeNA-which develops a range of low noise pixels. Applications being developed include autoradiography, a gamma camera system, radiotherapy verification, tissue diffraction imaging, X-ray phase-contrast imaging, DNA sequencing and electron microscopy.

  17. Imaging by Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Deconvolution Resolving More Details of Surfaces Nanomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    Upon imaging, electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ESTM), scanning electrochemical micro-scopy (SECM) and in situ STM resolve information on electronic structures and on surface topography. At very high resolution, imaging processing is required, as to obtain information that relates...... to crystallographic-surface structures. Within the wide range of new technologies, those images surface features, the electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM) provides means of atomic resolution where the tip participates actively in the process of imaging. Two metallic surfaces influence ions trapped...... of the characteristic details of the images. A large proportion of the observed noise may be explained by the scanning actions of the feedback circuitry while a minor fraction of the image details may be explained by surface drift phenomena. As opposed to the method of deconvolution, conventional methods of filtering...

  18. A new practical method to reconstruct cerebral surface anatomical images for computer-assisted neurosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Shin; Kato, Amami; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Taneda, Mamoru; Hayakawa, Toru (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    Authors have developed a new, practical method to reconstruct cerebral surface anatomical images for better surgical orientation and surgical planning. Using a personal computer and a commercially available image handling software, an area encompassing the surface gyri and sulci is selected from the most superficial slice of T1-weighted MR images, after which this selected area, on adjusting the alignment, is overlayed onto the next superficial slice. By repeating this procedure for 4 to 7 times, the brain surface image obtained clearly displays the gyri and sulci. A vascular image of the cerebral surface can also be obtained by this same method by using T2-weighted images or MR angiograms. Then, by combining both the brain surface and vascular images, an anatomically reconstructed image of the cerebral surface is achieved. The outlines of the lesion or ventricles can also be added, if necessary, and the entire procedure takes an hour or less. The authors believe that this method is superior to conventional surface anatomy scanning for discriminating anatomical structures close to a lesion. This surface anatomical imaging method has been used for the surgical planning and its use helped to minimize surgical damage to the eloquent areas. (author).

  19. Bone surface enhancement in ultrasound images using a new Doppler-based acquisition/processing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Tang, Songyuan; Tasciotti, Ennio; Righetti, Raffaella

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging has long been considered as a potential aid in orthopedic surgeries. US technologies are safe, portable and do not use radiations. This would make them a desirable tool for real-time assessment of fractures and to monitor fracture healing. However, image quality of US imaging methods in bone applications is limited by speckle, attenuation, shadow, multiple reflections and other imaging artifacts. While bone surfaces typically appear in US images as somewhat ‘brighter’ than soft tissue, they are often not easily distinguishable from the surrounding tissue. Therefore, US imaging methods aimed at segmenting bone surfaces need enhancement in image contrast prior to segmentation to improve the quality of the detected bone surface. In this paper, we present a novel acquisition/processing technique for bone surface enhancement in US images. Inspired by elastography and Doppler imaging methods, this technique takes advantage of the difference between the mechanical and acoustic properties of bones and those of soft tissues to make the bone surface more easily distinguishable in US images. The objective of this technique is to facilitate US-based bone segmentation methods and improve the accuracy of their outcomes. The newly proposed technique is tested both in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The results of these preliminary experiments suggest that the use of the proposed technique has the potential to significantly enhance the detectability of bone surfaces in noisy ultrasound images.

  20. Hierarchical clustering of RGB surface water images based on MIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus characterised images were partitioned into clusters of similar images using hierarchical clustering. The best defined clusters were obtained when the Ward's method was applied. Images were partitioned into the 2 main clusters in terms of similar colours of displayed objects. Each main cluster was further partitioned ...

  1. Hierarchical clustering of RGB surface water images based on MIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-11-25

    Nov 25, 2009 ... quently have to be solved by common laboratory methods. Images contain a large amount of .... neighbour, furthest neighbour, centroid, median, group aver- age, and Ward's method. The theory of .... tion of image matrices prior to SVD computed on a common. 1 GB RAM desktop computer. For each image ...

  2. Multidisciplinary Collaboration and the Development of Multimedia Resources: The Images for Teaching Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Patrick; Coupland, Jon; Edwards, Tony; Hudson, Alison; Tearle, Penni

    1998-01-01

    Describes the management of the University of Exeter (England) Images for Teaching Education Project, the design and use of educational materials, the production and use of images and sound, and the evaluation of teaching and learning. Discusses processes and outcomes of collaboration and the importance of a multidisciplinary approach. (PEN)

  3. Image restoration by the method of convex projections: part 2 applications and numerical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezan, M I; Stark, H

    1982-01-01

    The image restoration theory discussed in a previous paper by Youla and Webb [1] is applied to a simulated image and the results compared with the well-known method known as the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm. The results show that the method of image restoration by projection onto convex sets, by providing a convenient technique for utilizing a priori information, performs significantly better than the Gerchberg-Papoulis method.

  4. Traumatic Brain Injury Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research Roadmap Development Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    optical imaging methods, PET/SPECT with radioisotope agents, and other technologies are less generally available or have known limitations. No “one...Brain Injury D-MRI Research Roadmap Development Project. Product Line Review (PLR) meeting, Medical Imaging Technologies. 12 June 2012. 11. Xia...meeting, Medical Imaging Technologies. Presentation slides. 12 June 2012. 1 Product Line Traumatic Brain Injury Diffusion Magnetic Resonance

  5. Surface-driven registration method for the structure-informed segmentation of diffusion MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Oscar; Zosso, Dominique; Daducci, Alessandro; Bach-Cuadra, Meritxell; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Santos, Andres

    2016-10-01

    Current methods for processing diffusion MRI (dMRI) to map the connectivity of the human brain require precise delineations of anatomical structures. This requirement has been approached by either segmenting the data in native dMRI space or mapping the structural information from T1-weighted (T1w) images. The characteristic features of diffusion data in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, resolution, as well as the geometrical distortions caused by the inhomogeneity of magnetic susceptibility across tissues hinder both solutions. Unifying the two approaches, we propose regseg, a surface-to-volume nonlinear registration method that segments homogeneous regions within multivariate images by mapping a set of nested reference-surfaces. Accurate surfaces are extracted from a T1w image of the subject, using as target image the bivariate volume comprehending the fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps derived from the dMRI dataset. We first verify the accuracy of regseg on a general context using digital phantoms distorted with synthetic and random deformations. Then we establish an evaluation framework using undistorted dMRI data from the Human Connectome Project (HCP) and realistic deformations derived from the inhomogeneity fieldmap corresponding to each subject. We analyze the performance of regseg computing the misregistration error of the surfaces estimated after being mapped with regseg onto 16 datasets from the HCP. The distribution of errors shows a 95% CI of 0.56-0.66mm, that is below the dMRI resolution (1.25mm, isotropic). Finally, we cross-compare the proposed tool against a nonlinear b0-to-T2w registration method, thereby obtaining a significantly lower misregistration error with regseg. The accurate mapping of structural information in dMRI space is fundamental to increase the reliability of network building in connectivity analyses, and to improve the performance of the emerging structure-informed techniques for dMRI data

  6. A projection graphic display for the computer aided analysis of bubble chamber images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomos, E.

    1979-01-01

    A projection graphic display for aiding the analysis of bubble chamber photographs has been developed by the Instrumentation Group of EF Division at CERN. The display image is generated on a very high brightness cathode ray tube and projected on to the table of the scanning-measuring machines as a superposition to the image of the bubble chamber. The display can send messages to the operator and aid the measurement by indicating directly on the chamber image the tracks which are measured correctly or not. (orig.)

  7. Technical validation of the Di3D stereophotogrammetry surface imaging system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winder, R.J.; Darvann, Tron Andre; McKnight, W.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the technical performance of a three-dimensional surface imaging system for geometric accuracy and maximum field of view. The system was designed for stereophotogrammetry capture of digital images from three-dimensional surfaces of the head, face, and neck...

  8. Nondestructive detection pesticide residue on navel orange surface using laser image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Mingyin; Liu, Muhua; Yao, Lintao

    2009-07-01

    To detect pesticide residue on navel orange surface by nondestructive means, five group oranges sprayed water, fenvalerate, isocarbophos, fenpropathrin, carbendazim pesticides respectively were chosen as experimental samples. Laser imaging system was built for acquiring images of fruits. Unitary nonlinear regression function was fitted by analyzing gray histogram curves of images within 12-40 range. The coefficient or eigenvalue of functions was different about every navel orange. The threshold coefficient was confirmed by data processing, which can establish fruits surface sprayed pesticide or not. The result showed that laser imaging technique is feasible for detecting pesticide residue on navel orange surface.

  9. Area Estimation of Deep-Sea Surfaces from Oblique Still Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Carvalho Dias

    Full Text Available Estimating the area of seabed surfaces from pictures or videos is an important problem in seafloor surveys. This task is complex to achieve with moving platforms such as submersibles, towed or remotely operated vehicles (ROV, where the recording camera is typically not static and provides an oblique view of the seafloor. A new method for obtaining seabed surface area estimates is presented here, using the classical set up of two laser devices fixed to the ROV frame projecting two parallel lines over the seabed. By combining lengths measured directly from the image containing the laser lines, the area of seabed surfaces is estimated, as well as the camera's distance to the seabed, pan and tilt angles. The only parameters required are the distance between the parallel laser lines and the camera's horizontal and vertical angles of view. The method was validated with a controlled in situ experiment using a deep-sea ROV, yielding an area estimate error of 1.5%. Further applications and generalizations of the method are discussed, with emphasis on deep-sea applications.

  10. Fractal analysis of AFM images of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Sueiras, Vivian; Ziebarth, Noël Marysa

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to further investigate the ultrastructural details of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. One representative image acquired of Bowman's membrane of a human cornea was investigated. The three-dimensional (3-D) surface of the sample was imaged using AFM in contact mode, while the sample was completely submerged in optisol solution. Height and deflection images were acquired at multiple scan lengths using the MFP-3D AFM system software (Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA), based in IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics, Lake Oswego, OR). A novel approach, based on computational algorithms for fractal analysis of surfaces applied for AFM data, was utilized to analyze the surface structure. The surfaces revealed a fractal structure at the nanometer scale. The fractal dimension, D, provided quantitative values that characterize the scale properties of surface geometry. Detailed characterization of the surface topography was obtained using statistical parameters, in accordance with ISO 25178-2: 2012. Results obtained by fractal analysis confirm the relationship between the value of the fractal dimension and the statistical surface roughness parameters. The surface structure of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea is complex. The analyzed AFM images confirm a fractal nature of the surface, which is not taken into account by classical surface statistical parameters. Surface fractal dimension could be useful in ophthalmology to quantify corneal architectural changes associated with different disease states to further our understanding of disease evolution.

  11. Research on binary CT image reconstruction of steel tube section from three projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Shuaijun; Wu Zhifang

    2008-01-01

    Fast online inspection technology is a difficult problem in the manufacture of steel tube. Radiographic CT imaging technology can reconstruct the image of steel tube section and acquire its most dimension parameters, which is quite appropriate for its inspection and quality control. A scan mode with immobile ray sources and detectors is proposed to reduce the inspection time. It can obtain projection data quickly and meet the need of online inspection. Maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction algorithm is modified based on the space domain and pixel value domain characters of steel tube sections in order to reconstruct its image from few projections. The results of simulation experiment indicate that the modified MAP algorithm can reconstruct the image of steel tube section from at least three projections. The precision of acquired dimension parameters meets the requirement of national standard and the technology is expected to be widely used in practice. (authors)

  12. Projection domain denoising method based on dictionary learning for low-dose CT image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Liyi; Sun, Yunshan; Zhang, Jingyu

    2015-01-01

    Reducing X-ray tube current is one of the widely used methods for decreasing the radiation dose. Unfortunately, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the projection data degrades simultaneously. To improve the quality of reconstructed images, a dictionary learning based penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) approach is proposed for sinogram denoising. The weighted least-squares considers the statistical characteristic of noise and the penalty models the sparsity of sinogram based on dictionary learning. Then reconstruct CT image using filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm from the denoised sinogram. The proposed method is particularly suitable for the projection data with low SNR. Experimental results show that the proposed method can get high-quality CT images when the signal to noise ratio of projection data declines sharply.

  13. Design and Development of a New Multi-Projection X-Ray System for Chest Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Boyce, Sarah; Washington, Lacey; McAdams, H. Page; Samei, Ehsan

    2009-02-01

    Overlapping anatomical structures may confound the detection of abnormal pathology, including lung nodules, in conventional single-projection chest radiography. To minimize this fundamental limiting factor, a dedicated digital multi-projection system for chest imaging was recently developed at the Radiology Department of Duke University. We are reporting the design of the multi-projection imaging system and its initial performance in an ongoing clinical trial. The system is capable of acquiring multiple full-field projections of the same patient along both the horizontal and vertical axes at variable speeds and acquisition frame rates. These images acquired in rapid succession from slightly different angles about the posterior-anterior (PA) orientation can be correlated to minimize the influence of overlying anatomy. The developed system has been tested for repeatability and motion blur artifacts to investigate its robustness for clinical trials. Excellent geometrical consistency was found in the tube motion, with positional errors for clinical settings within 1%. The effect of tube-motion on the image quality measured in terms of impact on the modulation transfer function (MTF) was found to be minimal. The system was deemed clinic-ready and a clinical trial was subsequently launched. The flexibility of image acquisition built into the system provides a unique opportunity to easily modify it for different clinical applications, including tomosynthesis, correlation imaging (CI), and stereoscopic imaging.

  14. Measuring grinding surface roughness based on the sharpness evaluation of colour images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huaian, Y I; Jian, L I U; Enhui, L U; Peng, A O

    2016-01-01

    Current machine vision-based detection methods for metal surface roughness mainly use the grey values of images for statistical analysis but do not make full use of the colour information and ignore the subjective judgment of the human vision system. To address these problems, this paper proposes a method to measure surface roughness through the sharpness evaluation of colour images. Based on the difference in sharpness of virtual images of colour blocks that are formed on grinding surfaces with different roughness, an algorithm for evaluating the sharpness of colour images that is based on the difference of the RGB colour space was used to develop a correlation model between the sharpness and the surface roughness. The correlation model was analysed under two conditions: constant illumination and varying illumination. The effect of the surface textures of the grinding samples on the image sharpness was also considered, demonstrating the feasibility of the detection method. The results show that the sharpness is strongly correlated with the surface roughness; when the illumination and the surface texture have the same orientation, the sharpness clearly decreases with increasing surface roughness. Under varying illumination, this correlation between the sharpness and surface roughness was highly robust, and the sharpness of each virtual image increased linearly with the illumination. Relative to the detection method for surface roughness using gray level co-occurrence matrix or artificial neural network, the proposed method is convenient, highly accurate and has a wide measurement range. (paper)

  15. Downscaling of Aircraft, Landsat, and MODIS-bases Land Surface Temperature Images with Support Vector Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    High spatial resolution Land Surface Temperature (LST) images are required to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) at a field scale for irrigation scheduling purposes. Satellite sensors such as Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) can offer images at s...

  16. WE-G-BRF-04: Robust Real-Time Volumetric Imaging Based On One Single Projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y; Yan, H; Ouyang, L; Wang, J; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Zhou, L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time volumetric imaging is highly desirable to provide instantaneous image guidance for lung radiation therapy. This study proposes a scheme to achieve this goal using one single projection by utilizing sparse learning and a principal component analysis (PCA) based lung motion model. Methods: A patient-specific PCA-based lung motion model is first constructed by analyzing deformable vector fields (DVFs) between a reference image and 4DCT images at each phase. At the training stage, we “learn” the relationship between the DVFs and the projection using sparse learning. Specifically, we first partition the projections into patches, and then apply sparse learning to automatically identify patches that best correlate with the principal components of the DVFs. Once the relationship is established, at the application stage, we first employ a patchbased intensity correction method to overcome the problem of different intensity scale between the calculated projection in the training stage and the measured projection in the application stage. The corrected projection image is then fed to the trained model to derive a DVF, which is applied to the reference image, yielding a volumetric image corresponding to the projection. We have validated our method through a NCAT phantom simulation case and one experiment case. Results: Sparse learning can automatically select those patches containing motion information, such as those around diaphragm. For the simulation case, over 98% of the lung region pass the generalized gamma test (10HU/1mm), indicating combined accuracy in both intensity and spatial domain. For the experimental case, the average tumor localization errors projected to the imager are 0.68 mm and 0.4 mm on the axial and tangential direction, respectively. Conclusion: The proposed method is capable of accurately generating a volumetric image using one single projection. It will potentially offer real-time volumetric image guidance to facilitate lung

  17. Mechanisms for SAR imaging of ocean surface phenomena: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesecky, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Understanding the SAR response to surface wave is a central issue in the analysis of SAR ocean images. The imaging mechanism for gravity waves and the practical question of just which characteristics of the ocean wave field can be measured remotely using SAR were examined. Assessments of wave imaging theory are based primarily on comparisons of the directional wave height variance spectrum psi (K) measured by in situ buoys with estimates from SAR images. Other criteria are also recommended, e.g., the effects of focus adjustments. It is assumed that fluctuations in SAR image intensity are proportional to fluctuations in ocean surface height. If this were true, the Fourier power spectrum of a SAR image and corresponding surface measurements of psi would coincide. Differences between SAR estimates based on this hypothesis and buoy measurements of psi are then used to begin the assessment of rival wave imaging theories.

  18. Contribution of polarimetric imaging for the characterization of fibrous surface properties at different scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourlonias, Michel; Bigué, Laurent; Bueno, Marie-Ange

    2010-01-01

    The point in using polarimetric imaging for surface characterization is highlighted in this paper. A method for the evaluation of nonwoven surface properties at microscopic and macroscopic scales is described. This method is based on a polarimetric apparatus and various image processing operations are then performed depending on the studied scale. Polarimetric imaging applied to nonwovens, particularly degree of polarization imaging, highlights texture inhomogeneities. At both scales, image processing techniques were designed to analyze surface zones of different textures. At the macroscopic scale, a basic image processing was developed in order to detect the nonwoven manufacturing process defects. Moreover at the microscopic scale, i.e. at the fiber scale, image processing was adapted to evaluate fiber orientation within nonwovens, which is known to be an important information for mechanical behavior prediction.

  19. Ion and electron beam interaction on surfaces - a detection mechanism for obtaining visual ion beam images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, J.; Gorden, R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional images have been obtained of ion beam impact cross sections on solid surfaces by the coincident interaction of a rastered electron beam. This detection method is effective in producing images in real time on various insulator surfaces. The size of these images correlates well with ion beam current density profile measurements (at full width) and, therefore, can be very useful for ion beam diagnostics and alignment. (Auth.)

  20. The Lunar Student Imaging Project (LSIP): Bringing the Excitement of Lunar Exploration to Students Using LRO Mission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, W. L.; Roberts, D.; Burnham, R.; Robinson, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    In June 2009, NASA launched the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) - the first mission in NASA's Vision for Space Exploration, a plan to return to the Moon and then to travel to Mars and beyond. LRO is equipped with seven instruments including the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC), a system of two narrow-angle cameras and one wide-angle camera, controlled by scientists in the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University. The orbiter will have a one-year primary mission in a 50 km polar orbit. The measurements from LROC will uncover much-needed information about potential landing sites and will help generate a meter scale map of the lunar surface. With support from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the LROC Science Operations Center and the ASU Mars Education Program, have partnered to develop an inquiry-based student program, the Lunar Student Imaging Project (LSIP). Based on the nationally recognized, Mars Student Imaging Project (MSIP), LSIP uses cutting-edge NASA content and remote sensing data to involve students in authentic lunar exploration. This program offers students (grades 5-14) immersive experiences where they can: 1) target images of the lunar surface, 2) interact with NASA planetary scientists, mission engineers and educators, and 3) gain access to NASA curricula and materials developed to enhance STEM learning. Using a project based learning model, students drive their own research and learn first hand what it’s like to do real planetary science. The LSIP curriculum contains a resource manual and program guide (including lunar feature identification charts, classroom posters, and lunar exploration time line) and a series of activities covering image analysis, relative age dating and planetary comparisons. LSIP will be based upon the well-tested MSIP model, and will encompass onsite as well as distance learning components.

  1. Application of instrument transfer function to a fringe projection system for measuring rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Davies, Angela; Ziegert, John; Evans, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    When fringe projection profilometry is used for measuring rough/textured surfaces, the fidelity of the measurement is subject to the spatial frequency response. The instrument transfer function (ITF) is one appealing approach to characterize this property. The foundation of ITF analysis is based on the linear theory; only linear systems are appropriate for ITF analysis. A fringe projection system is intrinsically nonlinear, but it can be approximated as a linear system when certain conditions are met. Here we investigate the linear conditions of a custom fringe projection system designed for an additive manufacturing application. The applicability of ITF is discussed through mathematical analysis and simulations.

  2. Image reconstruction for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) by using projection-angle-dependent filter functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yeonok; Park, Chulkyu; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Hong, Daeki; Lee, Minsik; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo

    2014-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is considered in clinics as a standard three-dimensional imaging modality, allowing the earlier detection of cancer. It typically acquires only 10-30 projections over a limited angle range of 15 - 60 .deg. with a stationary detector and typically uses a computationally-efficient filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm for image reconstruction. However, a common FBP algorithm yields poor image quality resulting from the loss of average image value and the presence of severe image artifacts due to the elimination of the dc component of the image by the ramp filter and to the incomplete data, respectively. As an alternative, iterative reconstruction methods are often used in DBT to overcome these difficulties, even though they are still computationally expensive. In this study, as a compromise, we considered a projection-angle dependent filtering method in which one-dimensional geometry-adapted filter kernels are computed with the aid of a conjugate-gradient method and are incorporated into the standard FBP framework. We implemented the proposed algorithm and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the imaging characteristics. Our results indicate that the proposed method is superior to a conventional FBP method for DBT imaging and has a comparable computational cost, while preserving good image homogeneity and edge sharpening with no serious image artifacts.

  3. Image reconstruction for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) by using projection-angle-dependent filter functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yeonok; Park, Chulkyu; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Hong, Daeki; Lee, Minsik; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is considered in clinics as a standard three-dimensional imaging modality, allowing the earlier detection of cancer. It typically acquires only 10-30 projections over a limited angle range of 15 - 60 .deg. with a stationary detector and typically uses a computationally-efficient filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm for image reconstruction. However, a common FBP algorithm yields poor image quality resulting from the loss of average image value and the presence of severe image artifacts due to the elimination of the dc component of the image by the ramp filter and to the incomplete data, respectively. As an alternative, iterative reconstruction methods are often used in DBT to overcome these difficulties, even though they are still computationally expensive. In this study, as a compromise, we considered a projection-angle dependent filtering method in which one-dimensional geometry-adapted filter kernels are computed with the aid of a conjugate-gradient method and are incorporated into the standard FBP framework. We implemented the proposed algorithm and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the imaging characteristics. Our results indicate that the proposed method is superior to a conventional FBP method for DBT imaging and has a comparable computational cost, while preserving good image homogeneity and edge sharpening with no serious image artifacts.

  4. PLÉIADES PROJECT: ASSESSMENT OF GEOREFERENCING ACCURACY, IMAGE QUALITY, PANSHARPENING PERFORMENCE AND DSM/DTM QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Topan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pléiades 1A and 1B are twin optical satellites of Optical and Radar Federated Earth Observation (ORFEO program jointly running by France and Italy. They are the first satellites of Europe with sub-meter resolution. Airbus DS (formerly Astrium Geo runs a MyGIC (formerly Pléiades Users Group program to validate Pléiades images worldwide for various application purposes. The authors conduct three projects, one is within this program, the second is supported by BEU Scientific Research Project Program, and the third is supported by TÜBİTAK. Assessment of georeferencing accuracy, image quality, pansharpening performance and Digital Surface Model/Digital Terrain Model (DSM/DTM quality subjects are investigated in these projects. For these purposes, triplet panchromatic (50 cm Ground Sampling Distance (GSD and VNIR (2 m GSD Pléiades 1A images were investigated over Zonguldak test site (Turkey which is urbanised, mountainous and covered by dense forest. The georeferencing accuracy was estimated with a standard deviation in X and Y (SX, SY in the range of 0.45m by bias corrected Rational Polynomial Coefficient (RPC orientation, using ~170 Ground Control Points (GCPs. 3D standard deviation of ±0.44m in X, ±0.51m in Y, and ±1.82m in Z directions have been reached in spite of the very narrow angle of convergence by bias corrected RPC orientation. The image quality was also investigated with respect to effective resolution, Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR and blur coefficient. The effective resolution was estimated with factor slightly below 1.0, meaning that the image quality corresponds to the nominal resolution of 50cm. The blur coefficients were achieved between 0.39-0.46 for triplet panchromatic images, indicating a satisfying image quality. SNR is in the range of other comparable space borne images which may be caused by de-noising of Pléiades images. The pansharpened images were generated by various methods, and are validated by most common

  5. Coalescence measurements for evolving foams monitored by real-time projection imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myagotin, A; Helfen, L; Baumbach, T

    2009-01-01

    Real-time radiographic projection imaging together with novel spatio-temporal image analysis is presented to be a powerful technique for the quantitative analysis of coalescence processes accompanying the generation and temporal evolution of foams and emulsions. Coalescence events can be identified as discontinuities in a spatio-temporal image representing a sequence of projection images. Detection, identification of intensity and localization of the discontinuities exploit a violation criterion of the Fourier shift theorem and are based on recursive spatio-temporal image partitioning. The proposed method is suited for automated measurements of discontinuity rates (i.e., discontinuity intensity per unit time), so that large series of radiographs can be analyzed without user intervention. The application potential is demonstrated by the quantification of coalescence during the formation and decay of metal foams monitored by real-time x-ray radiography

  6. Surface Explorations : 3D Moving Images as Cartographies of Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/241603471

    2016-01-01

    Moving images of travel and exploration have a long history. In this essay I will examine how the trope of navigation in 3D moving images can work towards an intimate and haptic encounter with other times and other places – elsewhen and elsewhere. The particular navigational construction of space in

  7. Principal component analysis for surface reflection components and structure in facial images and synthesis of facial images for various ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Misa; Toyota, Saori; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Ogawa-Ochiai, Keiko; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, principal component analysis is applied to the distribution of pigmentation, surface reflectance, and landmarks in whole facial images to obtain feature values. The relationship between the obtained feature vectors and the age of the face is then estimated by multiple regression analysis so that facial images can be modulated for woman aged 10-70. In a previous study, we analyzed only the distribution of pigmentation, and the reproduced images appeared to be younger than the apparent age of the initial images. We believe that this happened because we did not modulate the facial structures and detailed surfaces, such as wrinkles. By considering landmarks and surface reflectance over the entire face, we were able to analyze the variation in the distributions of facial structures and fine asperity, and pigmentation. As a result, our method is able to appropriately modulate the appearance of a face so that it appears to be the correct age.

  8. 3D palmprint and hand imaging system based on full-field composite color sinusoidal fringe projection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zonghua; Huang, Shujun; Xu, Yongjia; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Yan; Gao, Nan; Xiao, Yanjun

    2013-09-01

    Palmprint and hand shape, as two kinds of important biometric characteristics, have been widely studied and applied to human identity recognition. The existing research is based mainly on 2D images, which lose the third-dimensional information. The biological features extracted from 2D images are distorted by pressure and rolling, so the subsequent feature matching and recognition are inaccurate. This paper presents a method to acquire accurate 3D shapes of palmprint and hand by projecting full-field composite color sinusoidal fringe patterns and the corresponding color texture information. A 3D imaging system is designed to capture and process the full-field composite color fringe patterns on hand surface. Composite color fringe patterns having the optimum three fringe numbers are generated by software and projected onto the surface of human hand by a digital light processing projector. From another viewpoint, a color CCD camera captures the deformed fringe patterns and saves them for postprocessing. After compensating for the cross talk and chromatic aberration between color channels, three fringe patterns are extracted from three color channels of a captured composite color image. Wrapped phase information can be calculated from the sinusoidal fringe patterns with high precision. At the same time, the absolute phase of each pixel is determined by the optimum three-fringe selection method. After building up the relationship between absolute phase map and 3D shape data, the 3D palmprint and hand are obtained. Color texture information can be directly captured or demodulated from the captured composite fringe pattern images. Experimental results show that the proposed method and system can yield accurate 3D shape and color texture information of the palmprint and hand shape.

  9. Mid-infrared thermal imaging for an effective mapping of surface materials and sub-surface detachments in mural paintings: integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffara, C.; Parisotto, S.; Mariotti, P. I.

    2015-06-01

    Cultural Heritage is discovering how precious is thermal analysis as a tool to improve the restoration, thanks to its ability to inspect hidden details. In this work a novel dual mode imaging approach, based on the integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography (TQR) in the mid-IR is demonstrated for an effective mapping of surface materials and of sub-surface detachments in mural painting. The tool was validated through a unique application: the "Monocromo" by Leonardo da Vinci in Italy. The dual mode acquisition provided two spatially aligned dataset: the TQR image and the thermal sequence. Main steps of the workflow included: 1) TQR analysis to map surface features and 2) to estimate the emissivity; 3) projection of the TQR frame on reference orthophoto and TQR mosaicking; 4) thermography analysis to map detachments; 5) use TQR to solve spatial referencing and mosaicking for the thermal-processed frames. Referencing of thermal images in the visible is a difficult aspect of the thermography technique that the dual mode approach allows to solve in effective way. We finally obtained the TQR and the thermal maps spatially referenced to the mural painting, thus providing the restorer a valuable tool for the restoration of the detachments.

  10. A trial fabrication of activity standard surface sources and positional standard surface sources for an imaging plate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yasushi; Hino, Yoshio; Yamada, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Mikio

    2003-01-01

    An imaging plate system can detect low level activity, but quantitative analysis is difficult because there are no adequate standard surface sources. A new fabrication method was developed for standard surface sources by printing on a sheet of paper using an ink-jet printer with inks in which a radioactive material was mixed. The fabricated standard surface sources had high uniformity, high positional resolution arbitrary shapes and a broad intensity range. The standard sources were used for measurement of surface activity as an application. (H. Yokoo)

  11. Computerized mass detection for digital breast tomosynthesis directly from the projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, I.; Nishikawa, R.M.; Giger, M.L.; Wu, T.; Rafferty, E.A.; Moore, R.; Kopans, D.B.

    2006-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has recently emerged as a new and promising three-dimensional modality in breast imaging. In DBT, the breast volume is reconstructed from 11 projection images, taken at source angles equally spaced over an arc of 50 degrees. Reconstruction algorithms for this modality are not fully optimized yet. Because computerized lesion detection in the reconstructed breast volume will be affected by the reconstruction technique, we are developing a novel mass detection algorithm that operates instead on the set of raw projection images. Mass detection is done in three stages. First, lesion candidates are obtained for each projection image separately, using a mass detection algorithm that was initially developed for screen-film mammography. Second, the locations of a lesion candidate are backprojected into the breast volume. In this feature volume, voxel intensities are a combined measure of detection frequency (e.g., the number of projections in which a given lesion candidate was detected), and a measure of the angular range over which a given lesion was detected. Third, features are extracted after reprojecting the three-dimensional (3-D) locations of lesion candidates into projection images. Features are combined using linear discriminant analysis. The database used to test the algorithm consisted of 21 mass cases (13 malignant, 8 benign) and 15 cases without mass lesions. Based on this database, the algorithm yielded a sensitivity of 90% at 1.5 false positives per breast volume. Algorithm performance is positively biased because this dataset was used for development, training, and testing, and because the number of algorithm parameters was approximately the same as the number of patient cases. Our results indicate that computerized mass detection in the sequence of projection images for DBT may be effective despite the higher noise level in those images

  12. Study on preprocessing of surface defect images of cold steel strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoye GE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The image preprocessing is an important part in the field of digital image processing, and it’s also the premise for the image detection of cold steel strip surface defects. The factors including the complicated on-site environment and the distortion of the optical system will cause image degradation, which will directly affects the feature extraction and classification of the images. Aiming at these problems, a method combining the adaptive median filter and homomorphic filter is proposed to preprocess the image. The adaptive median filter is effective for image denoising, and the Gaussian homomorphic filter can steadily remove the nonuniform illumination of images. Finally, the original and preprocessed images and their features are analyzed and compared. The results show that this method can improve the image quality effectively.

  13. Self-Cleaning Surfaces: A Third-Year Undergraduate Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Ronald S.; Wu, Alex H. F.; Zhang, Hua; Coffey, Jacob; Huddle, Thomas; Lafountaine, Justin S.; Lim, Zhi-Jun; White, Eugene A.; Tuong, Nam T.; Lamb, Robert N.

    2009-01-01

    Superhydrophobic (non water-wettable) surfaces can possess the ability to self-clean (the so-called "lotus effect"). The task of devising the apparatus and method for quantifying this self-cleaning effect was offered as a project in a third-year undergraduate laboratory course. Using commonly available equipment the students devised a…

  14. Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance: evaluating simulations and making projections with regional climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rae, J.G.L.; Aðalgeirsdóttir, G.; Edwards, T.L.; Fettweis, X.; Gregory, J.M.; Hewitt, H.T.; Lowe, J.A.; Lucas-Picher, P.; Mottram, R.H.; Payne, A.J.; Ridley, J.K.; Shannon, S.R.; van de Berg, W.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831611; van de Wal, R.S.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/101899556; van den Broeke, M.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643

    2012-01-01

    Four high-resolution regional climate models (RCMs) have been set up for the area of Greenland, with the aim of providing future projections of Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB), and its contribution to sea level rise, with greater accuracy than is possible from coarser-resolution

  15. Evaporation over a heterogeneous land surface - The EVA-GRIPS project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mengelkamp, H.T.; Beyrich, F.; Heinemann, G.; Ament, F.; Bange, J.; Berger, F.; Bosenberg, J.; Foken, T.; Hennemuth, B.; Heret, C.; Huneke, S.; Johnsen, K.P.; Kerschgens, M.; Kohsiek, W.; Leps, J.P.; Liebethal, C.; Lohse, H.; Mauder, M.; Meijninger, W.M.L.; Raasch, S.; Simmer, C.

    2006-01-01

    The representation of subgrid-scale surface heterogeneities in numerical weather and climate models has been a challenging problem for more than a decade. The Evaporation at Grid and Pixel Scale (EVA-GRIPS) project adds to the numerous studies on vegetation-atmosphere interaction processes through a

  16. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH Signal Analysis Using Automated Generated Projection Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwei Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH tests provide promising molecular imaging biomarkers to more accurately and reliably detect and diagnose cancers and genetic disorders. Since current manual FISH signal analysis is low-efficient and inconsistent, which limits its clinical utility, developing automated FISH image scanning systems and computer-aided detection (CAD schemes has been attracting research interests. To acquire high-resolution FISH images in a multi-spectral scanning mode, a huge amount of image data with the stack of the multiple three-dimensional (3-D image slices is generated from a single specimen. Automated preprocessing these scanned images to eliminate the non-useful and redundant data is important to make the automated FISH tests acceptable in clinical applications. In this study, a dual-detector fluorescence image scanning system was applied to scan four specimen slides with FISH-probed chromosome X. A CAD scheme was developed to detect analyzable interphase cells and map the multiple imaging slices recorded FISH-probed signals into the 2-D projection images. CAD scheme was then applied to each projection image to detect analyzable interphase cells using an adaptive multiple-threshold algorithm, identify FISH-probed signals using a top-hat transform, and compute the ratios between the normal and abnormal cells. To assess CAD performance, the FISH-probed signals were also independently visually detected by an observer. The Kappa coefficients for agreement between CAD and observer ranged from 0.69 to 1.0 in detecting/counting FISH signal spots in four testing samples. The study demonstrated the feasibility of automated FISH signal analysis that applying a CAD scheme to the automated generated 2-D projection images.

  17. Application of image recognition algorithms for statistical description of nano- and microstructured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mărăscu, V.; Dinescu, G. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, Bucharest– Magurele (Romania); Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, 405 Atomistilor Street, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Chiţescu, I. [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bucharest, 14 Academiei Street, Bucharest (Romania); Barna, V. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, 405 Atomistilor Street, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Ioniţă, M. D.; Lazea-Stoyanova, A.; Mitu, B., E-mail: mitub@infim.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, Bucharest– Magurele (Romania)

    2016-03-25

    In this paper we propose a statistical approach for describing the self-assembling of sub-micronic polystyrene beads on silicon surfaces, as well as the evolution of surface topography due to plasma treatments. Algorithms for image recognition are used in conjunction with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging of surfaces. In a first step, greyscale images of the surface covered by the polystyrene beads are obtained. Further, an adaptive thresholding method was applied for obtaining binary images. The next step consisted in automatic identification of polystyrene beads dimensions, by using Hough transform algorithm, according to beads radius. In order to analyze the uniformity of the self–assembled polystyrene beads, the squared modulus of 2-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (2- D FFT) was applied. By combining these algorithms we obtain a powerful and fast statistical tool for analysis of micro and nanomaterials with aspect features regularly distributed on surface upon SEM examination.

  18. Nondestructive SEM for surface and subsurface wafer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propst, Roy H.; Bagnell, C. Robert; Cole, Edward I., Jr.; Davies, Brian G.; Dibianca, Frank A.; Johnson, Darryl G.; Oxford, William V.; Smith, Craig A.

    1987-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is considered as a tool for both failure analysis as well as device characterization. A survey is made of various operational SEM modes and their applicability to image processing methods on semiconductor devices.

  19. Surface coil MR imaging of acute spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McArdle, C.B.; Mirfakhraee, M.; Crofford, M.J.; Calhoun, J.H.; Amparo, E.G.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-two fractures were imaged in 21 patients, 18 in the first week after trauma, MR imaging detected all significant fractures of the thoracolumbar spine; and it was superior to other modalities in evaluating trauma to the disk and spinal cord. It was more sensitive, although less specific, than CT in assessing epidural mass effect. Most important, MR imaging was the only modality that identified tears of the spinal ligaments, enabling surgeons to accurately determine the stability of the spinal injury. The results indicate that Mr imaging can replace CT in evaluating the thoracolumbar spine. CT will play the major role in assessment of the cervical region, but MR is helpful in evaluating the spinal canal and cord

  20. Accuracy of three-dimensional measurements obtained from cone beam computed tomography surface-rendered images for cephalometric analysis: influence of patient scanning position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, B.; van der Stelt, P.; Sanderink, G.

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the accuracy of linear measurements on three-dimensional (3D) surface-rendered images generated from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in comparison with two-dimensional (2D) slices and 2D lateral and postero-anterior (PA) cephalometric projections, and to

  1. Atmospheric Polarization Imaging with Variable Aerosols, Clouds, and Surface Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Continuous outdoor operation of an all-sky polarization imager,” Proc. SPIE 7672 (Polarization: Measurement, Analysis , and Remote Sensing IX), 76720A-1-7, 7...condensation nuclei activity and hygroscopicity of in-situ biomass burning aerosol,” American Assoc. Aerosol Research 31 st Annual Conference...tunable liquid crystal variable retarders (LCVRs) allows the API to achieve much faster Stokes-image acquisition than instruments that rely on

  2. Deuteron injector for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, H. T.; Chen, J. E. [Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); SKLNPT, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Peng, S. X.; Lu, P. N.; Zhou, Q. F.; Yuan, Z. X.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, M.; Song, Z. Z.; Yu, J. X.; Guo, Z. Y. [SKLNPT, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-02-15

    The deuteron injector developed for the PKUNIFTY (Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility) has been installed and commissioned at Peking University (PKU). The injector system must transfer 50 keV 50 mA of D{sup +} ion beam to the entrance of the 2 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) with 10% duty factor (1 ms, 100 Hz). A compact 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (PMECR) ion source and a 1.36 m long low energy beam transport (LEBT) line using two solenoids was developed as the deuteron injector. A {phi}5 mm four-quadrant diaphragm was used to simulate the entrance of RFQ electrodes. The beam parameters are measured after this core with an emittance measurement unit (EMU) and a bending magnet for ion fraction analysis at the end of injector. During the commissioning, 77 mA of total deuteron beam was extracted from PMECR and 56 mA of pure D{sup +} beam that passed through the {phi}5 mm four-quadrant diaphragm was obtained at the position of RFQ entrance with the measured normalized rms emittance 0.12-0.16{pi} mm mrad. Ion species analysis results show that the deuteron fraction is as high as 99.5%. All of the parameters satisfy PKUNIFTY's requirements. In this paper, we will describe the deuteron injector design and report the commissioning results as well as the initial operation.

  3. JPEG2000-coded image error concealment exploiting convex sets projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Luigi; Ginesu, Giaime; Raccis, Alessio

    2005-04-01

    Transmission errors in JPEG2000 can be grouped into three main classes, depending on the affected area: LL, high frequencies at the lower decomposition levels, and high frequencies at the higher decomposition levels. The first type of errors are the most annoying but can be concealed exploiting the signal spatial correlation like in a number of techniques proposed in the past; the second are less annoying but more difficult to address; the latter are often imperceptible. In this paper, we address the problem of concealing the second class or errors when high bit-planes are damaged by proposing a new approach based on the theory of projections onto convex sets. Accordingly, the error effects are masked by iteratively applying two procedures: low-pass (LP) filtering in the spatial domain and restoration of the uncorrupted wavelet coefficients in the transform domain. It has been observed that a uniform LP filtering brought to some undesired side effects that negatively compensated the advantages. This problem has been overcome by applying an adaptive solution, which exploits an edge map to choose the optimal filter mask size. Simulation results demonstrated the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  4. Calibration and validation of a small-scale urban surface water flood event using crowdsourced images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Pattison, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Surface water flooding occurs when intense precipitation events overwhelm the drainage capacity of an area and excess overland flow is unable to infiltrate into the ground or drain via natural or artificial drainage channels, such as river channels, manholes or SuDS. In the UK, over 3 million properties are at risk from surface water flooding alone, accounting for approximately one third of the UK's flood risk. The risk of surface water flooding is projected to increase due to several factors, including population increases, land-use alterations and future climatic changes in precipitation resulting in an increased magnitude and frequency of intense precipitation events. Numerical inundation modelling is a well-established method of investigating surface water flood risk, allowing the researcher to gain a detailed understanding of the depth, velocity, discharge and extent of actual or hypothetical flood scenarios over a wide range of spatial scales. However, numerical models require calibration of key hydrological and hydraulic parameters (e.g. infiltration, evapotranspiration, drainage rate, roughness) to ensure model outputs adequately represent the flood event being studied. Furthermore, validation data such as crowdsourced images or spatially-referenced flood depth collected during a flood event may provide a useful validation of inundation depth and extent for actual flood events. In this study, a simplified two-dimensional inertial based flood inundation model requiring minimal pre-processing of data (FloodMap-HydroInundation) was used to model a short-duration, intense rainfall event (27.8 mm in 15 minutes) that occurred over the Loughborough University campus on the 28th June 2012. High resolution (1m horizontal, +/- 15cm vertical) DEM data, rasterised Ordnance Survey topographic structures data and precipitation data recorded at the University weather station were used to conduct numerical modelling over the small (present during the flood event via the

  5. Comparison of polar formatting and back-projection algorithms for spotlight-mode SAR image formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakowatz, Charles V., Jr.; Doren, Neall

    2006-05-01

    The convolution/back-projection (CBP) algorithm has recently once again been touted as the "gold standard" for spotlight-mode SAR image formation, as it is proclaimed to achieve better image quality than the well-known and often employed polar formatting algorithm (PFA). In addition, it has been suggested that PFA is less flexible than CBP in that PFA can only compute the SAR image on one grid and PFA cannot add or subtract pulses from the imaging process. The argument for CBP acknowledges the computational burden of CBP compared to PFA, but asserts that the increased image accuracy and flexibility of the formation process is warranted, at least in some imaging scenarios. Because CBP can now be sped up by the proper algorithm design, it becomes, according to this line of analysis, the clear algorithm of choice for SAR image formation. In this paper we reject the above conclusion by showing that PFA and CBP achieve the same image quality, and that PFA has complete flexibility, including choice of imaging plane, size of illuminated beam area to be imaged, resolution of the image, and others. We demonstrate these claims via formation of both simulated and real SAR imagery using both algorithms.

  6. Surface potential effects in low-energy current image diffraction patterns observed on the Al(001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine structure observed in high-resolution low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements near the energy threshold for emergence of new beams has been attributed to surface barrier effects. Recently, the surface barrier has been suggested as the source of the fine structure observed in current image diffraction (CID) patterns obtained by rastering the primary beam across an Al(001) crystal surface at a constant energy. This suggestion was based on kinematic arguments which correlated the emergence angle for a new electron beam with the observed structure in the CID pattern. In this work, the angular dependence of the elastic component of the total crystal reflectivity is calculated at constant energy. The calculations are based on full dynamical theories such as used in LEED but incorporating different surface barrier models to account for the saturating image potential. The results are compared with the experimental CID results

  7. Projection correction for the pixel-by-pixel basis in diffraction enhanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhifeng; Kang Kejun; Li Zheng

    2006-01-01

    Theories and methods of x-ray diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) and computed tomography of the DEI (DEI-CT) have been investigated recently. But the phenomenon of projection offsets which may affect the accuracy of the results of extraction methods of refraction-angle images and reconstruction algorithms of the DEI-CT is seldom of concern. This paper focuses on it. Projection offsets are revealed distinctly according to the equivalent rectilinear propagation model of the DEI. Then, an effective correction method using the equivalent positions of projection data is presented to eliminate the errors induced by projection offsets. The correction method is validated by a computer simulation experiment and extraction methods or reconstruction algorithms based on the corrected data can give more accurate results. The limitations of the correction method are discussed at the end

  8. Comparison of surface contour and volumetric three-dimensional imaging of the musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilford, W.B.; Ullrich, C.G.; Moore, T.

    1988-01-01

    Both surface contour and volumetric three-dimensional image processing from CT data can provide accurate demonstration of skeletal anatomy. While realistic, surface contour images may obscure fine detail such as nondisplaced fractures, and thin bone may disappear. Volumetric processing can provide high detail, but the transparency effect is unnatural and may yield a confusing image. Comparison of both three-dimensional modes is presented to demonstrate those findings best shown with each and to illustrate helpful techniques to improve volumetric display, such as disarticulation of unnecessary anatomy, short-angle repeating rotation (dithering), and image combination into overlay displays

  9. Tomographic mammography using a limited number of low-dose cone-beam projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Tao; Stewart, Alexander; Stanton, Martin; McCauley, Thomas; Phillips, Walter; Kopans, Daniel B.; Moore, Richard H.; Eberhard, Jeffrey W.; Opsahl-Ong, Beale; Niklason, Loren; Williams, Mark B.

    2003-01-01

    A method is described for using a limited number (typically 10-50) of low-dose radiographs to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of x-ray attenuation in the breast. The method uses x-ray cone-beam imaging, an electronic digital detector, and constrained nonlinear iterative computational techniques. Images are reconstructed with high resolution in two dimensions and lower resolution in the third dimension. The 3D distribution of attenuation that is projected into one image in conventional mammography can be separated into many layers (typically 30-80 1-mm-thick layers, depending on breast thickness), increasing the conspicuity of features that are often obscured by overlapping structure in a single-projection view. Schemes that record breast images at nonuniform angular increments, nonuniform image exposure, and nonuniform detector resolution are investigated in order to reduce the total x-ray exposure necessary to obtain diagnostically useful 3D reconstructions, and to improve the quality of the reconstructed images for a given exposure. The total patient radiation dose can be comparable to that used for a standard two-view mammogram. The method is illustrated with images from mastectomy specimens, a phantom, and human volunteers. The results show how image quality is affected by various data-collection protocols

  10. New Watermarking Scheme for Security and Transmission of Medical Images for PocketNeuro Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Bouhlel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new Watermarking system of medical information security and terminal mobile phone adaptation for PocketNeuro project. The later term refers to a Project created for the service of neurological diseases. It consists of transmitting information about patients "Desk of Patients" to a doctor's mobile phone when he is visiting or examining his patient. This system is capable of embedding medical information inside diagnostic images for security purposes. Our system applies JPEG Compression to Watermarked images to adapt them to the doctor's mobile phone. Experiments performed on a database of 30-256x256 pixel-sized neuronal images show that our Watermarking scheme for image security is robust against JPEG Compression. For the purpose of increasing the image Watermarking robustness against attacks for an image transmission and to perform a large data payload, we encode with Turbo-Code image-embedded bits information. Fidelity is improved by incorporation of the Relative Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (RPSNR as a perceptual metric to measure image degradation.

  11. Intensity-based bayesian framework for image reconstruction from sparse projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashed, E.A.; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a Bayesian framework for iterative image reconstruction from projection data measured over a limited number of views. The classical Nyquist sampling rule yields the minimum number of projection views required for accurate reconstruction. However, challenges exist in many medical and industrial imaging applications in which the projection data is undersampled. Classical analytical reconstruction methods such as filtered backprojection (FBP) are not a good choice for use in such cases because the data undersampling in the angular range introduces aliasing and streak artifacts that degrade lesion detectability. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian framework for maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM)-based iterative reconstruction methods that incorporates a priori knowledge obtained from expected intensity information. The proposed framework is based on the fact that, in tomographic imaging, it is often possible to expect a set of intensity values of the reconstructed object with relatively high accuracy. The image reconstruction cost function is modified to include the l 1 norm distance to the a priori known information. The proposed method has the potential to regularize the solution to reduce artifacts without missing lesions that cannot be expected from the a priori information. Numerical studies showed a significant improvement in image quality and lesion detectability under the condition of highly undersampled projection data. (author)

  12. Results Of The IMAGES Project 1986-1989; Facts And Fallacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottes, Fenno P.; de Valk, Jan P.; Lodder, Herman; Stut, W. J.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, I.; Hofland, Paul L.; van Poppel, Bas M.; Ter Haar Romeny, Bart M.; Bakker, Albert R.

    1989-05-01

    A concise overview is presented on the results of the total IMAGIS (IMAGe Information System) research as carried out by BAZIS. This paper is intended as a continuation of the IMAGIS presentation at the 'Dutch PACS session' during the SPIE Medical Imaging H Conference 1988. That session was jointly organized by the Utrecht University Hospital (AZU), BAZIS and Philips Medical Systems, the partners within the Dutch PACS project. The HIS-PACS coupling/integration project has resulted in a HIS-PACS coupling that is used to transfer data from the BAZIS HIS to the prototype Philips PACS. The modelling and simulation project has resulted in a modelling and simulation package (MIRACLES), which has been used to suggest performance improvements of existing and future PACS's. To support the technology assessment project a PC program has been developed that calculates the financial consequences of the introduction of a PACS (CAPACITY). The diagnostic image quality evaluation project has provided research protocols and a software package (FEASIBLE) that have been used as an aid to execute observer performance studies. A software package (FRACTALS) has been developed so that a standard computer (113M RT PC) can be used as a simple image workstation for radiological research. Furthermore, a number of general issues concerning the development, the acceptance and the introduction of PACS are discussed.

  13. Reconstruction of tomographic image from x-ray projections of a few views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Shoichiro

    1982-01-01

    Computer tomographs have progressed rapidly, and in the latest high performance types, the photographing time has been shortened to less than 5 sec, but the clear images of hearts have not yet been obtained. The X-ray tomographs used so far irradiate X-ray from many directions and measure the projected data, but by limiting projection direction to a small number, it was planned to shorter the X-ray photographing time and to reduce X-ray exposure as the objective of this study. In this paper, a method is proposed, by which tomographic images are reconstructed from projected data in a small number of direction by generalized inverse matrix penalty method. This method is the calculation method newly devised by the authors for this purpose. It is a kind of the nonlinear planning method added with the restrictive condition using a generalized inverse matrix, and it is characterized by the simple calculation procedure and rapid convergence. Moreover, the effect on reconstructed images when errors are included in projected data was examined. Also, the simple computer simulation to reconstruct tomographic images using the projected data in four directions was performed, and the usefulness of this method was confirmed. It contributes to the development of superhigh speed tomographs in future. (Kako, I.)

  14. High-resolution projections of surface water availability for Tasmania, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Bennett

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Changes to streamflows caused by climate change may have major impacts on the management of water for hydro-electricity generation and agriculture in Tasmania, Australia. We describe changes to Tasmanian surface water availability from 1961–1990 to 2070–2099 using high-resolution simulations. Six fine-scale (∼10 km2 simulations of daily rainfall and potential evapotranspiration are generated with the CSIRO Conformal Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM, a variable-resolution regional climate model (RCM. These variables are bias-corrected with quantile mapping and used as direct inputs to the hydrological models AWBM, IHACRES, Sacramento, SIMHYD and SMAR-G to project streamflows.

    The performance of the hydrological models is assessed against 86 streamflow gauges across Tasmania. The SIMHYD model is the least biased (median bias = −3% while IHACRES has the largest bias (median bias = −22%. We find the hydrological models that best simulate observed streamflows produce similar streamflow projections.

    There is much greater variation in projections between RCM simulations than between hydrological models. Marked decreases of up to 30% are projected for annual runoff in central Tasmania, while runoff is generally projected to increase in the east. Daily streamflow variability is projected to increase for most of Tasmania, consistent with increases in rainfall intensity. Inter-annual variability of streamflows is projected to increase across most of Tasmania.

    This is the first major Australian study to use high-resolution bias-corrected rainfall and potential evapotranspiration projections as direct inputs to hydrological models. Our study shows that these simulations are capable of producing realistic streamflows, allowing for increased confidence in assessing future changes to surface water variability.

  15. Future projections of the Greenland ice sheet energy balance driving the surface melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Franco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, simulations at 25 km resolution are performed over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, using the regional climate model MAR forced by four RCP scenarios from three CMIP5 global circulation models (GCMs, in order to investigate the projected changes of the surface energy balance (SEB components driving the surface melt. Analysis of 2000–2100 melt anomalies compared to melt results over 1980–1999 reveals an exponential relationship of the GrIS surface melt rate simulated by MAR to the near-surface air temperature (TAS anomalies, mainly due to the surface albedo positive feedback associated with the extension of bare ice areas in summer. On the GrIS margins, the future melt anomalies are preferentially driven by stronger sensible heat fluxes, induced by enhanced warm air advection over the ice sheet. Over the central dry snow zone, the surface albedo positive feedback induced by the increase in summer melt exceeds the negative feedback of heavier snowfall for TAS anomalies higher than 4 °C. In addition to the incoming longwave flux increase associated with the atmosphere warming, GCM-forced MAR simulations project an increase of the cloud cover decreasing the ratio of the incoming shortwave versus longwave radiation and dampening the albedo feedback. However, it should be noted that this trend in the cloud cover is contrary to that simulated by ERA-Interim–forced MAR for recent climate conditions, where the observed melt increase since the 1990s seems mainly to be a consequence of more anticyclonic atmospheric conditions. Finally, no significant change is projected in the length of the melt season, which highlights the importance of solar radiation absorbed by the ice sheet surface in the melt SEB.

  16. The IAEA research project on improvement of safety assessment methodologies for near surface disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Vidal, C.; Graham, D.; Batandjieva, B.

    2002-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Research Coordinated Project on Improvement of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities (ISAM) was launched in November 1997 and it has been underway for three years. The ISAM project was developed to provide a critical evaluation of the approaches and tools used in long-term safety assessment of near surface repositories. It resulted in the development of a harmonised approach and illustrated its application by way of three test cases - vault, borehole and Radon (a particular range of repository designs developed within the former Soviet Union) type repositories. As a consequence, the ISAM project had over 70 active participants and attracted considerable interest involving around 700 experts from 72 Member States. The methodology developed, the test cases, the main lessons learnt and the conclusions have been documented and will be published in the form of an IAEA TECDOC. This paper presents the work of the IAEA on improvement of safety assessment methodologies for near surface waste disposal facilities and the application of these methodologies for different purposes in the individual stages of the repository development. The paper introduces the main objectives, activities and outcome of the ISAM project and summarizes the work performed by the six working groups within the ISAM programme, i.e. Scenario Generation and Justification, Modelling, Confidence Building, Vault, Radon Type Facility and Borehole test cases. (author)

  17. First Results for a Superconducting Imaging-Surface Sensor Array for Magnetocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.R.; Espy, M.A.; Matlachov, A.; Overton, W.; Wood, C.C.; Peters, M.V.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-08-28

    The authors have completed fabrication and preliminary testing of a 12-channel SQUID array using the superconducting image-surface gradiometer concept. Sensor response to point dipole magnetic sources, and uniform fields used to simulate ambient magnetic fields followed predicted values to high precision. Edge effects were not observed for sources, within 5cm of the center of the imaging surface independent of whether the source is close or far from the surface. The superconducting imaging-surface also reduced uniform ambient fields at the SQUID sensors by approximately a factor of ten. Finally, a high degree of symmetry was observed between sides of the imaging surface for uniform fields. This symmetry, together with the very small sensitivity of sensors on the back side of the imaging surface to sources close to the front side provides an excellent circumstance for implementing either digital or analog background rejection. Their goal is to implement a higher density array with the superconducting imaging surface, together with background rejection, and utilize this system for MCG and other biomagnetic studies.

  18. Polarization Imaging Apparatus for Cell and Tissue Imaging and Diagnostics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work proposes to capitalize on our Phase I success in a novel visible-near infrared Stokes polarization imaging technology based on high performance fast...

  19. Improved sectioned images and surface models of the whole dog body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo Seok; Shin, Dong Sun; Cho, Dai Hai; Jung, Yong Wook; Park, Jin Seo

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this research was to produce high-quality sectioned images of a whole dog which can be used to create sectional anatomy atlases and three-dimensional (3D) models. A year old female beagle was sacrificed by potassium chloride injection and frozen. The frozen dog was then serially ground using a cryomacrotome. Sectioned surfaces were photographed using a digital camera to create 3555 sectioned images of whole dog body (intervals, 0.2 mm; pixel size, 0.1 mm; 48 bit color). In a sectioned image, structures of dimension greater than 0.1mm could be identified in detail. Photoshop was used to make segmented images of 16 structures. Sectioned and segmented images were stored in browsing software to allow easy access. Segmented images were reconstructed to make surface models of 16 structures using Mimics software and stored in portable document format (PDF) using Adobe 3D Reviewer software. In this research, state-of-art sectioned images and surface models were produced for the dog. The authors hope that the sectioned images produced will become a useful source of software for basic and clinical veterinary medicine, and therefore, are distributing the sectioned images and surface models through browsing software and PDF file available free of charge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of surface-mapping corrections and synthetic-aperture focusing techniques on ultrasonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, B.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Improvements in ultrasonic imaging that can be obtained using algorithms that map the surface of targets are evaluated. This information is incorporated in the application of synthetic-aperture focusing techniques which also have the potential to improve image resolution. Images obtained using directed-beam (flat) transducers and the focused transducers normally used for synthetic-aperture processing are quantitatively compared by using no processing, synthetic-aperture processing with no corrections for surface variations, and synthetic-aperture processing with surface mapping. The unprocessed images have relatively poor lateral resolutions because echoes from two adjacent reflectors show interference effects which prevent their identification even if the spacing is larger than the single-hole resolution. The synthetic-aperture-processed images show at least a twofold improvement in lateral resolution and greatly reduced interference effects in multiple-hole images compared to directed-beam images. Perhaps more importantly, in images of test blocks with substantial surface variations portions of the image are displaced from their actual positions by several wavelengths. To correct for this effect an algorithm has been developed for calculating the surface variations. The corrected images produced using this algorithm are accurate within the experimental error. In addition, the same algorithm, when applied to the directed-beam data, produced images that are not only accurately positioned, but that also have a resolution comparable to conventional synthetic-aperture-processed images obtained from focused-transducer data. This suggests that using synthetic-aperture processing on the type of data normally collected during directed-beam ultrasonic inspections would eliminate the need to rescan for synthetic-aperture enhancement

  1. Ocean Surface Current Vectors from MODIS Terra/Aqua Sea Surface Temperature Image Pairs, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Satellites that record imagery of the same sea surface area, at times separated by a few hours, can be used to estimate ocean surface velocity fields based on the...

  2. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Marika M; Landrum, Laura

    2015-07-13

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document. Final report: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    A critical mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the planning, implementation, and completion of environmental restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from the late 1940s into the 1970s. Among these facilities are the 24 former uranium mill sites designed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (42 USC section 7901 et seq.) Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designated sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project only; a separate MAP document has been prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project

  4. Twin image removal in digital in-line holography based on iterative inter-projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing Kuan; Chen, Tai-Yu; Hung, Shau Gang; Huang, Sheng-Lung; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    A simple and efficient phase retrieval method based on the iterative inter-projections of the recorded Fourier modulus between two effective holographic planes is developed to eliminate the twin image in digital in-line holography. The proposed algorithm converges stably in phase extraction procedures without requiring any prior knowledge or sophisticated support of the object and is applicable to lensless Gabor and Fourier holography as well as holographic microscopy with imaging lenses. Numerical and experimental results suggest that the spatial resolution enhancement on the reconstructed image can be achieved with this technique due to the capability of recovering the diffraction phases of low-intensity signals.

  5. Automatic content extraction of filled-form images based on clustering component block projection vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hanchuan; He, Xiaofeng; Long, Fuhui

    2003-12-01

    Automatic understanding of document images is a hard problem. Here we consider a sub-problem, automatically extracting content from filled form images. Without pre-selected templates or sophisticated structural/semantic analysis, we propose a novel approach based on clustering the component-block-projection-vectors. By combining spectral clustering and minimal spanning tree clustering, we generate highly accurate clusters, from which the adaptive templates are constructed to extract the filled-in content. Our experiments show this approach is effective for a set of 1040 US IRS tax form images belonging to 208 types.

  6. Improvement of image quality of holographic projection on tilted plane using iterative algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Hui; Cao, Axiu; Wang, Jiazhou; Zhang, Man; Deng, Qiling

    2017-12-01

    Holographic image projection on tilted plane has an important application prospect. In this paper, we propose a method to compute the phase-only hologram that can reconstruct a clear image on tilted plane. By adding a constant phase to the target image of the inclined plane, the corresponding light field distribution on the plane that is parallel to the hologram plane is derived through the titled diffraction calculation. Then the phase distribution of the hologram is obtained by the iterative algorithm with amplitude and phase constrain. Simulation and optical experiment are performed to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Spatial characterization of nanotextured surfaces by visual color imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Murthy, Swathi; Madsen, Morten H.

    2016-01-01

    We present a method using an ordinary color camera to characterize nanostructures from the visual color of the structures. The method provides a macroscale overview image from which micrometer-sized regions can be analyzed independently, hereby revealing long-range spatial variations...

  8. Imaging by Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Deconvolution Resolving More Details of Surfaces Nanomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    Upon imaging, electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ESTM), scanning electrochemical micro-scopy (SECM) and in situ STM resolve information on electronic structures and on surface topography. At very high resolution, imaging processing is required, as to obtain information that relates...... to crystallographic-surface structures. Within the wide range of new technologies, those images surface features, the electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM) provides means of atomic resolution where the tip participates actively in the process of imaging. Two metallic surfaces influence ions trapped.......g., nanoelectronics and single-molecule probing. In principle, the ESTM is capable of sub-atomic resolution but many details at this level of magnification need further treatment of recorded data before real information is obtained. Deconvolution of the data according to the instrument response may explain some...

  9. Asteroid Spectral Imaging Mission (ASPECT) CubeSat to characterize resources on asteroid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohout, T.; Näsilä, A.; Tikka, T.; Granvik, M.; Kestilä, A.; Penttilä, A.; Kuhno, J.; Muinonen, K.; Viherkanto, K.

    2017-09-01

    ASPECT is a 3U CubeSat with a VIS-NIR spectral imager. It can characterize composition of asteroid surfaces and identify areas and objects with desired properties for sample return or in-space resource utilization.

  10. A mobile laboratory for surface and subsurface imaging in geo-hazard monitoring activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornacchia, Carmela; Bavusi, Massimo; Loperte, Antonio; Pergola, Nicola; Pignatti, Stefano; Ponzo, Felice; Lapenna, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    A new research infrastructure for supporting ground-based remote sensing observations in the different phases of georisk management cycle is presented. This instrumental facility has been designed and realised by TeRN, a public-private consortium on Earth Observations and Natural Risks, in the frame of the project "ImpresAmbiente" funded by Italian Ministry of Research and University. The new infrastructure is equipped with ground-based sensors (hyperspectral cameras, thermal cameras, laser scanning and electromagnetic antennae) able to remotely map physical parameters and/or earth-surface properties (temperature, soil moisture, land cover, etc…) and to illuminate near-surface geological structures (fault, groundwater tables, landslide bodies etc...). Furthermore, the system can be used for non-invasive investigations of architectonic buildings and civil infrastructures (bridges, tunnel, road pavements, etc...) interested by natural and man-made hazards. The hyperspectral cameras can acquire high resolution images of earth-surface and cultural objects. They are operating in the Visible Near InfraRed (0.4÷1.0μm) with 1600 spatial pixel and 3.7nm of spectral sampling and in the Short Wave InfraRed (1.3÷2.5µm) spectral region with 320 spatial pixel and 5nm of spectral sampling. The IR cameras are operating in the Medium Wavelength InfraRed (3÷5µm; 640x512; NETDfield, as geology, architecture, environmental monitoring and cultural heritage. As a consequence, laser data can be useful integrated with traditional monitoring techniques. The Laser Scanner is characterized by very high data acquisition repetition rate up to 500.000 pxl/sec with a range resolution of 0.1 mm, vertical and horizontal FoV of 310° and 360° respectively with a resolution of 0.0018°. The system is also equipped with a metric camera allows to georeference the high resolution images acquired. The electromagnetic sensors allow to obtain in near real time high-resolution 2D and 3D subsurface

  11. EISCAT Aperture Synthesis Imaging (EASI _3D) for the EISCAT_3D Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Hoz, Cesar; Belyey, Vasyl

    2012-07-01

    Aperture Synthesis Imaging Radar (ASIR) is one of the technologies adopted by the EISCAT_3D project to endow it with imaging capabilities in 3-dimensions that includes sub-beam resolution. Complemented by pulse compression, it will provide 3-dimensional images of certain types of incoherent scatter radar targets resolved to about 100 metres at 100 km range, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio. This ability will open new research opportunities to map small structures associated with non-homogeneous, unstable processes such as aurora, summer and winter polar radar echoes (PMSE and PMWE), Natural Enhanced Ion Acoustic Lines (NEIALs), structures excited by HF ionospheric heating, meteors, space debris, and others. The underlying physico-mathematical principles of the technique are the same as the technique employed in radioastronomy to image stellar objects; both require sophisticated inversion techniques to obtain reliable images.

  12. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATION OF SURFACE AREA FROM DIGITAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Ziegel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A sampling design of local stereology is combined with a method from digital stereology to yield a novel estimator of surface area based on counts of configurations observed in a digitization of an isotropic 2- dimensional slice with thickness s. As a tool, a result of the second author and J. Rataj on infinitesimal increase of volumes of morphological transforms is refined and used. The proposed surface area estimator is asymptotically unbiased in the case of sets contained in the ball centred at the origin with radius s and in the case of balls centred at the origin with unknown radius. For general shapes bounds for the asymptotic expected relative worst case error are given. A simulation example is discussed for surface area estimation based on 2×2×2-configurations.

  13. Determination of forest road surface roughness by Kinect depth imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Marinello

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Roughness is a dynamic property of the gravel road surface that affects safety, ride comfort as well as vehicle tyre life and maintenance costs. A rapid survey of gravel road condition is fundamental for an effective maintenance planning and definition of the intervention priorities.Different non-contact techniques such as laser scanning, ultrasonic sensors and photogrammetry have recently been proposed to reconstruct three-dimensional topography of road surface and allow extraction of roughness metrics. The application of Microsoft Kinect™ depth camera is proposed and discussed here for collection of 3D data sets from gravel roads, to be implemented in order to allow quantification of surface roughness.The objectives are to: i verify the applicability of the Kinect sensor for characterization of different forest roads, ii identify the appropriateness and potential of different roughness parameters and iii analyse the correlation with vibrations recoded by 3-axis accelerometers installed on different vehicles. The test took advantage of the implementation of the Kinect depth camera for surface roughness determination of 4 different forest gravel roads and one well-maintained asphalt road as reference. Different vehicles (mountain bike, off-road motorcycle, ATV vehicle, 4WD car and compact crossover were included in the experiment in order to verify the vibration intensity when travelling on different road surface conditions. Correlations between the extracted roughness parameters and vibration levels of the tested vehicles were then verified. Coefficients of determination of between 0.76 and 0.97 were detected between average surface roughness and standard deviation of relative accelerations, with higher values in the case of lighter vehicles.

  14. Real-time three-dimensional surface measurement by color encoded light projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S. Y.; Li, Y. F.; Guan, Q.; Xiao, G.

    2006-01-01

    Existing noncontact methods for surface measurement suffer from the disadvantages of poor reliability, low scanning speed, or high cost. The authors present a method for real-time three-dimensional data acquisition by a color-coded vision sensor composed of common components. The authors use a digital projector controlled by computer to generate desired color light patterns. The unique indexing of the light codes is a key problem and is solved in this study so that surface perception can be performed with only local pattern analysis of the neighbor color codes in a single image. Experimental examples and performance analysis are provided

  15. Stereological estimation of surface area from digital images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegel, Johanna; Kiderlen, Markus

    2010-01-01

    A sampling design of local stereology is combined with a method from digital stereology to yield a novel estimator of surface area based on counts of configurations observed in a digitization of an isotropic 2- dimensional slice with thickness s. As a tool, a result of the second author and J....... Rataj on infinitesimal increase of volumes of morphological transforms is refined and used. The proposed surface area estimator is asymptotically unbiased in the case of sets contained in the ball centred at the origin with radius s and in the case of balls centred at the origin with unknown radius...

  16. AFM imaging of bacteria in liquid media immobilized on gelatin coated mica surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doktycz, M.J.; Sullivan, C.J.; Hoyt, P.R.; Pelletier, D.A.; Wu, S.; Allison, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    Immobilization of particulates, especially biomolecules and cells, onto surfaces is critical for imaging with the atomic force microscope (AFM). In this paper, gelatin coated mica surfaces are shown to be suitable for immobilizing and imaging both gram positive, Staphylococcus aureus, and gram negative, Escherichia coli, bacteria in both air and liquid environments. Gelatin coated surfaces are shown to be superior to poly-L-lysine coated surfaces that are commonly used for the immobilization of cells. This cell immobilization technique is being developed primarily for live cell imaging of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. The genome of R. palustris has been sequenced and the organism is the target of intensive studies aimed at understanding genome function. Images of R. palustris grown both aerobically and anaerobically in liquid media are presented. Images in liquid media show the bacteria is rod shaped and smooth while images in air show marked irregularity and folding of the surface. Significant differences in the vertical dimension are also apparent with the height of the bacteria in liquid being substantially greater than images taken in air. In air immobilized bacterial flagella are clearly seen while in liquid this structure is not visible. Additionally, significant morphological differences are observed that depend on the method of bacterial growth

  17. Single-Image Shadow Removal Using 3D Intensity Surface Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kai; Zhen, Rui; Yan, Jiaxing; Ge, Yunfeng

    2017-09-11

    Shadow removal from a single image is a challenging problem, whose solution is proposed in this study using 3D intensity surface modeling. Due to the high-order textural content in the original images, a direct modeling of the intensity surface of shadow image is difficult. In this study, image decomposition technology is used as an edge-preserving filter to remove the textural detail while keeping the local-smoothness pattern of image intensity surface. Using 3D modeling, a proper intensity surface of illumination in shadow region can be obtained based on that corresponding to the same texture in the non-shadow one. Thus, the intensity surface of shadow region can be compensated with a respective shadow-removal. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in the aspect of single-image shadow removal. In contrast to the alternative methods, it is not limited by additional assumptions or conditions; moreover, it can deal with the non-uniform and curved surface shadows, and is applicable to the shadow regions consisting of different types of textures.

  18. Characterization of E coli biofim formations on baby spinach leaf surfaces using hyperspectral fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyunjeong; Baek, Insuck; Oh, Mirae; Kim, Sungyoun; Lee, Hoonsoo; Kim, Moon S.

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial biofilm formed by pathogens on fresh produce surfaces is a food safety concern because the complex extracellular matrix in the biofilm structure reduces the reduction and removal efficacies of washing and sanitizing processes such as chemical or irradiation treatments. Therefore, a rapid and nondestructive method to identify pathogenic biofilm on produce surfaces is needed to ensure safe consumption of fresh, raw produce. This research aimed to evaluate the feasibility of hyperspectral fluorescence imaging for detecting Escherichia.coli (ATCC 25922) biofilms on baby spinach leaf surfaces. Samples of baby spinach leaves were immersed and inoculated with five different levels (from 2.6x104 to 2.6x108 CFU/mL) of E.coli and stored at 4°C for 24 h and 48 h to induce biofilm formation. Following the two treatment days, individual leaves were gently washed to remove excess liquid inoculums from the leaf surfaces and imaged with a hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system equipped with UV-A (365 nm) and violet (405 nm) excitation sources to evaluate a spectral-image-based method for biofilm detection. The imaging results with the UV-A excitation showed that leaves even at early stages of biofilm formations could be differentiated from the control leaf surfaces. This preliminary investigation demonstrated the potential of fluorescence imaging techniques for detection of biofilms on leafy green surfaces.

  19. Evaluation of the WAMME model surface fluxes using results from the AMMA land-surface model intercomparison project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Aaron Anthony [GAME-CNRM, Meteo-France, Toulouse (France); Poccard-Leclercq, Isabelle [Universite de Nantes, LETG-Geolittomer, Nantes (France); Xue, Yongkang; Feng, Jinming [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Rosnay, Patricia de [European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    The West African monsoon (WAM) circulation and intensity have been shown to be influenced by the land surface in numerous numerical studies using regional scale and global scale atmospheric climate models (RCMs and GCMs, respectively) over the last several decades. The atmosphere-land surface interactions are modulated by the magnitude of the north-south gradient of the low level moist static energy, which is highly correlated with the steep latitudinal gradients of the vegetation characteristics and coverage, land use, and soil properties over this zone. The African Multidisciplinary Monsoon Analysis (AMMA) has organised comprehensive activities in data collection and modelling to further investigate the significance land-atmosphere feedbacks. Surface energy fluxes simulated by an ensemble of land surface models from AMMA Land-surface Model Intercomparison Project (ALMIP) have been used as a proxy for the best estimate of the ''real world'' values in order to evaluate GCM and RCM simulations under the auspices of the West African Monsoon Modelling Experiment (WAMME) project, since such large-scale observations do not exist. The ALMIP models have been forced in off-line mode using forcing based on a mixture of satellite, observational, and numerical weather prediction data. The ALMIP models were found to agree well over the region where land-atmosphere coupling is deemed to be most important (notably the Sahel), with a high signal to noise ratio (generally from 0.7 to 0.9) in the ensemble and a inter-model coefficient of variation between 5 and 15%. Most of the WAMME models simulated spatially averaged net radiation values over West Africa which were consistent with the ALMIP estimates, however, the partitioning of this energy between sensible and latent heat fluxes was significantly different: WAMME models tended to simulate larger (by nearly a factor of two) monthly latent heat fluxes than ALMIP. This results due to a positive precipitation

  20. Using hyperspectral imaging for the assessment of mudflat surface stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, G.M.; Thomson, A.G.; Moller, I.; Kromkamp, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    The successful management of fine-grained coastal environments relies on an understanding of, and an ability to predict, their likely future behavior. The latter depends not only on the hydrodynamic conditions to which these coastal systems are exposed, but also on characteristic surface properties

  1. Imaging of Ground Ice with Surface-Based Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    intrusive ice feature occurring in existing permafrost ter- rain when surface water infiltrates into downward-propagated contraction cracks ...testing and pavement color testing was performed. 2.1.2 Creamer’s Field We constructed one transect at this site, which is located north of Fair

  2. Analysis of receptor clustering on cell surfaces by imaging fluorescent particles

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, I.E.; Anderson, C.M.; Georgiou, G.N.; Stevenson, G.V.; Cherry, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescently labeled low density lipoproteins (LDL) and influenza virus particles were bound to the surface of human fibroblasts and imaged with a cooled slow-scan CCD camera attached to a fluorescence microscope. Particles were also imaged after attachment to polylysine-coated microscope slides. The digital images were analyzed by fitting data points in the region of fluorescent spots by a two-dimensional Gaussian function, thus obtaining a measure of spot intensity with correction for loca...

  3. Optical projection tomography via phase retrieval algorithms for hidden three dimensional imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancora, Daniele; Di Battista, Diego; Giasafaki, Georgia; Psycharakis, Stylianos; Liapis, Evangelos; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2017-02-01

    Optical tomography in biomedical imaging is a highly dynamic field in which non-invasive optical and computational techniques are combined to obtain a three dimensional representation of the specimen we are interested to image. Although at optical wavelengths scattering is the main obstacle to reach diffraction limited resolution, recently several studies have shown the possibility to image even objects fully hidden behind a turbid layer exploiting the information contained in the speckle autocorrelation via an iterative phase retrieval algorithm. In this work we explore the possibility of blind three dimensional reconstruction approach based on the Optical Projection Tomography principles, a widely used tool to image almost transparent model organism such as C. Elegans and D. Rerio. By using autocorrelation information rather than projections at each angle we prove, both numerically and experimentally, the possibility to perform exact three dimensional reconstructions via a specifically designed phase retrieval algorithm, extending the capability of the projection-based tomographic methods to image behind scattering curtains. The reconstruction scheme we propose is simple to implement, does not require post-processing data alignment and moreover can be trivially implemented in parallel to fully exploit the computing power offered by modern GPUs, further reducing the need for costly computational resources.

  4. Direct image reconstruction with limited angle projection data for computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inouye, T.

    1980-01-01

    Discussions are made on the minimum angle range for projection data necessary to reconstruct the complete CT image. As is easily shown from the image reconstruction theorem, the lack of projection angle provides no data for the Fourier transformed function of the object on the corresponding angular directions, where the projections are missing. In a normal situation, the Fourier transformed function of an object image holds an analytic characteristic with respect to two-dimensional orthogonal parameters. This characteristic enables uniquely prolonging the function outside the obtained region employing a sort of analytic continuation with respect to both parameters. In the method reported here, an object pattern, which is confined within a finite range, is shifted to a specified region to have complete orthogonal function expansions without changing the projection angle directions. These orthogonal functions are analytically extended to the missing projection angle range and the whole function is determined. This method does not include any estimation process, whose effectiveness is often seriously jeopardized by the presence of a slight fluctuation component. Computer simulations were carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method

  5. Bone surface extraction from MR images of a temporomandibular joint using deformable modeling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Amane; Hattori, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Makoto; Tsukahara, Yasuo

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a two-step method, based on magnetic resonance (MR) images, for three-dimensional reconstruction of osseous components of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ), the mandibular condyle and the fossa. In the first step, images were segmented in order to extract the bony outline (contour) by using a two-dimensional deformable model. An object in the model was extracted by deforming the initial contour located near the object of the image. In the second step, using the surface reconstructed from the extracted contour as the initial surface, a three-dimensional deformable model was applied in order to extract the surface of the object. These procedures were handled semi-automatically. Multi-section 1-mm-thick sagittal images of the right normal TMJ were obtained with a 1.5-T MR system and surface coils by using a FLASH-3D sequence (TR=50 ms, TE=11 ms) from an asymptomatic volunteer (male, age 31 years). From these images, the bony surfaces of TMJ were extracted using the above-mentioned method. Even though the extracted surfaces were a little smaller than the surface traced by experienced dentists, they showed the normal, anatomical form of TMJ. (author)

  6. Geodetic Imaging of Marsh Surface Elevation with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C. T.; Starek, M. J.; Gibeaut, J. C.; Lord, A.

    2015-12-01

    The resilience of marshes to a rising sea is dependent on their elevation response. Given the level of precision required to measure minute changes in marsh elevation over time, survey methods have to be adapted to minimize impacts to the sediment surface. Current approaches include Surface Elevation Tables (SETs), which are used to monitor wetland surface change with respect to an in situ vertical benchmark. Although SETs have been proven as an effective technique to track subtle sedimentation rates (RTK GPS for comparison. Grand Bay in Mississippi USA is one of the most biologically productive estuarine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. The study region is covered by dense and tall saw-grass that makes it a challenging environment for bare-earth mapping. For this survey, a Riegl VZ-400 TLS (1550 nm wavelength) was utilized. The system is capable of recording multiple returns per a transmitted pulse (up to 15) and provides full-waveform output for signal post-processing to extract returns. The objectives of the study are twofold: 1) examine impacts of TLS survey design, scan angle and scan density on marsh elevation mapping; 2) assess the capabilities of multiple-echo and full-waveform TLS data to extract the bare-earth surface below the dense vegetation. This presentation will present results of the study including the developed TLS survey protocol and data processing workflow, details on waveform and multi-echo approaches for ground point detection, and a discussion on error analysis and challenges for measuring marsh surface elevation with TLS.

  7. Impact of Surface Waves on SWOT’s Projected Ocean Accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Peral, Eva; Rodríguez, Ernesto; Esteban-Fernández, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission being considered by NASA has, as one of its main objectives, to measure ocean topography with centimeter scale accuracy over kilometer scale spatial resolution. This paper investigates the impact of ocean waves on SWOT’s projected performance. Several effects will be examined: volumetric decorrelation, aliasing of ocean waves, backscattering modulation, and the so-called surfboard sampling.

  8. Locality Preserving Projection Based on Endmember Extraction for Hyperspectral Image Dimensionality Reduction and Target Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiting; Huang, Shiqi; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Hongxia; Liu, Daizhi

    2016-09-01

    In order to reduce the effect of spectral variability on calculation precision for the weighted matrix in the locality preserving projection (LPP) algorithm, an improved dimensionality reduction method named endmember extraction-based locality preserving projection (EE-LPP) is proposed in this paper. The method primarily uses the vertex component analysis (VCA) method to extract endmember spectra from hyperspectral imagery. It then calculates the similarity between pixel spectra and the endmember spectra by using the spectral angle distance, and uses it as the basis for selecting neighboring pixels in the image and constructs a weighted matrix between pixels. Finally, based on the weighted matrix, the idea of the LPP algorithm is applied to reduce the dimensions of hyperspectral image data. Experimental results of real hyperspectral data demonstrate that the low-dimensional features acquired by the proposed methods can fully reflect the characteristics of the original image and further improve target detection accuracy. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Survey of on-road image projection with pixel light systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Sadiq; Knöchelmann, Marvin; Ley, Peer-Phillip; Lachmayer, Roland

    2017-12-01

    HID, LED and laser-based high resolution automotive headlamps, as of late known as `pixel light systems', are at the forefront of the developing technologies paving the way for autonomous driving. In addition to light distribution capabilities that outperform Adaptive Front Lighting and Matrix Beam systems, pixel light systems provide the possibility of image projection directly onto the street. The underlying objective is to improve the driving experience, in any given scenario, in terms of safety, comfort and interaction for all road users. The focus of this work is to conduct a short survey on this state-of-the-art image projection functionality. A holistic research regarding the image projection functionality can be divided into three major categories: scenario selection, technological development and evaluation design. Consequently, the work presented in this paper is divided into three short studies. Section 1 provides a brief introduction to pixel light systems and a justification for the approach adopted for this study. Section 2 deals with the selection of scenarios (and driving maneuvers) where image projection can play a critical role. Section 3 discusses high power LED and LED array based prototypes that are currently under development. Section 4 demonstrates results from an experiment conducted to evaluate the illuminance of an image space projected using a pixel light system prototype developed at the Institute of Product Development (IPeG). Findings from this work can help to identify and advance future research work relating to: further development of pixel light systems, scenario planning, examination of optimal light sources, behavioral response studies etc.

  10. Surface plasmon resonance imaging based multiplex biosensor: Integration of biomolecular screening, detection and kinetics estimation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishnamoorthy, G.; Carlen, Edwin; van den Berg, Albert; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a multiplex biosensing method to simultaneously screen targets of interest in a multiple target analyte sample and to extract the binding affinities of all interactant pairs from a single sensor surface using a commercial surface plasmon resonance imaging system. For demonstration, we

  11. Label-free screening of foodborne Salmonella using surface plasmon resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 15 pathogens cause approximately 95% of the foodborne infections, it is desirable to develop rapid and simultaneous screening methods for these major pathogens. In this study, we developed an immunoassay for Salmonella based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). The sensor surface modif...

  12. Fan-beam and cone-beam image reconstruction via filtering the backprojection image of differentiated projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Tingliang; Leng Shuai; Nett, Brian E; Chen Guanghong

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a new image reconstruction scheme is presented based on Tuy's cone-beam inversion scheme and its fan-beam counterpart. It is demonstrated that Tuy's inversion scheme may be used to derive a new framework for fan-beam and cone-beam image reconstruction. In this new framework, images are reconstructed via filtering the backprojection image of differentiated projection data. The new framework is mathematically exact and is applicable to a general source trajectory provided the Tuy data sufficiency condition is satisfied. By choosing a piece-wise constant function for one of the components in the factorized weighting function, the filtering kernel is one dimensional, viz. the filtering process is along a straight line. Thus, the derived image reconstruction algorithm is mathematically exact and efficient. In the cone-beam case, the derived reconstruction algorithm is applicable to a large class of source trajectories where the pi-lines or the generalized pi-lines exist. In addition, the new reconstruction scheme survives the super-short scan mode in both the fan-beam and cone-beam cases provided the data are not transversely truncated. Numerical simulations were conducted to validate the new reconstruction scheme for the fan-beam case

  13. Tumor Surface Regularity at MR Imaging Predicts Survival and Response to Surgery in Patients with Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Beteta, Julián; Molina-García, David; Ortiz-Alhambra, José A; Fernández-Romero, Antonio; Luque, Belén; Arregui, Elena; Calvo, Manuel; Borrás, José M; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rodríguez de Lope, Ángel; Moreno de la Presa, Raquel; Iglesias Bayo, Lidia; Barcia, Juan A; Martino, Juan; Velásquez, Carlos; Asenjo, Beatriz; Benavides, Manuel; Herruzo, Ismael; Revert, Antonio; Arana, Estanislao; Pérez-García, Víctor M

    2018-04-03

    Purpose To evaluate the prognostic and predictive value of surface-derived imaging biomarkers obtained from contrast material-enhanced volumetric T1-weighted pretreatment magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequences in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Materials and Methods A discovery cohort from five local institutions (165 patients; mean age, 62 years ± 12 [standard deviation]; 43% women and 57% men) and an independent validation cohort (51 patients; mean age, 60 years ± 12; 39% women and 61% men) from The Cancer Imaging Archive with volumetric T1-weighted pretreatment contrast-enhanced MR imaging sequences were included in the study. Clinical variables such as age, treatment, and survival were collected. After tumor segmentation and image processing, tumor surface regularity, measuring how much the tumor surface deviates from a sphere of the same volume, was obtained. Kaplan-Meier, Cox proportional hazards, correlations, and concordance indexes were used to compare variables and patient subgroups. Results Surface regularity was a powerful predictor of survival in the discovery (P = .005, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.61) and validation groups (P = .05, HR = 1.84). Multivariate analysis selected age and surface regularity as significant variables in a combined prognostic model (P surface regularity was a predictor of survival for patients who underwent complete resection (P = .01, HR = 1.90). Tumors with irregular surfaces did not benefit from total over subtotal resections (P = .57, HR = 1.17), but those with regular surfaces did (P = .004, HR = 2.07). Conclusion The surface regularity obtained from high-resolution contrast-enhanced pretreatment volumetric T1-weighted MR images is a predictor of survival in patients with glioblastoma. It may help in classifying patients for surgery. © RSNA, 2018 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  14. Block matching sparsity regularization-based image reconstruction for incomplete projection data in computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ailong; Li, Lei; Zheng, Zhizhong; Zhang, Hanming; Wang, Linyuan; Hu, Guoen; Yan, Bin

    2018-02-01

    In medical imaging many conventional regularization methods, such as total variation or total generalized variation, impose strong prior assumptions which can only account for very limited classes of images. A more reasonable sparse representation frame for images is still badly needed. Visually understandable images contain meaningful patterns, and combinations or collections of these patterns can be utilized to form some sparse and redundant representations which promise to facilitate image reconstructions. In this work, we propose and study block matching sparsity regularization (BMSR) and devise an optimization program using BMSR for computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction for an incomplete projection set. The program is built as a constrained optimization, minimizing the L1-norm of the coefficients of the image in the transformed domain subject to data observation and positivity of the image itself. To solve the program efficiently, a practical method based on the proximal point algorithm is developed and analyzed. In order to accelerate the convergence rate, a practical strategy for tuning the BMSR parameter is proposed and applied. The experimental results for various settings, including real CT scanning, have verified the proposed reconstruction method showing promising capabilities over conventional regularization.

  15. Learning binary code via PCA of angle projection for image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fumeng; Ye, Zhiqiang; Wei, Xueqi; Wu, Congzhong

    2018-01-01

    With benefits of low storage costs and high query speeds, binary code representation methods are widely researched for efficiently retrieving large-scale data. In image hashing method, learning hashing function to embed highdimensions feature to Hamming space is a key step for accuracy retrieval. Principal component analysis (PCA) technical is widely used in compact hashing methods, and most these hashing methods adopt PCA projection functions to project the original data into several dimensions of real values, and then each of these projected dimensions is quantized into one bit by thresholding. The variances of different projected dimensions are different, and with real-valued projection produced more quantization error. To avoid the real-valued projection with large quantization error, in this paper we proposed to use Cosine similarity projection for each dimensions, the angle projection can keep the original structure and more compact with the Cosine-valued. We used our method combined the ITQ hashing algorithm, and the extensive experiments on the public CIFAR-10 and Caltech-256 datasets validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. A method for volumetric imaging in radiotherapy using single x-ray projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yuan; Yan, Hao; Ouyang, Luo; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun; Zhou, Linghong; Cervino, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: It is an intriguing problem to generate an instantaneous volumetric image based on the corresponding x-ray projection. The purpose of this study is to develop a new method to achieve this goal via a sparse learning approach. Methods: To extract motion information hidden in projection images, the authors partitioned a projection image into small rectangular patches. The authors utilized a sparse learning method to automatically select patches that have a high correlation with principal component analysis (PCA) coefficients of a lung motion model. A model that maps the patch intensity to the PCA coefficients was built along with the patch selection process. Based on this model, a measured projection can be used to predict the PCA coefficients, which are then further used to generate a motion vector field and hence a volumetric image. The authors have also proposed an intensity baseline correction method based on the partitioned projection, in which the first and the second moments of pixel intensities at a patch in a simulated projection image are matched with those in a measured one via a linear transformation. The proposed method has been validated in both simulated data and real phantom data. Results: The algorithm is able to identify patches that contain relevant motion information such as the diaphragm region. It is found that an intensity baseline correction step is important to remove the systematic error in the motion prediction. For the simulation case, the sparse learning model reduced the prediction error for the first PCA coefficient to 5%, compared to the 10% error when sparse learning was not used, and the 95th percentile error for the predicted motion vector was reduced from 2.40 to 0.92 mm. In the phantom case with a regular tumor motion, the predicted tumor trajectory was successfully reconstructed with a 0.82 mm error for tumor center localization compared to a 1.66 mm error without using the sparse learning method. When the tumor motion

  17. Mirage is the image of an object in the flat ground surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoly, M. T.; Dashtdar, M.

    2011-09-01

    It is generally accepted that mirage is formed when temperature of the ground surface, in a flat area like desert, is higher than the temperatures of the over ground air layers. In this case, light emerging from a distant object makes total internal reflection in the air layers and forms the image of the object that is called mirage. Our investigation on mirage formation in desert indicates that there is no meaningful relation between mirage formation and temperature change over the ground. In addition, we show that, the interference of the lights reflected from different air layers destroys the coherency of the image forming light. This happens because the temperature change occurs in an interval larger than a wavelength. In the second part of the report we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that flat rough surfaces behave like mirrors at very large incident angles. We show that there is a threshold incident angle for observation of image in a rough surface that depends on the surface roughness and light wavelength. The shortest distance between observer and the image is determined by the threshold incident angle. Mirage is such an image. Image formation is studied in rough sheet glass surfaces that prepared by grinding with powders of different sizes.

  18. Comparison of optical design methods of freeform surfaces for imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agócs, Tibor

    2015-09-01

    Optical systems based on freeform optical components offer many advantages over conventional systems in imaging applications, e.g. superior image quality, compact and lightweight designs. There are a few well established manufacturing method that can be used for the generation of freeform surfaces with low surface form error and low surface roughness, in the case of freeform mirrors e.g. diamond turning, nickel plating and post-polishing. Metrology is evolving rapidly, although developments are still needed in order to verify the manufactured surface with the necessary accuracy. Optical design methods of freeform surfaces are also lagging behind, many algorithms address non-imaging applications, but in the field of imaging (image-forming) only a few exists and works with various limitations. We compare the available techniques in freeform optical design for imaging and explore the advantages, disadvantages and boundary conditions of the different methods. We also intend to identify the most useful concepts and investigate how they can be embedded into commercially available optical design software.

  19. Imaging technique for detection of leaf surface contaminations with fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Etsuko

    2011-01-01

    Fission fragments by the Fukushima Daiichi catastrophe were scattered over a large area. Between Tokyo and Fukushima, leaves were gathered up from March to June and measured their radioactivities by HPGe. Radionuclides of 129m Tc, 131 I, 134 Cs and 137 Cs were rightly detected. Also the leaf surface contaminations were shown as images by imaging technique which detected beta- and gamma-rays exposure. The clear images were gotten within 24 h exposure though a normal leaf image needs at least one week exposure in a shield box. The total PSL values of leaves depend on their activities of sampling points, so the imaging technique is able to use for detection of the spread of fission fragments and the relative concentration. Also the rain effect to leaves could be shown by imaging technique when leaves were washed in running water. The imaging technique is easy and useful for the nuclear catastrophe. (author)

  20. Assessment of Surface Water at the Sobradinho Reservoir Under the Effects of Drought Using Multi-Temporal Landsat Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, E. A.; Pedrosa, M. M.; Azevedo, S. C.; Cardim, G. P.; Carvalho, F. P. S.

    2016-06-01

    The matrix of energy generation in Brazil is predominantly hydroelectric power. Consequently, the reservoirs need constant monitoring due to the large volume of artificially dammed water. Images from remote sensing can provide reliable information concerning water bodies. In this paper, we use remote sensing imagery to monitor the Sobradinho dam in three different epochs. The objective was to verify quantitatively the area of the dam's surface reduced due to the drought of 2015, which was considered the worst in history. The approach used water surface area estimations from bands of Landsat5 and Landsat8 satellites which highlight water bodies better from other features present on surface of the Earth. Through the techniques of growth region and normalized difference water index (NDWI), we determined the surface area of the reservoir in 2011 and calculated the decrease caused by the drought. By analyzing the numbers provided by the results it is possible to estimate how the Sobradinho reservoir has been affected by the drastic drought. The results show that the Landsat images enable the monitoring of large reservoirs. Bearing in mind that monitoring is a primary and indispensable tool, not only for technical study, but also for economic and environmental research, it can help establish planning projects and water administration strategies for future decisions about the hydrical resource priority.

  1. ASSESSMENT OF SURFACE WATER AT THE SOBRADINHO RESERVOIR UNDER THE EFFECTS OF DROUGHT USING MULTI-TEMPORAL LANDSAT IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The matrix of energy generation in Brazil is predominantly hydroelectric power. Consequently, the reservoirs need constant monitoring due to the large volume of artificially dammed water. Images from remote sensing can provide reliable information concerning water bodies. In this paper, we use remote sensing imagery to monitor the Sobradinho dam in three different epochs. The objective was to verify quantitatively the area of the dam’s surface reduced due to the drought of 2015, which was considered the worst in history. The approach used water surface area estimations from bands of Landsat5 and Landsat8 satellites which highlight water bodies better from other features present on surface of the Earth. Through the techniques of growth region and normalized difference water index (NDWI, we determined the surface area of the reservoir in 2011 and calculated the decrease caused by the drought. By analyzing the numbers provided by the results it is possible to estimate how the Sobradinho reservoir has been affected by the drastic drought. The results show that the Landsat images enable the monitoring of large reservoirs. Bearing in mind that monitoring is a primary and indispensable tool, not only for technical study, but also for economic and environmental research, it can help establish planning projects and water administration strategies for future decisions about the hydrical resource priority.

  2. First Results for a Novel Superconducting Imaging-Surface Sensor Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, R.R.; Flynn, E.R.; Espy, M.A.; Matlashov, A.; Overton, W.; Peters, M.V.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-09-13

    A superconducting imaging-surface system was constructed using 12 coplanar thin-film SQUID magnetometers located parallel to and spaced 2 cm from a 25 cm diameter lead imaging-plane. Some measurements included two additional sensors on the ''back'' side of the superconducting imaging-plane to study the field symmetry for our system. Performance was measured in a shielded can and in the open laboratory environment. Data from this system has been used to: (a) understand the noise characteristics of the dewar-SQUID imaging plate arrangement, (b) to verify the imaging principle, (c) measure the background rejection factor of the imaging plane, and (d) compare superconducting materials for the imaging plane. A phantom source field was measured at the sensors as a function of phantom distance from the sensor array to verify the imaging theory. Both the shape and absolute value of the measured and predicted curves agree very well indicating the system is behaving as a gradiometer in accordance with theory. The output from SQUIDs located behind the imaging surface that sense background fields can be used for software or analog background cancellation. Fields arising from sources close to the imaging plane were shielded form the background sensors by more than a factor of 1000. Measurement of the symmetry of sensor sensitivity to uniform fields exactly followed theoretical predictions.

  3. First results for a novel superconducting imaging-surface sensor array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.R.; Espy, M.A.; Matlashov, A.; Overton, W.; Peters, M.V.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-12-31

    A superconducting imaging-surface system was constructed using 12 coplanar thin-film SQUID magnetometers located parallel to and spaced 2 cm from a 25 cm diameter lead imaging-plane. Some measurements included two additional sensors on the back side of the superconducting imaging-plane to study the field symmetry for the system. Performance was measured in a shielded can and in the open laboratory environment. Data from this system has been used to: (1) understand the noise characteristics of the dewar-SQUID imaging plate arrangement, (2) to verify the imaging principle, (c) measure the background rejection factor of the imaging plane, and (4) compare superconducting materials for the imaging plane. A phantom source field was measured at the sensors as a function of phantom distance from the sensor array to verify the imaging theory. Both the shape and absolute values of the measured and predicted curves agree very well indicating the system is behaving as a gradiometer in accordance with theory. The output from SQUIDs located behind the imaging surface that sense background fields can be used for software or analog background cancellation. Fields arising from sources close to the imaging plane were shielded from the background sensors by more than a factor of 1000. Measurement of the symmetry of sensor sensitivity to uniform fields exactly followed theoretical predictions.

  4. Automatic analysis of image of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Hu, K; Cai, N; Su, W; Xiong, H; Lou, Z; Lin, T; Hu, Y

    2001-01-01

    Some computer applications for cell characterization in medicine and biology, such as analysis of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC (El Tor Vibrio of Cholera), operate with cell samples taken from very small areas of interest. In order to perform texture characterization in such an application, only a few texture operators can be employed: the operators should be insensitive to noise and image distortion and be reliable in order to estimate texture quality from images. Therefore, we introduce wavelet theory and mathematical morphology to analyse the cellular surface micro-area image obtained by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). In order to describe the quality of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC, we propose a fully automatic computerized method. The image analysis process is carried out in two steps. In the first, we decompose the given image by dyadic wavelet transform and form an image approximation with higher resolution, by doing so, we perform edge detection of given images efficiently. In the second, we introduce many operations of mathematical morphology to obtain morphological quantitative parameters of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC. The obtained results prove that the method can eliminate noise, detect the edge and extract the feature parameters validly. In this work, we have built automatic analytic software named "EVC.CELL".

  5. Reconstruction of pseudo three-dimensional dental image from dental panoramic radiograph and tooth surface shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imura, Masataka; Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Oshiro, Osamu; Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kagiyama, Yoshiyuki; Yagi, Masakazu; Takada, Kenji; Azuma, Hiroko

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional volume data set is useful for diagnosis in dental treatments. However, to obtain three-dimensional images of a dental arch in general dental clinics is difficult. In this paper, we propose a method to reconstruct pseudo three-dimensional dental images from a dental panoramic radiograph and a tooth surface shape which can be obtained from three dimensional shape measurement of a dental impression. The proposed method finds an appropriate curved surface on which the dental panoramic radiograph is mapped by comparing a virtual panoramic image made from a tooth surface shape to a real panoramic radiograph. The developed pseudo three-dimensional dental images give clear impression of patient's dental condition. (author)

  6. Monitoring of biofilm formation on different material surfaces of medical devices using hyperspectral imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Moon S.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2012-03-01

    Contamination of the inner surface of indwelling (implanted) medical devices by microbial biofilm is a serious problem. Some microbial bacteria such as Escherichia coli form biofilms that lead to potentially lifethreatening infections. Other types of medical devices such as bronchoscopes and duodenoscopes account for the highest number of reported endoscopic infections where microbial biofilm is one of the major causes for these infections. We applied a hyperspectral imaging method to detect biofilm contamination on the surface of several common materials used for medical devices. Such materials include stainless steel, titanium, and stainless-steeltitanium alloy. Potential uses of hyperspectral imaging technique to monitor biofilm attachment to different material surfaces are discussed.

  7. Calibration, Projection, and Final Image Products of MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denevi, Brett W.; Chabot, Nancy L.; Murchie, Scott L.; Becker, Kris J.; Blewett, David T.; Domingue, Deborah L.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Hash, Christopher D.; Hawkins, S. Edward; Keller, Mary R.; Laslo, Nori R.; Nair, Hari; Robinson, Mark S.; Seelos, Frank P.; Stephens, Grant K.; Turner, F. Scott; Solomon, Sean C.

    2018-02-01

    We present an overview of the operations, calibration, geodetic control, photometric standardization, and processing of images from the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) acquired during the orbital phase of the MESSENGER spacecraft's mission at Mercury (18 March 2011-30 April 2015). We also provide a summary of all of the MDIS products that are available in NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS). Updates to the radiometric calibration included slight modification of the frame-transfer smear correction, updates to the flat fields of some wide-angle camera (WAC) filters, a new model for the temperature dependence of narrow-angle camera (NAC) and WAC sensitivity, and an empirical correction for temporal changes in WAC responsivity. Further, efforts to characterize scattered light in the WAC system are described, along with a mosaic-dependent correction for scattered light that was derived for two regional mosaics. Updates to the geometric calibration focused on the focal lengths and distortions of the NAC and all WAC filters, NAC-WAC alignment, and calibration of the MDIS pivot angle and base. Additionally, two control networks were derived so that the majority of MDIS images can be co-registered with sub-pixel accuracy; the larger of the two control networks was also used to create a global digital elevation model. Finally, we describe the image processing and photometric standardization parameters used in the creation of the MDIS advanced products in the PDS, which include seven large-scale mosaics, numerous targeted local mosaics, and a set of digital elevation models ranging in scale from local to global.

  8. The CEOS-Land Surface Imaging Constellation Portal for GEOSS: A resource for land surface imaging system information and data access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Thomas; Gallo, Kevin P.; Bailey, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites is an international group that coordinates civil space-borne observations of the Earth, and provides the space component of the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). The CEOS Virtual Constellations concept was implemented in an effort to engage and coordinate disparate Earth observing programs of CEOS member agencies and ultimately facilitate their contribution in supplying the space-based observations required to satisfy the requirements of the GEOSS. The CEOS initially established Study Teams for four prototype constellations that included precipitation, land surface imaging, ocean surface topography, and atmospheric composition. The basic mission of the Land Surface Imaging (LSI) Constellation [1] is to promote the efficient, effective, and comprehensive collection, distribution, and application of space-acquired image data of the global land surface, especially to meet societal needs of the global population, such as those addressed by the nine Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Societal Benefit Areas (SBAs) of agriculture, biodiversity, climate, disasters, ecosystems, energy, health, water, and weather. The LSI Constellation Portal is the result of an effort to address important goals within the LSI Constellation mission and provide resources to assist in planning for future space missions that might further contribute to meeting those goals.

  9. Multi-mission mean sea surface and geoid models for ocean monitoring within the GOCINA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, O. B.; Knudsen, P.; Anne, V. L.

    2004-05-01

    A major goal of the EU project GOCINA (Geoid and Ocean Circulation In the North Atlantic) is to develop tools for ocean monitoring using satellite altimetry combined with satellite gravimetry. Furthermore, the project will determine an accurate geoid in the region between Greenland and the UK and, hereby, create a platform for validation of future GOCE Level 2 data and higher order scientific products. The central quantity bridging the geoid and the ocean circulation is the mean dynamic topography, which is the difference between the mean sea surface and the geoid. The mean dynamic topography provides the absolute reference surface for the ocean circulation. The improved determination of the mean circulation will advance the understanding of the role of the ocean mass and heat transport in climate change. To calculate the best possible synthetic mean dynamic topographies a new mean sea surface (KMS03) has been derived from nine years of altimetric data (1993-2001). The regional geoid has furthermore being updated using GRACE and gravimetric data from a recent airborne survey. New synthetic mean dynamic topography models have been computed from the best available geoid models (EGM96, GRACE, GOCINA) and the present mean sea surface models (i.e. CLS01, GSFC00, KMS03). These models will be compared with state of the art hydrodynamic mean dynamic topography models in the North Atlantic GOCINA area. An extended comparison in the Artic Ocean will also be presented to demonstrate the impact of improved geoid and mean sea surface modeling. Particularly using the GRACE derived geoid models, and the KMS03 mean sea surface.

  10. Self-consistent density functional calculation of the image potential at a metal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Alvarellos, J E [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Chacon, E [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); GarcIa-Gonzalez, P [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-04

    It is well known that the exchange-correlation (XC) potential at a metal surface has an image-like asymptotic behaviour given by -1/4(z-z{sub 0}), where z is the coordinate perpendicular to the surface. Using a suitable fully non-local functional prescription, we evaluate self-consistently the XC potential with the correct image behaviour for simple jellium surfaces in the range of metallic densities. This allows a proper comparison between the corresponding image-plane position, z{sub 0}, and other related quantities such as the centroid of an induced charge by an external perturbation. As a by-product, we assess the routinely used local density approximation when evaluating electron density profiles, work functions, and surface energies by focusing on the XC effects included in the fully non-local description.

  11. Self-consistent density functional calculation of the image potential at a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J; Alvarellos, J E; Chacon, E; GarcIa-Gonzalez, P

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the exchange-correlation (XC) potential at a metal surface has an image-like asymptotic behaviour given by -1/4(z-z 0 ), where z is the coordinate perpendicular to the surface. Using a suitable fully non-local functional prescription, we evaluate self-consistently the XC potential with the correct image behaviour for simple jellium surfaces in the range of metallic densities. This allows a proper comparison between the corresponding image-plane position, z 0 , and other related quantities such as the centroid of an induced charge by an external perturbation. As a by-product, we assess the routinely used local density approximation when evaluating electron density profiles, work functions, and surface energies by focusing on the XC effects included in the fully non-local description

  12. Dust Plate, Retina, Photograph: Imaging on Experimental Surfaces in Early Nineteenth-Century Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Chitra

    2015-09-01

    This article explores the entangled histories of three imaging techniques in early nineteenth-century British physical science, techniques in which a dynamic event (such as a sound vibration or an electric spark) was made to leave behind a fixed trace on a sensitive surface. Three categories of "sensitive surface" are examined in turn: first, a metal plate covered in fine dust; second, the retina of the human eye; and finally, a surface covered with a light-sensitive chemical emulsion (a photographic plate). For physicists Michael Faraday and Charles Wheatstone, and photographic pioneer William Henry Fox Talbot, transient phenomena could be studied through careful observation and manipulation of the patterns wrought on these different surfaces, and through an understanding of how the imaging process unfolded through time. This exposes the often-ignored materiality and temporality of epistemic practices around nineteenth-century scientific images said to be "drawn by nature."

  13. Imaging prototypical aromatic molecules on insulating surfaces: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann-Vogel, R.

    2018-01-01

    Insulating substrates allow for in-plane contacted molecular electronics devices where the molecule is in contact with the insulator. For the development of such devices it is important to understand the interaction of molecules with insulating surfaces. As substrates, ionic crystals such as KBr, KCl, NaCl and CaF2 are discussed. The surface energies of these substrates are small and as a consequence intrinsic properties of the molecules, such as molecule–molecule interaction, become more important relative to interactions with the substrates. As prototypical molecules, three variants of graphene-related molecules are used, pentacene, C60 and PTCDA. Pentacene is a good candidate for molecular electronics applications due to its high charge carrier mobility. It shows mainly an upright standing growth mode and the morphology of the islands is strongly influenced by dewetting. A new second flat-lying phase of the molecule has been observed. Studying the local work function using the Kelvin method reveals details such as line defects in the center of islands. The local work function differences between the upright-standing and flat-lying phase can only be explained by charge transfer that is unusual on ionic crystalline surfaces. C60 nucleation and growth is explained by loosely bound molecules at kink sites as nucleation sites. The stability of C60 islands as a function of magic numbers is investigated. Peculiar island shapes are obtained from unusual dewetting processes already at work during growth, where molecules ‘climb’ to the second molecular layer. PTCDA is a prototypical semiconducting molecule with strong quadrupole moment. It grows in the form of elongated islands where the top and the facets can be molecularly resolved. In this way the precise molecular arrangement in the islands is revealed.

  14. Pattern recognition of concrete surface cracks and defects using integrated image processing algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbin, Jessie R.; Hortinela, Carlos C.; Garcia, Ramon G.; Baylon, Sunnycille; Ignacio, Alexander Joshua; Rivera, Marco Antonio; Sebastian, Jaimie

    2017-06-01

    Pattern recognition of concrete surface crack defects is very important in determining stability of structure like building, roads or bridges. Surface crack is one of the subjects in inspection, diagnosis, and maintenance as well as life prediction for the safety of the structures. Traditionally determining defects and cracks on concrete surfaces are done manually by inspection. Moreover, any internal defects on the concrete would require destructive testing for detection. The researchers created an automated surface crack detection for concrete using image processing techniques including Hough transform, LoG weighted, Dilation, Grayscale, Canny Edge Detection and Haar Wavelet Transform. An automatic surface crack detection robot is designed to capture the concrete surface by sectoring method. Surface crack classification was done with the use of Haar trained cascade object detector that uses both positive samples and negative samples which proved that it is possible to effectively identify the surface crack defects.

  15. Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory project. A project on research stage of investigating prediction from ground surface. Project report at fiscal year of 2000 to 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    This was a detailed plan after fiscal year 2000 on the first stage of the Research stage at investigating prediction from ground surface' in three researches carried out at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) according to the 'Basic plan on research of underground science at MIU', based on progress of investigation and research before fiscal year 1999. This project contains following three items as its general targets; establishment of general investigating techniques for geological environment, collection of informations on deep underground environment, and development on foundation of engineering technology at super-deep underground. And, targets at investigating prediction stage from ground surface contain acquisition of geological environment data through investigations from ground surface to predict changes of the environment accompanied with underground geological environment and construction of experimental tunnel, to determine evaluating method on prediction results, and to determine plannings of an investigating stage accompanied with excavation of the tunnel by carrying out detail design of the tunnel. Here were introduced about results and problems on the investigation of the first phase, the integration of investigating results, and the investigation and researches on geology/geological structure, hydrology and geochemistry of groundwater, mechanical properties of rocks, and the mass transfer. (G.K.)

  16. Development of an image reconstruction algorithm for a few number of projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Wilson S.; Brandao, Luiz E.; Braz, Delson

    2007-01-01

    An image reconstruction algorithm was developed for specific cases of radiotracer applications in industry (rotating cylindrical mixers), involving a very few number of projection data. The algorithm was planned for imaging radioactive isotope distributions around the center of circular planes. The method consists of adapting the original expectation maximization algorithm (EM) to solve the ill-posed emission tomography inverse problem in order to reconstruct transversal 2D images of an object with only four projections. To achieve this aim, counts of photons emitted by selected radioactive sources in the plane, after they had been simulated using the commercial software MICROSHIELD 5.05, constitutes the projections and a computational code (SPECTEM) was developed to generate activity vectors or images related to those sources. SPECTEM is flexible to support simultaneous changes of the detectors's geometry, the medium under investigation and the properties of the gamma radiation. As a consequence of the code had been followed correctly the proposed method, good results were obtained and they encouraged us to continue the next step of the research: the validation of SPECTEM utilizing experimental data to check its real performance. We aim this code will improve considerably radiotracer methodology, making easier the diagnosis of fails in industrial processes. (author)

  17. Development of an image reconstruction algorithm for a few number of projection data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Wilson S.; Brandao, Luiz E. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN-CNEN/RJ), Rio de Janeiro , RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: wilson@ien.gov.br; brandao@ien.gov.br; Braz, Delson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programa de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: delson@mailhost.lin.ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    An image reconstruction algorithm was developed for specific cases of radiotracer applications in industry (rotating cylindrical mixers), involving a very few number of projection data. The algorithm was planned for imaging radioactive isotope distributions around the center of circular planes. The method consists of adapting the original expectation maximization algorithm (EM) to solve the ill-posed emission tomography inverse problem in order to reconstruct transversal 2D images of an object with only four projections. To achieve this aim, counts of photons emitted by selected radioactive sources in the plane, after they had been simulated using the commercial software MICROSHIELD 5.05, constitutes the projections and a computational code (SPECTEM) was developed to generate activity vectors or images related to those sources. SPECTEM is flexible to support simultaneous changes of the detectors's geometry, the medium under investigation and the properties of the gamma radiation. As a consequence of the code had been followed correctly the proposed method, good results were obtained and they encouraged us to continue the next step of the research: the validation of SPECTEM utilizing experimental data to check its real performance. We aim this code will improve considerably radiotracer methodology, making easier the diagnosis of fails in industrial processes. (author)

  18. Project Blue: Optical Coronagraphic Imaging Search for Terrestrial-class Exoplanets in Alpha Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jon; Project Blue team

    2018-01-01

    Project Blue is a coronagraphic imaging space telescope mission designed to search for habitable worlds orbiting the nearest Sun-like stars in the Alpha Centauri system. With a 45-50 cm baseline primary mirror size, Project Blue will perform a reconnaissance of the habitable zones of Alpha Centauri A and B in blue light and one or two longer wavelength bands to determine the hue of any planets discovered. Light passing through the off-axis telescope feeds into a coronagraphic instrument that forms the heart of the mission. Various coronagraph designs are being considered, such as phase induced amplitude apodization (PIAA), vector vortex, etc. Differential orbital image processing techniques will be employed to analyze the data for faint planets embedded in the residual glare of the parent star. Project Blue will advance our knowledge about the presence or absence of terrestrial-class exoplanets in the habitable zones and measure the brightness of zodiacal dust around each star, which will aid future missions in planning their observational surveys of exoplanets. It also provides on-orbit demonstration of high-contrast coronagraphic imaging technologies and techniques that will be useful for planning and implementing future space missions by NASA and other space agencies. We present an overview of the science goals, mission concept and development schedule. As part of our cooperative agreement with NASA, the Project Blue team intends to make the data available in a publicly accessible archive.

  19. The Effect of Images on Surface Potential and Resistance Calculation of Grounding Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARTINS, A.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the grounding systems with a two layers soil, the calculation of the surface potential using the image method is sometimes impossible due to singularities, avoiding researchers to use the method for electrodes in the bottom layer. In the literature this problem solution is refereed as unreliable or solved with other more complex methods. This paper presents a new approach to calculate the surface potentials in a two. layer soil, for electrodes in the bottom layer, when images are at surface. The singularities in computing surface voltage, when the first image upwards lies at surface, are analysed and it's shown that a small change in top layer thickness allows an approximate solution. Surface potentials due to grid conductor are also considered and the values of resistance are compared with those from other methodologies. Singularities for a ground rod that crosses the two layers are also treated. The obtained values of resistance are not satisfactory, due to lower segments images that overlap the upper segments. This paper also proposes shifting the surface of the upper part of the ground rod, in the upper layer, or taking the modulus of the mutual resistance, to overcome this difficulty.

  20. Polarimetric infrared imaging simulation of a synthetic sea surface with Mie scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Si; Wang, Xia; Xia, Runqiu; Jin, Weiqi; Liang, Jian'an

    2018-03-01

    A novel method to simulate the polarimetric infrared imaging of a synthetic sea surface with atmospheric Mie scattering effects is presented. The infrared emission, multiple reflections, and infrared polarization of the sea surface and the Mie scattering of aerosols are all included for the first time. At first, a new approach to retrieving the radiative characteristics of a wind-roughened sea surface is introduced. A two-scale method of sea surface realization and the inverse ray tracing of light transfer calculation are combined and executed simultaneously, decreasing the consumption of time and memory dramatically. Then the scattering process that the infrared light emits from the sea surface and propagates in the aerosol particles is simulated with a polarized light Monte Carlo model. Transformations of the polarization state of the light are calculated with the Mie theory. Finally, the polarimetric infrared images of the sea surface of different environmental conditions and detection parameters are generated based on the scattered light detected by the infrared imaging polarimeter. The results of simulation examples show that our polarimetric infrared imaging simulation can be applied to predict the infrared polarization characteristics of the sea surface, model the oceanic scene, and guide the detection in the oceanic environment.

  1. VALIDATION OF SPACEBORNE RADAR SURFACE WATER MAPPING WITH OPTICAL sUAS IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li-Chee-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS has over 40 years of experience with airborne and spaceborne sensors and is now starting to use small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS to validate products from large coverage area sensors and create new methodologies for very high resolution products. Wetlands have several functions including water storage and retention which can reduce flooding and provide continuous flow for hydroelectric generation and irrigation for agriculture. Synthetic Aperture Radar is well suited as a tool for monitoring surface water by supplying acquisitions irrespective of cloud cover or time of day. Wetlands can be subdivided into three classes: open water, flooded vegetation and upland which can vary seasonally with time and water level changes. RADARSAT‐2 data from the Wide-Ultra Fine, Spotlight and Fine Quad-Pol modes has been used to map the open water in the Peace‐Athabasca Delta, Alberta using intensity thresholding. We also use spotlight modes for higher resolution and the fully polarimetric mode (FQ for polarimetric decomposition. Validation of these products will be done using a low altitude flying sUAS to generate optical georeferenced images. This project provides methodologies which could be used for flood mapping as well as ecological monitoring.

  2. Projections of rapidly rising surface temperatures over Africa under low mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelbrecht, Francois; Bopape, Mary-Jane; Naidoo, Mogesh; Garland, Rebecca; Adegoke, Jimmy; Thatcher, Marcus; McGregor, John; Katzfey, Jack; Werner, Micha; Ichoku, Charles; Gatebe, Charles

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of observed trends in African annual-average near-surface temperatures over the last five decades reveals drastic increases, particularly over parts of the subtropics and central tropical Africa. Over these regions, temperatures have been rising at more than twice the global rate of temperature increase. An ensemble of high-resolution downscalings, obtained using a single regional climate model forced with the sea-surface temperatures and sea-ice fields of an ensemble of global circulation model (GCM) simulations, is shown to realistically represent the relatively strong temperature increases observed in subtropical southern and northern Africa. The amplitudes of warming are generally underestimated, however. Further warming is projected to occur during the 21st century, with plausible increases of 4–6 °C over the subtropics and 3–5 °C over the tropics by the end of the century relative to present-day climate under the A2 (a low mitigation) scenario of the Special Report on Emission Scenarios. High impact climate events such as heat-wave days and high fire-danger days are consistently projected to increase drastically in their frequency of occurrence. General decreases in soil-moisture availability are projected, even for regions where increases in rainfall are plausible, due to enhanced levels of evaporation. The regional dowscalings presented here, and recent GCM projections obtained for Africa, indicate that African annual-averaged temperatures may plausibly rise at about 1.5 times the global rate of temperature increase in the subtropics, and at a somewhat lower rate in the tropics. These projected increases although drastic, may be conservative given the model underestimations of observed temperature trends. The relatively strong rate of warming over Africa, in combination with the associated increases in extreme temperature events, may be key factors to consider when interpreting the suitability of global mitigation targets in terms of

  3. Imaging Analysis of Carbohydrate-Modified Surfaces Using ToF-SIMS and SPRi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Dubey

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Covalent modification of surfaces with carbohydrates (glycans is a prerequisite for a variety of glycomics-based biomedical applications, including functional biomaterials, glycoarrays, and glycan-based biosensors. The chemistry of glycan immobilization plays an essential role in the bioavailability and function of the surface bound carbohydrate moiety. However, the scarcity of analytical methods to characterize carbohydrate-modified surfaces complicates efforts to optimize glycan surface chemistries for specific applications. Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS is a surface sensitive technique suited for probing molecular composition at the biomaterial interface. Expanding ToF-SIMS analysis to interrogate carbohydrate-modified materials would increase our understanding of glycan surface chemistries and advance novel tools in the nascent field of glycomics. In this study, a printed glycan microarray surface was fabricated and subsequently characterized by ToF-SIMS imaging analysis. A multivariate technique based on principal component analysis (PCA was used to analyze the ToF-SIMS dataset and reconstruct ToF-SIMS images of functionalized surfaces. These images reveal chemical species related to the immobilized glycan, underlying glycan-reactive chemistries, gold substrates, and outside contaminants. Printed glycoarray elements (spots were also interrogated to resolve the spatial distribution and spot homogeneity of immobilized glycan. The bioavailability of the surface-bound glycan was validated using a specific carbohydrate-binding protein (lectin as characterized by Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRi. Our results demonstrate that ToF-SIMS is capable of characterizing chemical features of carbohydrate-modified surfaces and, when complemented with SPRi, can play an enabling role in optimizing glycan microarray fabrication and performance.

  4. Imaging Analysis of Carbohydrate-Modified Surfaces Using ToF-SIMS and SPRi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolles, Kathryn M; Cheng, Fang; Burk-Rafel, Jesse; Dubey, Manish; Ratner, Daniel M

    2010-07-07

    Covalent modification of surfaces with carbohydrates (glycans) is a prerequisite for a variety of glycomics-based biomedical applications, including functional biomaterials, glycoarrays, and glycan-based biosensors. The chemistry of glycan immobilization plays an essential role in the bioavailability and function of the surface bound carbohydrate moiety. However, the scarcity of analytical methods to characterize carbohydrate-modified surfaces complicates efforts to optimize glycan surface chemistries for specific applications. Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is a surface sensitive technique suited for probing molecular composition at the biomaterial interface. Expanding ToF-SIMS analysis to interrogate carbohydrate-modified materials would increase our understanding of glycan surface chemistries and advance novel tools in the nascent field of glycomics. In this study, a printed glycan microarray surface was fabricated and subsequently characterized by ToF-SIMS imaging analysis. A multivariate technique based on principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the ToF-SIMS dataset and reconstruct ToF-SIMS images of functionalized surfaces. These images reveal chemical species related to the immobilized glycan, underlying glycan-reactive chemistries, gold substrates, and outside contaminants. Printed glycoarray elements (spots) were also interrogated to resolve the spatial distribution and spot homogeneity of immobilized glycan. The bioavailability of the surface-bound glycan was validated using a specific carbohydrate-binding protein (lectin) as characterized by Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRi). Our results demonstrate that ToF-SIMS is capable of characterizing chemical features of carbohydrate-modified surfaces and, when complemented with SPRi, can play an enabling role in optimizing glycan microarray fabrication and performance.

  5. Surface Activity Distributions of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Derived from VIRTIS Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougere, Nicolas; Combi, Michael R.; Tenishev, Valeriy; Migliorini, Alessandra; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Fink, Uwe; Filacchione, Gianrico; Rinaldi, Giovanna; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, T. I.; Hansen, Kenneth C.; Huang, Zhenguang; Shou, Yinsi; VIRTIS Team

    2017-10-01

    The outgassing mechanism of comets still remains a critical question to better understand these objects. The Rosetta mission gave some insight regarding the potential activity distribution from the surface of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Fougere et al. (2016, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Volume 588, id.A134, 11 pp and Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Volume 462, Issue Suppl_1, p.S156-S169) used a spherical harmonics inversion scheme with in-situ measurements from the ROSINA instrument to derive mapping of the broad distribution of potential activity at the surface of the nucleus. Marschall et al. (2016, Astronomy & Astrophysics, doi: 10.1051/0004-6361/201730849) based on the appearance of dust active areas suggested that the so-called “neck” region and regions with fractured cliffs and locally steep slopes show more activity than the rest of comet 67P’s nucleus. Using in situ ROSINA measurements from a distance makes it difficult to distinguish between these two scenarios because the fast expansion of the gas and large molecular mean free paths prevents distinguishing small outgassing features even when the spacecraft was in bound orbits within 10 km from the nucleus. In this paper, we present a similar numerical inversion approach using VIRTIS images, which should better probe the very inner coma of comet 67P and give more detailed information about the outgassing activity. Support from contracts JPL #1266314 and #1266313 from the US Rosetta Project and grant NNX14AG84G from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program are gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Benchtop and Animal Validation of a Projective Imaging System for Potential Use in Intraoperative Surgical Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qi; Wang, Dong; Ye, Jian; Zhang, Zeshu; Wang, Xinrui; Hu, Chuanzhen; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X

    2016-01-01

    We propose a projective navigation system for fluorescence imaging and image display in a natural mode of visual perception. The system consists of an excitation light source, a monochromatic charge coupled device (CCD) camera, a host computer, a projector, a proximity sensor and a Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) camera. With perspective transformation and calibration, our surgical navigation system is able to achieve an overall imaging speed higher than 60 frames per second, with a latency of 330 ms, a spatial sensitivity better than 0.5 mm in both vertical and horizontal directions, and a projection bias less than 1 mm. The technical feasibility of image-guided surgery is demonstrated in both agar-agar gel phantoms and an ex vivo chicken breast model embedding Indocyanine Green (ICG). The biological utility of the system is demonstrated in vivo in a classic model of ICG hepatic metabolism. Our benchtop, ex vivo and in vivo experiments demonstrate the clinical potential for intraoperative delineation of disease margin and image-guided resection surgery.

  7. A study on projection angles for an optimal image of PNS water's view on children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Sang Hyuk; Song, Young Geun; Kim, Sung Kyu; Hong, Sang Woo; Kim, Je Bong

    2007-01-01

    This study is to calculate the proper angle for the optimal image of PNS Water's view on children, comparing and analyzing the PNS Water's projection angles between children and adults at every age. This study randomly selected 50 patients who visited the Medical Center from January to May in 2005, and examined the incidence path of central ray, taking a PNS Water's and skull trans-Lat. view in Water's filming position while attaching a lead ball mark on the Orbit, EAM, and acanthion of the patient's skull. And then, we calculated the incidence angles (angle A) of the line connected from OML and the petrous ridge to the inferior margin of maxilla on general (random) patient's skull image, following the incidence path of central ray. Finally, we analyzed two pieces of the graphs at ages, developing out the patient's ideal images at PNS Water's filming position taken by a digital camera, and calculating the angle (angle B) between OML and IP(Image Plate). The angle between OML and IP is about 43 .deg. in 4-years-old children, which is higher than 37 .deg. as age increases the angle decreases, it goes to 37 .deg. around 30 years of age. That is similar result to maxillary growth period. We can get better quality of Water's image for children when taking the PNS Water's view if we change the projection angles, considering maxillary growth for patients in every age stage

  8. Clinical usefulness of a newly-developed head and neck surface coil for MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Morio; Kogure, Takashi; Hayashi, Sanshin

    1995-01-01

    To obtain correct diagnosis at early stages of cervical lymph node swelling, especially cases with suspected epipharyngeal carcinoma, and cerebral arterial sclerotic diseases, high-quality MR images visualizing the entire head and neck structures and vessels are of crucial importance. When obtaining images of head and neck regions using a head coil, signal intensity (SI) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of regions below the hypopharynx are weakened. Moreover, when obtaining images of head and neck regions using an anterior neck coil, SI and SNR of upper regions of epipharynx are also weakened. In an attempt to solve these problems, we developed a new head and neck surface coil for MR imaging. With this new coil we were able to obtain better images (153 cases) from regions below the hypopharynx to the upper regions of the epipharynx in the same time as images obtained using the head coil and anterior neck coil. 2D TOF MR angiographic images (11 cases) obtained by the head and neck surface coil are superior to 2D TOF angiographic images obtained by the anterior neck coil. MR images obtained with this improved method are valuable in the evaluation and management of head and neck region disease. (author)

  9. Current status of the surface-based investigations in the MIU project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Katushi; Osawa, Hideaki

    2001-01-01

    Tono Geoscience Center (TGC) has been conducting a wide range of geoscientific research in order to build a firm scientific and technological basis for the research and development of geological disposal. One of the major components of the ongoing geoscientific research program is the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) project in the Tono region, central Japan. The R and D work of the MIU project has the following main goals: Develop comprehensive investigation techniques for the geological environment. Develop a range of engineering techniques for deep underground application. A wide range of geoscientific research and development activities of the MIU project is planned in three phases a 20 years period; Phase one: surface-based investigation. Phase two: construction. Phase three: operations. The MIU site has been investigated by geological, hydrogeological, hydrochemical and rock mechanical surveys on the surface. Based on this information, modeling and simulation works have been conducted in the different investigation stages. Technological knowledge and experience have been accumulated, which allow application of the methodologies and techniques to characterize the deep geological environment in crystalline rock. This report presents the results of the investigations from fiscal 1996 to 1999 in phase one. (author)

  10. Surface water-quality assessment of the Kentucky River basin, Kentucky; project description

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K.D.; Smoot, J.L.; Jackson, J.K.; Choquette, Anne F.

    1987-01-01

    In April 1986, the U.S. Geological Survey began the National Water Quality Assessment Program, which at present (1987) is in a pilot phase in which assessment concepts and approaches are being tested and modified to prepare for full implementation of the program in the future. Seven pilot projects (four surface water projects and three groundwater projects) have been started. The preliminary plans for the surface water quality assessment of the Kentucky River basin pilot project are described. The Kentucky River basin drains an area of approximately 7,000 sq mi in east central Kentucky and is underlain by rocks that range in composition from limestone to sandstone and shale. Because greater than 95% of the basin population relies on surface water, surface water quality is of great concern. Land use practices that affect the surface water quality in the basin include agriculture, forestry, oil and gas production, coal mining, and urbanization. Water quality concerns resulting from the various land uses include the effects of: oil and gas field brine discharges; agricultural chemicals; sedimentation caused by coal mining; and trace element impacts from industrial and urban environments. Assessment activity is designed to occur over a 9-year period of time. During the first 3-year period of the cycle, concentrated data acquisition and interpretation will occur. For the next 6 years, sample collection will occur at a much lower level of intensity to document the occurrence of any gross changes in water quality. This 9-year cycle will then be repeated. Historical data will be evaluated to provide, to the extent possible, a description of existing and past trends in water quality conditions and to develop conceptual models that relate the observed conditions to the sources and causes, both natural and human-controlled. New data will be collected to verify the water quality conditions documented by historic data, to track long-term trends in water quality, to intensify

  11. Comparison of surface coil and knee coil for evaluation of the patellar cartilage by MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, M. van den; Maeseneer, M. de E-mail: midema@belgacom.net; Hoste, M.; Vanderdood, K.; Ridder, F. de; Osteaux, M

    2003-07-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to compare the knee coil and the surface coil for the visualisation of the patellar cartilage. Materials and methods: In 28 patients (17 women, 11 men) with an average age of 40 years (range 14-76) with knee pain MR was performed. Transverse images were obtained using a fast spin echo proton density weighted sequence on a Philips Gyroscan Intera 1.5 T clinical system. Transverse images were obtained at the level of the patellar cartilage using both the surface and the knee coil. All images were evaluated by consensus of two radiologists. They evaluated a number of quality criteria on a 4-point scale. Criteria for artefacts were also graded on a 4-point scale. Results: For the visualisation of fluid there was no significant difference between the knee coil and the surface coil (P=0.021). For all other criteria regarding image quality and presence of imaging artefacts there was a significant difference between both coils (P<0.001) with the surface coil obtaining the better result. Conclusion: The use of the surface coil in the visualisation of the patellar cartilage can be recommended at knee MR.

  12. Underwater 3D Surface Measurement Using Fringe Projection Based Scanning Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Heinze, Matthias; Schmidt, Ingo; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2015-12-23

    In this work we show the principle of optical 3D surface measurements based on the fringe projection technique for underwater applications. The challenges of underwater use of this technique are shown and discussed in comparison with the classical application. We describe an extended camera model which takes refraction effects into account as well as a proposal of an effective, low-effort calibration procedure for underwater optical stereo scanners. This calibration technique combines a classical air calibration based on the pinhole model with ray-based modeling and requires only a few underwater recordings of an object of known length and a planar surface. We demonstrate a new underwater 3D scanning device based on the fringe projection technique. It has a weight of about 10 kg and the maximal water depth for application of the scanner is 40 m. It covers an underwater measurement volume of 250 mm × 200 mm × 120 mm. The surface of the measurement objects is captured with a lateral resolution of 150 μm in a third of a second. Calibration evaluation results are presented and examples of first underwater measurements are given.

  13. Statistical multi-model climate projections of surface ocean waves in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jorge; Menendez, Melisa; Camus, Paula; Mendez, Fernando J.; Losada, Inigo J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the impact of climate change on sea surface waves has received increasingly more attention by the climate community. Indeed, ocean waves reaching the coast play an important role in several processes concerning coastal communities, such as inundation and erosion. However, regional downscaling at the high spatial resolution necessary for coastal studies has received less attention. Here, we present a novel framework for regional wave climate projections and its application in the European region. Changes in the wave dynamics under different scenarios in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean are analyzed. The multi-model projection methodology is based on a statistical downscaling approach. The statistical relation between the predictor (atmospheric conditions) and the predictand (multivariate wave climate) is based on a weather type (WT) classification. This atmospheric classification is developed by applying the k-means clustering technique over historical offshore sea level pressure (SLP) fields. Each WT is linked to sea wave conditions from a wave hindcast. This link is developed by associating atmospheric conditions from reanalysis with multivariate local waves. This predictor-predictand relationship is applied to the daily SLP fields from global climate models (GCMs) in order to project future changes in regional wave conditions. The GCMs used in the multi-model projection are selected according to skill criteria. The application of this framework uses CMIP5-based wave climate projections in Europe. The low computational requirements of the statistical approach allow a large number of GCMs and climate change scenarios to be studied. Consistent with previous works on global wave climate projections, the estimated changes from the regional wave climate projections show a general decrease in wave heights and periods in the Atlantic Europe for the late twenty-first century. The regional projections, however, allow a more detailed

  14. Rigid motion correction of dual opposed planar projections in single photon imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, G. I.; Ryder, W. J.; Gillam, J. E.; Boisson, F.; Kyme, A. Z.; Fulton, R. R.; Meikle, S. R.; Kench, P. L.

    2017-05-01

    Awake and/or freely moving small animal single photon emission imaging allows the continuous study of molecules exhibiting slow kinetics without the need to restrain or anaesthetise the animals. Estimating motion free projections in freely moving small animal planar imaging can be considered as a limited angle tomography problem, except that we wish to estimate the 2D planar projections rather than the 3D volume, where the angular sampling in all three axes depends on the rotational motion of the animal. In this study, we hypothesise that the motion corrected planar projections estimated by reconstructing an estimate of the 3D volume using an iterative motion compensating reconstruction algorithm and integrating it along the projection path, will closely match the true, motion-less, planar distribution regardless of the object motion. We tested this hypothesis for the case of rigid motion using Monte-Carlo simulations and experimental phantom data based on a dual opposed detector system, where object motion was modelled with 6 degrees of freedom. In addition, we investigated the quantitative accuracy of the regional activity extracted from the geometric mean of opposing motion corrected planar projections. Results showed that it is feasible to estimate qualitatively accurate motion-corrected projections for a wide range of motions around all 3 axes. Errors in the geometric mean estimates of regional activity were relatively small and within 10% of expected true values. In addition, quantitative regional errors were dependent on the observed motion, as well as on the surrounding activity of overlapping organs. We conclude that both qualitatively and quantitatively accurate motion-free projections of the tracer distribution in a rigidly moving object can be estimated from dual opposed detectors using a correction approach within an iterative reconstruction framework and we expect this approach can be extended to the case of non-rigid motion.

  15. Regional quantitative analysis of cortical surface maps of FDG PET images

    CERN Document Server

    Protas, H D; Hayashi, K M; Chin Lung, Yu; Bergsneider, M; Sung Cheng, Huang

    2006-01-01

    Cortical surface maps are advantageous for visualizing the 3D profile of cortical gray matter development and atrophy, and for integrating structural and functional images. In addition, cortical surface maps for PET data, when analyzed in conjunction with structural MRI data allow us to investigate, and correct for, partial volume effects. Here we compared quantitative regional PET values based on a 3D cortical surface modeling approach with values obtained directly from the 3D FDG PET images in various atlas-defined regions of interest (ROIs; temporal, parietal, frontal, and occipital lobes). FDG PET and 3D MR (SPGR) images were obtained and aligned to ICBM space for 15 normal subjects. Each image was further elastically warped in 2D parameter space of the cortical surface, to align major cortical sulci. For each point within a 15 mm distance of the cortex, the value of the PET intensity was averaged to give a cortical surface map of FDG uptake. The average PET values on the cortical surface map were calcula...

  16. Estimation of Shie Glacier Surface Movement Using Offset Tracking Technique with Cosmo-Skymed Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Zhou, W.; Fan, J.; Yuan, W.; Li, H.; Sousa, J. J.; Guo, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Movement is one of the most important characteristics of glaciers which can cause serious natural disasters. For this reason, monitoring this massive blocks is a crucial task. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) can operate all day in any weather conditions and the images acquired by SAR contain intensity and phase information, which are irreplaceable advantages in monitoring the surface movement of glaciers. Moreover, a variety of techniques like DInSAR and offset tracking, based on the information of SAR images, could be applied to measure the movement. Sangwang lake, a glacial lake in the Himalayas, has great potentially danger of outburst. Shie glacier is situated at the upstream of the Sangwang lake. Hence, it is significant to monitor Shie glacier surface movement to assess the risk of outburst. In this paper, 6 high resolution COSMO-SkyMed images spanning from August to December, 2016 are applied with offset tracking technique to estimate the surface movement of Shie glacier. The maximum velocity of Shie glacier surface movement is 51 cm/d, which was observed at the end of glacier tongue, and the velocity is correlated with the change of elevation. Moreover, the glacier surface movement in summer is faster than in winter and the velocity decreases as the local temperature decreases. Based on the above conclusions, the glacier may break off at the end of tongue in the near future. The movement results extracted in this paper also illustrate the advantages of high resolution SAR images in monitoring the surface movement of small glaciers.

  17. GROUND SURFACE VISUALIZATION USING RED RELIEF IMAGE MAP FOR A VARIETY OF MAP SCALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Chiba

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There are many methods to express topographical features of ground surface. In which, contour map has been the traditional method and along with development of digital data, surface model such as shaded relief map has been using for ground surface expression. Recently, data acquisition has been developed very much quick, demanding more advanced visualization method to express ground surface so as to effectively use the high quality data. In this study, the authors using the Red Relief Image Map (RRIM, Chiba et al., 2008 to express ground surface visualization for a variety of map scales. The authors used 30 m mesh data of SRTM to show the topographical features of western Mongolian and micro-topographical features of ground surface in tectonically active regions of Japan. The results show that, compared to traditional and other similar methods, the RRIM can express ground surface more precisely and 3-dimensionally, suggested its advanced usage for many fields of topographical visualization.

  18. Neural network CT image reconstruction method for small amount of projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, X.F.; Fukuhara, M.; Takeda, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for two-dimensional image reconstruction by using a multi-layer neural network. Though a conventionally used object function of such a neural network is composed of a sum of squared errors of the output data, we define an object function composed of a sum of squared residuals of an integral equation. By employing an appropriate numerical line integral for this integral equation, we can construct a neural network which can be used for CT image reconstruction for cases with small amount of projection data. We applied this method to some model problems and obtained satisfactory results. This method is especially useful for analyses of laboratory experiments or field observations where only a small amount of projection data is available in comparison with the well-developed medical applications

  19. Neural network CT image reconstruction method for small amount of projection data

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, X F; Takeda, T

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for two-dimensional image reconstruction by using a multi-layer neural network. Though a conventionally used object function of such a neural network is composed of a sum of squared errors of the output data, we define an object function composed of a sum of squared residuals of an integral equation. By employing an appropriate numerical line integral for this integral equation, we can construct a neural network which can be used for CT image reconstruction for cases with small amount of projection data. We applied this method to some model problems and obtained satisfactory results. This method is especially useful for analyses of laboratory experiments or field observations where only a small amount of projection data is available in comparison with the well-developed medical applications.

  20. Multimodal imaging of ocular surface of dry eye subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aizhong; Salahura, Gheorghe; Kottaiyan, Ranjini; Yoon, Geunyoung; Aquavella, James V.; Zavislan, James M.

    2016-03-01

    To study the relationship between the corneal lipid layer and the ocular surface temperature (OST), we conducted a clinical trial for 20 subjects. Subjects were clinically screened prior to the trial. Of the 20 subjects, 15 have Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD), and 5 have aqueous-deficient dry eye (ADDE). A custom, circularly polarized illumination video tearscope measured the lipid layer thickness of the ocular tear film. A long-wave infrared video camera recorded the dynamic thermal properties of the ocular team film. The results of these two methods were analyzed and compared. Using principal component analysis (PCA) of the lipid layer distribution, we find that the 20 subjects could be categorized into five statistically significant groups, independent of their original clinical classification: thin (6 subjects), medium (5 subjects), medium and homogenous (3 subjects), thick (4 subjects), and very thick (2 subjects) lipids, respectively. We also conducted PCA of the OST data, and recategorized the subjects into two thermal groups by k-means clustering: one includes all ADDE subjects and some MGD subjects; the other includes the remaining MGD subjects. By comparing these two methods, we find that dry eye subjects with thin (lipids have significantly lower OST, and a larger OST drop range, potentially due to more evaporation. However, as long as the lipid layer is not thin (> 40 nm), there is no strong correlation between the lipid layer thickness and heterogeneity and the OST patterns.

  1. An Orthogonal Projection Algorithm to Suppress Interference in High-Frequency Surface Wave Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zezong Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency surface wave radar (HFSWR has been widely applied in sea-state monitoring, and its performance is known to suffer from various unwanted interferences and clutters. Radio frequency interference (RFI from other radiating sources and ionospheric clutter dominate the various types of unwanted signals because the HF band is congested with many users and the ionosphere propagates interference from distant sources. In this paper, various orthogonal projection schemes are summarized, and three new schemes are proposed for interference cancellation. Simulations and field data recorded by experimental multi-frequency HFSWR from Wuhan University are used to evaluate the cancellation performances of these schemes with respect to both RFI and ionospheric clutter. The processing results may provide a guideline for identifying the appropriate orthogonal projection cancellation schemes in various HFSWR applications.

  2. Spatio-temporal image-based parametric water surface reconstruction: a novel methodology based on refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, L.; Creëlle, S.; Schindfessel, L.; De Mulder, T.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a low-cost and easy-to-implement image-based reconstruction technique for laboratory experiments, which results in a temporal description of the water surface topography. The distortion due to refraction of a known pattern, located below the water surface, is used to fit a low parameter surface model that describes the time-dependent and three-dimensional surface variation. Instead of finding the optimal water depth for characteristic points on the surface, the deformation of the entire pattern is compared to its original shape. This avoids the need for feature tracking adopted in similar techniques, which improves the robustness to suboptimal optical conditions and small-scale, high-frequency surface perturbations. Experimental validation, by comparison with water depth measurements using a level gauge and pressure sensor, proves sub-millimetre accuracy for smooth and steady surface shapes. Although such accuracy cannot be achieved in case of highly dynamic surface phenomena, the low-frequency and large-scale free surface oscillations can still be measured with a temporal and spatial resolution mostly limited by the available optical set-up. The technique is initially intended for periodic surface phenomena, but the results presented in this paper indicate that also irregular surface shapes can robustly be reconstructed. Therefore, the presented technique is a promising tool for other research applications that require non-intrusive, low-cost surface measurements while maintaining visual access to the water below the surface. The latter ensures that the suggested surface reconstruction is compatible with simultaneous image-based velocity measurements, enabling a detailed study of the flow.

  3. Normal appearance of the prostate and seminal tract: MR imaging using an endorectal surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Lee, Moo Sang; Choi, Pil Sik; Hong, Sung Joon; Lee, Yeon Hee; Choi, Hak Yong [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-15

    To assess the ability of MR imaging with an endorectal surface coil for the depiction of normal anatomical structure of prostate and its adjacent organs. MR imaging using an endorectal surface coil was performed in 23 male patients(age ; 20-75) to evaluate various prostatic and vasovesicular disorders, i. e, 14 cases of ejaculatory problems, 3 cases of hypogonadism, and 4 cases of prostatic cancers and 2 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia. MR images were obtained with axial, sagittal and coronal fast spin echo long TR/TE images and axial spin echo short TR/TE images. Field of views was 10-12 cm and scan thickness was 3-5 mm. Depiction of normal anatomcial structures was excellent in all cases. On T2WI, zonal anatomy of the prostate and prostatic urethra, urethral crest, and ejaculatory duct were cleary visualized. On T1WI, periprostatic fat plane is more cleary visualized. On transverse images, periprostatic structures were well visualized on T1WI,and on T2WI, anterior fibromuscular stroma, transition zone and peripheral zone could be readily differentiated. Coronal images were more helpful in visualization of both central and peripheral zones. Vas deferens, ejaculatory duct and vermontanum were also more easily defined on these images. Sagittal images was helpful in the depiction of anterior fibromuscular stroma, central zone and peripheral zone with prostatic urethra and ejaculatory duct in a single plane. High resolution MR imaging with an endorectal surface coil can readily visualize the normal anatomy of the prostate and its related structures and may be useful in the evaluation of various diseases of prostate and vasvesicular system.

  4. Condensed listing of surface boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project through 31 December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, L.R.; Aguilar, R.; Mercer, J.W.; Newman, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains a condensed listing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project surface boreholes drilled for the purpose of site selection and characterization through 31 December 1995. The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored the drilling activities, which were conducted primarily by Sandia National Laboratories. The listing provides physical attributes such as location (township, range, section, and state-plane coordinates), elevation, and total borehole depth, as well as the purpose for the borehole, drilling dates, and information about extracted cores. The report also presents the hole status (plugged, testing, monitoring, etc.) and includes salient findings and references. Maps with borehole locations and times-of-drilling charts are included

  5. Ground-based thermal imaging of stream surface temperatures: Technique and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Scott A.; Petre, Sally J.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated a ground-based handheld thermal imaging system for measuring water temperatures using data from eight southwestern USA streams and rivers. We found handheld thermal imagers could provide considerably more spatial information on water temperature (for our unit one image = 19,600 individual temperature measurements) than traditional methods could supply without a prohibitive amount of effort. Furthermore, they could provide measurements of stream surface temperature almost instantaneously compared with most traditional handheld thermometers (e.g., >20 s/reading). Spatial temperature analysis is important for measurement of subtle temperature differences across waterways, and identification of warm and cold groundwater inputs. Handheld thermal imaging is less expensive and equipment intensive than airborne thermal imaging methods and is useful under riparian canopies. Disadvantages of handheld thermal imagers include their current higher expense than thermometers, their susceptibility to interference when used incorrectly, and their slightly lower accuracy than traditional temperature measurement methods. Thermal imagers can only measure surface temperature, but this usually corresponds to subsurface temperatures in well-mixed streams and rivers. Using thermal imaging in select applications, such as where spatial investigations of water temperature are needed, or in conjunction with stationary temperature data loggers or handheld electronic or liquid-in-glass thermometers to characterize stream temperatures by both time and space, could provide valuable information on stream temperature dynamics. These tools will become increasingly important to fisheries biologists as costs continue to decline.

  6. DIEP Flap Breast Reconstruction Using 3-dimensional Surface Imaging and a Printed Mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Tomita, MD, PhD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Recent advances in 3-dimensional (3D surface imaging technologies allow for digital quantification of complex breast tissue. We performed 11 unilateral breast reconstructions with deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP flaps (5 immediate, 6 delayed using 3D surface imaging for easier surgery planning and 3D-printed molds for shaping the breast neoparenchyma. A single- or double-pedicle flap was preoperatively planned according to the estimated tissue volume required and estimated total flap volume. The DIEP flap was then intraoperatively shaped with a 3D-printed mold that was based on a horizontally inverted shape of the contralateral breast. Cosmetic outcomes were assessed as satisfactory, as confirmed by the postoperative 3D measurements of bilateral breasts. We believe that DIEP flap reconstruction assisted with 3D surface imaging and a 3D-printed mold is a simple and quick method for rebuilding a symmetric breast.

  7. 6430.1A Compliance Matrix for 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ERHART, M.F.

    1999-01-01

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) has recently exhibited a steady waste surface level growth. A path forward to mitigate the SY-101 surface level growth issue has been developed. The project has been directed to install the necessary equipment to transfer 380-570m 3 (100,000-150,000 gallons) of waste from SY-101 to SY-102 before the waste elevation reached the region of the tank where the transition from a double to a single shell tank occurs. The purpose of this document is to record the design attributes of the RAPID mitigation system which fulfill the requirements specified in DOE order 6430.1A as it relates to the 241-SY-101 RAPID Mitigation System

  8. Kinematic Measurement of Knee Prosthesis from Single-Plane Projection Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Shunji; Ariyoshi, Shogo; Takahashi, Kenji; Maruyama, Koichi

    In this paper, the measurement of 3D motion from 2D perspective projections of knee prosthesis is described. The technique reported by Banks and Hodge was further developed in this study. The estimation was performed in two steps. The first-step estimation was performed on the assumption of orthogonal projection. Then, the second-step estimation was subsequently carried out based upon the perspective projection to accomplish more accurate estimation. The simulation results have demonstrated that the technique archived sufficient accuracies of position/orientation estimation for prosthetic kinematics. Then we applied our algorithm to the CCD images, thereby examining the influences of various artifacts, possibly incorporated through an imaging process, on the estimation accuracies. We found that accuracies in the experiment were influenced mainly by the geometric discrepancies between the prosthesis component and computer generated model and by the spacial inconsistencies between the coordinate axes of the positioner and that of the computer model. However, we verified that our algorithm could achieve proper and consistent estimation even for the CCD images.

  9. Preliminary Understanding of Surface Plasmon-Enhanced Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy by Single Particle Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Kangshu

    Monitoring chiral optical signals of biomolecules as their conformation changes is an important means to study their structures, properties, and functions. Most measurements, however, are ensemble measurements because chiral optical signals from a single biomolecule is often too weak to be detected. In this dissertation, I present my early attempts to study conformational changes of adsorbed proteins by taking advantage of the enhanced electromagnetic (EM) field around a well-designed plasmonic nanofeature. In particular, I discuss the detection of protein adsorption and denaturation on metallic nanoparticles using single particle scattering and CD spectroscopic imaging. Particles of two distinctively different sizes were compared and two different sample protein molecules were studied. A combination of experimental and computational tools was used to simulate and interpret the collected scattering and CD results. The first chapter provides a brief overview of the state-of-art research in CD spectroscopic studies at the single particle level. Three different means to make particles capable of chiral detection are discussed. Various applications beyond single particle imaging are presented to showcase the potential of the described research project, beyond our immediate goals. The second chapter describes my initial characterization of large, metallic, anisotropic nanorods and the establishment of experimental procedures used later for spectrum reconstruction, data visualization and analysis. The physical shape and structure of the particles were imaged by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the chemical composition by energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), and the optical properties by darkfield microscopy. An experimental protocol was developed to connect information collected from separate techniques for the same particle, with the aims of discovering any possible structural-property correlation. The reproducibility of the single particle imaging method was

  10. Simulation of Specular Surface Imaging Based on Computer Graphics: Application on a Vision Inspection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seulin Ralph

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at detecting surface defects on reflecting industrial parts. A machine vision system, performing the detection of geometric aspect surface defects, is completely described. The revealing of defects is realized by a particular lighting device. It has been carefully designed to ensure the imaging of defects. The lighting system simplifies a lot the image processing for defect segmentation and so a real-time inspection of reflective products is possible. To bring help in the conception of imaging conditions, a complete simulation is proposed. The simulation, based on computer graphics, enables the rendering of realistic images. Simulation provides here a very efficient way to perform tests compared to the numerous attempts of manual experiments.

  11. Theory and application of shapelets to the analysis of surface self-assembly imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suderman, Robert; Lizotte, Daniel J; Abukhdeir, Nasser Mohieddin

    2015-03-01

    A method for quantitative analysis of local pattern strength and defects in surface self-assembly imaging is presented and applied to images of stripe and hexagonal ordered domains. The presented method uses "shapelet" functions which were originally developed for quantitative analysis of images of galaxies (∝10(20)m). In this work, they are used instead to quantify the presence of translational order in surface self-assembled films (∝10(-9)m) through reformulation into "steerable" filters. The resulting method is computationally efficient (with respect to the number of filter evaluations), robust to variation in pattern feature shape, and, unlike previous approaches, is applicable to a wide variety of pattern types. An application of the method is presented which uses a nearest-neighbor analysis to distinguish between uniform (defect-free) and nonuniform (strained, defect-containing) regions within imaged self-assembled domains, both with striped and hexagonal patterns.

  12. Exploring surface photoreaction dynamics using pixel imaging mass spectrometry (PImMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershis, Matthew D.; Wilson, Daniel P.; White, Michael G.; John, Jaya John; Nomerotski, Andrei; Brouard, Mark; Lee, Jason W. L.; Vallance, Claire; Turchetta, Renato

    2013-08-01

    A new technique for studying surface photochemistry has been developed using an ion imaging time-of-flight mass spectrometer in conjunction with a fast camera capable of multimass imaging. This technique, called pixel imaging mass spectrometry (PImMS), has been applied to the study of butanone photooxidation on TiO2(110). In agreement with previous studies of this system, it was observed that the main photooxidation pathway for butanone involves ejection of an ethyl radical into vacuum which, as confirmed by our imaging experiment, undergoes fragmentation after ionization in the mass spectrometer. This proof-of-principle experiment illustrates the usefulness and applicability of PImMS technology to problems of interest within the surface science community.

  13. THE USE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS IN PROJECTING AN ORGANIZATION'S POSITIVE IMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Olariu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is a theoretical approach on the importance of using public relations in helping an organization to project a positive image. The study of the impact information has on the image of organisations seems to be an interesting research topic. Practice has proved that the image of institutions has a patrimonial value and it is sometimes essential in raising their credibility. It can be said that an image is defined as the representation of certain attitudes, opinions or prejudices concerning a person, a group of persons or the public opinion concerning an institution. In other words, an image is the opinion of a person, of a group of persons or of the public opinion regarding that institution. All specialists agree that a negative image affects, sometimes to an incredible extent, the success of an institution. In the contemporary age, we cannot speak about public opinion without taking into consideration the mass media as a main agent in transmitting the information to the public, with unlimited possibilities of influencing or forming it. The plan for the PR department starts with its own declaration of principles, which describes its roles and contribution to the organisation.

  14. MIT Project Apophis: Surface Evaulation & Tomography (SET) Mission Study for the April 2029 Earth Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binzel, R. P.; Earle, A. M.; Vanatta, M.; Miller, D. W.

    2017-12-01

    Nature is providing a once-per-thousand year opportunity to study the geophysical outcome induced on an unprecedentedly large (350 meter) asteroid making an extremely close passage by the Earth (inside the distance of geosynchronous satellites) on Friday April 13, 2029. The aircraft carrier-sized (estimated 20 million metric ton) asteroid is named Apophis. While many previous spacecraft missions have studied asteroids, none has ever had the opportunity to study "live" the outcome of planetary tidal forces on their shapes, spin states, surface geology, and internal structure. Beyond the science interest directly observing this planetary process, the Apophis encounter provides an invaluable opportunity to gain knowledge for any eventuality of a known asteroid found to be on a certain impact trajectory. MIT's Project Apophis [1] is our response to nature's generous opportunity by developing a detailed mission concept for sending a spacecraft to orbit Apophis with the objectives of surveying its surface and interior structure before, during, and after its 2029 near-Earth encounter. The Surface Evaluation & Tomography (SET) mission concept we present is designed toward accomplishing three key science objectives: (1) bulk physical characterization, (2) internal structure, and (3) long-term orbit tracking. For its first mission objective, SET will study Apophis' bulk properties, including: shape, size, mass, volume, bulk density, surface geology, and composition, rotation rate, and spin state. The second mission objective is to characterize Apophis' internal structure before and after the encounter to determine its strength and cohesion - including tidally induced changes. Finally, the third objective studies the process of thermal re-radiation and consequential Yarkovsky drift, whose results will improve orbit predictions for Apophis as well as other potentially hazardous asteroids. [1] https://eapsweb.mit.edu/mit-project-apophis

  15. Clinical application of synthesized brain surface imaging for preoperative simulation of brain biopsy under local anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogura, Yuko; Katada, Kazuhiro; Imai, Fumihiro; Fujisawa, Kazuhisa; Takeshita, Gen; Kanno, Tetsuo; Koga, Sukehiko (Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan))

    1994-06-01

    Surface anatomy scanning (SAS) is the technique which permits the direct visualization of brain surface structures, including cortical sulci, guri, subcortical lesions as well as skin markings for craniotomy. A synthesized brain surface image is a technique that combines MR angiography (MRA) with SAS, and it proposed by us for detecting cerebral superficial veins with these surface structures on the same image. The purpose of this report is to present the result of applying the synthesized brain surface image to the preoperative simulation of biopsy under local anesthesia in 2 cases of multiple metastatic brain tumors. The parameters for SAS were TR/TE=50/40 msec, flip angle=60deg by the fast T[sub 2] technique using refocused FID in steady-state (STERF technique). SAS images were processed by gray scale reversal. The MRA data were acquired with two-dimensional time of flight (TOF) sequence after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA. Before imaging, the water-filled plastic tubes were placed on the patients scalp as markings for craniotomy. Their positions were planned by the neurosurgeons. On SAS, the markings for burr-hole appeared located above the tumors. However on the synthesized brain surface images, the positions of burr-hole were considered to be inadequate, since superficial cerebral vein and sinus were also visualized in the area of the markings. From these results, the positions of burr-hole were reset to avoid the venous structures, and so as to include the lesions in operations. The biopsies were performed successfully and safely because the venous structure could be excluded from the operative field. By this technique it was easy to confirm the relationships among lesions, skin markings and venous structures. The technique described appears to be a useful method for preoperative simulation of biopsies for multiple metastatic brain tumors under local anesthesia. (author).

  16. Quantitative Evaluation of Surface Color of Tomato Fruits Cultivated in Remote Farm Using Digital Camera Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Atsushi; Suehara, Ken-Ichiro; Kameoka, Takaharu

    To measure the quantitative surface color information of agricultural products with the ambient information during cultivation, a color calibration method for digital camera images and a remote monitoring system of color imaging using the Web were developed. Single-lens reflex and web digital cameras were used for the image acquisitions. The tomato images through the post-ripening process were taken by the digital camera in both the standard image acquisition system and in the field conditions from the morning to evening. Several kinds of images were acquired with the standard RGB color chart set up just behind the tomato fruit on a black matte, and a color calibration was carried out. The influence of the sunlight could be experimentally eliminated, and the calibrated color information consistently agreed with the standard ones acquired in the system through the post-ripening process. Furthermore, the surface color change of the tomato on the tree in a greenhouse was remotely monitored during maturation using the digital cameras equipped with the Field Server. The acquired digital color images were sent from the Farm Station to the BIFE Laboratory of Mie University via VPN. The time behavior of the tomato surface color change during the maturing process could be measured using the color parameter calculated based on the obtained and calibrated color images along with the ambient atmospheric record. This study is a very important step in developing the surface color analysis for both the simple and rapid evaluation of the crop vigor in the field and to construct an ambient and networked remote monitoring system for food security, precision agriculture, and agricultural research.

  17. Neural network algorithm for image reconstruction using the grid friendly projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierniak, R.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The presented paper describes a development of original approach to the reconstruction problem using a recurrent neural network. Particularly, the 'grid-friendly' angles of performed projections are selected according to the discrete Radon transform (DRT) concept to decrease the number of projections required. The methodology of our approach is consistent with analytical reconstruction algorithms. Reconstruction problem is reformulated in our approach to optimization problem. This problem is solved in present concept using method based on the maximum likelihood methodology. The reconstruction algorithm proposed in this work is consequently adapted for more practical discrete fan beam projections. Computer simulation results show that the neural network reconstruction algorithm designed to work in this way improves obtained results and outperforms conventional methods in reconstructed image quality. (author)

  18. Stereoscopic versus monoscopic detection of masses on breast tomosynthesis projection images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidhar, Gautam S.; Ganapathi, Tejaswini; Bovik, Alan C.; Markey, Mia K.; Haygood, Tamara M.; Stephens, Tanya W.; Whitman, Gary J.

    2012-02-01

    The goal of this study was to assess if stereoscopic viewing of breast tomosynthesis projection images impacted mass detection performance when compared to monoscopic viewing. The dataset for this study, provided by Hologic, Inc., contained 47 craniocaudal cases (23 biopsy proven malignant masses and 24 normals). Two projection images that were separated by 8 degrees were chosen to form a stereoscopic pair. The images were preprocessed to enhance their contrast and were presented on a stereoscopic display. Three experienced breast imagers participated in a blinded observer study as readers. Each case was shown twice to each reader - once in the stereoscopic mode, and once in the monoscopic mode in a random order. The readers were asked to make a binary decision on whether they saw a mass for which they would initiate a diagnostic workup or not, and also report the location of the mass and provide a confidence score in the range of 0-100. The binary decisions were analyzed using the sensitivity-specificity measure, while the confidence scores were analyzed using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC). We also report a statistical analysis of the difference in partial AUC values greater than 95% sensitivity between the stereoscopic and monoscopic modes.

  19. The Ilac-Project Supporting Ancient Coin Classification by Means of Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavelar, A.; Zambanini, S.; Kampel, M.; Vondrovec, K.; Siegl, K.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the ILAC project, which aims at the development of an automated image-based classification system for ancient Roman Republican coins. The benefits of such a system are manifold: operating at the suture between computer vision and numismatics, ILAC can reduce the day-to-day workload of numismatists by assisting them in classification tasks and providing a preselection of suitable coin classes. This is especially helpful for large coin hoard findings comprising several thousands of coins. Furthermore, this system could be implemented in an online platform for hobby numismatists, allowing them to access background information about their coin collection by simply uploading a photo of obverse and reverse for the coin of interest. ILAC explores different computer vision techniques and their combinations for the use of image-based coin recognition. Some of these methods, such as image matching, use the entire coin image in the classification process, while symbol or legend recognition exploit certain characteristics of the coin imagery. An overview of the methods explored so far and the respective experiments is given as well as an outlook on the next steps of the project.

  20. THE ILAC-PROJECT: SUPPORTING ANCIENT COIN CLASSIFICATION BY MEANS OF IMAGE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kavelar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the ILAC project, which aims at the development of an automated image-based classification system for ancient Roman Republican coins. The benefits of such a system are manifold: operating at the suture between computer vision and numismatics, ILAC can reduce the day-to-day workload of numismatists by assisting them in classification tasks and providing a preselection of suitable coin classes. This is especially helpful for large coin hoard findings comprising several thousands of coins. Furthermore, this system could be implemented in an online platform for hobby numismatists, allowing them to access background information about their coin collection by simply uploading a photo of obverse and reverse for the coin of interest. ILAC explores different computer vision techniques and their combinations for the use of image-based coin recognition. Some of these methods, such as image matching, use the entire coin image in the classification process, while symbol or legend recognition exploit certain characteristics of the coin imagery. An overview of the methods explored so far and the respective experiments is given as well as an outlook on the next steps of the project.

  1. AFM imaging and analysis of local mechanical properties for detection of surface pattern of functional groups

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knotek, P.; Chánová, Eliška; Rypáček, František

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2013), s. 1963-1968 ISSN 0928-4931 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/11/1857; GA ČR GPP108/12/P624 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : phase shift image * AFAM * force spectroscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.736, year: 2013

  2. Mass spectrometry imaging of surface lipids on intact Drosophila melanogaster flies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaftan, Filip; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Kynast, P.; Kulkarni, P.; Böcker, S.; Cvačka, Josef; Knaden, M.; Svatoš, Aleš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2014), s. 223-232 ISSN 1076-5174 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0139 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : MALDI * laser desorption * mass spectrometric imaging * fruit flies * neutral lipids * sex pheromones * mass shift correction Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.379, year: 2014

  3. Image potential resonances of the aluminum (100) surface; Bildpotentialresonanzen der Aluminium-(100)-Oberflaeche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Matthias

    2011-07-08

    Image-potential resonances on the (100) surface of pure Aluminum are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experiments are conducted both energy- and time-resolved using the method of two-photon photoemission spectroscopy. The main attention of the theoretical examination and extensive numerical calculations is devoted to the interaction between surface and bulk states. Image-potential resonances on Al(100) are a system in which a complete series of discrete Rydberg states strongly couples to a continuum of states. As a simple metal it also provides a good opportunity to test theoretical models of the structure of the potential at metal surfaces. This work represents the first high-resolution investigation of image-potential resonances with such strong resonance character. For the first time, it is demonstrated experimentally that isolated image-potential resonances exist on an Aluminum surface. On the (100) surface of Aluminum the second through fifth image-potential resonance are resolved and both, their energies and lifetimes are measured. The binding energies of the image-potential resonances form a Rydberg series of states {epsilon}{sub n}=-(0,85 eV)/((n+a){sup 2}). Within the accuracy of the measurement it is not necessary to introduce a quantum defect a (a=0.022{+-}0.035). Using angle-resolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy the effective mass of electrons in the second image-potential resonance is measured to 1.01{+-}0.11 electron masses. The lifetimes of the resonances increase as {tau}{sub n} = (1.0{+-}0.2)fs.n{sup 3} starting from n=2. Calculations using the density matrix formalism show that the experimentally observed lifetimes can be explained well by electrons decaying into the bulk. The effect of resonance trapping leads to extended lifetimes in the process. Contrary to common theoretical models of image-potential states at metal surfaces the first image-potential resonance cannot be observed in two-photon photoemission on Al(100

  4. A high-throughput surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on differential interferometric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Daqian; Ding, Lili; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Enyao; Yu, Xinglong; Luo, Zhaofeng; Ou, Huichao

    2012-01-01

    A new high-throughput surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on differential interferometric imaging is reported. The two SPR interferograms of the sensing surface are imaged on two CCD cameras. The phase difference between the two interferograms is 180°. The refractive index related factor (RIRF) of the sensing surface is calculated from the two simultaneously acquired interferograms. The simulation results indicate that the RIRF exhibits a linear relationship with the refractive index of the sensing surface and is unaffected by the noise, drift and intensity distribution of the light source. The affinity and kinetic information can be extracted in real time from continuously acquired RIRF distributions. The results of refractometry experiments show that the dynamic detection range of SPR differential interferometric imaging system can be over 0.015 refractive index unit (RIU). High refractive index resolution is down to 0.45 RU (1 RU = 1 × 10 −6 RIU). Imaging and protein microarray experiments demonstrate the ability of high-throughput detection. The aptamer experiments demonstrate that the SPR sensor based on differential interferometric imaging has a great capability to be implemented for high-throughput aptamer kinetic evaluation. These results suggest that this biosensor has the potential to be utilized in proteomics and drug discovery after further improvement. (paper)

  5. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP): Rift Processes and Earthquake Hazards in the Salton Trough (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Rymer, M. J.; Murphy, J. M.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C. J.; Goldman, M.; Catchings, R. D.; Ricketts, J. W.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Driscoll, N.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) and coordinated projects will acquire seismic data in and across the Salton Trough in southern California and northern Mexico, including the Coachella, Imperial, and Mexicali Valleys. These projects address both rifting processes at the northern end of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. In the central Salton Trough, North American lithosphere appears to have been rifted completely apart. Based primarily on a 1979 seismic refraction project, the 20-22 km thick crust is apparently composed entirely of new crust added by magmatism from below and sedimentation from above. The new data will constrain the style of continental breakup, the role and mode of magmatism, the effects of rapid Colorado River sedimentation upon extension and magmatism, and the partitioning of oblique extension. The southernmost San Andreas Fault is considered at high risk of producing a large damaging earthquake, yet structures of the fault and adjacent basins are poorly constrained. To improve hazard models, SSIP will image the geometry of the San Andreas and Imperial Faults, structure of sedimentary basins in the Salton Trough, and three-dimensional seismic velocity of the crust and uppermost mantle. SSIP and collaborating projects have been funded by several different programs at NSF and the USGS. These projects include seven lines of land refraction and low-fold reflection data, airguns and OBS data in the Salton Sea, coordinated fieldwork for onshore-offshore and 3-D data, and a densely sampled line of broadband stations across the trough. Fieldwork is tentatively scheduled for 2010. Preliminary work in 2009 included calibration shots in the Imperial Valley that quantified strong ground motion and proved lack of harm to agricultural irrigation tile drains from explosive shots. Piggyback and complementary studies are encouraged.

  6. A combined 3D and hyperspectral method for surface imaging of wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Denstedt, Martin; Røren, Thomas; Pukstad, Brita; Randeberg, Lise Lyngsnes

    2013-03-01

    Information about the size and depth of a wound and how it is developing is an important prognostic tool in wound diagnostics. In this study a two-camera vision system has been developed to collect optical properties, shape and volume of chronic skin ulcers as tool for diagnostic assistance. This system combines the functionality of 2D imaging spectroscopy and 3D stereo-photogrammetry. A high resolution hyperspectral camera and a monochromatic video frame camera were mounted on the same scanning system. Stereo images were acquired to obtain information about the wound surface geometry. A Digital Surface Model (DSM) of the wound surface was reconstructed by applying stereophotogrammetric methods. The hyperspectral image was co-registered to the monochromatic frame image and the wound border was extracted by applying spectroscopic analysis (e.g. tissue oxygenation, pigmentation, classification). The resulting DSM of the undamaged surroundings of the wound was used to reconstruct the top surface above the wound and thus the wound volume. The analyses can, if desired, be limited to a certain depth of interest like the wound bed or wound border. Simultaneous analysis of the hyperspectral data and the surface model gives a promising, new, non-invasive tool for characterization of chronic wounds. Future work will concentrate on implementation of real time analysis and improvement of the accuracy of the system.

  7. Antibody-protein A conjugated quantum dots for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Takashi; Tiwari, Dhermendra K; Tanaka, Shin-Ichi; Inouye, Yasushi; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Tomonobu M

    2010-11-01

    To use quantum dots (QDs) as fluorescent probes for receptor imaging, QD surface should be modified with biomolecules such as antibodies, peptides, carbohydrates, and small-molecule ligands for receptors. Among these QDs, antibody conjugated QDs are the most promising fluorescent probes. There are many kinds of coupling reactions that can be used for preparing antibody conjugated QDs. Most of the antibody coupling reactions, however, are non-selective and time-consuming. In this paper, we report a facile method for preparing antibody conjugated QDs for surface receptor imaging. We used ProteinA as an adaptor protein for binding of antibody to QDs. By using ProteinA conjugated QDs, various types of antibodies are easily attached to the surface of the QDs via non-covalent binding between the F(c) (fragment crystallization) region of antibody and ProteinA. To show the utility of ProteinA conjugated QDs, HER2 (anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) in KPL-4 human breast cancer cells were stained by using anti-HER2 antibody conjugated ProteinA-QDs. In addition, multiplexed imaging of HER2 and CXCR4 (chemokine receptor) in the KPL-4 cells was performed. The result showed that CXCR4 receptors coexist with HER2 receptors in the membrane surface of KPL-4 cells. ProteinA mediated antibody conjugation to QDs is very useful to prepare fluorescent probes for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

  8. Experimental determination of void fraction in surface aeration using image processing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadpur, Amir; Akhavan-Behabadi, Mohammad Ali; Ebrahimzaedh, Masoud; Hanafizadeh, Pedram; Raisee, Mehrdad [University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, a new method for determination of void fraction in surface aeration process is presented and discussed. The proposed method is based on the image processing technique. The experimental setup has been designed to create various surface aeration conditions in the water. Void fraction has been calculated for the wide range of water height, impeller immersion depth and rotational speed. Experiments have been performed in an open cubic tank with side length of 60 cm, equipped with one Rushton disk turbine. Moreover, the void fraction has been measured with level gauge method. The results showed that the image processing technique provides more accurate results than the level gauge measurements for void fraction calculation in surface aeration especially in low void fraction aeration. In addition, the experimental data revealed that increase in impeller immersion depth and rotational speed increase void fraction and oxygen transfer rate in surface aeration process.

  9. Assessment of Ulcer Wounds Size Using 3D Skin Surface Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hani, Ahmad Fadzil M.; Eltegani, Nejood M.; Hussein, Suraiya H.; Jamil, Adawiyah; Gill, Priya

    In this work 3D surface scans of wounds are used to obtain several measurement including wound top area, true surface area (rue area), depth, and volume for the purpose of assessing the progress of ulcer wounds throughout treatment. KONICA MINOLTA 910 laser scanner is used to obtain the surface scans. The algorithm for estimating top area and true surface area from surface scan can reduce the inaccuracy that might result when using manual method. Two methods for solid construction and volume computation were considered; namely mid-point projection and convex hull approximation (Delaunay tetrahedralization). The performance of convex hull approximation method for volume estimation is improved by performing surface subdivision prior to the approximation. The performance of these algorithms on different patterns of simulated wound models is presented. Furthermore the algorithms are tested in two molded wounds printed using rapid prototyping (RP) technique.

  10. Self-calibrated dynamical optical biochip system using surface plasmon resonance imaging: application to genotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottin, Jérôme; Moreau, Julien; Spadavecchia, Jolanda; Bellemain, Alain; Lecerf, Laure; Goossens, Michel; Canva, Michael

    2008-04-01

    The present paper summarizes some of our work in the field of genetic diagnosis using Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging. The optical setup and its capability are presented, as well as the gold surface functionalization used. Results obtained with oligonucleotides targets, specific to Cystic Fibrosis disease, in high and low concentration are shown. The self-calibration method we have developed to reduce data dispersion in genetic diagnosis applications is described.

  11. Validity of digital imaging of fiber-optic transillumination in caries detection on proximal tooth surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Laitala, M.-L. (Marja-Liisa); Piipari, L. (Liina); Sämpi, N. (Noora); Korhonen, M. (Maria); Pesonen, P. (Paula); Joensuu, T. (Tiina); Anttonen, V. (Vuokko)

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the validity of the digital imaging fiber-optic transillumination (DIFOTI) method in comparison with clinical visual examination (CV) and bitewing (BW) radiography on detecting caries lesions on proximal surfaces of teeth. Materials and Methods Proximal tooth surfaces of premolars and molars (n = 2,103) of 91 voluntary university students aged from 18 to 30 years were examined with CV, BW radiography, and the DIFOTI method. Results DIFOTI detecte...

  12. Acetylene on Cu(111): imaging a molecular surface arrangement with a constantly rearranging tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yeming; Wyrick, Jonathan; Cohen, Kamelia D; Magnone, Katie Marie; Holzke, Connor; Salib, Daniel; Ma, Quan; Sun, Dezheng; Bartels, Ludwig

    2012-09-05

    Acetylene on Cu(111) is investigated by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM); a surface pattern previously derived from diffraction measurements can be validated, if the variation of the STM image transfer function through absorption of an acetylene molecule onto the tip apex is taken into account. Density functional theory simulations point to a balance between short-range repulsive interactions of acetylene/Cu(111) associated with surface stress and longer range attractive interactions as the origin of the ordering.

  13. SU-C-204-06: Surface Imaging for the Set-Up of Proton Post-Mastectomy Chestwall Irradiation: Gated Images Vs Non Gated Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batin, E; Depauw, N; MacDonald, S; Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Historically, the set-up for proton post-mastectomy chestwall irradiation at our institution started with positioning the patient using tattoos and lasers. One or more rounds of orthogonal X-rays at gantry 0° and beamline X-ray at treatment gantry angle were then taken to finalize the set-up position. As chestwall targets are shallow and superficial, surface imaging is a promising tool for set-up and needs to be investigated Methods: The orthogonal imaging was entirely replaced by AlignRT™ (ART) images. The beamline X-Ray image is kept as a confirmation, based primarily on three opaque markers placed on skin surface instead of bony anatomy. In the first phase of the process, ART gated images were used to set-up the patient and the same specific point of the breathing curve was used every day. The moves (translations and rotations) computed for each point of the breathing curve during the first five fractions were analyzed for ten patients. During a second phase of the study, ART gated images were replaced by ART non-gated images combined with real-time monitoring. In both cases, ART images were acquired just before treatment to access the patient position compare to the non-gated CT. Results: The average difference between the maximum move and the minimum move depending on the chosen breathing curve point was less than 1.7 mm for all translations and less than 0.7° for all rotations. The average position discrepancy over the course of treatment obtained by ART non gated images combined to real-time monitoring taken before treatment to the planning CT were smaller than the average position discrepancy obtained using ART gated images. The X-Ray validation images show similar results with both ART imaging process. Conclusion: The use of ART non gated images combined with real time imaging allows positioning post-mastectomy chestwall patients in less than 3 mm / 1°.

  14. SU-C-204-06: Surface Imaging for the Set-Up of Proton Post-Mastectomy Chestwall Irradiation: Gated Images Vs Non Gated Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batin, E; Depauw, N; MacDonald, S; Lu, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Historically, the set-up for proton post-mastectomy chestwall irradiation at our institution started with positioning the patient using tattoos and lasers. One or more rounds of orthogonal X-rays at gantry 0° and beamline X-ray at treatment gantry angle were then taken to finalize the set-up position. As chestwall targets are shallow and superficial, surface imaging is a promising tool for set-up and needs to be investigated Methods: The orthogonal imaging was entirely replaced by AlignRT™ (ART) images. The beamline X-Ray image is kept as a confirmation, based primarily on three opaque markers placed on skin surface instead of bony anatomy. In the first phase of the process, ART gated images were used to set-up the patient and the same specific point of the breathing curve was used every day. The moves (translations and rotations) computed for each point of the breathing curve during the first five fractions were analyzed for ten patients. During a second phase of the study, ART gated images were replaced by ART non-gated images combined with real-time monitoring. In both cases, ART images were acquired just before treatment to access the patient position compare to the non-gated CT. Results: The average difference between the maximum move and the minimum move depending on the chosen breathing curve point was less than 1.7 mm for all translations and less than 0.7° for all rotations. The average position discrepancy over the course of treatment obtained by ART non gated images combined to real-time monitoring taken before treatment to the planning CT were smaller than the average position discrepancy obtained using ART gated images. The X-Ray validation images show similar results with both ART imaging process. Conclusion: The use of ART non gated images combined with real time imaging allows positioning post-mastectomy chestwall patients in less than 3 mm / 1°

  15. Modeling of the LA-ICPMS surface rastering procedure to optimize elemental imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elteren, J.T. van; Triglav, J.; Selih, V.S.; Zivin, M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The quality of elemental image maps generated by LA-ICPMS is a function of the instrumental settings (laser fluence, pulse rate, beam diameter, scanning speed, gas flow rate and acquisition time). Optimizing these settings is a matter of trial and error since quality criteria for elemental imaging (sensitivity, resolution, analysis time) are intricately linked. A theoretical model (and software) will be discussed with which it is possible to simply compute the image distortion introduced by the LA-ICPMS as a function of the instrumental settings and optimize the surface rastering procedure prior to the actual analysis to meet the required quality criteria. (author)

  16. Gold-enhanced biomolecular surface imaging of cells and tissue by SIMS and MALDI mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altelaar, A F Maarten; Klinkert, Ivo; Jalink, Kees; de Lange, Robert P J; Adan, Roger A H; Heeren, Ron M A; Piersma, Sander R

    2006-02-01

    Surface metallization by plasma coating enhances desorption/ionization of membrane components such as lipids and sterols in imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) of tissues and cells. High-resolution images of cholesterol and other membrane components were obtained for neuroblastoma cells and revealed subcellular details (resolving power 1.5 mum). Alternatively, in matrix-enhanced SIMS, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid electrosprayed on neuroblastoma cells allowed intact molecular ion imaging of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin at the cellular level. Gold deposition on top of matrix-coated rat brain tissue sections strongly enhanced image quality and signal intensity in stigmatic matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry. High-quality total ion count images were acquired, and the neuropeptide vasopressin was localized in the rat brain tissue section at the hypothalamic area around the third ventricle. Although the mechanism of signal enhancement by gold deposition is under debate, the results we have obtained for cells and tissue sections illustrate the potential of this sample preparation technique for biomolecular surface imaging by mass spectrometry.

  17. Imaging and reconstruction of cell cortex structures near the cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Luhong; Zhou, Xiaoxu; Xiu, Peng; Luo, Wei; Huang, Yujia; Yu, Feng; Kuang, Cuifang; Sun, Yonghong; Liu, Xu; Xu, Yingke

    2017-11-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) provides high optical sectioning capability and superb signal-to-noise ratio for imaging of cell cortex structures. The development of multi-angle (MA)-TIRFM permits high axial resolution imaging and reconstruction of cellular structures near the cell surface. Cytoskeleton is composed of a network of filaments, which are important for maintenance of cell function. The high-resolution imaging and quantitative analysis of filament organization would contribute to our understanding of cytoskeleton regulation in cell. Here, we used a custom-developed MA-TIRFM setup, together with stochastic photobleaching and single molecule localization method, to enhance the lateral resolution of TIRFM imaging to about 100 nm. In addition, we proposed novel methods to perform filament segmentation and 3D reconstruction from MA-TIRFM images. Furthermore, we applied these methods to study the 3D localization of cortical actin and microtubule structures in U373 cancer cells. Our results showed that cortical actins localize ∼ 27 nm closer to the plasma membrane when compared with microtubules. We found that treatment of cells with chemotherapy drugs nocodazole and cytochalasin B disassembles cytoskeletal network and induces the reorganization of filaments towards the cell periphery. In summary, this study provides feasible approaches for 3D imaging and analyzing cell surface distribution of cytoskeletal network. Our established microscopy platform and image analysis toolkits would facilitate the study of cytoskeletal network in cells.

  18. Investigating Surface and Near-Surface Bushfire Fuel Attributes: A Comparison between Visual Assessments and Image-Based Point Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spits, Christine; Wallace, Luke; Reinke, Karin

    2017-04-20

    Visual assessment, following guides such as the Overall Fuel Hazard Assessment Guide (OFHAG), is a common approach for assessing the structure and hazard of varying bushfire fuel layers. Visual assessments can be vulnerable to imprecision due to subjectivity between assessors, while emerging techniques such as image-based point clouds can offer land managers potentially more repeatable descriptions of fuel structure. This study compared the variability of estimates of surface and near-surface fuel attributes generated by eight assessment teams using the OFHAG and Fuels3D, a smartphone method utilising image-based point clouds, within three assessment plots in an Australian lowland forest. Surface fuel hazard scores derived from underpinning attributes were also assessed. Overall, this study found considerable variability between teams on most visually assessed variables, resulting in inconsistent hazard scores. Variability was observed within point cloud estimates but was, however, on average two to eight times less than that seen in visual estimates, indicating greater consistency and repeatability of this method. It is proposed that while variability within the Fuels3D method may be overcome through improved methods and equipment, inconsistencies in the OFHAG are likely due to the inherent subjectivity between assessors, which may be more difficult to overcome. This study demonstrates the capability of the Fuels3D method to efficiently and consistently collect data on fuel hazard and structure, and, as such, this method shows potential for use in fire management practices where accurate and reliable data is essential.

  19. Grand Composite Raster Images for Sea Surface Temperature in the Gulf of Maine for Stellwagen Bank NMS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This personal geodatabase contains raster images of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Maine. These raster images are a composite of several years...

  20. Seasonal Composite Raster Images for Sea Surface Temperature in the Gulf of Maine for Stellwagen Bank NMS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This personal geodatabase contains raster images of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Maine. These raster images are seasonal composites, and were...

  1. Monthly Composite Raster Images for Sea Surface Temperature in the Gulf of Maine for Stellwagen Bank NMS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This personal geodatabase contains raster images of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Maine. These raster images are monthly composites, and were...

  2. CHEMICAL MAPPING OF ELEMENTAL SULFUR ON PYRITE AND ARSENOPYRITE SURFACES USING NEAR-INFRARED RAMAN IMAGING MICROSCOPY. (R826189)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractNear-infrared Raman imaging microscopy (NIRIM) was used to produce chemical images of the distribution of elemental sulfur on oxidized pyrite and arsenopyrite surfaces. Analysis using Savitsky¯Golay filtering permits an unambiguous identificati...

  3. High spatial resolution quantitative MR images: an experimental study of dedicated surface coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gensanne, D; Josse, G; Lagarde, J M; Vincensini, D

    2006-01-01

    Measuring spin-spin relaxation times (T 2 ) by quantitative MR imaging represents a potentially efficient tool to evaluate the physicochemical properties of various media. However, noise in MR images is responsible for uncertainties in the determination of T 2 relaxation times, which limits the accuracy of parametric tissue analysis. The required signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends on the T 2 relaxation behaviour specific to each tissue. Thus, we have previously shown that keeping the uncertainty in T 2 measurements within a limit of 10% implies that SNR values be greater than 100 and 300 for mono- and biexponential T 2 relaxation behaviours, respectively. Noise reduction can be obtained either by increasing the voxel size (i.e., at the expense of spatial resolution) or by using high sensitivity dedicated surface coils (which allows us to increase SNR without deteriorating spatial resolution in an excessive manner). However, surface coil sensitivity is heterogeneous, i.e., it- and hence SNR-decreases with increasing depth, and the more so as the coil radius is smaller. The use of surface coils is therefore limited to the analysis of superficial structure such as the hypodermic tissue analysed here. The aim of this work was to determine the maximum limits of spatial resolution and depth compatible with reliable in vivo T 2 quantitative MR images using dedicated surface coils available on various clinical MR scanners. The average thickness of adipose tissue is around 15 mm, and the results obtained have shown that obtaining reliable biexponential relaxation analysis requires a minimum achievable voxel size of 13 mm 3 for a conventional volume birdcage coil and only of 1.7 mm 3 for the smallest available surface coil (23 mm in diameter). Further improvement in spatial resolution allowing us to detect low details in MR images without deteriorating parametric T 2 images can be obtained by image filtering. By using the non-linear selective blurring filter described in a

  4. New K-edge-balanced contrast phantom for image quality assurance in projection radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresens, Marc; Schaetzing, Ralph

    2003-06-01

    X-ray-absorber step-wedge phantoms serve in projection radiography to assess a detection system's overall exposure-related signal-to-noise ratio performance and contrast response. Data derived from a phantom image, created by exposing a step-wedge onto the image receptor, are compared with predefined acceptance criteria during periodic image quality assurance (QA). For contrast-related measurements, in particular, the x-ray tube potential requires accurate setting and low ripple, since small deviations from the specified kVp, causing energy spectrum changes, lead to significant image signal variation at high contrast ratios. A K-edge-balanced, rare-earth-metal contrast phantom can generate signals that are significantly more robust to the spectral variability and instability of exposure equipment in the field. The image signals from a hafnium wedge, for example, are up to eight times less sensitive to spectral fluctuations than those of today"s copper phantoms for a 200:1 signal ratio. At 120 kVp (RQA 9), the hafnium phantom still preserves 70% of the subject contrast present at 75 kVp (RQA 5). A copper wedge preserves only 7% of its contrast over the same spectral range. Spectral simulations and measurements on prototype systems, as well as potential uses of this new class of phantoms (e.g., QA, single-shot exposure response characterization) are described.

  5. Respiratory compensation in projection imaging using a magnification and displacement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, C.R.; King, K.F.; Ritchie, C.J.; Godwin, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    Respiratory motion during the collection of computed tomography (CT) projections generates structured artifacts and a loss of resolution that can render the scans unusable. This motion is problematic in scans of those patients who cannot suspend respiration, such as the very young or incubated patients. In this paper, the authors present an algorithm that can be used to reduce motion artifacts in CT scans caused by respiration. An approximate model for the effect of respiration is that the object cross section under interrogation experiences time-varying magnification and displacement along two axes. Using this model an exact filtered backprojection algorithm is derived for the case of parallel projections. The result is extended to generate an approximate reconstruction formula for fan-beam projections. Computer simulations and scans of phantoms on a commercial CT scanner validate the new reconstruction algorithms for parallel and fan-beam projections. Significant reduction in respiratory artifacts is demonstrated clinically when the motion model is satisfied. The method can be applied to projection data used in CT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

  6. Methods of X-ray CT image reconstruction from few projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.

    2011-01-01

    To improve the safety (low dose) and the productivity (fast acquisition) of a X-ray CT system, we want to reconstruct a high quality image from a small number of projections. The classical reconstruction algorithms generally fail since the reconstruction procedure is unstable and suffers from artifacts. A new approach based on the recently developed 'Compressed Sensing' (CS) theory assumes that the unknown image is in some sense 'sparse' or 'compressible', and the reconstruction is formulated through a non linear optimization problem (TV/l1 minimization) by enhancing the sparsity. Using the pixel (or voxel in 3D) as basis, to apply the CS framework in CT one usually needs a 'sparsifying' transform, and combines it with the 'X-ray projector' which applies on the pixel image. In this thesis, we have adapted a 'CT-friendly' radial basis of Gaussian family called 'blob' to the CS-CT framework. The blob has better space-frequency localization properties than the pixel, and many operations, such as the X-ray transform, can be evaluated analytically and are highly parallelizable (on GPU platform). Compared to the classical Kaisser-Bessel blob, the new basis has a multi-scale structure: an image is the sum of dilated and translated radial Mexican hat functions. The typical medical objects are compressible under this basis, so the sparse representation system used in the ordinary CS algorithms is no more needed. 2D simulations show that the existing TV and l1 algorithms are more efficient and the reconstructions have better visual quality than the equivalent approach based on the pixel or wavelet basis. The new approach has also been validated on 2D experimental data, where we have observed that in general the number of projections can be reduced to about 50%, without compromising the image quality. (author) [fr

  7. Simulations of Aperture Synthesis Imaging Radar for the EISCAT_3D Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Hoz, C.; Belyey, V.

    2012-12-01

    EISCAT_3D is a project to build the next generation of incoherent scatter radars endowed with multiple 3-dimensional capabilities that will replace the current EISCAT radars in Northern Scandinavia. Aperture Synthesis Imaging Radar (ASIR) is one of the technologies adopted by the EISCAT_3D project to endow it with imaging capabilities in 3-dimensions that includes sub-beam resolution. Complemented by pulse compression, it will provide 3-dimensional images of certain types of incoherent scatter radar targets resolved to about 100 metres at 100 km range, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio. This ability will open new research opportunities to map small structures associated with non-homogeneous, unstable processes such as aurora, summer and winter polar radar echoes (PMSE and PMWE), Natural Enhanced Ion Acoustic Lines (NEIALs), structures excited by HF ionospheric heating, meteors, space debris, and others. To demonstrate the feasibility of the antenna configurations and the imaging inversion algorithms a simulation of synthetic incoherent scattering data has been performed. The simulation algorithm incorporates the ability to control the background plasma parameters with non-homogeneous, non-stationary components over an extended 3-dimensional space. Control over the positions of a number of separated receiving antennas, their signal-to-noise-ratios and arriving phases allows realistic simulation of a multi-baseline interferometric imaging radar system. The resulting simulated data is fed into various inversion algorithms. This simulation package is a powerful tool to evaluate various antenna configurations and inversion algorithms. Results applied to realistic design alternatives of EISCAT_3D will be described.

  8. Seismic imaging of the upper mantle beneath the northern Central Andean Plateau: Implications for surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, K. M.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extending over 1,800 km along the active South American Cordilleran margin, the Central Andean Plateau (CAP) as defined by the 3 km elevation contour is second only to the Tibetan Plateau in geographic extent. The uplift history of the 4 km high Plateau remains uncertain with paleoelevation studies along the CAP suggesting a complex, non-uniform uplift history. As part of the Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project, we use surface waves measured from ambient noise and two-plane wave tomography to image the S-wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle to investigate the upper mantle component of plateau uplift. We observe three main features in our S-wave velocity model including (1), a high velocity slab (2), a low velocity anomaly above the slab where the slab changes dip from near horizontal to a normal dip, and (3), a high-velocity feature in the mantle above the slab that extends along the length of the Altiplano from the base of the Moho to a depth of ~120 km with the highest velocities observed under Lake Titicaca. A strong spatial correlation exists between the lateral extent of this high-velocity feature beneath the Altiplano and the lower elevations of the Altiplano basin suggesting a potential relationship. Non-uniqueness in our seismic models preclude uniquely constraining this feature as an uppermost mantle feature bellow the Moho or as a connected eastward dipping feature extending up to 300 km in the mantle as seen in deeper mantle tomography studies. Determining if the high velocity feature represents a small lithospheric root or a delaminating lithospheric root extending ~300 km into the mantle requires more integration of observations, but either interpretation shows a strong geodynamic connection with the uppermost mantle and the current topography of the northern CAP.

  9. An Extension to a Filter Implementation of Local Quadratic Surface for Image Noise Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    1999-01-01

    Based on regression analysis this paper gives a description for simple image filter design. Specifically 3x3 filter implementations of a quadratic surface, residuals from this surface, gradients and the Laplacian are given. For the residual a 5x5 filter is given also. It is shown that the 3x3......) it is concluded that if striping is to be considered as a part of the noise, the residual from a 3x3 median filter seems best. If we are interested in a salt-and-pepper noise estimator the proposed extension to the 3x3 filter for the residual from a quadratic surface seems best. Simple statistics...

  10. History, current activities and future direction of the IMAGE project the briefing book for the 3rd meeting of the Ad-hoc IMAGE Advisory Board

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans R; MNV; CIM

    1999-01-01

    This report presents background material for the third meeting of the Ad-hoc IMAGE-2 Advisory Board. This Board reviews recent developments and applications and give advice on potential future directions of the IMAGE-related climate-change projects at RIVM. The aim of this report is to give an

  11. Multispectral UV imaging for surface analysis of MUPS tablets with special focus on the pellet distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Anna; Carstensen, Jens M; Rades, Thomas; Leopold, Prof Dr Claudia S

    2016-12-30

    In the present study the applicability of multispectral UV imaging in combination with multivariate image analysis for surface evaluation of MUPS tablets was investigated with respect to the differentiation of the API pellets from the excipients matrix, estimation of the drug content as well as pellet distribution, and influence of the coating material and tablet thickness on the predictive model. Different formulations consisting of coated drug pellets with two coating polymers (Aquacoat ® ECD and Eudragit ® NE 30 D) at three coating levels each were compressed to MUPS tablets with various amounts of coated pellets and different tablet thicknesses. The coated drug pellets were clearly distinguishable from the excipients matrix using a partial least squares approach regardless of the coating layer thickness and coating material used. Furthermore, the number of the detected drug pellets on the tablet surface allowed an estimation of the true drug content in the respective MUPS tablet. In addition, the pellet distribution in the MUPS formulations could be estimated by UV image analysis of the tablet surface. In conclusion, this study revealed that UV imaging in combination with multivariate image analysis is a promising approach for the automatic quality control of MUPS tablets during the manufacturing process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Xenon-131 surface sensitive imaging of aerogels in liquid xenon near the critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovskaya, G; Blue, A K; Gibbs, S J; Haake, M; Cros, F; Malier, L; Meersmann, T

    1999-03-01

    In recent years, optically pumped xenon-129 has received a great deal of attention as a contrast agent in gas-phase imaging. This report is about the other NMR active xenon isotope (i.e., xenon-131, S = 32) which exhibits distinctive features for imaging applications in material sciences that are not obtainable from xenon-129 (S = (1/2)). The spin dynamics of xenon-131 in gas and liquid phases is largely determined by quadrupolar interactions which depend strongly on the surface of the surrounding materials. This leads to a surface dependent dispersion of relaxation rates, which can be substantial for this isotope. The dephasing of the coherence due to quadrupolar interactions may be used to yield surface specific contrast for imaging. Although optical pumping is not practical for this isotope because of its fast quadrupolar relaxation, a high spin density of liquid xenon close to the critical point (289 K) overcomes the sensitivity problems of xenon-131. We report the first xenon-131 magnetic resonance images and have tested this technique on various meso-porous aerogels as host structures. Aerogels of different densities and changing levels of hydration can clearly be distinguished from the images obtained. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. Image-based rendering of intersecting surfaces for dynamic comparative visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busking, S.; Botha, C.P.; Ferrarini, L.; Milles, J.; Post, F.H.

    2010-01-01

    Nested or intersecting surfaces are proven techniques for visualizing shape differences between static 3D objects (Weigle and Taylor II, IEEE Visualization, Proceedings, pp. 503–510, 2005). In this paper we present an image-based formulation for these techniques that extends their use to dynamic

  14. Multiplex surface plasmon resonance imaging platform for label-free detection of foodborne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonellae are among the leading causes of foodborne outbreaks in the United States, and more rapid and efficient detection methods are needed. Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) is an emerging optical technique, which allows for rapid and label-free screening of multiple targets simultaneous...

  15. Surface plasmon resonance imaging for label-free detection of foodborne pathogens and toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    More rapid and efficient detection methods for foodborne pathogenic bacteria and toxins are needed to address the long assay time and limitations in multiplex capacity. Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) is an emerging optical technique, which allows for rapid and label-free screening of multi...

  16. Accuracy of surface strain measurements from transmission electron microscopy images of nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob; Liu, Pei; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2017-01-01

    Strain analysis from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images offers a convenient tool for measuring strain in materials at the atomic scale. In this paper we present a theoretical study of the precision and accuracy of surface strain measurements directly from aberration...

  17. High resolution imaging of dielectric surfaces with an evanescent field optical microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Bölger, B.

    1992-01-01

    An evanescent field optical microscope (EFOM) is presented which employs frustrated total internal reflection o­n a localized scale by scanning a dielectric tip in close proximity to a sample surface. High resolution images of dielectric gratings and spheres containing both topographic and

  18. Preliminary results of endorectal surface coil magnetic resonance imaging for local staging of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, G. J.; Barentsz, J. O.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Rosenbusch, G.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of endorectal surface coil (ERC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the local staging of adenocarcinoma of the prostate (ACP). A total of 23 patients who were considered candidates for radical prostatectomy because of clinically localized ACP were examined by ERC-MRI.

  19. Detection of apoptosis in cancer cell lines using Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanović, I.; van Hal, Y.; van der Velden, T.J.G.; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie

    2016-01-01

    Induction of apoptosis in cancer cells by therapeutic agents is an important event to detect the potential effectiveness of therapies. Here we explore the potential of Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) to assess apoptosis in cancer cells exposed to therapeutic agents by measuring the

  20. Kinematic behaviour of a large earthflow defined by surface displacement monitoring, DEM differencing, and ERT imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokešová, R.; Kardoš, M.; Tábořík, Petr; Medveďová, A.; Stacke, V.; Chudý, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 224, NOV 1 (2014), s. 86-101 ISSN 0169-555X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : earthflow * surface displacement * strain modelling * DEM differencing * kinematic behaviour Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.577, year: 2013

  1. Processed infrared images of plastic and metallic landmines in an Argentine project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, E. H.; Abbate, H. A.; Costanzo, M.; Mejail, M. E.; Gambini, J.; Jacobo Berlles, J. C.; Santos, J. M.; Borensztejn, P.

    2007-04-01

    A great development of technologies for the detection of buried landmines took place worldwide in the last years. In Argentina, a project for the development of an autonomous robot with sensors for landmines detection was recently approved by the Science and Technology National Agency. Within this project we are studying the detection of landmines by infrared radiation. Metallic and plastic objects with landmines shape and dimension were buried at different depths from 1 to 4 cm in soil and sand. Periodic natural warming by solar radiation or artificial warming by means of electric resistances or flash lamps were applied. Infrared images were obtained in the 8-12 micrometers spectral band with a microbolometer camera. The IR images were processed by different methods to obtain a definition as good as possible of the buried objects. After this a B-Spline method was applied to detect the targets contours and determine shape and dimensions of them so as to distinguish landmines from other objects. We are looking for a landmine detection method as simple and fast possible, with detection capability of metallic and plastic landmines and an acceptable false alarm rate which would be reduced when applied with other detection methods as GPR and electromagnetic induction. We present obtained and processed images and results obtained to distinguish buried landmines from other buried objects.

  2. The effect of compensating filter on image quality in lateral projection of thoraco lumbar radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, N. A. A.; Ali, M. H.; Nazri, N. A. Ahmad; Hamzah, N. J.; Awang, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this project was to study the effect of compensating filter on image quality in lateral projection of thoraco lumbar radiography. The specific objectives of this study were to verify the relationship between density, contrast and noise of lateral thoraco lumbar radiography using various thickness of compensating filter and to determine the appropriate filter thickness with the thoraco lumbar density. The study was performed by an X- ray unit exposed to the body phantom where different thicknesses of aluminium were used as compensating filter. The radiographs were processed by CR reader and being imported to KPACS software to analyze the pixel depth value, contrast and noise. Result shows different thickness of aluminium compensating filter improved the image quality of lateral projection thoraco lumbar radiography. The compensating filter of 8.2 mm was considered as the optimal filter to compensate the thoraco lumbar junction (T12-L1), 1 mm to compensate lumbar region and 5.9 mm to compensate thorax region. The addition of aluminium compensating filter is advantageous in terms of efficiency which saving radiograph film, workload of the radiographer and radiation dose to patient.

  3. ABrIL - Advanced Brain Imaging Lab : a cloud based computation environment for cooperative neuroimaging projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves Tafula, Sérgio M; Moreira da Silva, Nádia; Rozanski, Verena E; Silva Cunha, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience is an increasingly multidisciplinary and highly cooperative field where neuroimaging plays an important role. Neuroimaging rapid evolution is demanding for a growing number of computing resources and skills that need to be put in place at every lab. Typically each group tries to setup their own servers and workstations to support their neuroimaging needs, having to learn from Operating System management to specific neuroscience software tools details before any results can be obtained from each setup. This setup and learning process is replicated in every lab, even if a strong collaboration among several groups is going on. In this paper we present a new cloud service model - Brain Imaging Application as a Service (BiAaaS) - and one of its implementation - Advanced Brain Imaging Lab (ABrIL) - in the form of an ubiquitous virtual desktop remote infrastructure that offers a set of neuroimaging computational services in an interactive neuroscientist-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). This remote desktop has been used for several multi-institution cooperative projects with different neuroscience objectives that already achieved important results, such as the contribution to a high impact paper published in the January issue of the Neuroimage journal. The ABrIL system has shown its applicability in several neuroscience projects with a relatively low-cost, promoting truly collaborative actions and speeding up project results and their clinical applicability.

  4. Engaging stakeholder communities as body image intervention partners: The Body Project as a case example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Carolyn Black; Perez, Marisol; Kilpela, Lisa Smith; Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Trujillo, Eva; Stice, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Despite recent advances in developing evidence-based psychological interventions, substantial changes are needed in the current system of intervention delivery to impact mental health on a global scale (Kazdin & Blase, 2011). Prevention offers one avenue for reaching large populations because prevention interventions often are amenable to scaling-up strategies, such as task-shifting to lay providers, which further facilitate community stakeholder partnerships. This paper discusses the dissemination and implementation of the Body Project, an evidence-based body image prevention program, across 6 diverse stakeholder partnerships that span academic, non-profit and business sectors at national and international levels. The paper details key elements of the Body Project that facilitated partnership development, dissemination and implementation, including use of community-based participatory research methods and a blended train-the-trainer and task-shifting approach. We observed consistent themes across partnerships, including: sharing decision making with community partners, engaging of community leaders as gatekeepers, emphasizing strengths of community partners, working within the community's structure, optimizing non-traditional and/or private financial resources, placing value on cost-effectiveness and sustainability, marketing the program, and supporting flexibility and creativity in developing strategies for evolution within the community and in research. Ideally, lessons learned with the Body Project can be generalized to implementation of other body image and eating disorder prevention programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Near-Surface Geophysics: Advancing Earth Science Through Advances in Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R.

    2006-05-01

    The near-surface of Earth (the top ~100 m) is the region that supports human infrastructure, provides water and mineral resources, and is the interface between solid Earth and atmosphere for many of the biogeochemical cycles that sustain life. Developing an understanding of the processes and properties that occur here is essential for advancing our understanding of many parts of the Earth system. Yet our ability to study, sample, or probe this zone is remarkably primitive. Many investigations rely on drilling, trenching, and direct sampling. But given the pervasive spatial heterogeneity of the region, such methods yield information that is inadequate in terms of the spatial extent and density of sampling. As a result, the Earth science community is turning to geophysical imaging. The area of research that is focused on developing and applying geophysical methods to study this region of Earth is referred to as near-surface geophysics. Near-surface geophysics, as an area of research, includes many types of research, and many types of researchers. Some researchers are drawn to near-surface geophysics due to an interest in specific properties, processes, or applications, which can range from applied to basic science. As examples, near-surface geophysical methods are used for resource exploration and extraction, for the characterization of contaminated sites, for the assessment and design of built infrastructure; and to address scientific questions in neotectonics, volcanology, glaciology, hydrology, sedimentology, archaeology, geochemistry and biogeochemistry. Other researchers are drawn to near-surface geophysics due to an interest in the science of imaging as the driving scientific question. Advances in imaging require investigating the ways in which physical sensors can (or cannot) capture the complexity of a natural system, determining how best to quantify and enhance the spatial and temporal resolution of a measurement, developing new methods for the inversion of

  6. Modeling Images of Natural 3D Surfaces: Overview and Potential Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalobeanu, Andre; Kuehnel, Frank; Stutz, John

    2004-01-01

    Generative models of natural images have long been used in computer vision. However, since they only describe the of 2D scenes, they fail to capture all the properties of the underlying 3D world. Even though such models are sufficient for many vision tasks a 3D scene model is when it comes to inferring a 3D object or its characteristics. In this paper, we present such a generative model, incorporating both a multiscale surface prior model for surface geometry and reflectance, and an image formation process model based on realistic rendering, the computation of the posterior model parameter densities, and on the critical aspects of the rendering. We also how to efficiently invert the model within a Bayesian framework. We present a few potential applications, such as asteroid modeling and Planetary topography recovery, illustrated by promising results on real images.

  7. Analytical expressions of the imaging and aberration coefficients of a general form surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Qi, Jin Wei; Bin, Zhu

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical development is presented in this paper for describing and understanding the imaging and aberrations of a general form surface. The development is based on the Taylor expansion of an arbitrary ray trace from the object reference plane to the image reference plane, which is called the base mapping of the general form surface in this paper. The base mapping is expressed as two Taylor series of the object and pupil coordinates and the imaging and aberration coefficients in the third-order scope are derived and presented as analytical expressions relevant to the optic parameters, invoking no approximations. The situation with tilted object and observing plane is also considered, and the mapping from a tilted object to a tilted observing plane is derived via simple mathematical manipulations based on the base mapping.

  8. The knee: Surface-coil MR imaging at 1.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, J.; Noto, A.M.; Mosure, J.C.; Weiss, K.L.; Zuelzer, W.; Christoforidis, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Seven normal knees (in five volunteers) and seven injured knees (in seven patients) were examined by high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5 T with a surface coil. Seven medial meniscal tears, three anterior cruciate ligament tears, one posterior cruciate ligament avulsion, an old osteochondral fracture, femoral condylar chondro-malacia, and one case of semimembranous tendon reinsertion were identified. MR images correlated well with recent double-contrast arthrograms or results of surgery. All tears were identified in both the sagittal and coronal planes. Because of its ability to demonstrate small meniscal lesions and ligamentous injuries readily, MR imaging with a surface coil may eventually replace the more invasive arthrography

  9. Transference of surface markers in X-ray, CT- and MR-imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grevelhoerster, T.; Poetter, R.; Prott, F.J.; Dittrich, M.

    1995-01-01

    By using pharmacological capsules and plastic tubes filled with oily contrast medium contraining iodine (Lipiodol; Byk Gulden), marking aids were developed which can be seen in similar definite limits within the framework of MRI-, CT- and conventional X-ray-Imaging. A method to view these new, artificial markers in combination with individual, anatomical landmarks is introduced. The marking aid/surface marker, fixed on anatomical reference structures on the skin, does not result in an additional burden for the patient. The new, artificial markers are also useful for making other structures recognizable, such as anatomical relation lines, center of the portal and edges in planning imaging for radiotherapy treatments and are used as leading and reference structures to compare localisation and extent of lesions in X-ray-, CT- and MRI. Marking aids/surface markers do not have to be changed in different imaging methods. (orig./MG) [de

  10. The knee: Surface-coil MR imaging at 1. 5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, J.; Noto, A.M.; Mosure, J.C.; Weiss, K.L.; Zuelzer, W.; Christoforidis, A.J.

    1986-06-01

    Seven normal knees (in five volunteers) and seven injured knees (in seven patients) were examined by high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5 T with a surface coil. Seven medial meniscal tears, three anterior cruciate ligament tears, one posterior cruciate ligament avulsion, an old osteochondral fracture, femoral condylar chondro-malacia, and one case of semimembranous tendon reinsertion were identified. MR images correlated well with recent double-contrast arthrograms or results of surgery. All tears were identified in both the sagittal and coronal planes. Because of its ability to demonstrate small meniscal lesions and ligamentous injuries readily, MR imaging with a surface coil may eventually replace the more invasive arthrography.

  11. Pushing CHARA to its Limit: A Pathway Toward 80X80 Pixel Images of Stellar Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Ryan

    2018-04-01

    Imagine a future with 80x80 pixel images of stellar surfaces. With a maximum baseline of 330 m, the CHARA Array is already capable of achieving 0.5 mas resolution, sufficient for imaging the red supergiant Betelgeuse (d = 42.3 mas ) at such a scale. However several issues have hampered attempts to image the largest stars at CHARA, including a lack of baselines shorter than 34 m and instrument sensitivities unable to measure the faintest fringes. Here we discuss what is needed to achieve imaging of large stars at CHARA. We will present suggestions for future telescope placement, describing the advantages of a short baseline, while also considering the needs of other imaging targets that might benefit from additional baselines. We will also present developments in image reconstruction methods that can improve the resolution of images today, albeit of smaller targets and at a lesser scale. Of course, there will be example images, created using simulated oifits data and state of the art reconstruction techniques!

  12. Surface topography analysis and performance on post-CMP images (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jusang; Bello, Abner F.; Kakita, Shinichiro; Pieniazek, Nicholas; Johnson, Timothy A.

    2017-03-01

    Surface topography on post-CMP processing can be measured with white light interference microscopy to determine the planarity. Results are used to avoid under or over polishing and to decrease dishing. The numerical output of the surface topography is the RMS (root-mean-square) of the height. Beyond RMS, the topography image is visually examined and not further quantified. Subjective comparisons of the height maps are used to determine optimum CMP process conditions. While visual comparison of height maps can determine excursions, it's only through manual inspection of the images. In this work we describe methods of quantifying post-CMP surface topography characteristics that are used in other technical fields such as geography and facial-recognition. The topography image is divided into small surface patches of 7x7 pixels. Each surface patch is fitted to an analytic surface equation, in this case a third order polynomial, from which the gradient, directional derivatives, and other characteristics are calculated. Based on the characteristics, the surface patch is labeled as peak, ridge, flat, saddle, ravine, pit or hillside. The number of each label and thus the associated histogram is then used as a quantified characteristic of the surface topography, and could be used as a parameter for SPC (statistical process control) charting. In addition, the gradient for each surface patch is calculated, so the average, maximum, and other characteristics of the gradient distribution can be used for SPC. Repeatability measurements indicate high confidence where individual labels can be lower than 2% relative standard deviation. When the histogram is considered, an associated chi-squared value can be defined from which to compare other measurements. The chi-squared value of the histogram is a very sensitive and quantifiable parameter to determine the within wafer and wafer-to-wafer topography non-uniformity. As for the gradient histogram distribution, the chi-squared could

  13. The artificial object detection and current velocity measurement using SAR ocean surface images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpatov, Boris; Strotov, Valery; Ershov, Maksim; Muraviev, Vadim; Feldman, Alexander; Smirnov, Sergey

    2017-10-01

    Due to the fact that water surface covers wide areas, remote sensing is the most appropriate way of getting information about ocean environment for vessel tracking, security purposes, ecological studies and others. Processing of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images is extensively used for control and monitoring of the ocean surface. Image data can be acquired from Earth observation satellites, such as TerraSAR-X, ERS, and COSMO-SkyMed. Thus, SAR image processing can be used to solve many problems arising in this field of research. This paper discusses some of them including ship detection, oil pollution control and ocean currents mapping. Due to complexity of the problem several specialized algorithm are necessary to develop. The oil spill detection algorithm consists of the following main steps: image preprocessing, detection of dark areas, parameter extraction and classification. The ship detection algorithm consists of the following main steps: prescreening, land masking, image segmentation combined with parameter measurement, ship orientation estimation and object discrimination. The proposed approach to ocean currents mapping is based on Doppler's law. The results of computer modeling on real SAR images are presented. Based on these results it is concluded that the proposed approaches can be used in maritime applications.

  14. Controlled-Resonant Surface Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the advancement of a controlled-resonance surface tapping-mode single capillary liquid junction extraction/ESI emitter for mass spectrometry imaging. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to spot sample, lane scan and chemically image in an automated and controlled fashion were demonstrated. Rapid, automated spot sampling was demonstrated for a variety of compound types including the cationic dye basic blue 7, the oligosaccharide cellopentaose, and the protein equine heart cytochrome c. The system was used for lane scanning and chemical imaging of the cationic dye crystal violet in inked lines on glass and for lipid distributions in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Imaging of the lipids in mouse brain tissue under optimized conditions provided a spatial resolution of approximately 35 m based on the ability to distinguish between features observed both in the optical and mass spectral chemical images. The sampling spatial resolution of this system was comparable to the best resolution that has been reported for other types of atmospheric pressure liquid extraction-based surface sampling/ionization techniques used for mass spectrometry imaging.

  15. Surface imaging, portal imaging, and skin marker set-up vs. CBCT for radiotherapy of the thorax and pelvis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallotta, Stefania; Bucciolini, Marta; Vanzi, Eleonora; Marrazzo, Livia; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Paiar, Fabiola; Ceroti, Marco; Livi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare surface imaging, portal imaging, and skin marker set-up in radiotherapy of thoracic and pelvic regions, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data as the gold standard. Twenty patients were included in this study. CBCT, surface acquisition (SA), and two orthogonal portal images (PI) were acquired during the first four treatment sessions. Patient set-up corrections, obtained by registering the planning CT with CBCT, were used as the gold standard. Registration results of the PI and SA were evaluated and compared with those obtained with CBCT. The advantage derived from using SA or PI verification systems over a skin marker set-up was also quantified. A statistically significant difference between PI and SA (in favour of PI) was observed in seven patients undergoing treatment of the pelvic region and in two patients undergoing treatment of the thoracic region. The use of SA or PI, compared with a skin marker set-up, improved patient positioning in 50% and 57 % of the thoracic fractions, respectively. For pelvic fractions, the use of PI was beneficial in 73 % of the cases, while the use of SA was beneficial in only 45 %. Patient positioning worsened with SA, particularly along longitudinal and vertical directions. PI yielded more accurate registration results than SA for both pelvic and thoracic fractions. Compared with the skin marker set-up, PI performances were superior to SA for pelvic fractions while comparable results were obtained for thoracic fractions. (orig.) [de

  16. Data Qualification Report: Precipitation and Surface Geology Data for Use on the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Wilson

    2000-01-01

    The unqualified data addressed in this qualification report have been cited in an Analysis Model Report (AMR) to support the Site Recommendation in determining the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a repository for high-level radioactive waste. The unqualified data include precipitation volumes and surface geology maps The precipitation data consist of daily precipitation volumes measured at Yucca Mountain. The surface geology data include identification of the types and surface expressions of geologic units and associated structural features such as faults. These data were directly used in AMR U0010, Simulation of Net Infiltration for Modern and Potential Future Climates, ANL-NBS-HS-000032 (Hevesi et al. 2000), to estimate net infiltration into Yucca Mountain. This report evaluates the unqualified data within the context of supporting studies of this type for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The purpose of this report is to identify data that can be cited as qualified for use in technical products to support the YMP Site Recommendation and that may also be used to support the License Application. The qualified data may either be retained in the original Data Tracking Number (DTN) or placed in new DTNs generated as a result of the evaluation. The appropriateness and limitations (if any) of the data with respect to intended use are addressed in this report. In accordance with Attachment 1 of procedure AP-3.15Q, Rev. 02, Managing Technical Product Inputs, it has been determined that the unqualified precipitation and surface geology data are not used in the direct calculation of Principal Factors for postclosure safety or disruptive events. References to tables, figures, and sections from Hevesi et al. (2000) are based on Rev. 00 of that document

  17. SU-F-I-73: Surface Dose from KV Diagnostic Beams From An On-Board Imager On a Linac Machine Using Different Imaging Techniques and Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, I; Hossain, S; Syzek, E; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively investigate the surface dose deposited in patients imaged with a kV on-board-imager mounted on a radiotherapy machine using different clinical imaging techniques and filters. Methods: A high sensitivity photon diode is used to measure the surface dose on central-axis and at an off-axis-point which is mounted on the top of a phantom setup. The dose is measured for different imaging techniques that include: AP-Pelvis, AP-Head, AP-Abdomen, AP-Thorax, and Extremity. The dose measurements from these imaging techniques are combined with various filtering techniques that include: no-filter (open-field), half-fan bowtie (HF), full-fan bowtie (FF) and Cu-plate filters. The relative surface dose for different imaging and filtering techniques is evaluated quantiatively by the ratio of the dose relative to the Cu-plate filter. Results: The lowest surface dose is deposited with the Cu-plate filter. The highest surface dose deposited results from open fields without filter and it is nearly a factor of 8–30 larger than the corresponding imaging technique with the Cu-plate filter. The AP-Abdomen technique delivers the largest surface dose that is nearly 2.7 times larger than the AP-Head technique. The smallest surface dose is obtained from the Extremity imaging technique. Imaging with bowtie filters decreases the surface dose by nearly 33% in comparison with the open field. The surface doses deposited with the HF or FF-bowtie filters are within few percentages. Image-quality of the radiographic images obtained from the different filtering techniques is similar because the Cu-plate eliminates low-energy photons. The HF- and FF-bowtie filters generate intensity-gradients in the radiographs which affects image-quality in the different imaging technique. Conclusion: Surface dose from kV-imaging decreases significantly with the Cu-plate and bowtie-filters compared to imaging without filters using open-field beams. The use of Cu-plate filter does not affect

  18. Exploring the Leishmania Hydrophilic Acylated Surface Protein B (HASPB) Export Pathway by Live Cell Imaging Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Lorna; Price, Helen; O'Toole, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania major is a human-infective protozoan parasite transmitted by the bite of the female phlebotomine sand fly. The L. major hydrophilic acylated surface protein B (HASPB) is only expressed in infective parasite stages suggesting a role in parasite virulence. HASPB is a "nonclassically" secreted protein that lacks a conventional signal peptide, reaching the cell surface by an alternative route to the classical ER-Golgi pathway. Instead HASPB trafficking to and exposure on the parasite plasma membrane requires dual N-terminal acylation. Here, we use live cell imaging methods to further explore this pathway allowing visualization of key events in real time at the individual cell level. These methods include live cell imaging using fluorescent reporters to determine the subcellular localization of wild type and acylation site mutation HASPB18-GFP fusion proteins, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to analyze the dynamics of HASPB in live cells, and live antibody staining to detect surface exposure of HASPB by confocal microscopy.

  19. FPGA based image processing for optical surface inspection with real time constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani, Ylber; Bodenstorfer, Ernst; Brodersen, Jörg; Mayer, Konrad J.

    2015-02-01

    Today, high-quality printing products like banknotes, stamps, or vouchers, are automatically checked by optical surface inspection systems. In a typical optical surface inspection system, several digital cameras acquire the printing products with fine resolution from different viewing angles and at multiple wavelengths of the visible and also near infrared spectrum of light. The cameras deliver data streams with a huge amount of image data that have to be processed by an image processing system in real time. Due to the printing industry's demand for higher throughput together with the necessity to check finer details of the print and its security features, the data rates to be processed tend to explode. In this contribution, a solution is proposed, where the image processing load is distributed between FPGAs and digital signal processors (DSPs) in such a way that the strengths of both technologies can be exploited. The focus lies upon the implementation of image processing algorithms in an FPGA and its advantages. In the presented application, FPGAbased image-preprocessing enables real-time implementation of an optical color surface inspection system with a spatial resolution of 100 μm and for object speeds over 10 m/s. For the implementation of image processing algorithms in the FPGA, pipeline parallelism with clock frequencies up to 150 MHz together with spatial parallelism based on multiple instantiations of modules for parallel processing of multiple data streams are exploited for the processing of image data of two cameras and three color channels. Due to their flexibility and their fast response times, it is shown that FPGAs are ideally suited for realizing a configurable all-digital PLL for the processing of camera line-trigger signals with frequencies about 100 kHz, using pure synchronous digital circuit design.

  20. The IAC Stripe 82 Legacy Project: a wide-area survey for faint surface brightness astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliri, Jürgen; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2016-02-01

    We present new deep co-adds of data taken within Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), especially stacked to reach the faintest surface brightness limits of this data set. Stripe 82 covers 275 ° ^2 within -50° ≤ RA ≤ +60° and -1.25° ≤ Dec. ≤ +1.25°. We discuss the steps of our reduction which puts special emphasis on preserving the characteristics of the background (sky + diffuse light) in the input images using a non-aggressive sky subtraction strategy. Our reduction reaches a limit of ˜28.5 mag arcsec-2 (3σ, 10 × 10 arcsec2) in the r band. The effective surface brightness limit (50 per cent completeness for exponential light distribution) lies at ˜ 25.5 mag arcsec-2. For point sources, we reach 50 per cent completeness limits (3σ level) of (24.2, 25.2, 24.7, 24.3, 23.0) mag in (u, g, r, I, z). This is between 1.7 and 2.0 mag deeper than the single-epoch SDSS releases. The co-adds show point spread functions (PSFs) with median full width at half-maximum values ranging from 1 arcsec in I and z to 1.3 arcsec in the u band. The imaging data are made publicly available at http://www.iac.es/proyecto/stripe82. The release includes deep co-adds and representations of the PSF for each field. Additionally, we provide object catalogues with stars and galaxies confidently separated until g ˜ 23 mag. The IAC Stripe 82 co-adds offer a rather unique possibility to study the low surface brightness Universe, exemplified by the discovery of stellar streams around NGC 0426 and NGC 0936. We also discuss further science cases like stellar haloes and disc truncations, low surface brightness galaxies, the intracluster light in galaxy clusters and the diffuse emission of Galactic dust known as Galactic Cirrus.

  1. ESTIMATION OF SHIE GLACIER SURFACE MOVEMENT USING OFFSET TRACKING TECHNIQUE WITH COSMO-SKYMED IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Movement is one of the most important characteristics of glaciers which can cause serious natural disasters. For this reason, monitoring this massive blocks is a crucial task. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR can operate all day in any weather conditions and the images acquired by SAR contain intensity and phase information, which are irreplaceable advantages in monitoring the surface movement of glaciers. Moreover, a variety of techniques like DInSAR and offset tracking, based on the information of SAR images, could be applied to measure the movement. Sangwang lake, a glacial lake in the Himalayas, has great potentially danger of outburst. Shie glacier is situated at the upstream of the Sangwang lake. Hence, it is significant to monitor Shie glacier surface movement to assess the risk of outburst. In this paper, 6 high resolution COSMO-SkyMed images spanning from August to December, 2016 are applied with offset tracking technique to estimate the surface movement of Shie glacier. The maximum velocity of Shie glacier surface movement is 51 cm/d, which was observed at the end of glacier tongue, and the velocity is correlated with the change of elevation. Moreover, the glacier surface movement in summer is faster than in winter and the velocity decreases as the local temperature decreases. Based on the above conclusions, the glacier may break off at the end of tongue in the near future. The movement results extracted in this paper also illustrate the advantages of high resolution SAR images in monitoring the surface movement of small glaciers.

  2. Quantitative analysis of visible surface defect risk in tablets during film coating using terahertz pulsed imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Masahiro; Hiraishi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-30

    Tablets are the most common form of solid oral dosage produced by pharmaceutical industries. There are several challenges to successful and consistent tablet manufacturing. One well-known quality issue is visible surface defects, which generally occur due to insufficient physical strength, causing breakage or abrasion during processing, packaging, or shipping. Techniques that allow quantitative evaluation of surface strength and the risk of surface defect would greatly aid in quality control. Here terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI) was employed to evaluate the surface properties of core tablets with visible surface defects of varying severity after film coating. Other analytical methods, such as tensile strength measurements, friability testing, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), were used to validate TPI results. Tensile strength and friability provided no information on visible surface defect risk, whereas the TPI-derived unique parameter terahertz electric field peak strength (TEFPS) provided spatial distribution of surface density/roughness information on core tablets, which helped in estimating tablet abrasion risk prior to film coating and predicting the location of the defects. TPI also revealed the relationship between surface strength and blending condition and is a nondestructive, quantitative approach to aid formulation development and quality control that can reduce visible surface defect risk in tablets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Low-complexity camera digital signal imaging for video document projection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Shih-Chang; Tsai, Po-Shien

    2011-04-01

    We present high-performance and low-complexity algorithms for real-time camera imaging applications. The main functions of the proposed camera digital signal processing (DSP) involve color interpolation, white balance, adaptive binary processing, auto gain control, and edge and color enhancement for video projection systems. A series of simulations demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve good image quality while keeping computation cost and memory requirements low. On the basis of the proposed algorithms, the cost-effective hardware core is developed using Verilog HDL. The prototype chip has been verified with one low-cost programmable device. The real-time camera system can achieve 1270 × 792 resolution with the combination of extra components and can demonstrate each DSP function.

  4. A new EU-funded project for enhanced real-time imaging for radiotherapy

    CERN Multimedia

    KTT Life Sciences Unit

    2011-01-01

    ENTERVISION (European training network for digital imaging for radiotherapy) is a new Marie Curie Initial Training Network coordinated by CERN, which brings together multidisciplinary researchers to carry out R&D in physics techniques for application in the clinical environment.   ENTERVISION was established in response to a critical need to reinforce research in online 3D digital imaging and to train professionals in order to deliver some of the key elements for early detection and more precise treatment of tumours. The main goal of the project is to train researchers who will help contribute to technical developments in an exciting multidisciplinary field, where expertise from physics, medicine, electronics, informatics, radiobiology and engineering merges and catalyses the advancement of cancer treatment. With this aim in mind, ENTERVISION brings together ten academic institutes and research centres, as well as the two leading European companies in particle therapy, IBA and Siemens. &ldq...

  5. Grid Databases for Shared Image Analysis in the MammoGrid Project

    CERN Document Server

    Amendolia, S R; Hauer, T; Manset, D; McClatchey, R; Odeh, M; Reading, T; Rogulin, D; Schottlander, D; Solomonides, T

    2004-01-01

    The MammoGrid project aims to prove that Grid infrastructures can be used for collaborative clinical analysis of database-resident but geographically distributed medical images. This requires: a) the provision of a clinician-facing front-end workstation and b) the ability to service real-world clinician queries across a distributed and federated database. The MammoGrid project will prove the viability of the Grid by harnessing its power to enable radiologists from geographically dispersed hospitals to share standardized mammograms, to compare diagnoses (with and without computer aided detection of tumours) and to perform sophisticated epidemiological studies across national boundaries. This paper outlines the approach taken in MammoGrid to seamlessly connect radiologist workstations across a Grid using an "information infrastructure" and a DICOM-compliant object model residing in multiple distributed data stores in Italy and the UK

  6. Quadrature Slotted Surface Coil Pair for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla: Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solis S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A coil array was composed of two slotted surface coils forming a structure with two plates at 900, each one having 6 circular slots and is introduced in this paper. Numerical simulations of the magnetic field of this coil array were performed at 170 MHz using the finite element method to study its behaviour. This coil array was developed for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode and quadrature driven. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses and high field magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Micro patterned surfaces: an effective tool for long term digital holographic microscopy cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mues, Sarah; Lilge, Inga; Schönherr, Holger; Kemper, Björn; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    The major problem of Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) long term live cell imaging is that over time most of the tracked cells move out of the image area and other ones move in. Therefore, most of the cells are lost for the evaluation of individual cellular processes. Here, we present an effective solution for this crucial problem of long-term microscopic live cell analysis. We have generated functionalized slides containing areas of 250 μm per 200 μm. These micropatterned biointerfaces consist of passivating polyaclrylamide brushes (PAAm). Inner areas are backfilled with octadecanthiol (ODT), which allows cell attachment. The fouling properties of these surfaces are highly controllable and therefore the defined areas designed for the size our microscopic image areas were effective in keeping all cells inside the rectangles over the selected imaging period.

  8. Effects of energy space smoothing and projection space normalization on multispectral PET image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, R.; Msaki, P.; Bentourkia, M.; Lecomte, R.

    1996-01-01

    Independent processing of multispectral positron emission tomography (MSPET) data in individual energy frames has the potential to improve system sensitivity and the accuracy of energy dependent scatter correction. However, statistical fluctuations due to the use of multiple energy windows and low system detection efficiency severely undermine this potential. These limitations have been overcome without resolution loss by smoothing data in the energy space to suppress statistical fluctuations and by normalizing detector efficiency in the spatial domain to minimize systematic errors. The effectiveness of these corrections was evaluated by comparing images acquired in different energy frames with and without energy space smoothing. Smoothing improved the sharpness and contrast and decreased noise of images. The FWHM and FWTM evaluated from line source images confirmed an earlier postulate which stated that smoothing in the energy space has no effect on image resolution since such process does not move counts across lines of response (LORs). It was concluded that smoothing in the energy space in conjunction with normalization in the projection space is a prerequisite for subsequent energy-dependent data processing such as scatter correction

  9. Improved superficial brain hemorrhage visualization in susceptibility weighted images by constrained minimum intensity projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John

    2016-03-01

    Minimum intensity projection is a technique commonly used to display magnetic resonance susceptibility weighted images, allowing the observer to better visualize hemorrhages and vasculature. The technique displays the minimum intensity in a given projection within a thick slab, allowing different connectivity patterns to be easily revealed. Unfortunately, the low signal intensity of the skull within the thick slab can mask superficial tissues near the skull base and other regions. Because superficial microhemorrhages are a common feature of traumatic brain injury, this effect limits the ability to proper diagnose and follow up patients. In order to overcome this limitation, we developed a method to allow minimum intensity projection to properly display superficial tissues adjacent to the skull. Our approach is based on two brain masks, the largest of which includes extracerebral voxels. The analysis of the rind within both masks containing the actual brain boundary allows reclassification of those voxels initially missed in the smaller mask. Morphological operations are applied to guarantee accuracy and topological correctness, and the mean intensity within the mask is assigned to all outer voxels. This prevents bone from dominating superficial regions in the projection, enabling superior visualization of cortical hemorrhages and vessels.

  10. Image restoration by the method of convex projections: part 1 theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youla, D C; Webb, H

    1982-01-01

    A projection operator onto a closed convex set in Hilbert space is one of the few examples of a nonlinear map that can be defined in simple abstract terms. Moreover, it minimizes distance and is nonexpansive, and therefore shares two of the more important properties of ordinary linear orthogonal projections onto closed linear manifolds. In this paper, we exploit the properties of these operators to develop several iterative algorithms for image restoration from partial data which permit any number of nonlinear constraints of a certain type to be subsumed automatically. Their common conceptual basis is as follows. Every known property of an original image f is envisaged as restricting it to lie in a well-defined closed convex set. Thus, m such properties place f in the intersection E(0) = E(i) of the corresponding closed convex sets E(1),E(2),...EE(m). Given only the projection operators PE(i) onto the individual E(i)'s, i = 1 --> m, we restore f by recursive means. Clearly, in this approach, the realization of the P(i)'s in a Hilbert space setting is one of the major synthesis problems. Section I describes the geometrical significance of the three main theorems in considerable detail, and most of the underlying ideas are illustrated with the aid of simple diagrams. Section II presents rules for the numerical implementation of 11 specific projection operators which are found to occur frequently in many signal-processing applications, and the Appendix contains proofs of all the major results.

  11. Influence of the number of basis images and projection array on caries detection using tuned aperture computed tomography (TACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, M; Tyndall, D A; Ludlow, J B; Nortjé, C J

    2002-01-01

    to determine if the number of basis images and spatial distribution of the projection array used for TACT slice generation influence observer performance in caries detection. In the first experiment, 2, 4, 8 and 12 basis projections of each of 40 teeth were acquired using a CMOS digital radiography sensor. Projections were distributed radially in space using a 20 degree angular disparity. TACT slices were generated from the four subgroups of images, presented to eight observers, and viewed on a high-resolution monitor. Observers scored the presence/absence of caries using a 5-point confidence scale. Gold standard was histological examination of tooth sections. ROC curves measured observer diagnostic performance. ANOVA tested for significant differences between observers and experimental conditions. In the second experiment, the number of basis projections judged to be satisfactory for TACT slice generation was used. Horizontal and vertical linear arrays of projections were compared to the circular projection array. There was a statistically significant difference between the numbers of basis projections in the detection of both occlusal (P=0.006) and proximal caries (P=0.005). No significant difference was found between projection arrays in the detection of either occlusal (P=0.065) or proximal (P=0.515) caries. The number of TACT basis projections significantly influences caries detection. Eight or more images should be used. Either linear-vertical, linear-horizontal or circular arrays of basis projections may be used for TACT slice generation in caries detection tasks.

  12. Project of the planetary terrain analogs research for technology development and education in geodesy and image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Gavrushin, Nikolay; Bataev, Mikhail; Kruzhkov, Maxim; Oberst, Juergen

    2013-04-01

    The MIIGAiK Extraterrestrial Laboratory (MExLab) is currently finalizing the development the robotic mobile science platform MExRover, designed for simulating rover activities on the surface of earth-type planets and satellites. In the project, we develop a hardware and software platform for full rover operation and telemetry processing from onboard instruments, as a means of training undergraduate and postgraduate students and young scientists working in the field of planetary exploration. 1. Introduction The main aim of the project is to provide the research base for image processing development and geodesy survey. Other focus is the development of research programs with participation of students and young scientists of the University, for digital terrain model creation for macro- and microrelief surveying. MExRover would be a bridge from the old soviet Lunokhod experience to the new research base for the future rover technology development support. 2. Rover design The design of the rover and its instrument suite allows acquiring images and navigation data satisfying the requirements for photogrammetric processing. The high-quality color panoramas as well as DTMs (Digital Terrain Models) will be produced aboard and could be used for the real-time track correction and environment analysis. A local operator may control the rover remotely from a distance up to 3 km and continuously monitor all systems. The MExRover has a modular design, which provides maximum flexibility for accomplishing different tasks with different sets of additional equipment weighing up to 15 kg. The framework can be easily disassembled and fit into 3 transport boxes, which allows transporting them on foot, by car, train or plane as a the ordinary luggage. The imaging system included in the present design comprises low resolution video cameras, high resolution stereo camera, microphone and IR camera. More instruments are planned to be installed later as auxiliary equipment, such as

  13. Assessing surface water availability considering human water use and projected climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Batool; AghaKouchak, Amir; Mousavi-Baygi, Mohammd; Moftakhari, Hamed; Anjileli, Hassan

    2017-04-01

    Climate variability along with anthropogenic activities alter the hydrological cycle and local water availability. The overarching goal of this presentation is to demonstrate the compounding interactions between human water use/withdrawals and climate change and variability. We focus on Karkheh River basin and Urmia basin, in western Iran, that have high level of human activity and water use, and suffer from low water productivity. The future of these basins and their growth relies on sustainable water resources and hence, requires a holistic, basin-wide management to cope with water scarcity challenges. In this study, we investigate changes in the hydrology of the basin including human-induced alterations of the system, during the past three decades. Then, we investigate the individual and combined effects of climate variability and human water withdrawals on surface water storage in the 21st century. We use bias-corrected historical simulations and future projections from ensemble mean of eleven General Circulation Models (GCMs) under two climate change scenarios RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. The results show that, hydrology of the studied basins are significantly dominated by human activities over the baseline period (1976 - 2005). Results show that the increased anthropogenic water demand resulting from substantial socio-economic growth in the past three decades have put significant stress on water resources. We evaluate a number of future water demand scenarios and their interactions with future climate projections. Our results show that by the end of the 21st century, the compounding effects of increased irrigation water demand and precipitation variability may lead to severe local water scarcity in these basins. Our study highlights the necessity for understanding and considering the compounding effects of human water use and future climate projections. Such studies would be useful for improving water management and developing adaption plans in water scarce regions.

  14. Minimally Invasive Holographic Surface Scanning for Soft-Tissue Image Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackworth, Douglas M.; Webster, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in registration have extended intra-surgical image guidance from its origins in bone-based procedures to new applications in soft tissues, thus enabling visualization of spatial relationships between surgical instruments and subsurface structures before incisions begin. Preoperative images are generally registered to soft tissues through aligning segmented volumetric image data with an intraoperatively sensed cloud of organ surface points. However, there is currently no viable noncontact minimally invasive scanning technology that can collect these points through a single laparoscopic port, which limits wider adoption of soft-tissue image guidance. In this paper, we describe a system based on conoscopic holography that is capable of minimally invasive surface scanning. We present the results of several validation experiments scanning ex vivo biological and phantom tissues with a system consisting of a tracked, off-the-shelf, relatively inexpensive conoscopic holography unit. These experiments indicate that conoscopic holography is suitable for use with biological tissues, and can provide surface scans of comparable quality to existing clinically used laser range scanning systems that require open surgery. We demonstrate experimentally that conoscopic holography can be used to guide a surgical needle to desired subsurface targets with an average tip error of less than 3 mm. PMID:20659823

  15. Minimally invasive holographic surface scanning for soft-tissue image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, Ray A; Hackworth, Douglas M; Webster, Robert J

    2010-06-01

    Recent advances in registration have extended intrasurgical image guidance from its origins in bone-based procedures to new applications in soft tissues, thus enabling visualization of spatial relationships between surgical instruments and subsurface structures before incisions begin. Preoperative images are generally registered to soft tissues through aligning segmented volumetric image data with an intraoperatively sensed cloud of organ surface points. However, there is currently no viable noncontact minimally invasive scanning technology that can collect these points through a single laparoscopic port, which limits wider adoption of soft-tissue image guidance. In this paper, we describe a system based on conoscopic holography that is capable of minimally invasive surface scanning. We present the results of several validation experiments scanning ex vivo biological and phantom tissues with a system consisting of a tracked, off-the-shelf, relatively inexpensive conoscopic holography unit. These experiments indicate that conoscopic holography is suitable for use with biological tissues, and can provide surface scans of comparable quality to existing clinically used laser range scanning systems that require open surgery. We demonstrate experimentally that conoscopic holography can be used to guide a surgical needle to desired subsurface targets with an average tip error of less than 3 mm.

  16. Detection of fecal contamination on beef meat surfaces using handheld fluorescence imaging device (HFID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Mirae; Lee, Hoonsoo; Cho, Hyunjeong; Moon, Sang-Ho; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Moon S.

    2016-05-01

    Current meat inspection in slaughter plants, for food safety and quality attributes including potential fecal contamination, is conducted through by visual examination human inspectors. A handheld fluorescence-based imaging device (HFID) was developed to be an assistive tool for human inspectors by highlighting contaminated food and food contact surfaces on a display monitor. It can be used under ambient lighting conditions in food processing plants. Critical components of the imaging device includes four 405-nm 10-W LEDs for fluorescence excitation, a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, optical filter (670 nm used for this study), and Wi-Fi transmitter for broadcasting real-time video/images to monitoring devices such as smartphone and tablet. This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of HFID in enhancing visual detection of fecal contamination on red meat, fat, and bone surfaces of beef under varying ambient luminous intensities (0, 10, 30, 50 and 70 foot-candles). Overall, diluted feces on fat, red meat and bone areas of beef surfaces were detectable in the 670-nm single-band fluorescence images when using the HFID under 0 to 50 foot-candle ambient lighting.

  17. 3D real holographic image movies are projected into a volumetric display using dynamic digital micromirror device (DMD) holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebschman, Michael L.; Hunt, Jeremy; Garner, Harold R.

    2006-04-01

    The Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is being used as the recording medium for display of pre-calculated digital holograms. The high intensity throughput of the reflected laser light from DMD holograms enables volumetric display of projected real images as well as virtual images. A single DMD and single laser projector system has been designed to reconstruct projected images in a 6''x 6''x 4.5'' volumetric display. The volumetric display is composed of twenty-four, 6''-square, PSCT liquid crystal plates which are each cycled on and off to reduce unnecessary scatter in the volume. The DMD is an XGA format array, 1024x768, with 13.6 micron pitch mirrors. This holographic projection system has been used in the assessment of hologram image resolution, maximum image size, optical focusing of the real image, image look-around, and physiological depth cues. Dynamic movement images are projected by transferring the appropriately sequenced holograms to the DMD at movie frame rates.

  18. Mammography with and without radiolucent positioning sheets: Comparison of projected breast area, pain experience, radiation dose and technical image quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Janine; ten Voorde, Marloes; van Engen, Ruben E.; van Landsveld-Verhoeven, Cary; Pijnappel, Ruud; Droogh-de Greve, Kitty; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2015-01-01

    To compare projected breast area, image quality, pain experience and radiation dose between mammography performed with and without radiolucent positioning sheets. 184 women screened in the Dutch breast screening programme (May-June 2012) provided written informed consent to have one additional image

  19. Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site. Final [report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing sits are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards (40 CFR 192), in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100-m{sup 2} grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. A bulk interpretation of these EPA standards has been accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and while the concentration of the finer-sized soil fraction less than a No. 4 mesh sieve contains the higher concentration of radioactivity, the bulk approach in effect integrates the total sample radioactivity over the entire sample mass. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 cleanup protocol has been developed in accordance with Supplemental Standard provisions of 40 CFR 192 for NRC/Colorado Department of Health (CDH) approval for timely implementation. Detailed elements of the protocol are contained in Appendix A, Generic Protocol from Thorium-230 Cleanup/Verification at UMTRA Project Processing Sites. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR 192 relative to supplemental standards.

  20. Evaluation of surface water treatment and discharge options for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyette, M.L.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program, is responsible for conducting response actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: (1) the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits and two small ponds, and (2) a 3.6-ha (9-acre) quarry located about 6.4 km (4 mi) southwest of the chemical plant area. Both of these areas became chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through 1960s. The Weldon Spring site, located about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis, is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Nitroaromatic explosives were processed by the Army at the chemical plant area during the 1940s, and radioactive materials were processed by DOE's predecessor agency (the Atomic Energy Commission) during the 1950s and 1960s. Overall remediation of the Weldon Spring site is being addressed through the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, and it consists of several components. One component is the management of radioactively and chemically contaminated surface water impoundments at the chemical plant area -- i.e., the four raffinate pits, Frog Pond, and Ash Pond which was addressed under a separate action and documented in an engineering evaluation/cost analysis report. This report discusses the evaluation of surface water treatment at the Weldon Spring site

  1. Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing sits are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards (40 CFR 192), in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100-m 2 grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. A bulk interpretation of these EPA standards has been accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and while the concentration of the finer-sized soil fraction less than a No. 4 mesh sieve contains the higher concentration of radioactivity, the bulk approach in effect integrates the total sample radioactivity over the entire sample mass. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 cleanup protocol has been developed in accordance with Supplemental Standard provisions of 40 CFR 192 for NRC/Colorado Department of Health (CDH) approval for timely implementation. Detailed elements of the protocol are contained in Appendix A, Generic Protocol from Thorium-230 Cleanup/Verification at UMTRA Project Processing Sites. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR 192 relative to supplemental standards

  2. North American Ground Surface Temperature Histories: A Contribution to the PAGES2k North American Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareschal, J. C.; Jaume Santero, F.; Beltrami, H.

    2015-12-01

    Within the framework of the PAGES NorthAmerica2k project, three hundred and seventy three (373) North American temperature-depth profiles from boreholes deeper than 300 meters were analyzed for recent climate. To facilitate comparisons and examine the same time period, the profiles were truncated at 300 m. The ground surface temperature (GST) histories for the last 500 years were inverted from the subsurface temperature anomalies using singular value decomposition for a model of 10 temperature changes along time-intervals of increasing duration. The inversion retains four singular values and accounts for the data acquisition time difference. The reference surface temperature and geothermal gradient were estimated by linear regression to the deepest 100 meters with a 95% confidence interval. Additionally, a Monte-Carlo method was used to find the range of solutions within a maximum subsurface anomaly error determined by the root mean square between the model and the data. The GST history results for North America, given by the mean and 95% confidence interval, reveal in most cases, a warming up to 1°C - 2.5°C during the last 100-150 years.

  3. Study on municipal road cracking and surface deformation based on image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Haitao; Wang, Shuai; Tan, Jizong

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, the digital image recognition technology of concrete structure cracks and deformation of binocular vision technology detection of civil engineering structure have made substantial development. As a result, people's understanding of the road engineering structure cracking and surface deformation recognition gives rise to a new situation. For the research on digital image concrete structure cracking and masonry structure surface deformation recognition technology, the key is to break through in the method, and to improve the traditional recognition technology and mode. Only in this way can we continuously improve the security level of the highway, to adapt to the new requirements of the development of new urbanization and modernization. This thesis focuses on and systematically analyzes the digital image road engineering structure cracking and key technologies of surface deformation recognition and its engineering applications. In addition, we change the concrete structure cracking and masonry structure surface deformation recognition pattern, and realize the breakthrough and innovation of the road structure safety testing means and methods.

  4. Surface mineral maps of Afghanistan derived from HyMap imaging spectrometer data, version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a new version of surface mineral maps derived from HyMap imaging spectrometer data collected over Afghanistan in the fall of 2007. This report also describes the processing steps applied to the imaging spectrometer data. The 218 individual flight lines composing the Afghanistan dataset, covering more than 438,000 square kilometers, were georeferenced to a mosaic of orthorectified Landsat images. The HyMap data were converted from radiance to reflectance using a radiative transfer program in combination with ground-calibration sites and a network of cross-cutting calibration flight lines. The U.S. Geological Survey Material Identification and Characterization Algorithm (MICA) was used to generate two thematic maps of surface minerals: a map of iron-bearing minerals and other materials, which have their primary absorption features at the shorter wavelengths of the reflected solar wavelength range, and a map of carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials, which have their primary absorption features at the longer wavelengths of the reflected solar wavelength range. In contrast to the original version, version 2 of these maps is provided at full resolution of 23-meter pixel size. The thematic maps, MICA summary images, and the material fit and depth images are distributed in digital files linked to this report, in a format readable by remote sensing software and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The digital files can be downloaded from http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/787/downloads/.

  5. Two-Slotted Surface Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, S. E.; Hernandez, J. A.; Rodriguez, A. O.; Tomasi, D.

    2008-01-01

    Arrays of antennas have been widely accepted for magnetic resonance imaging applications due to their high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over large volumes of interest. A new surface coil based on the magnetron tube and called slotted surface coil, has been recently introduced by our group. This coil design experimentally demonstrated a significant improvement over the circular-shaped coil when used in the receive-only mode. The slotted coils formed a two-sheet structure with a 90 deg. separation and each coil had 6 circular slots. Numerical simulations were performed using the finite element method for this coil design to study the behaviour of the array magnetic field. Then, we developed a two-coil array for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses for high field magnetic resonance imaging

  6. Resolved Spectrophotometric Properties of the Ceres Surface from Dawn Framing Camera Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Stefan; Mottola, Stefano; Carsenty, Uri; Jaumann, Ralf; Li, Jian-Yang; Palmer, Eric; Pieters, Carle; Preusker, Frank; Stephan, Katrin; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-10-01

    We present a global spectrophotometric characterization of the Ceres surface using Dawn Framing Camera images. We identify the photometric model that yields the best results for photometrically correcting images. Corrected images acquired on approach to Ceres were assembled into global maps of albedo and color. The albedo map is dominated by a large, circular, bright basin-like feature, known from HST images, and dotted by smaller bright features mostly associated with fresh-looking craters. The dominant color variation over the surface is represented by the presence of "blue" material in and around such craters, which has a negative spectral slope when compared to average terrain. We also mapped variations of the phase curve by employing an exponential photometric model, a technique previously applied to asteroid Vesta. The surface of Ceres scatters light differently from Vesta in the sense that the ejecta of several fresh-looking craters appear to be physically smooth rather than rough. Albedo, blue color, and physical smoothness all appear to be indicators of youth. The physical smoothness of some blue terrains is consistent with an initially liquid condition, perhaps as a consequence of impact melting of subsurface water ice. We propose that the color of blue ejecta derives from an originally ice-rich condition, which implies the presence of sub-surface deposits of water ice. Space weathering may be responsible for the fading of the blue color over time. The large positive albedo feature of which the Dantu crater forms the northern part may be an ancient impact basin, or palimpsest, whose relief has mostly disappeared. Its visible color and phase curve are similar to those of Ceres average. Occator crater has several bright spots. The center spot is the brightest with a visual normal albedo of six times Ceres average and has a red color. Its scattering properties are consistent with those of a particulate surface deposit of high albedo. The less

  7. Accuracy evaluation of a 3-dimensional surface imaging system for guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Honnef, Joeri; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the applicability of 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy (DIBH-RT) for patients with left-sided breast cancer. For this purpose, setup data based on captured 3D surfaces was compared with setup data based on cone beam

  8. A study to evaluate the reliability of using two-dimensional photographs, three-dimensional images, and stereoscopic projected three-dimensional images for patient assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, S; Yang, Y; Khambay, B

    2017-01-01

    Clinicians are accustomed to viewing conventional two-dimensional (2D) photographs and assume that viewing three-dimensional (3D) images is similar. Facial images captured in 3D are not viewed in true 3D; this may alter clinical judgement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of using conventional photographs, 3D images, and stereoscopic projected 3D images to rate the severity of the deformity in pre-surgical class III patients. Forty adult patients were recruited. Eight rat...

  9. Resolved spectrophotometric properties of the Ceres surface from Dawn Framing Camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, S. E.; Mottola, S.; Carsenty, U.; Ciarniello, M.; Jaumann, R.; Li, J.-Y.; Longobardo, A.; Palmer, E.; Pieters, C.; Preusker, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2017-05-01

    We present a global spectrophotometric characterization of the Ceres surface using Dawn Framing Camera (FC) images. We identify the photometric model that yields the best results for photometrically correcting images. Corrected FC images acquired on approach to Ceres were assembled into global maps of albedo and color. Generally, albedo and color variations on Ceres are muted. The albedo map is dominated by a large, circular feature in Vendimia Planitia, known from HST images (Li et al., 2006), and dotted by smaller bright features mostly associated with fresh-looking craters. The dominant color variation over the surface is represented by the presence of "blue" material in and around such craters, which has a negative spectral slope over the visible wavelength range when compared to average terrain. We also mapped variations of the phase curve by employing an exponential photometric model, a technique previously applied to asteroid Vesta (Schröder et al., 2013b). The surface of Ceres scatters light differently from Vesta in the sense that the ejecta of several fresh-looking craters may be physically smooth rather than rough. High albedo, blue color, and physical smoothness all appear to be indicators of youth. The blue color may result from the desiccation of ejected material that is similar to the phyllosilicates/water ice mixtures in the experiments of Poch et al. (2016). The physical smoothness of some blue terrains would be consistent with an initially liquid condition, perhaps as a consequence of impact melting of subsurface water ice. We find red terrain (positive spectral slope) near Ernutet crater, where De Sanctis et al. (2017) detected organic material. The spectrophotometric properties of the large Vendimia Planitia feature suggest it is a palimpsest, consistent with the Marchi et al. (2016) impact basin hypothesis. The central bright area in Occator crater, Cerealia Facula, is the brightest on Ceres with an average visual normal albedo of about 0.6 at

  10. Comparison analysis between filtered back projection and algebraic reconstruction technique on microwave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhan, Rifqi; Prabowo, Rian Gilang; Aprilliyani, Ria; Basari

    2018-02-01

    Victims of acute cancer and tumor are growing each year and cancer becomes one of the causes of human deaths in the world. Cancers or tumor tissue cells are cells that grow abnormally and turn to take over and damage the surrounding tissues. At the beginning, cancers or tumors do not have definite symptoms in its early stages, and can even attack the tissues inside of the body. This phenomena is not identifiable under visual human observation. Therefore, an early detection system which is cheap, quick, simple, and portable is essensially required to anticipate the further development of cancer or tumor. Among all of the modalities, microwave imaging is considered to be a cheaper, simple, and portable system method. There are at least two simple image reconstruction algorithms i.e. Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART), which have been adopted in some common modalities. In this paper, both algorithms will be compared by reconstructing the image from an artificial tissue model (i.e. phantom), which has two different dielectric distributions. We addressed two performance comparisons, namely quantitative and qualitative analysis. Qualitative analysis includes the smoothness of the image and also the success in distinguishing dielectric differences by observing the image with human eyesight. In addition, quantitative analysis includes Histogram, Structural Similarity Index (SSIM), Mean Squared Error (MSE), and Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) calculation were also performed. As a result, quantitative parameters of FBP might show better values than the ART. However, ART is likely more capable to distinguish two different dielectric value than FBP, due to higher contrast in ART and wide distribution grayscale level.

  11. Prevalence of incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging: Cuban project to map the human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Gonzalez, Gertrudis de los Angeles; Alvarez Sanchez, Marilet; Jordan Gonzalez, Jose

    2010-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of incidental findings in healthy subjects of the Cuban Human Brain Mapping Project sample, it was performed a retrospective descriptive study of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained from 394 healthy subjects that make up the sample of the project, between 2006-2007, with an age range of 18 to 68 years (mean 33,12), of which 269 (68,27 %) are male and 125 (31,73 %) are women. It was shown that 40,36 % had one or more anomaly in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In total, the number of incidental findings was 188, 23,6 % of which were brain findings and 24,11 % were non-brain findings, among the latter, were the sinusopathy with 20,81 % and maxillary polyps with 3,30 %. The most prevalent brain findings were: intrasellar arachnoidocele, 11,93 %, followed by the prominence of the pituitary gland, 5,84 %, ventricular asymmetry, 1,77 % and bone defects, 1,02 %. Other brain abnormalities found with very low prevalence had no pathological significance, except for two cases with brain tumor, which were immediately sent to a specialist. Incidental findings in MRI are common in the general population (40,36 %), being the sinusopathy, and intrasellar arachnoidocele the most common findings. Asymptomatic individuals who have any type of structural abnormality provide invaluable information on the prevalence of these abnormalities in a presumably healthy population, which may be used as references for epidemiological studies

  12. Procedure to detect impervious surfaces using satellite images and light detection and ranging (lidar) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cuenca, B.; Alonso-Rodríguez, M. C.; Domenech-Tofiño, E.; Valcárcel Sanz, N.; Delgado-Hernández, J.; Peces-Morera, Juan José; Arozarena-Villar, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    The detection of impervious surfaces is an important issue in the study of urban and rural environments. Imperviousness refers to water's inability to pass through a surface. Although impervious surfaces represent a small percentage of the Earth's surface, knowledge of their locations is relevant to planning and managing human activities. Impervious structures are primarily manmade (e.g., roads and rooftops). Impervious surfaces are an environmental concern because many processes that modify the normal function of land, air, and water resources are initiated during their construction. This paper presents a novel method of identifying impervious surfaces using satellite images and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data. The inputs for the procedure are SPOT images formed by four spectral bands (corresponding to red, green, near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths), a digital terrain model, and an .las file. The proposed method computes five decision indexes from the input data to classify the studied area into two categories: impervious (subdivided into buildings and roads) and non-impervious surfaces. The impervious class is divided into two subclasses because the elements forming this category (mainly roads and rooftops) have different spectral and height properties, and it is difficult to combine these elements into one group. The classification is conducted using a decision tree procedure. For every decision index, a threshold is set for which every surface is considered impervious or non-impervious. The proposed method has been applied to four different regions located in the north, center, and south of Spain, providing satisfactory results for every dataset.

  13. SU-E-J-209: Verification of 3D Surface Registration Between Stereograms and CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, T; Gifford, K [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Smith, B [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Salehpour, M [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereography can provide a visualization of the skin surface for radiation therapy patients. The aim of this study was to verify the registration algorithm in a commercial image analysis software, 3dMDVultus, for the fusion of stereograms and CT images. Methods: CT and stereographic scans were acquired of a head phantom and a deformable phantom. CT images were imported in 3dMDVultus and the surface contours were generated by threshold segmentation. Stereograms were reconstructed in 3dMDVultus. The resulting surfaces were registered with Vultus algorithm and then exported to in-house registration software and compared with four algorithms: rigid, affine, non-rigid iterative closest point (ICP) and b-spline algorithm. RMS (root-mean-square residuals of the surface point distances) error between the registered CT and stereogram surfaces was calculated and analyzed. Results: For the head phantom, the maximum RMS error between registered CT surfaces to stereogram was 6.6 mm for Vultus algorithm, whereas the mean RMS error was 0.7 mm. For the deformable phantom, the maximum RMS error was 16.2 mm for Vultus algorithm, whereas the mean RMS error was 4.4 mm. Non-rigid ICP demonstrated the best registration accuracy, as the mean of RMS errors were both within 1 mm. Conclusion: The accuracy of registration algorithm in 3dMDVultus was verified and exceeded RMS of 2 mm for deformable cases. Non-rigid ICP and b-spline algorithms improve the registration accuracy for both phantoms, especially in deformable one. For those patients whose body habitus deforms during radiation therapy, more advanced nonrigid algorithms need to be used.

  14. Potential of hyperspectral imaging to assess the stability of mudflat surfaces by mapping sediment characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Geoff; Thomson, Andrew; Moller, Iris; Kromkamp, Jacco

    2003-03-01

    This work assessed the suitability of hyperspectral data for estimating mudflat surface characteristics related to stability. Due to the inaccessibility of intertidal areas, precise ground-based measurements of mudflat stability are difficult to conduct. Remote sensing can provide full spatial coverage and non-intrusive measurement. As stability changes on mudflats are linked to subtle differences in mudflat surface characteristics, they can potentially be mapped by hyperspectral data. Hyperspectral images were collected along with near contemporary ground measurements. An unsupervised classification gave a map which confirmed that a channel bar was mainly sand whereas soft mud dominated an adjacent embayment. Multiple regression analysis was used to relate surface characteristics to hyperspectral data to construct regression equations. Erosion shear stress was estimated directly from the hyperspectral data and also by a relationship with the surface characteristics. The results of the thematic class map matched well with the known situation at the site during image acquisition. The maps of surface characteristics highlighted the additional information that can be extracted from hyperspectral data. Stability maps, based on the erosion shear stress, can be used as a basis for predicting the likely future behaviour in this dynamic environment and will be of use for coastal zone management.

  15. Enhanced magneto-optical imaging of internal stresses in the removed surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agalidi, Yuriy; Kozhukhar, Pavlo; Levyi, Sergii; Turbin, Dmitriy

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes a software method of reconstructing the state of the removed surface layer by visualising internal stresses in the underlying layers of the sample. Such a problem typically needs to be solved as part of forensic investigation that aims to reveal original marking of a sample with removed surface layer. For example, one may be interested in serial numbers of weapons or vehicles that had the surface layer of metal removed from the number plate. Experimental results of studying gradient internal stress fields in ferromagnetic sample using the NDI method of magneto-optical imaging (MOI) are presented. Numerical modelling results of internal stresses enclosed in the surface marking region are analysed and compared to the experimental results of magneto-optical imaging (MOI). MOI correction algorithm intended for reconstructing internal stress fields in the removed surface layer by extracting stresses retained by the underlying layers is described. Limiting ratios between parameters of a marking font are defined for the considered correction algorithm. Enhanced recognition properties for hidden stresses left by marking symbols are experimentally verified and confirmed.

  16. Macro-carriers of plastic deformation of steel surface layers detected by digital image correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopanitsa, D. G., E-mail: kopanitsa@mail.ru; Ustinov, A. M., E-mail: artemustinov@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq, Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Potekaev, A. I., E-mail: potekaev@spti.tsu.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Klopotov, A. A., E-mail: klopotovaa@tsuab.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq, Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Kopanitsa, G. D., E-mail: georgy.kopanitsa@mail.com [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    This paper presents a study of characteristics of an evolution of deformation fields in surface layers of medium-carbon low-alloy specimens under compression. The experiments were performed on the “Universal Testing Machine 4500” using a digital stereoscopic image processing system Vic-3D. A transition between stages is reflected as deformation redistribution on the near-surface layers. Electronic microscopy shows that the structure of the steel is a mixture of pearlite and ferrite grains. A proportion of pearlite is 40% and ferrite is 60%.

  17. Macro optical projection tomography for large scale 3D imaging of plant structures and gene activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Karen J I; Calder, Grant M; Hindle, Christopher R; Newman, Jacob L; Robinson, Simon N; Avondo, Jerome J H Y; Coen, Enrico S

    2017-01-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a well-established method for visualising gene activity in plants and animals. However, a limitation of conventional OPT is that the specimen upper size limit precludes its application to larger structures. To address this problem we constructed a macro version called Macro OPT (M-OPT). We apply M-OPT to 3D live imaging of gene activity in growing whole plants and to visualise structural morphology in large optically cleared plant and insect specimens up to 60 mm tall and 45 mm deep. We also show how M-OPT can be used to image gene expression domains in 3D within fixed tissue and to visualise gene activity in 3D in clones of growing young whole Arabidopsis plants. A further application of M-OPT is to visualise plant-insect interactions. Thus M-OPT provides an effective 3D imaging platform that allows the study of gene activity, internal plant structures and plant-insect interactions at a macroscopic scale. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. An Inter-Projection Interpolation (IPI) Approach with Geometric Model Restriction to Reduce Image Dose in Cone Beam CT (CBCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Kong, Fengchong; Ren, Lei; Jin, Jian-Yue

    2014-09-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging is a key step in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) to improve tumor targeting. The quality and imaging dose of CBCT are two important factors. However, X-ray scatter in the large cone beam field usually induces image artifacts and degrades the image quality for CBCT. A synchronized moving grid (SMOG) approach has recently been proposed to resolve this issue and shows great promise. However, the SMOG technique requires two projections in the same gantry angle to obtain full information due to signal blockage by the grid. This study aims to develop an inter-projection interpolation (IPI) method to estimate the blocked image information. This approach will require only one projection in each gantry angle, thus reducing the scan time and patient dose. IPI is also potentially suitable for sparse-view CBCT reconstruction to reduce the imaging dose. To be compared with other state-of-the-art spatial interpolation (called inpainting) methods in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on a Catphan and head phantoms, IPI increases SNR from 15.3dB and 12.7dB to 29.0dB and 28.1dB, respectively. The SNR of IPI on sparse-view CBCT reconstruction can achieve from 28dB to 17dB for undersample projection sets with gantry angle interval varying from 1 to 3 degrees for both phantoms.

  19. Acoustic imaging in application to reconstruction of rough rigid surface with airborne ultrasound waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krynkin, A.; Dolcetti, G.; Hunting, S.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate reconstruction of the surface roughness is of high importance to various areas of science and engineering. One important application of this technology is for remote monitoring of open channel flows through observing its dynamic surface roughness. In this paper a novel airborne acoustic method of roughness reconstruction is proposed and tested with a static rigid rough surface. This method is based on the acoustic holography principle and Kirchhoff approximation which make use of acoustic pressure data collected at multiple receiver points spread along an arch. The Tikhonov regularisation and generalised cross validation technique are used to solve the underdetermined system of equations for the acoustic pressures. The experimental data are collected above a roughness created with a 3D printer. For the given surface, it is shown that the proposed method works well with the various number of receiver positions. In this paper, the tested ratios between the number of surface points at which the surface elevation can be reconstructed and number of receiver positions are 2.5, 5, and 7.5. It is shown that, in a region comparable with the projected size of the main directivity lobe, the method is able to reconstruct the spatial spectrum density of the actual surface elevation with the accuracy of 20%.

  20. Mobile depth profiling and sub-surface imaging techniques for historical paintings—A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfeld, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.alfeld@desy.de [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); University of Antwerp, Department of Chemistry, Groenenbrogerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Broekaert, José A.C., E-mail: jose.broekaert@chemie.uni-hamburg.de [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Hidden, sub-surface paint layers and features contain valuable information for the art-historical investigation of a painting's past and for its conservation for coming generations. The number of techniques available for the study of these features has been considerably extended in the last decades and established techniques have been refined. This review focuses on mobile non-destructive subsurface imaging and depth profiling techniques, which allow for the in-situ investigation of easel paintings, i.e. paintings on a portable support. Among the techniques discussed are: X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography, which are long established methods and are in use for several decades. Their capabilities of element/species specific imaging have been extended by the introduction of energy/wavelength resolved measurements. Scanning macro-X-ray fluorescence analysis made it for the first time possible to acquire elemental distribution images in-situ and optical coherence tomography allows for the non-destructive study the surface paint layers in virtual cross-sections. These techniques and their variants are presented next to other techniques, such as Terahertz imaging, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance depth profiling and established techniques for non destructive testing (thermography, ultrasonic imaging and laser based interference methods) applied in the conservation of historical paintings. Next to selected case studies the capabilities and limitations of the techniques are discussed. - Highlights: • All mobile sub-surface and depth-profiling techniques for paintings are reviewed. • The number of techniques available has increased considerably in the last years. • X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography are still the most used techniques. • Scanning macro-XRF and optical coherence tomography begin to establish. • Industrial non destructive testing techniques support the preservation of paintings.

  1. Combined analysis of surface reflection imaging and vertical seismic profiling at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.; Karageorgi, E.

    1994-08-01

    This report presents results from surface and borehole seismic profiling performed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) on Yucca Mountain. This work was performed as part of the site characterization effort for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Their objective was to provide seismic imaging from the near surface (200 to 300 ft. depth) to the repository horizon and below, if possible. Among the issues addressed by this seismic imaging work are location and depth of fracturing and faulting, geologic identification of reflecting horizons, and spatial continuity of reflecting horizons. The authors believe their results are generally positive, with tome specific successes. This was the first attempt at this scale using modem seismic imaging techniques to determine geologic features on Yucca Mountain. The principle purpose of this report is to present the interpretation of the seismic reflection section in a geologic context. Three surface reflection profiles were acquired and processed as part of this study. Because of environmental concerns, all three lines were on preexisting roads. Line 1 crossed the mapped surface trace of the Ghost Dance fault and it was intended to study the dip and depth extent of the fault system. Line 2 was acquired along Drill Hole wash and was intended to help the ESF north ramp design activities. Line 3 was acquired along Yucca Crest and was designed to image geologic horizons which were thought to be less faulted along the ridge. Unfortunately, line 3 proved to have poor data quality, in part because of winds, poor field conditions and limited time. Their processing and interpretation efforts were focused on lines 1 and 2 and their associated VSP studies

  2. The ATLAS3D project - XXIX. The new look of early-type galaxies and surrounding fields disclosed by extremely deep optical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Karabal, Emin; Cappellari, Michele; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Michel-Dansac, Leo; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Paudel, Sanjaya; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Galactic archaeology based on star counts is instrumental to reconstruct the past mass assembly of Local Group galaxies. The development of new observing techniques and data reduction, coupled with the use of sensitive large field of view cameras, now allows us to pursue this technique in more distant galaxies exploiting their diffuse low surface brightness (LSB) light. As part of the ATLAS3D project, we have obtained with the MegaCam camera at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope extremely deep, multiband images of nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs). We present here a catalogue of 92 galaxies from the ATLAS3D sample, which are located in low- to medium-density environments. The observing strategy and data reduction pipeline, which achieve a gain of several magnitudes in the limiting surface brightness with respect to classical imaging surveys, are presented. The size and depth of the survey are compared to other recent deep imaging projects. The paper highlights the capability of LSB-optimized surveys at detecting new prominent structures that change the apparent morphology of galaxies. The intrinsic limitations of deep imaging observations are also discussed, among those, the contamination of the stellar haloes of galaxies by extended ghost reflections, and the cirrus emission from Galactic dust. The detection and systematic census of fine structures that trace the present and past mass assembly of ETGs are one of the prime goals of the project. We provide specific examples of each type of observed structures - tidal tails, stellar streams and shells - and explain how they were identified and classified. We give an overview of the initial results. The detailed statistical analysis will be presented in future papers.

  3. Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation Project Near Surface Test Facility 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the development of the reclamation project for the Hanford Site Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF), its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation project is to return disturbed sites as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native species. Gable Mountain is dominated by two plant communities: a big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) -- Sandberg's bluegrass (Poa sandbergii) community and a stiff sagebrush (Artemisia rigida) -- Sandberg's bluegrass community. Disassembly of the site installations began on March 15, 1988, and the site was returned to original contours by December 12, 1988. Two separate revegetation methods were employed at the NSTF to meet differing site constraints. Vegetative cover and density in the revegetation plots were assessed in April 1989 and again in June 1989 and 1990. It is extremely unlikely that the sand pit, borrow pit, box cuts, generator pad area, or ventilation fan area will reach the reclamation objectives set for these areas within the next 50 years without further intervention. These areas currently support few living plants. Vegetation on revegetated native soils appears to be growing as expected. Vegetation growth on the main waterline is well below the objective. To date, no shrubs have grown on the area, growth of native grasses is well below the objective, and much of the area has been covered with the pit run material, which may not support adequate growth. Without further treatments, the areas without the pit run material will likely revert to a nearly pure cheatgrass condition. 44 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. MALDI imaging of enzymatic degradation of glycerides by lipase on textile surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall-Andersen, Jonatan; Kaasgaard, Svend G; Janfelt, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Most modern laundry detergents contain enzymes such as proteases, amylases, and lipases for more efficient removal of stains containing proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids during wash at low temperature. The function of the lipases is to hydrolyse the hydrophobic triglycerides from fats and oils...... to the more hydrophilic lipids diglycerides, monoglycerides and free fatty acids. Here, we use MALDI imaging to study the effect of enzymatic degradation of triglycerides by lipases directly on the textile surface. Textile samples were created by using swatches of different textile blends, adding a lipid...... stain and simulating washing cycles using well-defined detergents with lipase concentrations ranging between 0 and 0.5ppm. After washing, the textile swatches as well as cryo-sections of the swatches were imaged using MALDI imaging in positive ion mode at pixel sizes of 15-75μm. Similar samples were...

  5. Validity and repeatability of a depth camera-based surface imaging system for thigh volume measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullas, Alice M; Choppin, Simon; Heller, Ben; Wheat, Jon

    2016-10-01

    Complex anthropometrics such as area and volume, can identify changes in body size and shape that are not detectable with traditional anthropometrics of lengths, breadths, skinfolds and girths. However, taking these complex with manual techniques (tape measurement and water displacement) is often unsuitable. Three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging systems are quick and accurate alternatives to manual techniques but their use is restricted by cost, complexity and limited access. We have developed a novel low-cost, accessible and portable 3D surface imaging system based on consumer depth cameras. The aim of this study was to determine the validity and repeatability of the system in the measurement of thigh volume. The thigh volumes of 36 participants were measured with the depth camera system and a high precision commercially available 3D surface imaging system (3dMD). The depth camera system used within this study is highly repeatable (technical error of measurement (TEM) of <1.0% intra-calibration and ~2.0% inter-calibration) but systematically overestimates (~6%) thigh volume when compared to the 3dMD system. This suggests poor agreement yet a close relationship, which once corrected can yield a usable thigh volume measurement.

  6. Near infrared imager for spectral and polarization analysis of planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, D. A.; Yushkov, K. B.; Anikin, S. P.; Evdokimova, N. A.; Potanin, S. A.; Dobrolenskiy, Y. S.; Korablev, O. I.; Molchanov, V. Ya; Mantsevich, S. N.

    2017-09-01

    We propose a concept of an imaging near-IR spectrometer for sensing of planetary surfaces. This instrument is intended to analyze mineralogical and, in some cases, petrographic composition of the upper surface layer in the planetary regolith; to identify and monitor OH/H2O bearing minerals and water adsorption in this layer. The scheme of the spectrometer was designed on a basis of an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) that allows imaging of samples in two orthogonal polarization planes simultaneously. Images are registered as a light (e.g. solar one) reflected and scattered from an observed target in the near infrared spectral range. The AOTF's electrical tuning provides fast and flexible spectral scanning of an image through whole the range analyzed - potentially, ten microseconds per a spectral point. Thus, it is possible to explore reflectance spectra of specified areas on a sample and to detect its minerals composition and microstructure variations. In parallel, one can estimate polarization contrast at different wavelengths thanks to the AOTF's birefringence properties. In this paper we report design and performance of a laboratory prototype for the near-IR spectro-polarimeteric imaging AOTF system operating in the spectral range from 0.8 to 1.75 μm. Reflectance spectra of some minerals were measured with the spectral resolution of 100 cm-1 (passband 10 nm at 1 μm). When imaging samples the spatial resolution as high as 0.5 mm was reached at the target distance of one meter. It corresponds to 100 by 100 resolving elements on the CCD matrix for each of two polarizations of the reflected light. Such a concept is also being designed for the spectral range from 1.7 to 3.5 μm.

  7. Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance: evaluating simulations and making projections with regional climate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. L. Rae

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Four high-resolution regional climate models (RCMs have been set up for the area of Greenland, with the aim of providing future projections of Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB, and its contribution to sea level rise, with greater accuracy than is possible from coarser-resolution general circulation models (GCMs. This is the first time an intercomparison has been carried out of RCM results for Greenland climate and SMB. Output from RCM simulations for the recent past with the four RCMs is evaluated against available observations. The evaluation highlights the importance of using a detailed snow physics scheme, especially regarding the representations of albedo and meltwater refreezing. Simulations with three of the RCMs for the 21st century using SRES scenario A1B from two GCMs produce trends of between −5.5 and −1.1 Gt yr−2 in SMB (equivalent to +0.015 and +0.003 mm sea level equivalent yr−2, with trends of smaller magnitude for scenario E1, in which emissions are mitigated. Results from one of the RCMs whose present-day simulation is most realistic indicate that an annual mean near-surface air temperature increase over Greenland of ~ 2°C would be required for the mass loss to increase such that it exceeds accumulation, thereby causing the SMB to become negative, which has been suggested as a threshold beyond which the ice sheet would eventually be eliminated.

  8. Evaluating the Hydrologic Sensitivities of Three Land Surface Models to Bound Uncertainties in Runoff Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, T.; Nijssen, B.; Stickel, L.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrologic modeling is often used to assess the potential impacts of climate change on water availability and quality. A common approach in these studies is to calibrate the selected model(s) to reproduce historic stream flows prior to the application of future climate projections. This approach relies on the implicit assumptions that the sensitivities of these models to meteorological fluctuations will remain relatively constant under climate change and that these sensitivities are similar among models if all models are calibrated to the same historic record. However, even if the models are able to capture the historic variability in hydrological variables, differences in model structure and parameter estimation contribute to the uncertainties in projected runoff, which confounds the incorporation of these results into water resource management decision-making. A better understanding of the variability in hydrologic sensitivities between different models can aid in bounding this uncertainty. In this research, we characterized the hydrologic sensitivities of three watershed-scale land surface models through a case study of the Bull Run watershed in Northern Oregon. The Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM), Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), and Variable Infiltration Capacity model (VIC) were implemented and calibrated individually to historic streamflow using a common set of long-term, gridded forcings. In addition to analyzing model performances for a historic period, we quantified the temperature sensitivity (defined as change in runoff in response to change in temperature) and precipitation elasticity (defined as change in runoff in response to change in precipitation) of these three models via perturbation of the historic climate record using synthetic experiments. By comparing how these three models respond to changes in climate forcings, this research aims to test the assumption of constant and similar hydrologic sensitivities. Our

  9. Femtosecond few- to single-electron point-projection microscopy for nanoscale dynamic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, A. R.; Barlow Myers, C. W.; Bryan, W. A.

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond electron microscopy produces real-space images of matter in a series of ultrafast snapshots. Pulses of electrons self-disperse under space-charge broadening, so without compression, the ideal operation mode is a single electron per pulse. Here, we demonstrate femtosecond single-electron point projection microscopy (fs-ePPM) in a laser-pump fs-e-probe configuration. The electrons have an energy of only 150 eV and take tens of picoseconds to propagate to the object under study. Nonetheless, we achieve a temporal resolution with a standard deviation of 114 fs (equivalent to a full-width at half-maximum of 269 ± 40 fs) combined with a spatial resolution of 100 nm, applied to a localized region of charge at the apex of a nanoscale metal tip induced by 30 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 50 kHz. These observations demonstrate real-space imaging of reversible processes, such as tracking charge distributions, is feasible whilst maintaining femtosecond resolution. Our findings could find application as a characterization method, which, depending on geometry, could resolve tens of femtoseconds and tens of nanometres. Dynamically imaging electric and magnetic fields and charge distributions on sub-micron length scales opens new avenues of ultrafast dynamics. Furthermore, through the use of active compression, such pulses are an ideal seed for few-femtosecond to attosecond imaging applications which will access sub-optical cycle processes in nanoplasmonics. PMID:27158637

  10. Femtosecond few- to single-electron point-projection microscopy for nanoscale dynamic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bainbridge

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond electron microscopy produces real-space images of matter in a series of ultrafast snapshots. Pulses of electrons self-disperse under space-charge broadening, so without compression, the ideal operation mode is a single electron per pulse. Here, we demonstrate femtosecond single-electron point projection microscopy (fs-ePPM in a laser-pump fs-e-probe configuration. The electrons have an energy of only 150 eV and take tens of picoseconds to propagate to the object under study. Nonetheless, we achieve a temporal resolution with a standard deviation of 114 fs (equivalent to a full-width at half-maximum of 269 ± 40 fs combined with a spatial resolution of 100 nm, applied to a localized region of charge at the apex of a nanoscale metal tip induced by 30 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 50 kHz. These observations demonstrate real-space imaging of reversible processes, such as tracking charge distributions, is feasible whilst maintaining femtosecond resolution. Our findings could find application as a characterization method, which, depending on geometry, could resolve tens of femtoseconds and tens of nanometres. Dynamically imaging electric and magnetic fields and charge distributions on sub-micron length scales opens new avenues of ultrafast dynamics. Furthermore, through the use of active compression, such pulses are an ideal seed for few-femtosecond to attosecond imaging applications which will access sub-optical cycle processes in nanoplasmonics.

  11. Planetary geodetic control using satellite imaging. [equations for determination of control points from surface television-imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, T. C.

    1979-01-01

    A new data type for planetary geodetic control using natural satellite imaging is presented. Spacecraft images of natural satellites against the planet give a direct tie between inertial space and surface features surrounding the satellite image. This technique is expected to offer a factor of 3-10 improvement in accuracy over present geodetic reduction for Mars. A specific example using Viking imaging of Phobos against Mars is given.

  12. X-ray CT core imaging of Oman Drilling Project on D/V CHIKYU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michibayashi, K.; Okazaki, K.; Leong, J. A. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Johnson, K. T. M.; Greenberger, R. N.; Manning, C. E.; Harris, M.; de Obeso, J. C.; Abe, N.; Hatakeyama, K.; Ildefonse, B.; Takazawa, E.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Coggon, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    We obtained X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) images for all cores (GT1A, GT2A, GT3A and BT1A) in Oman Drilling Project Phase 1 (OmanDP cores), since X-ray CT scanning is a routine measurement of the IODP measurement plan onboard Chikyu, which enables the non-destructive observation of the internal structure of core samples. X-ray CT images provide information about chemical compositions and densities of the cores and is useful for assessing sample locations and the quality of the whole-round samples. The X-ray CT scanner (Discovery CT 750HD, GE Medical Systems) on Chikyu scans and reconstructs the image of a 1.4 m section in 10 minutes and produces a series of scan images, each 0.625 mm thick. The X-ray tube (as an X-ray source) and the X-ray detector are installed inside of the gantry at an opposing position to each other. The core sample is scanned in the gantry with the scanning rate of 20 mm/sec. The distribution of attenuation values mapped to an individual slice comprises the raw data that are used for subsequent image processing. Successive two-dimensional (2-D) slices of 512 x 512 pixels yield a representation of attenuation values in three-dimensional (3-D) voxels of 512 x 512 by 1600 in length. Data generated for each core consist of core-axis-normal planes (XY planes) of X-ray attenuation values with dimensions of 512 × 512 pixels in 9 cm × 9 cm cross-section, meaning at the dimensions of a core section, the resolution is 0.176 mm/pixel. X-ray intensity varies as a function of X-ray path length and the linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) of the target material is a function of the chemical composition and density of the target material. The basic measure of attenuation, or radiodensity, is the CT number given in Hounsfield units (HU). CT numbers of air and water are -1000 and 0, respectively. Our preliminary results show that CT numbers of OmanDP cores are well correlated to gamma ray attenuation density (GRA density) as a function of chemical

  13. Image and Diagnosis Quality of X-Ray Image Transmission via Cell Phone Camera: A Project Study Evaluating Quality and Reliability

    OpenAIRE

    Goost, Hans; Witten, Johannes; Heck, Andreas; Hadizadeh, Dariusch R.; Weber, Oliver; Gräff, Ingo; Burger, Christof; Montag, Mareen; Koerfer, Felix; Kabir, Koroush

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Developments in telemedicine have not produced any relevant benefits for orthopedics and trauma surgery to date. For the present project study, several parameters were examined during assessment of x-ray images, which had been photographed and transmitted via cell phone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 100 x-ray images of various body regions were photographed with a Nokia cell phone and transmitted via email or MMS. Next, the transmitted photographs were reviewed on a laptop ...

  14. Imaging of surfaces and defects of crystals. Progress report, May 1, 1978--April 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, J.M.

    1979-04-01

    The possibility of obtaining electron diffraction patterns from very small specimen regions combined with high resolution imaging by use of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows the detailed study of small nuclei of reaction products or of crystal defects. The capabilities of this method have been extended by the design and construction of a TV system for the viewing and recording of microdiffraction patterns from our STEM instrument so that clear patterns can be obtained from regions as small as 10A in diameter. This system has been applied to the study of initial stages of oxidation of chromium films, revealing the presence of very small oxide nuclei and identifying these crystals as having a previously unsuspected spinel structure. The further stages of growth of oxides on chromium are being investigated. Initial results have also been obtained on the surface structure of oxides such as MgO. The extension of previous work on the diffraction from, and imaging of crystal surfaces by the use of medium-to-low energy electrons (15 to 1 keV) has allowed a much more complete understanding of the contrast-producing mechanisms. Application to the study of pyrolytic graphite surfaces has given a clear picture of the mosaic structure and defect distribution and provided a basis for the more reliable and quantitative general use of these techniques in surface structure analysis

  15. Three dimensional display of the brain surface from magnetic resonance images using a personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Jin

    1991-01-01

    A new system for three dimensional display of brain surface from magnetic resonance images has been developed using a personal computer. The system consists of the personal computer with a co-processor for mathematical operation and frame memory for full color graphic display. MRI data were transferred to the computer with the floppy disks. Using the paint algorithm, extraction of brain tissue was performed semi-automatically with a manual operation. Brain surface data were displayed on a CRT by a voxel method from an arbitral direction. The result of clinical application of the system showed that the 3-dimentional display of brain surface was useful in comprehending abnormalities including atrophy and cystic lesions. In this paper, we introduce the new system and discuss clinical applicabilities. (author)

  16. Imaging of surfaces and defects of crystals. Progress report, August 1, 1983-July 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The current year has been one of major advances in our progress towards the development of techniques for the study of surfaces with high spatial resolution. The medium-energy (1-15keV) REMEDIE system (for Reflection Electron Microscopy and Electron Diffraction at Intermediate Energies) has been rebuilt to the stage of showing better than 100A in the transmission mode in good vacuum and has been applied to the study of some surface reconstructions on silicon. These instruments include a 300 keV TEM-STEM analytical electron microscopy from Philips, to be converted for operation under ultra-high vacuum conditions by GATAN Inc. In this a resolution of better than 2.3A and various microanalytical techniques will be applied to surface studies. Also an ultra-high vacuum dedicated STEM instrument is being obtained and this will be modified for the combined application of high resolution STEM imaging, microdiffraction and microanalysis and the surface research techniques of AES, SAM, LEED, UPS and so on. Further observations on the interactions of small metal particles with ceramics have revealed a situation which has profound implications for electron-optical studies and for some possible technical applications of ceramic systems. It has been shown that the surface of MgO is modified by the presence of small amounts of various metals in such a way that it becomes highly sensitive to electron irradiation, undergoing vigorous reconstructions of the surface morphology and in some cases, becoming amorphous

  17. Project and construction of a spectrometer for alpha particles using surface barrier detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terini, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The project, construction, tests and some applications of a system for alpha and beta spectrometry, using surface barrier detector are described. The device includes a solid state detector ORTEC-Series F coupled to a system for amplifying the charges produced by passage of an ionizing particle through the detector. The amplifying system is composed by a charge sensitive pre-amplifier, which employs an operational amplifier CA 3140, and a low noise linear amplifier, which is based on the operational amplifiers CA 3140 and LM 301. The pre-amplifier stage input impedance is on the order of TΩ and produces output pulses which heights are proportional to total charge produced by passage of particle through the detector sensitive volume. The main advantage to use charge sensitive system lies in obtention of independent pulse heights of the distributed capacity of connecting cable between the detector and the pre-amplifier. The total system amplification ca reach a maximum of 50.000 in the linear region. Pulses are analysed in a multichannel system ORTEC, model 6240. The amplifier system is easily constructed and low cost using components available in the national market, and it can be employed with ionization chambers, proportional counters, scitillation counters and semiconductor detectors. The results of spectrometer application for alpha spectrometry of AM 241 source were compared to systems made with imported stages. (Author) [pt

  18. Off-site radiation exposure review project: computer-aided surface interpolation and graphical display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, T.A. Jr.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents the implementation of an iterative procedure that solves the following bivariate interpolation problem: Given N distinct points in the plane (x/sub i/, y/sub i/) and N real numbers Z/sub i/, construct a function F(x,y) that satisfies F(x/sub i/, y/sub i/) = Z/sub i/, for i = 1, ..., N. This problem can be interpreted as fitting a surface through N points in three dimensional space. The application of primary concern to the Offsite Radiation Exposure Review Project is the characterization of the radionuclide activity resulting from nuclear tests. Samples of activity were measured at various locations. The location of the sample point is represented by (x/sub i/, y/sub i/), and the magnitude of the reading is represented by Z/sub i/. The method presented in this report is constructed to be efficient on large data sets, stable on the large variations of the Z/sub i/ magnitudes, and capable of smoothly filling in areas that are void of data. This globally defined icode was initiateminednitial shock but to two later eriological invaders are Staphylococcus albus, Beta-hemolytic Streptococcus e to the same general semiclassical treatment

  19. A study to evaluate the reliability of using two-dimensional photographs, three-dimensional images, and stereoscopic projected three-dimensional images for patient assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S; Yang, Y; Khambay, B

    2017-03-01

    Clinicians are accustomed to viewing conventional two-dimensional (2D) photographs and assume that viewing three-dimensional (3D) images is similar. Facial images captured in 3D are not viewed in true 3D; this may alter clinical judgement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of using conventional photographs, 3D images, and stereoscopic projected 3D images to rate the severity of the deformity in pre-surgical class III patients. Forty adult patients were recruited. Eight raters assessed facial height, symmetry, and profile using the three different viewing media and a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS), and appraised the most informative viewing medium. Inter-rater consistency was above good for all three media. Intra-rater reliability was not significantly different for rating facial height using 2D (P=0.704), symmetry using 3D (P=0.056), and profile using projected 3D (P=0.749). Using projected 3D for rating profile and symmetry resulted in significantly lower median VAS scores than either 3D or 2D images (all Pprojection was the preferred method for rating. The reliability of assessing specific characteristics was dependent on the viewing medium. Clinicians should be aware that the visual information provided when viewing 3D images is not the same as when viewing 2D photographs, especially for facial depth, and this may change the clinical impression. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Observing hydrological processes: recent advancements in surface flow monitoring through image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauro, Flavia; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2017-04-01

    Recently, several efforts have been devoted to the design and development of innovative, and often unintended, approaches for the acquisition of hydrological data. Among such pioneering techniques, this presentation reports recent advancements towards the establishment of a novel noninvasive and potentially continuous methodology based on the acquisition and analysis of images for spatially distributed observations of the kinematics of surface waters. The approach aims at enabling rapid, affordable, and accurate surface flow monitoring of natural streams. Flow monitoring is an integral part of hydrological sciences and is essential for disaster risk reduction and the comprehension of natural phenomena. However, water processes are inherently complex to observe: they are characterized by multiscale and highly heterogeneous phenomena which have traditionally demanded sophisticated and costly measurement techniques. Challenges in the implementation of such techniques have also resulted in lack of hydrological data during extreme events, in difficult-to-access environments, and at high temporal resolution. By combining low-cost yet high-resolution images and several velocimetry algorithms, noninvasive flow monitoring has been successfully conducted at highly heterogeneous scales, spanning from rills to highly turbulent streams, and medium-scale rivers, with minimal supervision by external users. Noninvasive image data acquisition has also afforded observations in high flow conditions. Latest novelties towards continuous flow monitoring at the catchment scale have entailed the development of a remote gauge-cam station on the Tiber River and integration of flow monitoring through image analysis with unmanned aerial systems (UASs) technology. The gauge-cam station and the UAS platform both afford noninvasive image acquisition and calibration through an innovative laser-based setup. Compared to traditional point-based instrumentation, images allow for generating surface